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Sample records for facial aesthetic subunits

  1. Improving outcomes in aesthetic facial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Stefan O P; Mureau, Marc A M

    2009-07-01

    Aesthetic facial reconstruction is a challenging art. Improving outcomes in aesthetic facial reconstruction requires a thorough understanding of the basic principles of the functional and aesthetic requirements for facial reconstruction. From there, further refinement and attention to detail can be provided. This paper discusses basic principles of aesthetic facial reconstruction.

  2. The Facial Profile in the Context of Facial Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppt, Werner J; Vent, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Beauty has been an intriguing issue since the evolving of a culture in mankind. Even the Neanderthals are believed to have applied makeover to enhance facial structures and thus underline beauty. The determinants of beauty and aesthetics have been defined by artists and scientists alike. This article will give an overview of the evolvement of a beauty concept and the significance of the facial profile. It aims at sharpening the senses of the facial plastic surgeon for analyzing the patient's face, consulting the patient on feasible options, planning, and conducting surgery in the most individualized way.

  3. Effects of facial hard tissue surgery on facial aesthetics: changes in facial content and frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2012-11-01

    Aesthetic units of the face can be divided into facial content (FC; eyes, nose, lips, and mouth), anterior facial frame (AFF; a contour line from the trichion, the temporal line of the frontal bone, the lateral orbital rim, the most lateral line of the anterior part of the zygomatic body, the anterior border of the masseter muscle, to the inferior border of the chin), and posterior facial frame (PFF; a contour line from the hairline, the zygomatic arch, to the ramus and gonial angle area of the mandible). The size and shape of each FC and the balance and proportion between FCs create a unique appearance for each person. The facial form can be determined through the combination of AFF and PFF. In the Asian population, clinicians frequently encounter problems of FC (eg, acute nasolabial angle, protrusive and everted lips, nonconsonant lip line, or lip canting), AFF (eg, midface hypoplasia, protrusive and asymmetric chin, vertical deficiency/excess of the anterior maxilla and symphysis, or prominent zygoma), and PFF (eg, square mandibular angle). These problems can be efficiently and effectively corrected through the combination of hard tissue surgery such as anterior segmental osteotomy, genioplasty, mandibular angle reduction, malarplasty, and orthognathic surgery. Therefore, the purposes of this article were to introduce the concepts of FC, AFF, and PFF, and to explain the effects of facial hard tissue surgery on facial aesthetics.

  4. Aesthetic Subunit Reconstruction Facilitated with V-Y Island Advancement Flaps on the Face: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Eduardo Pachón Suárez, MD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The reconstruction of complex facial soft-tissue defects is a challenge that is often encountered by the plastic surgeon. Careful planning and knowledge of the aesthetic subunits that border the defect are paramount to achieve optimal results. We present a case of a 56-year-old woman who underwent excision of a large disfiguring chronic xanthelasma that extended from canthus to canthus across the nasal bridge. An aesthetic outcome was achieved by use of bilateral V-Y nasolabial flaps combined with a V-Y glabella advancement, which allowed for a tension-free like-for-like subunit reconstruction.

  5. [Facial paralysis: functional and aesthetic rehabilitation techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveze, A; Paris, J

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of a permanent facial paralysis can be devastating to a patient, because of the cosmetic, functional and psychological disorders. Our society places on physical appearance and leads to isolation of patients who are embarrassed with their paralyzed face. The objectives of the facial rehabilitation is to correct the functional and cosmetic losses of the patient. The main functional goals are to protect the eye and reestablish oral competence. The primary cosmetic goals are to create balance and symmetry of the face at rest and to reestablish the coordinated movement of the facial musculature. The surgeon should be familiar with the variety of options available so that an individual plan can be developed based on each patient's clinical picture. History of the facial paralysis, its etiology and the duration of the paralysis are of particular interest as they orientate the rehabilitation plan strategy.

  6. Facial sculpting: Comprehensive approach for aesthetic correction of round face

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    M K Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Standards for an aesthetic face are dynamic. The current trend is towards a leaner looking face with preservation of the inverted triangle of youth. Procedures that have been reported to be employed for correction of a chubby face include buccal fat pad excision, facial liposuction and injection lipolysis. In addition to giving the face an aesthetic triangular cut, chin and malar augmentation may be performed. The rounded appearance at the angles may further be reduced by injection of Botulinum toxin into the masseter. Materials and Methods: Forty patients who presented to us for correction of chubby (round faces were analysed and treated by facial sculpting surgery, which included at least two of the procedures in combination. The procedures included facial liposuction, buccal fat pad excision, chin augmentation, malar augmentation and injection lipolysis. All cases were followed-up for a minimum of 6 months after surgery. Results: Aesthetic expectations of the patients were met in 39 cases, one patient complained of facial asymmetry following facial liposuction and was subjected to a touch-up injection lipolysis. Conclusions: A combination of procedures is necessary to give the face an attractive contour. All the individual procedures have stood the test of time and are safe, proven and are put in mainstream. However, a thorough analysis of the face preoperatively and then subjecting the patient to a combination of these procedures in a single surgical sitting has yielded good results as seen in this study.

  7. Modemmethodsofcomputerdiagnosticsdentalocclusionand TMJ, craniomandibular system and facial aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Yanushevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the traditional methods of instrumental diagnosis of occlusion and TMJ - quite time consuming and difficult to perform.Requires a very high qualification of experts capable of conducting such a diagnosis. In this regard, the existing and evolving digital technologycan not only producevarious removable and nonremovableorthodonticand orthopedicdesign, but also allow for a precise and easier to perform, diagnoseocclusion of dentition with the biomechanicsof the temporomandibular joint and the aesthetics of the patient's face.

  8. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

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    Samuels, Curtis A; Butterworth, George; Roberts, Tony; Graupner, Lida; Hole, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face.

  9. Male Aesthetics: A Review of Facial Anatomy and Pertinent Clinical Implications.

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    Farhadian, Joshua A; Bloom, Bradley S; Brauer, Jeremy A

    2015-09-01

    Aesthetics continues to be a rapidly growing field within dermatology. In 2014, Americans spent 5 billion dollars on an estimated 9 million minimally invasive cosmetic procedures. Between 1997 and 2014, the number of aesthetic procedures performed on men increased by 273%. The approach to male aesthetics differs from that of females. Men have a squarer face, a more angled and larger jaw, and equally balanced upper and lower facial proportions. Facial muscle mass, subcutaneous tissue, and blood vessel density are also increased in men relative to women. While many of the same cosmetic procedures are performed in males and females, the approach, assessment, and treatment parameters are often different. Improper technique in a male patient can result in feminizing facial features and patient dissatisfaction. With an increasing number of men seeking aesthetic procedures, it behooves dermatologists to familiarize themselves with male facial anatomy and the practice of cosmetic dermatology in this population.

  10. Botulinum toxin: examining duration of effect in facial aesthetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Timothy Corcoran

    2010-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with botulinum toxin treatment is a key success factor in aesthetic procedures and is governed by the interaction of numerous variables. Duration of effect is important because it influences retreatment intervals as well as affecting cost and convenience to the patient. In order to review the evidence on the duration of benefit associated with various commercial formulations of botulinum toxin, MEDLINE was searched using the following terms: 'botulinum' and 'duration'/'retreatment' (limits: 'clinical trials,' 'meta-analyses,' 'English'). I also searched my existing reference files, reference lists of identified articles, and meeting/conference abstracts to ensure completeness. The focus was on clinical medicine and aesthetic trials. To be eligible for the analysis, studies had to include efficacy assessments at multiple timepoints. To estimate duration of benefit, the following outcomes were examined and summarized: responder rates, mean wrinkle severity scores at various timepoints (with or without changes from baseline), and relapse rates. Duration at both repose and maximum attempted muscle contraction was considered when provided. Where possible, duration was assessed by formulation and dose. The initial search yielded 164 articles. Of these, 35 included an adequate measure of duration in aesthetic indications. The majority of these (22) were on the glabellar area. Study designs and endpoints were highly heterogeneous, and duration of effect varied between studies. Several studies with the BOTOX Cosmetic (onabotulinumtoxinA; Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) formulation of botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) included relapse rates, defined conservatively as return to baseline levels of line severity for two consecutive visits approximately 30 days apart (at repose and maximum contraction). In these studies, duration of effect ranged from 3 to 5 months in female patients and from 4 to 6 months in male patients. Individual patients had longer

  11. Subjective assessment of facial aesthetics after maxillofacial orthognathic surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea.

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    Islam, Shofiq; Aleem, Fahd; Ormiston, Ian W

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the subjective perception of facial appearance by patients after maxillofacial surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and explored the possible correlation between satisfaction and surgical outcome. A total of 26 patients, 24 men and 2 women (mean (SD) age 45 (7) years), subjectively assessed their facial appearance before and after operation using a visual analogue scale (VAS). To investigate a possible association between postoperative facial appearance and surgical outcome, we analysed postoperative scores for the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) and Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). Postoperatively, 14 (54%) indicated that their facial appearance had improved, 4 (15%) recorded a neutral score, and 8 (31%) a lower score. The rating of facial appearance did not correlate with changes in the AHI or ESS following surgery. This study supports the view that most patients are satisfied with their appearance after maxillofacial orthognathic surgery for OSA. The subjective perception of facial aesthetics was independent of the surgical outcome.

  12. A measuring system for facial aesthetics in Caucasian adolescents: reproducibility and validity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiekens, R.M.A.; Maltha, J.C.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new measuring system to judge facial aesthetics in young Caucasians is presented. The system uses sets of three photographs (one frontal, one three-quarter smiling, and one lateral) as a stimulus. Scores are performed on a visual analogue scale (VAS) with separate sets of reference photographs for

  13. Malocclusion, facial profile and dental aesthetics in Asian adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soh, Jen

    2006-01-01

    Chapter I provides an overview of malocclusion studies that involve the assessment of occlusal traits in relation to the prevalence of malocclusions, orthodontic treatment need and the perception of dentofacial aesthetics. The main aims of this study are introduced. The aims were to establish the ma

  14. Malocclusion, facial profile and dental aesthetics in Asian adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soh, Jen

    2006-01-01

    Chapter I provides an overview of malocclusion studies that involve the assessment of occlusal traits in relation to the prevalence of malocclusions, orthodontic treatment need and the perception of dentofacial aesthetics. The main aims of this study are introduced. The aims were to establish the ma

  15. Clinical Photography for Periorbital and Facial Aesthetic Practice.

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    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Santhanam, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    External cutaneous photography involves photographic documentation, which helps in treatment planning, documentation of facial features, teaching, publishing and pre- and post-procedural comparisons. The key is not simply documenting, but documenting it the right way and ensuring that photography is standardised and reproducible. In this review, basic photography techniques, standardised and reproducible angles such as frontal, oblique and lateral views and specific photographic angles for conditions such as facial rejuvenation are discussed. Use of photography accessories and a few tips on how to click good photographs in the examination room and how to achieve consistency in standardised photography are also presented. External photography in ophthalmic and facial plastic surgery like any other speciality too has standardised guidelines. Even small variations cause a drastic change in the photos and it's clinical and research value. Unless stringent criteria are met, the photographs lose their relevance and impact.

  16. Clinical Photography for Periorbital and Facial Aesthetic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Santhanam, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    External cutaneous photography involves photographic documentation, which helps in treatment planning, documentation of facial features, teaching, publishing and pre- and post-procedural comparisons. The key is not simply documenting, but documenting it the right way and ensuring that photography is standardised and reproducible. In this review, basic photography techniques, standardised and reproducible angles such as frontal, oblique and lateral views and specific photographic angles for conditions such as facial rejuvenation are discussed. Use of photography accessories and a few tips on how to click good photographs in the examination room and how to achieve consistency in standardised photography are also presented. External photography in ophthalmic and facial plastic surgery like any other speciality too has standardised guidelines. Even small variations cause a drastic change in the photos and it's clinical and research value. Unless stringent criteria are met, the photographs lose their relevance and impact. PMID:27398013

  17. The effects of platelet-rich plasma on recovery time and aesthetic outcome in facial rejuvenation : preliminary retrospective observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Joep C N; van der Lei, Berend; Vermeulen, Karin M; Stevens, Hieronymus P J D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study focused on the possible effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on recovery time and aesthetic outcome after facial rejuvenation. We conducted a retrospective analysis with regard to recovery time and the aesthetic improvement after treatment among four groups of patients: those

  18. The effects of platelet-rich plasma on recovery time and aesthetic outcome in facial rejuvenation : preliminary retrospective observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Joep C N; van der Lei, Berend; Vermeulen, Karin M; Stevens, Hieronymus P J D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study focused on the possible effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on recovery time and aesthetic outcome after facial rejuvenation. We conducted a retrospective analysis with regard to recovery time and the aesthetic improvement after treatment among four groups of patients: those

  19. Multipoint and multilevel injection technique of botulinum toxin A in facial aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iozzo, Ivano; Tengattini, Vera; Antonucci, Valentina A

    2014-06-01

    Botulinum toxin represents one of the most frequently requested cosmetic procedures. We treated 223 patients with facial wrinkles using a new technique of injection of botulinum toxin A (BTA) called multipoint and multilevel injection technique (MMIT). The aim of MMIT was to relax the muscle and not paralyze it. Patient satisfaction was evaluated by Facial Line Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (FTSQ). Treatment with botulinum toxin determined a good response in all patients. Facial rhytids were completely resolved in case of young skin and well reduced in case of aged skin, leaving a natural aspect both in static and dynamic wrinkles. Patient mean overall satisfaction evaluated with FTSQ was 6.4 ± 1.1. In our experience, the use of botulin toxin by MMIT consents a better calibration of action with a soft and natural result. This can be achieved by distributing the BTA dose through various injection points for each area ("multipoint injections"). Furthermore, injections can be performed at different levels ("multilevel injections"). The level of injections regulates the potency of effect on the muscle: if the level is deep (intramuscular), the effect will be strong while if it is medium or superficial (subcutaneous and intradermal), the effect will be soft. This consents a fine calibration of action on muscle activity with a personal aesthetic result.

  20. Introduction of Aesthetic Analyzer Software: Computer-aided Linear and Angular Analysis of Facial Profile Photographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshkelgosha V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Evaluation of diagnostic records as a supplement to direct examination has an important role in treatment planning of orthodontic patients with aesthetic needs. Photogrammetry as a quantitative tool has recently attracted the attention of researchers again.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to design computer software to analyze orthodontic patients’ facial profile photographic images and to estimate reliability and validity of its measurement.Materials and Method: Profile photographic images of 20 volunteered students were taken in the natural head position with standard technique. Manual linear and angular measurements were used as a gold standard and compared with the results obtained from Aesthetic analyzer Software (designed for that purpose. Dahlberg’s method error and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC was used to estimate validity, reliability and inter-examiner errors.Results: Almost all the measurements showed a high correlation between the manual and computerized method (ICC>0.75. The maximum method errors computed from Dahlberg’s formula were 1.345 mm in linear and 3.294 degrees in angular measurements. At the highest levels, inter-examiner errors were 1.684 mm and 3.741 degrees in linear and angular measurements, respectively. Conclusion: Although a low budget has been allocated for the design of Aesthetic Analyzer software, its features are comparable with commercially available products. The software’s capabilities can be increased. The results of the current study indicated that the software is accurate and repeatable in photographic analysis of orthodontic patients.

  1. Facial aesthetics and perceived need for further treatment among adults with repaired cleft as assessed by cleft team professionals and laypersons.

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    Foo, Peter; Sampson, Wayne; Roberts, Rachel; Jamieson, Lisa; David, David

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the ratings of professionals and laypeople with and without a cleft regarding the facial aesthetics of adult patients previously treated for orofacial clefting. The necessity for further treatment, as perceived by the respective groups, is also compared. The design of the study was a cross-sectional study. Professionals (two plastic surgeons, one dentist, one orthodontist, and one psychologist) and laypeople (one male and one female adult without a cleft and one male and one female adult with a cleft) were recruited to rate photographs of 80 non-syndromic cleft patients treated by the Australian Craniofacial Unit from 1975 to 2009. Facial aesthetics were measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-100 mm). High values indicated good aesthetics. Necessity for further treatment was also measured by a VAS (0-100 mm). High values indicated high perceived need for further treatment. The professionals rated facial aesthetics significantly lower and had a lower perception of need for further treatment than the raters with and without a cleft. The laypeople with a cleft rated facial aesthetics significantly higher and had a lower perceived need for further treatment than laypeople without a cleft. The non-surgical professionals rated facial aesthetics significantly lower and had a lower perceived need for further treatment than the surgical professionals. Differences exist in the facial aesthetics ratings and perceived need for further surgery between professionals and laypeople with and without a cleft. This should be considered when managing cleft treatment expectations.

  2. Nasal reconstruction with the paramedian forehead flap using the aesthetic subunits principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pochat, Victor Diniz; Alonso, Nivaldo; Ribeiro, Emilie Barreto; Figueiredo, Bruno Suffredini; de Magaldi, Eduarda Nilo; Cunha, Marcelo Sacramento; Meneses, José Valber Lima

    2014-11-01

    Reconstruction of nasal defects is challenging because it requires covering skin, supporting framework, and lining. Traditionally, the forehead flaps are transferred in 2 stages; however, it can be accomplished in a single stage or in 3 stages. Few published studies are available about the paramedian forehead flap using the intermediate stage (3-stage) and the aesthetic subunits principle. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of the paramedian forehead flap in 2 and 3 stages for nasal reconstructions, highlighting the indications, complications, and technical details and evaluating the patient's satisfaction through a questionnaire about the quality of life (Derriford Appearance Scale 24). A retrospective review was performed between 2011 and 2013 for a consecutive series of 11 patients who underwent nasal reconstructions using the paramedian forehead flap in 2 or 3 stages. All preoperative and postoperative data were collected, and outcomes were also assessed through a questionnaire about the patients' postoperative quality of life. The causes of nasal lesions varied among skin cancer, trauma, and infection. Two-stage paramedian forehead flap reconstruction was performed upon 4 patients, whereas the 3-stage reconstruction was performed for 7 patients. Of the 10 survey respondents, 6 were highly satisfied (score of 11-27), and 4 were moderately satisfied (score of 28-44), whereas no one was dissatisfied after his/her surgical nasal reconstruction procedure. Whether the approach is accomplished in 2 or 3 stages, all areas of the reconstructed nose must be firmly supported. Applying the nasal subunits principle seems to contribute to an overall satisfied population in our study, according to the score obtained by the questionnaire about quality of life.

  3. Development and psychometric evaluation of the FACE-Q satisfaction with appearance scale: a new patient-reported outcome instrument for facial aesthetics patients.

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    Pusic, Andrea L; Klassen, Anne F; Scott, Amie M; Cano, Stefan J

    2013-04-01

    Satisfaction with appearance and improved quality of life are key outcomes for patients undergoing facial aesthetic procedures. The FACE-Q is a new patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument encompassing a suite of independently functioning scales designed to measure a range of important outcomes for facial aesthetics patients. FACE-Q scales were developed with strict adherence to international guidelines for PRO instrument development. This article describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the core FACE-Q scale, the Satisfaction with Facial Appearance scale. Both modern and traditional psychometric methods were used to confirm that this new 10-item scale is a reliable, valid, and responsive measure.

  4. 面部挫裂伤的急诊美容修复%The aesthetic repair of facial lacerating wound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王量; 杨东运; 陶灵; 刘剑毅; 陈亮; 李世荣

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyzed the experience in the aesthetic repair of facial lacerating wound. Methods To observed the healing effects of 87 emergency facial lacerating wound cases with aesthetic repair from 2009 to 2012. Results All the cases were primary healed, there was no obvious hypertrophic scar and no disfunction,the secondary repair was not required. The results were satisfactory. Conclusion Early stage aesthetic repair with plastic surgical principles and techniques of facial trauma could prevent the secondary treatment and relieve the pain of the patients.lt should be emphasized that tissue preserving could lessen deformity postoperative in the repairment of facial lacerating wound.%目的:总结面部挫裂伤的急诊整形美容外科修复经验,为临床工作提供指导.方法:对2009年至2012年间我科急诊整形美容修复的87例面部挫裂伤患者术后效果进行观察.结果:87例患者随访均Ⅰ期愈合,均无明显瘢痕增生,无功能障碍,无需进行Ⅱ期修复,效果满意.结论:面部挫裂伤后遵循整形外科基本原则的急诊整形美容精细修复,可达到无需或减少后续治疗,为患者减少痛苦,减轻负担.特别要提出在挫裂伤修复中对组织的保留,可减轻术后畸形.

  5. Muscular subunits transplantation for facial reanimation Transplantes de sub-unidades musculares na reanimação facial

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    André Salo Buslik Hazan

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present an alternative technique for reconstruction of musculocutaneous damages in the face transferring innervated subsegments(subunits of the latissimus dorsi flap for replacement of various facial mimetic muscles. METHODS: One clinical case of trauma with skin and mimetic muscles damage is described as an example of the technique. The treatment was performed with microsurgical transfer of latissimus dorsi muscle subunits. Each subunit present shape and dimensions of the respective mimetic muscles replaced. The origin, insertions and force vectors for the mimicmuscle lost were considered. Each subsegment has its own arterial and venous supply with a motor nerve component for the muscular unit. RESULTS: Pre and one year postoperative photos registration of static and dynamic mimic aspects, as well as digital electromyography digital data of the patients were compared. The transplanted muscular units presented myoeletric activity, fulfilling both the functional and cosmetic aspect. CONCLUSION: This technique seems to be a promising way to deal with the complex musculocutaneous losses of the face as well as facial palsy.OBJETIVO: Apresentar uma alternativa técnica para reconstrução de perdas músculo-cutâneas na face com a transferência de sub-segmentos(sub-unidades inervados do músculo grande dorsal para a substituição dos diversos músculos da mímica facial. MÉTODOS: É descrito um caso de trauma com perda de pele e músculo da mímica. Foi corrigido com a transferência microcirúrgica de uma sub-unidade de músculo grande dorsal que apresenta, forma, tamanho e peso similares aos dos músculos da mímica. Respeitou-se as origens e inserções e vetores de ação para a mímica desejada. Cada um dos sub-segmentos têm artéria e veia que irrigam a unidade muscular e também um nervo com componente motor. RESULTADOS: O paciente foi avaliado comparando-se o pré e pós-operatório de um ano com foto e vídeo com mímica em

  6. Consensus panel's assessment and recommendations on the use of 3 botulinum toxin type A products in facial aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenc, Z Paul; Kenkel, Jeffrey M; Fagien, Steven; Hirmand, Haideh; Nestor, Mark S; Sclafani, Anthony P; Sykes, Jonathan M; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2013-03-01

    In this summary article, the authors discuss the characteristics of abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and onabotulinumtoxinA. With 3 neuromodulators available in the US market, comparisons between and among products will invariably be made, so arguments for the most effective facial aesthetic uses of each neuromodulator are presented. Topics addressed in this article include patient expectations, toxin reconstitution and preparation, patient positioning, differences among products, the role of complexing proteins, and dosing and injection strategies. Recommendations are also provided by treatment area.

  7. Use of triple-convergence polypropylene thread for the aesthetic correction of partial facial paralysis.

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    Citarella, Enzo Rivera; Sterodimas, Aris; Green, Alexandra Conde; Sinder, Ramil; Pitanguy, Ivo

    2008-07-01

    Rehabilitation and reanimation of the paralyzed face remains a challenge. A variety of autografts and allografts have been used for static facial suspension. We report two cases of long-standing partial facial paralysis treated with 3C triple-convergence polypropylene thread. A 39-year-old woman with right-sided partial facial paralysis underwent an endoscopy-assisted facial suspension using the 3C threads and a 60-year-old woman with right-sided partial facial paralysis underwent a round face-lifting combined with endoscopic brow lift and placement of 3C triple-convergence polypropylene threads. Its use for partial facial paralysis has not been previously described. The 1-year follow-up shows effective preservation of the surgical result and patient satisfaction.

  8. 秦腔戏剧脸谱的构成及其美学意蕴%The constituents of the Shaanxi opera facial makeup and its aesthetic connotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰宇; 顾朝晖

    2013-01-01

    以历史考据的方式,将秦腔脸谱与传统面具相联系,分析其起源、形成、发展以及不同类型。以美学、文化学理论和秦腔戏剧发展为参照,得出了秦腔脸谱以色彩隐喻忠奸,以写意表达好恶,以神态刻画精神三大美学表现特征的结论。%The facial makeup in operas is the content of formulation during the process of drama perform-ance ,which means a lot to the drama performance .The facial makeup of Shaanxi opera can be regarded as the costumes of Shaanxi opera---the special presentation of facial clothing .Based on the history ,con-nects the facial makeup of Shaanxi opera with the traditional masks ,the origins ,formation ,development and various types of facial makeup of Shaanxi opera are analyzed systematically .According to the theo-ries of aesthetics and culture ,it reaches a conclusion ,namely three aesthetic features about the facial makeup of Shaanxi opera .T hey are as follow s :the artistic beauty of the facial makeup of Shaanxi opera . The artistic concept of the facial makeup of Shaanxi opera .The vivid performance of the facial makeup of Shaanxi opera .the colore used as a metaphor for logyalty and evil .

  9. Severe facial dermatitis as a late complication of aesthetic rhinoplasty; a case report

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    Sodaify Manoochehr

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contact dermatitis, as a cutaneous complication after rhinoplasty, is of early onset, limited and transient. The cause of this dermatitis is irritant or allergic. Late onset skin complications are rare and non-inflammatory. Case presentation We are reporting an unexpected, severe allergic contact dermatitis of the face, in a young female, appearing one month following aesthetic rhinoplasty. She failed to respond to ordinary treatments for dermatitis. We did standard battery – including nitrofurazone, tincture of benzoin and hydrocortisone – patch test for the patient that showed sensitivity to benzoin and corticosteroid. Conclusions In summary we report a case of a severe allergic contact dermatitis of the face, in a 21-year-old girl who underwent corrective aesthetic rhinoplasty, appearing one month following surgical operation. We were unable to find a similar report in the medical literature.

  10. 颜面部皮肤囊肿的美容切除%The aesthetic incision of facial dermal cyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张行涛; 彭友林

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨颜面部皮肤囊肿的美容切除疗效.方法 颜面部皮肤囊肿患者217例.顺颜面部皮肤Langer's线、轮廊线、隐蔽线切开皮肤,锐性剥离,切除整个囊肿,伤口分层减张缝合,5-0美容缝线行真皮内缝合,伤口愈合后外用疤痕贴1~3个月.结果 本组病例均Ⅰ期愈合,随访6~12个月,1例皮样囊肿术后复发,其余无复法,颜面部无明显切口瘢痕.结论 颜面部皮肤囊肿均可采用美容切口进行切除,术后外形美观,效果良好.%Objective To explore the efficacy of aesthetic incision of facial dermal cyst. Methods The facial skin was sliced along Lan-ger's line, contour line and hidden line, the cyst was sharply dissected and totally removed, then the wound surface was sutured by layer with 5 -0 thread through dermis and using scar paster for 1 ~ 3 months after the healing of wound in order to prevent the formation of scar. Results After follow - up for 6 to 12 months, all patients in this group were healed with phase I, and dermal cyst was not reappeared except one recurred after operation. The scar of wound is not obvious, and all these patients were satisfactory for their beautiful shape. Conclusion The technique of cosmetic surgery has been much improved, and the quality of treatment for facial dermal cyst is good with beautiful shape after operation.

  11. Actualización sobre aplicaciones de la toxina botulínica en estética facial Update on the use of botulinium toxin in facial aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Alcolea López

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad, la toxina botulínica (TB es parte importante en los tratamientos médico-estéticos de la cara. Este trabajo hace una aproximación didáctica, con fines prácticos formativos, sobre el manejo de la TB para el rejuvenecimiento facial en el ejercicio de la Cirugía Plástica y Estética. Entender la anatomía del envejecimiento es clave para manejar de forma integral la TB junto con otras técnicas de la especialidad destinadas a combatir el envejecimiento, considerándolo en su conjunto. Resumimos los conocimientos actuales sobre el empleo de las inyecciones de TB en el tercio superior de la cara.Currently, botulinum toxin (BT plays an important role in aesthetic-medical treatments of the face. This paper provides a didactical approach for practical training purposes, concerning the use of BT for facial rejuvenation when practising Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery. It is essential to understand the anatomy of ageing in order to integrate TB in combination with other techniques of the speciality employed to combat ageing by considering it as a whole. This paper resumes the current knowledge about the use of TB injections in the upper third of the face.

  12. Significance of young females’ different vertical facial types on the aesthetic evaluation of facial profiles%不同垂直骨面型对青年女性面部侧貌美学评价的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玥; 雷勇华; 岳莉; 彭艺

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It is confirmed that the characteristics of soft and hard tissue development vary largely in different vertical facial types, which reflect the development trend of the patients and the control ing degree on anchorage. OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the influence of different vertical facial types on the aesthetic evaluation of facial profiles in young females, and analyze the perception of facial attractiveness from different people. METHODS:Three beautiful females, with high, average and low mandibular angle, respectively were selected according to the measurement data of projection and the orthodontist’s aesthetic appreciation. They were yel ow race, bilateral facial appearance was basical y symmetrical, and no other maxil ofacial disease was found. They also received no orthodontic or orthognathic treatment. The profile digital photographs and cephalograms of three females were col ected. The positions of soft tissue lip and soft tissue chin were altered incremental y with Dolphin Imaging and Management software. Twenty-five new pictures were generated by the smal scale (2 mm per unit) modification in the sagittal direction. By using“acceptable facial appearance”as a filter, 15 orthodontists selected 11 from 25 pictures. Fifty parents of orthodontic patients, 50 orthodontic patients, and 50 amateurs were taken as the evaluators for subjective aesthetic ratings and for the assessment of the influence of vertical facial types on the facial profile attractiveness. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:With low and average angle, straight profile, slightly protrude chin was perceived to be beautiful. With high angle, straight profile, slightly protrude profile was perceived to be beautiful, and evaluation results are consistent between men and women. Evaluators are in agreement when it comes to evaluating the perception of facial attractiveness of three different vertical facial types profile in young females. They also have certain difference in aesthetic tendencies

  13. 面部美容中自体脂肪颗粒的应用%Application of Autologous Fat Granules in Aesthetic Facial Restoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔荣霞; 赵秀云; 王玉玺

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the application effect of aesthetic facial restoration using autologous fat granules. Methods:50 cases with facial depression were randomly divided into treatment group and control group with 25 cases. Control group was given artificial tissue substitute implantation therapy,treatment group was given autologous fat granules implantation therapy. Results:All cosmetic repairs completed,and the healing rates after 30d and 60d of treatment group were higher than control group,the occurrences of complication in treatment group,including necrosis,hematoma,and infection,were lower than that of control group,the differences were statistically significant(P<0.05). Conclusions:The application effect of autologous fat granules in aesthetic facial restoration effectively improves the facial depression healing, decreases occurrences of complications,worth clinical promotion.%目的:探讨面部美容中自体脂肪颗粒的应用效果。方法:面部凹陷患者50例随机分为治疗组与对照组各25例,对照组给予人工组织代用品植入术,治疗组自体脂肪颗粒移植治疗。结果:所有患者完成美容修复,治疗组术后30d和60d的凹陷面愈合比率显著高于对照组(P<0.05)。治疗组术后并发症发生率显著少于对照组(P<0.05),处理后都明显好转。结论:面部美容中自体脂肪颗粒的应用能有效促进面部凹陷的愈合,不良反应少,值得推广应用。

  14. Surgical-Allogeneic Facial Reconstruction: Facial Transplants

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Coelho Goiato; Daniela Micheline Dos Santos; Lisiane Cristina Bannwart; Marcela Filié Haddad; Leonardo Viana Pereira; Aljomar José Vechiato Filho

    2014-01-01

    Several factors including cancer, malformations and traumas may cause large facial mutilation. These functional and aesthetic deformities negatively affect the psychological perspectives and quality of life of the mutilated patient. Conventional treatments are prone to fail aesthetically and functionally. The recent introduction of the composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA), which uses transplanted facial tissues of healthy donors to recover the damaged or non-existent facial tissue of mu...

  15. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  16. Facial anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery.

  17. Surface Aesthetics and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Barış; Öreroğlu, Ali Rıza; Daniel, Rollin K

    2016-01-01

    Surface aesthetics of an attractive nose result from certain lines, shadows, and highlights with specific proportions and breakpoints. Analysis emphasizes geometric polygons as aesthetic subunits. Evaluation of the complete nasal surface aesthetics is achieved using geometric polygons to define the existing deformity and aesthetic goals. The relationship between the dome triangles, interdomal triangle, facet polygons, and infralobular polygon are integrated to form the "diamond shape" light reflection on the nasal tip. The principles of geometric polygons allow the surgeon to analyze the deformities of the nose, define an operative plan to achieve specific goals, and select the appropriate operative technique.

  18. Estética em Ortodontia: Diagramas de Referências Estéticas Dentárias (DRED e Faciais (DREF Aesthetics in Orthodontics: Diagrams of Facial Aesthetic References (DFAR and Diagrams of Dental Aesthetic References (DDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Leopoldo Peersen da Câmara

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Seria interessante que todas as especialidades odontológicas envolvidas com a Odontologia Estética utilizassem parâmetros estéticos dentários e faciais que fossem comuns a todos os profissionais. Considerando que essa tarefa só poderá ser exercida quando as especialidades puderem contar com análises estéticas simplificadas que sejam do entendimento de todos, esse trabalho propõe-se a apresentar os Diagramas de Referências Estéticas Dentárias e Faciais, que terão o intuito de prover uma avaliação da estética dentofacial, de uma forma simples, individualizada e subjetiva de cada paciente, e que servem como instrumentos de referência para todas as especialidades odontológicas, auxiliando no diagnóstico e planejamento dos tratamentos multidisciplinares.It would be interesting if all odontological specialties engaged in the Esthetic Dentistry could use dental and facial esthetics parameters common to all professionals. Considering that this task will only be performed when the specialties can count upon a simplified esthetic analysis that everybody understands, this study aim to show Dental and Facial Esthetic References Diagrams in order to help both the diagnosis and planning of multidisciplinary treatments.

  19. [Peripheral facial nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Y; Ukkola-Pons, E; Ballivet de Régloix, S; Champagne, C; Raynal, M; Lepage, P; Kossowski, M

    2013-06-01

    Facial palsy can be defined as a decrease in function of the facial nerve, the primary motor nerve of the facial muscles. When the facial palsy is peripheral, it affects both the superior and inferior areas of the face as opposed to central palsies, which affect only the inferior portion. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The prognosis is good in most cases. In cases with significant cosmetic sequelae, a variety of surgical procedures are available (such as hypoglossal-facial anastomosis, temporalis myoplasty and Tenzel external canthopexy) to rehabilitate facial aesthetics and function.

  20. Surgical-allogeneic facial reconstruction: facial transplants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Coelho Goiato

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Several factors including cancer, malformations and traumas may cause large facial mutilation. These functional and aesthetic deformities negatively affect the psychological perspectives and quality of life of the mutilated patient. Conventional treatments are prone to fail aesthetically and functionally. The recent introduction of the composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA, which uses transplanted facial tissues of healthy donors to recover the damaged or non-existent facial tissue of mutilated patients, resulted in greater clinical results. Therefore, the present study aims to conduct a literature review on the relevance and effectiveness of facial transplants in mutilated subjects. It was observed that the facial transplants recovered both the aesthetics and function of these patients and consequently improved their quality of life.

  1. Environmental Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie; Ekelund, Kathrine

    2015-01-01

    The philosophical subfield environmental aesthetics can contribute to the design of sustainable futures. Environmental aesthetics provides a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship between nature and culture. Current positions in environmental aesthetics are lined out and used...

  2. Is moral beauty different from facial beauty? Evidence from an fMRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tingting; Mo, Lei; Mo, Ce; Tan, Li Hai; Cant, Jonathan S.; Zhong, Luojin; Cupchik, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Is moral beauty different from facial beauty? Two functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments were performed to answer this question. Experiment 1 investigated the network of moral aesthetic judgments and facial aesthetic judgments. Participants performed aesthetic judgments and gender judgments on both faces and scenes containing moral acts. The conjunction analysis of the contrasts ‘facial aesthetic judgment > facial gender judgment’ and ‘scene moral aesthetic judgment > scene gender ...

  3. Segmental masseteric flap for dynamic reanimation of facial palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Marco; Lim, Yee Jun; Fogg, Quentin; Morley, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    The masseter muscle is one of the major chewing muscles and contributes to define facial contour. It is an important landmark for aesthetic and functional surgery and has been used for facial palsy reanimation or as source of donor motor nerve. We present an anatomic study to evaluate the possibility of using a muscle subunit for dynamic eye reanimation. Sixteen head halves were dissected under magnification to study the neurovascular distribution and determine safe muscle subunits; areas of safe/dangerous dissection were investigated. Once isolated, the arc of rotation of the muscular subunit was measured on fresh body to verify the reach to the lateral canthus. The patterns of neurovascular distribution and areas of safe dissection were identified; the anterior third of the muscle represents an ideal subunit with constant nerve and artery distribution. The muscle is too short to reach the lateral canthus; a fascia graft extension is needed. The information provided identified the main neurovascular branches and confirms the feasibility of a dynamic segmental flap. The need of efficient motor units for facial reanimation demands for different surgical options. A detailed anatomic description of the neurovascular bundle is mandatory to safely raise a functional motor subunit.

  4. Robot Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Putnam, Lance Jonathan

    This paper considers art-based research practice in robotics through a discussion of our course and relevant research projects in autonomous art. The undergraduate course integrates basic concepts of computer science, robotic art, live performance and aesthetic theory. Through practice...... in robotics research (such as aesthetics, culture and perception), we believe robot aesthetics is an important area for research in contemporary aesthetics....

  5. 面部皮肤挫裂伤伴灰粒嵌入的急诊美容修复%The aesthetic repair of facial lacerating wound associated with dust embedded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李开梓; 王晓川; 高吕静; 李志鹏; 颜如珍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the methods and technique of plastic surgical repair in facial soft tissue trauma with dust embedded.Methods We repaired 62 wounds of emergency traumatic cases with aesthetic surgery methods and technique.Results The 62 wounds of emergency traumatic cases healed perfectly except the 2 cases with serious bruise and coloboma of skin were grafted skin on the granulation burn wounds.Conclusion Injury of facial superficial soft tissue might be repaired with cosmetic surgical operation on emergency and we applied aesthetic surgery methods and technique to repair the facial trauma can reduce traumatic tattoo,postoperative scar abnormality and iatrogenic disfigure effectively.%目的:探讨颜面部软组织外伤伴灰尘颗粒嵌入的急诊美容修复技术和方法.方法:根据伤情,分别对62例灰尘颗粒创面进行急诊清创及美容外科修复.结果:本组62例灰尘颗粒创面,除2例因皮肤挫伤严重并缺损行肉芽创面植皮外,余均达到Ⅰ期修复并愈合,外伤性文身不明显.结论:遵循美容整形外科原则修复颜面部灰尘颗粒嵌入创面,可有效地减少伤后颜面部的外伤性文身、瘢痕畸形和医源性毁容.

  6. Speculative aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Trafford, James; Pendrell, Luke; Mackay, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Edited by James Trafford, Robin Mackay, and Luke Pendrell. Documenting a roundtable on the ramifications of Speculative Realism for aesthetics, this discussion ranges from contemporary art's relation to the aesthetic, to accelerationism and abstraction, logic and design.

  7. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter;

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing interest in considering aesthetic aspects in the design of interactive systems. A set of approaches are emerging each representing different applications of the terminology as well as different inherent assumptions on the role of the user, designer and interaction ideals....... In this paper, we use the concept of Pragmatist Aesthetics to provide a framework for distinguishing between different approaches to aesthetics. Moreover, we use our own design cases to illustrate how pragmatist aesthetics is a promising path to follow in the context of designing interactive systems......, as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  8. Aesthetic applications of random pattern skin flap in repair of facial soft tissue defects%随意型皮瓣在面部软组织缺损美学修复中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淑琴; 谭谦; 郑东风; 许澎; 葛华强; 林樾; 燕辛

    2016-01-01

    Objective To discuss the effects of random pattern skin flap on the repair of facial soft tissue defects as well as its aesthetic applications.Methods In view of the facial soft tissue defects caused by various reasons,36 cases of patients were repaired according to the defect location,size,design such as "the kite" flap,adjacent pedicle flap or V-Y glide flaps.Results After operation,all flaps were survived;Incisions were healed at stage Ⅰ;follow-up for 2 to 12 months,the cosmetic results were satisfactory.Conclusions The random pattern skin flap can be applied to repair facial soft tissue defects with aesthetic effects.The flap's texture and color have no obvious difference from nor mal skin;postoperative incision scar is slightly,and it can retains the facial appearance and function to the maximum limit.%目的 探讨随意型皮瓣在修复面部软组织缺损中的美学效果.方法 针对各种原因所致的面部软组织缺损,根据缺损部位所处的面部美学亚单位、缺损形态及缺损面积等设计随意型皮瓣,如旋转皮瓣、推进皮瓣、易位皮瓣、“风筝”皮瓣等,对36例患者进行修复.切口设计顺皮纹方向,切口无张力缝合.结果 术后36例患者的皮瓣全部成活,切口均Ⅰ期愈合,切口瘢痕轻微,随访2~1 2个月,美学效果满意.结论 应用随意型皮瓣修复面部软组织缺损,皮瓣质地柔软,色泽无明显差异,能最大限度地保留面部美观及功能.

  9. Social Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine; Buhl, Mie

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we show how use of technology affects aesthetics to become increasingly social. The article looks at semi-organized structures that allow people to negotiate visual practices in their everyday lives. These structures emerge resulting in social aesthetics, i.e., aesthetics...

  10. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Neerja Puri

    2015-01-01

    Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  11. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  12. The Oro-Facial Investment Scale (OFIS) – A Novel Outcomes and Evaluation Measure for Self-Appraised Oro-Facial Behavioural and Aesthetic Constructs among Professional Healthcare Students of Belagavi : A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankola, Anil V; Jalihal, Sagar G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown that self perceived dental appearance is an important determinant in the decision to seek treatment. Aim The aim of the present study was to assess the self-perceived oral health knowledge, attitude, practice, behaviour and perception among 18-20 year old students of professional healthcare institutions in Belagavi city, Karnataka. Materials and Methods The novel 21 item Oro-Facial Investment Scale (OFIS) formulated for this study was distributed to 600 students of professional healthcare institutions (200 each from Medical, Physiotherapy and Ayurveda specialties respectively). Psychometric properties of the questionnaire were assessed. Descriptive statistics and chi-square test were applied. Results Total 98.17% practiced the use of facial and oral care products on a regular basis. All 600 participants disagreed that they hate their facial appearance and the way their teeth looked. Out of 200 Ayurveda students, 37 were unsatisfied with the appearance of their teeth. Also, majority of the respondents agreed that they take prompt care of oral wounds or lesions. While majority of the subjects did not feel conscious when a dentist checks their teeth, a robust 153 respondents expressed their reservations for their dental examination to be performed. Conclusion The OFIS seamlessly amalgamates the dental unit with the immediate facial components; hence, bringing together, in harmony, a multifaceted dimension in self assessment of the overall facial and dental behavioural practices. PMID:28050503

  13. A study of the difference of orthodontic patients' facial aesthetic perception and the related factors%不同类型正畸患者对颜面美感知的差异及相关因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪冰峰; 王兵; 刘婷; 郭丽娟; 田慧娟; 张凡

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the difference of orthodontic patients'facial aesthetic perception and its related factors in order to instruct orthodontic planning. Method:A panel of 213 orthodontic patients who have not received or-thodontic treatment from Shandong University Stomatology Hospital evaluated the facial beauty of sets of four standardized photographs (one frontal, one frontal smiling,one lateral and one frontal occlusal) of 45 patients. Results were statistically analyzed. Result: ①ClassⅢis considered to be the worst beauty for orthodontic patients,followed by class Ⅱ1,then classⅡ2 and class I patients. ②Sex,age and education rather than marriage condition are factors affecting patients' facial aes-thetic perception. The facial aesthetic perception of adult women with a higher level of education is better than young male patients with a lower level of education. Conclusion: We orthodontic doctors should pay more attention to adult women with a higher level of education and know their preference for beauty to make an individual treatment plan.%目的:调查不同类型的正畸患者对颜面美的感知差异,为正畸医师进行诊断设计提供美学参考。方法:选取45例初诊患者的面像(正面像、正面微笑像、侧面像、正面咬合像)制作调查问卷。另随机选取213例正畸患者在治疗前对问卷中病例资料的颜面美进行评价,进行统计学分析。结果:①.性别、年龄、文化程度等因素会影响患者对颜面美的感知度,婚姻状况对患者颜面美的感知影响不明显。中青年、女性、文化程度较高者比少年、男性、文化程度较低者对颜面美的感知度相对较高。②.正畸患者对安氏Ⅲ类病例颜面美的评价最低,其次是安氏Ⅱ1类病例,对安氏Ⅱ2类、安氏I类病例的美学评价较高。结论:不同背景患者对颜面美的感知度不同,提示进行正畸治疗前应充分了解患者的美学

  14. Contemporary facial reanimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhama, Prabhat K; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-04-01

    The facial nerve is the most commonly paralyzed nerve in the human body. Facial paralysis affects aesthetic appearance, and it has a profound effect on function and quality of life. Management of patients with facial paralysis requires a multidisciplinary approach, including otolaryngologists, plastic surgeons, ophthalmologists, and physical therapists. Regardless of etiology, patients with facial paralysis should be evaluated systematically, with initial efforts focused upon establishing proper diagnosis. Management should proceed with attention to facial zones, including the brow and periocular region, the midface and oral commissure, the lower lip and chin, and the neck. To effectively compare contemporary facial reanimation strategies, it is essential to employ objective intake assessment methods, and standard reassessment schemas during the entire management period.

  15. Social Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine; Buhl, Mie

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we show how use of technology affects aesthetics to become increasingly social. The article looks at semi-organized structures that allow people to negotiate visual practices in their everyday lives. These structures emerge resulting in social aesthetics, i.e., aesthetics...... that is shared, negotiated and developed in cooperation between multiple users. The article describes the interactions and processes around common applications (apps) for visual production, such as Instagram, DrawSomething, Pinterest and Flickr, arguing that users develop visual cultures through materializing...... draws on a visual cultural approach to aesthetic practices with digital (visual) media....

  16. Aesthetic Play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jytte Susanne

    2012-01-01

    to the children’s complex life-worlds. Further, this leads to an analysis of music-play activities as play with an art-form (music), which includes aesthetic dimensions and gives the music-play activities its character of being aesthetic play. Following Lev Vygotsky’s insight that art is a way of building life...

  17. Aesthetic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, François J

    2008-02-01

    An initial clinical question, 'Why does an analysand talk about his/her relationship with an aesthetic object?' opens an investigation into the nature of aesthetic experience. Three principal aspects of the psychoanalytic approach are presented: sublimation, a Freudian concept concerning the vicissitudes of the drives; reparation, a Kleinian concept linked to depressive anxiety; and transformation, a concept of object-relations theory about primitive ego-states. The article discusses the psychic function of aesthetic feelings in mastering anxiety as related to ego, id and superego. The transformation of the experience of passivity is a common link underlying these aspects. Such transformation relies on tolerating ambiguous and contrary feelings within the self, fostered by contact with an aesthetic object. This balance can, however, be upset: two excessive forms of aesthetic experience ensue, namely, fascination and bewitchment. The first belongs to the experience of awe; the second can lead to claustrophobic anxiety. The initial clinical question requires an elaboration of aesthetic transference, a variant of the narcissistic transference, whereby the analysand invites the analyst to share his/her internal state as a common unspoken object.

  18. 多个局部皮瓣在颜面部美学重建中的联合应用%Combined application of multiple local flaps in facial aesthetic reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小兵; 裴洁; 张宝林

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study combined multiple local flaps to repair small or medium-sized area of facial skin and soft tissue defects,and to explore the advantages of the local flap collaboration repair.Methods Following the partition repair principle and depending on the wound size and location of these defects,the appropriate local flap was selected to cover the wound.Therefore,the incision was hidden and conformed to the face natural contour or skin wrinkles.Results 77 patients were treated in this group,74 cases got phase] healing and the other 3 got phase Ⅱ healing; all were followed-up for 1 to 8 months.The repair flap and surrounding skin had good similarity in terms of color,texture and contour,the incisions were hidden and the scars were not obvious; no tumor had recurred.The face contour and visual effects were good,and the aesthetic results were satisfactory.Conclusions The combined application of several different local skin flap to repair facial trauma defects,can not only reduce the overall difficulty and risk,reduce surgical complications,but also improve the repair quality,to maximize the recovery of facial aesthetic appearance.%目的 探讨联合应用多个局部皮瓣协同修复颜面部中、小面积的皮肤软组织缺损的优势.方法 根据患者皮肤软组织缺损创面大小及部位的不同,遵循分区修复原则,选择相应的局部皮瓣联合修复覆盖创面,使切口尽可能隐蔽及顺应面部自然轮廓线或皮肤皱纹线.结果 77例患者中74例创面Ⅰ期愈合,3例Ⅱ期愈合;术后全部随访1~8个月,修复皮瓣与周围皮肤在色泽、质地、轮廓等方面均有较好的相似度,切口隐蔽、无明显瘢痕,肿瘤切除后未见复发,面部轮廓及视觉效果良好,美学效果满意.结论 联合应用多个局部皮瓣对颜面部创伤缺损进行修复,可以明显提高修复质量,最大程度地恢复颜面部美学外观.

  19. Aesthetic Appeal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    of experience, e.g. in appeal to emotions or pleasure. 2) On a conceptual-hermeneutical level, the staging of meaning by design objects is in question. This regards, on the one hand, the appeal to understanding by the human subject and, on the other hand, the ability of the object to reflect its own character......This paper is a theoretical contribution to an aesthetics of design beyond style. The paper will present an interpretive framework for investigating and questioning the formation and articulation of aesthetic meaning in design. In the context of the paper, aesthetic meaning can be seen to evolve...... on three levels: 1) On a sensual-phenomenological level, the focus is on sensual appeal, i.e. how the design object by its sensual and tactile effects and its outer shape creates an appeal to human experience. This is not a matter of style but of the object relating to and framing the conditions...

  20. Aesthetic Play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jytte Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The present article explores the role of music-related artefacts and technologies in children’s lives. More specifically, it analyzes how four 10- to 11-year old girls use CDs and DVD games in their music-play activities and which developmental themes and potentials may accrue from such activities...... to the children’s complex life-worlds. Further, this leads to an analysis of music-play activities as play with an art-form (music), which includes aesthetic dimensions and gives the music-play activities its character of being aesthetic play. Following Lev Vygotsky’s insight that art is a way of building life...

  1. Soft tissue assessment in midface advancement: the use of regional flaps to enhance facial projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanne, Juan Martin; Steinberg, Diego; Houssay, Alfredo; Margaride, Luis A

    2009-09-01

    Classically, soft tissue repair when indicated is done before or after the skeletal mobilization especially in those cases that present midface deficiency with severe midline soft tissue restriction by scars or congenital affectation. The distraction osteogenesis method has contributed to improve substantially this problem elongating bones, muscles, and ligaments, but some situations need specific and more precise reconstruction of the subunits to gain in aesthetics. The labial-columella junction, the tip of the nose, and the more projecting point of the cheeks are one of these exigent anatomic areas, where only sophisticated reconstruction by flaps can improve facial proportions and projections.

  2. Aesthetic Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory, aesthetics is defined as a manner of reinforcing the connectivity, or Anschlusswert, of communication. Without changing the content, a message can be made more attractive, strengthening the receiver's willingness to be attentive and accepting. As communic......Based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory, aesthetics is defined as a manner of reinforcing the connectivity, or Anschlusswert, of communication. Without changing the content, a message can be made more attractive, strengthening the receiver's willingness to be attentive and accepting....... As communication inevitably makes use of a sensuous medium, such as light or sound, all communication has an aesthetic dimension. In the 19th Century, an important distinction was made between pure and applied art, following Immanuel Kant's separation of theory of knowledge, moral theory and aesthetic theory....... Whereas pure art is produced in order to be observed, applied art has to fulfill practical purposes as well. Modern organizations, defined as systems of communication, may use art works to embellish and define themselves. But they inevitably use applied art as a practical tool in their normal...

  3. Digital aesthetics

    CERN Document Server

    Cubitt, Sean

    1998-01-01

    This book investigates the aesthetic nature and purposes of computer culture in the contemporary world. It casts a cool eye on the claims of cybertopians, tracing the globalization of the new medium and enquiring into its effects on subjectivity and sociality.

  4. Aesthetic Supererogation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archer, Alfred; Ware, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    A number of moral philosophers have accepted the need to make room for acts of supererogation, those that go beyond the call of duty. In this paper, we argue that there is also good reason to make room for acts of aesthetic supererogation.

  5. Wavefront Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Riis, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    . Subscribing to this view also confronts music and sound art as consistent autonomous categories and focuses on how the pieces attune to the environment, emphasising meetings, transformations and translations through and with other objects. These meetings generate an ecological awareness of causal aesthetics...

  6. Troiage Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sheldon

    As the world around us is transformed into digitally enabled forms and processes, aesthetic strategies are required that articulate this underlying condition. A method for doing so involves a formal and conceptual strategy that is derived from collage, montage and assemblage. This triple "age" is termed "troiage", and it uses a style of computational apparency which articulates the edges of our current representational forms and processes as the semantic elements of culture. Each of these component aesthetics has previously had an important effect upon different areas of contemporary art and culture. Collage in painting, montage in film, assemblage in sculpture and architecture, are recombined via algorithmic methods, forefronting the structure of the algorithmic itself. The dynamic of the aesthetic is put into play by examining binary relationships such as: nature/culture, personal/public, U.S/Mexico, freedom/coercion, mediation/experience, etc. Through this process, the pervasiveness of common algorithmic approaches across cultural and social operations is revealed. This aesthetic is used in the project "The Scalable City" in which a virtual urban landscape is created by users interacting with data taken from the physical world in the form of different photographic techniques. This data is transformed by algorithmic methods which have previously been unfamiliar to the types of data that they are utilizing. The Scalable City project creates works across many media; such as prints, procedural animations, digital cinema and interactive 3D computer graphic installations.

  7. Aesthetic Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricard, Lykke Margot

    2003-01-01

    Aesthetics, Art & Management - Towards a New Field of Flow. European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM) Workshop , Gattières (France). 2003 Short description: This paper explores some of the rigid theoretical interpretations of the interplay between art and business through a case...... is often described in terms of what a business manager is not and vice versa. This paper explores some of the rigid theoretical interpretations of the interplay between art and business through a case study of two radical Danish artists, Kristian Hornsleth and Michael Brammer. Today, these two artists......, also create for myself, otherwise I don?t live up to people?s expectations.? (Brammer, Interview, August 6, 2002). This paper was presented at the European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM) Workshop on "Aesthetics, Art & Management - Towards a New Field of Flow"....

  8. Aesthetically Pleasing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A Western academic sets out to prove the practical side of beauty and helps Chinese artists in the process Aesthetics can be a pretty daunting concept to many people. Most people have heard the word, but it is vague as to its implications or even what part it plays in everyday life. And what kind of person studies this branch of philosophy that deals with the nature and expression of beauty?

  9. Evaluation of Eyelid Function and Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimkin, Michael G; Holds, John B

    2016-05-01

    The eyes and periocular area are the central aesthetic unit of the face. Facial aging is a dynamic process that involves skin, subcutaneous soft tissues, and bony structures. An understanding of what is perceived as youthful and beautiful is critical for success. Knowledge of the functional aspects of the eyelid and periocular area can identify pre-preoperative red flags.

  10. Rhinoplasty: surface aesthetics and surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Bariş; Doğan, Teoman; Öreroğlu, Ali Riza; Daniel, Rollin K

    2013-03-01

    Surface aesthetics of the attractive nose are created by certain lines, shadows, and highlights, with specific proportions and breakpoints. Our evaluation of the nasal surface aesthetics is achieved using the concept of geometric polygons as aesthetic subunits, both to define the existing deformity and the aesthetic goals. Surgical techniques have been developed and modified to achieve the desired surface appearance, and those are detailed in this article. The principles of geometric polygons allow the surgeon to analyze the deformities of the nose, to define an operative plan to achieve specific goals, and to select the appropriate operative technique. These aesthetic concepts and surgical techniques were used in 257 consecutive rhinoplasties performed in the past 3 years by the principal author (B.Ç.).

  11. Freestyle Local Perforator Flaps for Facial Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the successful reconstruction of facial defects, various perforator flaps have been used in single-stage surgery, where tissues are moved to adjacent defect sites. Our group successfully performed perforator flap surgery on 17 patients with small to moderate facial defects that affected the functional and aesthetic features of their faces. Of four complicated cases, three developed venous congestion, which resolved in the subacute postoperative period, and one patient with partial necrosis underwent minor revision. We reviewed the literature on freestyle perforator flaps for facial defect reconstruction and focused on English articles published in the last five years. With the advance of knowledge regarding the vascular anatomy of pedicled perforator flaps in the face, we found that some perforator flaps can improve functional and aesthetic reconstruction for the facial defects. We suggest that freestyle facial perforator flaps can serve as alternative, safe, and versatile treatment modalities for covering small to moderate facial defects.

  12. Freestyle Local Perforator Flaps for Facial Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Yong; Kim, Ji Min; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No; Shim, Hyung Sup; Kim, Sang Wha

    2015-01-01

    For the successful reconstruction of facial defects, various perforator flaps have been used in single-stage surgery, where tissues are moved to adjacent defect sites. Our group successfully performed perforator flap surgery on 17 patients with small to moderate facial defects that affected the functional and aesthetic features of their faces. Of four complicated cases, three developed venous congestion, which resolved in the subacute postoperative period, and one patient with partial necrosis underwent minor revision. We reviewed the literature on freestyle perforator flaps for facial defect reconstruction and focused on English articles published in the last five years. With the advance of knowledge regarding the vascular anatomy of pedicled perforator flaps in the face, we found that some perforator flaps can improve functional and aesthetic reconstruction for the facial defects. We suggest that freestyle facial perforator flaps can serve as alternative, safe, and versatile treatment modalities for covering small to moderate facial defects.

  13. Aesthetic Cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toland, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    Art theorists, Carole Gray and Heather Delday (2010) pose the question, "What might be known through creative practice that could not be known by any other means?" As a visual artist with a doctorate degree in environmental planning from the TU-Berlin's Department of Soil Protection, I have long considered this question in my work and over the years contributed an active voice to discussions on research, education, and public engagement with soil and art and soil and culture in Germany and around the world. After presenting many other examples of artists' work at international scientific symposia, I would like to present examples of some of my own artistic practice with soil mapping and soil protection issues at the 2017 EGU. In combining methods of visual art, landscape analysis, and soil mapping, I have developed a practice called Aesthetic Cartography that employs sculptural techniques, object-making, installation and performance, printing and graphic design, as well as site analysis, data mining, and map reading and interpretation. Given my background in participatory planning practices, I also integrate small-group dialogic processes in the creation and implementation of my works. The projects making up the body of works in Aesthetic Cartography are mainly focused on urban issues, including: soil sealing, inner-city watershed management, creative brownfield use, rubble substrates and leachates, foraging and urban agriculture, and envisioning sustainable cities of the future. In the session SSS1.4 - Soil, Art, and Culture I will summarize project goals, materials and methods, venues and public contexts, elements of collaboration and participation, as well as target audiences involved in several projects of the Aesthetic Cartography series. The aim of the presentation is not to give a comprehensive answer to Gray and Delday's question above, but rather to share personal insights from a professional practice that merges artistic and scientific approaches to soil

  14. Simple technique for facial dimple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hassan El-Sabbagh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subjects seeking aesthetic surgery for facial dimples are increasing in number. Literature on dimple creation surgery are sparse. Various techniques have been used with their own merits and disadvantages. Materials and Methods: Facial dimples were created in 23 cases. All the subjects were females. Five cases were bilateral and the rest were unilateral. Results: Minor complications such as swelling and hematoma were observed in four cases. Infection occurred in two cases. Most of the subjects were satisfied with the results. Conclusions: Suturing technique is safe, reliable and an easily reproducible way to create facial dimple. Level of Evidence: IV: Case series.

  15. Aesthetic satisfaction scoring - introducing an aesthetic numeric analogue scale (ANA-scale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Wolfgang; Podmelle, Fred; Guiol, Claudia; Metelmann, Hans Robert

    2012-07-01

    To objectively and reproducibly assess the outcome of aesthetic procedures remains one of the major, unmet challenges in maxillo-facial and plastic surgery. Frequently employed scoring systems for the evaluation of aesthetic procedures are confounded by observer bias, be it that of the patient or of the surgeon. A new approach of pragmatic and simple scoring is the ANA [Aesthetic Numeric Analogue] scale, which facilitates the objective, reproducible, standardized and internationally uniform evaluation of aesthetic procedure outcome by converting all ratings for any kind of aesthetic procedures from a subjective value to an objective figure. The intention of the ANA-scale is to relate aesthetic satisfaction from wording to figures and by this create a rating system. The study is arranging matching pairs of verbal description and figures to finally queue up generating a scale. The clinical feasibility of this rating system is demonstrated in a surgical case. As a detail of the results the influence of the viewer's age to the aesthetic benefit assessment is obvious. In summary the ANA-scale looks to be a tool useful in individual treatment protocols as well as analysis of different techniques of aesthetic surgery for rating of the pure aesthetic satisfaction of the patients.

  16. Minimally invasive aesthetic procedures in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina1, Alberto Goldman21Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande du Sul, BrazilAbstract: Age is a significant factor in modifying specific needs when it comes to medical aesthetic procedures. In this review we will focus on young adults in their third decade of life and review minimally invasive aesthetic procedures other than cosmetics and cosmeceuticals. Correction of asymmetries, correction after body modifying procedures, and facial sculpturing are important issues for young adults. The implication of aesthetic medicine as part of preventive medicine is a major ethical challenge that differentiates aesthetic medicine from fashion.Keywords: acne scars, ice pick scars, boxcar scars, fillers 

  17. [Aesthetic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Johannes C

    2006-01-01

    The WHO describes health as physical, mental and social well being. Ever since the establishment of plastic surgery aesthetic surgery has been an integral part of this medical specialty. It aims at reconstructing subjective well-being by employing plastic surgical procedures as described in the educational code and regulations for specialists of plastic surgery. This code confirms that plastic surgery comprises cosmetic procedures for the entire body that have to be applied in respect of psychological exploration and selection criteria. A wide variety of opinions resulting from very different motivations shows how difficult it is to differentiate aesthetic surgery as a therapeutic procedure from beauty surgery as a primarily economic service. Jurisdiction, guidelines for professional conduct and ethical codes have tried to solve this question. Regardless of the intention and ability of the health insurances, it has currently been established that the moral and legal evaluation of advertisements for medical procedures depends on their purpose: advertising with the intent of luring patients into cosmetic procedures that do not aim to reconstruct a subjective physical disorder does not comply with a medical indication. If, however, the initiative originates with the patient requesting the amelioration of a subjective disorder of his body, a medical indication can be assumed.

  18. Aesthetic Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landgrebe, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with how an aesthetic performance is enacted and coordinated by a performance group attracting attention and engaging commuters in a public space. Multimodal interactional resources and the way they are coordinated by interactants are investigated, and include verbal and non......-verbal actions, gaze orientation, active and static interactional strategies and props. From the data investigated, it seems that the performance act is divided into different stages which each calls for different strategies: the group's initiation of the entire performance act reveals that the group stand out...... as uncoordinated and it may have a significance for whether the 'street' performers manage to stay in character or not. Once attention from commuters is obtained, a continued gaze from these commuters opens up for subsequent interaction, which then ultimately may result in the successful handing over of a card...

  19. Aesthetic Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricard, Lykke Margot

    2003-01-01

    Aesthetics, Art & Management - Towards a New Field of Flow. European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM) Workshop , Gattières (France). 2003 Short description: This paper explores some of the rigid theoretical interpretations of the interplay between art and business through a case...... is often described in terms of what a business manager is not and vice versa. This paper explores some of the rigid theoretical interpretations of the interplay between art and business through a case study of two radical Danish artists, Kristian Hornsleth and Michael Brammer. Today, these two artists...... are experimenting with the concept of what an artist is, and to some extent they are using a romantic picture of how an artist works in a commercial way: ?There is a romantic perception of the artist as being a Rainman-type ? an autistic person that can do nothing but paint. It is an image that I, as an artist...

  20. Plastic Changes of Synapses and Excitatory Neurotransmitter Receptors in Facial Nucleus Following Facial-facial Anastomosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei CHEN; Jun SONG; Linghui LUO; Shusheng GONG

    2008-01-01

    The remodeling process of synapses and eurotransmitter receptors of facial nucleus were observed. Models were set up by facial-facial anastomosis in rat. At post-surgery day (PSD) 0, 7, 21 and 60, synaptophysin (p38), NMDA receptor subunit 2A and AMPA receptor subunit 2 (GIuR2) were observed by immunohistochemical method and emi-quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Meanwhile, the synaptic structure of the facial motorneurons was observed under a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The intensity of p38 immunoreactivity was decreased, reaching the lowest value at PSD day 7, and then increased slightly at PSD 21. Ultrastructurally, the number of synapses in nucleus of the operational side decreased, which was consistent with the change in P38 immhnoreactivity. NMDAR2A mRNA was down-regulated significantly in facial nucleus after the operation (P000.05). The synapses innervation and the expression of NMDAR2A and AMPAR2 mRNA in facial nucleus might be modified to suit for the new motor tasks following facial-facial anastomosis, and influenced facial nerve regeneration and recovery.

  1. Dentofacial Composition: An Entire Aesthetic Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Michael; Peleska, Barbara; Hmaidouch, Rim; Mehrhof, Jürgen; Weigel, Dana

    2015-10-01

    The aesthetic appearance of the mouth region, in addition to the eye and nose area, is the impressive element for facial aesthetics. Therefore, the reconstruction of the intraoral region is very important for the facial aesthetics in the case of genetic dysplasia, trauma, or even in cases for rejuvenating purposes only. The entire region is complex so that in many patient cases only the team work of restorative dentists, surgeons, and orthodontists will be effective. A key role is played here by the dental technician. Besides the frequent necessity of osseous augmentation, the mucogingival complex needs to be, in most cases, harmonized and reconstructed, respectively. There is often a lack of keratinized gingiva and disturbing cicatrice tracks. Quite frequently the mucogingival appearance is also unsatisfactory due to preceding operations and attempted plastic coverages. The aim of this report is to describe the successful surgical and prosthetic treatment of aesthetically and functionally impaired intraoral hard and soft tissue. For surgeons who are interested in aesthetics, it is advisable to learn from experiences of a specialized restorative dentist, oral surgeon, and orthodontist. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Educational Aesthetics and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author conceptualizes educational aesthetics in terms of two domains: educational aesthetics as arts education and educational aesthetics as a range of nonarts educational activities understood from artistic and aesthetic points of view. A lead is taken from Harry S. Broudy's midcentury essay "Some Duties of an Educational…

  3. Critical Aesthetic Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    A clear-cut concept of the aesthetic is elusive. Kant's "Critique of Judgment" presents one of the more comprehensive aesthetic theories from which one can extract a set of features, some of which pertain to aesthetic experience and others to the logical structure of aesthetic judgment. When considered together, however, these features present a…

  4. Educational Aesthetics and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author conceptualizes educational aesthetics in terms of two domains: educational aesthetics as arts education and educational aesthetics as a range of nonarts educational activities understood from artistic and aesthetic points of view. A lead is taken from Harry S. Broudy's midcentury essay "Some Duties of an Educational…

  5. Stop "cruising for a bruising": mitigating bruising in aesthetic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Connie

    2014-01-01

    The quest to restore a more youthful appearance by filling and volumizing facial deformities and deficiencies continues to be an ongoing pursuit in the noninvasive aesthetics market. Bruising can result from the delivery of neuromodulators and dermal fillers--common tools in the aesthetic provider's armamentarium to combat the ravages of aging. There are steps both the aesthetic provider and the client can take to minimize the potential for bruising. This article focuses on the etiology of bruising, the pharmacological and herbal agents to avoid prior to an aesthetic procedure, techniques to utilize during aesthetic procedures that lessen the potential of bruise formation, and pharmacological and herbal agents to administer after an aesthetic procedure to ultimately mitigate bruise formation.

  6. Sleep Wrinkles: Facial Aging and Facial Distortion During Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Goesel; Kane, Michael A C; Lambros, Val

    2016-09-01

    Wrinkles are just one indicator of facial aging, but an indicator that is of prime importance in our world of facial aesthetics. Wrinkles occur where fault lines develop in aging skin. Those fault lines may be due to skin distortion resulting from facial expression or may be due to skin distortion from mechanical compression during sleep. Expression wrinkles and sleep wrinkles differ in etiology, location, and anatomical pattern. Compression, shear, and stress forces act on the face in lateral or prone sleep positions. We review the literature relating to the development of wrinkles and the biomechanical changes that occur in response to intrinsic and extrinsic influences. We explore the possibility that compression during sleep not only results in wrinkles but may also contribute to facial skin expansion.

  7. Orthodontics in the "Art" of Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mayuri

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetics in dentistry has of late become an awakening/actor among patients and often serves as a major reason for seeking dental treatment and care. Ever since the introduction of orthodontics as a separate specialty branch in dentistry, a variety of techniques have evolved, and methods developed both in the type of devices/instruments used and treatments planned. The discipline of orthodontic aesthetics involves micro and macro aesthetics, gingival, and facial aesthetics. This article helps focus on the artistic part of the orthodontic science. It brings out various important factors involved in customizing aesthetic orthodontic treatment planning according to the individual needs of the patient. Through this kind of treatment planning not only are the functional and biological needs of the patient met, they also provide a stable and durable results. Less invasive treatment planning makes it easier for the patient to select future treatment options as new technologies keep evolving. The review was selected by typing aesthetic orthodontics in the Google search engine, Pubmed, and Pubmed Central. Literature review of articles reflecting history, different analysis, factors responsible, and the latest technique was conducted.

  8. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology.

  9. Facial paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003028.htm Facial paralysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Facial paralysis occurs when a person is no longer able ...

  10. Freestyle Local Perforator Flaps for Facial Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Yong Lee; Ji Min Kim; Ho Kwon; Sung-No Jung; Hyung Sup Shim; Sang Wha Kim

    2015-01-01

    For the successful reconstruction of facial defects, various perforator flaps have been used in single-stage surgery, where tissues are moved to adjacent defect sites. Our group successfully performed perforator flap surgery on 17 patients with small to moderate facial defects that affected the functional and aesthetic features of their faces. Of four complicated cases, three developed venous congestion, which resolved in the subacute postoperative period, and one patient with partial necrosi...

  11. Reflections on Aesthetic Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulou-Zormpala, Marina

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how it is possible to use the aesthetic process to enrich teaching practices in preschool and elementary school education. What is under scrutiny is the aesthetic dimension of a core curricular subject, the ultimate goal being to achieve an understanding of curricular content through aesthetic learning processes. For this…

  12. [Introduction to nursing aesthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Chang

    2011-04-01

    Empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and personal knowing are the four fundamental patterns of knowledge inquiry. Of these, the aesthetic knowing pattern is least discussed in nursing literature. This article discusses the definition of nursing aesthetics; its utilization in practice; and correlations between aesthetics and clinical practice. One of the advantages inherent to nursing is its ability to deliver skillful care directly to patients. Skillful performance is essential to reduce discrepancies between goals and patterns. Aesthetic nursing addresses more than the form of nursing. It further addresses the crucial elements of nursing knowledge. The science of nursing is influential in its ability to attain harmony among abundant empiric content, power of beneficence, and pleasure of aesthetic experience. In clinical practice, nurses can employ aesthetic nursing through various channels to create meaning and promote the professional image of nurses. Concepts listed in this article may be utilized in clinical supervision, practice and education.

  13. [Facial palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  14. Is moral beauty different from facial beauty? Evidence from an fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Mo, Ce; Tan, Li Hai; Cant, Jonathan S.; Zhong, Luojin; Cupchik, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Is moral beauty different from facial beauty? Two functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments were performed to answer this question. Experiment 1 investigated the network of moral aesthetic judgments and facial aesthetic judgments. Participants performed aesthetic judgments and gender judgments on both faces and scenes containing moral acts. The conjunction analysis of the contrasts ‘facial aesthetic judgment > facial gender judgment’ and ‘scene moral aesthetic judgment > scene gender judgment’ identified the common involvement of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), inferior temporal gyrus and medial superior frontal gyrus, suggesting that both types of aesthetic judgments are based on the orchestration of perceptual, emotional and cognitive components. Experiment 2 examined the network of facial beauty and moral beauty during implicit perception. Participants performed a non-aesthetic judgment task on both faces (beautiful vs common) and scenes (containing morally beautiful vs neutral information). We observed that facial beauty (beautiful faces > common faces) involved both the cortical reward region OFC and the subcortical reward region putamen, whereas moral beauty (moral beauty scenes > moral neutral scenes) only involved the OFC. Moreover, compared with facial beauty, moral beauty spanned a larger-scale cortical network, indicating more advanced and complex cerebral representations characterizing moral beauty. PMID:25298010

  15. Is moral beauty different from facial beauty? Evidence from an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Mo, Lei; Mo, Ce; Tan, Li Hai; Cant, Jonathan S; Zhong, Luojin; Cupchik, Gerald

    2015-06-01

    Is moral beauty different from facial beauty? Two functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments were performed to answer this question. Experiment 1 investigated the network of moral aesthetic judgments and facial aesthetic judgments. Participants performed aesthetic judgments and gender judgments on both faces and scenes containing moral acts. The conjunction analysis of the contrasts 'facial aesthetic judgment > facial gender judgment' and 'scene moral aesthetic judgment > scene gender judgment' identified the common involvement of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), inferior temporal gyrus and medial superior frontal gyrus, suggesting that both types of aesthetic judgments are based on the orchestration of perceptual, emotional and cognitive components. Experiment 2 examined the network of facial beauty and moral beauty during implicit perception. Participants performed a non-aesthetic judgment task on both faces (beautiful vs common) and scenes (containing morally beautiful vs neutral information). We observed that facial beauty (beautiful faces > common faces) involved both the cortical reward region OFC and the subcortical reward region putamen, whereas moral beauty (moral beauty scenes > moral neutral scenes) only involved the OFC. Moreover, compared with facial beauty, moral beauty spanned a larger-scale cortical network, indicating more advanced and complex cerebral representations characterizing moral beauty. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Aesthetics and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austring, Bennyé D.; Sørensen, Merete

    2011-01-01

    ) and Bjørn Rasmussen (1998). According to these theories aesthetic activities are an integrated and irreplaceable part of all children's socialization. Essential activities that develops creativity and enables the child to use the aesthetic languages to reflect and communicate feelings, experiences......This paper is built on our book "Aesthetics and Learning", Hans Reizels Publishers, Copenhagen 2010. In this book we describe the relationship between aesthetic creative activities and children’s development and learning, based on among other the theories of Malcolm Ross (1988), Hansjörg Hohr (2000...... and impressions, and develop understanding of herself, the others and the world she is a part of. ”In order to grasp this potential, we need to deconstruct both the concepts of "Aesthetic" and "Education" to find new ways to organize what we shall label as cultural-aesthetic and playful education” (Rasmussen...

  17. Evaluating Aesthetic in Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2010-01-01

    The article proposes a conceptual framework for discussing, theorizing, analyzing and practically dealing with aesthetics in design. With the phenomenological theory of Maurice Merleau-Ponty as its point of departure, the article identifies two important aspects of aesthetics in design: an aesthe......The article proposes a conceptual framework for discussing, theorizing, analyzing and practically dealing with aesthetics in design. With the phenomenological theory of Maurice Merleau-Ponty as its point of departure, the article identifies two important aspects of aesthetics in design...

  18. Aesthetic Response and Cosmic Aesthetic Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madacsi, D.

    2013-04-01

    For Homo sapiens, the experience of a primal aesthetic response to nature was perhaps a necessary precursor to the arousal of an artistic impulse. Among the likely visual candidates for primal initiators of aesthetic response, arguments can be made in favor of the flower, the human face and form, and the sky and light itself as primordial aesthetic stimulants. Although visual perception of the sensory world of flowers and human faces and forms is mediated by light, it was most certainly in the sky that humans first could respond to the beauty of light per se. It is clear that as a species we do not yet identify and comprehend as nature, or part of nature, the entire universe beyond our terrestrial environs, the universe from which we remain inexorably separated by space and time. However, we now enjoy a technologically-enabled opportunity to probe the ultimate limits of visual aesthetic distance and the origins of human aesthetic response as we remotely explore deep space via the Hubble Space Telescope and its successors.

  19. Facial swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help reduce facial swelling. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have: Sudden, painful, or severe facial ... or if you have breathing problems. The health care provider will ask about your medical and personal history. This helps determine treatment or ...

  20. Aesthetics of sustainable architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to reveal, explore and further the debate on the aesthetic potentials of sustainable architecture and its practice. This book opens a new area of scholarship and discourse in the design and production of sustainable architecture, one that is based in aesthetics. The chapt

  1. Components of aesthetic experience: aesthetic fascination, aesthetic appraisal, and aesthetic emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper aesthetic experience is defined as an experience qualitatively different from everyday experience and similar to other exceptional states of mind. Three crucial characteristics of aesthetic experience are discussed: fascination with an aesthetic object (high arousal and attention), appraisal of the symbolic reality of an object (high cognitive engagement), and a strong feeling of unity with the object of aesthetic fascination and aesthetic appraisal. In a proposed model, two parallel levels of aesthetic information processing are proposed. On the first level two sub-levels of narrative are processed, story (theme) and symbolism (deeper meanings). The second level includes two sub-levels, perceptual associations (implicit meanings of object's physical features) and detection of compositional regularities. Two sub-levels are defined as crucial for aesthetic experience, appraisal of symbolism and compositional regularities. These sub-levels require some specific cognitive and personality dispositions, such as expertise, creative thinking, and openness to experience. Finally, feedback of emotional processing is included in our model: appraisals of everyday emotions are specified as a matter of narrative content (eg, empathy with characters), whereas the aesthetic emotion is defined as an affective evaluation in the process of symbolism appraisal or the detection of compositional regularities. PMID:23145263

  2. Empirical Music Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    musical performance and reception is inspired by traditional approaches within aesthetics, but it also challenges some of the presuppositions inherent in them. As an example of such work I present a research project in empirical music aesthetics begun last year and of which I am a team member....

  3. Aesthetics of sustainable architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to reveal, explore and further the debate on the aesthetic potentials of sustainable architecture and its practice. This book opens a new area of scholarship and discourse in the design and production of sustainable architecture, one that is based in aesthetics. The chapt

  4. Empirical Music Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    musical performance and reception is inspired by traditional approaches within aesthetics, but it also challenges some of the presuppositions inherent in them. As an example of such work I present a research project in empirical music aesthetics begun last year and of which I am a team member....

  5. Aesthetics and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, L. Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, the author talks about the aesthetic aspects of education with some special reference to movement in different senses. First, he discusses the aesthetic and its relation to education in a general way. He then explains the concepts of expression and embodiment in the appreciation of the arts. Lastly, the author talks about the…

  6. Aesthetics of Mundane Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, D.M.; Hassenzahl, M.

    2008-01-01

    John Dewey’s pragmatist aesthetics is used as a conceptual basis for designing new technologies that support staff-members’ mundane social interactions in an academic department. From this perspective, aesthetics is seen as a broader phenomenon that encompasses experiential aspects of staff-members’

  7. Aesthetic Judgements and Motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archer, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Are aesthetic judgements cognitive, belief-like states or non-cognitive, desire-like states? There have been a number of attempts in recent years to evaluate the plausibility of a non-cognitivist theory of aesthetic judgements. These attempts borrow heavily from Non-cognitivism in metaethics. One ar

  8. Evolutionary neurobiology and aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher Upham

    2005-01-01

    If aesthetics is a human universal, it should have a neurobiological basis. Although use of all the senses is, as Aristotle noted, pleasurable, the distance senses are primarily involved in aesthetics. The aesthetic response emerges from the central processing of sensory input. This occurs very rapidly, beneath the level of consciousness, and only the feeling of pleasure emerges into the conscious mind. This is exemplified by landscape appreciation, where it is suggested that a computation built into the nervous system during Paleolithic hunter-gathering is at work. Another inbuilt computation leading to an aesthetic response is the part-whole relationship. This, it is argued, may be traced to the predator-prey "arms races" of evolutionary history. Mate selection also may be responsible for part of our response to landscape and visual art. Aesthetics lies at the core of human mentality, and its study is consequently of importance not only to philosophers and art critics but also to neurobiologists.

  9. Lasers in aesthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Timothy C; Pang, Peter K

    2004-10-01

    This article focuses on lasers and aesthetic dentistry and their unique parallel in history from their early development to their present day usage and application. The demand for aesthetic dentistry has had a major impact not only on treatment planning but also on the choice of materials, techniques, and equipment. It is this demand that has married the use of lasers with aesthetic dentistry. A short literature review on the five basic laser types precedes the basic premise of smile design and its critical importance in attaining the desirable aesthetic end result. A short review on biologic width and biologic zone reinforces their importance when manipulating gingival tissue. Four case reports highlight the use of diode, erbium, and carbon dioxide lasers. The end results show the power of proper treatment planning and the use of a smile design guide when using these instruments and confirm a conservative, aesthetic treatment without compromising the health and function of the patients.

  10. The Conundrum of Modern Art : Prestige-Driven Coevolutionary Aesthetics Trumps Evolutionary Aesthetics among Art Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpooten, Jan; Dewitte, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    Two major mechanisms of aesthetic evolution have been suggested. One focuses on naturally selected preferences (Evolutionary Aesthetics), while the other describes a process of evaluative coevolution whereby preferences coevolve with signals. Signaling theory suggests that expertise moderates these mechanisms. In this article we set out to verify this hypothesis in the domain of art and use it to elucidate Western modern art's deviation from naturally selected preferences. We argue that this deviation is consistent with a Coevolutionary Aesthetics mechanism driven by prestige-biased social learning among art experts. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted two studies in which we assessed the effects on lay and expert appreciation of both the biological relevance of the given artwork's depicted content, viz., facial beauty, and the prestige specific to the artwork's associated context (MoMA). We found that laypeople appreciate artworks based on their depictions of facial beauty, mediated by aesthetic pleasure, which is consistent with previous studies. In contrast, experts appreciate the artworks based on the prestige of the associated context, mediated by admiration for the artist. Moreover, experts appreciate artworks depicting neutral faces to a greater degree than artworks depicting attractive faces. These findings thus corroborate our contention that expertise moderates the Evolutionary and Coevolutionary Aesthetics mechanisms in the art domain. Furthermore, our findings provide initial support for our proposal that prestige-driven coevolution with expert evaluations plays a decisive role in modern art's deviation from naturally selected preferences. After discussing the limitations of our research as well as the relation that our results bear on cultural evolution theory, we provide a number of suggestions for further research into the potential functions of expert appreciation that deviates from naturally selected preferences, on the one hand, and

  11. Facial tics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tic - facial; Mimic spasm ... Tics may involve repeated, uncontrolled spasm-like muscle movements, such as: Eye blinking Grimacing Mouth twitching Nose wrinkling Squinting Repeated throat clearing or grunting may also be ...

  12. Facial Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mihalache Sergiu; Stoica Mihaela-Zoica

    2014-01-01

    .... From birth, faces are important in the individual's social interaction. Face perceptions are very complex as the recognition of facial expressions involves extensive and diverse areas in the brain...

  13. Everyday Aesthetics and Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Leddy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Everyday photographs as well as art photographs may be aesthetically appreciated.  Although this may be most obvious in the case of advertising  it is also true for amateur photographs.  Non-art photographs play an important role in our everyday lives and should not be neglected by aesthetics. That these photographs draw much of their value (often a very personal value from being associated with memories and musings does not make them non-aesthetic. I discuss these issues drawing on Clive Bell, Lyotard and Bourdieu with special emphasis placed such contemporary art photographers as Nan Goldin and Ed Burtynsky.

  14. Application Value of Autologous Fat Transplantation in Facial Aesthetic Surgery%自体颗粒脂肪移植术在面部美容整形中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴震

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the application value of autologous fat transplantation in facial cosmetic surgery. Methods:Waist abdomen and inner thigh were as fat supply areas,liposuction was used,then the fat particles in physiological saline was flushed,and multiple suction purification was done. Fat was injected into the cheek,temporal,nasolabial wrinkles depression and unsymmetrical position. Results:Through 1~3 fat particle injection,the depression of cheek and temporal was improved in 46 patients. Wrinkles reduced significantly,and some subsided. After 4~19 months follow-up,46 patients in the cosmetic had satisfactory result,with no nodules,hematoma,infection and complications. Conclusion:Scar transplantation of autologous fat granules technology has the advantages of simple operation,high safety coefficient,and little scar after the operation. It has good effect in the facial plasty operation.%目的:分析自体颗粒脂肪移植技术在面部美容整形中的应用价值。方法:以患者的腰腹部、大腿内侧部位作为脂肪供区,实施脂肪抽吸术,然后将抽吸的脂肪颗粒生理盐水纯化冲洗多次、沉淀后,注射至面颊部、颞部、鼻唇沟以及皱纹的凹陷不对称部位。结果:46例患者通过1~3次的颗粒脂肪注射填充,面颊部、颞部等处的凹陷情况明显有所改善,皱纹有明显的减轻,且部分已经消退。手术后随访4~19个月,46例患者对美容整形效果满意,没有出现结节、血肿、感染及不对称等并发症。结论:自体颗粒脂肪移植技术操作简单、安全系数高、且手术后的瘢痕小,在面部美容整形中的应用效果良好。

  15. Towards an aesthetics of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, P

    2000-09-01

    Towards an aesthetics of nursing This paper re-appraises the work of Barbara Carper on aesthetics and the art of nursing. It identifies serious flaws in Carper's original arguments and the way in which she and subsequent authors have conflated the concepts of art and aesthetics in nursing. The paper explores a broader approach to aesthetics and proposes a way in which a theoretical approach to nursing aesthetics could be developed. The paper concludes that nursing is a fit object of aesthetic appreciation and that aesthetic quality is a necessary attribute of good nursing practice.

  16. Chronological hypoplasia: aesthetic management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheranjeevi Jayam; Anila Bandlapalli; Nikunj Patel; Rama Shankar Kashinath Choudhary

    2014-01-01

    ... (multiple, symmetrical, chronological pattern). Chronological hypoplasias are seen at the time tooth erupts into the oral cavity leading to several problems like aesthetic problems, tooth sensitivity, caries and early pulpal involvement...

  17. Neuroscience of aesthetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Vartanian, Oshin

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, we conduct a selective review of the literature on neuroaesthetics to demonstrate that aesthetic experiences likely emerge from the interaction between emotion–valuation, sensory–motor, and meaning...

  18. To the Ecological Aesthetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀青

    2014-01-01

    Landscape design is one of the space form and space environment comprehensive planning and design, to im-prove the quality of urban environment, quality of life and urban landscape level play a very important role.It is expounded in this article based on the value of landscape ecological aesthetics under the background of productive landscape, discusses the"bigfoot aesthetics"innovative application in modern landscape design and new thinking.

  19. The aesthetics of chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Glenn

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and philosophers have long reflected on the place of aesthetics in science. In this essay, I review these discussions, identifying work of relevance to chemistry and, in particular, to the field of chemical biology. Topics discussed include the role of aesthetics in scientific theory choice, the aesthetics of molecular images, the beauty-making features of molecules, and the relation between the aesthetics of chemical biology and the aesthetics of industrial design.

  20. Personalized visual aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessel, Edward A.; Stahl, Jonathan; Maurer, Natalia; Denker, Alexander; Starr, G. G.

    2014-02-01

    How is visual information linked to aesthetic experience, and what factors determine whether an individual finds a particular visual experience pleasing? We have previously shown that individuals' aesthetic responses are not determined by objective image features but are instead a function of internal, subjective factors that are shaped by a viewers' personal experience. Yet for many classes of stimuli, culturally shared semantic associations give rise to similar aesthetic taste across people. In this paper, we investigated factors that govern whether a set of observers will agree in which images are preferred, or will instead exhibit more "personalized" aesthetic preferences. In a series of experiments, observers were asked to make aesthetic judgments for different categories of visual stimuli that are commonly evaluated in an aesthetic manner (faces, natural landscapes, architecture or artwork). By measuring agreement across observers, this method was able to reveal instances of highly individualistic preferences. We found that observers showed high agreement on their preferences for images of faces and landscapes, but much lower agreement for images of artwork and architecture. In addition, we found higher agreement for heterosexual males making judgments of beautiful female faces than of beautiful male faces. These results suggest that preferences for stimulus categories that carry evolutionary significance (landscapes and faces) come to rely on similar information across individuals, whereas preferences for artifacts of human culture such as architecture and artwork, which have fewer basic-level category distinctions and reduced behavioral relevance, rely on a more personalized set of attributes.

  1. Facial cystic lymphangioma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasotto, Matteo; Clozza, Emanuele; Tirelli, Giancarlo

    2012-07-01

    Lymphangiomas are uncommon congenital malformations of the lymphatic system, generally diagnosed during childhood. These malformations are rarely seen in adults, and the literature provides poor guidelines for treatment options that must be carefully applied to the facial region. Diagnosis in adult subjects is difficult to achieve, and also management of these conditions is still challenging because they tend to infiltrate adjacent tissues, causing frequent relapses. Radical surgery is the main form of treatment, avoiding the sacrifice of function or aesthetics of the patient. Two cases of cystic lymphangioma of the facial region found in adults are described from a clinical and pathologic point of view. The aim of this article was to point out that an early recognition of cystic lymphangioma is a crucial goal to initiate a prompt treatment avoiding serious complication.

  2. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Facial Sports Injuries Facial Sports Injuries Patient Health Information News media interested in ... should receive immediate medical attention. Prevention Of Facial Sports Injuries The best way to treat facial sports injuries ...

  3. Children and Facial Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Children and Facial Trauma Children and Facial Trauma Patient Health Information News ... staff at newsroom@entnet.org . What is facial trauma? The term facial trauma means any injury to ...

  4. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  5. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment When the skin is injured from a cut or tear the body heals by forming scar tissue. The appearance of the scar can range from ...

  6. Management of the Eye in Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, John J

    2016-02-01

    The preoperative assessment of the eye in facial paralysis is a critical component of surgical management. The degree of facial nerve paralysis, lacrimal secretion, corneal sensation, and lower eyelid position must be assessed accurately. Upper eyelid loading procedures are standard management of lagophthalmos. Lower eyelid tightening repositions the lower eyelid and helps maintain the aqueous tear film. Eyelid reanimation allows an aesthetic symmetry with blinking and restores protective functions vital to ocular preservation. Patients often have multiple nervous deficits, including corneal anesthesia. Other procedures include tarsorrhaphy, spring implantation, and temporalis muscle transposition; associated complications have rendered them nearly obsolete.

  7. Facial blindsight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eSolcà

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Blindsight denotes unconscious residual visual capacities in the context of an inability to consciously recollect or identify visual information. It has been described for color and shape discrimination, movement or facial emotion recognition. The present study investigates a patient suffering from cortical blindness whilst maintaining select residual abilities in face detection. Our patient presented the capacity to distinguish between jumbled/normal faces, known/unknown faces or famous people’s categories although he failed to explicitly recognize or describe them. Conversely, performance was at chance level when asked to categorize non-facial stimuli. Our results provide clinical evidence for the notion that some aspects of facial processing can occur without perceptual awareness, possibly using direct tracts from the thalamus to associative visual cortex, bypassing the primary visual cortex.

  8. Rejuvenecimiento facial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Daniel Jacubovsky, Dr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El envejecimiento facial es un proceso único y particular a cada individuo y está regido en especial por su carga genética. El lifting facial es una compleja técnica desarrollada en nuestra especialidad desde principios de siglo, para revertir los principales signos de este proceso. Los factores secundarios que gravitan en el envejecimiento facial son múltiples y por ello las ritidectomías o lifting cérvico faciales descritas han buscado corregir los cambios fisonómicos del envejecimiento excursionando, como se describe, en todos los planos tisulares involucrados. Esta cirugía por lo tanto, exige conocimiento cabal de la anatomía quirúrgica, pericia y experiencia para reducir las complicaciones, estigmas quirúrgicos y revisiones secundarias. La ridectomía facial ha evolucionado hacia un procedimiento más simple, de incisiones más cortas y disecciones menos extensas. Las suspensiones musculares han variado en su ejecución y los vectores de montaje y resección cutánea son cruciales en los resultados estéticos de la cirugía cérvico facial. Hoy estos vectores son de tracción más vertical. La corrección de la flaccidez va acompañada de un interés en reponer el volumen de la superficie del rostro, en especial el tercio medio. Las técnicas quirúrgicas de rejuvenecimiento, en especial el lifting facial, exigen una planificación para cada paciente. Las técnicas adjuntas al lifting, como blefaroplastias, mentoplastía, lipoaspiración de cuello, implantes faciales y otras, también han tenido una positiva evolución hacia la reducción de riesgos y mejor éxito estético.

  9. Aesthetic responses to music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Istok, Eva; Brattico, Elvira; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    , the adjective "touching" was often listed together with "beautiful". In addition, we found music-specific vocabulary as well as adjectives related to emotions and mood states indicating that affective processes are an essential part of aesthetic responses to music. Differences between music experts and laymen......We explored the content and structure of the cognitive, knowledge-based concept underlying aesthetic responses to music. To this aim, we asked 290 Finnish students to verbally associate the aesthetic value of music and to write down a list of appropriate adjectives within a given time limit....... No music was presented during the task. In addition, information about participants' musical background was collected. A variety of analysis techniques was used to determine the key results of our study. The adjective "beautiful" proved to be the core item of the concept under question. Interestingly...

  10. Hepburn's Natural Aesthetic and Its Implications for Aesthetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The world is rich in natural beauty, and learning how to appreciate the beauty of nature is an important part of aesthetic education. Unfortunately, the teaching of aesthetics is usually restricted to art education, especially in Taiwan. Students' perceptual awareness of and sensitivity to the aesthetics of nature should be cultivated so that…

  11. Ideal female brow aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Garrett R; Kim, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    The concept of the ideal female eyebrow has changed over time. Modern studies examining youthful brow aesthetics are reviewed. An analysis of ideal female brow characteristics as depicted in the Western print media between 1945 and 2011 was performed. This analysis provided objective evidence that the ideal youthful brow peak has migrated laterally over time to lie at the lateral canthus. There has been a nonstatistically significant trend toward lower and flatter brows. These findings are discussed in relation to current concepts of female brow aging, with repercussions regarding endoscopic brow lift and aesthetic forehead surgery.

  12. The aesthetic hand prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, J

    1981-10-01

    The high-quality aesthetic prosthesis can be equally helpful to those with acquired amputation and to those whose loss is due to agenesis. Restoring near-normal appearance improves patients' function in a global sense, enabling them to better utilize what they have in the complex socioeconomic environment of today's mobile society. The aesthetic prosthesis often also gives some prehensile assistance, providing an opposition part for remaining digits or thumb. The needs of each patient must be carefully considered, and the prosthesis must conform to the high standards of quality outlined. Its use is primarily for the unilateral amputee who is making a good adjustment to the loss with realistic expectations.

  13. Aesthetic experience of dance performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukadinović Maja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the aesthetic experience of dance performances is investigated. The study includes construction of an instrument for measuring the aesthetic experience of dance performances and an investigation of the structure of both dancers’ and spectators’ aesthetic experience. The experiments are carried out during eight different performances of various dance forms, including classical ballet, contemporary dance, flamenco and folklore. Three factors of aesthetic experience of dance performances are identified: Dynamism, Exceptionality and Affective Evaluation. The results show that dancers’ aesthetic experience has a somewhat different factorial structure from that of the spectators’. Unlike spectators’ aesthetic experience, dancers’ aesthetic experience singles out the Excitement factor. The results are discussed within the context of dancers’ proprioception and spectators’ exteroception since these findings confirm the idea of a significant role of proprioception in dancers’ aesthetic experience.

  14. IncobotulinumtoxinA in aesthetics: Russian multidisciplinary expert consensus recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutskovskaya Y

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Yana Yutskovskaya,1 Elena Gubanova,2 Irina Khrustaleva,3 Vasiliy Atamanov,4 Anastasiya Saybel,5 Elena Parsagashvili,6 Irina Dmitrieva,7 Elena Sanchez,8 Natalia Lapatina,9 Tatiana Korolkova,10 Alena Saromytskaya,11 Elena Goltsova,12 Elmira Satardinova13 1Department of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, Pacific State Medical University, Vladivostock, 2Department of Skin and Venereal Diseases, Postgraduate Medical Institute, Moscow National University of Food Production, Moscow, 3Department of Plastic Surgery, IP Pavlov Medical State University, St Petersburg, 4Department of Reconstructive and Plastic Surgery, SN Fedorova, Federal State Institution, Novosibirsk, 5Clinic Ideal, Laser Technologies Center, Moscow, 6Aestima-clinic, 7Clinic “Academy”, St Petersburg, 8Eklan Medical Center of Cosmetological Correction, 9Clinic of Aesthetic Medicine and Plastic Surgery, Moscow, 10Department of Cosmetology, II Mechnikov North-Western State Medical University, St Petersburg, 11Plastic Surgery Clinic, Center of Aesthetic Medicine and Beauty Cosmetology, 12“Neo-Clinic,” Tyumen, 13Botulinum Toxin Therapy Department, Diagnostic Center of the Irkutsk State Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Irkutsk, Russia Background: Although there are various international consensus recommendations on the use of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A in facial aesthetics, there are no global or Russian guidelines on the optimal dose of incobotulinumtoxinA, free from complexing proteins, within specific aesthetic indications. This article reports the outcomes of two expert consensus meetings, conducted to review and analyze efficacy and tolerability data for incobotulinumtoxinA in various facial aesthetic indications and to give expert consensus recommendations to ensure best clinical practice among Russian clinicians. Methods: Thirteen dermatology and/or plastic surgery experts attended meetings held in Paris, France (November 2013, and Moscow, Russia (March 2014

  15. Positive Aesthetics : claims and problems

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaraz León, María José

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I present an overview of the doctrine known as Positive Aesthetics regarding aesthetic judgements about nature. According to this view, all pristine nature is always beautiful and, generally, although not necessarily, human intervention tends to introduce ugliness in nature. One of the strong practical motivations behind this claim is an attempt to ground our reasons to preserve natural environments in aesthetic reasons. Positive Aesthetics has been defended within contrary appr...

  16. Variations of Structural Components: Specific Intercultural Differences in Facial Morphology, Skin Type, and Structures

    OpenAIRE

    McKnight, Aisha; Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Bullocks, Jamal M.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the differences in facial morphology and skin structure and tone among ethnic groups within the realm of plastic surgery is relevant due to the increasing number of ethnic individuals seeking cosmetic surgery. Previous classifications of ideal facial morphologic characteristics have been revised and challenged over the years to accurately reflect the differences in facial structure that are aesthetically pleasing to individuals of differing ethnic groups. The traditional neoclassi...

  17. Scientific aesthetics: three steps forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2014-11-01

    Leder and Nadal (2014, this issue) examine the current state of scientific aesthetics through the lens of a prescient psychological model proposed 10 years ago. These retrospective points to several future directions of which I touch on three: the nature of aesthetic emotions, the time course of emotions in aesthetic episodes, and the relationship of art and evolution.

  18. Aesthetic Principles for Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Patrick E.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers principles that contribute to developing the aesthetics of instructional design. Rather than describing merely the surface qualities of things and events, the concept of aesthetics as applied here pertains to heightened, integral experience. Aesthetic experiences are those that are immersive, infused with meaning, and felt as…

  19. What's Wrong with "Aesthetic Education"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca-Marshall, Judith B.

    1980-01-01

    The author considers definitions of "aesthetic," especially that offered by Woodrow Wilson in his essay on Adam Smith. Her major contention is that too much of aesthetic and other education is not very aesthetic, for it does not excite both senses and intellect nor develop the ability to generalize. (Author/SJL)

  20. Against Moderate Aesthetic Formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Formalists believe that the aesthetic appreciation of an artwork generally involves an attentive awareness of its sensory or perceptual qualities and does not require knowledge about its nonperceptual properties. Criticisms of classical formalist views, such as that of Clive Bell, are well known. However, a number of philosophers have recently…

  1. Invisalign and aesthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Invisalign has been an integral part of dental practices for many years. Besides improving crowding and spacing in teeth, it is an excellent adjunct for many different aesthetic procedures. One such case is illustrated in this article, where the combination of Invisalign and minimally invasive dentistry allowed for a stellar outcome, and one very happy dental patient.

  2. Permanent facial paralysis: surgical correction with Labbe’s technique

    OpenAIRE

    Yangali, Rubén; Servicio de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Hospital Central de la Fuerza Aérea del Perú. Lima, Perú.; Neme, Alex; Servicio de Urgencias. Hospital La Mancha Centro. Ciudad Real, España.; Moreno, Kattia; Research Assistant Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. University Of Cincinnati. Ohio, USA.; Cuadros, Jerson; Centro de Terapia Física y Rehabilitación (CETEFI). Arequipa, Perú

    2013-01-01

    Facial paralysis causes a large aesthetic and functional defect. Different surgical techniques may be used to repair this defect. Some of them have focused in structural and physiological aspects. We consider that temporalis lengthening myoplasty is currently the most important technique for permanent facial paralysis repair. La parálisis facial genera un gran déficit estético y funcional. Las diversas técnicas quirúrgicas han ido evolucionando, a fin de corregir este defecto de la forma m...

  3. Quantitative facial asymmetry: using three-dimensional photogrammetry to measure baseline facial surface symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Helena O; Morrison, Clinton S; Linden, Olivia; Phillips, Benjamin; Chang, Johnny; Byrne, Margaret E; Sullivan, Stephen R; Forrest, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Although symmetry is hailed as a fundamental goal of aesthetic and reconstructive surgery, our tools for measuring this outcome have been limited and subjective. With the advent of three-dimensional photogrammetry, surface geometry can be captured, manipulated, and measured quantitatively. Until now, few normative data existed with regard to facial surface symmetry. Here, we present a method for reproducibly calculating overall facial symmetry and present normative data on 100 subjects. We enrolled 100 volunteers who underwent three-dimensional photogrammetry of their faces in repose. We collected demographic data on age, sex, and race and subjectively scored facial symmetry. We calculated the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between the native and reflected faces, reflecting about a plane of maximum symmetry. We analyzed the interobserver reliability of the subjective assessment of facial asymmetry and the quantitative measurements and compared the subjective and objective values. We also classified areas of greatest asymmetry as localized to the upper, middle, or lower facial thirds. This cluster of normative data was compared with a group of patients with subtle but increasing amounts of facial asymmetry. We imaged 100 subjects by three-dimensional photogrammetry. There was a poor interobserver correlation between subjective assessments of asymmetry (r = 0.56). There was a high interobserver reliability for quantitative measurements of facial symmetry RMSD calculations (r = 0.91-0.95). The mean RMSD for this normative population was found to be 0.80 ± 0.24 mm. Areas of greatest asymmetry were distributed as follows: 10% upper facial third, 49% central facial third, and 41% lower facial third. Precise measurement permitted discrimination of subtle facial asymmetry within this normative group and distinguished norms from patients with subtle facial asymmetry, with placement of RMSDs along an asymmetry ruler. Facial surface symmetry, which is poorly assessed

  4. Subcutaneous island pedicle flap for aesthetic reconstruction of the face

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-hui; XING Xin; OUYANG Tian-xiang; LI Ping; XU Jie; GUO En-tan

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the outcomes of subcutaneous island pedicle flap for reconstruction of the medium-sized facial skin defects. Methods: Eighty nine cases of facial defects within one cosmetic unit following removal of skin tumors or scars were reconstructed with advancement or transposition island pedicle flaps. Patient records and postoperative photographs were reviewed retrospectively. Both patients and other surgeons were asked to assess outcome variables. Results: All flaps survived with primary healing postoperatively. Patients and surgeons judged excellent or good overall outcomes in 95.5% and 92.7%of all evaluated cases, respectively. Conclusion: The subcutaneous island pedicle flap may be an extremely versatile and reliable method for aesthetic reconstruction of medium-sized facial defects in the patients of all time of life.

  5. Orthognathic surgery with or without autologous fat micrograft injection: preliminary report on aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaini, M; Pisani, C

    2015-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery leaves the intrinsic volume of the facial soft tissues untouched, sometimes resulting in unsatisfactory improvements in aesthetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction following bimaxillary orthognathic surgery with or without simultaneous facial lipofilling procedures. The preoperative and postoperative facial appearances of 210 patients were compared through analysis of photographs and postoperative clinical evaluation. A patient questionnaire was used to assess the perceived improvement in aesthetics. One hundred and twenty patients (mean age 20.3 years) underwent bimaxillary orthognathic surgery and simultaneous facial lipofilling procedures (group I). The remaining 90 patients (mean age 19.8 years) underwent skeletal procedures only (group II). The overall aesthetic improvement was similar in the two groups (group I 92.5%, group II 91.1%). Greater higher-level aesthetic improvement scores were recorded for group I (group I 80%, group II 55.6%). The overall patient satisfaction was 98.3% for group I and 97.8% for group II. Greater higher-level satisfaction scores were recorded for group I (group I 14.2%, group II 6.7%). The simultaneous use of the autologous fat micrograft is a promising technique that may improve the aesthetic outcomes of orthognathic surgery, leading to greater patient satisfaction.

  6. Perception of Aesthetics by Different Professionals of Different Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadgaonkar, Vaishali Devidas; Deshpande, Kiran Jayant; Gangurde, Parag Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the perception of aesthetics by different professionals of different communities in India by a photographic study. Materials and Methods This was a photographic study conducted among different professionals of different communities to establish an aesthetic norm for Indian population. The communities to which the professionals belonged were North Indian, South Indian, Maharashtrian, Gujarati and Parsi. The subjects photographed were aesthetic profiles with good occlusion. Five different facial photographic views each for male and female were obtained. These photographs were then subjected to changes in increments of 2 mm and 4 mm in retrusive and protrusive profile in Adobe Photoshop CS5 after which they were evaluated by different professionals of different communities according to their preference from most liked to least liked. Results The aesthetic preferences differed widely among different professionals of different community. Conclusion The established aesthetic norms can be utilized by the dental fraternity in general and Orthodontist’s in particular in diagnosis and treatment planning of Samples belonging to different communities to have the treatment outcome in unison with the established soft tissue norm for that particular community. PMID:26557609

  7. Ten years of a model of aesthetic appreciation and aesthetic judgments : The aesthetic episode - Developments and challenges in empirical aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Helmut; Nadal, Marcos

    2014-11-01

    About a decade ago, psychology of the arts started to gain momentum owing to a number of drives: technological progress improved the conditions under which art could be studied in the laboratory, neuroscience discovered the arts as an area of interest, and new theories offered a more comprehensive look at aesthetic experiences. Ten years ago, Leder, Belke, Oeberst, and Augustin (2004) proposed a descriptive information-processing model of the components that integrate an aesthetic episode. This theory offered explanations for modern art's large number of individualized styles, innovativeness, and for the diverse aesthetic experiences it can stimulate. In addition, it described how information is processed over the time course of an aesthetic episode, within and over perceptual, cognitive and emotional components. Here, we review the current state of the model, and its relation to the major topics in empirical aesthetics today, including the nature of aesthetic emotions, the role of context, and the neural and evolutionary foundations of art and aesthetics.

  8. Contemporary Culture and Aesthetic Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    My focus is on the importance of an education of our senses and body through sensorial elements in order to improve our sense of situations and faculty of judgement. This was the key focus of aesthetics in its classical form from antiquity until it declines from the aesthetic agenda during the 19th...... century, a focus we on aesthetic education and communication. Important were arts and letters which still are important but very much on the defensive in our contemporary culture also because aesthetics often is a debate about criticism rather than about the sensorial and bodily aspect of cultural...... products. We can learn from the early generations within aesthetics not least from Kant when we keep in mind that his investigation of the aesthetic judgement is for the sake of judgement as such, thus for our ability to chose the right conduct of behaviour. The aesthetic judgement is a judgement about our...

  9. A systematic comprehensive approach to management of irreversible facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Raymond S; Gausas, Roberta E

    2003-02-01

    Irreversible facial palsy (IFP) presents a multitude of problems arising from a paretic periorbital and facial complex, the solutions to which cross the spectrum of multiple specialties. The process of facial rehabilitation can be simplified by subdividing the face into functional units. These units consist of the brow complex, the periorbital complex, the midface complex, and the lower face/oral complex. Although all of these units are interrelated and influence each other, careful study of the deformity and symptoms of each unit yields a coherent approach and customized surgical plan. The following provides a complete evaluation method for the surgeon to review and customize an approach to the individual patient's needs and desires. Facial rehabilitation must be tailored to each individual, addressing both functional as well as aesthetic concerns for each facial unit.

  10. Tissue Engineering and the Future of Facial Volumization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, Marsha; Watson, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    Volume loss due to facial aging can be restored by facial volumization using a variety of materials. Volumization can be performed in isolation or concurrent with other facial rejuvenation procedures to obtain an optimal aesthetic result. There is a myriad of manufactured products available for volumization. The use of autologous fat as facial filler has been adopted more recently and possesses certain advantages; however, the ideal filler is still lacking. Tissue engineering may offer a solution. This technology would provide autologous soft-tissue components for use in facial volumization. The use of stem cells may enable customization of the engineered product for the specific needs of each patient. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Pediatric facial nerve rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Caroline A; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-11-01

    Facial paralysis is a rare but severe condition in the pediatric population. Impaired facial movement has multiple causes and varied presentations, therefore individualized treatment plans are essential for optimal results. Advances in facial reanimation over the past 4 decades have given rise to new treatments designed to restore balance and function in pediatric patients with facial paralysis. This article provides a comprehensive review of pediatric facial rehabilitation and describes a zone-based approach to assessment and treatment of impaired facial movement.

  12. Facial nerve regeneration after facial allotransplantation: A longitudinal clinical and electromyographic follow-up of lip movements during speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Letter, Miet; Vanhoutte, Sarah; Aerts, Annelies; Santens, Patrick; Vermeersch, Hubert; Roche, Nathalie; Stillaert, Filip; Blondeel, Philip; Van Lierde, Kristiane

    2017-06-01

    Facial allotransplantation constitutes a reconstructive option after extensive damage to facial structures. Functional recovery has been reported but remains an issue. A patient underwent facial allotransplantation after a ballistic injury with extensive facial tissue damage. Speech motor function was sequentially assessed clinically, along with repeated electromyography of lip movements during a follow-up of 3 years. Facial nerve recovery could be demonstrated within the first month, followed by a gradual increase in electromyographic amplitude and decrease in reaction times. These were accompanied by gradual improvement of clinical assessments. Axonal recovery starts early after transplantation. Electromyographic testing is sensitive in demonstrating this early recovery, which ultimately results in clinical improvements. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The aesthetic composite bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, R A

    1997-01-01

    New developments are constantly introduced in the search for the optimal treatment modality to restore a single anterior tooth. The patient attention has shifted to aesthetics of the restoration, biocompatibility of the dental materials utilized, conservative preparation of the teeth to be restored, and the retention of intact adjacent dentition. The learning objective of this article is to review the methods currently utilized and to present a recently introduced treatment modality--the two-component bridge, which combines the strength and resiliency of composite resin with the aesthetic advantages of porcelain. The technology of the material is reviewed, the predominantly lingual tooth preparation procedures are outlined, and the bridge try-in is described. The advantages of the two-component bridge are presented along with the contraindications and suggestions of careful case selection. Three cases with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors in youthful patients are presented to supplement the theoretical outline and to describe and illustrate the clinical procedure.

  14. Aesthetic self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2015-01-01

    The concept of aesthetic self-esteem was explored for utilization in the medical spa environment. The aims and purposes of the analysis were outlined. The literature review identified various uses of the self-esteem concept as well as published definitions of the word. Defining attributes were also explored and examined, including positive and negative connotations of self-esteem. Two tools were utilized to help aesthetic nurse specialists assess patients for self-esteem and assess for a possible mental illness that may present as low self-esteem. A culturally sensitive theoretical definition of self-esteem was constructed to fit the needs and environment of medical spas. A model case of this definition, as well as a borderline and contrary case, was presented. Antecedents and consequences, as well as empirical referents of the concept, were explored.

  15. Aesthetics and collective creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Annette Svaneklink

    2013-01-01

    Tokyo, Nicolas Bourriaud (Bourriaud:1998) and now, the art centre stands as place where a cultural institution, an architectural mode of thinking and participatory artistic experiments work together. Recently, is has become of increasing interest to art museums to be relational and socially aware...... possibilities for relations and differentiated movement patterns to further transform the potentials of visitorʼs interactions with each other and with works of art. Lacaton & Vassalʼs relational, bottom-up architecture resonated well with the aesthetic thinking by one of the initial directors of the Palais de...... that reactualises the experimental exhibition space designed by Lina Bo Bardi for Museu de Arte de Sao Paulo (1968). These aspects of the practice of museums and art centres, where social change, creation and exhibition experience affect each other raise the question of how (social) change is related to aesthetics...

  16. To the Ecological Aesthetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀青

    2014-01-01

    Landscape design is one of the space form and space environment comprehensive planning and design, to im- prove the quality of urban environment, quality of life and urban landscape level play a very important role.It is expounded in this article based on the value of landscape ecological aesthetics under the background of productive landscape, discusses the "bigfoot aesthetics" innovative application in modern landscape design and new thinking.

  17. Aesthetics and Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Barretto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this few comments is to link tourism to the desire for beauty that seems to be side by side with humankind since the very beginnings. Reflections are grounded on Benjamin ́s interpretation of Baudelaire, on Boorstin, MacCannel and Urry, as well as on my own field experience and intend to stimulate more research on the role played by aesthetics in tourism experience.

  18. Aesthetics and Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Barretto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this few comments is to link tourism to the desire for beauty that seems to be side by side with humankind since the very beginnings. Reflections are grounded on Benjamin ́s interpretation of Baudelaire, on Boorstin, MacCannel and Urry, as well as on my own field experience and intend to stimulate more research on the role played by aesthetics in tourism experience.

  19. Aesthetics and Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Barretto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this few comments is to link tourism to the desire for beauty that seems to be side by side with humankind since the very beginnings. Reflections are grounded on Benjamin ́s interpretation of Baudelaire, on Boorstin, MacCannel and Urry, as well as on my own field experience and intend to stimulate more research on the role played by aesthetics in tourism experience.

  20. [Aesthetic surgery, psychic preparation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiss, R

    2003-10-01

    The aesthetic surgery impacts the psychological picture of the body. The candidate must be prepared to this change in appearance. If not, the surgeon must suggest the psychological preparation, evaluating the risk of dissatisfaction, in order to allow the surgical and narcissistic success of his operation. The author, a psychiatric, beneficiary in a strong experience of a surgical assistance, develops the interest of such a preparation upon a period of about 15 years (1988-2002).

  1. Pan Pan Theatre Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Ruiz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to elucidate Pan Pan Theatre’s aesthetics through an instance of their rehearsal process, especially in terms of their performance mode, which cannot be dissociated from their manifest intention to create a specific atmosphere. This paper explores Michael Kirby’s continuum between non-matrixed performance and complex acting, with regard to Pan Pan Theatre’s performance style, which enhances a particular conception of time and space as metonymic.

  2. Aesthetic Pleasure versus Aesthetic Interest: The Two Routes to Aesthetic Liking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Laura K. M.; Landwehr, Jan R.

    2017-01-01

    Although existing research has established that aesthetic pleasure and aesthetic interest are two distinct positive aesthetic responses, empirical research on aesthetic preferences usually considers only aesthetic liking to capture participants’ aesthetic response. This causes some fundamental contradictions in the literature; some studies find a positive relationship between easy-to-process stimulus characteristics and aesthetic liking, while others suggest a negative relationship. The present research addresses these empirical contradictions by investigating the dual character of aesthetic liking as manifested in both the pleasure and interest components. Based on the Pleasure-Interest Model of Aesthetic Liking (PIA Model; Graf and Landwehr, 2015), two studies investigated the formation of pleasure and interest and their relationship with aesthetic liking responses. Using abstract art as the stimuli, Study 1 employed a 3 (stimulus fluency: low, medium, high) × 2 (processing style: automatic, controlled) × 2 (aesthetic response: pleasure, interest) experimental design to examine the processing dynamics responsible for experiencing aesthetic pleasure versus aesthetic interest. We find that the effect of stimulus fluency on pleasure is mediated by a gut-level fluency experience. Stimulus fluency and interest, by contrast, are related through a process of disfluency reduction, such that disfluent stimuli that grow more fluent due to processing efforts become interesting. The second study employed product designs (bikes, chairs, and lamps) as stimuli and a 2 (fluency: low, high) × 2 (processing style: automatic, controlled) × 3 (product type: bike, chair, lamp) experimental design to examine pleasure and interest as mediators of the relationship between stimulus fluency and design attractiveness. With respect to lamps and chairs, the results suggest that the effect of stimulus fluency on attractiveness is fully mediated by aesthetic pleasure, especially in the

  3. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more to fully heal and achieve maximum improved appearance. Facial plastic surgery makes it possible to correct facial flaws that can undermine self-confidence. Changing how your scar looks can help change ...

  4. Facial attractiveness: General patterns of facial preferences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kościński, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    This review covers universal patterns in facial preferences. Facial attractiveness has fascinated thinkers since antiquity, but has been the subject of intense scientific study for only the last quarter of a century...

  5. [Surgical facial reanimation after persisting facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasche, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Facial reanimation following persistent facial paralysis can be managed with surgical procedures of varying complexity. The choice of the technique is mainly determined by the cause of facial paralysis, the age and desires of the patient. The techniques most commonly used are the nerve grafts (VII-VII, XII-VII, cross facial graft), dynamic muscle transfers (temporal myoplasty, free muscle transfert) and static suspensions. An intensive rehabilitation through specific exercises after all procedures is essential to archieve good results.

  6. Facial porokeratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Dafnis C; Haley, Jennifer C; Chiu, Melvin

    2008-01-01

    A 34-year-old man from El Salvador was referred to our clinic with a 10-year history of a pruritic erythematous facial eruption. He reported increased pruritus and scaling of lesions when exposed to the sun. He worked as a construction worker and admitted to frequent sun exposure. Physical examination revealed well-circumscribed erythematous to violaceous papules with raised borders and atrophic centers localized to the nose (Figure 1). He did not have lesions on the arms or legs. He did not report a family history of similar lesions. A biopsy specimen was obtained from the edge of a lesion on the right ala. Histologic examination of the biopsy specimen showed acanthosis of the epidermis with focal invagination of the corneal layer and a homogeneous column of parakeratosis in the center of that layer consistent with a cornoid lamella (Figure 2). Furthermore, the granular layer was absent at the cornoid lamella base. The superficial dermis contained a sparse, perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate. No evidence of dysplasia or malignancy was seen. These findings supported a diagnosis of porokeratosis. The patient underwent a trial of cryotherapy with moderate improvement of the facial lesions.

  7. Quantification of negative aesthetic ratings in primary unrepaired unilateral cleft lip infants by modified paired comparison method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Takeshi; Kitamura, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Akira; Suga, Ken-Ichiro; Nakano, Yoko; Hitoshi, Ohhata; Takagiwa, Mutsumi

    2014-01-01

    To quantify negative aesthetic ratings in primary unrepaired cleft lip infants by further refining our previously reported paired comparison method. The Thurstone paired comparison method was used to quantify negative aesthetic ratings of plaster facial models selected and ordered according to a table of paired random numbers. A total of 30 facial models of unrepaired incomplete unilateral cleft lip infants were used in this study. Raters comprised 20 oral surgeons and anesthesiologists. Quantification of aesthetic ratings for the 30 face models of unrepaired incomplete unilateral cleft lip infants was obtained. The ratings ranged from 0 to 5.08. Quantification of the aesthetic ratings for the 30 face models will be used as objective variables in a multivariate analysis in the third stage of this ongoing study.

  8. Avoiding Facial Incisions with Midface Free Tissue Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Mark W.; Sosin, Michael; Urbinelli, Leo J.; Mayo, James L.; Dorafshar, Amir H.; Hilaire, Hugo St.; Borsuk, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: We have adopted an intraoral microsurgical anastomosis to the facial vessels to eliminate the need for any visible facial incisions. Methods: Cadaveric dissection was used to demonstrate accessibility of the facial artery and vein through an intraoral approach. Additionally, 5 patients underwent free tissue transfer for reconstruction of major defects of the midface through an intraoral, transmucosal approach, obviating the need for visible skin incisions. Results: The pathology included palatal defects due to mucoepidermoid carcinoma and ischemic necrosis from cocaine abuse, maxillary defects secondary to fibrous dysplasia and avascular necrosis from traumatic blast injury, and a residual posttraumatic bony deformity of the zygoma. Reconstructions were performed with a free ulnar forearm flap, a free vastus lateralis muscle flap, a deep circumflex iliac artery myoosseous flap, a free fibula flap, and a deep circumflex iliac artery osseous flap, respectively. The facial artery and vein were used as recipient vessels for microvascular anastomosis for all cases. Mean follow-up was 12.2 months. All free tissue transfers were successful, and each patient had a satisfactory aesthetic outcome with no associated facial scars. Conclusion: This technique can be employed during reconstruction of an array of bony or soft-tissue midface deficits with minimal morbidity. This small series effectively demonstrates the varied pathologies and tissue deficiencies that can be successfully reconstructed with free tissue transfer using an entirely intraoral approach to the recipient facial vessels, resulting in no visible scars on the face and an improvement in the overall aesthetic outcome. PMID:28280662

  9. A Road to Aesthetic Stylistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Al-Sheikh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Being a linguistic phenomenon, poetry is marked by the defamilarization of language in a poetic discourse there is an aesthetic distortion of  the normal codes, in which the aesthetic value is the most prominent function of the poetic texture . This study is a new  adventure in correlating linguistics to aesthetics by and through the so-called approach Aesthetic stylistics( As. Aesthetic stylistics is the application of the theory of beauty to the intentionally violated components in literary text. It proceeds with the hypothesis that John Keats's Ode on a Grecian Urn and Kabbani's Maritime Poem are disinterested poetic experiences which create ecstatic responses to the reader's awareness, therefore, the judgment of the reader's taste is aesthetic. The study aims at highlighting the stylistic-aesthetic factors which generate the judgment of taste. While drawing heavily on the aestheticism of the Prague Linguistic Circle and Halliday's Functional Linguistics (FL, or what has come to be called the Traditional European Functionalism, the study will analyze Keats' Ode and Kabbani's poem in terms of Kant's Kritik der Urteilstraft, KdU. The two circles of the linguistic description and aesthetic interpretation will be internally interlinked to create the coherence of the stylistic process. The study consists of an introduction, two parts, one in theory and the other in analysis; it is eventually rounded up with concluding remarks elicited from the semiotic quest.  Keywords: Stylistics, Functionalism, Aesthetics

  10. Measuring Facial Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  11. Facial Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihalache Sergiu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During their lifetime, people learn to recognize thousands of faces that they interact with. Face perception refers to an individual's understanding and interpretation of the face, particularly the human face, especially in relation to the associated information processing in the brain. The proportions and expressions of the human face are important to identify origin, emotional tendencies, health qualities, and some social information. From birth, faces are important in the individual's social interaction. Face perceptions are very complex as the recognition of facial expressions involves extensive and diverse areas in the brain. Our main goal is to put emphasis on presenting human faces specialized studies, and also to highlight the importance of attractiviness in their retention. We will see that there are many factors that influence face recognition.

  12. Comprehensive approach in surgical reconstruction of facial nerve paralysis: a 10-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Eyal; Stahl, Shy; Barnea, Yoav; Leshem, David; Zaretski, Arik; Amir, Aharon; Meilik, Beni; Miller, Ehud; Shapira, Eyal; Abu Jabel, Amin; Weiss, Jerry; Arad, Ehud

    2010-04-01

    Facial paralysis presents diverse functional and aesthetic abnormalities. Reconstruction may be achieved by several methods. We reviewed the management and outcome of facial paralysis patients to establish principles on which a comprehensive reconstructive approach may be based. Records were reviewed of all patients operated for facial paralysis at our institution between 1998 and 2007. Ninety-five patients were included, of which 15 patients had static reconstruction alone, and 80 patients had dynamic reconstruction. Presented is our experience in reconstruction of facial paralysis over the past decade, delineating a comprehensive approach to this condition. Various surgical techniques are described.

  13. Experience Communication and Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    In this article the term "experience communication" will be introduced and discussed. It will be illustrated how different concepts of aesthetical experiences are an integrated part of experience communication and how these concepts are produced within the industries of consumerism, branding...... which was a given to something which each human being has to manage individually. As a consequence the human being experiences an increasing sense of insecurity and restless seeking after identity and recognition, which is reflected in an increasing demand of among other things self...

  14. Transformations of Radio Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Stachyra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some remarks upon the nature of contemporary radio communications in the context of the terms “aesthetics” and “aesthetisation”. The latter, denoting a process of turning aesthetic phenomena into unaesthetic ones, becomes the dominant strategy of formatted radio. The “surface aesthetisation,” which provides mainly pleasure and entertainment, transcends the simple styling of objects or environment and appears to be a more significant strand of contemporary culture. The article shows several examples of “surface” modelling of radio programming and explains their purpose in radio communication.

  15. Assembling an aesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Emily

    2012-12-01

    Recent research informing and related to the study of three-dimensional scientific models is assembled here in a way that explores an aesthetic, specifically, of touch. I concentrate on the materiality of models, drawing on insights from the history and philosophy of science, design and metaphysics. This article chronicles the ways in which touch, or material interactions, operate in the world of 3D models, and its role in what models mean and do. I end with a call for greater attention to scientific process, described as assembly of and within science, which is revealed by this focus on touch. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of aesthetic sensitivity in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrou, Christina; Veale, David; Wilson, Glenn

    2011-05-01

    Individuals with a higher aesthetic sensitivity may be more vulnerable to developing body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Aesthetic sensitivity has 3 components: (a) perceptual, (b) emotional, and (c) evaluative. Individuals with BDD (n = 50) were compared with a control group of individuals with an education or employment in art and design related fields (n = 50) and a control group of individuals without aesthetic training (n = 50). A facial photograph of each participant was manipulated to create a 9-image symmetry continuum. Presented with the continuum on a computer, participants were required to select and rate the image representing their self-actual, self-ideal, idea of perfect, most physically attractive, most pleasure, and most disgust. Control symmetry continua examined the specificity of the disturbance. As predicted, BDD participants displayed no distortion in their perceptual processing but were disturbed in their negative emotional/evaluative processing of their self-image. A significant discrepancy between their self-actual and self-ideal, resulting from an absent self-serving bias in their self-actual (a bias exhibited by controls) appears to be the source of their disturbance. They also overvalued the importance of appearance and self-objectified. These aesthetic evaluations may predispose individuals to BDD and/or maintain the disorder.

  17. Towards an Aesthetics of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    This article is an enquiry into the possible shape of "an aesthetics of care" drawn from the experience of looking after a Congolese colleague after he was injured in a massacre in the DR Congo. The mix of different professional and personal circumstances directs the writing towards concerns with the ethics and aesthetics of caring for…

  18. Contemporary Culture and Aesthetic Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    century, a focus we on aesthetic education and communication. Important were arts and letters which still are important but very much on the defensive in our contemporary culture also because aesthetics often is a debate about criticism rather than about the sensorial and bodily aspect of cultural...

  19. Visual aesthetics and human preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Stephen E; Schloss, Karen B; Sammartino, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Human aesthetic preference in the visual domain is reviewed from definitional, methodological, empirical, and theoretical perspectives. Aesthetic science is distinguished from the perception of art and from philosophical treatments of aesthetics. The strengths and weaknesses of important behavioral techniques are presented and discussed, including two-alternative forced-choice, rank order, subjective rating, production/adjustment, indirect, and other tasks. Major findings are reviewed about preferences for colors (single colors, color combinations, and color harmony), spatial structure (low-level spatial properties, shape properties, and spatial composition within a frame), and individual differences in both color and spatial structure. Major theoretical accounts of aesthetic response are outlined and evaluated, including explanations in terms of mere exposure effects, arousal dynamics, categorical prototypes, ecological factors, perceptual and conceptual fluency, and the interaction of multiple components. The results of the review support the conclusion that aesthetic response can be studied rigorously and meaningfully within the framework of scientific psychology.

  20. Rejuvenecimiento facial en "doble sigma" "Double ogee" facial rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Ramírez

    2007-03-01

    . Este arco conecta con la convexidad superior del tercio medio facial que se une con la concavidad de la porción inferior del tercio medio (arco inferior. Los paciente con un considerable envejecimiento y ptosis de las estructuras centrales faciales se pueden beneficiar en la mayoría de los casos de nuestro abordaje endoscópico. Las cejas, las comisuras de los párpados, de los tejidos blandos nasoglaberlares, los surcos nasolabiales, la nariz, las mejillas, el ángulo de la boca y los "jowls" (mejillas de bulldog se pueden tratar con eficacia mediante este abordaje. También las ojeras y los hundimientos orbitarios inferiores. Es eficaz también en ritidectomías secundarias o terciarias que requieren rejuvenecimiento cutáneo simultaneo y para cuando se precisa aumento de los tejidos blandos así como en las desproporciones esqueléticas y de los tejidos blandos. Las estructuras óseas expuestas pueden ser aumentadas o reducidas según convenga. Recomendamos este abordaje cuando hay que cambiar o extirpar implantes faciales aloplásticos. Los procedimientos endoscópicos de la frente y del tercio medio facial permiten la reconstrucción del "Doble Sigma" que se asocia a un aspecto juvenil.Subperiosteal techniques describes by Tessier have revolutionized the treatment of the aging face advocating this approach to treat early signs of aging in young and middleage patients. Psillakis refines the technique further and Ramirez describes a safer and more effective method of subperiosteal lifting, so that this technique could be applied across the full spectrum of facial aging. The introduction of the endoscope in the treatment of facial rejuvenation ushered in a new era in Aesthetic Surgery. Today, endoscopically assisted subperiosteal undermining of the upper, middle and lower face can provide a means for repositioning the sagging facial soft tissues in addition to augmentation of the craniofacial skeleton, with a reduced preoperative facial edema, minimal injury to the

  1. The use of polarized light in aesthetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colić, Miodrag M; Vidojković, Natasa; Jovanović, Milan; Lazović, Goran

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a clinical investigation of polarized light therapy after aesthetic surgery procedures. The study included patients who the authors underwent face-lifts, blepharoplasties, and various facial ancillary procedures, at center during the past 2 1/2 years. One side of the surgically treated area was managed with polarized light, whereas the other side served as a control. The results were compared using clinical examination only including signs of recovery such as resolution of swelling and bruises. The results in most cases showed a significant difference between the treated and untreated sides.

  2. Miserere. Aesthetics of Terror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Incampo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available I say: “Oh, what a beautiful surrealist picture!” With quite precise awareness: this páthos, these emotions of mine do not stem from our common sense. An aesthetic judgment is founded on an immediate subjective intuition: an emotion or a free feeling of a single subject towards an object. A universal sense, possibly. Some judgments of ours in ethics and in law are no different from our perceptions in front of art. It would be the same for a hypothetical sentence of the judge that concluded with these words: “I acquit Arsenio Lupin because of his magnificent handlebar moustache like that of Guy de Maupassant”. Everyone would think intuitively that it is an unfair sentence. Is there aesthetics of terror? The case that the article intends to examine is that of the famous kidnapping and murder of the Italian statesman Aldo Moro by the “Brigate Rosse” [Red Brigades] (1978. The method used here consists in studying the image of the kidnapping as iconic documentation of reality, and, above all, as an ethical-legal judgment about the terrorist crime. Moro was photographed during his kidnapping. There are at least two pictures. Both constitute an extraordinary source for a judgment on the basis of an image. In both of them, Aldo Moro is pictured in front of a Red Brigades banner during the captivity. In what sense do these pictures document an aesthetic judgment concerning the “case Moro”? The answer can be found in a remarkable iconic coincidence of these pictures with a masterpiece by Georges Rouault (Paris 1871-1958 devoted to the theme of the “Ecce Homo”. The Gospel in the “Ecce Homo” scene (John: 19, 4-5 narrates how Pontius Pilate wanted to arouse the compassion of the people with a scourging and the exposure of Jesus to the crowd. The plate under consideration is entitled “Qui ne se grime pas?” [Who does not have a painted face?] and is a key work in Rouault’s suite of prints Miserere, dated for 1923.

  3. THE AESTHETIC AXIOMATIC: DECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRINA VASKES SANTCHES

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El presente trabajo contribuye al debate sobre la actualidad estética, abordando diferentes enfoques del polémico concepto de deconstrucción, introducido por Jacques Derrida. Esta categoría es de referencia casi obligatoriacuando se habla sobre teoría estética contemporánea, forma parte de su nuevo aparato conceptual y expresa bien la nueva realidad que no tiene análogos históricos en lo que antes llamaban arte, estética y cultura. La elaboracióndel concepto de deconstrucción, el análisis de cómo funciona esa nueva forma del pensamiento crítico, y el método creativo de la interpretación y de la producción del texto artístico, nos permite entrar en el código de muchas obras artísticas actuales donde el espacio entre arte y teoría del arte es cada vez más incierto, especialmente en las diversas formas de arte conceptual o “performance art”.Abstract: Tackling polemic concept of deconstruction, introduced by Jacqes Derrida, from different approaches this article contributes to the debate on aesthetic current issues. This category is of almost obligatory reference when discussing about contemporary aesthetic theory. Deconstruction belongs to its new conceptual apparatus, and expresses well new reality that does not have historical analogy with what before was called art, aesthetics and culture. The elaboration of the concept of deconstruction, and the analysis of how this new form of strategical “procedure” of interpretation and production of the text (as textual reading is functioning allow us to enter the code of many current art works where the space between art and theory of the art is more and more uncertain, specially in the diverse forms of conceptual art or “performance art“.

  4. Aesthetic meanings and aesthetic emotions: how historical and intentional knowledge expand aesthetic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvia, Paul J

    2013-04-01

    This comment proposes that Bullot & Reber's (B&R's) emphasis on historical and intentional knowledge expands the range of emotions that can be properly viewed as aesthetic states. Many feelings, such as anger, contempt, shame, confusion, and pride, come about through complex aesthetic meanings, which integrate conceptual knowledge, beliefs about the work and the artist's intentions, and the perceiver's goals and values.

  5. PSYCHOANALYSIS AS APPLIED AESTHETICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The question of how to place psychoanalysis in relation to science has been debated since the beginning of psychoanalysis and continues to this day. The author argues that psychoanalysis is best viewed as a form of applied art (also termed applied aesthetics) in parallel to medicine as applied science. This postulate draws on a functional definition of modernity as involving the differentiation of the value spheres of science, art, and religion. The validity criteria for each of the value spheres are discussed. Freud is examined, drawing on Habermas, and seen to have erred by claiming that the psychoanalytic method is a form of science. Implications for clinical and metapsychological issues in psychoanalysis are discussed.

  6. Experience Communication and Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    to user aspect (web 2.0), the personal engagement or the community spirit. This increasing demand of experiences reflects the postmodern cultural trends where rules for how to think and behave no longer exist. This results in individualism, where the identity of the human being has changed from something...... which was a given to something which each human being has to manage individually. As a consequence the human being experiences an increasing sense of insecurity and restless seeking after identity and recognition, which is reflected in an increasing demand of among other things self......In this article the term "experience communication" will be introduced and discussed. It will be illustrated how different concepts of aesthetical experiences are an integrated part of experience communication and how these concepts are produced within the industries of consumerism, branding...

  7. Big Data Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnsten, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    of large data sets – or Big Data – into the sphere of art and the aesthetic. Central to the discussion here is the analysis of how different structuring principles of data and the discourses that surround these principles shape our perception of data. This discussion involves considerations on various......This article discusses artistic practices and artifacts that are occupied with exploring data through visualization and sonification strategies as well as with translating data into materially solid formats and embodied processes. By means of these examples the overall aim of the article...... is to critically question how and whether such artistic practices can eventually lead to the experience and production of knowledge that could not otherwise be obtained via more traditional ways of data representation. The article, thus, addresses both the problems and possibilities entailed in extending the use...

  8. Long Memory of Pathfinding Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Coleman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a new dynamic (i.e., space-time model to measure aesthetic values in pathfinding for videogames. The results we report are important firstly because the artificial intelligence literature has given relatively little attention to aesthetic considerations in pathfinding. Secondly, those investigators who have studied aesthetics in pathfinding have relied largely on anecdotal arguments rather than metrics. Finally, in those cases where metrics have been used in the past, they show only that aesthetic paths are different. They provide no quantitative means to classify aesthetic outcomes. The model we develop here overcomes these deficiencies using rescaled range (R/S analysis to estimate the Hurst exponent, . It measures long-range dependence (i.e., long memory in stochastic processes and provides a novel well-defined mathematical classification for pathfinding. Indeed, the data indicates that aesthetic and control paths have statistically significantly distinct signatures. Aesthetic paths furthermore have more long memory than controls with an effect size that is large, more than three times that of an alternative approach. These conclusions will be of interest to researchers investigating games as well as other forms of entertainment, simulation, and in general nonshortest path motion planning.

  9. Ethical considerations in aesthetic rhinoplasty: a survey, critical analysis, and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Kian; McKneally, Martin F; Adamson, Peter A

    2012-11-01

    Although the practice of medicine is built on a foundation of ethics, science, and common sense, the increasing complexity of medical interventions, social interactions, and societal norms of behavior challenges the ethical practice of aesthetic surgeons. We report a survey of the opinions, practices, and attitudes of experienced and novice facial plastic surgeons. The survey consisted of 15 clinical vignettes addressing ethical quandaries in aesthetic rhinoplasty. The vignettes are based on the experience and observations of the senior author (P.A.A.) over nearly 30 years of practice and teaching. Fellowship directors and facial plastic surgery fellows of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery were surveyed anonymously. Five of the 15 vignettes demonstrated significant differences between the responses of the fellowship directors and the fellows. No single vignette had a unanimous consensus in either group. Aesthetic rhinoplasty surgeons encounter ethical issues that should be reflected on by both experienced and inexperienced facial plastic surgeons, preferably before being faced with them in practice. We present a practical approach to ethical issues in clinical practice. Our survey can also be used as a stimulus for further discussion and teaching.

  10. The aesthetic jaw line: management of the aging jowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Edward M; Rohrich, Rod J

    2008-01-01

    The lower third of the face is often an afterthought in aesthetic plastic surgery. Aging across the mandibular border may be described by several mechanisms: fat atrophy and volume loss; shifting of subcutaneous fat compartments; and mandibular septum dehiscence with submandibular fat hypertrophy. Accurate diagnosis of the apparent mechanism of jaw line aging is critical to successful facial rejuvenation. Diagnosis directs the plastic surgeon as to which key anatomic components in this region to manipulate to optimize rejuvenation. The senior author's technique for facial rejuvenation across the mandibular border is described with an algorithm for facial rejuvenation of the jaw line. Several consistent patterns of facial aging are apparent and a theory of their mechanism is suggested: (1) patients with thin skin and minimal jowling resulting from fat atrophy; (2) jowl ptosis with normal skin and loss of submalar hollow and midface fullness, caused by displacement of fat compartments; and (3) cascading confluent fat over the mandible, produced by septum dehiscence. Fat atrophy is treated with fat replacement, either injectable or autologous fat. Jowl ptosis is treated with septum release and superficial musculoaponeurotic system elevation to restore jaw line definition. Confluent fat is treated by septum release, superficial musculoaponeurotic system elevation, and direct excision of fat over the mandible. Application of techniques without proper analysis and definition may lead to an operated look with a swept jaw line. Undertreatment may not achieve jaw line definition.

  11. Aesthetic Consensus and Aesthetic Difference in Anime Art Creation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗淞译

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that anime art has been existed as far back as the 1920s. While along with the continued development of china’s economy since the reform and opening up, anime art went into its rapid development stage. As we all know, aesthetic feeling differs from one person to another because of the differences of age, gender, geography, etc. Therefore, artistic value can only be demonstrated in the anime art when anime art can satisfy all different aesthetic feelings. The present thesis gives an analysis into the anime art creation from the perspective of aesthetic consensus and aesthetic difference, which can stimulate the sustainable development of anime art and inspire anime creators to become better and better in the field of anime and create more better works.

  12. Facial contour deformity correction with microvascular flaps based on the 3-dimentional template and facial moulage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Facial contour deformities presents with varied aetiology and degrees severity. Accurate assessment, selecting a suitable tissue and sculpturing it to fill the defect is challenging and largely subjective. Objective assessment with imaging and software is not always feasible and preparing a template is complicated. A three-dimensional (3D wax template pre-fabricated over the facial moulage aids surgeons to fulfil these tasks. Severe deformities demand a stable vascular tissue for an acceptable outcome. Materials and Methods: We present review of eight consecutive patients who underwent augmentation of facial contour defects with free flaps between June 2005 and January 2011. De-epithelialised free anterolateral thigh (ALT flap in three, radial artery forearm flap and fibula osteocutaneous flap in two each and groin flap was used in one patient. A 3D wax template was fabricated by augmenting the deformity on facial moulage. It was utilised to select the flap, to determine the exact dimensions and to sculpture intraoperatively. Ancillary procedures such as genioplasty, rhinoplasty and coloboma correction were performed. Results: The average age at the presentation was 25 years and average disease free interval was 5.5 years and all flaps survived. Mean follow-up period was 21.75 months. The correction was aesthetically acceptable and was maintained without any recurrence or atrophy. Conclusion: The 3D wax template on facial moulage is simple, inexpensive and precise objective tool. It provides accurate guide for the planning and execution of the flap reconstruction. The selection of the flap is based on the type and extent of the defect. Superiority of vascularised free tissue is well-known and the ALT flap offers a versatile option for correcting varying degrees of the deformities. Ancillary procedures improve the overall aesthetic outcomes and minor flap touch-up procedures are generally required.

  13. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, ... your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For ...

  14. Brief Introduction to Industrial Design Aesthetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓

    2009-01-01

    The paper proposes the idea that in the primary stage of industrial product design, the aesthetic nature of the product should be grasped. In addition, the paper poses two questions about aesthetic nature industrial design: first, what is the object of industrial design aesthetics? Second, what are the characteristics of design aesthetics of industrial products?

  15. Design and the question of aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    is the goal of an aesthetic education. Through discussions of different approaches to aesthetics like Grant Kester’s dialogical aesthetics and Kant’s critique of the faculty of judgement, it is emphasized how sensibility as the key focus of aesthetics rather than art and beauty makes the ability to manoeuvre...

  16. Gingival and dental parameters in the evaluation of aesthetic characteristics of fixed restorations (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Đuričić Kosovka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a continuing evaluation of dental and facial parameters in the estimation of aesthetic characteristic of fixed restorations. First of all, attention is paid to the phenomenon describing the tooth tissue's characteristics (transiucency, opalescence, and transparency. The paper also discusses tooth color as a special occurrence, the position of the lower lip line as well as the symmetry of the smile. In addition to these fundamental objective criteria, the paper also deals with subjective criteria (tooth arrangement and position, variation in tooth form, and relative crown length, which play a part in the successful aesthetic integration of fixed restorations.

  17. Linear Elastic Properties of the Facial Soft Tissues Using an Aspiration Device: Towards Patient Specific Characterization.

    OpenAIRE

    Luboz, Vincent; Promayon, Emmanuel; Payan, Yohan

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Biomechanical modeling of the facial soft tissue behavior is needed in aesthetic or maxillo-facial surgeries where the simulation of the bone displacements cannot accurately predict the visible outcome on the patient's face. Because these tissues have different nature and elastic properties across the face, depending on their thickness, and their content in fat or muscle, individualizing their mechanical parameters could increase the simulation accuracy. Using a specif...

  18. Affective priming using facial expressions modulates liking for abstract art.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Flexas

    Full Text Available We examined the influence of affective priming on the appreciation of abstract artworks using an evaluative priming task. Facial primes (showing happiness, disgust or no emotion were presented under brief (Stimulus Onset Asynchrony, SOA = 20 ms and extended (SOA = 300 ms conditions. Differences in aesthetic liking for abstract paintings depending on the emotion expressed in the preceding primes provided a measure of the priming effect. The results showed that, for the extended SOA, artworks were liked more when preceded by happiness primes and less when preceded by disgust primes. Facial expressions of happiness, though not of disgust, exerted similar effects in the brief SOA condition. Subjective measures and a forced-choice task revealed no evidence of prime awareness in the suboptimal condition. Our results are congruent with findings showing that the affective transfer elicited by priming biases evaluative judgments, extending previous research to the domain of aesthetic appreciation.

  19. Affective Priming Using Facial Expressions Modulates Liking for Abstract Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexas, Albert; Rosselló, Jaume; Christensen, Julia F.; Nadal, Marcos; Olivera La Rosa, Antonio; Munar, Enric

    2013-01-01

    We examined the influence of affective priming on the appreciation of abstract artworks using an evaluative priming task. Facial primes (showing happiness, disgust or no emotion) were presented under brief (Stimulus Onset Asynchrony, SOA = 20ms) and extended (SOA = 300ms) conditions. Differences in aesthetic liking for abstract paintings depending on the emotion expressed in the preceding primes provided a measure of the priming effect. The results showed that, for the extended SOA, artworks were liked more when preceded by happiness primes and less when preceded by disgust primes. Facial expressions of happiness, though not of disgust, exerted similar effects in the brief SOA condition. Subjective measures and a forced-choice task revealed no evidence of prime awareness in the suboptimal condition. Our results are congruent with findings showing that the affective transfer elicited by priming biases evaluative judgments, extending previous research to the domain of aesthetic appreciation. PMID:24260350

  20. Affective priming using facial expressions modulates liking for abstract art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexas, Albert; Rosselló, Jaume; Christensen, Julia F; Nadal, Marcos; Olivera La Rosa, Antonio; Munar, Enric

    2013-01-01

    We examined the influence of affective priming on the appreciation of abstract artworks using an evaluative priming task. Facial primes (showing happiness, disgust or no emotion) were presented under brief (Stimulus Onset Asynchrony, SOA = 20 ms) and extended (SOA = 300 ms) conditions. Differences in aesthetic liking for abstract paintings depending on the emotion expressed in the preceding primes provided a measure of the priming effect. The results showed that, for the extended SOA, artworks were liked more when preceded by happiness primes and less when preceded by disgust primes. Facial expressions of happiness, though not of disgust, exerted similar effects in the brief SOA condition. Subjective measures and a forced-choice task revealed no evidence of prime awareness in the suboptimal condition. Our results are congruent with findings showing that the affective transfer elicited by priming biases evaluative judgments, extending previous research to the domain of aesthetic appreciation.

  1. Facial Expression Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial compon

  2. Facial Expression Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial

  3. Facial paralysis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sashank; Redett, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Facial paralysis can have devastating physical and psychosocial consequences. These are particularly severe in children in whom loss of emotional expressiveness can impair social development and integration. The etiologies of facial paralysis, prospects for spontaneous recovery, and functions requiring restoration differ in children as compared with adults. Here we review contemporary management of facial paralysis with a focus on special considerations for pediatric patients.

  4. The Definition of Everyday Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Melchionne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article responds to recent controversy in the aesthetics of everyday life with a succinct definition designed to clarify the domain of study. The article is intentionally designed for brevity and accessibility in order to facilitate usage.

  5. The Potential of Design Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise; Folkmann, Mads Nygaard; Jensen, Hans-Christian;

    The paper is a contribution to building a research discourse and methodology across disciplines. Taking design aesthetics as our theme, we present and discuss a research framework with roots in the interest in aesthetics within the humanities but aimed at producing research perspectives across...... design practice, the humanities and the social sciences. The initial research question is a meta-question contesting the relevance of the concept of design aesthetics in design research in terms of the interest in practice methodology within design practice, the interest in understanding the object......) and speculative settings of employed concepts, and (ii) to investigate the methodological setting of how the research frame may be engaged in an overall framework of aesthetics while the participants simultaneously operate with the particular interests of their disciplines. After a presentation of the concept...

  6. Aura, Self, and Aesthetic Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Battani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic experiences are generated in encounters with cultural objects and such experiences are marked by the free play of cognitive and numinous experience unstructured by concepts. Kant’s famous three types of pleasure, made infamous in social theory by Pierre Bourdieu, are examined in relation to the critical theoretical concept of aura, the social psychology of “flow,” and cognitive explanations of perception to explain experience in aesthetic fields. Theories of aesthetic experience developed at the crossroad of critical social thought and cognitive science hold promise for a social analysis able to avoid the usual sociological pitfalls of either ignoring aesthetics or reducing it to structurally determined differences of taste.

  7. The Cleft Aesthetic Rating Scale for 18-Year-Old Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients: A Tool for Nasolabial Aesthetics Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, F J; Mosmuller, D G M; de Vet, H C W; Mouës, C M; Breugem, C C; van der Molen, A B Mink; Griot, J P W Don

    2016-12-20

      To develop a reliable and easy-to-use method to assess the nasolabial appearance of 18-year-old patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP).   Retrospective analysis of nasolabial aesthetics using a 5-point ordinal scale and newly developed photographic reference scale: the Cleft Aesthetic Rating Scale (CARS). Three cleft surgeons and 20 medical students scored the nasolabial appearance on standardized frontal photographs.   Medical Center X.   Inclusion criteria: 18-year-old patients, unilateral cleft lip and palate, available photograph of the frontal view. history of facial trauma, congenital syndromes affecting facial appearance. Eighty photographs were available for scoring.   The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the CARS for 18-year-old patients when used by cleft surgeons and medical students.   The interobserver reliability for the nose and lip together was 0.64 for the cleft surgeons and 0.61 for the medical students. There was an intraobserver reliability of 0.75 and 0.78 from the surgeons and students, respectively, on the nose and lip together. No significant difference was found between the cleft surgeons and medical students in the way they scored the nose (P = 0.22) and lip (P = 0.72).   The Cleft Aesthetic Rating Scale for 18-year-old patients has a substantial overall estimated reliability when the average score is taken from three or more cleft surgeons or medical students assessing the nasolabial aesthetics of CLP patients.

  8. Histopathological Basis of Different Anatomic Subunit of Facial Port-Wine Stain Treated by Pulsed Dye Laser%面部不同亚解剖区域葡萄酒色斑激光治疗效果差异的病理学基础

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于文心; 李伟; 周恒花; 林晓曦; 马刚; 仇雅璟; 陈辉; 金云波; 杨希; 胡晓洁; 王天佑; 常雷

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨面部不同亚解剖区域葡萄酒色斑(Port-wine stain,PWS)脉冲染料激光(Pulsed dye laser,PDL)治疗效果差异的病理学基础。方法6例患者按面部不同亚解剖区域(A、B区)行PWS的病理活检,对PWS血管的管径及深度进行测量,并给予脉冲染料激光治疗。术后2个月光度计测量(ΔE和Δa*值),进行疗效评估,并对各区域结果进行比较分析。结果患者均接受脉冲染料激光治疗,光度计测量示B区PWS的平均Δa*和ΔE值分别为(4.63±2.24)及(8.81±2.24),而A区PWS的平均Δa*及ΔE值分别为(-0.19±2.40)及(3.55±1.46),两者差异显著(P<0.05)。组织学表现示B区PWS扩张的血管主要分布于真皮浅层,而A区PWS扩张的血管分布于真皮浅层至深层,部分累及皮下。皮尔森相关系数显示PWS血管深度、血管管径与PDL疗效呈负相关。结论对同一位患者,相比于面部偏中心区域PWS, PDL对偏外周区域PWS具有更佳疗效;PWS血管的组织学差异特别是血管深度,可能是面部不同亚解剖区域PWS疗效差异的重要原因之一。%Objective To explore the histopathological basis of different anatomic subunit of facial port-wine stain (PWS) treated by pulsed dye laser (PDL) and to illustrate the possible explanation for the discrepancy of therapeutic efficacy. Meth-ods Six PWS patients had biopsies and underwent PDL treatments in different anatomic subunit of facial PWS (A and B area). The diameter and depth of PWS vessels were analyzed and the clinical efficacy were evaluated by chromameter assess-ment 2 months after treatment. Results All patients were treated on both sites, according to the chromameter evaluation, av-erageΔa*and averageΔE were 4.63±2.24 and 8.81±2.24 for B area, while-0.19±2.40 and 3.55±1.46 for A area respective-ly (P<0.05). Histopthological observation showed that ectatic vessels in B area were primarily distributed

  9. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) in Aesthetic Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytras, B.; Drozdowski, P.; Zub, K.

    2011-08-01

    Introduction. Newer and newer technologies have been widely developed in recent years due to increasing need for aesthetic medicine procedures. Less invasive methods of skin imperfection and time-related lesions removal, IPL (Intense Pulse Light) being one of them, are gaining more and more interest. The shorter the "downtime" for the patient is and the more efficient the procedure results, the more popular the method becomes. Materials and methods_Authors analyse the results of treatment of a 571 patients-group (501 women and 70 men) aged 5-72 years in the period: October 2006-August 2010. IPL™ Quantum (Lumenis Ltd.) device with 560 nm. cut-off filter was used. Results. The results were regarded as: very good, good or satisfying (%):Skin photoaging symptomes 37/40/23, Isolated facial dyschromia 30/55/25, Isolated facial erythema 62/34/4, Lower limbs teleangiectasia 12/36/52, Keratosis solaris on hands 100/-/-. Approximately half of the patients developed transitory erythema and 25%- transitory, mild, circumscribed oedema. Following undesirable effects were noted: skin thermal irritation (6,1% of the patients) and skin hypopigmentation (2% of the patients). Discussion. Results and post-treatment management proposed by authors are similar to those reported by other authors. Conclusions. Treatment results of the 571-patients group prove IPL to be a very efficient method of non-ablative skin rejuvenation. It turned out effective also in lower limbs teleangiectasia treatment. It presents low risk of transitory and mild side effects. Futhermore, with short or no downtime, it is well-tolerated by the patients.

  10. Surgical treatment of facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ritvik P

    2009-03-01

    The management of facial paralysis is one of the most complex areas of reconstructive surgery. Given the wide variety of functional and cosmetic deficits in the facial paralysis patient, the reconstructive surgeon requires a thorough understanding of the surgical techniques available to treat this condition. This review article will focus on surgical management of facial paralysis and the treatment options available for acute facial paralysis (facial paralysis (3 weeks to 2 yr) and chronic facial paralysis (>2 yr). For acute facial paralysis, the main surgical therapies are facial nerve decompression and facial nerve repair. For facial paralysis of intermediate duration, nerve transfer procedures are appropriate. For chronic facial paralysis, treatment typically requires regional or free muscle transfer. Static techniques of facial reanimation can be used for acute, intermediate, or chronic facial paralysis as these techniques are often important adjuncts to the overall management strategy.

  11. Facial Profile Characteristics Evaluation in a Population of Central Romania Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibelean (Cires-Marginean Manuela

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate the variables that define the facial profile of a sample of the population in the centre of Romania, and to compare male’s and female’s soft tissue profile. These values could be useful in elaborating the aesthetic objectives for treating the population in this area.

  12. The Two Sides of Beauty: Laterality and the Duality of Facial Attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Robert G., Jr.; Adams, Reginald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that facial attractiveness represents a dual judgment, a combination of reward-based, sexual processes, and aesthetic, cognitive processes. Herein we describe a study that demonstrates that sexual and nonsexual processes both contribute to attractiveness judgments and that these processes can be dissociated. Female participants…

  13. Understanding the Anatomy of the Upper Face When Providing Aesthetic Injection Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Tracey A

    2016-01-01

    Advanced rejuvenation procedures for the upper face are becoming increasingly popular for aesthetic providers but are considered a high-risk treatment area for dermal filler/contouring products. Risks may range from bruising, which is manageable, to blindness, most often irreversible. Detailed comprehension of the facial anatomy is imperative when performing aesthetic injections including neuromodulators and dermal filler/contouring products. Understanding the location and function of the muscles, as well as landmarking the blood vessels and nerves, will assist the aesthetic provider to perform safe, confident injection procedures. This article focuses on the upper face anatomy as identified by the author's cadaveric dissections and includes the treatment areas of the frontalis, temporalis, and glabellar complex. The author's next article for the Plastic Surgical Nursing journal will focus on the periorbital area.

  14. The role of facial proportion in hair restoration surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, D B; Schell, B J; Weyrich, R P

    1997-02-01

    Facial aesthetics involve basic artistic principles that relate individual features to the face as a whole. These principles, such as balance and proportion, are key elements in the development of hair restoration surgery and can be applied to reconstructive procedures for the trauma or burn patient. This paper describes the application of anthropometric and artistic principles used in hair reconstruction. Attention has been directed to the procedures used to determine hairline contour and placement, and certain aspects of frontotemporal recession management. The frontal hair has a profound effect on facial balance because of the major role hair plays in framing and visually enhancing the face. The presence of frontal hair and facial framing also serves to retain a vital element of autonomy in appearance for the individual.

  15. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively.

  16. ETHICAL CHALLENGES IN AESTHETIC DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius NEAGU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic dentistry is a branch of dentistry which aims primarily at improving patient’s physical appearance and, to a lesser extent, the functionality of teeth. This field raises particular ethical dilemmas and requires a careful evaluation of patient’s needs and wishes versus his/her clinical best interests. In this article, the authors discuss the main ethical challenges in the field of aesthetic dentistry in the light of the four “classical” principles of bioethics: autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. The authors conclude that the principles of medical ethics should be at the very foundation of the field of aesthetic dentistry, for establishing a patient-physician relationship which could lead to optimum clinical outcomes, while respecting the wishes of the patient and promoting his/her best interests.

  17. Movement in aesthetic form creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the good practice based experiences found when movement is used to strengthen form creation and to create flow in the process of artistic education. Faced with the design engineering students’ problems with creating forms with aesthetic statements, the experiences with movement...... inspired the thesis that the design engineers’ training in aesthetic form creation can be improved by integrating the movement potential into their education. The paper documents the on-going work on developing a model for embodied creation of form called ‘Somatechne model’. The study also identifies...... a lens to assess the students’ development of mind-body skills, known as ‘The Three Soma’. The Somatechne model also helps to identify the activity that gives the students the opportunity to develop their sensibility and thus aesthetic attention....

  18. Facial discrimination in body dysmorphic, obsessive-compulsive and social anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Claudia; Wiesendahl, Wiebke; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Stangier, Ulrich; Kathmann, Norbert; Buhlmann, Ulrike

    2016-02-28

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by preoccupation with perceived flaws in one's own appearance. Several risk factors such as aesthetic perceptual sensitivity have been proposed to explain BDD's unique symptomatology. Although research on facial discrimination is limited so far, the few existing studies have produced mixed results. Thus, the purpose of this study was to further examine facial discrimination in BDD. We administered a facial discrimination paradigm, which allows to assess the ability to identify slight to strong facial changes (e.g., hair loss, acne) when presented with an original (unmodified) facial image, relative to a changed (modified) facial image. The experiment was administered in individuals with BDD, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and mentally healthy controls (32 per group, respectively). Overall, groups did not differ with respect to their ability to correctly identify facial aberrations when presented with other people's faces. Our findings do not support the hypothesis of enhanced general aesthetic perceptual sensitivity in individuals with (vs. without) BDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Aesthetic Engagement in the City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Blanc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Translated from French by Miriam Rosen This article aims at showing how environmental aesthetics relates to the common environment, the ordinary environment that we discuss, share, and live in. Aesthetics has primarily been understood in relation to art and art history, but it has now been emancipated from this framework of interpretation. In the wake of John Dewey, aesthetics has become the problem of experience as ordinary sensitivity. One can even think that it is a question of adequately defining the world of sensitivity that rests on the faculty of perception: both the capacity to perceive and the concept of the perceptual commons that follows from this. The forms that are perceived could then very well be understood as those we have in common and that we discuss in questions of policy (formal commons. Arnold Berleant, in his essay "The Aesthetic Politics of Environment," explains: Such a vision brings us to the need for recognizing and shaping environment. It may be that the perceptual commons identifies the establishing conditions of the human environment, that is, of the human world, and that in shaping environment we are enhancing and making coherent all its participating constituents.[1] In the remarks that follow I would like to show just how much aesthetic engagement, involving active participation in the appreciative process, sometimes by overt physical action but always by creative perceptual involvement,[2] concerns urban lives and also, in spite of the eminently artificial nature of the urban environment, how much it draws on the depth of the perceptual experience involved. Indeed, if there is knowledge in our city-dwellers' gaze, it is not this erudition that gives the aesthetic experiences their depth and liveliness, but the human capacity to project ourselves into these environments, to feel connected to them ecologically.

  20. Facial wrinkles correction through autologous fat microinjection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Cháves Sánchez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: autologous fat microinjection is a technique which allows the correction of different dispositions that appear in the face in a very fast, effective and simple way compared to other procedures implying more pain, incisions, and elevated doses of anesthesia. Objective: to show the effectiveness of the autologous fat microinjection in the correction of facial wrinkles. Methods: a series study was carried out from May 2005 to May 2006 at the University Hospital “Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” in Cienfuegos city, Cuba. 60 patients of both sexes constituted this series study. They had facial wrinkles and this procedure was performed on them. Age, sex, patient’s race, localization and the type of wrinkle as well as the satisfaction level of the patient with the surgical procedure were analyzed. Results: Female sex was predominant, as well as white race and the ages from 45-50. A good aesthetic result was obtained. The satisfaction level of the patients was more elevated in short and medium terms. Conclusions: the level of satisfaction reached in the studied series reassure the advantages of the autologous fat microinjection technique so that, it is recommended for the elimination of facial wrinkles.

  1. Identification of Facial Shape by Applying Golden Ratio to the Facial Measurements: An Interracial Study in Malaysian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packiriswamy, Vasanthakumar; Kumar, Pramod; Rao, Mohandas

    2012-01-01

    Background: The “golden ratio” is considered as a universal facial aesthetical standard. Researcher's opinion that deviation from golden ratio can result in development of facial abnormalities. Aims: This study was designed to study the facial morphology and to identify individuals with normal, short, and long face. Materials and Methods: We studied 300 Malaysian nationality subjects aged 18-28 years of Chinese, Indian, and Malay extraction. The parameters measured were physiognomical facial height and width of face, and physiognomical facial index was calculated. Face shape was classified based on golden ratio. Independent t test was done to test the difference between sexes and among the races. Results: The mean values of the measurements and index showed significant sexual and interracial differences. Out of 300 subjects, the face shape was normal in 60 subjects, short in 224 subjects, and long in 16 subjects. Conclusion: As anticipated, the measurements showed variations according to gender and race. Only 60 subjects had a regular face shape, and remaining 240 subjects had irregular face shape (short and long). Since the short and long shape individuals may be at risk of developing various disorders, the knowledge of facial shapes in the given population is important for early diagnostic and treatment procedures. PMID:23272303

  2. Identification of facial shape by applying golden ratio to the facial measurements: an interracial study in malaysian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packiriswamy, Vasanthakumar; Kumar, Pramod; Rao, Mohandas

    2012-12-01

    The "golden ratio" is considered as a universal facial aesthetical standard. Researcher's opinion that deviation from golden ratio can result in development of facial abnormalities. This study was designed to study the facial morphology and to identify individuals with normal, short, and long face. We studied 300 Malaysian nationality subjects aged 18-28 years of Chinese, Indian, and Malay extraction. The parameters measured were physiognomical facial height and width of face, and physiognomical facial index was calculated. Face shape was classified based on golden ratio. Independent t test was done to test the difference between sexes and among the races. The mean values of the measurements and index showed significant sexual and interracial differences. Out of 300 subjects, the face shape was normal in 60 subjects, short in 224 subjects, and long in 16 subjects. As anticipated, the measurements showed variations according to gender and race. Only 60 subjects had a regular face shape, and remaining 240 subjects had irregular face shape (short and long). Since the short and long shape individuals may be at risk of developing various disorders, the knowledge of facial shapes in the given population is important for early diagnostic and treatment procedures.

  3. Environmental Aesthetics, Social Engagement and Aesthetic Experiences in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the Youth Theatre for Peace (YTP) project in relation to environmental aesthetics and engaged participatory practices towards tolerance building in Central Asia. My main argument is that cultural histories of storytelling, "manas" (an oral and now literary Kyrgyz epic) and trickster tales incorporate ideas and…

  4. North Korean Aesthetic Theory: Aesthetics, Beauty, and "Man"

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-West, Alzo

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetics is not a subject usually associated with North Korea in Western scholarship, the usual tropes being autocracy, counterfeiting, drugs, human-rights abuse, famine, nuclear weapons, party-military dictatorship, Stalinism, and totalitarianism. Where the arts are concerned, they are typically seen as crude political propaganda. One British…

  5. Embodied Aesthetics, Evocative Art Criticism: Aesthetically Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Boyd

    2011-01-01

    This study introduces one approach to arts-based research, one that emerges from aesthetic encounters and ensuing art criticism. Examples are drawn from one preservice teacher's attempts to write art criticism, both discursive and evocative, based on her personal responses to a chosen artwork. The articulation of her responses is a form of…

  6. Embodied Aesthetics, Evocative Art Criticism: Aesthetically Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Boyd

    2011-01-01

    This study introduces one approach to arts-based research, one that emerges from aesthetic encounters and ensuing art criticism. Examples are drawn from one preservice teacher's attempts to write art criticism, both discursive and evocative, based on her personal responses to a chosen artwork. The articulation of her responses is a form of…

  7. Facial Reconstruction and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Genther, Dane J; Byrne, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Extracranial infiltration of the facial nerve by salivary gland tumors is the most frequent cause of facial palsy secondary to malignancy. Nevertheless, facial palsy related to salivary gland cancer is uncommon. Therefore, reconstructive facial reanimation surgery is not a routine undertaking for most head and neck surgeons. The primary aims of facial reanimation are to restore tone, symmetry, and movement to the paralyzed face. Such restoration should improve the patient's objective motor function and subjective quality of life. The surgical procedures for facial reanimation rely heavily on long-established techniques, but many advances and improvements have been made in recent years. In the past, published experiences on strategies for optimizing functional outcomes in facial paralysis patients were primarily based on small case series and described a wide variety of surgical techniques. However, in the recent years, larger series have been published from high-volume centers with significant and specialized experience in surgical and nonsurgical reanimation of the paralyzed face that have informed modern treatment. This chapter reviews the most important diagnostic methods used for the evaluation of facial paralysis to optimize the planning of each individual's treatment and discusses surgical and nonsurgical techniques for facial rehabilitation based on the contemporary literature.

  8. [Facial tics and spasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieser, Adriaan R E; van Dijk, J Marc C; Elting, Jan Willem J; de Koning-Tijssen, Marina A J

    2014-01-01

    Facial tics and spasms are socially incapacitating, but effective treatment is often available. The clinical picture is sufficient for distinguishing between the different diseases that cause this affliction.We describe three cases of patients with facial tics or spasms: one case of tics, which are familiar to many physicians; one case of blepharospasms; and one case of hemifacial spasms. We discuss the differential diagnosis and the treatment possibilities for facial tics and spasms. Early diagnosis and treatment is important, because of the associated social incapacitation. Botulin toxin should be considered as a treatment option for facial tics and a curative neurosurgical intervention should be considered for hemifacial spasms.

  9. History of facial pain diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M; Jensen, Troels S

    2017-01-01

    Premise Facial pain refers to a heterogeneous group of clinically and etiologically different conditions with the common clinical feature of pain in the facial area. Among these conditions, trigeminal neuralgia (TN), persistent idiopathic facial pain, temporomandibular joint pain, and trigeminal...

  10. Designers as the Determinants of Aesthetic Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin; Alkærsig, Lars

    Aesthetic innovations have become increasingly important appropriation mechanisms for firms. Since 2003, the number of design patent applications (to protect aesthetic innovations) has tripled compared to doubling in the numbers of both patent and trademark applications. However, despite the grow......Aesthetic innovations have become increasingly important appropriation mechanisms for firms. Since 2003, the number of design patent applications (to protect aesthetic innovations) has tripled compared to doubling in the numbers of both patent and trademark applications. However, despite...

  11. Exploring the Aesthetics of Sustainable Fashion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    , sustainable fashion. In programming the didactical setting for the students’ projects, several aesthetics must be considered: the aesthetic codes of the textile and fashion design discipline, both in terms of materials and expression, deriving from within the design practice itself and the aesthetic codes...

  12. Holding Aesthetics and Ideology in Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncum, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Studying imagery, irrespective of the kind, must focus equally upon its aesthetic attractiveness, its sensory lures, and its oftentimes dubious social ideology. The terms "aesthetic" and "ideology" are addressed as problematic and are defined in current, ordinary language terms: aesthetics as visual appearances and their effects and ideology as a…

  13. Designers as Determinant for Aesthetic Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin; Alkærsig, Lars

    2015-01-01

    a designer does increase firms? likelihood of producing aesthetic innovations. Secondly, firms with prior experience of aesthetic innovations are more likely to apply for design registrations. Thirdly, there is a positive moderating effect of firms with prior experience of generating aesthetic innovations...

  14. Cognitive aesthetics of alchemical imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Angela M

    2013-02-01

    Jung's contribution to the understanding of the relevance of psychology to alchemy has become increasingly invalidated by the ahistorical nature of his approach, just as his tendency to ignore the importance of cognitive aesthetics for an improved comprehension of the functions of alchemical images has prevented Jungians from further extending Jung's insight of the importance of alchemy for psychology. This paper explores the history of the development of alchemical illustrations in Western Europe from the 14(th) to the 16(th) century, tracing the emergent processes over time. It is only when we take into consideration the historical dimension and the aesthetics of alchemical imagery that it becomes possible to demonstrate how the increasing use of certain aesthetic techniques such as the disjunction and recombination of separate metaphorical elements of previous illustrations, the use of compressive combinations and the use of framing devices worked to gradually increase the cognitive function and the symbolical power of the images. If alchemy is still relevant to psychotherapy it is exactly because it helps us to understand the importance of cognitive aesthetics in our approach to the images, metaphors and narratives of our patients.

  15. Lip asymmetry and smile aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batwa, Waeil; McDonald, Fraser; Cash, Alex

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To determine if lip asymmetry can affect lip aesthetics. Setting and Participants : A group of dentists (n = 40) and cleft patients (n = 40) were recruited from the dental hospital and cleft service. Interventions : Still photographic digital images of lips and teeth were manipulated to produce a computerized gradient of smile appearance with different degrees of upper-lip vertical asymmetry. These five photographs (with 0 mm representing "symmetry," and 1, 2, 2.5, and 3 mm, asymmetries) were assessed by participants using a 5-point Likert scale. Statistics : Descriptive statistics in addition to chi-square test were used to analyze the data. In order to satisfy the requirement of the chi-square test, the five smile ratings were reduced to three. Results : Lip asymmetry did affect relative smile aesthetics, as determined by dentists and cleft patients. Both the dentists and cleft patients rated the 0-mm photograph more attractive than the 2.5-mm and 3-mm smiles (P aesthetics. However, cleft patients and dentists were tolerant of minor asymmetries. This suggests that small degrees of lip asymmetry do not affect relative smile aesthetics as much as large degrees of lip asymmetry (2.5 mm or more).

  16. Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Ranciere. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Ranciere's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a…

  17. Aesthetic Adaptation in Translating Poetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽艳

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore the strategy of adaptation,in particular,the method of naturalizing and historicizing,in the translation of poetry to maintain the aesthetic meaning.Theoretical support from Susan Bassnett,James Holmes and others is applied and example lines from both Chinese and English verses are given.

  18. Bridge Aesthetics and Structural Honesty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In bridges the overall form must be chosen with due respect to the transmission of forces if efficient structures shall be created, The design must therefore be governed by experienced structural engineers - in some cases assisted by aesthetic advisers on specific issues. Some basic requirements...

  19. Bioeconomy analysis in Aesthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Dana Tudose

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioeconomy is currently an area of great and mighty power development. High complexity of this field is to combine the use of technologies that use biological resources in the range of human values involved. This study requires that objective SWOT analysis applied in dental esthetics with strict reference to the quality of work in relation to aesthetic and functional effectiveness of the treatment, the life, the method of reconstruction, working technique, the degree of invasiveness of treatment in relation to conservation dental tissues ,execution costs, costs of resources used in dental anterior segment reconstruction and economic analysis of the modalities of treatment techniques reported the need and level of understanding of patients on treatment aesthetic-functional complexity. As material and method took into account the interaction of four factors: Strenghts-Weaknesses-Opportunities -Hazards. In group “Strengths” we have included successful treatment aesthetic-functional execution moderate cost, short time working on the seat, which shows limited use of natural resources. In group “Weaknesses” I included invasiveness of biological treatment, increased during execution of the work, aesthetic-functional failure , lack of training practitioners in dental aesthetics, lack of existant cabinets to promote interest in aesthetic dental medicine. “Op-portunities” referred to the minimally invasive treatment of dental tissue in existing clinical context with predictable results, as higher interest of patients for dental esthetics, raising the standard of care internationally. on group “Risks” (threats I listed: low resistance while works (weak predictability, decreasing purchasing power, changing customer preferences, increase service quality standards. In the second chapter we presented a report on the economic analysis - term labor - cost - average degree of patient satisfaction . In order to establish an economic plan to make a

  20. [Patients' decision for aesthetic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fansa, H; Haller, S

    2011-12-01

    Aesthetic surgery is a service which entails a high degree of trust. Service evaluation prior to provision is difficult for the patient. This leads to the question of how to manage the service successfully while still focusing on the medical needs. The decision to undergo an operation is not influenced by the operation itself, but by preoperative events which induce the patient to have the operation done. According to "buying decisions" for products or in service management, the decision for an aesthetic operation is extensive; the patient is highly involved and actively searching for information using different directed sources of information. The real "buying decision" consists of 5 phases: problem recognition, gathering of information, alternative education, purchase decision, and post purchase behaviour. A retrospective survey of 40 female patients who have already undergone an aesthetic operation assessed for problem recognition, which types of information were collected prior to the appointment with the surgeon, and why the patients have had the operation at our hospital. They were also asked how many alternative surgeons they had been seen before. Most of the patients had been thinking about undergoing an operation for several years. They mainly used the web for their research and were informed by other (non-aesthetic) physicians/general practitioners. Requested information was about the aesthetic results and possible problems and complications. Patients came based on web information and because of recommendations from other physicians. 60% of all interviewees did not see another surgeon and decided to have the operation because of positive patient-doctor communication and the surgeon's good reputation. Competence was considered to be the most important quality of the surgeon. However, the attribute was judged on subjective parameters. Environment, office rooms and staff were assessed as important but not very important. Costs of surgery were ranked second

  1. Magic and the aesthetic illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, Leon

    2002-01-01

    The aesthetic illusion is the subjective experience that the content of a work of art is reality. It has an intrinsic relation to magic, an intrapsychic maneuver oriented toward modification and control of the extraspyschic world, principally through ego functioning. Magic is ontogenetically and culturally archaic, expresses the omnipotence inherent in primary narcissism, and operates according to the logic of the primary process. Magic is a constituent of all ego functioning, usually latent in later development. It may persist as an archaic feature or may be evoked regressively in global or circumscribed ways. It causes a general disinhibition of instincts and impulses attended by a sense of confidence, exhiliration, and exuberance. The aesthetic illusion is a combination of illusions: (1) that the daydream embodied by the work of art is the beholder's own, the artist being ignored, and (2) that the artistically described protagonist is a real person with a real "world." The first illusion arises through the beholder's emotional-instinctual gratification from his or her own fantasy-memory constellations; the second comes about because the beholder, by taking the protagonist as proxy, mobilizes the subjective experience of the imaginary protagonist's "reality." The first illusion is necessary for the second to take place; the second establishes the aesthetic illusion proper. Both illusions are instances of magic. Accordingly, the aesthetic illusion is accompanied by a heady experience of excitement and euphoria. The relation among the aesthetic illusion, magic, and enthusiasm is illustrated by an analytic case, J. D. Salinger's "The Laughing Man," Woody Allen's Play It Again, Sam, Don Quixote, and the medieval Cult of the Saints.

  2. Facial expression and sarcasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, P

    2001-08-01

    This study examined facial expression in the presentation of sarcasm. 60 responses (sarcastic responses = 30, nonsarcastic responses = 30) from 40 different speakers were coded by two trained coders. Expressions in three facial areas--eyebrow, eyes, and mouth--were evaluated. Only movement in the mouth area significantly differentiated ratings of sarcasm from nonsarcasm.

  3. Holistic facial expression classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, John; McDonald, J.

    2005-06-01

    This paper details a procedure for classifying facial expressions. This is a growing and relatively new type of problem within computer vision. One of the fundamental problems when classifying facial expressions in previous approaches is the lack of a consistent method of measuring expression. This paper solves this problem by the computation of the Facial Expression Shape Model (FESM). This statistical model of facial expression is based on an anatomical analysis of facial expression called the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). We use the term Action Unit (AU) to describe a movement of one or more muscles of the face and all expressions can be described using the AU's described by FACS. The shape model is calculated by marking the face with 122 landmark points. We use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to analyse how the landmark points move with respect to each other and to lower the dimensionality of the problem. Using the FESM in conjunction with Support Vector Machines (SVM) we classify facial expressions. SVMs are a powerful machine learning technique based on optimisation theory. This project is largely concerned with statistical models, machine learning techniques and psychological tools used in the classification of facial expression. This holistic approach to expression classification provides a means for a level of interaction with a computer that is a significant step forward in human-computer interaction.

  4. Facial talon cusps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, T

    1997-12-01

    This is a report of two patients with isolated facial talon cusps. One occurred on a permanent mandibular central incisor; the other on a permanent maxillary canine. The locations of these talon cusps suggests that the definition of a talon cusp include teeth in addition to the incisor group and be extended to include the facial aspect of teeth.

  5. The SOOF lift: its role in correcting midfacial and lower facial asymmetry in patients with partial facial palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlock, Nigel; Sanders, Roy; Harrison, Douglas H

    2002-03-01

    Subperiosteal face lifting has gained wide acceptance in aesthetic surgical practice. It may also have a role to play in patients with partial facial palsy. These patients demonstrate poor static position of the mouth but maintain some degree of facial movement. This study examined the role of subperiosteal facial suspension as an alternative treatment modality in this patient group. In this series, five patients with varying degrees of partial facial palsy underwent subperiosteal face lifting, including sub-orbicularis oculi fat elevation via a temporal, lower lid, and buccal approach, thereby mobilizing and elevating and suspending the zygomaticus major and levator labii superioris muscles on the facial skeleton. An attempt was made to categorize the patients according to overall House-Brackmann score. It was not possible to precisely classify the patients by this method, although the approximate scores were two patients scoring 3, two patients scoring 4, and one patient scoring 5. To overcome inconsistencies with this method, the degree of static and dynamic asymmetry of the mouth and also the excursion of the mouth were graded separately. Four patients with mild to moderate dynamic and static asymmetry (House-Brackmann score of approximately 3 and 4) who maintained excellent or good excursion of the mouth achieved excellent or good results. One patient with poor excursion and severe partial facial palsy (House-Brackmann score of 5) was improved but remained markedly asymmetric (follow-up, 4 months to 1 year). Subperiosteal face lifting is a useful therapeutic modality for management of selected patients with mild partial facial palsy. These patients demonstrate asymmetric static position but maintain some degree of muscle excursion. Patients with severe facial palsies with poor muscle excursion continue to require muscle transfer or sling procedures. The authors hope that long-term follow-up will confirm the sustained effect of midfacial suspension in this

  6. Neutralizing antibodies to botulinum neurotoxin type A in aesthetic medicine: five case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Torres,1 Mark Hamilton,2 Elena Sanches,4 Polina Starovatova,3 Elena Gubanova,3 Tatiana Reshetnikova51Di Stefano Velona Clinic, Catania, Italy; 2Hamilton Face Clinic, Dublin, Ireland; 3Preventive Medicine Clinic "Vallex M", Moscow, Russia; 4EKLAN Co Ltd Medical Center for Aesthetic Correction, Moscow, Russia; 5Department of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, State Medical University, Novosibirsk, RussiaAbstract: Botulinum neurotoxin injections are a valuable treatment modality for many therapeutic indications as well as in the aesthetic field for facial rejuvenation. As successful treatment requires repeated injections over a long period of time, secondary resistance to botulinum toxin preparations after repeated injections is an ongoing concern. We report five case studies in which neutralizing antibodies to botulinum toxin type A developed after injection for aesthetic use and resulted in secondary treatment failure. These results add to the growing number of reports in the literature for secondary treatment failure associated with high titers of neutralizing antibodies in the aesthetic field. Clinicians should be aware of this risk and implement injection protocols that minimize resistance development.Keywords: aesthetic medicine, botulinum neurotoxin type A, neutralizing antibody, secondary treatment failure

  7. Ethical issues in Chinese aesthetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Shuai; Dong, Ming-Min; Liu, Lin-Bo; Hu, Xiao-Ying

    2014-10-01

    Guided by the medical ethics principles of "four principles plus scope," Chinese aesthetic medical practitioners have proposed some extremely valuable ethical principles combined with the construction of aesthetic medicine and the requirements of clinical practice such as the principle of general nonmaleficence, the principle of local minimal invasiveness, the principle of informed consent, and the principle of respect and confidentiality. Chinese aesthetic surgical ethics provide valuable guidance for the practice of aesthetic medicine. Adherence to the ethics of Chinese aesthetic surgery provides an essential guide for the practice of aesthetic medicine in China. These principles protect both the medical practitioner and the patient, helping them to avoid unnecessary risks and disputes and ultimately promoting the sustainable development of aesthetic medicine.

  8. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  9. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Meek, Marcel F.

    2009-01-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two

  10. Use of rapidly hardening hydroxyapatite cement for facial contouring surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Ji Ye; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2010-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite cement is an ideal alloplastic material to replace the autogenous bone grafts in craniofacial surgery. Hydroxyapatite cement is advantageous because it can be easily molded by hand unlike other alloplastic materials such as silicone and high-density polyethylene. For aesthetic applications of hydroxyapatite cement, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of the rapidly hardening hydroxyapatite cement used in facial contour augmentation, especially for the forehead and the malar area. A total of 18 cases of facial skeleton augmentation or contouring surgery using rapidly hardening hydroxyapatite cement (Mimix; Biomet, Warsaw, IN) were examined, and the long-term cosmetic results and any complications were also analyzed. The aims of facial contouring surgeries were to correct the following conditions: hemifacial microsomia, craniosynostosis, posttraumatic facial deformity, deformity after tumor resection, dentofacial deformity, and Romberg disease. The application sites of hydroxyapatite cement were the forehead, malar area, chin, and paranasal area. A mean of 16 g (range, 5-50 g) of the hydroxyapatite cement was used. Postoperative infection, seroma, and migration of the implant were not observed during the follow-up period of 23 months. Rapidly hardening hydroxyapatite cement, Mimix, is easy to manipulate, promptly sclerotized, and can be replaced by living bone tissue, with a low complication rate. Therefore, it can be an optimal treatment that can be used instead of other conventional types of alloplastic materials used in facial contouring surgery.

  11. Live facial feature extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO JieYu

    2008-01-01

    Precise facial feature extraction is essential to the high-level face recognition and expression analysis. This paper presents a novel method for the real-time geomet-ric facial feature extraction from live video. In this paper, the input image is viewed as a weighted graph. The segmentation of the pixels corresponding to the edges of facial components of the mouth, eyes, brows, and nose is implemented by means of random walks on the weighted graph. The graph has an 8-connected lattice structure and the weight value associated with each edge reflects the likelihood that a random walker will cross that edge. The random walks simulate an anisot-ropic diffusion process that filters out the noise while preserving the facial expres-sion pixels. The seeds for the segmentation are obtained from a color and motion detector. The segmented facial pixels are represented with linked lists in the origi-nal geometric form and grouped into different parts corresponding to facial com-ponents. For the convenience of implementing high-level vision, the geometric description of facial component pixels is further decomposed into shape and reg-istration information. Shape is defined as the geometric information that is invari-ant under the registration transformation, such as translation, rotation, and iso-tropic scale. Statistical shape analysis is carried out to capture global facial fea-tures where the Procrustes shape distance measure is adopted. A Bayesian ap-proach is used to incorporate high-level prior knowledge of face structure. Ex-perimental results show that the proposed method is capable of real-time extraction of precise geometric facial features from live video. The feature extraction is robust against the illumination changes, scale variation, head rotations, and hand inter-ference.

  12. Aristotle's Aesthetic Thoughts in Tragedy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿利红

    2010-01-01

    @@ Aristotle is the greatest thinker and profound scholar in ancient Greece,who inherits the philosophy achievements of ancient Greece since Thales,especially the fruits of Plato'S thought.His inheritance takes criticism as the basis and innovation as the objective.Poetics has long been known as the foundation-laying work in the history of western literary theory among the most works of Aristotle.In Poetics,tragedy is focused by Aristotle.He attaches more importance to tragedy,analyzes its artistic features and elements to show its aesthetic significance and value.This is not simply to discuss the artistic technique but to discuss his aesthetic thoughts in tragedy.

  13. PCA facial expression recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hori, Inas H.; El-Momen, Zahraa K.; Ganoun, Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. The comparative study of Facial Expression Recognition (FER) techniques namely Principal Component's analysis (PCA) and PCA with Gabor filters (GF) is done. The objective of this research is to show that PCA with Gabor filters is superior to the first technique in terms of recognition rate. To test and evaluates their performance, experiments are performed using real database by both techniques. The universally accepted five principal emotions to be recognized are: Happy, Sad, Disgust and Angry along with Neutral. The recognition rates are obtained on all the facial expressions.

  14. HD aesthetics and digital cinematography

    OpenAIRE

    Flaxton, T.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is accompanied by a series of online interviews entitled ‘A Verbatim History of the Aesthetics, Technology and Techniques of Digital Cinematography’. This online resource seeks to circumscribe and circumlocute the wide variety of interests and usages of incoming digital media with specific relation to the effects of increased resolution being offered by emerging digital technologies and can be found here: www.visualfields.co.uk/indexHDresource.htm

  15. The ethics of aesthetic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Mousavi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in plastic and reconstructive surgery have revolutionized the management of patients suffering from disfiguring congenital abnormalities, burns and skin cancers. The demand for aesthetic surgery has increased in recent years, as our culture has become more concerned with image and appearance. Several ethical considerations such as patient′s right for informed counseling, beneficience and maleficience need to be given careful consideration.

  16. Bridge Aesthetics and Structural Honesty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In bridges the overall form must be chosen with due respect to the transmission of forces if efficient structures shall be created, The design must therefore be governed by experienced structural engineers - in some cases assisted by aesthetic advisers on specific issues. Some basic requirements...... decisive for choosing the form of trusses, arches and cable-stayed bridges are outlined, and several examples show bridges designed without giving priority to the structural aspects....

  17. Surgical Treatment of Facial Paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Ritvik P.

    2009-01-01

    The management of facial paralysis is one of the most complex areas of reconstructive surgery. Given the wide variety of functional and cosmetic deficits in the facial paralysis patient, the reconstructive surgeon requires a thorough understanding of the surgical techniques available to treat this condition. This review article will focus on surgical management of facial paralysis and the treatment options available for acute facial paralysis (2 yr). For acute facial paralysis, the main surgi...

  18. Persistent facial pain conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forssell, Heli; Alstergren, Per; Bakke, Merete

    2016-01-01

    , clinical features, consequences, central and peripheral mechanisms, diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD), and principles of management. For each of the neuropathic facial pain entities, the definitions, prevalence, clinical features, and diagnostics are described. The current understanding of the pathophysiology......Persistent facial pains, especially temporomandibular disorders (TMD), are common conditions. As dentists are responsible for the treatment of most of these disorders, up-to date knowledge on the latest advances in the field is essential for successful diagnosis and management. The review covers...... TMD, and different neuropathic or putative neuropathic facial pains such as persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia, trigeminal neuralgia and painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy. The article presents an overview of TMD pain as a biopsychosocial condition, its prevalence...

  19. Persistent facial pain conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forssell, Heli; Alstergren, Per; Bakke, Merete

    2016-01-01

    TMD, and different neuropathic or putative neuropathic facial pains such as persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia, trigeminal neuralgia and painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy. The article presents an overview of TMD pain as a biopsychosocial condition, its prevalence......Persistent facial pains, especially temporomandibular disorders (TMD), are common conditions. As dentists are responsible for the treatment of most of these disorders, up-to date knowledge on the latest advances in the field is essential for successful diagnosis and management. The review covers......, clinical features, consequences, central and peripheral mechanisms, diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD), and principles of management. For each of the neuropathic facial pain entities, the definitions, prevalence, clinical features, and diagnostics are described. The current understanding of the pathophysiology...

  20. Persistent facial pain conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forssell, Heli; Alstergren, Per; Bakke, Merete;

    2016-01-01

    , clinical features, consequences, central and peripheral mechanisms, diagnostic criteria (DC/TMD), and principles of management. For each of the neuropathic facial pain entities, the definitions, prevalence, clinical features, and diagnostics are described. The current understanding of the pathophysiology...

  1. Management of facial blushing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Peter B; Pilegaard, Hans K

    2008-01-01

    people. Side effects are frequent, but most patients are satisfied with the operation. In the short term, the key to success in sympathetic surgery for facial blushing lies in a meticulous and critical patient selection and in ensuring that the patient is thoroughly informed about the high risk of side...... effects. In the long term, the key to success in sympathetic surgery for facial blushing lies in more quality research comparing surgical, pharmacologic, and psychotherapeutic treatments....

  2. Simultaneous facial feature tracking and facial expression recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; Wang, Shangfei; Zhao, Yongping; Ji, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    The tracking and recognition of facial activities from images or videos have attracted great attention in computer vision field. Facial activities are characterized by three levels. First, in the bottom level, facial feature points around each facial component, i.e., eyebrow, mouth, etc., capture the detailed face shape information. Second, in the middle level, facial action units, defined in the facial action coding system, represent the contraction of a specific set of facial muscles, i.e., lid tightener, eyebrow raiser, etc. Finally, in the top level, six prototypical facial expressions represent the global facial muscle movement and are commonly used to describe the human emotion states. In contrast to the mainstream approaches, which usually only focus on one or two levels of facial activities, and track (or recognize) them separately, this paper introduces a unified probabilistic framework based on the dynamic Bayesian network to simultaneously and coherently represent the facial evolvement in different levels, their interactions and their observations. Advanced machine learning methods are introduced to learn the model based on both training data and subjective prior knowledge. Given the model and the measurements of facial motions, all three levels of facial activities are simultaneously recognized through a probabilistic inference. Extensive experiments are performed to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed model on all three level facial activities.

  3. Designers as determinants for aesthetic innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin; Alkærsig, Lars

    The innovation literature states that scientists are core ingredients in creating technological innovations. This paper investigates whether the hiring of a designer generates aesthetic innovations by a firm. Further we investigate what the level of design knowledge of the receiving firm means...... for the firms’ absorptive capacity, in terms of turning the hiring of the designer into aesthetic innovations. We explore a unique dataset containing information on firms, their hiring of designers and aesthetic innovations measured by design applications (design patents). Our findings show that hiring...... a designer does increase firms’ likelihood of producing aesthetic innovations. Secondly, firms with prior experience of aesthetic innovations are more likely to apply for design registrations. Thirdly, there is a positive moderating effect of firms with prior experience of generating aesthetic innovations...

  4. Designers as the Determinants of Aesthetic Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin

    Aesthetic innovations have become increasingly important appropriation mechanisms for firms. Since 2003, the number of design patent applications (to protect aesthetic innovations) has tripled compared to doubling in the numbers of both patent and trademark applications. However, despite the grow...... findings show that hiring a designer does increase the likelihood of producing an aesthetic innovation. Hence, designers re a determinant of aesthetic innovations. However, in order to benefit fully from hiring a designer the firm needs prior experience in aesthetic innovation....... the growing interest of firms in aesthetic innovations, knowledge on the ir determinants is limited. Work on labor mobility with in the innovation studies literature focuses mainly on discussion of scientists as crucial for creating technological innovations. This paper adds to work on labor mobility...

  5. Classifying Facial Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  6. Negative regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor on free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fugao Zhu; Dawei Sun; Yanqing Wang; Rui Zhou; Junfeng Wen; Xiuming Wan; Yanjun Wang; Banghua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca2+ overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an important inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, exists in the facial nerve nucleus. It is assumed that GABA negatively regulates free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus. The present study investigated GABA type A (GABAA) receptor expression in the facial nerve nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, as well as the regulatory effects of GABAA receptor on nicotinic receptor response following facial nerve injury. Subunits α1, α3, α5, β1, β2, δ, and γ3 of GABAA receptors were expressed in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury. In addition, GABAA receptor expression significantly inhibited the increase in nicotinic receptor-mediated free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results suggest that GABAA receptors exhibit negative effects on nicotinic receptor responses following facial nerve injury.

  7. Discrimination of facial appearance stimuli in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangier, Ulrich; Adam-Schwebe, Stefanie; Müller, Thomas; Wolter, Manfred

    2008-05-01

    Cognitive-behavioral models of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) propose that information-processing biases--in particular, selective attention to a defect in one's appearance as well as improved aesthetical perception--might contribute to the development or maintenance of the disorder. In the present study, the authors tested the hypothesis that patients with BDD discriminate facial appearance stimuli more accurately than controls. Sixty female patients from a dermatological clinic participated in the study: 21 patients with BDD, 19 patients with disfiguring dermatological conditions, and 20 patients with nondisfiguring dermatological disorders. Participants rated dissimilarities between pictures of neutral faces that had been manipulated with regard to aesthetic characteristics. Manipulation ratings of participants with BDD were significantly more accurate than those of both control groups. Implications of these results for cognitive theories of BDD are discussed.

  8. Facial paralysis and the role of free muscle transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuker, R M

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis can have significant functional, psychological and aesthetic concerns that alter the lives of our patients. These effects can be functional, affecting the eye, nose and mouth, or aesthetic, affecting the symmetry of the face and particularly the mimetic function of smile. Several reanimation procedures have been described to address this. In this chapter, we will outline our technique for reanimation utilizing segmental gracilis muscle transplants to the face. These are innervated either by the contralateral normal 7th nerve via a cross face nerve graft, or a different ipsilateral motor where no 7th nerve is available or would not produce the required result. The other ipsilateral motor that we have found extremely effective is the motor nerve to masseter. This can power a segmental gracilis muscle transplant and lead to excursion that is near normal. These techniques will be described in detail.

  9. Domain specificity and mental chronometry in empirical aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    This article is a commentary on 'Ten years of a model of aesthetic appreciation and aesthetic judgments: The aesthetic episode - developments and challenges in empirical aesthetics' (Leder & Nadal, 2014, this issue). It focuses on domain specificity and mental chronometry in empirical aesthetics.

  10. Aesthetics and function in web design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    Since the origin of the web site in the first part of the 90’s there has been discussions regarding the relative weighting of function and aesthetics. A renewed discussion is needed, however, to clarify what exactly is meant by aesthetics in web design. Moreover the balance between aesthetics...... and function ought to be considered more in respect to the target group and the genre of web site....

  11. Aesthetics and function in web design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    Since the origin of the web site in the first part of the 90’s there has been discussions regarding the relative weighting of function and aesthetics. A renewed discussion is needed, however, to clarify what exactly is meant by aesthetics in web design. Moreover the balance between aesthetics...... and function ought to be considered more in respect to the target group and the genre of web site....

  12. The Theological Aesthetics of Jonathan Edwards

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, Kin Yip

    2007-01-01

    This is a study of the theological aesthetics of Jonathan Edwards. Previous studies of Edwards’ aesthetics tend to pass over doctrinal issues and address Edwards mostly within a philosophical context. In this treatment, the aesthetics of Edwards is examined within an explicitly theological framework. The definitions of beauty offered by several Enlightenment philosophers known to Edwards (Shaftesbury, Addison, Hutcheson) are explored. Edwards creatively integrates from these...

  13. Leadership and Management in Aesthetic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Connie

    2016-01-01

    The aesthetic provider is obligated to leverage their leadership, management, and teamwork skills on a daily basis in order to deliver optimum aesthetic outcomes for their clients. This article discusses leadership and motivational theories, leadership and management traits, complexity theory, Gardner's tasks of leadership, and the role of emotional intelligence in leading, managing, and following, so the aesthetic provider can identify and align with a particular leadership and management style that suits their practice philosophy.

  14. Introduction: Aesthetics after the Speculative Turn

    OpenAIRE

    Askin, Ridvan; Hägler, Andreas; Schweighauser, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Ever since the turn of the century aesthetics has steadily gained momentum as a central field of study across the disciplines. No longer sidelined, aesthetics has grown in confidence. While this recent development brings with it a return to the work of the canonical authors (most notably Baumgarten and Kant), some contemporary scholars reject the traditional focus on epistemology and theorize aesthetics in its ontological connotations. It is according to this shift that speculative realists h...

  15. Secondary surgery in paediatric facial paralysis reanimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Olivares, Fatima S

    2010-11-01

    Ninety-two children, the entire series of paediatric facial reanimation by a single surgeon over thirty years, are presented. The objective is to analyse the incidence and value of secondary revisions for functional and aesthetic refinements following the two main stages of reanimation. The reconstructive strategy varied according to the denervation time, the aetiology, and whether the paralysis was uni- or bilateral, complete or partial. Irrespective of these variables, 89% of the patients required secondary surgery. Post-operative videos were available in seventy-two cases. Four independent observers graded patients' videos using a scale from poor to excellent. The effect of diverse secondary procedures was measured computing a mean-percent-gain score. Statistical differences between treatment groups means were tested by the t-test and one-way ANOVA. Two-thirds of the corrective and ancillary techniques utilized granted significantly higher mean-scores post-secondary surgery. A comparison of pre- and post-operative data found valuable improvements in all three facial zones after secondary surgery. In conclusion, inherent to dynamic procedures is the need for secondary revisions. Secondary surgery builds in the potential of reanimation surgery, effectively augmenting functional faculties and aesthesis.

  16. Designers as determinant for aesthetic innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin; Alkærsig, Lars

    This paper investigates whether the hiring of a designer generates aesthetic innovations by a firm and what the level of design knowledge of the receiving firm means for the firms’ absorptive capacity in terms of turning the hiring of the designer into aesthetic innovations. We explore a unique d...... innovations are more likely to apply for design registrations. Thirdly, there is a positive moderating effect of firms with prior experience of generating aesthetic innovations on the effect of hiring a designer on aesthetic innovation outcome....

  17. The Role of Aesthetics for Design Phenomenology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    The aim of the paper is to conceptualize the means and effects of different dimensions of aesthetic meaning in relation to the experience of design. In doing so, the paper combines two philosophical interests in design, design phenomenology and design aesthetics, in order to promote a framework...... for discussing the impact of aesthetic meaning construction on experience. First, the paper raises the phenomenological question of the relationship between design and experience, specifically, how design conditions experience. Second, in looking at aesthetics in terms of a) the sensual appeal of design, b...

  18. Aesthetic Value of Trademark Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈佳

    2016-01-01

    Trademarks and trademark, as a part of language, are unavoidably influenced and restricted by the cultures of various countries and nationalities. Through trademark, we can get abundant implications of social history and culture. Language is the most important tool of information transmission. It can not only convey sentence and semantic information, but also carry additional contents of society and culture. In order to meet the increasingly competitive demands of market, in addition to express detailed information of commodity, the differences of aesthetic psychology between diverse cultural customers shall be taken into consideration when naming modern brand names.

  19. Evolutionary Aesthetics and Print Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Luczaj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the extent to which predictions based on the theory of evolutionary aesthetics are utilized by the advertising industry. The purpose of a comprehensive content analysis of print advertising is to determine whether the items indicated by evolutionists such as animals, flowers, certain types of landscapes, beautiful humans, and some colors are part of real advertising strategies. This article has shown that many evolutionary hypotheses (although not all of them are supported by empirical data. Along with these hypotheses, some inferences from Bourdieu’s cultural capital theory were tested. It turned out that advertising uses both biological schemata and cultural patterns to make an image more likable.

  20. The Aesthetic Experience of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2005-01-01

    The use of sound in (3D) computer games basically falls in two. Sound is used as an element in the design of the set and as a narrative. As set design sound stages the nature of the environment, it brings it to life. As a narrative it brings us information that we can choose to or perhaps need to...... exploration of the virtual space laid out before him is pertinent. In this mood of exploration sound is important and heavily contributing to the aesthetic of the experience....

  1. Aesthetics and Anthropology of Megacities

    OpenAIRE

    Krieger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the aesthetic and anthropological research on the image of the megacities in the early 21st century, focusing on the case of Mexico City. Since art history has been revised and developed towards a “science of the image” —Bildwissenschaft in German—, objects and methods of research have been widely extended, so that even a topic like “megacities”, formerly monopolized by sociology, geography and economical studies, can be accepted as a contribution to our discipline. Aest...

  2. Neuropsychology of Aesthetic Judgment of Ambiguous and Non-Ambiguous Artworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maddalena; Barbetti, Sonia; Piccardi, Laura; Guariglia, Cecilia; Giannini, Anna Maria

    2017-03-18

    Several affective and cognitive processes have been found to be pivotal in affecting aesthetic experience of artworks and both neuropsychological as well as psychiatric symptoms have been found to affect artistic production. However, there is a paucity of studies directly investigating effects of brain lesions on aesthetic judgment. Here, we assessed the effects of unilateral brain damage on aesthetic judgment of artworks showing part/whole ambiguity. We asked 19 unilaterally brain-damaged patients (10 left and 9 right brain damaged patients, respectively LBDP and RBDP) and 20 age- and education-matched healthy individuals (controls, C) to rate 10 Arcimboldo's ambiguous portraits (AP), 10 realistic Renaissance portraits (RP), 10 still life paintings (SL), and 10 Arcimboldo's modified portraits where only objects/parts are detectable (AO). They were also administered a Navon task, a facial recognition test, and evaluated on visuo-perceptual and visuo-constructional abilities. Patients included in the study did not show any deficits that could affect the capability to explore and enjoy artworks. SL and RP was not affected by brain damage regardless of its laterality. On the other hand, we found that RBDP liked AP more than the C participants. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between aesthetic judgment of AP and visuo-perceptual skills even if the single case analyses failed to find a systematic association between neuropsychological deficits and aesthetic judgment of AP. On the whole, the present data suggest that a right hemisphere lesion may affect aesthetic judgment of ambiguous artworks, even in the absence of exploration or constructional deficits.

  3. Neuropsychology of Aesthetic Judgment of Ambiguous and Non-Ambiguous Artworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maddalena; Barbetti, Sonia; Piccardi, Laura; Guariglia, Cecilia; Giannini, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Several affective and cognitive processes have been found to be pivotal in affecting aesthetic experience of artworks and both neuropsychological as well as psychiatric symptoms have been found to affect artistic production. However, there is a paucity of studies directly investigating effects of brain lesions on aesthetic judgment. Here, we assessed the effects of unilateral brain damage on aesthetic judgment of artworks showing part/whole ambiguity. We asked 19 unilaterally brain-damaged patients (10 left and 9 right brain damaged patients, respectively LBDP and RBDP) and 20 age- and education-matched healthy individuals (controls, C) to rate 10 Arcimboldo’s ambiguous portraits (AP), 10 realistic Renaissance portraits (RP), 10 still life paintings (SL), and 10 Arcimboldo’s modified portraits where only objects/parts are detectable (AO). They were also administered a Navon task, a facial recognition test, and evaluated on visuo-perceptual and visuo-constructional abilities. Patients included in the study did not show any deficits that could affect the capability to explore and enjoy artworks. SL and RP was not affected by brain damage regardless of its laterality. On the other hand, we found that RBDP liked AP more than the C participants. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between aesthetic judgment of AP and visuo-perceptual skills even if the single case analyses failed to find a systematic association between neuropsychological deficits and aesthetic judgment of AP. On the whole, the present data suggest that a right hemisphere lesion may affect aesthetic judgment of ambiguous artworks, even in the absence of exploration or constructional deficits. PMID:28335460

  4. Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roald, Tone

    2014-01-01

    /himself and the world and to her/his experiences, emotions, thoughts, and actions. The concept builds on a socio-materially situated understanding of the human being and stands in opposition to mainstream psychologies which conduct their research from an external – third-person – perspective. From such a view from...

  5. Adolescents with HIV and facial lipoatrophy: response to facial stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Jesus Claudio Gabana-Silveira; Laura Davison Mangilli; Sassi, Fernanda C.; Arnaldo Feitosa Braga; Claudia Regina Furquim de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of facial stimulation over the superficial muscles of the face in individuals with facial lipoatrophy associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and with no indication for treatment with polymethyl methacrylate. METHOD: The study sample comprised four adolescents of both genders ranging from 13 to 17 years in age. To participate in the study, the participants had to score six or less points on the Facial Lipoatrophy Index. The facial stim...

  6. Assessing Pain by Facial Expression: Facial Expression as Nexus

    OpenAIRE

    Prkachin, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    The experience of pain is often represented by changes in facial expression. Evidence of pain that is available from facial expression has been the subject of considerable scientific investigation. The present paper reviews the history of pain assessment via facial expression in the context of a model of pain expression as a nexus connecting internal experience with social influence. Evidence about the structure of facial expressions of pain across the lifespan is reviewed. Applications of fa...

  7. Nietzsche's aesthetic critique of Darwin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Charles H

    2011-01-01

    Despite his position as one of the first philosophers to write in the "post-Darwinian" world, the critique of Darwin by Friedrich Nietzsche is often ignored for a host of unsatisfactory reasons. I argue that Nietzsche's critique of Darwin is important to the study of both Nietzsche's and Darwin's impact on philosophy. Further, I show that the central claims of Nietzsche's critique have been broadly misunderstood. I then present a new reading of Nietzsche's core criticism of Darwin. An important part of Nietzsche's response can best be understood as an aesthetic critique of Darwin, reacting to what he saw as Darwin having drained life of an essential component of objective aesthetic value. For Nietzsche, Darwin's theory is false because it is too intellectual, because it searches for rules, regulations, and uniformity in a realm where none of these are to be found - and, moreover, where they should not be found. Such a reading goes furthest toward making Nietzsche's criticism substantive and relevant. Finally, I attempt to relate this novel explanation of Nietzsche's critique to topics in contemporary philosophy of biology, particularly work on the evolutionary explanation of culture.

  8. Aesthetic management of dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Ninawe, Nupur

    2013-05-22

    Significant numbers of patients visiting the paediatric dental clinics have aesthetically objectionable brown stains and desire treatment for them. Intrinsic tooth discolouration can be a significant aesthetic, and in some instances, functional, problem. Dental fluorosis, tetracycline staining, localised and chronological hypoplasia, and both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta can all produce a cosmetically unsatisfactory dentition. The aetiology of intrinsic discolouration of enamel may sometimes be deduced from the patient's history, and one factor long associated with the problem has been a high level of fluoride intake. Optimal use of topical fluorides leads to a decrease in the caries prevalence but may show an increase in the prevalence of fluorosis staining because of metabolic alterations in the ameloblasts, causing a defective matrix formation and improper calcification. A 12-year-old male patient was screened at the dental clinic for routine dental care. He wanted us to remove and/or minimise the noticeable brown/yellow staining of his teeth. He requested the least invasive and most cost-effective treatment to change his smile. Various treatment modalities are present for the treatment of fluorosis stains. This report discusses the microabrasion technique in the patient having dental fluorosis.

  9. A standardized formula for aesthetic mandibular reconstruction using an osteocutaneous fibular free flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soung Min; Amponsah, Emmanuel K; Kim, Hui Young; Kwon, Ik Jae; Myoung, Hoon; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-09-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most common benign odontogenic tumor of the jaw, and expansional growth of a huge untreated ameloblastoma can result in disturbances in facial aesthetics and function, such as difficulty with mouth opening, swallowing, chewing, breathing, neurologic deficits, and pathologic fractures. Radical wide resection with safety margins and subsequent reconstruction is generally recommended. A fibular free flap (FFF) is commonly used to reconstruct the mandible in order to adequately restore both aesthetic appearance and function. The aim of this brief clinical report is to present a case of huge ameloblastoma after wide resection with free safety margins, and describe the immediate one-step mandibular reconstruction using a vascularized composite FFF. The sterolithographic( rapid prototype, RP) model, a wax pattern of the resected mandible, and a surgical fibular stent made from the wax pattern were constructed preoperatively. We suggest a standardized surgical protocol for mandibular reconstruction with FFF.

  10. Promising Technique for Facial Nerve Reconstruction in Extended Parotidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ithzel Maria Villarreal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malignant tumors of the parotid gland account scarcely for 5% of all head and neck tumors. Most of these neoplasms have a high tendency for recurrence, local infiltration, perineural extension, and metastasis. Although uncommon, these malignant tumors require complex surgical treatment sometimes involving a total parotidectomy including a complete facial nerve resection. Severe functional and aesthetic facial defects are the result of a complete sacrifice or injury to isolated branches becoming an uncomfortable distress for patients and a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons.   Case Report: A case of a 54-year-old, systemically healthy male patient with a 4 month complaint of pain and swelling on the right side of the face is presented. The patient reported a rapid increase in the size of the lesion over the past 2 months. Imaging tests and histopathological analysis reported an adenoid cystic carcinoma. A complete parotidectomy was carried out with an intraoperative notice of facial nerve infiltration requiring a second intervention for nerve and defect reconstruction. A free ALT flap with vascularized nerve grafts was the surgical choice. A 6 month follow-up showed partial facial movement recovery and the facial defect mended.   Conclusion:  It is of critical importance to restore function to patients with facial nerve injury.  Vascularized nerve grafts, in many clinical and experimental studies, have shown to result in better nerve regeneration than conventional non-vascularized nerve grafts. Nevertheless, there are factors that may affect the degree, speed and regeneration rate regarding the free fasciocutaneous flap. In complex head and neck defects following a total parotidectomy, the extended free fasciocutaneous ALT (anterior-lateral thigh flap with a vascularized nerve graft is ideally suited for the reconstruction of the injured site.  Donor–site morbidity is low and additional surgical time is minimal

  11. Promising Technique for Facial Nerve Reconstruction in Extended Parotidectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Ithzel Maria; Rodríguez-Valiente, Antonio; Castelló, Jose Ramon; Górriz, Carmen; Montero, Oscar Alvarez; García-Berrocal, Jose Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant tumors of the parotid gland account scarcely for 5% of all head and neck tumors. Most of these neoplasms have a high tendency for recurrence, local infiltration, perineural extension, and metastasis. Although uncommon, these malignant tumors require complex surgical treatment sometimes involving a total parotidectomy including a complete facial nerve resection. Severe functional and aesthetic facial defects are the result of a complete sacrifice or injury to isolated branches becoming an uncomfortable distress for patients and a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Case Report: A case of a 54-year-old, systemically healthy male patient with a 4 month complaint of pain and swelling on the right side of the face is presented. The patient reported a rapid increase in the size of the lesion over the past 2 months. Imaging tests and histopathological analysis reported an adenoid cystic carcinoma. A complete parotidectomy was carried out with an intraoperative notice of facial nerve infiltration requiring a second intervention for nerve and defect reconstruction. A free ALT flap with vascularized nerve grafts was the surgical choice. A 6 month follow-up showed partial facial movement recovery and the facial defect mended. Conclusion: It is of critical importance to restore function to patients with facial nerve injury. Vascularized nerve grafts, in many clinical and experimental studies, have shown to result in better nerve regeneration than conventional non-vascularized nerve grafts. Nevertheless, there are factors that may affect the degree, speed and regeneration rate regarding the free fasciocutaneous flap. In complex head and neck defects following a total parotidectomy, the extended free fasciocutaneous ALT (anterior-lateral thigh) flap with a vascularized nerve graft is ideally suited for the reconstruction of the injured site. Donor–site morbidity is low and additional surgical time is minimal compared with the time of a single

  12. Sense Training as Basis for Aesthetic Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2016-01-01

    . It is a special problem for design engineers, who must guarantee the aesthetic, ethical and utilitarian qualities of products in a product development process. It does not matter whether they or other designers have conceived the product idea. It has been found that sense training can open up to aesthetic...

  13. 40 CFR 240.207 - Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aesthetics. 240.207 Section 240.207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.207 Aesthetics....

  14. Processes of aesthetic transformation in ordinary landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Jonna Majgaard

    2004-01-01

    with utilitarian aspects. This is seen both as an example of how transnational contemporary cultural changes have an impact on local Nordic farming landscapes and their aesthetic expression and as an example of how processes of transformation in aesthetic experience and interpretation have an impact on the general...

  15. Modeling Human Aesthetic Perception of Visual Textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thumfart, Stefan; Jacobs, Richard H. A. H.; Lughofer, Edwin; Eitzinger, Christian; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Groissboeck, Werner; Richter, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Texture is extensively used in areas such as product design and architecture to convey specific aesthetic information. Using the results of a psychological experiment, we model the relationship between computational texture features and aesthetic properties of visual textures. Contrary to previous a

  16. Modeling Human Aesthetic Perception of Visual Textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thumfart, Stefan; Jacobs, Richard H. A. H.; Lughofer, Edwin; Eitzinger, Christian; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Groissboeck, Werner; Richter, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Texture is extensively used in areas such as product design and architecture to convey specific aesthetic information. Using the results of a psychological experiment, we model the relationship between computational texture features and aesthetic properties of visual textures. Contrary to previous

  17. Aesthetic Learning, Creative Writing and English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Francis

    2016-01-01

    My article argues that the concept of "aesthetic learning" can be helpful for English teachers on two levels. First, it can be a useful identity for English teachers and students to adopt, based upon my own experiences as a secondary English teacher, creative writer and PhD student. Second, I argue that "aesthetic learning" is…

  18. Grounding Moralism: Moral Flaws and Aesthetic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuts, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Can moral flaws lessen an artwork's aesthetic value? Answering yes to this question requires both that artworks can be morally flawed and that moral flaws within a work of art can have an aesthetic impact. For present purposes, the author will assume that artworks can be morally flawed by such means as endorsing immoral perspectives, culpably…

  19. Sight, Sound, Motion; Applied Media Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Herbert

    The purpose of this book is to help both communicator and viewer to attain a degree of emotional literacy and sophistication in media aesthetics that will allow both to judge a television program or film with sureness and confidence. Specifically, the book describes the basic aesthetic elements and principles of sight, motion, and sound in film…

  20. Aesthetic Learning, Creative Writing and English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Francis

    2016-01-01

    My article argues that the concept of "aesthetic learning" can be helpful for English teachers on two levels. First, it can be a useful identity for English teachers and students to adopt, based upon my own experiences as a secondary English teacher, creative writer and PhD student. Second, I argue that "aesthetic learning" is…

  1. Engineering aesthetics and aesthetic ergonomics: theoretical foundations and a dual-process research methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yili

    Although industrial and product designers are keenly aware of the importance of design aesthetics, they make aesthetic design decisions largely on the basis of their intuitive judgments and "educated guesses". Whilst ergonomics and human factors researchers have made great contributions to the safety, productivity, ease-of-use, and comfort of human-machine-environment systems, aesthetics is largely ignored as a topic of systematic scientific research in human factors and ergonomics. This article discusses the need for incorporating the aesthetics dimension in ergonomics and proposes the establishment of a new scientific and engineering discipline that we can call "engineering aesthetics". This discipline addresses two major questions: How do we use engineering and scientific methods to study aesthetics concepts in general and design aesthetics in particular? How do we incorporate engineering and scientific methods in the aesthetic design and evaluation process? This article identifies two special features that distinguish aesthetic appraisal of products and system designs from aesthetic appreciation of art, and lays out a theoretical foundation as well as a dual-process research methodology for "engineering aesthetics". Sample applications of this methodology are also described.

  2. Design Articulations for Aesthetics of Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present three categories of design articulations addressing the characteristic qualities of aesthetics of interaction. By aesthetics of interaction we point to the process in which interactive technology brings about aesthetic experience in the use of interactive technology...... in everyday life. As designers we are prohibited access to the aesthetic experience of the user. However, we have the possibility of articulating intentions and values embedded in the artefact that can be interpreted in use and thereby providing the artefact an aesthetic potential for users to unleash. Design...... articulations serve as catalysts for developing and choosing design expressions in the design process. Design articulations are embodied in artifacts, that address desired, anticipated or identified user experiences and capabilities, carrying a format which enable discussions also with non...

  3. Exploring the Aesthetics of Sustainable Fashion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    This working paper is a discussion of different notions and conceptions of aesthetics that may be at play when developing new design. The empirical case of the paper derives from the context of design education in a module aimed at the development of a new design expression for contemporary......, sustainable fashion. In programming the didactical setting for the students’ projects, several aesthetics must be considered: the aesthetic codes of the textile and fashion design discipline, both in terms of materials and expression, deriving from within the design practice itself and the aesthetic codes...... of mediated expressions seen in e.g. fashion magazines which create a frame of aestheticization influencing how fashion expressions are valued. In this tension between internal aesthetics and external aestheticization, the students are set out to create a new design expression for sustainable design which...

  4. The Third Tear in Everyday Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Mandoki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although totally overlooked by mainstream aesthetic theory, various paths were nevertheless left open for addressing everyday aesthetics, a natural yet surprisingly controversial topic. Why they were never taken until recently, when the theme of everyday aesthetics is now becoming fashionable, can be explained not only by the obvious fact of philosophical aesthetics’ restrictive focal point on art but, among other reasons, by a kind of fetishism that demands an object of recognized value for legitimating an aesthetic inquiry. This new popularity entails, however, certain theoretical risks such as clinging to traditional art-centric and beauty-centric categories to explain the everyday and borrowing their concepts uncritically. In this paper I will examine some of these paths and risks with special emphasis on current events which exude aesthetics throughout their pores and require attention from this discipline.

  5. The holism of aesthetic knowing in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Mandy M

    2012-07-01

    In 1978, Carper identified 'four fundamental patterns of knowing' that became largely foundational to subsequent epistemological discourse within the nursing discipline. These patterns of empirical, personal, aesthetic, and ethical knowing were presented as conceptually distinct yet related patterns of knowing. In order to provide an alternative conceptualization of aesthetics in nursing, the main tenants of Carper's discussion of aesthetic knowing will be revisited, and the foundations for her arguments will be examined. Specifically, Dewey's Art as Experience will be examined in relation to the 'holism' of nursing, and an alternative position on pragmatic aesthetics in nursing will be offered. A preliminary reintegration of the four patterns of knowing will then be presented as will an example of a potential cultivation of aesthetics in nursing, through an example of Rodin's 19th century sculpture, the Burghers of Calais.

  6. Conceptualizing Aesthetics in Design: A Phenomenological Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2017-01-01

    experience: We can look at sensual, conceptual, and contextual aesthetic dimensions of design and examine their contribution to the framing of experience, that is, how different dimensions of meaning articulation in design offer different framings of the experiences promoted by design objects and solutions......The aim of this chapter is to introduce and discuss aesthetics as an approach to understand how design frames experience. In doing so, the chapter combines two philosophical interests in design, design phenomenology and design aesthetics, in order to promote a framework for discussing the impact...... of aesthetic meaning construction on experience. First, the chapter raises the phenomenological question of the relationship between design and experience, specifically, how design conditions experience. Second, in looking at aesthetics in terms of a) the sensual appeal of design, b) design objects...

  7. Neuromuscular retraining for facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diels, H J; Combs, D

    1997-10-01

    Neuromuscular retraining is an effective method for rehabilitating facial musculature in patients with facial paralysis. This nonsurgical therapy has demonstrated improved functional outcomes and is an important adjunct to surgical treatment for restoring facial movement. Treatment begins with an intensive clinical evaluation and incorporates appropriate sensory feedback techniques into a patient-specific, comprehensive, home therapy program. This article discusses appropriate patients, timelines for referral, and basic treatment practices of facial neuromuscular retraining for restoring function and expression to the highest level possible.

  8. Transcendental in Hans Urs von Balthasar’s theological aesthetics and its significance for Chinese academic aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Sheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    This thesis begins a dialogue between Hans Urs von Balthasar’s theological aesthetics and Chinese academic aesthetics. We identify a tension between aesthetics and religion in Chinese academic aesthetics, and argue that a dialogue with von Balthasar’s work has the potential to contribute to the development of Chinese academic aesthetics with regard to overcoming that tension. In order to set a ground for the dialogue, von Balthasar’s theological aesthetics is examined in Par...

  9. Computer facial animation

    CERN Document Server

    Parke, Frederic I

    2008-01-01

    This comprehensive work provides the fundamentals of computer facial animation and brings into sharper focus techniques that are becoming mainstream in the industry. Over the past decade, since the publication of the first edition, there have been significant developments by academic research groups and in the film and games industries leading to the development of morphable face models, performance driven animation, as well as increasingly detailed lip-synchronization and hair modeling techniques. These topics are described in the context of existing facial animation principles. The second ed

  10. Facial Data Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuliang; YUAN Hanning; CAO Baohua; WANG Dakui

    2015-01-01

    Expressional face recognition is a challenge in computer vision for complex expressions. Facial data field is proposed to recognize expression. Fundamentals are presented in the methodology of face recognition upon data field and subsequently, technical algorithms including normalizing faces, generating facial data field, extracting feature points in partitions, assigning weights and recog-nizing faces. A case is studied with JAFFE database for its verification. Result indicates that the proposed method is suitable and eff ective in expressional face recognition con-sidering the whole average recognition rate is up to 94.3%. In conclusion, data field is considered as a valuable alter-native to pattern recognition.

  11. Asymmetrical facial expressions in portraits and hemispheric laterality: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, W R; Schirillo, J A

    2009-11-01

    Studies of facial asymmetry have revealed that the left and the right sides of the face differ in emotional attributes. This paper reviews many of these distinctions to determine how these asymmetries influence portrait paintings. It does so by relating research involving emotional expression to aesthetic pleasantness in portraits. For example, facial expressions are often asymmetrical-the left side of the face is more emotionally expressive and more often connotes negative emotions than the right side. Interestingly, artists tend to expose more of their poser's left cheek than their right. This is significant, in that artists also portray more females than males with their left cheek exposed. Reasons for these psychological findings lead to explanations for the aesthetic leftward bias in portraiture.

  12. Facial palsy after blunt trauma and without facial bone fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltro, Pedro Soler; Goldenberg, Dov Charles; Aldunate, Johnny Leandro Conduta Borda; Alessi, Mariana Sisto; Chang, Alexandre Jin Bok Audi; Alonso, Nivaldo; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2010-07-01

    A 14-year-old patient had a low-energy facial blunt trauma that evolved to right facial paralysis caused by parotid hematoma with parotid salivary gland lesion. Computed tomography and angiography demonstrated intraparotid collection without pseudoaneurysm and without radiologic signs of fracture in the face. The patient was treated with serial punctures for hematoma deflation, resolving with regression and complete remission of facial paralysis, with no late sequela. The authors discuss the relationship between facial nerve traumatic injuries associated or not with the presence of facial fractures, emphasizing the importance of early recognition and appropriate treatment of such cases.

  13. Plan de negocios Centro de estética masculina Aesthetic Men

    OpenAIRE

    García Fajardo, Pablo Andrés

    2011-01-01

    El presente documento contiene todos los aspectos relacionados con la formulación de un plan de negocios que evidencia las oportunidades y riesgos asociados a la inversión en la conformación y puesta en marcha de una empresa. El negocio abordado se ha denominado Centro de Estética Masculina Aesthetic Men dado que implica la prestación de servicios personales de belleza estética facial y corporal a hombres de la localidad de Suba en la ciudad de Bogotá. Actualmente los servicios personales ...

  14. The Impact of Facial Lipofilling on Patient-Perceived Improvement in Facial Appearance and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepavcevic, Brankica; Radak, Djordje; Jovanovic, Milan; Radak, Sandra; Tepavcevic, Darija Kisic

    2016-06-01

    An investigation of the effect of facial lipofilling on patient's satisfaction is a challenging and ongoing research area. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of aesthetic intervention on self-perceived improvement in facial appearance and quality of life (QoL) after 1- and 6-month follow-ups. In the period from October 1, 2014, to March 1, 2015, a total of 63 consecutive subjects who underwent a facial lipofilling were included in the study. The satisfaction with facial appearance was estimated by using the Satisfaction with Facial Appearance Overall scale. QoL was assessed by using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms was quantified by using the Hamilton depression and anxiety rating scales. The self-esteem was assessed by Rosenberg self-esteem scale. The average Satisfaction with Facial Appearance Overall scale score at baseline was 45.5 ± 13.0, while this score reached values of 84.5 ± 16.2 after 1 month (Z = -6.744, p Appearance Overall scale score from baseline to 1-month follow-up was 38.9 ± 21.2 and from baseline to 6-month follow-up was 37.1 ± 18.9. Statistically significant improvement in QoL at each subsequent time point, compared with those at baseline, was detected for all domains of the SF-36 except for subscales of physical functioning and pain. It has been highlighted that advanced social life was strongly associated with improvement in satisfaction with facial appearance, better self-esteem, and lower level of anxiety and depression during the period of follow-up after facial lipofilling. The results of this study supported the hypothesis that the level of self-confidence and mental health-related QoL could be significantly improved following facial lipofilling treatment.

  15. Black Orpheus and Aesthetic Historicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay offers a novel approach for understanding the poetry of negritude and its role in the struggle for black liberation by appealing to Giambattista Vico’s insights on the historical, cultural, and myth-making function of poetry and of the mythopoetic imagination.  The essay begins with a discussion of Vico’s aesthetic historicism and of his ideas regarding the role of imagination, poetry, and myth-making and then brings these ideas to bear on the discussion of the function of negritude poetry, focusing primarily on the writings of Aimé Césaire and on Jean-Paul Sartre’s essay, Black Orpheus.

  16. The Specificity of Human Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Today, humankind is being reintroduced within nature. Humankind is no longer presented as supernatural to nature. There is no longer a clear divide between animal and human. What makes us human is neither culture, nor language nor labor, nor art, but the degree of complexity those products and ca...... creativity. Art is fundamentally about shaping visions and very closely related to this specific human ability to make projects. Especially in times of crisis, when the old sources of meaning hardly can make sense in a new context, imagination must be used in order to survive......., and the craving to make sense of all kinds of relations that characterizes humans. Being able to produce artworks as external representations aimed at “the other,” made of internal representations is thus essential to humanity. Human aesthetics is not so much an issue of beauty but of imagination and social...

  17. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Mohd Noor, Nor Farid; Basri, Rehana; Yew, Tan Fo; Wen, Tay Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; Pmean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  18. Diplegia facial traumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de paralisia facial bilateral, incompleta, associada a hipoacusia esquerda, após traumatismo cranioencefálico, com fraturas evidenciadas radiológicamente. Algumas considerações são formuladas tentando relacionar ditas manifestações com fraturas do osso temporal.

  19. Management of facial blushing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Peter B; Pilegaard, Hans K

    2008-01-01

    an indication for treatment, facial blushing may be treated effectively by thoracoscopic sympathectomy. The type of blushing likely to benefit from sympathectomy is mediated by the sympathetic nerves and is the uncontrollable, rapidly developing blush typically elicited when one receives attention from other...

  20. Facial Paralysis Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razfar, Ali; Lee, Matthew K; Massry, Guy G; Azizzadeh, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Facial nerve paralysis is a devastating condition arising from several causes with severe functional and psychological consequences. Given the complexity of the disease process, management involves a multispecialty, team-oriented approach. This article provides a systematic approach in addressing each specific sequela of this complex problem.

  1. Paralisia facial bilateral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1976-03-01

    Full Text Available É apresentado um caso de diplegia facial surgida após meningite meningocócica e infecção por herpes simples. Depois de discutir as diversas condições que o fenômeno pode apresentar-se, o autor inclina-se por uma etiologia herpética.

  2. Novel Facial Features Segmentation Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for facial features extractions is proposed. The facial features we segment are the two eyes, nose and mouth. The algorithm is based on an improved Gabor wavelets edge detector, morphological approach to detect the face region and facial features regions, and an improved T-shape face mask to locate the extract location of facial features. The experimental results show that the proposed method is robust against facial expression, illumination, and can be also effective if the person wearing glasses, and so on.

  3. Capoeira, ADHD and Aesthetic Movements of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Kasper

    In psychological research art and aesthetics are rarely considered central to the perspective of everyday life. Philosophically this relates to an insistent separation of art and life that goes back to Immanuel Kant’s theory of sensation in which aesthetics takes on a double meaning. Thus, on the...... of an aesthetic approach to everyday life I will take point of departure in my own research exploring the relationship between the expressive movements in the Brazilian martial art, capoeira, and the conduct of children diagnosed with ADHD.......In psychological research art and aesthetics are rarely considered central to the perspective of everyday life. Philosophically this relates to an insistent separation of art and life that goes back to Immanuel Kant’s theory of sensation in which aesthetics takes on a double meaning. Thus......, on the one hand, aesthetics is a theory of art by which we can reflect on our actual experiences with different material forms of expression (aesthetic judgment); on the other hand, it also refers to a more general theory of sensibility, as the conditions of possibility for subjective experience...

  4. Art fighting its way back to aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejten, Anne Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    When Claire Farago and Donald Preziosi claim that ‘art is not what you think it is,’ aesthetics itself is implicitly challenged, especially aesthetics’ seemingly inherent correlation with art. However, aesthetics, as complex and ambiguous as the concept of art, calls for a similar suspicion. In t...... at the threshold of contemporary art, is summoned, on the contrary, to give evidence of an intact, though profoundly transformed, aesthetic engagement by the artist........ In this essay, ‘Aesthetics is not what you think it is’ is thus an invitation to break through at the very point in which contemporary art seems to state the opposite—that art no longer should be a concern of aesthetics. The iconic example of Marcel Duchamp’s readymade, Fountain, which writes art history......When Claire Farago and Donald Preziosi claim that ‘art is not what you think it is,’ aesthetics itself is implicitly challenged, especially aesthetics’ seemingly inherent correlation with art. However, aesthetics, as complex and ambiguous as the concept of art, calls for a similar suspicion...

  5. [Correction of the position of the cilia in facial paralysis: Technical note].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillot, A; Labbé, D

    2015-06-01

    Facial paralysis is a incapacitating pathology that we treat with lengthening temporalis myoplasty for reanimation of the smile. To treat lagophthalmia, we use the extension of the levator of the upper eyelid according Tessier and the asymmetric external blepharorraphy. These techniques can optionally be combined with other techniques, as needed. However, many patients are embarrassed by the appearance of the lashes of the upper eyelid homolateral side facial paralysis. The cilia are lowered and horizontalised, creating a functional disorder by partial "amputation" of the visual field and aesthetic inconvenience. We describe a surgical technique to correct the malposition of the lashes. This technique can be carried out independently or in the lengthening of the temporal myoplasty or another surgical procedure on the eye. In case of extension of the levator of the upper eyelid, the technique we propose requires no additional incision. This is a simple technique and increases very little surgical time. It is fast, little or no morbid, reproducible and provides a significant improvement in the aesthetic and functional patient. This simple technique allows to provide both aesthetic and functional refinement for patients with facial paralysis sequelae.

  6. Comparison of speech and aesthetic outcomes in patients with maxillary reconstruction versus maxillary obturators after maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Jana M; Tang, Judith A Lam; Wolfaardt, Johan; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi

    2011-02-01

    Two options exist for restoring structure and function after maxillectomy. Prosthodontic rehabilitation requires that an obturator be constructed to address the oronasal communication that exists after resection of the maxilla. Surgical reconstruction of the defect is another option, often accomplished with the use of bone-containing flaps. To determine whether prosthetic rehabilitation or surgical reconstruction of the maxilla provides better speech and facial aesthetic outcomes after maxillectomy. Fifty-nine patients in three groups were included: 23 patients with maxillary obturators, 16 patients with maxillary reconstruction, and 20 patients without any maxillary defects but who were diagnosed with nasopharyngeal cancer and who served as a control group. Using digitized photographs, facial attractiveness was rated on a 10-point scale by eight judges who were blinded to treatment group. Speech outcomes included nasalance, velopharyngeal orifice opening, and speech intelligibility. There were no significant between-group differences found for facial attractiveness ratings. However, patients in either group who had involvement of the orbital rim or the orbital rim and zygoma were rated as significantly less attractive than those without such involvement. With respect to speech outcomes, the control group (ie, nasopharynx) had smaller velopharyngeal orifice areas than the obturator group; however, this was not clinically significant as scores in both groups were within normal limits. In conclusion, this study found no differences between surgical reconstruction or prosthodontic intervention of maxillary defects when facial attractiveness was assessed by naive raters and speech outcomes were assessed using objective measurements.

  7. Mexico: the aesthetic challenge of forced disappearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Deotté

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay is a reflection on the aesthetic of forced disappearance based on the case in Mexico in October 2014 in which 43 young students from Ayotzinapa, in the state of Guerrero, disappeared. We analyse the photographic support of this shocking event and relate it to the function of the image in other cases of serious crimes against humanity, establishing a genealogy of the aesthetic of disappearance. We present fifteen declarations on the aesthetic of disappearance which enable us to debate on old and new forms of organised violence, particularly in the Latin American context.

  8. "Light and the aesthetics of the perception"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volf, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    through the meeting with form. Therefore, since form has been the major theme for the aesthetics up until now, giving form to light is a complex and challenging task and reducing it to Lux and measurable numbers only an escape from facing what is actually percieved. In this way light seems to suffer from...... what can be called the dichotomy between the aesthetics of the objects and the aesthetics of the perception - as stated by Boehme. To improve practice this article conducts a study of our perception, focusing more on the effects of light and less on the physical light (Lux). By doing so the article...

  9. Aesthetism, Russian Formalism, and Their Comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张孟豪

    2014-01-01

    In our class, we have already learned some articles of Aesthetism. The famous aesthetes, such as Walter Pater, Oscar Wilde, Benedetto Croce, all give us huge impressions. And Russian Formalism is also very important school of thoughts. As they all study art, literature and form, I would like to know the relationship between them. In this paper, first I will show some of my own understandings on Both Aesthetism and Russian Formalism. Then I will compare them to find similarities and differences. At last, I will say something about my preference.

  10. Aesthetics and “transcultural” turn

    OpenAIRE

    Patella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    What does “trancultural turn” exactly means and which is its relationship with aesthetics? Culture has never been as important as it is today, so it is now more than ever crucial to reflect on its current expressions and transformations. In this sense it is useful to examine the perspective of cultural studies. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of the “cultural turn” on aesthetics highlighting positive and negative aspects of the relationship between aesthetics and cultural ...

  11. Capoeira, ADHD and Aesthetic Movements of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Kasper

    In psychological research art and aesthetics are rarely considered central to the perspective of everyday life. Philosophically this relates to an insistent separation of art and life that goes back to Immanuel Kant’s theory of sensation in which aesthetics takes on a double meaning. Thus, on the...... of an aesthetic approach to everyday life I will take point of departure in my own research exploring the relationship between the expressive movements in the Brazilian martial art, capoeira, and the conduct of children diagnosed with ADHD....

  12. Interaction between facial expression and color

    OpenAIRE

    Kae Nakajima; Tetsuto Minami; Shigeki Nakauchi

    2017-01-01

    Facial color varies depending on emotional state, and emotions are often described in relation to facial color. In this study, we investigated whether the recognition of facial expressions was affected by facial color and vice versa. In the facial expression task, expression morph continua were employed: fear-anger and sadness-happiness. The morphed faces were presented in three different facial colors (bluish, neutral, and reddish color). Participants identified a facial expression between t...

  13. Aesthetic Chills: Knowledge-Acquisition, Meaning-Making, and Aesthetic Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeller, Felix; Perlovsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the relation between aesthetic emotions, knowledge-acquisition, and meaning-making. We briefly review theoretical foundations and present experimental data related to aesthetic chills. These results suggest that aesthetic chills are inhibited by exposing the subject to an incoherent prime prior to the chill-eliciting stimulation and that a meaningful prime makes the aesthetic experience more pleasurable than a neutral or an incoherent one. Aesthetic chills induced by narrative structures seem to be related to the pinnacle of the story, to have a significant calming effect and subjects describe a strong empathy for the characters. We discuss the relation between meaning-making and aesthetic emotions at the psychological, physiological, narratological, and mathematical levels and propose a series of hypotheses to be tested in future research.

  14. Reimer through Confucian Lenses: Resonances with Classical Chinese Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I compare all three editions of Bennett Reimer's "A Philosophy of Music Education" with early Chinese philosophy, in particular, classical Chinese aesthetics. I structure my analysis around a quartet of interrelated themes: aesthetic education, education of feeling, aesthetic experience, and ethics and aesthetics. This…

  15. Exploring the Relationship between Humor and Aesthetic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    The connection between humor and aesthetic experience has already been recognized by several thinkers and aesthetic educators. For instance, humor theorist John Morreall writes that "humor is best understood as itself a kind of aesthetic experience, equal in value at least to any other kind of aesthetic experience." For Morreall, both humor and…

  16. Exploring the Relationship between Humor and Aesthetic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    The connection between humor and aesthetic experience has already been recognized by several thinkers and aesthetic educators. For instance, humor theorist John Morreall writes that "humor is best understood as itself a kind of aesthetic experience, equal in value at least to any other kind of aesthetic experience." For Morreall, both humor and…

  17. Reimer through Confucian Lenses: Resonances with Classical Chinese Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I compare all three editions of Bennett Reimer's "A Philosophy of Music Education" with early Chinese philosophy, in particular, classical Chinese aesthetics. I structure my analysis around a quartet of interrelated themes: aesthetic education, education of feeling, aesthetic experience, and ethics and aesthetics. This…

  18. Aesthetic deprivation : the role of aesthetics for older patients in hospital

    OpenAIRE

    MOSS, HILARY

    2014-01-01

    While arts have been integral to all cultures, it is a relatively recent research phenomenon to explore and examine the association between arts and health and well-being (Johnson and Stanley, 2007). This research centres on the concept that aesthetics, the arts and culture are important for well-being and that hospitals may be aesthetically deprived environments. The research area of interest is the experience of older patients in acute hospital regarding aesthetics before, during and after ...

  19. The Listening Train: A Collaborative, Connective Aesthetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dylan McGarry, Durban University of Technology. Abstract ... researchers, among others, who created new 'connective aesthetic' social spaces for dialogue and exchange. Drawing ... create an alternative to the traditional 'conference' space.

  20. Silberman and the British on Aesthetic Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph A.

    1973-01-01

    Author describes two instructive ways of illustrating the principal business of aesthetic education and summarizes the way in which the notion of a form of understanding is dealt with by Dearden. (Author/RK)

  1. Cultural history and aesthetics of nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles González, José; Ruiz, Maria del Carmen Solano

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of aesthetics in the organization and motivation of care through history. The guiding questions were: What values and aesthetic feelings have supported and motivated pre-professional and professional care? and Based on what structures has pre-professional and professional care been historically socialized? Primary and secondary sources were consulted, selected according to established criteria with a view to avoiding search and selection bias. Data analysis was guided by the categories: "habitus" and "logical conformism". It was found that the relation between social structures and pre-professionals (motherhood, religiosity) and professional aesthetic standards (professionalism, technologism) of care through history is evidenced in the caregiving activity of the functional unit, in the functional framework and the functional element. In conclusion, in social structures, through the socialization process, "logical conformism" and "habitus" constitute the aesthetic standards of care through feelings like motherhood, religiosity, professionalism, technologism and humanism.

  2. Silberman and the British on Aesthetic Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph A.

    1973-01-01

    Author describes two instructive ways of illustrating the principal business of aesthetic education and summarizes the way in which the notion of a form of understanding is dealt with by Dearden. (Author/RK)

  3. Nietzsche and the Aesthetics of Rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Steve; Poulakos, John

    1993-01-01

    Addresses the debate over rhetoric's epistemic status in terms of Nietzsche's critique of epistemology. Suggests that Nietzsche's aestheticism provides an alternative to the debate. Focuses on differences between the rhetorics of the epistemic and the aesthetic. (SR)

  4. 40 CFR 230.53 - Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... perception of beauty by one or a combination of the senses of sight, hearing, touch, and smell. Aesthetics of...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can mar the beauty of natural...

  5. Environmental Aesthetics. Crossing Divides and Breaking Ground

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, M.; Keulartz, J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental aesthetics crosses several commonly recognized divides: between analytic and continental philosophy, Eastern and Western traditions, universalizing and historicizing approaches, and theoretical and practical concerns. This volume sets out to show how these,perspectives can be brought i

  6. Aesthetic surgery, medical discourse and health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco Romão Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    .... Our work investigated the construction of meaning and value, the use of aesthetic parameters in this construction and how those meanings are appropriated and treated by those representatives of the...

  7. Film Aesthetics and the Embodied Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses - based on neuroscience and cognitive science - how the aesthetic experience of films depends on the brain's architecture and the mental flow called the PECMA flow. It describes how the flow from (visual and acoustic) perception of the film, via emotional and cognitive proce...... something is real or mental Keywords: Film aesthetics, neuroaesthetics, cognitive film theory film emotions   ......The article discusses - based on neuroscience and cognitive science - how the aesthetic experience of films depends on the brain's architecture and the mental flow called the PECMA flow. It describes how the flow from (visual and acoustic) perception of the film, via emotional and cognitive...... processes in the brain to simulated motor actions provides a series of options for aesthetic effects by the film's control of focus; focus on different steps in the flow will evoke different effects. The article further describe how shift of focus control experience of reality status, that is, whether...

  8. JEWELRY AS AN OBJECT OF AESTHETIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaybey KAROĞLU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is important to consider the jewelry as an aesthetic object and within the frame of the meaning given to aesthetic object concept from the beginning until today. First of all, jewelry which has the qualification of having a weight, being held and seen is a tangible presence. Since the jewelry which is a plain tangible presence has been comprehended by the subject with an attitude of liking and admiring, the jewelry is no longer a plain information object and turns into an aesthetic object. Archeological and anthropological researches showed that first examples of art are related to body decoration. This study is handled under “jewelry as an aesthetical object” and the subject is evaluated with an analytic approach.

  9. The religion under the rule of aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto da Silva Moreira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the modern process of aestheticization of culture and religion as consequent unfolding of the expansion of market rationality to the subjective life and the libidinal sphere of subjects. Its main objective is to inquire about the future of religion under the impact of sensation seeking culture and the inflation of aesthetics. Firstly, with the help of Türcke, Welsch, Foucault and Schultze´s investigate the aestheticization process of of social life, its causes and characteristics; Secondly, following Dufour, Türcke Leiss, Kline, Jhally e Welsch, it asks how the dynamics of aesthetical impacts the daily life and the bio-psychic economy of people; thirdly, it applies the results obtained to the analysis of what is happening with religion under the regime of aesthetics and sensational culture. Finally, it asks about the possible emancipatory potential of aestheticized own religious experience and tries to draw some further consequences for religion in the aesthetic field.

  10. Retinotopy of facial expression adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Kazumichi

    2014-01-01

    The face aftereffect (FAE; the illusion of faces after adaptation to a face) has been reported to occur without retinal overlap between adaptor and test, but recent studies revealed that the FAE is not constant across all test locations, which suggests that the FAE is also retinotopic. However, it remains unclear whether the characteristic of the retinotopy of the FAE for one facial aspect is the same as that of the FAE for another facial aspect. In the research reported here, an examination of the retinotopy of the FAE for facial expression indicated that the facial expression aftereffect occurs without retinal overlap between adaptor and test, and depends on the retinal distance between them. Furthermore, the results indicate that, although dependence of the FAE on adaptation-test distance is similar between facial expression and facial identity, the FAE for facial identity is larger than that for facial expression when a test face is presented in the opposite hemifield. On the basis of these results, I discuss adaptation mechanisms underlying facial expression processing and facial identity processing for the retinotopy of the FAE.

  11. Realistic facial animation generation based on facial expression mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Garrod, Oliver; Jack, Rachael; Schyns, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Facial expressions reflect internal emotional states of a character or in response to social communications. Though much effort has been taken to generate realistic facial expressions, it still remains a challenging topic due to human being's sensitivity to subtle facial movements. In this paper, we present a method for facial animation generation, which reflects true facial muscle movements with high fidelity. An intermediate model space is introduced to transfer captured static AU peak frames based on FACS to the conformed target face. And then dynamic parameters derived using a psychophysics method is integrated to generate facial animation, which is assumed to represent natural correlation of multiple AUs. Finally, the animation sequence in the intermediate model space is mapped to the target face to produce final animation.

  12. Reanimation of the middle and lower face in facial paralysis: review of the literature and personal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Shadi; MacQuillan, Anthony; Grobbelaar, Adriaan O

    2011-04-01

    Facial paralysis refers to a condition in which all or portions of the facial nerve are paralysed. The facial nerve controls the muscles of facial expression, paralysis which results in a lack of facial expression which is not only an aesthetic issue, but has functional consequences as the patient cannot communicate effectively. The treatment of long-standing facial paralysis has challenged plastic surgeons for centuries, and still the ultimate goal of normality of the paralysed hemi-face with symmetry at rest as well as the generation of a spontaneous symmetrical smile with corneal protection has not yet fully been reached. Until the end of the 19th century, the treatment of this condition involved non-surgical means such as ointments, medicines and electrotherapy. With the advent and refinement of microvascular surgical techniques in the latter half of the 20th century, vascularised free muscle transfers coupled with cross-facial nerve grafts were introduced, allowing the possibility of spontaneous emotion being restored to the paralysed face became reality. The aim of this article is to revisit the surgical evolution and current options available as well as outcomes for patients suffering from facial paralysis concentrating on middle and lower face reanimation.

  13. Aesthetics in synthesis and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steven A

    2012-12-01

    Physicists frequently allow aesthetics to guide their science. Chemists sometimes do. Biologists rarely do. They have encountered too frequently the consequences of the Darwinian 'hack'. The biological parts delivered by Darwinian processes are rarely simple, efficient, or elegant solutions to the biological problems that they address. Nevertheless, as humans, we seek to find aesthetics within our activities. In general, however, it is hard to distinguish what we say is beautiful from what is, in reality, utilitarian.

  14. Aesthetics and the Effects of Advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian

    Based on an evolutionary understanding of aesthetics a cognitive approach to analyzing advertising is proposed. This approach is compared with different semiotic traditions, and the advantages of a semio-cognitive approach are foregrounded.......Based on an evolutionary understanding of aesthetics a cognitive approach to analyzing advertising is proposed. This approach is compared with different semiotic traditions, and the advantages of a semio-cognitive approach are foregrounded....

  15. Aesthetics and the Effects of Advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian

    Based on an evolutionary understanding of aesthetics a cognitive approach to analyzing advertising is proposed. This approach is compared with different semiotic traditions, and the advantages of a semio-cognitive approach are foregrounded.......Based on an evolutionary understanding of aesthetics a cognitive approach to analyzing advertising is proposed. This approach is compared with different semiotic traditions, and the advantages of a semio-cognitive approach are foregrounded....

  16. Aesthetic and Culture Origin of Vocal Art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张延春

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most commonly and widely adopted art forms, vocal art has been closely related with national culture and the aesthetics trend. Traditional Chinese vocal art rooted from China' s long history and distinctive culture. On the contrary, Italian bel canto stems from the prospect of Italian Opera Art during the Renaissance period. This essay discusses the differences between East and West vocal art, from its aesthetic and culture origin.

  17. The art of nursing: an aesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Raeve, L

    1998-09-01

    This article explores the question of whether or not the 'art' of nursing can properly be described as an 'aesthetics'. The author concludes that, although much nursing literature on the subject is confused and even incoherent, there is nevertheless some justification for seeing a connection between the art of nursing and aesthetics. The philosophical writings of Martha Nussbaum and Iris Murdoch are used to support this position.

  18. Five things I believe about the aesthetics of interaction design

    OpenAIRE

    Löwgren, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    1. It makes little sense to talk about "visual aesthetics" as an isolated modality. 2. The genre determines the aesthetic qualities. 3. Aesthetic is not equal to good, pleasant, pretty, or nice. 4. Aesthetic experience is connected with intellectual deliberation as much as with immediate, "visceral" response. 5. We need holistic, interpretative approaches to dealing with aesthetics in interaction design. These five beliefs are introduced and substantiated by means of examples ...

  19. Reconstruction of Complex Facial Defects Using Cervical Expanded Flap Prefabricated by Temporoparietal Fascia Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Qinghua; Jiang, Haiyue; Liu, Ge; Huang, Wanlu; Dong, Weiwei

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of complex facial defects using cervical expanded flap prefabricated by temporoparietal fascia flap. Complex facial defects are required to restore not only function but also aesthetic appearance, so it is vital challenge for plastic surgeons. Skin grafts and traditional flap transfer cannot meet the reconstructive requirements of color and texture with recipient. The purpose of this sturdy is to create an expanded prefabricated temporoparietal fascia flap to repair complex facial defects. Two patients suffered severe burns on the face underwent complex facial resurfacing with prefabricated cervical flap. The vasculature of prefabricated flap, including the superficial temporal vessel and surrounding fascia, was used as the vascular carrier. The temporoparietal fascia flap was sutured underneath the cervical subcutaneous tissue, and expansion was begun in postoperative 1 week. After 4 to 6 months of expansion, the expander was removed, facial scars were excised, and cervical prefabricated flap was elevated and transferred to repair the complex facial defects. Two complex facial defects were repaired successfully by prefabricated temporoparietal fascia flap, and prefabricated flaps survived completely. On account of donor site's skin was thinner and expanded too fast, 1 expanded skin flap was rupture during expansion, but necrosis was not occurred after the 2nd operation. Venous congestion was observed in 1 patient, but after dressing, flap necrosis was not happened. Donor site was closed primarily. Postoperative follow-up 6 months, the color, texture of prefabricated flap was well-matched with facial skin. This method of expanded prefabricated flap may provide a reliable solution to the complex facial resurfacing.

  20. Other facial neuralgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Francis; Nurmikko, Turo; Sommer, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Premise In this article we review some lesser known cranial neuralgias that are distinct from trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, or trigeminal neuropathies. Included are occipital neuralgia, superior laryngeal neuralgia, auriculotemporal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal and nervus intermedius neuralgia, and pain from acute herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia of the trigeminal and intermedius nerves. Problem Facial neuralgias are rare and many physicians do not see such cases in their lifetime, so patients with a suspected diagnosis within this group should be referred to a specialized center where multidisciplinary team diagnosis may be available. Potential solution Each facial neuralgia can be identified on the basis of clinical presentation, allowing for precision diagnosis and planning of treatment. Treatment remains conservative with oral or topical medication recommended for neuropathic pain to be tried before more invasive procedures are undertaken. However, evidence for efficacy of current treatments remains weak.

  1. Facial resemblance enhances trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruine, Lisa M

    2002-07-07

    Organisms are expected to be sensitive to cues of genetic relatedness when making decisions about social behaviour. Relatedness can be assessed in several ways, one of which is phenotype matching: the assessment of similarity between others' traits and either one's own traits or those of known relatives. One candidate cue of relatedness in humans is facial resemblance. Here, I report the effects of an experimental manipulation of facial resemblance in a two-person sequential trust game. Subjects were shown faces of ostensible playing partners manipulated to resemble either themselves or an unknown person. Resemblance to the subject's own face raised the incidence of trusting a partner, but had no effect on the incidence of selfish betrayals of the partner's trust. Control subjects playing with identical pictures failed to show such an effect. In a second experiment, resemblance of the playing partner to a familiar (famous) person had no effect on either trusting or betrayals of trust.

  2. Congenital Facial Teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Manjunath; Hegde, Padmaraj; Devaraju, Umesh M.

    2011-01-01

    Teratomas are neoplasm composed of three germinal layers of the embryo that form tissues not normally found in the organ in which they arise. These are most common in the sacrococcygeal region and are rare in the head and neck, which account for less than 6%. An unusual case of facial teratoma in a new born, managed successfully is described here with postoperative follow up of 2 years without any recurrence.

  3. Brain correlates of aesthetic judgment of beauty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas; Schubotz, Ricarda I; Höfel, Lea; Cramon, D Yves V

    2006-01-01

    Functional MRI was used to investigate the neural correlates of aesthetic judgments of beauty of geometrical shapes. Participants performed evaluative aesthetic judgments (beautiful or not?) and descriptive symmetry judgments (symmetric or not?) on the same stimulus material. Symmetry was employed because aesthetic judgments are known to be often guided by criteria of symmetry. Novel, abstract graphic patterns were presented to minimize influences of attitudes or memory-related processes and to test effects of stimulus symmetry and complexity. Behavioral results confirmed the influence of stimulus symmetry and complexity on aesthetic judgments. Direct contrasts showed specific activations for aesthetic judgments in the frontomedian cortex (BA 9/10), bilateral prefrontal BA 45/47, and posterior cingulate, left temporal pole, and the temporoparietal junction. In contrast, symmetry judgments elicited specific activations in parietal and premotor areas subserving spatial processing. Interestingly, beautiful judgments enhanced BOLD signals not only in the frontomedian cortex, but also in the left intraparietal sulcus of the symmetry network. Moreover, stimulus complexity caused differential effects for each of the two judgment types. Findings indicate aesthetic judgments of beauty to rely on a network partially overlapping with that underlying evaluative judgments on social and moral cues and substantiate the significance of symmetry and complexity for our judgment of beauty.

  4. AESTHETICS: FROM NATURE TO ENGINEERING AND BACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tanga

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetics rises in XVIII Century involving the inner and the senses of the subject. The bipolar couple beautiful/ugly is no more enough to define new emerging aesthetic experiences of agreeable, charming, interesting, sublime... Traditional models of Perfection (based on metron, nomos, logos, eurhythmy, symmetry, once centrepieces of the metaphysics of beauty are soon overruled: irrational, disgusting, ugliness, darkness, mystery, shadow, troubled, dreadful, perturbing gain wide and independent spaces. Time, body, proximity senses, geographic, naturalistic and technological discoveries and inventions are among the factors of this turning point that go with the development of aesthetics. Rising and growing modern science, new technology and engineering determine a deep crisis in the aesthetic vision of nature, art, world, but also offer the references to build a new cultural and existential frame. In particular, actual engineering contributes to quality of life and offer explanations and demonstrations about how and because a thing or an action can satisfy our aesthetic sense, meant in a wide acceptation. As example we use the geometry of road and its curves and we compare this with structures we find in Nature. We use curves whose curvature changes along their development. They are very suitable to show how science and technology have dispelled the classic idea of perfection (based on quite, simple, exactly defined shapes as circle or square and have contributed to build a new kind of aesthetic taste that understands and appreciates less defined and more problematic ones, coming from different laws.

  5. Reshaping Spectatorship: Immersive and Distributed Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwina Bartlem

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although discourses of immersive aesthetics and distributed aesthetics may evoke associations with different media, creative processes, modes of audience engagement and even political ideologies, artists using these aesthetics often share similar interests in transforming and enhancing notions of the body and perception through technological intervention. This paper undertakes a comparison between immersive and distributed aesthetics in relation to Virtual Reality (VR and Networked Art (net.art, particularly networked installation art. It focuses on the ways in which both VR and networked installations immerse the viewer in states of perceptual and cognitive transition. Central to this article is the argument that VR and net.art are able to generate immersive experiences in the viewer by creating the sensation of being (tele-present in an electronically mediated environment that is illusionistic and sometimes remote from the physical body of the participant. Furthermore, the immersive and distributed aesthetics generated by specific VR and net.art projects have revolutionary consequences for traditional aesthetic theories of spectatorship and art appreciation that assert the need for critical and physical distance.

  6. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khursheed Alam

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian, with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25. Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI, Malaysian Chinese (MC and Malaysian Malay (MM were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05 but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1% were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5% short and 81 (28.3% long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts.1 Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%; 2 Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3 Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4 All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5 No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  7. Comparison of hemihypoglossal- and accessory-facial neurorrhaphy for treating facial paralysis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dezhi; Wan, Hong; Feng, Jie; Wang, Shiwei; Su, Diya; Hao, Shuyu; Schumacher, Michael; Liu, Song

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-end (HemiHN-FN) and accessory-facial nerve end-to-end (AN-FN) neurorrhaphy using a predegenerated nerve graft (PNG) for reanimating facial paralysis in a rat FN injury model. A total of 25 rats with complete unilateral facial paralysis resulting from section of the right FN were divided into 5 groups (n=5 each) that were submitted to immediate, delayed (3 months after FN injury) or no (control) FN reconstruction procedures involving HemiHN-FN or AN-FN neurorrhaphy. Approximately 3 months after FN reconstruction, cholera toxin subunit B conjugate Alexa 555 (CTB-Alexa 555) was injected into the ipsilateral whisker pad muscle and CTB-Alexa 555-labeled neurons were observed in the hypoglossal or accessory nuclei of all the FN reconstruction rats, but none of these neurons were found in the controls. There were numerous myelinated and nonmyelinated axons in both PNG and repaired FN of the FN reconstruction rats. No differences were found for these numbers between the two neurorrhaphy methods for each of the treatment time points, indicating the equal effectiveness of axon regeneration. However, a significantly higher number of CTB-Alexa 555-labeled neurons was observed in the hypoglossal nucleus of the immediate HemiHN-FN neurorrhaphy-treated rats when compared to that in the accessory nucleus of the immediate AN-FN neurorrhaphy-treated rats, consistent with the surface values of the recorded MAPs at the whisker pad muscle while electro-stimulating the FN. These results suggest that HemiHN-FN neurorrhaphy produces more efficient innervation of the paralyzed facial muscles than AN-FN neurorrhaphy without sacrificing ipsilateral hypoglossal function. Taking into consideration the clinical relevance of these findings for postoperative complications and functional reanimation in relation to the central plasticity, we suggest that HemiHN-FN neurorrhaphy may be the preferable facial

  8. Disección anatómica de la musculatura mímica facial: revisión iconográfica de apoyo a los tratamientos complementarios en rejuvenecimiento facial Anatomical dissection of the mimic facial musculature: iconographic review as a support to the complementary treatments in facial rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Casado Sánchez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A la hora de valorar las múltiples técnicas empleadas en el rejuvenecimiento facial y centrándonos de manera particular en aquellos procedimientos mínimamente invasivos complementarios a las intervenciones habituales en Cirugía Plástica-Estética, cobra especial relevancia el conocimiento exhaustivo de las estructuras musculares implicadas en la mímica facial. A tal efecto, se ha realizado un estudio anatómico en cadáveres frescos, en los que se han disecado las principales estructuras referidas. Se presenta un resumen iconográfico de los músculos faciales implicados, haciendo hincapié en su anatomía descriptiva y funcional, así como un recuerdo de las principales áreas problemáticas por alguna circunstancia especial (presencia de un nervio sensitivo o motor.To value the multiple technologies involved in facial rejuvenation and focusing in those minimally invasive complementary procedures to the usual Plastic and Aesthetic Surgeries, it´s very important the exhaustive knowledge of the muscular structures involved in the facial movements. To such an effect, an anatomical study has been realized in fresh corpses, dissecting the principal above-mentioned structures. We present an iconographic summary of the facial implied muscles, emphasizing in his descriptive and functional anatomy, as well as a recollection of the principal problematic areas for some special circumstance (presence of a sensory or motor nerve.

  9. First Consensus on Primary Prevention and Early Intervention in Aesthetic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Marina; Anand, Chytra V; Besins, Thierry; Chao, Yates Yen Yu; Fabi, Sabrina Guillen; Gout, Uliana; Kerscher, Martina; Pavicic, Tatjana; Peng, Peter Hsien Li; Rzany, Berthold; Sattler, Gerhard; Tiryaki, Tunk; Waldorf, Heidi A; Braz, Andre

    2017-09-01

    Facial aging is a complex interplay of extrinsic and intrinsic factors leading to progressive changes in the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and bone. Clinical experience suggests that early aesthetic intervention may slow the signs of aging, but treatment in the absence of symptoms or with minimal signs of aging has not yet been properly addressed. To provide treatment recommendations for primary prevention and early intervention in individuals with no or minimal signs of aging. Fourteen specialists in aesthetic medicine convened over a full-day meeting under the guidance of a certified moderator. Tailored treatment recommendations have been provided for prevention and early intervention of fine wrinkles, static lines and folds, irregular pigmentation, laxity, and subcutaneous volume loss by protecting the epidermis, stimulating neocollagenesis, reducing hyperkinetic musculature, and reinforcing supporting structures. Preventive measures and early therapeutic interventions that may alter the course of facial aging were defined. Further studies are needed to support these recommendations with the best possible evidence. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(9):846-854..

  10. Facial pain and temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of facial pain and the association of facial pain with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) as well as with other factors, in a geographically defined population-based sample consisting of subjects born in 1966 in northern Finland, and in a case-control study including subjects with facial pain and their healthy controls. In addition, the influence of conservative stomatognathic and necessary prosthetic treatme...

  11. Body actions change the appearance of facial expressions.

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    Carlo Fantoni

    Full Text Available Perception, cognition, and emotion do not operate along segregated pathways; rather, their adaptive interaction is supported by various sources of evidence. For instance, the aesthetic appraisal of powerful mood inducers like music can bias the facial expression of emotions towards mood congruency. In four experiments we showed similar mood-congruency effects elicited by the comfort/discomfort of body actions. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure, we let participants perform comfortable/uncomfortable visually-guided reaches and tested them in a facial emotion identification task. Through the alleged mediation of motor action induced mood, action comfort enhanced the quality of the participant's global experience (a neutral face appeared happy and a slightly angry face neutral, while action discomfort made a neutral face appear angry and a slightly happy face neutral. Furthermore, uncomfortable (but not comfortable reaching improved the sensitivity for the identification of emotional faces and reduced the identification time of facial expressions, as a possible effect of hyper-arousal from an unpleasant bodily experience.

  12. A cross-sectional study of soft tissue facial morphometry in children of West Bengal

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    Badruddin A Bazmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Facial analysis is the first step in the evaluation of patients with orthodontic, cosmetic, or reconstructive procedures of the face, and one of the most important components of orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. It is a well-established fact that human faces differ from one another on the basis of race and ethnicity. The study will provide the aesthetic guidelines to assess the facial discrepancy in Bengali children to develop a proper treatment plan. Aims: To find out the mean values for selective linear measurements on the facial soft tissue of Bengali children, to demonstrate gender differences in the measurements. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was done on 250 Bengali children of 6-14 years age, by measuring certain identified facial landmarks using a digital caliper. Statistical Analysis Used: Analytical statistical method with the help of student′s t-test was used to determine mean values, standard deviation, and gender differences in the measurements using SPSS version 11.0. Results: In 6-8 years age group, male′s average inter-endocanthion distance was significantly higher than that of females ( P 0.05, though for 87% of cases, it was significant ( P = 0.13. Total facial height for male subject was significantly high compared to that of females ( P < 0.001 in 12-14 years age group. Conclusions: The study will provide the aesthetic guidelines to assess the facial discrepancy in Bengali children and provide a proper treatment plan through a simple and economically reasonable soft tissue analysis method.

  13. [Prosopagnosia and facial expression recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews clinical neuropsychological studies that have indicated that the recognition of a person's identity and the recognition of facial expressions are processed by different cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. The fusiform gyrus, especially the right fusiform gyrus, plays an important role in the recognition of identity. The superior temporal sulcus, amygdala, and medial frontal cortex play important roles in facial-expression recognition. Both facial recognition and facial-expression recognition are highly intellectual processes that involve several regions of the brain.

  14. Virtual 3-D Facial Reconstruction

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    Martin Paul Evison

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial reconstructions in archaeology allow empathy with people who lived in the past and enjoy considerable popularity with the public. It is a common misconception that facial reconstruction will produce an exact likeness; a resemblance is the best that can be hoped for. Research at Sheffield University is aimed at the development of a computer system for facial reconstruction that will be accurate, rapid, repeatable, accessible and flexible. This research is described and prototypical 3-D facial reconstructions are presented. Interpolation models simulating obesity, ageing and ethnic affiliation are also described. Some strengths and weaknesses in the models, and their potential for application in archaeology are discussed.

  15. History of facial pain diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Troels S

    2017-01-01

    Premise Facial pain refers to a heterogeneous group of clinically and etiologically different conditions with the common clinical feature of pain in the facial area. Among these conditions, trigeminal neuralgia (TN), persistent idiopathic facial pain, temporomandibular joint pain, and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TAC) are the most well described conditions. Conclusion TN has been known for centuries, and is recognised by its characteristic and almost pathognomonic clinical features. The other facial pain conditions are less well defined, and over the years there has been confusion about their classification. PMID:28181442

  16. Management of facial burns with a collagen/glycosaminoglycan skin substitute-prospective experience with 12 consecutive patients with large, deep facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthew B; Engrav, Loren H; Holmes, James H; Friedrich, Jeffrey B; Costa, Beth A; Honari, Shari; Gibran, Nicole S

    2005-05-01

    Management of deep facial burns remains one of the greatest challenges in burn care. We have developed a protocol over the past 20 years for management of facial burns that includes excision and coverage with thick autograft. However, the results were not perfect. Deformities of the eyelids, nose and mouth as well as the prominence of skin graft junctures demonstrated the need to explore novel approaches. Integra has been used with success in the management of burns of the trunk and extremities. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the aesthetic outcome of the use of Integra for deep facial burns. Twelve consecutive patients underwent excision of large, deep facial burns and placement of Integra. Integra provides excellent color and minimally visible skin graft junctures. The texture is good but not as supple as thick autograft. Integra is not well suited for use in the coverage of eyelid burns due to the need to wait 2 weeks for adequate vascularization. In summary, thick autograft remains the gold standard for deep facial burns. However, for patients with extensive burns and limited donor sites, Integra provides an acceptable alternative.

  17. The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The main intent of this article is to describe some opportunities for an education in aesthetics by referring to similarities between intensive experiences of music in the individual life and in the history of aesthetics. Here, the author discusses Romanticism through the writings of Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder. Among other things, she discusses…

  18. The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The main intent of this article is to describe some opportunities for an education in aesthetics by referring to similarities between intensive experiences of music in the individual life and in the history of aesthetics. Here, the author discusses Romanticism through the writings of Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder. Among other things, she discusses…

  19. Aesthetics, the Arts, and Education: The Painter as a Model in Aesthetic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munski, Marilyn L.

    Arguing that the visual arts serve as the focus for potential aesthetic experience in the discipline of art education, this paper describes the influence of the sensory elements of aesthetic experience in nature and other art forms on the work of three artists--Kandinsky, Van Gogh, and Picasso--and suggests that teachers can enrich students'…

  20. Psychological change after aesthetic plastic surgery: a prospective controlled outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Timothy P; Harris, David L

    2009-10-01

    Aesthetic plastic surgery has been long practiced for primarily psychological rather than physical benefit to patients. However, evaluation of the psychological impact of aesthetic plastic surgery has often been of limited methodological rigor in both study design and appropriate measurement. This study is intended to evaluate the psychological impact of aesthetic surgery on patients seeking such intervention in regard to concerns about breasts, nose or upper limbs using standardised psychometric instruments. Participants were recruited through the Plastic Surgery Unit (Patients) and general surgery, ENT surgery and Maxillo-facial surgery (Comparisons) at a UK General Hospital. Outcome measures included the Crown-Crisp Experiential Inventory anxiety scale, Beck Depression Inventory and Derriford Appearance Scale-24, a valid and reliable measure of distress and dysfunction in relation to self-consciousness of appearance. Data were collected pre-operatively (T1) and 3 months post-operatively (T2) for both groups. Longitudinal appearance adjustment for the plastic surgery group was also assessed at 12 months (T3). Both groups were less depressed and anxious post-operatively. The improvement in anxiety was significantly greater in the plastic surgery group. Body site specific appearance distress was significantly improved for the plastics group only, and the level of improvement was related to the body site affected.

  1. Cleidocranial Dysplasia Case Report: Remodeling of Teeth as Aesthetic Restorative Treatment

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    Leonardo Fernandes da Cunha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD, is an autosomal dominant disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 1,000,000 individuals. It is generally characterized by orofacial manifestations, including enamel hypoplasia, retained primary teeth, and impacted permanent and supernumerary teeth. The successful treatment involving a timing intervention (orthodontic-maxillofacial surgeons-restorative is already described. However, the restorative treatment might improve the aesthetic final result in dentistry management for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. Objective. Therefore, this clinical report presents a conservative restorative management (enamel microabrasion, dental bleaching, and direct composite resin for aesthetic solution for a patient with CCD. Clinical Considerations. The cosmetic remodeling is a conservative, secure, and low cost therapy that can be associated with other procedures such as enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to achieve optimal outcome. Additionally, the Golden Proportion can be used to guide dental remodeling to improve the harmony of the smile and the facial composition. Conclusions. Thus, dentists must know and be able to treat dental aesthetic problems in cleidocranial dysplasia patients. The intention of this paper is to describe a restorative approach with the cosmetic remodeling teeth (by grinding or addicting material associated with enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to reestablish the form, shape, and color of smile for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia.

  2. Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Sections Botulinum Toxin (Botox) ... Facial Wrinkles How Does Botulinum Toxin (Botox) Work? Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  3. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... this condition. Some factors that can cause birth trauma (injury) include: Large baby size (may be seen ...

  4. Shadows alter facial expressions of Noh masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyata, Hiromitsu; Nishimura, Ritsuko; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    A Noh mask, worn by expert actors during performance on the Japanese traditional Noh drama, conveys various emotional expressions despite its fixed physical properties. How does the mask change its expressions? Shadows change subtly during the actual Noh drama, which plays a key role in creating elusive artistic enchantment. We here describe evidence from two experiments regarding how attached shadows of the Noh masks influence the observers' recognition of the emotional expressions. In Experiment 1, neutral-faced Noh masks having the attached shadows of the happy/sad masks were recognized as bearing happy/sad expressions, respectively. This was true for all four types of masks each of which represented a character differing in sex and age, even though the original characteristics of the masks also greatly influenced the evaluation of emotions. Experiment 2 further revealed that frontal Noh mask images having shadows of upward/downward tilted masks were evaluated as sad/happy, respectively. This was consistent with outcomes from preceding studies using actually tilted Noh mask images. Results from the two experiments concur that purely manipulating attached shadows of the different types of Noh masks significantly alters the emotion recognition. These findings go in line with the mysterious facial expressions observed in Western paintings, such as the elusive qualities of Mona Lisa's smile. They also agree with the aesthetic principle of Japanese traditional art "yugen (profound grace and subtlety)", which highly appreciates subtle emotional expressions in the darkness.

  5. Shadows alter facial expressions of Noh masks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Kawai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A Noh mask, worn by expert actors during performance on the Japanese traditional Noh drama, conveys various emotional expressions despite its fixed physical properties. How does the mask change its expressions? Shadows change subtly during the actual Noh drama, which plays a key role in creating elusive artistic enchantment. We here describe evidence from two experiments regarding how attached shadows of the Noh masks influence the observers' recognition of the emotional expressions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Experiment 1, neutral-faced Noh masks having the attached shadows of the happy/sad masks were recognized as bearing happy/sad expressions, respectively. This was true for all four types of masks each of which represented a character differing in sex and age, even though the original characteristics of the masks also greatly influenced the evaluation of emotions. Experiment 2 further revealed that frontal Noh mask images having shadows of upward/downward tilted masks were evaluated as sad/happy, respectively. This was consistent with outcomes from preceding studies using actually tilted Noh mask images. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results from the two experiments concur that purely manipulating attached shadows of the different types of Noh masks significantly alters the emotion recognition. These findings go in line with the mysterious facial expressions observed in Western paintings, such as the elusive qualities of Mona Lisa's smile. They also agree with the aesthetic principle of Japanese traditional art "yugen (profound grace and subtlety", which highly appreciates subtle emotional expressions in the darkness.

  6. Using Computers for Assessment of Facial Features and Recognition of Anatomical Variants that Result in Unfavorable Rhinoplasty Outcomes

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    Tarik Ozkul

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoplasty and facial plastic surgery are among the most frequently performed surgical procedures in the world. Although the underlying anatomical features of nose and face are very well known, performing a successful facial surgery requires not only surgical skills but also aesthetical talent from surgeon. Sculpting facial features surgically in correct proportions to end up with an aesthetically pleasing result is highly difficult. To further complicate the matter, some patients may have some anatomical features which affect rhinoplasty operation outcome negatively. If goes undetected, these anatomical variants jeopardize the surgery causing unexpected rhinoplasty outcomes. In this study, a model is developed with the aid of artificial intelligence tools, which analyses facial features of the patient from photograph, and generates an index of "appropriateness" of the facial features and an index of existence of anatomical variants that effect rhinoplasty negatively. The software tool developed is intended to detect the variants and warn the surgeon before the surgery. Another purpose of the tool is to generate an objective score to assess the outcome of the surgery.

  7. iFace: Facial Expression Training System

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Kyoko; Kurose, Hiroyuki; Takami, Ai; Nishida, Shogo

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a target facial expression selection interface for a facial expression training system and a facial expression training system were both proposed and developed. Twelve female dentists used the facial expression training system, and evaluations and opinions about the facial expression training system were obtained from these participants. In the future, we will attempt to improve both the target facial expression selection interface and the comparison of a current and a target f...

  8. Cephalometric soft tissue facial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, R T

    1999-10-01

    My objective is to present a cephalometric-based facial analysis to correlate with an article that was published previously in the American Journal of Orthodontic and Dentofacial Orthopedics. Eighteen facial or soft tissue traits are discussed in this article. All of them are significant in successful orthodontic outcome, and none of them depend on skeletal landmarks for measurement. Orthodontic analysis most commonly relies on skeletal and dental measurement, placing far less emphasis on facial feature measurement, particularly their relationship to each other. Yet, a thorough examination of the face is critical for understanding the changes in facial appearance that result from orthodontic treatment. A cephalometric approach to facial examination can also benefit the diagnosis and treatment plan. Individual facial traits and their balance with one another should be identified before treatment. Relying solely on skeletal analysis, assuming that the face will balance if the skeletal/dental cephalometric values are normalized, may not yield the desired outcome. Good occlusion does not necessarily mean good facial balance. Orthodontic norms for facial traits can permit their measurement. Further, with a knowledge of standard facial traits and the patient's soft tissue features, an individualized norm can be established for each patient to optimize facial attractiveness. Four questions should be asked regarding each facial trait before treatment: (1) What is the quality and quantity of the trait? (2) How will future growth affect the trait? (3) How will orthodontic tooth movement affect the existing trait (positively or negatively)? (4) How will surgical bone movement to correct the bite affect the trait (positively or negatively)?

  9. Children's Facial Trustworthiness Judgments: Agreement and Relationship with Facial Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fengling; Xu, Fen; Luo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined developmental changes in children's abilities to make trustworthiness judgments based on faces and the relationship between a child's perception of trustworthiness and facial attractiveness. One hundred and one 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds, along with 37 undergraduates, were asked to judge the trustworthiness of 200 faces. Next, they issued facial attractiveness judgments. The results indicated that children made consistent trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments based on facial appearance, but with-adult and within-age agreement levels of facial judgments increased with age. Additionally, the agreement levels of judgments made by girls were higher than those by boys. Furthermore, the relationship between trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments increased with age, and the relationship between two judgments made by girls was closer than those by boys. These findings suggest that face-based trait judgment ability develops throughout childhood and that, like adults, children may use facial attractiveness as a heuristic cue that signals a stranger's trustworthiness.

  10. Nerve Transfer for Facial Paralysis Under Intravenous Sedation and Local Analgesia for the High Surgical Risk Elderly Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Carlos; Cardenas Mejia, Alexander; Cavadas, Pedro Carlos; Thione, Alessandro; Aramburo Garcia, Rigoberto; Rozen, Shai

    2016-07-01

    This case report describes an 86-year-old woman with complete peripheral right-sided facial paralysis resulting from resection of a cervical lipoma 14 months before surgery. Because of the high anesthetic risk, a masseter to facial nerve transfer was performed under combined light sedation and local anesthetic. Good functional and aesthetic outcomes were noted without complications. To our knowledge, nerve transfers under light sedation and local anesthesia have not been described in the literature and may be useful in elderly patients with significant comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Implicaciones médico legales del trasplante facial Medicolegal implications in the facial transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maikel Vargas Sanabria

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Un hecho reciente que ha causado revuelo en la comunidad médica internacional ha sido la noticia de la realización del primer trasplante parcial de cara en Francia. Con este hecho se ha vuelto a poner sobre el tapete un tema que desde el punto de vista médico, psicosocial y ético ha generado polémica. Asimismo, puede tener implicaciones desde el enfoque medicolegal. Los trasplantes han tenido un desarrollo vertiginoso desde los inicios del siglo XX, desarrollando técnicas microquirúrgicas y fármacos inmunomoduladores capaces de garantizar un alto porcentaje de éxito. Sin embargo en este momento el trasplante facial estaría indicado para un reducido número de casos con severas lesiones faciales en los cuales las técnicas convencionales no ofreciesen más ayuda. Además los pacientes tendrían que dar su consentimiento informado a un procedimiento que aún está en fase experimental y del cual no se conocen con certeza las consecuencias a corto, mediano y largo plazo. Desde el punto de vista medicolegal implicaría principalmente la modificación de la evolución usual de los estados secuelares funcionales y estéticos del rostro.A recent fact that has caused commotion in the international medical community has been the news of first partial face transplantation executed in France. With this fact, this theme has been put again on the covering. Since the medical, psychosocial and ethical point of view, it has generated polemics. Likewise, it can have medicolegal implications. The transplants have had a giddy development since the starts of the 20th century, when were developed microsurgical techniques and then inmunosuppressant drugs. With both there was a high percentage of transplant success. Nevertheless, at this time, the facial transplant would be indicated for a reduced number of patients with severe facial wounds, in which the conventional techniques don’t offer more helps. Also, it is necessary that the patients give their

  12. Towards a sensorimotor aesthetics of performing art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Merino, B; Jola, C; Glaser, D E; Haggard, P

    2008-09-01

    The field of neuroaesthetics attempts to identify the brain processes underlying aesthetic experience, including but not limited to beauty. Previous neuroaesthetic studies have focussed largely on paintings and music, while performing arts such as dance have been less studied. Nevertheless, increasing knowledge of the neural mechanisms that represent the bodies and actions of others, and which contribute to empathy, make a neuroaesthetics of dance timely. Here, we present the first neuroscientific study of aesthetic perception in the context of the performing arts. We investigated brain areas whose activity during passive viewing of dance stimuli was related to later, independent aesthetic evaluation of the same stimuli. Brain activity of six naïve male subjects was measured using fMRI, while they watched 24 dance movements, and performed an irrelevant task. In a later session, participants rated each movement along a set of established aesthetic dimensions. The ratings were used to identify brain regions that were more active when viewing moves that received high average ratings than moves that received low average ratings. This contrast revealed bilateral activity in the occipital cortices and in right premotor cortex. Our results suggest a possible role of visual and sensorimotor brain areas in an automatic aesthetic response to dance. This sensorimotor response may explain why dance is widely appreciated in so many human cultures.

  13. Aesthetic quality inference for online fashion shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Allebach, Jan

    2014-03-01

    On-line fashion communities in which participants post photos of personal fashion items for viewing and possible purchase by others are becoming increasingly popular. Generally, these photos are taken by individuals who have no training in photography with low-cost mobile phone cameras. It is desired that photos of the products have high aesthetic quality to improve the users' online shopping experience. In this work, we design features for aesthetic quality inference in the context of online fashion shopping. Psychophysical experiments are conducted to construct a database of the photos' aesthetic evaluation, specifically for photos from an online fashion shopping website. We then extract both generic low-level features and high-level image attributes to represent the aesthetic quality. Using a support vector machine framework, we train a predictor of the aesthetic quality rating based on the feature vector. Experimental results validate the efficacy of our approach. Metadata such as the product type are also used to further improve the result.

  14. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery.

  15. Processing faces and facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posamentier, Mette T; Abdi, Hervé

    2003-09-01

    This paper reviews processing of facial identity and expressions. The issue of independence of these two systems for these tasks has been addressed from different approaches over the past 25 years. More recently, neuroimaging techniques have provided researchers with new tools to investigate how facial information is processed in the brain. First, findings from "traditional" approaches to identity and expression processing are summarized. The review then covers findings from neuroimaging studies on face perception, recognition, and encoding. Processing of the basic facial expressions is detailed in light of behavioral and neuroimaging data. Whereas data from experimental and neuropsychological studies support the existence of two systems, the neuroimaging literature yields a less clear picture because it shows considerable overlap in activation patterns in response to the different face-processing tasks. Further, activation patterns in response to facial expressions support the notion of involved neural substrates for processing different facial expressions.

  16. Tracking facial features with occlusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MARKIN Evgeny; PRAKASH Edmond C.

    2006-01-01

    Facial expression recognition consists of determining what kind of emotional content is presented in a human face.The problem presents a complex area for exploration, since it encompasses face acquisition, facial feature tracking, facial expression classification. Facial feature tracking is of the most interest. Active Appearance Model (AAM) enables accurate tracking of facial features in real-time, but lacks occlusions and self-occlusions. In this paper we propose a solution to improve the accuracy of fitting technique. The idea is to include occluded images into AAM training data. We demonstrate the results by running ex periments using gradient descent algorithm for fitting the AAM. Our experiments show that using fitting algorithm with occluded training data improves the fitting quality of the algorithm.

  17. Facial Asymmetry and Emotional Expression

    CERN Document Server

    Pickin, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This report is about facial asymmetry, its connection to emotional expression, and methods of measuring facial asymmetry in videos of faces. The research was motivated by two factors: firstly, there was a real opportunity to develop a novel measure of asymmetry that required minimal human involvement and that improved on earlier measures in the literature; and secondly, the study of the relationship between facial asymmetry and emotional expression is both interesting in its own right, and important because it can inform neuropsychological theory and answer open questions concerning emotional processing in the brain. The two aims of the research were: first, to develop an automatic frame-by-frame measure of facial asymmetry in videos of faces that improved on previous measures; and second, to use the measure to analyse the relationship between facial asymmetry and emotional expression, and connect our findings with previous research of the relationship.

  18. [A "dialogue" between the aesthetics of nursing and philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hsiu; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2012-02-01

    Nursing aesthetics belong to the broader school of aesthetics, a branch of philosophy, as well as the nursing arts, an element of professional nursing. The philosophy of aesthetics recognizes the connection between an author and appreciators and identifies both substantive and abstract aesthetic experiences in interpersonal communication through the fine arts. Nursing aesthetics values the meaningful moments of patients, is sensitive to the influences of different circumstances and situations, and appreciates the unique qualities of humanness. Nursing aesthetics is emancipatory knowledge and involves empirical, ethical and personal knowing. The article is based on a search of OvidSP and Chinese Electronic Periodical Services (CEPS) database references using key words including aesthetic, aesthetics, art of nursing, or nursing aesthetics as well as a review of books related to aesthetics, knowledge construction, and nursing aesthetics. Authors determined definitions as defined by nursing experts and the applications thereof in clinical practice. This article aimed to illustrate that the ultimate concern of philosophy is "goodness" and that the foundation of caring behaviors is "love". In practice, nursing aesthetics is expressed through empathy, appreciation, inspiration and the therapeutic use of the self. Through aesthetic knowing and enhanced perceptual sensibility and reflection, nurses can transform intuitive knowing into art-acts and ultimately enhance nursing care quality.

  19. Forming Future Teachers’ Aesthetic Culture in Foreign Educational Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotska Galyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a theoretical analysis of foreign educational experience in solving scientific problems of forming future teachers’ aesthetic culture. Given the current socio-cultural situation, it has been noted that a teacher who developed his/her aesthetic culture can make a direct contribution to the social and cultural challenges of a changing world. Based on the study of scientific and pedagogical literature, normative and legal support and the content of practical courses, the author has revealed the peculiarities of forming future specialists’ aesthetic culture in foreign countries (Japan, Germany, Canada, the United States, England. Special attention has been paid to the aesthetic potential of fine arts in forming future teachers’ aesthetic culture, which ensures the harmony of intellectual and aesthetic development of personality, enriches the emotional and sensual sphere, develops cognitive and creative activities, aesthetic needs and tastes, stipulates for future teachers’ involving in the process of artistic and aesthetic culture of the nation. The performed analysis proves that the forming of future teachers’ aesthetic culture should be based on the intercultural approach; the ideas of interrelation between aesthetic and ecological in aesthetic education; integration relations between powerful potential of fine (visual arts, environmental science and aesthetic creativity. The experience of foreign educational practice may be adopted by domestic universities to form individual aesthetic culture of future teachers.

  20. Should Advertising by Aesthetic Surgeons be Permitted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    Cosmetic, aesthetic and cutaneous surgical procedures require qualified specialists trained in the various procedures and competent to handle complications. However, it also requires huge investments in terms of infrastructure, trained staff and equipment. To be viable advertising is essential to any establishment which provides cosmetic and aesthetic procedures. Business men with deep pockets establish beauty chains which also provide these services and advertise heavily to sway public opinion in their favour. However, these saloons and spas lack basic medical facilities in terms of staff or equipment to handle any complication or medical emergency. To have a level playing field ethical advertising should be permitted to qualified aesthetic surgeons as is permitted in the US and UK by their respective organisations. PMID:28529421

  1. A Functional Model of the Aesthetic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Conrad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In a process of somatic evolution, the brain semi-randomly generates initially-unstable neural circuits that are selectively stabilized if they succeed in making sense out of raw sensory input. The human aesthetic response serves the function of stabilizing the circuits that successfully mediate perception and interpretation, making those faculties more agile, conferring selective advantage. It is triggered by structures in art and nature that provoke the making of sense. Art is deliberate human action aimed at triggering the aesthetic response in others; thus, if successful, it serves the same function of making perception and interpretation more agile. These few principles initiate a cascade of emergent phenomena which account for many observed qualities of aesthetics, including universality and idiosyncrasy of taste, the relevance of artists’ intentions, the virtues of openness and resonance, the dysfunction of formulaic art, and the fact that methods of art correspond to modes of perceptual transformation.

  2. Aesthetic Qualities of Cross Laminated Timber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejder, Anne Kirkegaard

    The common thread through this thesis is the aim of bringing the aesthetic, poetic and sensuous qualities of materials into focus. This is done with the belief that materials are more than merely the means of construction, i.e. more than a building system. The thesis takes its point of departure...... in the great importance wood has had as a building material throughout history as a naturally occurring, strong, light and workable construction material with various multi-sensuous qualities and great applicability. Over the last two decades, wood as a building material has gained renewed focus, partly due...... an undefined aesthetic potential that may innovate how we construct and perceive timber architecture, the overall aim of the thesis is to inquire into the architectural and aesthetic qualities of CLT. Through three chapters this thesis examines and discusses 1) the architectural qualities of CLT, 2...

  3. Vascularization of the facial bones by facial artery: implications for full face allotransplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rampazzo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background-The maxillary artery is recognized as the main vascular supply of the facial bones; nonetheless clinical evidence supports a co-dominant role for the facial artery. This study explores the extent of the facial skeleton within a facial allograft that can be harvested based on the facial artery. Methods-Twenty-three cadaver heads were used in this study. In 12 heads, the right facial, superficial temporal and maxillary arteries were injected. In 1 head, facial artery angiography w...

  4. Odontogenic Facial Cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yordany Boza Mejias

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: odontogenic facial cellulitis is an acute inflammatory process manifested in very different ways, with a variable scale in clinical presentation ranging from harmless well defined processes, to diffuse and progressive that may develop complications leading the patient to a critical condition, even risking their lives. Objective: To characterize the behavior of odontogenic facial cellulitis. Methods: A descriptive case series study was conducted at the dental clinic of Aguada de Pasajeros, Cienfuegos, from September 2010 to March 2011. It included 56 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Variables analyzed included: sex, age, teeth and regions affected, causes of cellulite and prescribed treatment. Results: no sex predilection was observed, lower molars and submandibular anatomical region were the most affected (50% and 30 4% respectively being tooth decay the main cause for this condition (51, 7%. The opening access was not performed to all the patients in the emergency service. The causal tooth extraction was not commonly done early, according to the prescribed antibiotic group. Thermotherapy with warm fomentation and saline mouthwash was the most prescribed and the most widely used group of antibiotics was the penicillin. Conclusions: dental caries were the major cause of odontogenic cellulite. There are still difficulties with the implementation of opening access.

  5. Integrating the philosophy and psychology of aesthetic experience: development of the aesthetic experience scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulou, Despina

    2004-10-01

    This study assessed the dynamic relationship between person and object in aesthetic experience. Patterns of the structure of aesthetic experience were derived from a conceptual model based on philosophical and psychological ideas. These patterns were further informed by interviewing individuals with extensive involvement in aesthetic activities and 25 secondary students. Accordingly, patterns were tested by developing a large pool of items attempting to identify measurable structural components of aesthetic experience. Refined first in a pilot study, the 36-item questionnaire was administered to 652 Greek students, aged from 13 to 15 years. Correlation matrices and exploratory factor analyses on principal components were used to examine internal structural relationships. The obliquely rotated five-factor solution of the refined instrument accounted for the 44.1% of the total variance and was combatible with the conceptual model of aesthetic experience, indicating the plausibility of both. The internal consistency of the items was adequate and external correlational analysis offered preliminary support for subsequent development of a self-report measure that serves to operationalize the major constructs of aesthetic experience in the general adolescent population. The results also raise theoretical issues for those interested in empirical aesthetics, suggesting that in experiential functioning, expressive perception and affect may play a more constructive role in cognitive processes than is generally acknowledged.

  6. A New Kind of Aesthetics —The Mathematical Structure of the Aesthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Kubota

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new approach to the investigation into aesthetics. Specifically, it~argues that it is possible to explain the aesthetic and its underlying dynamic relations with an~axiomatic structure (the octahedral axiom-derived category based on contemporary mathematics (namely category theory, and through this argument suggests the possibility for discussion about the mathematical structure of the aesthetic. If there were a way to describe the structure of the aesthetic with the language of mathematical structures and mathematical axioms---a~language completely devoid of arbitrariness---then we would make possible a universal argument about the essential human activity of ``the aesthetic'', and we would also gain a new method and viewpoint into the philosophy and meaning of the act of creating a work of art and artistic activities. This paper presents one mathematical structure as a foundation in constructing the science of dynamic aesthetics based on axiomatic functionalism, which is in turn based on a new interdisciplinary investigation into the generative structure of the aesthetic.

  7. Grammar and Aesthetic Mechanismus. From Wittgenstein’s Tractatus to the Lectures on Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Desideri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes distances from two influential images of Wittgenstein's philosophy: the image of a primarily ethical philosopher defended by the so-called «resolute» interpreters and that of an ascetically "analytical" philosopher transmitted by the standard interpretation. Instead of contrasting images (that of Wittgenstein as an "aesthetic" philosopher and that of the "ethical" Wittgenstein, this paper focuses on the analysis of the fractures and tensions characterizing not only the relationship between Wittgenstein's philosophy and aesthetics, but also the very style of Wittgenstein's thought. Addressing a specific issue from a conceptual and textual standpoint (the unity of Ethics and Aesthetics in the Tractatus seems to the author to be a fruitful strategy that allows us not only to understand whether and how determinant and central the aesthetic problem is for Wittgenstein, but also to see how aesthetics itself can be radically reshaped through the filter offered by his thought. In the first place, then, it is clarified what the Tractatus claim that ethics and aesthetics «sind eins» might entail. Secondly, it is checked if and how the conceptual consistency of the «being one» of ethics and aesthetics is transformed during the 1930s, to the point that it requires a different configuration: the metamor¬phosis of the logical unity between the two conceptual fields into an analogical affinity. Analyzing this conceptual metamorphosis the paper considers also the idea of an asymmetry of the aesthetic over the ethical as already evident, despite appearances, in the 1929 Lecture on Ethics. This asymmetry is then developed focusing the image of grammatical mechanism with its degrees of freedom of which Wittgensteins writes from 1930. In connection with this image the author outlines finally the idea of an aesthetic mechanism arising from primitive reactions and strictly related with the genesis of language games.

  8. Colesteatoma causando paralisia facial Cholesteatoma causing facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gurgel Testa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A paralisia facial causada pelo colesteatoma é pouco freqüente. As porções do nervo mais acometidas são a timpânica e a região do 2º joelho. Nos casos de disseminação da lesão colesteatomatosa para o epitímpano anterior, o gânglio geniculado é o segmento do nervo facial mais sujeito à injúria. A etiopatogenia pode estar ligada à compressão do nervo pelo colesteatoma seguida de diminuição do seu suprimento vascular como também pela possível ação de substâncias neurotóxicas produzidas pela matriz do tumor ou pelas bactérias nele contidas. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência, as características clínicas e o tratamento da paralisia facial decorrente da lesão colesteatomatosa. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico retrospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo envolvendo dez casos de paralisia facial por colesteatoma selecionados através de levantamento de 206 descompressões do nervo facial com diferentes etiologias, realizadas na UNIFESP-EPM nos últimos dez anos. RESULTADOS: A incidência de paralisia facial por colesteatoma neste estudo foi de 4,85%,com predominância do sexo feminino (60%. A idade média dos pacientes foi de 39 anos. A duração e o grau da paralisia (inicial juntamente com a extensão da lesão foram importantes em relação à recuperação funcional do nervo facial. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento cirúrgico precoce é fundamental para que ocorra um resultado funcional mais adequado. Nos casos de ruptura ou intensa fibrose do tecido nervoso, o enxerto de nervo (auricular magno/sural e/ou a anastomose hipoglosso-facial podem ser sugeridas.Facial paralysis caused by cholesteatoma is uncommon. The portions most frequently involved are horizontal (tympanic and second genu segments. When cholesteatomas extend over the anterior epitympanic space, the facial nerve is placed in jeopardy in the region of the geniculate ganglion. The aetiology can be related to compression of the nerve followed by impairment of its

  9. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sahintuerk, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sennaroglu, L. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Boyvat, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Guersel, B. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Besim, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell`s palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  10. The Role of Aesthetics in Web Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Web sites are rapidly becoming the preferred media choice for information search, company presentation, shopping, entertainment, education, and social contacts. At the same time we live in a period where visual symbols play an increasingly important role in our daily lives. The aim of this article...... is to present and discuss the four main areas in which aesthetics play an important role in the design of successful Web sites: aesthetics play an important role in supporting the content and the functionality, in appealing to the taste of the target audience, in creating the desired image for the sender......, and in addressing the requirements of the Web site genre....

  11. The biological roots of aesthetics and art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Bernd

    2013-07-18

    Animals' choice behavior is driven by motivation that is attributable to both innate urges and from positive and negative reinforcements. Using a comparative approach as well as experimental evidence, I explore how the first involves fitness-enhancing benefits from aesthetics that are derived from ancestral choices via natural selection. Innate urges and aesthetics help guide animals to produce appropriate positive and negative choices that are species-specific. Choices of food, habitat and mates or associates are considered. I propose that art is not a uniquely human product, but a representation or an extension of the maker, as are the ornaments, displays, and songs of a bird.

  12. Showing and Saying. An Aesthetic Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Sanfélix Vidarte

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wittgenstein’s distinction between saying and showing and the associated thesis, what can be shown cannot be said, were crucial to his first philosophy, persisted throughout the evolution of his whole thought and played a key role in his views on aesthetics. The objective of art is access to the mystical, forcing us to become aware of the uniqueness of our own experience and life. When art is good is a perfect expression and the work of art becomes like a tautology. An important consequence of this understanding of art is the irreducibility of the aesthetic to the scientific perspective.

  13. "Light and the aesthetics of the perception"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volf, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Light seems to be a very changeable size in our build environment. Being an immaterial building stone, light takes a very liquid shape in our design-vocabulary. It consists of an invisible material – photons – and therefore it takes no specific form in itself but is only articulated...... what can be called the dichotomy between the aesthetics of the objects and the aesthetics of the perception - as stated by Boehme. To improve practice this article conducts a study of our perception, focusing more on the effects of light and less on the physical light (Lux). By doing so the article...

  14. The Role of Aesthetics in Web Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Web sites are rapidly becoming the preferred media choice for information search, company presentation, shopping, entertainment, education, and social contacts. At the same time we live in a period where visual symbols play an increasingly important role in our daily lives. The aim of this article...... is to present and discuss the four main areas in which aesthetics play an important role in the design of successful Web sites: aesthetics play an important role in supporting the content and the functionality, in appealing to the taste of the target audience, in creating the desired image for the sender......, and in addressing the requirements of the Web site genre....

  15. Avoiding Psychological Pitfalls in Aesthetic Medical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuyu; Cao, Chuan; Guo, Rui; Li, Xiaoge; Lu, Lele; Wang, Wenping; Li, Shirong

    2016-12-01

    To assess the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in an aesthetic surgery setting in the region of Southwest China, and to ascertain the differences in terms of body images between patients in the aesthetic setting and general Chinese population. This study tracked patient satisfaction with their body image changes while undergoing aesthetic medical procedures to identify whether the condition of patients who were presenting with BDD symptoms or their psychological symptoms could be improved by enhancing their appearance. Additionally, this study explored whether there was improvement in quality of life (QoL) and self-esteem after aesthetic medical procedures. A total of 106 female patients who were undergoing aesthetic medical procedures for the first time (plastic surgery, n = 26; minimally invasive aesthetic treatment, n = 42; and aesthetic dermatological treatment, n = 38) were classified as having body dysmorphic disorder symptoms or not having body dysmorphic disorder symptoms, based on the body dysmorphic disorder examination (BDDE), which was administered preoperatively. These patients were followed up for 1 month after the aesthetic procedures. The multidimensional body self-relations questionnaire-appearance scales (MBSRQ-AS) and rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSE-S) were used to assess patients' preoccupation with appearance and self-esteem pre-procedure and 1 month post-procedure. Additionally, 100 female healthy control participants were recruited as a comparative group into this study and they were also assessed using BDDE, MBSRQ-AS, and RSE-S. A total of 14.2 % of 106 aesthetic patients and 1 % of 100 healthy controls were diagnosed with BDD to varying extents. BDDE scores were 72.83 (SD ± 30.7) and 68.18 (SD ± 31.82), respectively, before and after the procedure for the aesthetic patient group and 43.44 (SD ± 15.65) for the healthy control group (F = 34.28; p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the

  16. The aesthetic of dragon pattern elements in modern clothing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任倩慧

    2015-01-01

    Dragon pattern with a long history of traditional patterns,contains profound cultural connotation.This passage illustrate the aesthetic analysis of dragon pattern in modern clothing, analyze the aesthetic expression of dragon pattern with modern costume designer.

  17. Does Aesthetics of Web Page Interface Matters to Mandarin Learning?

    CERN Document Server

    Zain, Jasni Mohamad; Goh, Yingsoon

    2011-01-01

    Aesthetics of web page refers to how attractive a web page is in which it catches the attention of the user to read through the information. In addition, the visual appearance is important in getting attentions of the users. Moreover, it was found that those screens, which were perceived as aesthetically pleasing, were having a better usability. Usability might be a strong basic in relating to the applicability for learning, and in this study pertaining to Mandarin learning. It was also found that aesthetically pleasing layouts of web page would motivate students in Mandarin learning The Mandarin Learning web pages were manipulated according to the desired aesthetic measurements. GUI aesthetic measuring method was used for this purpose. The Aesthetics-Measurement Application (AMA) accomplished with six aesthetic measures was developed and used. On top of it, questionnaires were distributed to the users to gather information on the students' perceptions on the aesthetic aspects and learning aspects. Respondent...

  18. Aesthetics of Chemical Products: Materials, Molecules, and Molecular Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Schummer

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available By comparing chemistry to art, chemists have recently made claims to the aesthetic value, even beauty, of some of their products. This paper takes these claims seriously and turns them into a systematic investigation of the aesthetics of chemical products. I distinguish three types of chemical products - materials, molecules, and molecular models - and use a wide variety of aesthetic theories suitable for an investigation of the corresponding sorts of objects. These include aesthetics of materials, idealistic aesthetics from Plato to Kant and Schopenhauer, psychological approaches of Ernst Gombrich and Rudolf Arnheim, and semiotic aesthetics of Nelson Goodman and Umberto Eco. Although the investigation does not support recent claims, I point out where aesthetics does and can play an import role in chemistry. Particularly, Eco's approach helps us understand that and how aesthetic experience can be a driving force in chemical research.

  19. Diplegia facial traumatica Traumatic facial diplegia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de paralisia facial bilateral, incompleta, associada a hipoacusia esquerda, após traumatismo cranioencefálico, com fraturas evidenciadas radiológicamente. Algumas considerações são formuladas tentando relacionar ditas manifestações com fraturas do osso temporal.A case of traumatic facial diplegia with left partial loss of hearing following head injury is reported. X-rays showed fractures on the occipital and left temporal bones. A review of traumatic facial paralysis is made.

  20. Paralisia facial bilateral Bilateral facial paralysis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rego

    1976-03-01

    Full Text Available É apresentado um caso de diplegia facial surgida após meningite meningocócica e infecção por herpes simples. Depois de discutir as diversas condições que o fenômeno pode apresentar-se, o autor inclina-se por uma etiologia herpética.A case of bilateral facial paralysis following meningococcal meningitis and herpes simplex infection is reported. The author discusses the differential diagnosis of bilateral facial nerve paralysis which includes several diseases and syndromes and concludes by herpetic aetiology.

  1. Aesthetic and incentive salience of cute infant faces: studies of observer sex, oral contraception and menstrual cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Sprengelmeyer

    Full Text Available Infant cuteness can influence adult-infant interaction and has been shown to activate reward centres in the brain. In a previous study, we found men and women to be differentially sensitive to small differences in infant facial cuteness, with reproductive hormone status as the potential underlying cause. It is unclear, however, whether reproductive hormone status impacts on the aesthetic and incentive salience of infant faces. To address this question, we conducted two interlinked studies. We used static images of the same smiling and neutral-looking infant faces in both a rating task, in which participants had to rate the cuteness of infant faces (aesthetic salience - 'liking', and a key-press task, in which participants could prolong or shorten viewing time of infant faces by rapid alternating key-presses (incentive salience - 'wanting'. In a first study, we compared the performance of men, women who are taking oral contraceptives, and regularly cycling women. In this study, we found a significant correlation between cuteness ratings within and between groups, which implies that participants had the same concept of cuteness. Cuteness ratings and effort to look at faces was linked regardless of sex and reproductive hormone status, in that cute faces were looked at for longer than less cute faces. A happy facial expression contributed only marginally to the incentive salience of the face. To explore the potential impact of reproductive hormone status in more detail, we followed a subset of regularly cycling women during the menstrual, follicular and luteal phases of their cycle. The aesthetic and incentive salience of infant faces did not change across the menstrual cycle. Our findings suggest that reproductive hormone status does not modulate the aesthetic and incentive value of infant faces.

  2. The McCollough Facial Rejuvenation System: a condition-specific classification algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, E Gaylon

    2011-02-01

    The search for the holy grail in facial rejuvenation is an ongoing quest. Perhaps the reason the "ideal" face-lift has yet to be discovered is a result of three factors. First, the term FACE-LIFT has never been adequately defined. Second, fads and trends play a role in how the operation is taught and performed. Third, surgeons searching for the prototypic technique have not had a way to index the physical signs of facial aging. After 37 years of practicing facial plastic surgery and performing more than 5000 face-lifts, the author determined that replacing chaos with order is long overdue. To achieve this goal, he developed a classification system that is designed to match each potential patient's problems with the most appropriate facial rejuvenation treatment plan and a "language" by which facial rejuvenation surgeons can communicate. Five progressive stages of aging have been identified and matched with recommended courses of face-lifting, blepharoplasty, volume augmentation, and skin resurfacing techniques. Ancillary procedures have also been included when indicated. It is the author's hope that a new classification system will bring order to mounting confusion within the aesthetic surgery professions as well as within the public sector.

  3. The Dehiscent Facial Nerve Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental injury to the facial nerve where the bony canal defects are present may result with facial nerve dysfunction during otological surgery. Therefore, it is critical to know the incidence and the type of facial nerve dehiscences in the presence of normal development of the facial canal. The aim of this study is to review the site and the type of such bony defects in 144 patients operated for facial paralysis, myringoplasty, stapedotomy, middle ear exploration for sudden hearing loss, and so forth, other than chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, middle ear tumors, and anomaly. Correlation of intraoperative findings with preoperative computerized tomography was also analyzed in 35 patients. Conclusively, one out of every 10 surgical cases may have dehiscence of the facial canal which has to be always borne in mind during surgical manipulation of the middle ear. Computerized tomography has some limitations to evaluate the dehiscent facial canal due to high false negative and positive rates.

  4. Does facial resemblance enhance cooperation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Giang

    Full Text Available Facial self-resemblance has been proposed to serve as a kinship cue that facilitates cooperation between kin. In the present study, facial resemblance was manipulated by morphing stimulus faces with the participants' own faces or control faces (resulting in self-resemblant or other-resemblant composite faces. A norming study showed that the perceived degree of kinship was higher for the participants and the self-resemblant composite faces than for actual first-degree relatives. Effects of facial self-resemblance on trust and cooperation were tested in a paradigm that has proven to be sensitive to facial trustworthiness, facial likability, and facial expression. First, participants played a cooperation game in which the composite faces were shown. Then, likability ratings were assessed. In a source memory test, participants were required to identify old and new faces, and were asked to remember whether the faces belonged to cooperators or cheaters in the cooperation game. Old-new recognition was enhanced for self-resemblant faces in comparison to other-resemblant faces. However, facial self-resemblance had no effects on the degree of cooperation in the cooperation game, on the emotional evaluation of the faces as reflected in the likability judgments, and on the expectation that a face belonged to a cooperator rather than to a cheater. Therefore, the present results are clearly inconsistent with the assumption of an evolved kin recognition module built into the human face recognition system.

  5. Analysis methods for facial motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Mishima

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective techniques to evaluate a facial movement are indispensable for the contemporary treatment of patients with motor disorders such as facial paralysis, cleft lip, postoperative head and neck cancer, and so on. Recently, computer-assisted, video-based techniques have been devised and reported as measuring systems in which facial movements can be evaluated quantitatively. Commercially available motion analysis systems, in which a stereo-measuring technique with multiple cameras and markers to facilitate search of matching among images through all cameras, also are utilized, and are used in many measuring systems such as video-based systems. The key is how the problems of facial movement can be extracted precisely, and how useful information for the diagnosis and decision-making process can be derived from analyses of facial movement. Therefore, it is important to discuss which facial animations should be examined, and whether fixation of the head and markers attached to the face can hamper natural facial movement.

  6. Acupuncture Treatment of Facial Spasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Case History Ms. Zheng from Singapore, aged 51 years, paid her first visit on Aug.30, 2006, with the chief complaint of left facial paralysis accompanied with facial spasm for 5 years. The patient got left facial paralysis in 2001, which was not completely cured, and developed into facial spasm one year later. Although she had received various treatments including surgical operation, the disease was not cured. At the moment she had discomfort and dull sensation in the left facial area, mainly accompanied with twitching of the peripheral nerve of the eye. She was also accompanied with posterior auricular muscle tension and discomfort. She had fairly good sleep and appetite, but slightly quick temper. Physical examination at the moment showed that the patient had a slightly thin body figure, flushing face, and good mental state. The blood pressure was 110/75mmHg and the heart rate was 85 beats/min. No abnormal signs were found in the heart and lungs. The facial examination showed mild swelling of the left side of the face, incomplete closing of the eye lids, disappearance of wrinkles on the forehead, shallow nasolabial groove, and obvious muscle tension and tenderness in the left opisthotic region. Careful observation could find slight facial muscular twitching. The tongue proper was red with little coating, and the pulse thready-wiry.

  7. A Scandinavian View on the Aesthetics as a Learning Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austring, Bennye D.; Sorensen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    As the aesthetic learning process is always relational and developed in interaction with the surrounding culture, the participants in the aesthetic activities can develop cultural identity and social skills. Add to this that the individual can share its inner world with others through aesthetic activities in the potential space and in this way…

  8. Gustology As A Science About The Aesthetical Taste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NataliaG.Kalashnik

    2003-01-01

    The new problem to be solved together; Last decade's changes of the world; The aesthetical taste as a part of day-by-day life; Gustology - the new science; Definitions and the double nature of the aesthetical taste; History of the aesthetical taste studying.

  9. A Scandinavian View on the Aesthetics as a Learning Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austring, Bennyé D.; Sørensen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    As the aesthetic learning process is always relational and developed in interaction with the surrounding culture, the participants in the aesthetic activities can develop cultural identity and social skills. Add to this that the individual can share its inner world with others through aesthetic...

  10. James Mark Baldwin and the Aesthetic Development of the Individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Michael J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper recounts the ideas of the American cognitive-developmental psychologist James Mark Baldwin (1861-1934) on aesthetic experience: his conceptualization of aesthetic experience as immediate, semblant, personalized, and idealized; and his three-stage theory of aesthetic development. (SJL)

  11. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878... External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external aesthetic restoration prosthesis... external prosthesis adhesive. The device is not intended to be implanted. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. A Comparison Study on the Chinese and Western Music Aesthetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Specialty:Literary Theory Music Aesthetics is a basic and theoretical subject,which studies the basic rules of music,and especially regards the study of the particularity of music and aesthetics as its general goal.Belonging to liberal arts,music aesthetics is the same as other

  13. Curator and Critic: Role of the Assessor in Aesthetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Rachael

    2012-01-01

    Assessment in aesthetic fields presents a myriad of challenges in the higher education environment. This paper uses a metaphorical representation to explore the role of assessors within aesthetic assessment settings in higher education. It begins with a discussion of aesthetic fields and an exploration of the role of assessment in this area.…

  14. Optimizing implant placement and aesthetics: technology to the rescue!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski, Timothy

    2009-08-01

    The goal for this patient was to create an aesthetic smile design using individual dental implants to reconstruct the edentulous spaces. Procera crowns aesthetically restored the separate and distinct teeth (Figures 18 and 19). The patient was thrilled with the final aesthetic result, and she was able to smile confidently again.

  15. Aesthetic Discourses in Early Childhood Settings: Dewey, Steiner, and Vygotsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Booyeun

    2004-01-01

    Early childhood, when young children are already capable of undergoing aesthetic experience, must be the starting point for aesthetic education. Despite increasing attention to the significant values of the arts in early childhood classrooms, no theoretical framework to support aesthetic education has been established. This article introduces the…

  16. Facial Action Units Recognition: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Wiggers, P.; Braspenning, R.A.C.; Shan, C.

    2011-01-01

    Many approaches to facial expression recognition focus on assessing the six basic emotions (anger, disgust, happiness, fear, sadness, and surprise). Real-life situations proved to produce many more subtle facial expressions. A reliable way of analyzing the facial behavior is the Facial Action Coding

  17. Microbial biofilms on silicone facial prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariani, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Facial disfigurements can result from oncologic surgery, trauma and congenital deformities. These disfigurements can be rehabilitated with facial prostheses. Facial prostheses are usually made of silicones. A problem of facial prostheses is that microorganisms can colonize their surface. It is hard

  18. Facial Action Units Recognition: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Wiggers, P.; Braspenning, R.A.C.; Shan, C.

    2011-01-01

    Many approaches to facial expression recognition focus on assessing the six basic emotions (anger, disgust, happiness, fear, sadness, and surprise). Real-life situations proved to produce many more subtle facial expressions. A reliable way of analyzing the facial behavior is the Facial Action Coding

  19. Prosthodontist contribution in treating post-burn hypertrophic facial scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmanabhan T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of hypertrophic scars is common following healing of the burn wound, particularly in children. The face is one of the areas of the body most frequently affected by burns. Scar formation as a result of burn wounds leads to contraction of the formed granulation tissue, which causes both aesthetic and functional impairment for the patient. Scarring has major psychological and physical repercussions. Scarring on the face and visible regions of the body can be very distressing for the patient. Prevention of scars involves early and continuous use of a compressive orthesis. However, their efficacy is often limited to the facial region because of the contours of this area of body. This paper describes a clinical case of post-burn hypertrophic scars treated with silicone gel sheeting applied with pressure under custom made auto-polymerizing resin stent.

  20. Five-year Experience with Perma Facial Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Raphael, MD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Augmentation cheiloplasty is becoming an increasingly popular aesthetic procedure despite current methodologies having met with disappointment among surgeons and patients. The goal of this study was to examine the benefits and drawbacks of 1 device in particular—Perma Facial Implant (PFI. The senior authors (P.R. and S.W.H. performed 832 consecutive PFI lip augmentations with excellent results based on photographic documentation, patient satisfaction surveys, unbiased surgeon ratings, and low complication rates. In addition to augmenting thin lips, PFIs hide excess dentition and improve vermilion rhytids and pout. Contrary to alternatives, they are both permanent and reversible. However, they do not level out asymmetries or benefit razor-thin lips without prior lifting or mucosal advancement.

  1. Facial melanoses: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Khanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial melanoses (FM are a common presentation in Indian patients, causing cosmetic disfigurement with considerable psychological impact. Some of the well defined causes of FM include melasma, Riehl′s melanosis, Lichen planus pigmentosus, erythema dyschromicum perstans (EDP, erythrosis, and poikiloderma of Civatte. But there is considerable overlap in features amongst the clinical entities. Etiology in most of the causes is unknown, but some factors such as UV radiation in melasma, exposure to chemicals in EDP, exposure to allergens in Riehl′s melanosis are implicated. Diagnosis is generally based on clinical features. The treatment of FM includes removal of aggravating factors, vigorous photoprotection, and some form of active pigment reduction either with topical agents or physical modes of treatment. Topical agents include hydroquinone (HQ, which is the most commonly used agent, often in combination with retinoic acid, corticosteroids, azelaic acid, kojic acid, and glycolic acid. Chemical peels are important modalities of physical therapy, other forms include lasers and dermabrasion.

  2. Therapy and the Aesthetics of the Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Post-structuralists argue that personal identity is a function of societal power dynamics. This becomes especially problematic for persons recruited into problem-saturated identities. In this paper, inspired by Foucault's call for us to "create ourselves as a work of art" (p. 262), I explore the therapeutic value of an aesthetic approach…

  3. Art's Detour: A Clash of Aesthetic Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Both John Dewey and Martin Heidegger thought that art's audience had to take a detour in order to appreciate or understand a work of art. They wrote about this around the same time (mid-1930s) and independently of one another, so this similar circumstance in the history of aesthetics is unusual since they come from very different philosophical…

  4. Aesthetics, Politics, and Art in American Novel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Literature was viewed as a form of cultural production that should be a vehicle for a different practice of representation, a representation of "art" works, through its aesthetic function to enlighten its audience rather than keep them in awe of power as the rhetorics of politics and ideology so often do.

  5. [Promoting aesthetics to enhance nursing services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheuan; Chang, Ting

    2011-10-01

    Nursing is a client-oriented profession dedicated to helping people. Nurses are responsible to both help relieve client physical and psychological symptoms and assist clients as necessary to die with dignity. As such, nursing schools should strengthen not only science and professional skills, but also student aesthetics. Today, fast changing medical technology is improving the treatment of diseases and extending average life spans. The National Health Insurance System in Taiwan, however, is increasingly restricting nursing manpower and raising staff workloads. Nurses are increasingly required to sacrifice ethical principles and conduct technical operations in medical settings defined by stringent cost controls. Nursing aesthetics cannot provide appropriate levels of care dignity and quality to clients under severe time and emotional distress constraints. Burnout, dissatisfaction, strained doctor-nurse relationships and lower quality care are all-too-frequent results. Under the circumstances, nursing functions are negatively influenced and fine nursing service is difficult to achieve. This article reviewed the literature to discuss the definition and meaning of aesthetics and relative factors that are difficult to define in clinical settings. This article may assist nurses to present aesthetics, upgrade care quality and further enhance nursing services.

  6. Incorporating the Aesthetic Dimension into Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R. Scott; Wolfe, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study that was undertaken to discover not only the belief and intent behind the everyday opportunities that four exemplary teachers offered their high performing students but what activities they incorporated into their everyday lessons in an attempt to make sense of how aesthetic experiences may enhance learning. The…

  7. Pragmatic Aesthetics and the Autistic Artist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Kyle; Barnbaum, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    There are many prominent examples of artists with autism. However, even when confronted with evidence of these accomplished "autistic savants", pragmatic aesthetic theories cannot adequately account for the work of these accomplished artists as "artists". This article first examines the nature of autism and explores a prominent psychological…

  8. The disruptive aesthetics of design activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    . In so doing, I will identify a theoretical ‘blind spot’ in the research literature, which has blocked our view of how design activism functions as an aesthetic practice and not only a socio-political one. To remedy this shortcoming, I then introduce some notions from Rancière (2004; 2010) that enable...

  9. Aesthetic Education for Morality: Schiller and Kant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Zvi

    2006-01-01

    Kant's "Critique of Judgment," which was published in 1790, referred in detail to the affinity between beauty and morality. Schiller's writings from the 1790s dealing with aesthetics and ethics are intertwined, simultaneously, both with an affirmative reception of Kant's ideas and with critical attitudes against them. This applies to essays such…

  10. Pursuing Aesthetic Inquiry in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    2008-01-01

    . Although aesthetic inquiry to some extent resides in most Participatory Design practice, we see the need for elaborating this perspective and to further build Participatory Design practice, tools and techniques that address this issue. The Fictional Inquiry technique is presented as an illustrating example...... for the Kattegat Marine Centre was developed. ...

  11. Aesthetic Solidarity "after" Kant and Lyotard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2008-01-01

    One of the most complex issues in Kant's "Critique of Judgment" is the aesthetic judgment's claim to universal validity and shareability. Kant is not very clear about the exact status of this claim. Kant's distinction between the beautiful and the sublime only complicates the matter, since the universal shareability of the judgment of the sublime…

  12. Aesthetics in Asian Child Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice S.

    This speech presents observations, made on a trip in June 1976, of the aesthetic environments of children in China, Japan, and Hong Kong. Home, school and day care environments are compared in terms of living and play space, room decor, the presence of art and toys, dramatic play and performance, music, nature and outdoor appreciation, food and…

  13. Foucault, Counselling and the Aesthetics of Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Michel Foucault was drawn late in life to study the "arts of the self" in Greco-Roman culture as a basis, following Nietzsche, for what he called an "aesthetics of existence." By this, he meant a set of creative and experimental processes and techniques by which an individual turns him- or herself into a work of art. For Nietzsche, it was above…

  14. Therapy and the Aesthetics of the Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Post-structuralists argue that personal identity is a function of societal power dynamics. This becomes especially problematic for persons recruited into problem-saturated identities. In this paper, inspired by Foucault's call for us to "create ourselves as a work of art" (p. 262), I explore the therapeutic value of an aesthetic approach…

  15. The Development of Environmental Art Aesthetic Rule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方元

    2014-01-01

    Everyone have different perception of beauty, but in exploring the source of the problem, need an objective, the analysis of the macro level. From natural conditions, the influence of human behavior, many factors such as the impression of social and historical experience to analyze the formation process of beauty, to the aesthetic trend of the development of make accurate judgment.

  16. McLuhan: The Aesthete as Historian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Attributes McLuhan's theories about media to his interpretation of history as an interpenetrating sequence of three processes: all history originated in oral societies, which were fragmented by literacy, but electronic media are returning society to that original state through implosion. Reviews the historical, literary, and aesthetic sources for…

  17. Jacques Joseph: Father of modern aesthetic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Surajit

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available When we review the history of modern aesthetic surgery, a name that stands out as bright as a beacon and precious as gold is undoubtedly that of Jacques Joseph. A surgeon, par excellence, far ahead of his time, who chose to think out of the box, Joseph, despite all odds set out to give respectability to Aesthetic Surgery without depriving it of any scientific core values. By his words and deeds proved beyond doubt that only the very best in the field of reconstructive surgery, can visualize the hidden perfection in imperfection and formulate a treatment plan and a surgical strategy to achieve that elusive perfection. The rich surgical literature that he has left behind, the wealth of surgical instruments that he had designed and above all a way of thinking that he propagated, that aesthetic surgery is not frivolous but very serious endeavor, and treating the psychology of the patient is as important as treating his disease, undoubtedly makes him the revered ′Father of Modern Aesthetic Surgery′.

  18. Foucault, Counselling and the Aesthetics of Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Michel Foucault was drawn late in life to study the "arts of the self" in Greco-Roman culture as a basis, following Nietzsche, for what he called an "aesthetics of existence." By this, he meant a set of creative and experimental processes and techniques by which an individual turns him- or herself into a work of art. For Nietzsche, it was above…

  19. Aesthetic Solidarity "after" Kant and Lyotard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2008-01-01

    One of the most complex issues in Kant's "Critique of Judgment" is the aesthetic judgment's claim to universal validity and shareability. Kant is not very clear about the exact status of this claim. Kant's distinction between the beautiful and the sublime only complicates the matter, since the universal shareability of the judgment of the sublime…

  20. Aesthetic Education for Morality: Schiller and Kant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Zvi

    2006-01-01

    Kant's "Critique of Judgment," which was published in 1790, referred in detail to the affinity between beauty and morality. Schiller's writings from the 1790s dealing with aesthetics and ethics are intertwined, simultaneously, both with an affirmative reception of Kant's ideas and with critical attitudes against them. This applies to essays such…

  1. The Aesthetic Classroom and the Beautiful Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurain, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores an analogy: A well-played soccer game has much in common with a well-taught lesson or course. Aesthetic pedagogy, as conceived by Dewey, Gadamer, and contemporary theorists and practitioners, is set alongside the world's favorite sport, including events from the 2006 World Cup and the autobiography of Pele. The discussion moves…

  2. The Aesthetics of Lattice Pattern in Clothing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪虹

    2011-01-01

    The lattice pattern has been applied widely in the field of textiles as a geometric decorative pattern,which is not only because of its technological characteristics but more due to the aesthetic features and unique cultural connotation.The depth of color

  3. Original Sin and T. E. Hulme's Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishler, Thomas C.

    1976-01-01

    T. E. Hulme, a vigorous opponent of romanticism in art, poetry, and philosophy, insisted that the underlying flaw of the romantic view was its rejection of the dogma of Original Sin and the fall of man. His views are explored for the significant bearing they have on the development of aesthetic insight and indirectly on value and outlook.…

  4. The Aesthetic Potential of Global Issues Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudelli, William; Hewitt, Randall

    2010-01-01

    There is a despondency and desperation about schools, and thereby curriculum, that too often fails to teach for and about something more than narrow, capitalist-driven, techno-rationalist ends. The prevailing educational theory undergirding schools, as well as the conceptualization of curriculum entailed, lacks an aesthetic and spiritual rationale…

  5. "ZEAL": An Aesthetic Revolution for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Barbara A.; French, James Joss

    2012-01-01

    Educators are hesitant to venture into the unknown landscape within a child's heart and mind because they have throughout their education experienced the same non-compassionate teachers. This research proposes an awakening, making a wave for a new revolution of compassionate teachers that institutes aesthetic methodology to address relevant…

  6. An Aesthetic Value Scale of the Rorschach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua, Ana Maria

    1981-01-01

    An aesthetic value scale of the Rorschach cards was built by the successive interval method. This scale was compared with the ratings obtained by means of the Semantic Differential Scales and was found to successfully differentiate sexes in their judgment of card attractiveness. (Author)

  7. [The aesthetic character of caring knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Yun

    2013-08-01

    The identity of nursing is founded on caring knowledge, which is derived from our understanding of its experience-revealed essence. This purposive knowledge differs from scientific knowledge because validity guides the latter and ethics guides the former. Therefore, justifying the objectivity of caring knowledge should be based on the aesthetic character of this knowledge rather than on a general social-science explanation.

  8. Typographical Design, Modernist Aesthetics, and Professional Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelnick, Charles

    1990-01-01

    Suggests that text and information design are rooted in the visual aesthetics of modernism as articulated by the Bauhaus. Explores four key ideas affecting visual design: unity of text and form; emphasis on economy and simplicity; search for a universal, objective style; and faith in individual and collective intuition. (KEH)

  9. Do Reading Habits Influence Aesthetic Preferences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Rebecca; Allaith, Zainab

    2013-01-01

    We tested the idea that the directionality of a person's primary writing system has influences outside the domain of reading and writing, specifically influences on aesthetic preferences. The results of several previous studies suggest that people whose primary writing system goes from left to right prefer pictures of moving and static objects…

  10. Symposium: Aesthetic Education in Japan Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Ako; Masuda, Kingo; Kaneda, Takuya; Hino, Yoko; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fukumoto, Kinichi; Nagamori, Motoki; Yamada, Kazumi; Motomura, Kenta; Ishizaki, Kazhiro; Okada, Masashi; Kaneko, Yoshimasa; Naoe, Toshio; Fujie, Mitsuru; Iwano, Masako

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this symposium is to provide readers with a general understanding of Japanese art and aesthetics education and its interaction with other cultures. The essays cover a variety of topics, including historical, cross-cultural, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Following an introduction by Ako Okazaki, the following papers are…

  11. Creative Writing and Schiller's Aesthetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Peter

    2007-01-01

    For academics committed to the idea of an all-round aesthetic education, one of the great successes of the last thirty years has been the tremendous expansion of creative writing classes. Despite the dramatic expansion of creative writing as an academic discipline, the methods, ideals, and values of creative writing workshops have very often been…

  12. Psychological contents and social effects associated to peripheral facial paralysis: a speech-language approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva, Mabile Francine Ferreira

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The peripheral facial paralysis (PFP results from the reduction or interruption of the axonal transport to the seventh cranial nerve resulting in complete or partial paralysis of the facial movements. The facial deformity and limitation of movements, besides affecting the aesthetics and functionality, can significantly interfere with interpersonal communication. Objective: Investigate the psychological contents and other social effects associated to PFP in adult subjects, performing a comparative analysis in three groups of subjects with PFP: at flaccid, recovery and sequel phases. Method: Quantitative and qualitative research. 16 adult subjects, from both sexes, aging between 43 and 88 years old, with PFP. Procedure: Open interviews with subjects. The material was recorded in audio and video, literally transcribed, systematized through categorical and statistical analysis. Results: The subjects bearing sequels presented higher statistical significance of psychological contents and social effects associated to PFP. Followed, respectively, by those that were on flaccid and recovery phases. The results suggest that the speech-language therapist, besides performing functional and aesthetical rehabilitation with the subject with PFP, needs to be aware of psychological and social aspects that may be involved, in order to evaluate and seek to reduce the degree of psychological distress and promote the social adjustment of these patients. Conclusion: The biopsychosocial approach to patients with PFP revealed a wide and significant range of subjective contents that warrant new studies that may contribute to the effectiveness of the speech-language clinical method to approach this medical condition.

  13. The Shaping and Reshaping of the Aesthetic Brain: Emerging Perspectives on the Neurobiology of Embodied Aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsch, L.P.; Urgesi, C.; E. S. Cross

    2015-01-01

    Less than two decades after its inception, the burgeoning field of neuroaesthetics continues to grow in interest and momentum. Despite the biological and social importance of the human body and the attention people pay to its appearance in daily life, only recently has neuroaesthetic inquiry turned its attention to questions concerning the aesthetic appraisal of the human body. We review evidence illustrating that the complexity of aesthetic experience is reflected by dynamic interplay betwee...

  14. Dynamic Facial Prosthetics for Sufferers of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal Coulter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis paper discusses the various methods and the materialsfor the fabrication of active artificial facial muscles. Theprimary use for these will be the reanimation of paralysedor atrophied muscles in sufferers of non-recoverableunilateral facial paralysis.MethodThe prosthetic solution described in this paper is based onsensing muscle motion of the contralateral healthy musclesand replicating that motion across a patient’s paralysed sideof the face, via solid state and thin film actuators. Thedevelopment of this facial prosthetic device focused onrecreating a varying intensity smile, with emphasis ontiming, displacement and the appearance of the wrinklesand folds that commonly appear around the nose and eyesduring the expression.An animatronic face was constructed with actuations beingmade to a silicone representation musculature, usingmultiple shape-memory alloy cascades. Alongside theartificial muscle physical prototype, a facial expressionrecognition software system was constructed. This formsthe basis of an automated calibration and reconfigurationsystem for the artificial muscles following implantation, soas to suit the implantee’s unique physiognomy.ResultsAn animatronic model face with silicone musculature wasdesigned and built to evaluate the performance of ShapeMemory Alloy artificial muscles, their power controlcircuitry and software control systems. A dual facial motionsensing system was designed to allow real time control overmodel – a piezoresistive flex sensor to measure physicalmotion, and a computer vision system to evaluate real toartificial muscle performance.Analysis of various facial expressions in real subjects wasmade, which give useful data upon which to base thesystems parameter limits.ConclusionThe system performed well, and the various strengths andshortcomings of the materials and methods are reviewedand considered for the next research phase, when newpolymer based artificial muscles are constructed

  15. The Cosmological Potential of Byzantine Ascetic Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аndrey Tsarenok

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study explores the peculiarities of the cosmological senses, which exist in Byzantine ascetic aesthetical doctrine. Underlining the obvious strong connection between theological aesthetics, ontology and cosmology, the author of the article points out the interpretation of world’s beauty, order and harmony by representatives of ascetic culture of Byzantium (sts. Grigoriy the Theologian, Grigoriy, bishop of Niss, Ioann Chrysostom, Ioann Damaskin, Simeon the New Theologian and others. The aesthetics of the asceticism is characterized as theocentrical ontology of beauty. Its development has been influenced by theism, trinitary monotheism and theocentrism of Christian world-view tradition. The theologians speak about the existence of the Highest Absolute Beauty, Who is the cause of the beautiful things in created reality. The impressive qualities of cosmos are considered as evidence of being of their Almighty Creator. Therefore, the sensual cognition can help believer in his or her search of God. At the same time, ascetic aesthetics prevents from unreasonable enjoying of the sensual (material, somatic beauty for such enjoying is able to make the true person’s spiritual perfection impossible. Moreover, according to Christian theology, absolutization of the cosmical beauty regularly distorts the person’s belief: Byzantine ascetics point out the “aesthetical” cause of paganism appearance. Appealing to Bible, theologians differentiate two periods in history of cosmos, which can be interpreted as the pre-sin and the post-sin ones. The beginning of visible world existence was marked with being of original beauty, order and harmony, but the transgression, committed by the first people, distorted the cosmos to a great degree. Acknowledging of this sorrowful fact does not ruin quite an optimistic character of ascetic aesthetical, ontological and cosmological conceptions of Byzantium. According to them, the beauty of Universe will be completely

  16. Aesthetic/Cosmetic surgery and ethical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Rubeiz, Michel T; Hayek, Shady N

    2008-11-01

    Is aesthetic surgery a business guided by market structures aimed primarily at material gain and profit or a surgical intervention intended to benefit patients and an integral part of the health-care system? Is it a frivolous subspecialty or does it provide a real and much needed service to a wide range of patients? At present, cosmetic surgery is passing through an identity crisis as well as an acute ethical dilemma. A closer look from an ethical viewpoint makes clear that the doctor who offers aesthetic interventions faces many serious ethical problems which have to do with the identity of the surgeon as a healer. Aesthetic surgery that works only according to market categories runs the risk of losing the view for the real need of patients and will be nothing else than a part of a beauty industry which has the only aim to sell something, not to help people. Such an aesthetic surgery is losing sight of real values and makes profit from the ideology of a society that serves only vanity, youthfulness, and personal success. Unfortunately, some colleagues brag that they chose the plastic surgery specialty just to become rich aesthetic surgeons, using marketing tactics to promote their practice. This is, at present, the image we project. As rightly proposed, going back a little to Hippocrates, to the basics of being a physician, is urgently warranted! Being a physician is all that a "cosmetic" surgeon should be. In the long run, how one skillfully and ethically practices the art of plastic surgery will always speak louder than any words.

  17. Aesthetic Appreciation, Ethics, and 9/11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Aretoulakis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous critical articles on what really happened on the otherwise beautiful morning of 11 September 2001. Beyond doubt, the bulk of the critical responses to the terrorist attacks focused on the ethical and humanitarian, or rather the unethical and inhumane implications of the atrocious act, leaving no room for any philosophical reflection on the potential assessment or reception of the event from the perspective of art and aesthetics. The few years that have gone by since 2001 have provided us with some a sense of emotional detachment from the horror of that day, a detachment that may have awakened our aesthetic and artistic instincts with regard to the attacks themselves as well as their visual representation. Chronological distance renders an unprejudiced and independent stance more possible now than ever. It also allows us to reconsider our initial politically correct and ethically justified repulsion of the efforts made by a few artists to aestheticize 9/11. Such repulsion, however, was associated with the delusion that by denouncing aesthetics we were really securing the prevalence of politics, morality and ethical responsibility in a terror-afflicted society. My point in this paper is that there is a need for aesthetic appreciation when contemplating a violent event such as the 9/11 terrorist attacks. What is more, appreciation of the beautiful, even in case of a 9/11, seems necessary because it is a key to establishing an ethical stance towards terror, life, and art. It should be stressed that independent aesthetic experience is not important in itself but is a means of cultivating an authentic moral and ethical judgment.

  18. Pediatric facial burns: Is facial transplantation the new reconstructive psychosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D; Zuker, Ronald M; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Current pediatric burn care has resulted in survival being the expectation for most children. Composite tissue allotransplantation in the form of face or hand transplantation may present opportunities for reconstructive surgery of patients with burns. The present paper addresses the question “Could facial transplantation be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of pediatric burns associated with facial disfigurement?” METHODS: Therapeutic benefit of facial transplantation was defined in terms of psychiatric adjustment and quality of life (QOL). To ascertain therapeutic benefit, studies of pediatric burn injury and associated psychiatric adjustment and QOL in children, adolescents and adults with pediatric burns, were reviewed. RESULTS: Pediatric burn injury is associated with anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and depressive disorders. Many patients with pediatric burns do not routinely access psychiatric care for these disorders, including those for psychiatric assessment of suicidal risk. A range of QOL outcomes were reported; four were predominantly satisfactory and one was predominantly unsatisfactory. DISCUSSION: Facial transplantation may reduce the risk of depressive and anxiety disorders other than post-traumatic stress disorder. Facial transplantation promises to be the new reconstructive psychosurgery, because it may be a surgical intervention with the potential to reduce the psychiatric suffering associated with pediatric burns. Furthermore, patients with pediatric burns may experience the stigma of disfigurement and psychiatric conditions. The potential for improved appearance with facial transplantation may reduce this ‘dual stigmata’. Studies combining surgical and psychiatric research are warranted. PMID:19949498

  19. Nablus mask-like facial syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allanson, Judith; Smith, Amanda; Hare, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Nablus mask-like facial syndrome (NMLFS) has many distinctive phenotypic features, particularly tight glistening skin with reduced facial expression, blepharophimosis, telecanthus, bulky nasal tip, abnormal external ear architecture, upswept frontal hairline, and sparse eyebrows. Over the last few...... heterozygous deletions significantly overlapping the region associated with NMLFS. Notably, while one mother and child were said to have mild tightening of facial skin, none of these individuals exhibited reduced facial expression or the classical facial phenotype of NMLFS. These findings indicate...

  20. Facial Expression Recognition Using SVM Classifier

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Facial feature tracking and facial actions recognition from image sequence attracted great attention in computer vision field. Computational facial expression analysis is a challenging research topic in computer vision. It is required by many applications such as human-computer interaction, computer graphic animation and automatic facial expression recognition. In recent years, plenty of computer vision techniques have been developed to track or recognize the facial activities in three levels...

  1. Sympathicotomy for isolated facial blushing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Peter Bjørn; Pilegaard, Hans K; Ladegaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background. Facial blushing is one of the most peculiar of human expressions. The pathophysiology is unclear, and the prevalence is unknown. Thoracoscopic sympathectomy may cure the symptom and is increasingly used in patients with isolated facial blushing. The evidence base for the optimal level...... of targeting the sympathetic chain is limited to retrospective case studies. We present a randomized clinical trial. Methods. 100 patients were randomized (web-based, single-blinded) to rib-oriented (R2 or R2-R3) sympathicotomy for isolated facial blushing at two university hospitals during a 6-year period...... in all social and mental domains in both groups. Overall, 85% of the patients had an excellent or satisfactory result, with no significant difference between the R2 procedure and the R2-R3 procedure. Mild recurrence of facial blushing occurred in 30% of patients within the first year. One patient...

  2. Spontaneous Emotional Facial Expression Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Zeng

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Change in a speaker’s emotion is a fundamental component in human communication. Automatic recognition of spontaneous emotion would significantly impact human-computer interaction and emotion-related studies in education, psychology and psychiatry. In this paper, we explore methods for detecting emotional facial expressions occurring in a realistic human conversation setting—the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI. Because non-emotional facial expressions have no distinct description and are expensive to model, we treat emotional facial expression detection as a one- class classification problem, which is to describe target objects (i.e., emotional facial expressions and distinguish them from outliers (i.e., non-emotional ones. Our preliminary experiments on AAI data suggest that one-class classification methods can reach a good balance between cost (labeling and computing and recognition performance by avoiding non-emotional expression labeling and modeling.

  3. Imaging of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, F. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francis.Veillon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Ramos-Taboada, L.; Abu-Eid, M. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Charpiot, A. [Service d' ORL, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Riehm, S. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve.

  4. Facial Areas and Emotional Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jerry D.; Ekman, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Provides strong support for the view that there is no one area of the face which best reveals emotion, but that the value of the different facial areas in distinguishing emotions depends upon the emotion being judged. (Author)

  5. Facial Areas and Emotional Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jerry D.; Ekman, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Provides strong support for the view that there is no one area of the face which best reveals emotion, but that the value of the different facial areas in distinguishing emotions depends upon the emotion being judged. (Author)

  6. A REVIEW ON FACIAL NEURALGIAS

    OpenAIRE

    Solanki, Gaurav

    2010-01-01

    Facial neuralgias are produced by a change in neurological structure or function. This type of neuropathic pain affects the mental health as well as quality of life of patients. There are different types of neuralgias affecting the oral and maxillofacial region. These unusual pains are linked to some possible mechanisms. Various diagnostic tests are done to diagnose the proper cause of facial neuralgia and according to it the medical and surgical treatment is done to provide relief to patient.

  7. Animating facial images with drawings

    OpenAIRE

    Tunali, Gamze Dilek

    1996-01-01

    Ankara : Bilkent Univ., 1996. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1996. Includes bibliographical references leaves 54-56. The work presented here describes the power of 2D animation with texture mai^ping controlled by line drawings. Animation is specifically intended for facial animation and not restricted by the human face. We initially have a sequence of facial images which are taken from a video sequence of the same face and an image of another face to be animated...

  8. Pediatric facial injuries: It's management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Geeta; Mohammad, Shadab; Pal, U. S.; Hariram; Malkunje, Laxman R.; Singh, Nimisha

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial injuries in children always present a challenge in respect of their diagnosis and management. Since these children are of a growing age every care should be taken so that later the overall growth pattern of the facial skeleton in these children is not jeopardized. Purpose: To access the most feasible method for the management of facial injuries in children without hampering the facial growth. Materials and Methods: Sixty child patients with facial trauma were selected randomly for this study. On the basis of examination and investigations a suitable management approach involving rest and observation, open or closed reduction and immobilization, trans-osseous (TO) wiring, mini bone plate fixation, splinting and replantation, elevation and fixation of zygoma, etc. were carried out. Results and Conclusion: In our study fall was the predominant cause for most of the facial injuries in children. There was a 1.09% incidence of facial injuries in children up to 16 years of age amongst the total patients. The age-wise distribution of the fracture amongst groups (I, II and III) was found to be 26.67%, 51.67% and 21.67% respectively. Male to female patient ratio was 3:1. The majority of the cases of facial injuries were seen in Group II patients (6-11 years) i.e. 51.67%. The mandibular fracture was found to be the most common fracture (0.60%) followed by dentoalveolar (0.27%), mandibular + midface (0.07) and midface (0.02%) fractures. Most of the mandibular fractures were found in the parasymphysis region. Simple fracture seems to be commonest in the mandible. Most of the mandibular and midface fractures in children were amenable to conservative therapies except a few which required surgical intervention. PMID:22639504

  9. Information Technology and Aesthetics: Passive and Active Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Haynes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with examining and recognizing aesthetics in an Information System (an organization incorporating both humans and information technology. Aesthetics emerge from the wholeness of things, not from specific parts or components. As such, aesthetics may naturally be considered in “systems”, and we propose that an effective manner of thinking of aesthetics is to think in terms of “themes”. Humans have an extraordinary capacity to capture events thematically. In other words, human beings have a natural sense of aesthetics. To examine aesthetics in an information systems context, we argue that one must consider not only aesthetics that may be perceived by the senses (a passive dimension, but also aesthetics that may be conceived in the mind (an active dimension. This paper draws the conclusion that the benefits of aesthetics in relation to the study of Information Systems, has characteristics similar to the nature and importance of ethics in IS. Also, the study of aesthetics in IS has greater implications than simply recognizing and appreciating beauty and art. The very human capacity for recognizing and appreciating beauty and art is also the same capacity for effective creativity and happiness: the active aesthetic dimension. It follows that if an information system encouraged and provided the enabling circumstances for the human capacity of thematic recognition (as found in the human appreciation of art and beauty it thereby also provides the ground and the necessary thematically recognizable stimulus for effective creative and visionary organizational management.

  10. Dynamics of brain networks in the aesthetic appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J.; García-Prieto, Juan; Ramasco, José J.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Bajo, Ricardo; Munar, Enric; Flexas, Albert; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimage experiments have been essential for identifying active brain networks. During cognitive tasks as in, e.g., aesthetic appreciation, such networks include regions that belong to the default mode network (DMN). Theoretically, DMN activity should be interrupted during cognitive tasks demanding attention, as is the case for aesthetic appreciation. Analyzing the functional connectivity dynamics along three temporal windows and two conditions, beautiful and not beautiful stimuli, here we report experimental support for the hypothesis that aesthetic appreciation relies on the activation of two different networks, an initial aesthetic network and a delayed aesthetic network, engaged within distinct time frames. Activation of the DMN might correspond mainly to the delayed aesthetic network. We discuss adaptive and evolutionary explanations for the relationships existing between the DMN and aesthetic networks and offer unique inputs to debates on the mind/brain interaction. PMID:23754437

  11. Dynamics of brain networks in the aesthetic appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J; García-Prieto, Juan; Ramasco, José J; Mirasso, Claudio R; Bajo, Ricardo; Munar, Enric; Flexas, Albert; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2013-06-18

    Neuroimage experiments have been essential for identifying active brain networks. During cognitive tasks as in, e.g., aesthetic appreciation, such networks include regions that belong to the default mode network (DMN). Theoretically, DMN activity should be interrupted during cognitive tasks demanding attention, as is the case for aesthetic appreciation. Analyzing the functional connectivity dynamics along three temporal windows and two conditions, beautiful and not beautiful stimuli, here we report experimental support for the hypothesis that aesthetic appreciation relies on the activation of two different networks, an initial aesthetic network and a delayed aesthetic network, engaged within distinct time frames. Activation of the DMN might correspond mainly to the delayed aesthetic network. We discuss adaptive and evolutionary explanations for the relationships existing between the DMN and aesthetic networks and offer unique inputs to debates on the mind/brain interaction.

  12. The Aesthetic Actualisation of Learning Potential with Media and ICT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2006-01-01

    The article discusses the possibilities for using aesthetics as a concept for potentialities that are actualised with respect to education and learning with media and IT. In order to realise this, a new understanding of the concept of aesthetics as a reflexive framing of performative choice...... by an evolutionary model based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory: when the concept of art changes, the concept of aesthetics also changes. This complex forms the basis for a discussion of how learning potential with media and IT can be actualised aesthetically....... is proposed. Thus, it is not enough to discuss aesthetics as form theory or philosophy, since technology clarifies how aesthetics develops in a new mode. The article proposes a revitalisation of Alexander Baumgarten's view of aesthetics as a theoretical concept linked to art. This is supported...

  13. Developmental facial paralysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Anesti, Katerina

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the confusing nomenclature and pathogenesis of Developmental Facial Paralysis, and how it can be differentiated from other causes of facial paralysis present at birth. Differentiating developmental from traumatic facial paralysis noted at birth is important for determining prognosis, but also for medicolegal reasons. Given the dramatic presentation of this condition, accurate and reliable guidelines are necessary in order to facilitate early diagnosis and initiate appropriate therapy, while providing support and counselling to the family. The 30 years experience of our center in the management of developmental facial paralysis is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve embryology, anatomy, nerve physiology, and an appreciation of well-recognized mishaps during fetal development. It is hoped that a better understanding of this condition will in the future lead to early targeted screening, accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment in this population of facially disfigured patients, which will facilitate their emotional and social rehabilitation, and their reintegration among their peers.

  14. Immediate Gore-Tex sling suspension for management of facial paralysis in head and neck extirpative surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Mia E; Weber, Stephen M; Kriet, J David; Girod, Douglas A; Tsue, Terance T; Wax, Mark K

    2007-08-01

    We sought to evaluate the functional and aesthetic outcomes of immediate facial reconstruction with a Gore-Tex (expanded polytetrofluoroethylene) sling in irradiated patients undergoing large head and neck tumor extirpation with facial nerve resection. We conducted a retrospective study of 17 patients at two academic institutions who underwent extirpative surgery with immediate Gore-Tex sling reconstruction and completed radiotherapy. Functional and aesthetic results were evaluated at three intervals. All patients had excellent immediate results and good or excellent intermediate-term results. At long-term follow-up, results were good to excellent in 47% and unacceptable in 35% of patients. In irradiated patients undergoing total parotidectomy with immediate facial reconstruction using Gore-Tex slings, early results are excellent, but there is a high incidence of major wound complications and unacceptable results in long-term follow-up. There is a high rate of late complications associated with immediate facial reconstruction with Gore-Tex slings in irradiated patients.

  15. [Reconstruction of facial burn sequelae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyatier, J L; Comparin, J P; Boulos, J P; Bichet, J C; Jacquin, F

    2001-06-01

    The deep burns of the face can lead to horrible scars functionally and aesthetically. Treatment of these scars need several surgical interventions frequently and during many years. In our region we deal with this type of wounds as team work, multidisciplinary approach carrying out many process starting by emergency treatment of acute burns till the social rehabilitation. The expansion technique was great help in improving the shape of scars, by using the expanding skin as full thickness grafts. Reconstruction of the anatomical units and application of aesthetic techniques (like rhinoplasty, lifting, tattooing and autologous fat injections) participate equally in improving the quality of results. Many examples of treatments of burns scars are shown.

  16. 牙列中线偏斜的审美研究进展%Aesthetic research progress on dental midline deviation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭丛丛; 周晨

    2012-01-01

    面部对称是容貌美观的重要影响因素.在微笑美学的研究中,牙列中线与面中线的一致性与微笑审美评价结果密切相关,直接影响患者微笑的美观程度.由于牙列中线偏斜在普通人群中发生率较高,因此,牙列中线与面中线不一致常作为患者就诊的主诉,同时也是正畸医生在制定治疗计划时需要特殊考虑的一个临床诊断指标和矫治目标.本文将对牙列中线偏斜的流行病学情况、病因学分类、诊断与治疗方法及其对微笑审美的影响作一综述,以期指导临床操作.%Facial symmetry is an important factor of facial aesthetics. In the study of smile aesthetics, the concordance of dental midline and facial midline is closely related to evaluation of smile aesthetics. Dental midline deviation is quite common among general people. As a result, dental midline deviation is often the patient' s chief complaint, and dentofacial midline discrepancy is considered as an important diagnostic factor in orthodontic treatment planning. This article will make a review on the epidemiology situation, etiology classification of dental mid-line deviation, as well as its diagnosis, treatment and its influence on smile aesthetics.

  17. The facial expression of schizophrenic patients applied with infrared thermal facial image sequence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bo-Lin Jian; Chieh-Li Chen; Wen-Lin Chu; Min-Wei Huang

    2017-01-01

    .... Thus, this study used non-contact infrared thermal facial images (ITFIs) to analyze facial temperature changes evoked by different emotions in moderately and markedly ill schizophrenia patients...

  18. Shadows Alter Facial Expressions of Noh Masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyata, Hiromitsu; Nishimura, Ritsuko; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Background A Noh mask, worn by expert actors during performance on the Japanese traditional Noh drama, conveys various emotional expressions despite its fixed physical properties. How does the mask change its expressions? Shadows change subtly during the actual Noh drama, which plays a key role in creating elusive artistic enchantment. We here describe evidence from two experiments regarding how attached shadows of the Noh masks influence the observers’ recognition of the emotional expressions. Methodology/Principal Findings In Experiment 1, neutral-faced Noh masks having the attached shadows of the happy/sad masks were recognized as bearing happy/sad expressions, respectively. This was true for all four types of masks each of which represented a character differing in sex and age, even though the original characteristics of the masks also greatly influenced the evaluation of emotions. Experiment 2 further revealed that frontal Noh mask images having shadows of upward/downward tilted masks were evaluated as sad/happy, respectively. This was consistent with outcomes from preceding studies using actually tilted Noh mask images. Conclusions/Significance Results from the two experiments concur that purely manipulating attached shadows of the different types of Noh masks significantly alters the emotion recognition. These findings go in line with the mysterious facial expressions observed in Western paintings, such as the elusive qualities of Mona Lisa’s smile. They also agree with the aesthetic principle of Japanese traditional art “yugen (profound grace and subtlety)”, which highly appreciates subtle emotional expressions in the darkness. PMID:23940748

  19. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, Frederic; Francois, Ghislain; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Hanaya, Tomoo; Batisse, Dominique; Cointereau-Chardon, Suzy; Seixas, Mirela Donato Gianeti; Dal Belo, Susi Elaine; Bazin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Skin pores (SP), as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc) that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage) on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 μm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm2) and determination of their respective sizes in mm2. Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage) that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1) were recorded in all studied subjects; 2) varied greatly with ethnicity; 3) plateaued with age in most cases; and 4) globally refected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having “enlarged pores” like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly distinct from other ethnicities in having very low density and sizes. Analyzing the present results suggests that facial skin pore’s morphology as perceived by human eye less result from functional criteria of associated appendages such as sebaceous glands. To what extent skin pores may be viewed as additional criteria of a photo-altered skin is an issue to be further addressed. PMID:25733918

  20. Inclinations of the facial profile: art versus reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, L G; Sohm, P; Kolar, J C; Katic, M J; Munro, I R

    1985-04-01

    The average inclinations of five basic facial profile lines and five individual facial profile segments were determined by direct anthropometry in a total group of 232 healthy young adults, all North American Caucasians. Significant sex-related differences were found only in the inclination of the forehead, the lower face, and the lower third of the face, with greater inclinations in males. These results were compared with data obtained from 49 art works produced by ancient, Renaissance, post-Renaissance, and contemporary artists and drawings of the face in scientific papers published by anthropologists, orthodontists, anatomists, and plastic surgeons. In the population study the average inclination of the general and the aesthetic profile lines, the lower face, the forehead, and the lower lip show a receding trend. The upper face is slightly protruded in the males and close to vertical in the females. The chin and the nose are equally prominent in both sexes. The only significant difference is in the greater recession of the lower face in males. The average female population values are reminiscent of those of the Renaissance. The average male inclinations come closest to the findings in the statues of antiquity. The population sample and the contemporary artists showed similar inclinations of the nasal bridge and the lower lip. Generally, the average inclination of the chin in the population is smaller than in any artistic style.