WorldWideScience

Sample records for fabricating plasmonic components

  1. Plasmonic components fabrication via nanoimprint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    A review report on nanoimprinted plasmonic components is given. The fabrication of different metal–dielectric geometries and nanostructured surfaces that support either propagating or localized surface plasmon modes is discussed. The main characteristics and advantages of the nanoimprint technolo...

  2. Fabricating plasmonic components for nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Jeppesen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of different metal-dielectric structures that are used as surface plasmon polariton waveguides and as plasmonic metamaterials. Fabrication approaches based on different lithographic and deposition techniques are discussed.......We report on experimental realization of different metal-dielectric structures that are used as surface plasmon polariton waveguides and as plasmonic metamaterials. Fabrication approaches based on different lithographic and deposition techniques are discussed....

  3. Fabricating plasmonic components for nano-and meta-photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Jeppesen, Claus;

    2009-01-01

    Different fabrication approaches for realization of metal-dielectric structures supporting propagating and localized surface plasmons are described including fabrication of nanophotonic waveguides and plasmonic nanoantennae.......Different fabrication approaches for realization of metal-dielectric structures supporting propagating and localized surface plasmons are described including fabrication of nanophotonic waveguides and plasmonic nanoantennae....

  4. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J.; Jin, M. L.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Berg, van den, A.E.; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots” with a deposited metal film, on which the localized surface plasmon resonance effect is obtained. These plasmonic microcapsules can be engineered and modified by nanoparticle size and the metal film thickness. Repeatable Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scatte...

  5. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Jin, M.L.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Berg, van den A.; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots” with a deposited metal film, on which the localized su

  6. Active components for integrated plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krasavin, A.V.; Bolger, P.M.; Zayats, A.V.;

    2009-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of highly efficient and compact passive and active components for integrated plasmonic circuit based on dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides.......We present a comprehensive study of highly efficient and compact passive and active components for integrated plasmonic circuit based on dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides....

  7. Nanoimprinted Long-range Surface Plasmon Polariton Waveguide Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Dan Mario; Boltasseva, A.; Nielsen, Theodor

    2006-01-01

    We report on the fabrication by nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and performance of metal stripe waveguides embedded in a polymer, capable of supporting long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) propagation.......We report on the fabrication by nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and performance of metal stripe waveguides embedded in a polymer, capable of supporting long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) propagation....

  8. Modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Lysenko, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of thin gold films embedded in silicon dioxide. The propagation vector of surface plasmon polaritons has been calculated by the effective index method for the wavelength range of 750-1700 nm and film thickness of 15......, 30 and 45 nm. The fabrication process of such plasmonic waveguides with width in the range of 1-100 μm and their quality inspection are described. The results of optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides using a high power laser with the peak power wavelength 1064 nm show significant deviation...

  9. Local Heating with Lithographically Fabricated Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold are compa......Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold...... are compared in the visible and near-infrared regions numerically and experimentally with samples fabricated using e-beam lithography. Results show that plasmonic titanium nitride nanodisks are efficient local heat sources and outperform gold nanodisks in the biological transparency window, dispensing the need...... for complex particle geometries....

  10. Ion-beam assisted laser fabrication of sensing plasmonic nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Vitrik, Oleg; Kulchin, Yuri; Milichko, Valentin; Makarov, Sergey; Kudryashov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Simple high-performance two-stage hybrid technique was developed for fabrication of different plasmonic nanostructures, including nanorods, nanorings, as well as more complex structures on glass substrates. In this technique a thin noble metal film on a dielectric substrate is irradiated by a tightly focused single nanosecond laser pulse and then the modified region is slowly polished by an accelerated argon ion (Ar+) beam. As a result, each nanosecond laser pulse locally modifies the initial metal film through initiation of fast melting and subsequent hydrodynamic processes, while the following Ar+-ion polishing removes the rest of the film, revealing the hidden topography features and fabricating separate plasmonic structures on the glass substrate. We demonstrate that the shape and lateral size of the resulting functional plasmonic nanostructures depends on the laser pulse energy and metal film thickness, while subsequent Ar+-ion polishing enables to vary height of the resulting nanostructures. The plasmon...

  11. Fabrication of plasmonic waveguides for device applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Leosson, Kristjan; Rosenzveig, Tiberiu

    2007-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of different metal-insulator geometries that are used as plasmonic waveguides guiding electromagnetic radiation along metal-dielectric interfaces via excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Three configurations are considered: metal strips, symmetric...... based on metal V-grooves that offer subwavelength confinement are also considered. We focus on recent advances in manufacturing of nanostructured metal strips and metal V-grooves using combined UV, electron-beam and nanoimprint lithography....

  12. Ion-beam assisted laser fabrication of sensing plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Gurbatov, Stanislav; Vitrik, Oleg; Kulchin, Yuri; Milichko, Valentin; Makarov, Sergey; Kudryashov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Simple high-performance, two-stage hybrid technique was developed for fabrication of different plasmonic nanostructures, including nanorods, nanorings, as well as more complex structures on glass substrates. In this technique, a thin noble-metal film on a dielectric substrate is irradiated by a single tightly focused nanosecond laser pulse and then the modified region is slowly polished by an accelerated argon ion (Ar+) beam. As a result, each nanosecond laser pulse locally modifies the initial metal film through initiation of fast melting and subsequent hydrodynamic processes, while the following Ar+-ion polishing removes the rest of the film, revealing the hidden topography features and fabricating separate plasmonic structures on the glass substrate. We demonstrate that the shape and lateral size of the resulting functional plasmonic nanostructures depend on the laser pulse energy and metal film thickness, while subsequent Ar+-ion polishing enables to vary height of the resulting nanostructures. Plasmonic properties of the fabricated nanostructures were characterized by dark-field micro-spectroscopy, Raman and photoluminescence measurements performed on single nanofeatures, as well as by supporting numerical calculations of the related electromagnetic near-fields and Purcell factors. The developed simple two-stage technique represents a new step towards direct large-scale laser-induced fabrication of highly ordered arrays of complex plasmonic nanostructures.

  13. V-groove plasmonic waveguides fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Cuesta, I.; Nielsen, R.B.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Propagation of channel plasmon-polariton modes in the bottom of a metal V groove has been recently demonstrated. It provides a unique way of manipulating light at nanometer length scale. In this work, we present a method based on nanoimprint lithography that allows parallel fabrication of integra......Propagation of channel plasmon-polariton modes in the bottom of a metal V groove has been recently demonstrated. It provides a unique way of manipulating light at nanometer length scale. In this work, we present a method based on nanoimprint lithography that allows parallel fabrication...

  14. Modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Lysenko, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of thin gold films embedded in silicon dioxide. The propagation vector of surface plasmon polaritons has been calculated by the effective index method for the wavelength range of 750-1700 nm and film thickness of 1...

  15. Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acar, H.

    2013-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was shaped by the goal---coming up new approaches to fabricate plasmonic materials with electron beam induced deposition (EBID). One-step, bottom-up and direct-write are typical adjectives that are used to indicate the advantageous properties of this technique. Thes

  16. Fabrication approaches for plasmon-improved photovoltaic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gritti, Claudia; Malureanu, Radu; Kardynal, B.

    During this talk we will present various fabrication approaches to improve the performance of photovoltaic (PV) cells by using metallic nanoparticles in order to generate photocurrent below the bandgap. This effect is possible due to the generation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in optimized...

  17. Key components for nano-assembled plasmon-excited single molecule non-linear devices

    CERN Document Server

    Kewes, Günter; Mazzamuto, Giacomo; Neitzke, Oliver; Schönfeld, Rolf-Simon; Schell, Andreas W; Probst, Jürgen; Wolters, Janik; Löchel, Bernd; Toninelli, Costanza; Benson, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Tremendous enhancement of light-matter interaction in plasmon-excited molecular hybrid devices allows for non-linearities on the level of single emitters and few photons. This promises a plethora of novel applications like single photon transistors. Nevertheless, building the components of such devices is technologically extremely challenging. We tackle this task by lithographically fabricating on-chip plasmonic waveguides, efficiently connected to far-field in- and out-coupling ports via low-loss dielectric waveguides. Furthermore, a nano-assembling technology is developed, enabling the controlled coupling of single organic emitters to the plasmonic waveguides. Dibenzoterrylene fluorescent molecules hosted in anthracene crystals are investigated for this purpose. Here we present all key-components and technologies for a plasmon-excited single molecule non-linear device.

  18. Nano-fabricated plasmonic optical transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hyuck; Cabrini, Stefano; Schuck, P. James; Liang, Xiaogan; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides a plasmonic optical transformer to produce a highly focuses optical beam spot, where the transformer includes a first metal layer, a dielectric layer formed on the first metal layer, and a second metal layer formed on the dielectric layer, where the first metal layer, the dielectric layer, and the second layer are patterned to a shape including a first section having a first cross section, a second section following the first section having a cross-section tapering from the first section to a smaller cross-section, and a third section following the second section having a cross-section matching the tapered smaller cross-section of the second section.

  19. Plasmonic and Dielectric Metasurfaces: Design, Fabrication and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional metasurfaces are widely focused on for their ability for flexible light manipulation (phase, amplitude, polarization over sub-wavelength propagation distances. Most of the metasurfaces can be divided into two categories by the material type of unit structure, i.e., plasmonic metasurfaces and dielectric metasurfaces. For plasmonic metasurfaces, they are made on the basis of metallic meta-atoms whose optical responses are driven by the plasmon resonances supported by metallic particles. For dielectric metasurfaces, the unit structure is constructed with high refractive index dielectric resonators, such as silicon, germanium or tellurium, which can support electric and magnetic dipole responses based on Mie resonances. The responses of plasmonic and dielectric metasurfaces are all relevant to the characteristics of unit structure, such as dimensions and materials. One can manipulate the electromagnetic field of light wave scattered by the metasurfaces through designing the dimension parameters of each unit structure in the metasurfaces. In this review article, we give a brief overview of our recent progress in plasmonic and dielectric metasurface-assisted nanophotonic devices and their design, fabrication and applications, including the metasurface-based broadband and the selective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM carrying vector beams, N-fold OAM multicasting using a V-shaped antenna array, a metasurface on conventional optical fiber facet for linearly-polarized mode (LP11 generation, graphene split-ring metasurface-assisted terahertz coherent perfect absorption, OAM beam generation using a nanophotonic dielectric metasurface array, as well as Bessel beam generation and OAM multicasting using a dielectric metasurface array. It is believed that metasurface-based nanophotonic devices are one of the devices with the most potential applied in various fields, such as beam steering, spatial light modulator, nanoscale

  20. Simple Method for Large-Scale Fabrication of Plasmonic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Shishkin, Ivan I; Mozharov, Alexey M; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for single-step, lithography-free, and large-scale laser writing of nanoparticle-based plasmonic structures has been developed. Changing energy of femtosecond laser pulses and thickness of irradiated gold film it is possible to vary diameter of the gold nanoparticles, while the distance between them can be varied by laser scanning parameters. This method has an advantage over the most previously demonstrated methods in its simplicity and versatility, while the quality of the structures is good enough for many applications. In particular, resonant light absorbtion/scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering have been demonstrated on the fabricated nanostructures.

  1. Design, fabrication and SNOM investigation of plasmonic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Zenin, Vladimir A.; Andryieuski, Andrei

    . In this work we will present an overview of our simulation, fabrication and characterisation activity in the plasmonic field where we tackle these issues. We start with presenting an optimised nanoantenna for coupling of free-propagating waves into a subwavelength slot waveguide modes. Optimised antennae show...... an increase in coupling efficiency up to 185 times compared to a bare waveguide. Once optimized, the nanoantennae were fabricated and the propagation in the slot waveguides was characterised. The characterisation shows an increase in the effective area (proportional to the coupling efficiency) of up to 175...... a field enhancement of up to ∼ 12000 evenly distributed in a volume of ∼ 30x 30 x 10 nm3. The same taper can be used also for modifying the waveguide profile from a wide strip waveguide to a nanorod waveguide showing both the flexibility of our taper design as well as allowing to measure and compare...

  2. Photoluminescence-enhanced plasmonic substrates fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bongseok; Iwanaga, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Hideki T.; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2014-04-01

    We fabricated large-area stacked complementary plasmonic crystals (SC PlCs) by employing ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography. The SC PlCs were made on silicon-on-insulator substrates consisting of three layers: the top layer contacting air was a perforated Au film, the bottom layer contacting the buried oxide layer included an Au disk array corresponding to the holes in the top layer, and the middle layer was a Si photonic crystal slab. The SC PlCs have prominent resonances in optical wavelengths. It is shown that the fabricated PlCs were precise in structure and uniform in their optical properties. We examined the photoluminescence (PL) enhancement of monolayer dye molecules on the SC PlC substrates in the visible range and found large PL enhancements of up to a 100-fold in comparison with dye molecules on nonprocessed Si wafers.

  3. Compact surface plasmonic waveguide component for integrated optical processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Nilima; Sahu, Partha Pratim

    2015-06-01

    A compact surface plasmonic two mode interference waveguide component having silicon core and silver and GaAsInP side cladding is proposed for optical processor elements. Coupling operation is obtained by using index modulation of GaAsInP cladding with applied optical pulse.

  4. Hybrid silicon-plasmonics: efficient waveguide interfacing for low-loss integrated switching components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilipakos, Odysseas; Pitilakis, Alexandros; Kriezis, Emmanouil E.

    2012-04-01

    We present a thorough numerical investigation of end-fire coupling between dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton (DLSPP) and compact rib/wire silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides. Simulations are based on the three-dimensional vector finite element method. The interface geometrical parameters leading to optimum performance, i.e., maximum coupling efficiency or, equivalently, minimum insertion loss (IL), are identified. We show that coupling efficiencies as high as 85 % are possible. In addition, we quantify the fabrication tolerances about the optimum parameter values. In the same context, we assess the effect of a metallic stripe gap and that of a horizontal offset between waveguides on insertion loss. Finally, we demonstrate that by benefiting form the low-loss coupling between the two waveguides, hybrid silicon-plasmonic 2 x 2 thermo-optic switching elements can outperform their all-plasmonic counterparts in terms of IL. Specifically, we examine two hybrid SOI-DLSPP switching elements, namely, a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) and a Multi-Mode-Interference (MMI) switch. In particular, in the MZI case the IL improvement compared to the all-plasmonic counterpart is 4.5 dB. Moreover, the proposed hybrid components maintain the high extinction ratio, small footprint, and efficient tuning traits of plasmonic technology.

  5. Plasmonic nanoantenna design and fabrication based on evolutionary optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Feichtner, Thorsten; Hecht, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Nanoantennas for light enhance light-matter interaction at the nanoscale making them useful in optical communication, sensing, and spectroscopy. So far nanoantenna engineering has been largely based on rules derived from the radio frequency domain which neglect the inertia of free metal electrons at optical frequencies causing phenomena such as complete field penetration, ohmic losses and plasmon resonances. Here we introduce a general and scalable evolutionary algorithm that accounts for topological constrains of the fabrication method and therefore yields unexpected nanoantenna designs exhibiting strong light localization and enhancement which can directly be "printed" by focused-ion beam milling. The fitness ranking in a hierarchy of such antennas is validated experimentally by two-photon photoluminescence. Analysis of the best antennas' operation principle shows that it deviates fundamentally from that of classical radio wave-inspired designs. Our work sets the stage for a widespread application of evolut...

  6. Long range hybrid tube-wedge plasmonic waveguide with extreme light confinement and good fabrication error tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Xu, Kai; Wang, Liang

    2016-02-22

    We studied a novel long range hybrid tube-wedge plasmonic (LRHTWP) waveguide consisting of a high index dielectric nanotube placed above a triangular metal wedge substrate. Using comprehensive numerical simulations on guiding properties of the designed waveguide, it is found that extreme light confinement and low propagation loss are obtained due to strong coupling between dielectric nanotube mode and wedge plasmon polariton. Comparing with previous studied hybrid plasmonic waveguides, the LRHTWP waveguide has longer propagation length and tighter mode confinement. In addition, the LRHTWP waveguide is quite tolerant to practical fabrication errors such as variation of the wedge tip angle and the horizontal misalignment between the nanotube and the metal wedge. The proposed LRHTWP waveguide could have many application potentials for various high performance nanophotonic components.

  7. Challenges of fabricating plasmonic and photonic structures with Neon ion beam milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Fiutowski, Jacek; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    properties. We are currently studying the capabilities of focussed Helium and Neon ion beam milling for the fabricating of plasmonic and photonic devices. We found that Neon ion beam milling enables us to prepare plasmonic structures, such as trenches (see Fig. 1) and V-grooves without doping and alloying...... effects specific to Galium FIB. Neon FIB milling is superior to Helium FIB milling in terms of the processing speed and smaller levels of implanted ions. From our perspective it is the most promising technique for the fabrication of individual plasmonic devices with a few nanometers precision. The main...... presentation we show the current progress in Neon FIB milling of plasmonic structures. We compare different materials, in particular poly- and mono-crystalline gold as well as thin films of Titanium Nitride, which are commonly used for plasmonic applications....

  8. Turbine component, turbine blade, and turbine component fabrication process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delvaux, John McConnell; Cairo, Ronald Ralph; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2017-05-30

    A turbine component, a turbine blade, and a turbine component fabrication process are disclosed. The turbine component includes ceramic matrix composite plies and a feature configured for preventing interlaminar tension of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The feature is selected from the group consisting of ceramic matrix composite tows or precast insert tows extending through at least a portion of the ceramic matrix composite plies, a woven fabric having fiber tows or a precast insert preventing contact between a first set of the ceramic matrix composite plies and a second set of the ceramic matrix composite plies, and combinations thereof. The process includes laying up ceramic matrix composite plies in a preselected arrangement and securing a feature configured for interlaminar tension.

  9. Ultralow-loss CMOS copper plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I.; Kirtaev, Roman V.

    2016-01-01

    with microelectronics manufacturing technologies. This prevents plasmonic components from integration with both silicon photonics and silicon microelectronics. Here, we demonstrate ultralow-loss copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a simple complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process, which...

  10. Efficient design, accurate fabrication and effective characterization of plasmonic quasicrystalline arrays of nano-spherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namin, Farhad A.; Yuwen, Yu A.; Liu, Liu; Panaretos, Anastasios H.; Werner, Douglas H.; Mayer, Theresa S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the scattering properties of two-dimensional quasicrystalline plasmonic lattices are investigated. We combine a newly developed synthesis technique, which allows for accurate fabrication of spherical nanoparticles, with a recently published variation of generalized multiparticle Mie theory to develop the first quantitative model for plasmonic nano-spherical arrays based on quasicrystalline morphologies. In particular, we study the scattering properties of Penrose and Ammann- Beenker gold spherical nanoparticle array lattices. We demonstrate that by using quasicrystalline lattices, one can obtain multi-band or broadband plasmonic resonances which are not possible in periodic structures. Unlike previously published works, our technique provides quantitative results which show excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  11. Ultrafast direct fabrication of flexible substrate-supported designer plasmonic nanoarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaowu; Kumar, Prashant; Xu, Rong; Zhao, Kejie; Cheng, Gary J.

    2015-12-01

    Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures has been an important topic for their potential applications in photonic and optoelectronic devices. Among plasmonic materials, gold is one of the most promising materials due to its low ohmic loss at optical frequencies and high oxidation resistance. However, there are two major bottlenecks for its industrial applications: (1) the need for large-scale fabrication technology for high-precision plasmonic nanostructures; and (2) the need to integrate the plasmonic nanostructures on various substrates. While conventional top-down approaches involve high cost and give low throughput, bottom-up approaches suffer from irreproducibility and low precision. Herein, we report laser shock induced direct imprinting of large-area plasmonic nanostructures from physical vapor deposited (PVD) gold thin film on a flexible commercial free-standing aluminum foil. Among the important characteristics of the laser-shock direct imprinting is their unique capabilities to reproducibly deliver designer plasmonic nanostructures with extreme precision and in an ultrafast manner. Excellent size tunability (from several μm down to 15 nm) has been achieved by varying mold dimensions and laser parameters. The physical mechanism of the hybrid film imprinting is elaborated by finite element modeling. A mechanical robustness test of the hybrid film validates a significantly improved interfacial contact between gold arrays and the underlying substrate. The strong optical field enhancement was realized in the large-area fabricated engineered gold nanostructures. Low concentration molecular sensing was investigated employing the fabricated structures as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The ability to ultrafast direct imprint plasmonic nanoarrays on a flexible substrate at multiscale is a critical step towards roll-to-roll manufacturing of multi-functional devices which is poised to inspire several emerging applications.Fabrication of

  12. High rate fabrication of compression molded components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Dykstra, William C.; Smith, Glen L.; Miller, Robert J.

    2016-04-19

    A method for fabricating a thermoplastic composite component comprises inductively heating a thermoplastic pre-form with a first induction coil by inducing current to flow in susceptor wires disposed throughout the pre-form, inductively heating smart susceptors in a molding tool to a leveling temperature with a second induction coil by applying a high-strength magnetic field having a magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors, shaping the magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors to flow substantially parallel to a molding surface of the smart susceptors, placing the heated pre-form between the heated smart susceptors; and applying molding pressure to the pre-form to form the composite component.

  13. Design, fabrication, and characterization of metallic nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and plasmonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qingzhen

    Metal/dielectric nanostructures have the ability to sustain coherent electron oscillations known as surface plasmons. Due to their capability of localizing and guiding light in sub-wavelength metal nanostructures beyond diffraction limits, surface plasmon-based photonics, or “plasmonics” has opened new physical phenomena and lead to novel applications in metamaterials, optoelectronics, surface enhanced spectroscopy and biological sensing. This dissertation centers on design, fabrication, characterization of metallic nanostructures and their applications in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and actively tunable plasmonics. Metal-dielectric nanostructures are the building blocks for photonic metamaterials. One valuable design guideline for metamaterials is the Babinet’s principle, which governs the optical properties of complementary nanostructures. However, most complementary metamaterials are designed for the far infrared region or beyond, where the optical absorption of metal is small. We have developed a novel dual fabrication method, capable of simultaneously producing optically thin complementary structures. From experimental measurements and theoretical simulations, we showed that Babinet’s principle qualitatively holds in the visible region for the optically thin complements. The complementary structure is also a good platform to study subtle differences between nanoparticles and nanoholes in SERS (a surface sensitive technique, which can enhance the conventional Raman cross-section by 106˜108 fold, thus very useful for highly sensitive biochemical sensing). Through experimental measurement and theoretical analysis, we showed that the SERS enhancement spectrum (plot of SERS enhancement versus excitation wavelengths), dominated by local near-field, for nanoholes closely follows their far-field optical transmission spectrum. However, the enhancement spectrum for nanoparticles red-shifts significantly from their far-field optical extinction

  14. Beet Juice-Induced Green Fabrication of Plasmonic AgCl/Ag Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple, green, and fast approach (complete within 5 min) was explored for the fabrication of hybrid AgCl/Ag plasmonic nanoparticles under microwave (MW) irradiation. In this method, beet juice served as a reducing reagent, which is an abundant sugar-rich agricultural produce. I...

  15. Beet Juice-Induced Green Fabrication of Plasmonic AgCl/Ag Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple, green, and fast approach (complete within 5 min) was explored for the fabrication of hybrid AgCl/Ag plasmonic nanoparticles under microwave (MW) irradiation. In this method, beet juice served as a reducing reagent, which is an abundant sugar-rich agricultural produce. I...

  16. Plasmonic doped semiconductor nanocrystals: Properties, fabrication, applications and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Scotognella, Francesco; Manna, Liberato

    2017-02-01

    Degenerately doped semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are of recent interest to the NC community due to their tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the near infrared (NIR). The high level of doping in such materials with carrier densities in the range of 1021cm-3 leads to degeneracy of the doping levels and intense plasmonic absorption in the NIR. The lower carrier density in degenerately doped semiconductor NCs compared to noble metals enables LSPR tuning over a wide spectral range, since even a minor change of the carrier density strongly affects the spectral position of the LSPR. Two classes of degenerate semiconductors are most relevant in this respect: impurity doped semiconductors, such as metal oxides, and vacancy doped semiconductors, such as copper chalcogenides. In the latter it is the density of copper vacancies that controls the carrier concentration, while in the former the introduction of impurity atoms adds carriers to the system. LSPR tuning in vacancy doped semiconductor NCs such as copper chalcogenides occurs by chemically controlling the copper vacancy density. This goes in hand with complex structural modifications of the copper chalcogenide crystal lattice. In contrast the LSPR of degenerately doped metal oxide NCs is modified by varying the doping concentration or by the choice of host and dopant atoms, but also through the addition of capacitive charge carriers to the conduction band of the metal oxide upon post-synthetic treatments, such as by electrochemical- or photodoping. The NIR LSPRs and the option of their spectral fine-tuning make accessible important new features, such as the controlled coupling of the LSPR to other physical signatures or the enhancement of optical signals in the NIR, sensing application by LSPR tracking, energy production from the NIR plasmon resonance or bio-medical applications in the biological window. In this review we highlight the recent advances in the synthesis of various different plasmonic

  17. Reliable fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures without an adhesion layer using dry lift-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiqin; Li, Zhiqin; Xiang, Quan; Wang, Yasi; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Huigao

    2015-10-01

    Lift-off is the most commonly used pattern-transfer method to define lithographic plasmonic metal nanostructures. A typical lift-off process is realized by dissolving patterned resists in solutions, which has the limits of low yield when not using adhesion layers and incompatibility with the fabrication of some specific structures and devices. In this work, we report an alternative ‘dry’ lift-off process to obtain metallic nanostructures via mechanical stripping by using the advantage of poor adhesion between resists and noble metal films. We show that this dry stripping lift-off method is effective for both positive- and negative-tone resists to fabricate sparse and densely-packed plasmonic nanostructures, respectively. In particular, this method is achieved without using an adhesion layer, which enables the mitigation of plasmon damping to obtain larger field enhancement. Dark-field scattering, one-photon luminescence and surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements were performed to demonstrate the improved quality factor of the plasmonic nanostructures fabricated by this dry lift-off process.

  18. Bimetallic structure fabricated by laser interference lithography for tuning surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C H; Hong, M H; Cheung, H W; Zhang, F; Huang, Z Q; Tan, L S; Hor, T S A

    2008-07-07

    Tuning of surface plasmon resonance by gold and silver bimetallic thin film and bimetallic dot array is investigated. Laser interference lithography is applied to fabricate the nanostructures. A bimetallic dot structure is obtained by a lift-off procedure after gold and silver thin film deposition by an electron beam evaporator. Surface plasmon behaviors of these films and nanostructures are studied using UV-Vis spectroscopy. It is observed that for gold thin film on quartz substrate, the optical spectral peak is blue shifted when a silver thin film is coated over it. Compared to the plasmon band in single metal gold dot array, the bimetallic nanodot array shows a similar blue shift in its spectral peak. These shifts are both attributed to the interaction between gold and silver atoms. Electromagnetic interaction between gold and silver nanostructures is discussed using a simplified spring model.

  19. Transparent Substrates for Plasmonic Sensing by Lithography-Free Fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh

    . For LSPR, the glass hollow-core nanocylinders with suspended gold nanorings showed a sensitivity of 658 nm RIU{1 with a gure-of-merit of 10. The LSPR wavelengths could be shifted by tuning the plasma etching parameters. Due to the low electrical conductivity of glass substrates, electrodes could......-free fabrication methods, and resulted in large-area, high throughput and low cost production techniques. The fabrication techniques consisted of using aluminum patterned areas and reactive ion etching (RIE) to achieve nanopillars or nanocylinders in glass; using RIE to achieve nanopillars in silicon as a mould...

  20. Planar self-aligned imprint lithography for coplanar plasmonic nanostructures fabrication

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Weiwei

    2014-03-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a cost-efficient nanopatterning technology because of its promising advantages of high throughput and high resolution. However, accurate multilevel overlay capability of NIL required for integrated circuit manufacturing remains a challenge due to the high cost of achieving mechanical alignment precision. Although self-aligned imprint lithography was developed to avoid the need of alignment for the vertical layered structures, it has limited usage in the manufacture of the coplanar structures, such as integrated plasmonic devices. In this paper, we develop a new process of planar self-alignment imprint lithography (P-SAIL) to fabricate the metallic and dielectric structures on the same plane. P-SAIL transfers the multilevel imprint processes to a single-imprint process which offers higher efficiency and less cost than existing manufacturing methods. Such concept is demonstrated in an example of fabricating planar plasmonic structures consisting of different materials. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. Profile Prediction and Fabrication of Wet-Etched Gold Nanostructures for Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dispersed nanosphere lithography can be employed to fabricate gold nanostructures for localized surface plasmon resonance, in which the gold film evaporated on the nanospheres is anisotropically dry etched to obtain gold nanostructures. This paper reports that by wet etching of the gold film, various kinds of gold nanostructures can be fabricated in a cost-effective way. The shape of the nanostructures is predicted by profile simulation, and the localized surface plasmon resonance spectrum is observed to be shifting its extinction peak with the etching time. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-009-9486-4 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  2. Ultrathin suspended nanopores with surface plasmon resonance fabricated by combined colloidal lithography and film transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junesch, Juliane; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2014-05-14

    Suspended plasmonic nanopores in ultrathin film layers were fabricated through a simple and widely applicable method combining colloidal lithography and thin film transfer, which allows mass production of short-range ordered nanopore arrays on a large scale. By this combined method, mechanically stable and flexible free-standing nanopore membranes with a thickness down to 15-30 nm were produced. The plasmon resonances of the ultrathin plasmonic nanopores fabricated in AlN/Au/AlN trilayer and single layer Au membranes were tuned to lie in the vis-NIR wavelength range by properly designing their dimensions. The optical responses to the refractive index changes were tested and applied to adlayer sensing. The trilayer nanopore membrane showed a unique property to support water only on one side of the membrane, which was confirmed by the resonance shift and comparison with numerical simulation. Pore size reduction down to 10 nm can be achieved through additional material deposition. The filtering function of such pore-size-reduced conical shaped nanofunnels has also been demonstrated. The presented nanopore fabrication method offers new platforms for ultrathin nanopore sensing or filtering devices with controlled pore-size and optical properties. The film transfer technique employed in this work would enable the transformation of any substrate-based nanostructures to free-standing membrane based devices without complicated multiple etching processes.

  3. Laser ablative decoration of micro-diamonds by gold nanoparticles for fabrication of hybrid plasmonic-dielectric antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, A. K.; Ionin, A. A.; Khmelnitskii, R. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mel'nik, N. N.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Umanskaya, S. P.; Zayarny, D. A.; Nguyen, L. V.; Nguyen, T. T. H.; Pham, M. H.; Pham, D. V.; Do, T. H.

    2017-06-01

    Hybrid plasmonic-dielectric antennae are fabricated by laser ablation of gold in water sols of micro-diamonds. Electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of their deposits on a silicon wafer surface indicate close proximity of gold nanoparticles and micro-diamonds, which is supported by photoluminescence studies demonstrating strong (eight-fold) damping of micro-diamond luminescence owing to the attachment of the gold nanoparticles. UV-near-IR spectroscopy of their sols reveals a considerable plasmonic effect, related to red spectral shifts of surface plasmon resonance for the gold nanoparticles in the laser-ablation-fabricated antennae.

  4. 49 CFR 192.153 - Components fabricated by welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Components fabricated by welding. 192.153 Section....153 Components fabricated by welding. (a) Except for branch connections and assemblies of standard... welding, whose strength cannot be determined, must be established in accordance with paragraph UG-101...

  5. Fabrication of three-dimensional plasmonic cavity by femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei Ting; Tseng, Ming Lun; Liao, Chun Yen; Wu, Pin Chieh; Sun, Shulin; Huang, Yao-Wei; Chang, Chia Min; Lu, Chung Hao; Zhou, Lei; Huang, Ding-Wei; Liu, Ai Qun; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-01-14

    We fabricated a three-dimensional five-layered plasmonic resonant cavity by low-cost, efficient and high-throughput femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer (fs-LIFT) technique. The fabricated cavity was characterized by optical measurements, showing two different cavity modes within the measured wavelength region which is in good agreement with numerical simulations. The mode volume corresponding to each resonance is found to be squeezed over 10(4) smaller than the cube of incident wavelength. This property may facilitate many applications in integrated optics, optical nonlinearities, and luminescence enhancement, etc.

  6. Fabrication of fiber-optic localized surface plasmon resonance sensor and its application to detect antibody-antigen reaction of interferon-gamma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Erdene, Norov; Lee, Seung-Ki; Jeong, Dae-Hong; Park, Jae-Hyoung

    2011-12-01

    A fiber-optic localized surface plasmon (FO LSPR) sensor was fabricated by gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) immobilized on the end-face of an optical fiber. When Au NPs were formed on the end-face of an optical fiber by chemical reaction, Au NPs aggregation occurred and the Au NPs were immobilized in various forms such as monomers, dimers, trimers, etc. The component ratio of the Au NPs on the end-face of the fabricated FO LSPR sensor was slightly changed whenever the sensors were fabricated in the same condition. Including this phenomenon, the FO LSPR sensor was fabricated with high sensitivity by controlling the density of Au NPs. Also, the fabricated sensors were measured for the resonance intensity for the different optical systems and analyzed for the effect on sensitivity. Finally, for application as a biosensor, the sensor was used for detecting the antibody-antigen reaction of interferon-gamma.

  7. The fabrication of flip-covered plasmonic nanostructure surfaces with enhanced wear resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joo-Yun; Sung, Sang-Keun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Cheon, So-Hui; Lee, Jihye; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Eungsug

    2017-01-01

    Exposed nanostructure surfaces often suffer from external dynamic wear, particularly when used in human interaction, resulting in surface defects and the degradation of plasmonic resonance properties particularly in terms of transmittance extinction rate and peak-to-valley slope. In this work, a method for the fabrication of flip-covered silver nanostructure-arrayed surfaces is shown to enhance wear resistance. Selectively transferred silver dot and silver webbed-trench exposed reference samples were fabricated by metal nanoimprint, and flip-covered samples were created by flipping and bonding reference samples onto a PET film coated with an adhesive layer. The samples' spectral transmittance was measured before and after a dynamic wear test. Some spectral shift was observed due to the change in refractive index of the surrounding media, but this was not as significant as the effects of the other chosen geometry factors. It was found that dynamic wear had a greater effect on the plasmonic resonance behavior of the exposed samples than in those that had been flip-covered. This suggests that flip-covering may be an effective strategy for the protection of plasmonic resonators against dynamic wear. It is expected that the slight variations in spectral transmittance could be compensated through proper tuning of the sample geometry.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of plasmonic nanocone antennas for strong spontaneous emission enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Björn; Vassant, Simon; Chen, Xue-Wen; Götzinger, Stephan; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonic antennas are attractive nanostructures for a large variety of studies ranging from fundamental aspects of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale to industry-relevant applications such as ultrasensitive sensing, enhanced absorption in solar cells or solar fuel generation. A particularly interesting feature of these antennas is that they can enhance the fluorescence properties of emitters. Theoretical calculations have shown that nanocone antennas provide ideal results, but a high degree of manufacturing precision and control is needed to reach optimal performance. In this study, we report on the fabrication of nanocones with base diameters and heights in the range of 100 nm with variable aspect ratios using focused ion beam milling of sputtered nano-crystalline gold layers. The controlled fabrication process allows us to obtain cones with tailored plasmon resonances. The measured plasmon spectra show very good agreement with finite-difference time-domain calculations. Theoretical investigations predict that these nanocones can enhance the spontaneous emission rate of a quantum emitter by several hundred times while keeping its quantum efficiency above 60%.

  9. The sodium tungsten bronzes as plasmonic materials: fabrication, calculation and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegg, Levi; Cuskelly, Dylan; Keast, Vicki J.

    2017-06-01

    The tungsten bronzes are non-stoichiometric transition metal oxides of the form M x WO3, where 0  ⩽  x  ⩽  1, and M is a dopant ion, most commonly an alkali metal. In this work, the sodium tungsten bronzes (Na x WO3) are investigated as materials for plasmonic applications. The bronzes were fabricated with a solid state reaction, the dielectric function calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and the nanoparticle responses calculated with the boundary element method (BEM). The results were compared to Au and Ag, the materials most widely used in plasmonic applications. It was shown that for x  >  0.5, the solid state fabrication method produces cube-shaped particles of diameter  ⩾1 µm, whose bulk optical properties are well described by a free-electron model and a rigid band structure. The addition of Na into the lattice increases the free electron density, increasing the bulk plasma frequency. Nanoparticle plasmon resonances are found to be highly tunable, and generally at a lower frequency than Au or Ag, and so sodium tungsten bronzes are predicted to be well suited to biomedical or chemical sensing applications.

  10. Fabrication and Robotization of Ultrasensitive Plasmonic Nanosensors for Molecule Detection with Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Kim, Kwanoh; Liu, Chao; Fan, Donglei

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we introduce the history and mechanisms of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), discuss various techniques for fabrication of state-of-the-art SERS substrates, and review recent work on robotizing plasmonic nanoparticles, especially, the efforts we made on fabrication, characterization, and robotization of Raman nanosensors by design. Our nanosensors, consisting of tri-layer nanocapsule structures, are ultrasensitive, well reproducible, and can be robotized by either electric or magnetic tweezers. Three applications using such SERS nanosensors were demonstrated, including location predictable detection, single-cell bioanalysis, and tunable molecule release and monitoring. The integration of SERS and nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) devices is innovative in both device concept and fabrication, and could potentially inspire a new device scheme for various bio-relevant applications. PMID:25946633

  11. Diffraction efficiency of plasmonic gratings fabricated by electron beam lithography using a silver halide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer, Porwal, S.; Bhartiya, S.; Rao, B. T.; Tiwari, P.; Srivastava, Himanshu; Sharma, T. K.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Naik, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    The silver nanoparticle surface relief gratings of ˜10 μm period are fabricated using electron beam lithography on the silver halide film substrate. Morphological characterization of the gratings shows that the period, the shape, and the relief depth in the gratings are mainly dependent on the number of lines per frame, the spot size, and the accelerating voltage of electron beam raster in the SEM. Optical absorption of the silver nanoparticle gratings provides a broad localized surface plasmon resonance peak in the visible region, whereas the intensity of the peaks depends on the number density of silver nanoparticles in the gratings. The maximum efficiency of ˜7.2% for first order diffraction is observed for the grating fabricated at 15 keV. The efficiency is peaking at 560 nm with ˜380 nm bandwidth. The measured profiles of the diffraction efficiency for the gratings are found in close agreement with the Raman-Nath diffraction theory. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structures with high diffraction efficiency having broad wavelength tuning.

  12. Diffraction efficiency of plasmonic gratings fabricated by electron beam lithography using a silver halide film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudheer,, E-mail: sudheer@rrcat.gov.in, E-mail: sudheer.rrcat@gmail.com; Tiwari, P.; Srivastava, Himanshu; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Naik, P. A. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Porwal, S. [Solid State Lasers Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Bhartiya, S. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Laser Materials Development and Device Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Rao, B. T. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Laser Materials Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Sharma, T. K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Solid State Lasers Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India)

    2016-07-28

    The silver nanoparticle surface relief gratings of ∼10 μm period are fabricated using electron beam lithography on the silver halide film substrate. Morphological characterization of the gratings shows that the period, the shape, and the relief depth in the gratings are mainly dependent on the number of lines per frame, the spot size, and the accelerating voltage of electron beam raster in the SEM. Optical absorption of the silver nanoparticle gratings provides a broad localized surface plasmon resonance peak in the visible region, whereas the intensity of the peaks depends on the number density of silver nanoparticles in the gratings. The maximum efficiency of ∼7.2% for first order diffraction is observed for the grating fabricated at 15 keV. The efficiency is peaking at 560 nm with ∼380 nm bandwidth. The measured profiles of the diffraction efficiency for the gratings are found in close agreement with the Raman-Nath diffraction theory. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structures with high diffraction efficiency having broad wavelength tuning.

  13. Fabrication of anisotropically arrayed nano-slots metasurfaces using reflective plasmonic lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Zeng, Bo; Wang, Changtao; Gao, Ping; Liu, Kaipeng; Pu, Mingbo; Jin, Jinjin; Zhao, Zeyu; Li, Xiong; Yu, Honglin; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-11-28

    Nanofabrication technology with high-resolution, high-throughput and low-cost is essential for the development of nanoplasmonic and nanophotonic devices. At present, most metasurfaces are fabricated in a point by point writing manner with electron beam lithography or a focused ion beam, which imposes a serious cost barrier with respect to practical applications. Near field optical lithography, seemingly providing a high-resolution and low-cost way, however, suffers from the ultra shallow depth and poor fidelity of obtained photoresist patterns due to the exponential decay feature of evanescent waves. Here, we propose a method of surface plasmonic imaging lithography by introducing a reflective plasmonic lens to amplify and compensate evanescent waves, resulting in the production of nano resist patterns with high fidelity, contrast and enhanced depth beyond that usually obtained by near field optical lithography. As examples, a discrete and anisotropically arrayed nano-slots mask pattern with different orientations and a size of 40 nm × 120 nm could be imaged in photoresist and transferred successfully onto a metal layer through an etching process. Evidence for the pattern quality is given by virtue of the fabricated metasurface lens devices showing good focusing performance in experiments. It is believed that this method provides a parallel, low-cost, high-throughput and large-area nanofabrication route for fabricating nanostructures of holograms, vortex phase plates, bio-sensors and solar cells etc.

  14. Metal strips and wires as plasmonic waveguides for integrated-optics components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Leosson, Kristjan; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2007-01-01

    Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in different waveguide components based on nm-thin and ¿m-wide metal strips and symmetrical sub-wavelength metal nanowires embedded in a uniform dielectric is experimentally studied at telecom wavelengths.......Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in different waveguide components based on nm-thin and ¿m-wide metal strips and symmetrical sub-wavelength metal nanowires embedded in a uniform dielectric is experimentally studied at telecom wavelengths....

  15. Fabrication of planar SOFC components at ECN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huijsmans, J.P.P.; Siewers, E.J.; Van Heuveln, F.H.; De Jong, J.P.

    1991-03-01

    ECN is involved in several R and D programs for the development and testing of ceramic materials and components for flat plate SOFC reactors. Tape casting is used as the technique to manufacture SOFC components. First, the zirconia electrolyte (8YSZ) is tape cast, densified by firing and characterized. Then, the anode (Ni/YSZ cermet) and cathode ((La,Sr)MnO{sub 3}) structures are applied. The thickness of the electrolyte is 100-150 micrometer and that of the electrodes 30 micrometer. Firing of the electrodes occurs in oxidizing atmospheres at temperatures that ensure bonding to the electrolyte, but prevent degradation of the microstructure or the formation of reaction products on the electrolyte/electrode interfaces. 4 figs., 9 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Fabrication of Micro Components by Electrochemical Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben

    The main issue of this thesis is the combination of electrochemical deposition of metals and micro machining. Processes for electroplating and electroless plating of nickel and nickel alloys have been developed and optimised for compatibility with microelectronics and silicon based micromechanics...... of electrochemical machining and traditional machining is compared to micro machining techniques as performed in the field of microelectronics. Various practical solutions and equipment for electrochemical deposition of micro components are demonstrated, as well as the use and experience obtained utilising...

  17. Fabrication of discrete array of metallodielectric nanoshells and their surface plasmonic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shuhei; Yamamura, Kazuya [Research Center for Ultra-Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Zettsu, Nobuyuki, E-mail: zettsu@upst.eng.osaka-u.ac.j [Research Center for Ultra-Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-04-30

    In this paper we describe the fabrication of two-dimensionally periodic non-close-packed nanoshell arrays, consisting of a spherical polystyrene core coated with a thin gold shell, as well as their surface plasmonic properties. The principle of this procedure relies on stepwise integration of spin-coat-assisted colloidal self-assembly of the single layer of close-packed polystyrene nanoparticle, atmospheric pressure plasma-induced isotropic etching, and deposition of gold thin film by thermal evaporation. The plasma process converted the close-packed nanoparticle array into non-close-packed arrangement without changing their original spherical shape and periodicity. Both experimental and theoretical studies revealed that the densely packed nanoshell array with a 160 nm inner core diameter and a 20 nm thick shell strongly scattered and absorbed near infrared light, due to the interaction between primitive plasmon modes associated with the surface of the nanoparticle. Furthermore, the resultant nanoshell array was utilized for near infrared light responsible localized surface plasmon resonance based sensor. The bulk refractive index sensitivity was 220 nm RIU{sup -1}.

  18. Emission-enhanced plasmonic substrates fabricated by nano-imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bongseok; Iwanaga, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Hideki T.; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2014-03-01

    We fabricated large-area stacked complementary plasmonic crystals (SC PlCs) by employing ultra-violet (UV) nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The SC PlCs was made on silicon on insulator (SOI) substrates, consisting of three layers: the top layer contacting air was perforated Au film, the bottom layer contacting buried oxide (BOX) layer included Au disk array corresponding to the holes in the top layer, and the middle layer was Si photonic crystal slab. The SC PlCs have prominent resonances in the optical wavelengths. It is shown that the fabricated PlCs were precisely made in structure and well uniform in the optical properties. We have examined photoluminescence (PL) enhancement of dye molecules on the SC PlC substrates in the visible range and found large enhancement up to 100-fold in comparison with the dye molecules on non-processed Si wafers.

  19. Direct-write fabrication of integrated, multilayer ceramic components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimos, D.; Yang, P.

    1998-03-01

    The need for advanced (electronic) ceramic components with smaller size, greater functionality, and enhanced reliability requires the ability to integrate electronic ceramics in complex 3-D architectures. However, traditional tape casting and screen printing approaches are poorly suited to the requirements of rapid prototyping and small lot manufacturing. To address this need, the authors are developing a direct write approach for fabricating highly integrated, multilayer components using a micropen to deposit slurries in precise patterns. This approach provides the ability to fabricate multifunctional, multimaterial integrated ceramic components (MMICCs) in an agile and rapid way, and has been used to make integrated passive devices such RC filters, inductors, and voltage transformers.

  20. Design and Fabrication of SOI-based photonic crystal components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Harpøth, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    We present examples of ultra-compact photonic crystal components realized in silicon-on-insulator material. We have fabricated several different types of photonic crystal waveguide components displaying high transmission features. This includes 60° and 120° bends, different types of couplers......, and splitters. Recently, we have designed and fabricated components with more than 200 nm bandwidths. Design strategies to enhance the performance include systematic variation of design parameters using finite-difference time-domain simulations and inverse design methods such as topology optimization....

  1. Facile design of ultra-thin anodic aluminum oxide membranes for the fabrication of plasmonic nanoarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qi; Huang, Hao; Fan, Xingce; Hou, Xiangyu; Yin, Yin; Li, Wan; Si, Lifang; Nan, Haiyan; Wang, Huaiyu; Mei, Yongfeng; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2017-03-01

    Ultra-thin anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes are efficient templates for the fabrication of patterned nanostructures. Herein, a three-step etching method to control the morphology of AAO is described. The morphological evolution of the AAO during phosphoric acid etching is systematically investigated and a nonlinear growth mechanism during unsteady-state anodization is revealed. The thickness of the AAO can be quantitatively controlled from ∼100 nm to several micrometers while maintaining the tunablity of the pore diameter. The AAO membranes are robust and readily transferable to different types of substrates to prepare patterned plasmonic nanoarrays such as nanoislands, nanoclusters, ultra-small nanodots, and core–satellite superstructures. The localized surface plasmon resonance from these nanostructures can be easily tuned by adjusting the morphology of the AAO template. The custom AAO template provides a platform for the fabrication of low-cost and large-scale functional nanoarrays suitable for fundamental studies as well as applications including biochemical sensing, imaging, photocatalysis, and photovoltaics.

  2. Fabrication of single-crystalline plasmonic nanostructures on transparent and flexible amorphous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tomohiro; Mori, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Suzaki, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo

    2017-01-01

    A new experimental technique is developed for producing a high-performance single-crystalline Ag nanostructure on transparent and flexible amorphous substrates for use in plasmonic sensors and circuit components. This technique is based on the epitaxial growth of Ag on a (001)-oriented single-crystalline NaCl substrate, which is subsequently dissolved in ultrapure water to allow the Ag film to be transferred onto a wide range of different substrates. Focused ion beam milling is then used to create an Ag nanoarray structure consisting of 200 cuboid nanoparticles with a side length of 160 nm and sharp, precise edges. This array exhibits a strong signal and a sharp peak in plasmonic properties and Raman intensity when compared with a polycrystalline Ag nanoarray. PMID:28216626

  3. Tailoring reflection of graphene plasmons by focused ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Weiwei; Wu, Wei; Xiang, Yinxiao; Ren, Mengxin; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-01-01

    Graphene plasmons are of remarkable features that make graphene plasmon elements promising for applications to integrated photonic devices. The fabrication of graphene plasmon components and control over plasmon propagating are of fundamental important. Through near-field plasmon imaging, we demonstrate controllable modifying of the reflection of graphene plasmon at boundaries etched by ion beams. Moreover, by varying ion dose at a proper value, nature like reflection boundary can be obtained. We also investigate the influence of ion beam incident angle on plasmon reflection. To illustrate the application of ion beam etching, a simple graphene wedge-shape plasmon structure is fabricated and performs excellently, proving this technology as a simple and efficient tool for controlling graphene plasmons.

  4. Direct-write fabrication of integrated, multilayer ceramic components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimos, D.; Yang, P.; Garino, T.J.; Raymond, M.V.; Rodriguez, M.A.

    1997-08-01

    The need for advanced (electronic) ceramic components with smaller size, greater functionality, and enhanced reliability requires the ability to integrate electronic ceramics in complex 3-D architectures. For rapid prototyping and small-lot manufacturing, traditional tape casting and screen printing approaches are poorly suited. To address this need, the authors are developing a direct-write approach for fabricating highly integrated, multilayer components using a micropen to deposit slurries in precise patterns. With this technique, components can be constructed layer by layer, simplifying fabrication. It can also be used to produce structures combining several materials in a single layer. The parts are either cofired or sequentially fired, after each layer is deposited. Since differential shrinkage can lead to defects in these multilayer structures, they are characterizing the sintering behavior of individual layers. This technique has been used to fabricate devices such integrated RC filters, multilayer voltage transformers, and other passive components. The direct-write approach provides the ability to fabricate multifunctional, multimaterial integrated ceramic components (MMICCs) in an agile and rapid way.

  5. Demonstration of Al:ZnO as a plasmonic component for near-infrared metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Liu, Jingjing; Kildishev, Alexander V.;

    2012-01-01

    Noble metals such as gold and silver are conventionally used as the primary plasmonic building blocks of optical metamaterials. Making subwavelength-scale structural elements from these metals not only seriously limits the optical performance of a device due to high absorption, it also substantia....... In this letter, we replace a metal with aluminum-doped zinc oxide as a new plasmonic material and experimentally demonstrate negative refraction in an Al:ZnO/ZnO metamaterial in the near-infrared range....... substantially complicates the manufacturing process of nearly all metamaterial devices in the optical wavelength range. As an alternative to noble metals, we propose to use heavily doped oxide semiconductors that offer both functional and fabrication advantages in the near-infrared wavelength range...

  6. Fabrication of deep-profile Al-doped ZnO one- and two-dimensional lattices as plasmonic elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Flemming; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Takayama, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report on fabrication of deep-profile one- and two-dimensional lattices made from Al-doped ZnO (AZO). AZO is considered as an alternative plasmonic material having the real part of the permittivity negative in the near infrared range. The exact position of the plasma frequency...

  7. Fabrication of light weight radioisotope heater unit hardware components

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Dennis C.

    1996-03-01

    The Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) is planned to be used on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Cassini Mission, to provide localized thermal energy as strategic locations on the spacecraft. These one watt heater units will support the operation of many on-board instruments that require a specific temperature range to function properly. The system incorporates a fuel pellet encapsulated in a vented metallic clad fabricated from platinum-30% rhodium (Pt-30%Rh) tubing, sheet and foil materials. To complete the package, the clad assemblies are placed inside a combination of graphite components. This report describes the techniques employed by Mound related to the fabrication and sub assembly processes of the LWRHU clad hardware components. Included are details concerning configuration control systems, material procurement and certification, hardware fabrication specifics, and special processes that are utilized.

  8. Fabrication of Gold Nanodot Array for the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR is a promising method for detecting antigen-antibody binding in label-free biosensors. In this study, the fabrication of a LSPR substrate with a gold nanodot array through the lift-off process of an alumina mask is reported. The substrate showed an extinction peak in its extinction spectrum, and the peak position was dependent on the height of the gold nanodot array, and the change of extinction peak with the height could be predicted by the numerical simulation. In addition, the peak position was observed to be red-shifted with the increasing RIU value of the medium surrounding the gold nanodot array. In particular, the peak position in the 10 nm thick gold nanodot array was approximately 710 nm in air, and the sensitivity, defined as the ratio of the shift of peak position to the RIU of the medium, was 323.6 nm/RIU. The fabrication procedure could be applied to fabricate the LSPR substrates with a large area.

  9. Fabrication of two-dimensional visible wavelength nanoscale plasmonic structures using hydrogen silsesquioxane based resist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kyle Z.; Gadde, Akshitha; Kadiyala, Anand; Dawson, Jeremy M.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, the global market for biosensors has continued to increase in combination with their expanding use in areas such as biodefense/detection, home diagnostics, biometric identification, etc. A constant necessity for inexpensive, portable bio-sensing methods, while still remaining simple to understand and operate, is the motivation behind novel concepts and designs. Labeled visible spectrum bio-sensing systems provide instant feedback that is both simple and easy to work with, but are limited by the light intensity thresholds required by the imaging systems. In comparison, label-free bio-sensing systems and other detection modalities like electrochemical, frequency resonance, thermal change, etc., can require additional technical processing steps to convey the final result, increasing the system's complexity and possibly the time required for analysis. Further decrease in the detection limit can be achieved through the addition of plasmonic structures into labeled bio-sensing systems. Nano-structures that operate in the visible spectrum have feature sizes typically in the order of the operating wavelength, calling for high aspect ratio nanoscale fabrication capabilities. In order to achieve these dimensions, electron beam lithography (EBL) is used due to its accurate feature production. Hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) based electron beam resist is chosen for one of its benefits, which is after exposure to oxygen plasma, the patterned resist cures into silicon dioxide (SiO2). These cured features in conjunction with nanoscale gold particles help in producing a high electric field through dipole generation. In this work, a detailed process flow of the fabrication of square lattice of plasmonic structures comprising of gold coated silicon dioxide pillars designed to operate at 560 nm wavelength and produce an intensity increase of roughly 100 percent will be presented.

  10. Epitaxial superlattices with titanium nitride as a plasmonic component for optical hyperbolic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Gururaj V; Saha, Bivas; Liu, Jing; Saber, Sammy M; Stach, Eric A; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K; Sands, Timothy D; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2014-05-27

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a plasmonic material having optical properties resembling gold. Unlike gold, however, TiN is complementary metal oxide semiconductor-compatible, mechanically strong, and thermally stable at higher temperatures. Additionally, TiN exhibits low-index surfaces with surface energies that are lower than those of the noble metals which facilitates the growth of smooth, ultrathin crystalline films. Such films are crucial in constructing low-loss, high-performance plasmonic and metamaterial devices including hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs). HMMs have been shown to exhibit exotic optical properties, including extremely high broadband photonic densities of states (PDOS), which are useful in quantum plasmonic applications. However, the extent to which the exotic properties of HMMs can be realized has been seriously limited by fabrication constraints and material properties. Here, we address these issues by realizing an epitaxial superlattice as an HMM. The superlattice consists of ultrasmooth layers as thin as 5 nm and exhibits sharp interfaces which are essential for high-quality HMM devices. Our study reveals that such a TiN-based superlattice HMM provides a higher PDOS enhancement than gold- or silver-based HMMs.

  11. Design and Fabrication of Photonic Crystal Materials and Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpøth, Anders

    2005-01-01

    in the deposited silicon films and to open for a potential use with photonic crystals. In relation to photonic crystal structures, different properties have been investigated by using modelling tools such as the plane wave expansion method and the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. Furthermore different......The work described in this thesis covers the issues of producing materials for use as base material for fabricating photonic crystals and the design, fabrication and characterization of photonic crystal components. One of the aims is to investigate the possibilities of fabricating a silicon...... is in principle rather straightforward and benefits from being much cheaper compared to acquiring commercially available SOI substrates. Different issues as deposition temperature, surface roughness, crystallization, and silicon waveguide geometries have been investigated in order to reduce the optical loss...

  12. Surface dispersion engineering for subwavelength plasmonic components on-a-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qiaoqiang

    Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPP) are surface modes that propagate at metal-dielectric interfaces and constitute an electromagnetic field coupled to oscillations of the conduction electrons at the metal surface. The fields associated with the SPP are enhanced at the surface and decay exponentially into the media on either side of the interface. Recently, it was proposed that plasmonic structures and devices operating in the optical domain offer advantages for applications such as on-chip integration of optical circuits, data storages, and bio-sensing. By varying the surface nanotopology, the optical properties of SPPs can be tailored via so-called Surface Dispersion Engineering. This thesis is largely focused on the development of plasmonic components on a chip using surface dispersion engineering technology, including systematic investigations on (1) coupling, (2) waveguiding, (3) manipulation and (4) application of engineered SPP modes. More specifically, in Chapter 2, novel SPP coupling mechanisms will be investigated. Compared with the bulky conventional SPR coupling mechanism, nanopatterns are employed as miniaturized plasmonic surface wave couplers to couple the light to SPP modes. In Chapter 3, nanopatterned metallic surface are employed for waveguiding. By properly designing the geometric parameters of the structures, surface bandgaps can be created to realize a novel bidirectional surface wave splitter. In Chapter 4, the slow-light properties of SPP modes supported by the nanopatterned surfaces will be investigated. Using a graded grating structure, multi-wavelengths could be slow down and trapped at different positions along the metal surface, which is so called "rainbow" trapping effect. In Chapter 5, the structures investigated in the previous chapters are combined to design a novel plasmonic sensing architecture, e.g. vertical plasmonic Mach-Zehnder Interferometer. Such a novel integrated biosensing platform is promising for miniaturized, low cost

  13. Plasmonic nanostructures fabricated using nanosphere-lithography, soft-lithography and plasma etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Gonçalves

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present two routes for the fabrication of plasmonic structures based on nanosphere lithography templates. One route makes use of soft-lithography to obtain arrays of epoxy resin hemispheres, which, in a second step, can be coated by metal films. The second uses the hexagonal array of triangular structures, obtained by evaporation of a metal film on top of colloidal crystals, as a mask for reactive ion etching (RIE of the substrate. In this way, the triangular patterns of the mask are transferred to the substrate through etched triangular pillars. Making an epoxy resin cast of the pillars, coated with metal films, allows us to invert the structure and obtain arrays of triangular holes within the metal. Both fabrication methods illustrate the preparation of large arrays of nanocavities within metal films at low cost.Gold films of different thicknesses were evaporated on top of hemispherical structures of epoxy resin with different radii, and the reflectance and transmittance were measured for optical wavelengths. Experimental results show that the reflectivity of coated hemispheres is lower than that of coated polystyrene spheres of the same size, for certain wavelength bands. The spectral position of these bands correlates with the size of the hemispheres. In contrast, etched structures on quartz coated with gold films exhibit low reflectance and transmittance values for all wavelengths measured. Low transmittance and reflectance indicate high absorbance, which can be utilized in experiments requiring light confinement.

  14. Large-scale fabrication of achiral plasmonic metamaterials with giant chiroptical response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Slyngborg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A variety of extrinsic chiral metamaterials were fabricated by a combination of self-ordering anodic oxidation of aluminum foil, nanoimprint lithography and glancing angle deposition. All of these techniques are scalable and pose a significant improvement to standard metamaterial fabrication techniques. Different interpore distances and glancing angle depositions enable the plasmonic resonance wavelength to be tunable in the range from UVA to IR. These extrinsic chiral metamaterials only exhibit significant chiroptical response at non-normal angles of incidence. This intrinsic property enables the probing of both enantoimeric structures on the same sample, by inverting the tilt of the sample relative to the normal angle. In biosensor applications this allows for more precise, cheap and commercialized devices. As a proof of concept two different molecules were used to probe the sensitivity of the metamaterials. These proved the applicability to sense proteins through non-specific adsorption on the metamaterial surface or through functionalized surfaces to increase the sensing sensitivity. Besides increasing the sensing sensitivity, these metamaterials may also be commercialized and find applications in surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy, terahertz generation and terahertz circular dichroism spectroscopy.

  15. Plasmonic nanostructures fabricated using nanosphere-lithography, soft-lithography and plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Manuel R; Makaryan, Taron; Enderle, Fabian; Wiedemann, Stefan; Plettl, Alfred; Marti, Othmar; Ziemann, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We present two routes for the fabrication of plasmonic structures based on nanosphere lithography templates. One route makes use of soft-lithography to obtain arrays of epoxy resin hemispheres, which, in a second step, can be coated by metal films. The second uses the hexagonal array of triangular structures, obtained by evaporation of a metal film on top of colloidal crystals, as a mask for reactive ion etching (RIE) of the substrate. In this way, the triangular patterns of the mask are transferred to the substrate through etched triangular pillars. Making an epoxy resin cast of the pillars, coated with metal films, allows us to invert the structure and obtain arrays of triangular holes within the metal. Both fabrication methods illustrate the preparation of large arrays of nanocavities within metal films at low cost.Gold films of different thicknesses were evaporated on top of hemispherical structures of epoxy resin with different radii, and the reflectance and transmittance were measured for optical wavelengths. Experimental results show that the reflectivity of coated hemispheres is lower than that of coated polystyrene spheres of the same size, for certain wavelength bands. The spectral position of these bands correlates with the size of the hemispheres. In contrast, etched structures on quartz coated with gold films exhibit low reflectance and transmittance values for all wavelengths measured. Low transmittance and reflectance indicate high absorbance, which can be utilized in experiments requiring light confinement.

  16. Large-scale fabrication of achiral plasmonic metamaterials with giant chiroptical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyngborg, Morten; Tsao, Yao-Chung; Fojan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A variety of extrinsic chiral metamaterials were fabricated by a combination of self-ordering anodic oxidation of aluminum foil, nanoimprint lithography and glancing angle deposition. All of these techniques are scalable and pose a significant improvement to standard metamaterial fabrication techniques. Different interpore distances and glancing angle depositions enable the plasmonic resonance wavelength to be tunable in the range from UVA to IR. These extrinsic chiral metamaterials only exhibit significant chiroptical response at non-normal angles of incidence. This intrinsic property enables the probing of both enantoimeric structures on the same sample, by inverting the tilt of the sample relative to the normal angle. In biosensor applications this allows for more precise, cheap and commercialized devices. As a proof of concept two different molecules were used to probe the sensitivity of the metamaterials. These proved the applicability to sense proteins through non-specific adsorption on the metamaterial surface or through functionalized surfaces to increase the sensing sensitivity. Besides increasing the sensing sensitivity, these metamaterials may also be commercialized and find applications in surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy, terahertz generation and terahertz circular dichroism spectroscopy.

  17. Modeling fabrication of nuclear components: An integrative approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hench, K.W.

    1996-08-01

    Reduction of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the general downsizing of the nuclear weapons complex has presented challenges for Los Alamos. One is to design an optimized fabrication facility to manufacture nuclear weapon primary components in an environment of intense regulation and shrinking budgets. This dissertation presents an integrative two-stage approach to modeling the casting operation for fabrication of nuclear weapon primary components. The first stage optimizes personnel radiation exposure for the casting operation layout by modeling the operation as a facility layout problem formulated as a quadratic assignment problem. The solution procedure uses an evolutionary heuristic technique. The best solutions to the layout problem are used as input to the second stage - a simulation model that assesses the impact of competing layouts on operational performance. The focus of the simulation model is to determine the layout that minimizes personnel radiation exposures and nuclear material movement, and maximizes the utilization of capacity for finished units.

  18. Fabrication of highly active and cost effective SERS plasmonic substrates by electrophoretic deposition of gold nanoparticles on a DVD template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leordean, Cosmin; Marta, Bogdan; Gabudean, Ana-Maria; Focsan, Monica; Botiz, Ioan; Astilean, Simion, E-mail: simion.astilean@phys.ubbcluj.ro

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Simple and cost effective electrophoretic method to fabricate plasmonic substrates. • SERS performance at three different excitation laser lines. • Promising applicability in SERS based biosensing. - Abstract: In this work we present a simple, rapid and cost effective method to fabricate highly active SERS substrates. This method consists in an electrophoretic deposition of gold nanoparticles on a metallic nanostructured template of a commercial digital versatile disk (DVD). The negatively charged gold nanoparticles self-assemble on the positively charged DVD metallic film connected to a positive terminal of a battery, due to the influence of the electric field. When gold nanoparticles self-assembled on DVD metallic film, a 10-fold additional enhancement of Raman signal was observed when compared with the case of GNPs self-assembled on a polycarbonate DVD substrate only. Finite-difference time-domain simulations demonstrated that the additional electromagnetic field arising in the hot-spots created between gold nanoparticles and DVD metallic film induces an additional enhancement of the Raman signal. SERS efficiency of the fabricated plasmonic substrate was successfully demonstrated through detection of para-aminothiophenol molecule with three different excitation laser lines (532, 633 and 785 nm). The enhancement factor was calculated to be 10{sup 6} and indicates that plasmonic substrates fabricated through this method could be a promising platform for future SERS based sensors.

  19. Integrated-Optics Components Utilizing Long-Range Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a new class of components for integrated optics, based on the propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs) along metal stripes embedded in a dielectric. These novel components can provide guiding of light as well as coupling and splitting from/into a number...... that the photonic band gap might be expected only for some particular propagation directions. The possibilities of achieving a full band gap (in the surface plane) for LR-SPPs as well as use of the weak coherent-scattering effect are discussed. The effective index contrast, achieved in the investigated metallic...

  20. Two component micro injection molding for MID fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2009-01-01

    Molded Interconnect Devices (MIDs) are plastic substrates with electrical infrastructure. The fabrication of MIDs is usually based on injection molding and different process chains may be identified from this starting point. The use of MIDs has been driven primarily by the automotive sector......, but recently the medical sector seems more and more interested. In particular the possibility of miniaturization of 3D components with electrical infrastructure is attractive. The paper describes possible manufacturing routes and challenges of miniaturized MIDs based on two component micro injection molding...

  1. Design, fabrication, and control of scanning plasmonic probe for near-field photolithographic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Yen; Wang, Yuyan; Hoshino, Kazunori; Giese, David; Shrestha, Yujan; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2010-02-01

    We report the design, fabrication and operation of a scanning plasmonic probe compatible with a fully customized Near-field Scanning Microscope system. The probe is a silicon cantilever with a hollow pyramidal probe tip. A silicon dioxide layer was thermally grown to form the probe. A 100 nm thick aluminum layer was then e-beam evaporated onto the released probe tip to form the metal-dielectric interface for surface plasmonic wave propagation. A 500 nm diameter aperture was subsequently milled with the Focus Ion Beam. The probe was controlled with a built-in scanning controller for the probe-sample distance using a force sensing tuning fork. A tapered optical fiber, connected to 405 nm wavelength laser source, was aligned to the backside of the probe tip to serve as the light source. The transmitted light through the aperture was used to expose the photoresist (AZ 5209E), on a piece of cover glass attached on the tuning fork. The probe was controlled for near-field photolithography, where a series of 15 exposures, varied from 0 to 8 minutes, were carried out on the photoresist stepwise at 6.5 μm separation with subsequent 60 seconds development time. The transmitted light beam spot was simulated with a Full Width Half Maximum of 227 nm. Atomic Force Microscope measurement showed a 200 nm lateral resolution for the photolithography. The depths and widths of the developed patterns were linearly correlated with increasing exposure time, showing slopes of 0.76 nm/second and 1.4 nm/second respectively.

  2. Fluorescence enhancement from nano-gap embedded plasmonic gratings by a novel fabrication technique with HD-DVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, K.; Pathak, A.; Menke, D.; Cornish, P. V.; Gangopadhyay, K.; Korampally, V.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate strong electromagnetic field enhancement from nano-gaps embedded in silver gratings for visible wavelengths. These structures fabricated using a store-bought HD-DVD worth 10 and conventional micro-contact printing techniques have shown maximum fluorescence enhancement factors of up to 118 times when compared to a glass substrate under epi-fluorescent conditions. The novel fabrication procedure provides for the development of a cost-effective and facile plasmonic substrate for low-level chemical and biological detection. Electromagnetic field simulations were also performed that reveal the strong field confinement in the nano-gap region embedded in the silver grating, which is attributed to the combined effect of localized as well as propagating surface plasmons.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of gold nanocrown arrays on a gold film for a high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Munsik; Kim, Nak-hyeon; Eom, Seyoung [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Woo [School of East–West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Kyung Min, E-mail: kmbyun@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyeong-Ho, E-mail: hyeongho.park@kanc.re.kr [Nano Process Division, Korea Advanced Nano Fab Center, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    We report on a versatile method to fabricate gold nanocrown arrays on a thin gold film based on ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography and tilted evaporation technique. We realize highly ordered 2-dimensional nanocrown arrays and characterize their sizes and morphologies using scanning electron microscopy. To demonstrate an enhanced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection by the fabricated gold nanocrown samples, biosensing experiments are performed by measuring SPR angle shift for biotin–streptavidin interaction and bulk refractive index change of dielectric medium. We hope that the suggested plasmonic platform with a high sensitivity could be extended to a variety of biomolecular binding reactions. - Highlights: • Gold nanocrown arrays are produced by nanoimprint lithography and tilted evaporation. • Use of gold nanocrown arrays can improve the sensor sensitivity significantly. • Improved sensitivity is due to enhanced field–matter interaction at gold nanocrowns.

  4. Two-component microinjection moulding for MID fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2010-01-01

    Moulded interconnect devices (MIDs) are plastic substrates with electrical infrastructure. The fabrication of MIDs is usually based on injection moulding, and different process chains may be identified from this starting point. The use of MIDs has been driven primarily by the automotive sector......, but recently, the medical sector seems more and more interested. In particular, the possibility of miniaturisation of three-dimensional components with electrical infrastructure is attractive. The present paper describes possible manufacturing routes and challenges of miniaturised MIDs based on two......-component injection moulding and subsequent metallisation. This technology promises cost effective and convergent manufacturing approaches for both macro- and microapplications. This paper presents the results of industrial MID production based on two-component injection moulding and discusses the important issues...

  5. Molecular Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Willets, Katherine A.

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  6. Plasmonic integrated circuits comprising metal waveguides, multiplexer/demultiplexer, detectors, and logic circuits on a silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, M.; Ota, M.; Sumimura, A.; Okahisa, S.; Ito, M.; Ishii, Y.; Ishiyama, T.

    2017-05-01

    A plasmonic integrated circuit configuration comprising plasmonic and electronic components is presented and the feasibility for high-speed signal processing applications is discussed. In integrated circuits, plasmonic signals transmit data at high transfer rates with light velocity. Plasmonic and electronic components such as wavelength-divisionmultiplexing (WDM) networks comprising metal wires, plasmonic multiplexers/demultiplexers, and crossing metal wires are connected via plasmonic waveguides on the nanometer or micrometer scales. To merge plasmonic and electronic components, several types of plasmonic components were developed. To ensure that the plasmonic components could be easily fabricated and monolithically integrated onto a silicon substrate using silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible processes, the components were fabricated on a Si substrate and made from silicon, silicon oxides, and metal; no other materials were used in the fabrication. The plasmonic components operated in the 1300- and 1550-nm-wavelength bands, which are typically employed in optical fiber communication systems. The plasmonic logic circuits were formed by patterning a silicon oxide film on a metal film, and the operation as a half adder was confirmed. The computed plasmonic signals can propagate through the plasmonic WDM networks and be connected to electronic integrated circuits at high data-transfer rates.

  7. Fabricating a Homogeneously Alloyed AuAg Shell on Au Nanorods to Achieve Strong, Stable, and Tunable Surface Plasmon Resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-08-13

    Colloidal metal nanocrystals with strong, stable, and tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) can be useful in a corrosive environment for many applications including field-enhanced spectroscopies, plasmon-mediated catalysis, etc. Here, a new synthetic strategy is reported that enables the epitaxial growth of a homogeneously alloyed AuAg shell on Au nanorod seeds, circumventing the phase segregation of Au and Ag encountered in conventional synthesis. The resulting core–shell structured bimetallic nanorods (AuNR@AuAg) have well-mixed Au and Ag atoms in their shell without discernible domains. This degree of mixing allows AuNR@AuAg to combine the high stability of Au with the superior plasmonic activity of Ag, thus outperforming seemingly similar nanostructures with monometallic shells (e.g., Ag-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Ag) and Au-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Au)). AuNR@AuAg is comparable to AuNR@Ag in plasmonic activity, but that it is markedly more stable toward oxidative treatment. Specifically, AuNR@AuAg and AuNR@Ag exhibit similarly strong signals in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy that are some 30-fold higher than that of AuNR@Au. When incubated with a H2O2 solution (0.5 m), the plasmonic activity of AuNR@Ag immediately and severely decayed, whereas AuNR@AuAg retained its activity intact. Moreover, the longitudinal SPR frequency of AuNR@AuAg can be tuned throughout the red wavelengths (≈620–690 nm) by controlling the thickness of the AuAg alloy shell. The synthetic strategy is versatile to fabricate AuAg alloyed shells on different shaped Au, with prospects for new possibilities in the synthesis and application of plasmonic nanocrystals.

  8. Fabrication of Complex Optical Components From Mold Design to Product

    CERN Document Server

    Riemer, Oltmann; Gläbe, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    High quality optical components for consumer products made of glass and plastic are mostly fabricated by replication. This highly developed production technology requires several consecutive, well-matched processing steps called a "process chain" covering all steps from mold design, advanced machining and coating of molds, up to the actual replication and final precision measurement of the quality of the optical components. Current market demands for leading edge optical applications require high precision and cost effective parts in large volumes. For meeting these demands it is necessary to develop high quality process chains and moreover, to crosslink all demands and interdependencies within these process chains. The Transregional Collaborative Research Center "Process chains for the replication of complex optical elements" at Bremen, Aachen and Stillwater worked extensively and thoroughly in this field from 2001 to 2012. This volume will present the latest scientific results for the complete process chain...

  9. Ultralow-Loss CMOS Copper Plasmonic Waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I; Kirtaev, Roman V; Volkov, Valentyn S

    2016-01-13

    Surface plasmon polaritons can give a unique opportunity to manipulate light at a scale well below the diffraction limit reducing the size of optical components down to that of nanoelectronic circuits. At the same time, plasmonics is mostly based on noble metals, which are not compatible with microelectronics manufacturing technologies. This prevents plasmonic components from integration with both silicon photonics and silicon microelectronics. Here, we demonstrate ultralow-loss copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a simple complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process, which can outperform gold plasmonic waveguides simultaneously providing long (>40 μm) propagation length and deep subwavelength (∼λ(2)/50, where λ is the free-space wavelength) mode confinement in the telecommunication spectral range. These results create the backbone for the development of a CMOS plasmonic platform and its integration in future electronic chips.

  10. Modeling, Fabrication and Characterization of Scalable Electroless Gold Plated Nanostructures for Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Gyoung Gug

    The scientific and industrial demand for controllable thin gold (Au) film and Au nanostructures is increasing in many fields including opto-electronics, photovoltaics, MEMS devices, diagnostics, bio-molecular sensors, spectro-/microscopic surfaces and probes. In this study, a novel continuous flow electroless (CF-EL) Au plating method is developed to fabricate uniform Au thin films in ambient condition. The enhanced local mass transfer rate and continuous deposition resulting from CF-EL plating improved physical uniformity of deposited Au films and thermally transformed nanoparticles (NPs). Au films and NPs exhibited improved optical photoluminescence (PL) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), respectively, relative to batch immersion EL (BI-EL) plating. Suggested mass transfer models of Au mole deposition are consistent with optical feature of CF-EL and BI-EL films. The prototype CF-EL plating system is upgraded an automated scalable CF-EL plating system with real-time transmission UV-vis (T-UV) spectroscopy which provides the advantage of CF-EL plating, such as more uniform surface morphology, and overcomes the disadvantages of conventional EL plating, such as no continuous process and low deposition rate, using continuous process and controllable deposition rate. Throughout this work, dynamic morphological and chemical transitions during redox-driven self-assembly of Ag and Au film on silica surfaces under kinetic and equilibrium conditions are distinguished by correlating real-time T-UV spectroscopy with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The characterization suggests that four previously unrecognized time-dependent physicochemical regimes occur during consecutive EL deposition of silver (Ag) and Au onto tin-sensitized silica surfaces: self-limiting Ag activation; transitory Ag NP formation; transitional Au-Ag alloy formation during galvanic replacement of Ag by Au; and uniform morphology formation under

  11. High-throughput ultrasensitive characterization of chemical, structural and plasmonic properties of EBL-fabricated single silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Cao, Wei; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2012-01-21

    Electron beam lithography (EBL) has become a popular means to prepare a wide variety of nano-arrays for numerous studies and applications, including photonics and sensors. Their fabrications and characterizations are costly and time consuming, underscoring the importance of developing effective tools to rapidly study their physicochemical stabilities and properties over time. In this study, we characterized EBL-fabricated single silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) arrays over their 12-week exposure to ambient conditions using SEM/EDS, AFM and dark-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy (DFOMS). We found that chemical compositions, structural morphologies and plasmonic optical properties of single NPs altered drastically over the exposure. Single cuboid and triangular-prism Ag NPs degraded at rates of (0.74 ± 0.02) and (0.66 ± 0.02) per week, and their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectra showed striking blue-shifts (171 ± 25 and 203 ± 35 nm) over the 12-week exposure, respectively. Plasmonic colors of single NPs changed distinctively from red to green over the 12-week exposure. The LSPR spectra of individual NPs in each array were acquired simultaneously and correlated specifically with their SEM and AFM images, demonstrating that DFOMS can serve as high-throughput, ultrasensitive and non-invasive means to characterize chemical, structural and optical properties of nano-arrays in situ in real time at single-NP resolution.

  12. High-throughput fabrication and calibration of compact high-sensitivity plasmonic lab-on-chip for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzola, E.; Pozzato, A.; Ruffato, G.; Sovernigo, E.; Sonato, A.

    2016-08-01

    Surface plasmon resonance biosensors have recently known a rapid diffusion in the biological field and a large variety of sensor configurations is currently available. Biological applications are increasingly demanding sensor miniaturization, multiple detection in parallel, temperature-controlled environment and high sensitivity. Indeed, versatile and tunable sensing platforms, together with an accurate biological environment monitoring, could improve the realization of custom biosensing devices applicable to different biological reactions. Here we propose a smart and high throughput fabrication protocol for the realization of a custommicrofluidic plasmonic biochip that could be easily tuned and modified to address different biological applications. The sensor chip here presented shows a high sensing capability, monitored by an accurate signal calibration in the presence of concentration and temperature variation.

  13. Fabrication of deep-profile Al-doped ZnO one- and two-dimensional lattices as plasmonic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Flemming; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Takayama, Osamu; Larsen, Pernille V.; Mar, Mikkel D.; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we report on fabrication of deep-profile one- and two-dimensional lattices made from Al-doped ZnO (AZO). AZO is considered as an alternative plasmonic material having the real part of the permittivity negative in the near infrared range. The exact position of the plasma frequency of AZO is doping concentration dependent, allowing for tuning possibilities. In addition, the thickness of the AZO film also affects its material properties. Physical vapor deposition techniques typically applied for AZO coating do not enable deep profiling of a plasmonic structure. Using the atomic layer deposition technique, a highly conformal deposition method, allows us to fabricate high-aspect ratio structures such as one-dimensional lattices with a period of 400 nm and size of the lamina of 200 nm in width and 3 μm in depth. Thus, our structures have an aspect ratio of 1:15 and are homogeneous on areas of 2×2 cm2 and more. We also produce two-dimensional arrays of circular nanopillars with similar dimensions. Instead of nanopillars hollow tubes with a wall thickness on demand from 20 nm up to a complete fill can be fabricated.

  14. Silicon nitride based plasmonic components for CMOS back-end-of-line integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shiyang; Lo, G Q; Kwong, D L

    2013-10-07

    Silicon nitride waveguides provide low propagation loss but weak mode confinement due to the relatively small refractive index contrast between the Si₃N₄ core and the SiO2 cladding. On the other hand, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) plasmonic waveguides offer strong mode confinement but large propagation loss. In this work, MIM-like plasmonic waveguides and passive devices based on horizontal Cu-Si₃N₄-Cu or Cu-SiO₂-Si₃N₄-SiO₂-Cu structures are integrated in the conventional Si₃N₄ waveguide circuits using standard CMOS backend processes, and are characterized around 1550-nm telecom wavelengths using the conventional fiber-waveguide-fiber method. The Cu-Si₃N₄(~100 nm)-Cu devices exhibit ~0.78-dB/μm propagation loss for straight waveguides, ~38% coupling efficiency with the conventional 1-μm-wide Si₃N₄ waveguide through a 2-μm-long taper coupler, ~0.2-dB bending loss for sharp 90° bends, and ~0.1-dB excess loss for ultracompact 1 × 2 and 1 × 4 power splitters. Inserting a ~10-nm SiO₂ layer between the Si3N4 core and the Cu cover (i.e., the Cu-SiO2(~10 nm)-Si₃N₄(~100 nm)-SiO2(~10 nm)-Cu devices), the propagation loss and the coupling efficiency are improved to ~0.37 dB/μm and ~52% while the bending loss and the excess loss are degraded to ~3.2 dB and ~2.1 dB, respectively. These experimental results are roughly consistent with the numerical simulation results after taking the influence of possible imperfect fabrication into account. Ultracompact plasmonic ring resonators with 1-μm radius are demonstrated with an extinction ratio of ~18 dB and a quality factor of ~84, close to the theoretical prediction.

  15. Bottom-up fabrication of nanohole arrays loaded with gold nanoparticles: extraordinary plasmonic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Markus; Quint, Stefan B; Klenk, Simon; Pacholski, Claudia

    2014-12-18

    A chemical route to periodic hole arrays in gold films whose holes are loaded with single gold nanoparticles is presented, paving the road to mass production of highly sensitive plasmonic sensors on large areas.

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of Plasmonic Nanopores with Cavities in the Solid Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Malekian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanostructures are widely used for various sensing applications by monitoring changes in refractive index through optical spectroscopy or as substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. However, in most practical situations conventional surface plasmon resonance is preferred for biomolecular interaction analysis because of its high resolution in surface coverage and the simple single-material planar interface. Still, plasmonic nanostructures may find unique sensing applications, for instance when the nanoscale geometry itself is of interest. This calls for new methods to prepare nanoscale particles and cavities with controllable dimensions and curvature. In this work, we present two types of plasmonic nanopores where the solid support underneath a nanohole array has been etched, thereby creating cavities denoted as ‘nanowells’ or ‘nanocaves’ depending on the degree of anisotropy (dry or wet etch. The refractometric sensitivity is shown to be enhanced upon removing the solid support because of an increased probing volume and a shift of the asymmetric plasmonic field towards the liquid side of the finite gold film. Furthermore, the structures exhibit different spectral changes upon binding inside the cavities compared to the gold surface, which means that the structures can be used for location-specific detection. Other sensing applications are also suggested.

  17. Fabrication of a cost-effective polymer nanograting as a disposable plasmonic biosensor using nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Saswat; Kumari, Sudha; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.

    2017-07-01

    A simple and cost-effective flexible plasmonic sensor is developed using a gold-coated polymer nanograting structure prepared via soft UV nanoimprint lithography. The sub-wavelength nanograting patterns of digital versatile discs were used as a template to prepare the polydimethylsiloxane stamp. The plasmonic sensing substrate was achieved after coating a gold thin film on top of the imprinted nanograting sample. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) modes excited on the gold-coated nanograting structure appeared as a dip in the reflectance spectrum measured at normal incidence under white light illumination in the ambient air medium. Electromagnetic simulation based on the finite element method was carried out to analyze the excited SPR modes. The simulated result shows very close agreement with the experimental data. The performance of the sensor with respect to changing the surrounding dielectric medium yields a bulk refractive index sensitivity of 788  ±  21 nm per refractive index unit. Further, label-free detection of proteins using a plasmonic sensing substrate was demonstrated by monitoring specific interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA proteins, which gave a detection limit of 123 pg mm-2 with respect to target anti-BSA protein binding. Thus, our proposed plasmonic sensor has potential for the development of an economical and highly sensitive label-free optical biosensing device for biomedical applications.

  18. On-Fly Femtosecond-Laser Fabrication of Self-Organized Plasmonic Nanotextures for Chemo- and Biosensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Pustovalov, Evgenii; Syubaev, Sergey; Vitrik, Oleg; Kulchin, Yuri; Porfirev, Aleksey; Khonina, Svetlana; Kudryashov, Sergey; Danilov, Pavel; Ionin, Andrey

    2016-09-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced photoluminescence (SEPL) are emerging as versatile widespread methods for biological, chemical, and physical characterization in close proximity of nanostructured surfaces of plasmonic materials. Meanwhile, single-step, facile, cheap, and green technologies for large-scale fabrication of efficient SERS or SEPL substrates, routinely demonstrating both broad plasmonic response and high enhancement characteristics, are still missing. In this research, single-pulse spallative micron-size craters in a thick Ag film with their internal nanotexture in the form of nanosized tips are for the first time shown to demonstrate strong polarization-dependent enhancement of SEPL and SERS responses from a nanometer-thick covering Rhodamine 6G layer with average enhancement factors of 40 and 2 × 10(6), respectively. Additionally, the first detailed experimental study is reported for physical processes, underlying the formation mechanisms of ablative nanotextures on such "thick" metal films. Such mechanisms demonstrate a complex "hybrid" fluence-dependent ablation character-appearance of spallative craters, typical for bulk material, at low fluences and formation of upright standing nanotips (frozen nanojets), usually associated with thin-film ablation, in the crater centers at higher fluences. Moreover, special emphasis was made on the possibility to reshape the nanotopography of such spallative craters through multipulse laser-induced merging of their small nanotips into larger ones. The presented approach holds promise to be one of the cheapest and easiest-to-implement ways to mass-fabricate various efficient spallation-nanotextured single-element plasmonic substrates for routine chemo- and biosensing, using MHz-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser sources with multiplexed laser-beams.

  19. Fabrication of gold-deposited plasmonic crystal based on nanoimprint lithography for label-free biosensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Kiichi; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Hisamoto, Hideaki; Endo, Tatsuro

    2016-08-01

    Here, we developed a highly sensitive label-free plasmonic crystal (PC). The PC is composed of two types of nanoperiodic metal structures, nanodiscs and nanohole arrays, fabricated simultaneously by nanoimprint lithography using a nanostructured polymer mold. The PC absorbed light at specific wavelengths based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The strongly enhanced electric field was excited by the combined structures of nanodiscs and nanohole arrays; thus, highly sensitive biosensing was possible. The LSPR-based optical characteristics of the PC were analyzed by finite-difference time-domain simulation; the structure (metal layer thickness) was optimized to respond to changes in the surrounding refractive index with high sensitivity. PC-based biosensor chips were prepared by immobilizing anti-human immunoglobulin G, which was successfully detected in the 200 pg/mL to 200 ng/mL range. Our approach introduces an easy and rapid process allowing large-area fabrication of PCs, resulting in a highly sensitive label-free biosensor device.

  20. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  1. Plasmonic nanoparticle films for solar cell applications fabricated by size-selective aerosol deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, T.V.; Ortiz Gonzalez, J.; Santbergen, R.; Tan, H.; Schmidt-Ott, A.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A soft deposition method for incorporating surface plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles within photovoltaic devices was studied. This self-assembly method provides excellent control over both nanoparticle size and surface coverage. Films of spherical Ag nanoparticles with diameter of ∼100 nm were fa

  2. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka (OLI Systems Inc.); M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar (Southwest Research Institute)

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  3. Alternative Plasmonic Materials: Beyond Gold and Silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    such as gold and silver, that exhibit metallic properties and provide advantages in device performance, design flexibility, fabrication, integration, and tunability. This review explores different material classes for plasmonic and metamaterial applications, such as conventional semiconductors, transparent...... in plasmonics and metamaterials lacks good material building blocks in order to realize useful devices. Such devices suffer from many drawbacks arising from the undesirable properties of their material building blocks, especially metals. There are many materials, other than conventional metallic components...

  4. Fabrication and optical characterization of long-range surface-plasmon-polariton waveguides in the NIR

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Markus; Boehm, Florian; Fischer, Peter; Kraus, Marion; Tashima, Toshiyuki; Liebermeister, Lars; Altpeter, Philipp; Weinfurter, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the propagation of long-range surface plasmon-polaritons in a nobel metal stripe waveguide at an optical wavelength of 780 nm. To minimize propagation damping the lithographically structured waveguide is produced from a thin gold stripe embedded in a dielectric polymer. Our waveguide geometry supports a symmetric fundamental and anti-symmetric first order mode. For the fundamental mode we measure a propagation loss of $(6.12^{+0.66} _{-0.54})$ dB/mm, in good agreement with numerical simulations using a vectorial eigenmode solver. Our results are a promising starting point for coupling fluorescence of individual solid state quantum emitters to integrated plasmonic waveguide structures.

  5. Multi-Step Deep Reactive Ion Etching Fabrication Process for Silicon-Based Terahertz Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung-Kubiak, Cecile (Inventor); Reck, Theodore (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Perez, Jose Vicente Siles (Inventor); Lin, Robert H. (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Cooper, Ken B. (Inventor); Peralta, Alejandro (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A multi-step silicon etching process has been developed to fabricate silicon-based terahertz (THz) waveguide components. This technique provides precise dimensional control across multiple etch depths with batch processing capabilities. Nonlinear and passive components such as mixers and multipliers waveguides, hybrids, OMTs and twists have been fabricated and integrated into a small silicon package. This fabrication technique enables a wafer-stacking architecture to provide ultra-compact multi-pixel receiver front-ends in the THz range.

  6. Porous plasmonic nanocomposites for SERS substrates fabricated by two-step laser method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleva, M.E., E-mail: mihaela_ek@yahoo.com [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Chaussee blvd., Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-0044 (Japan); Nedyalkov, N.N.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Chaussee blvd., Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Gerlach, J.W.; Hirsch, D.; Prager, A.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification (IOM), Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Fukata, N.; Jevasuwan, W. [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-0044 (Japan)

    2016-04-25

    This research is focused on investigation of coupled plasmonic/metal-semiconductor nanomaterials. A two-step laser-assisted method is demonstrated for formation of plasmonic Ag nanoparticles (NPs) distributed into porous metal–oxide semiconductors. The mosaic Ag-ZnO target is used for laser ablation and, subsequently, laser annealing of the deposited layer is applied. The plasmon resonance properties of the nanostructures produced are confirmed by optical transmission spectroscopy. The wurtzite structure of ZnO is formed with tilted c-axis orientation and, respectively, a mixed Raman mode appears at 580 cm{sup −1}. The oxygen pressure applied during a deposition process has impact on the morphology and thickness of the porous nanostructures, but not on the size and size distribution of AgNPs. The porous nanocomposites exhibited potential for SERS applications, most pronounced for the oxygen deficient sample, grown at lower oxygen pressure. The observed considerable SERS enhancement of R6G molecules on AgNP/ZnO can be attributed to the ZnO-to-molecule charge transfer contribution, enhanced by the additional electrons from the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of AgNPs to the ZnO through the conduction band. - Highlights: • Porous AgNPs/ZnO composites are obtained by laser deposition and laser annealing. • Morphology and properties depend on growth oxygen pressure. • The emergence of mixed-symmetry Raman mode at 580 cm{sup −1} is registered. • The AgNPs/ZnO porous nanocomposites are suitable for SERS-active substrates. • The charge transfer enhanced by LSPR has a contribution to SERS effect.

  7. Weaving multi-layer fabrics for reinforcement of engineering components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, B. J.; Mcilhagger, R.; Mclaughlin, P.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of interlinked, multi-layer fabrics and near net shape preforms for engineering applications, woven on a 48 shaft dobby loom using glass, aramid, and carbon continuous filament yarns is assessed. The interlinking was formed using the warp yarns. Two basic types of structure were used. The first used a single warp beam and hence each of the warp yarns followed a similar path to form four layer interlinked reinforcements and preforms. In the second two warp beams were used, one for the interlinking yarns which pass from the top to the bottom layer through-the-thickness of the fabric and vice versa, and the other to provide 'straight' yarns in the body of the structure to carry the axial loading. Fabrics up to 15mm in thickness were constructed with varying amounts of through-the-thickness reinforcement. Tapered T and I sections were also woven, with the shaping produced by progressive removal of ends during construction. These fabrics and preforms were impregnated with resin and cured to form composite samples for testing. Using these two basic types of construction, the influence of reinforcement construction and the proportion and type of interlinking yarn on the performance of the composite was assessed.

  8. Plasmon resonances of Ag capped Si nanopillars fabricated using mask-less lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kaiyu; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk;

    2015-01-01

    . The LSPR peak position of the particle mode can be tuned by changing the size of the Ag cap, and can be hybridized by leaning of pillars. The resonance position of the cavity resonance mode can be tuned primarily via the diameter of the Si pillar, and cannot be tuned via leaning of Ag NPs. The presence...... of a substrate dramatically changes the intensity of these two LSPR modes by introducing constructive and destructive interference patterns with incident and reflected fields. Experimental scattering spectra can be interpreted using theoretical simulations. The Ag NP substrate displays a broad plasmonic...

  9. A THz semiconductor hybrid plasmonic waveguide with fabrication-error tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldlio, Mohamed; Ma, Youqiao; Che, Franklin; Maeda, Hiroshi; Cada, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In this letter, a novel waveguide based on semiconductor THz hybrid surface plasmon polariton (STHSPP) is proposed and numerically analyzed. The structure under study can confine light in the ultradeep-subwavelength region (ranging from λ2/360 to λ2/156) with a large propagation length ranging from 374 to 506 µm. Compared with a conventional hybrid SPP (HSPP) waveguide without a ridge, our proposed structure with the same propagation length has a much higher mode confinement with a one order of magnitude smaller normalized mode area.

  10. Polydopamine-Assisted Fabrication of Fiber-Optic Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on Gold Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏荣欣; 裴哲远; 黄仁亮; 齐崴; 王梦凡; 王利兵; 何志敏

    2015-01-01

    A fast and facile method of fabricating fiber-optic localized surface plasmon resonance sensors based on spherical gold nanoparticles was introduced in this study. The gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 55 nm were synthesized via the Turkevich method and were then immobilized onto the surface of an uncladded sensor probe using a polydopamine layer. To obtain a sensor probe with high sensitivity to changes in the refractive index, a set of key optimization parameters, including the sensing length, coating time of the polydopamine layer, and coating time of the gold nanoparticles, were investigated. The sensitivity of the optimized sensor probe was 522.80 nm per refractive index unit, and the probe showed distinctive wavelength shifts when the refractive index was changed from 1.328 6 to 1.398,7. When stored in deionized water at 4℃, the sensor probe proved to be stable over a period of two weeks. The sensor also exhibited advantages, such as low cost, fast fabrication, and simple optical setup, which indicated its potential application in remote sensing and real-time detection.

  11. Plasmonics in buried structures

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, I. T.; García de Abajo, Francisco Javier

    2009-01-01

    We describe plasmon propagation in silica-filled coupled nanovoids fully buried in gold. Propagation bands and band gaps are shown to be tunable through the degree of overlap and plasmon hybridization between contiguous voids. The effect of disorder and fabrication imperfections is thoroughly investigated. Our work explores a novel paradigm for plasmon photonics relying on plasmon modes in metal-buried structures, which can benefit from long propagation distances, cancelation of radiative los...

  12. Reaching the theoretical resonance quality factor limit in coaxial plasmonic nanoresonators fabricated by helium ion lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melli, M; Polyakov, A; Gargas, D; Huynh, C; Scipioni, L; Bao, W; Ogletree, D F; Schuck, P J; Cabrini, S; Weber-Bargioni, A

    2013-06-12

    Optical antenna structures have revolutionized the field of nano-optics by confining light to deep subwavelength dimensions for spectroscopy and sensing. In this work, we fabricated coaxial optical antennae with sub-10-nanometer critical dimensions using helium ion lithography (HIL). Wavelength dependent transmission measurements were used to determine the wavelength-dependent optical response. The quality factor of 11 achieved with our HIL fabricated structures matched the theoretically predicted quality factor for the idealized flawless gold resonators calculated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD). For comparison, coaxial antennae with 30 nm critical dimensions were fabricated using both HIL and the more common Ga focus ion beam lithography (Ga-FIB). The quality factor of the Ga-FIB resonators was 60% of the ideal HIL results for the same design geometry due to limitations in the Ga-FIB fabrication process.

  13. Effect of radiation damping on the spectral response of plasmonic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, Mikhail A; Yu, Nanfang; Genevet, Patrice; Gaburro, Zeno; Capasso, Federico

    2011-10-24

    We explore the relationship between the near-field enhancement, absorption, and scattering spectra of localized plasmonic elements. A simple oscillator model including both internal and radiative damping is developed, and is shown to accurately capture the near- and far-field spectral features of linear optical antennas, including their phase response. At wavelengths away from the interband transitions of the metal, we expect the absorption of a plasmonic element to be red-shifted relative to the scattering, and the near-field to be red-shifted relative to both.

  14. Localized surface plasmon resonance biosensing with large area of gold nanoholes fabricated by nanosphere lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Gansheng; Zhang, Nan; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2010-03-09

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) has been extensively studied as potential chemical and biological sensing platform due to its high sensitivity to local refractive index change induced by molecule adsorbate. Previous experiments have demonstrated the LSPR generated by gold nanoholes and its biosensing. Here, we realize large uniform area of nanoholes on scale of cm2 on glass substrate by nanosphere lithography which is essential for mass production. The morphology of the nanoholes is characterized using scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The LSPR sensitivity of the nanoholes to local refractive index is measured to be 36 nm/RIU. However, the chip has demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in biosensing: bovine serum albumin adsorption is detected with LSPR peak redshift of 27 nm, and biotin-streptavidin immunoassay renders a LSPR redshift of 11 nm. This work forms a foundation toward the cost-effective, high-throughput, reliable and robust chip-based LSPR biosensor.

  15. Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing with Large Area of Gold Nanoholes Fabricated by Nanosphere Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Nan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR has been extensively studied as potential chemical and biological sensing platform due to its high sensitivity to local refractive index change induced by molecule adsorbate. Previous experiments have demonstrated the LSPR generated by gold nanoholes and its biosensing. Here, we realize large uniform area of nanoholes on scale of cm2 on glass substrate by nanosphere lithography which is essential for mass production. The morphology of the nanoholes is characterized using scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The LSPR sensitivity of the nanoholes to local refractive index is measured to be 36 nm/RIU. However, the chip has demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in biosensing: bovine serum albumin adsorption is detected with LSPR peak redshift of 27 nm, and biotin-streptavidin immunoassay renders a LSPR redshift of 11 nm. This work forms a foundation toward the cost-effective, high-throughput, reliable and robust chip-based LSPR biosensor.

  16. Fabrication of gold nanorods with tunable longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peaks by reductive dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Gaoxing; Yang, Chi; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-01-20

    Hydroxyphenol compounds are often used as reductants in controlling the growth of nanoparticles. Herein, dopamine was used as an effective reductant in seed-mediated synthesis of gold nanorods (GNRs). The as-prepared GNRs (83 × 16 nm) were monodisperse and had a high degree of purity. The conversion ratio from gold ions to GNRs was around 80%. In addition, dopamine worked as an additive. At a very low concentration of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB; 0.025 M), thinner and shorter GNRs (60 × 9 nm) were successfully prepared. By regulating the concentration of silver ions, CTAB, seeds, and reductant, GNRs with longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks ranging from 680 to 1030 nm were synthesized. The growth process was tracked using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, and it was found that a slow growth rate was beneficial to the formation of GNRs.

  17. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-12-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons.

  18. Analysis of near-field components of a plasmonic optical antenna and their contribution to quantum dot infrared photodetector enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guiru; Vaillancourt, Jarrod; Lu, Xuejun

    2014-10-20

    In this paper, we analyze near-field vector components of a metallic circular disk array (MCDA) plasmonic optical antenna and their contribution to quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP) enhancement. The near-field vector components of the MCDA optical antenna and their distribution in the QD active region are simulated. The near-field overlap integral with the QD active region is calculated at different wavelengths and compared with the QDIP enhancement spectrum. The x-component (E(x)) of the near-field vector shows a larger intensity overlap integral and stronger correlation with the QDIP enhancement than E(z) and thus is determined to be the major near-field component to the QDIP enhancement.

  19. Epitaxial superlattices with titanium nitride as a plasmonic component for optical hyperbolic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Saha, Bivas; Liu, Jing;

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a plasmonic material having optical properties resembling gold. Unlike gold, however, TiN is complementary metal oxide semiconductor-compatible, mechanically strong, and thermally stable at higher temperatures. Additionally, TiN exhibits low-index surfaces with surface e...

  20. Fabrication Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance sensor chip of gold nanoparticles and detection lipase–osmolytes interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodselahi, T., E-mail: t_ghodselahi@yahoo.com [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hoornam, S. [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Science, Central Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vesaghi, M.A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ranjbar, B.; Azizi, A. [Department of Biophysics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mobasheri, H. [Laboratory of Membrane Biophysics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, PO Box 13145-1384, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biomaterials Research Institute (BRC), University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • We synthesized localized surface plasmon resonance sensor of gold nanoparticles by RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD. • LSPR sensor was characterized by TEM, XPS, AFM. • LSPR sensor was utilized to detect interaction between sorbitol and trehalose, with Pesudomonace Cepacia Lipase (PCL). • Unlike to trehalose, sorbitol interacts with the PCL. • Refractive index of PCL was obtained by Mie theory modeling. - Abstract: Co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD from acetylene gas and Au target were used to prepare sensor chip of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Deposition conditions were optimized to reach a Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) sensor chip of Au NPs with particle size less than 10 nm. The RF power was set at 180 W and the initial gas pressure was set at 0.035 mbar. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data were used to investigate particles size and surface morphology of LSPR sensor chip. The Au and C content of the LSPR sensor chip of Au NPs was obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) thin film was used as intermediate material to immobilize Au NPs on the SiO{sub 2} substrate. The interaction between two types of osmolytes, i.e. sorbitol and trehalose, with Pseudomonas cepacia lipase (PCL) were detected by the prepared LSPR biosensor chip. The detection mechanism is based on LSPR spectroscopy in which the wavelength of absorption peak is sensitive to the refractive index of the environment of the Au NPs. This mechanism eliminates the use of a probe or immobilization of PCL on the Au NPs of LSPR sensor chip. The interaction between PCL and osmolytes can change refractive index of the mixture or solution. We found that unlike to trehalose, sorbitol interacts with the PCL. This interaction increases refractive index of the PCL and sorbitol mixture. Refractive index of PCL in the presence of different concentration of sorbitol was

  1. Design and fabrication of structural color by local surface plasmonic meta-molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ya-Qi; Shao, Jin-Hai; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Lu, Bing-Rui; Zhang, Si-Chao; Sun, Yan; Qu, Xin-Ping; Chen, Yi-Fang

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new form of nanostructures with Al film deposited on a patterned dielectric material for generating structural color, which is induced by local surface plasmonic resonant (LSPR) absorption in sub-wavelength-indented hole/ring arrays. Unlike other reported results obtained by using focus ion beam (FIB) to create metallic nanostructures, the nano-sized hole/ring arrays in Al film in this work are replicated by high resolution electron beam lithography (EBL) combined with self-aligned metallization. Clear structural color is observed and systematically studied by numerical simulations as well as optical characterizations. The central color is strongly related to the geometric size, which provides us with good opportunities to dye the colorless Al surface by controlling the hole/ring dimensions (both diameter and radius), and to open up broad applications in display, jewelry decoration, green production of packing papers, security code, and counterfeits prevention. Project partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205148).

  2. Forging of metallic nano-objects for the fabrication of submicron-size components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesler, J [Technical University Braunschweig, IfW, Langer Kamp 8, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Mukherji, D [Technical University Braunschweig, IfW, Langer Kamp 8, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Schock, K [Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH, Aspenhaustrasse 25, 72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Kleindiek, S [Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH, Aspenhaustrasse 25, 72770 Reutlingen (Germany)

    2007-03-28

    In recent years, nanoscale fabrication has developed considerably, but the fabrication of free-standing nanosize components is still a great challenge. The fabrication of metallic nanocomponents utilizing three basic steps is demonstrated here. First, metallic alloys are used as factories to produce a metallic raw stock of nano-objects/nanoparticles in large numbers. These objects are then isolated from the powder containing thousands of such objects inside a scanning electron microscope using manipulators, and placed on a micro-anvil or a die. Finally, the shape of the individual nano-object is changed by nanoforging using a microhammer. In this way free-standing, high-strength, metallic nano-objects may be shaped into components with dimensions in the 100 nm range. By assembling such nanocomponents, high-performance microsystems can be fabricated, which are truly in the micrometre scale (the size ratio of a system to its component is typically 10:1)

  3. Theoretical investigation of fabrication-related disorders on the properties of subwavelength metal-dielectric-metal plasmonic waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Changjun; Veronis, Georgios

    2010-09-27

    We theoretically investigate the effect of fabrication-related disorders on subwavelength metal-dielectric-metal plasmonic waveguides. We use a Monte Carlo method to calculate the roughness-induced excess attenuation coefficient with respect to a smooth waveguide. For small roughness height, the excess optical power loss due to disorder is small compared to the material loss in a smooth waveguide. However, for large roughness height, the excess attenuation increases rapidly with height and the propagation length of the optical mode is severely affected. We find that the excess attenuation is mainly due to reflection from the rough surfaces. However, for small roughness correlation lengths, enhanced absorption is the dominant loss mechanism due to disorder. We also find that the disorder attenuation due to reflection is approximately maximized when the power spectral density of the disordered surfaces at the Bragg spatial frequency is maximized. Finally, we show that increasing the modal confinement or decreasing the guide wavelength, increase the attenuation due to disorder.

  4. Titanium nitride as a plasmonic material for visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy L.; Ni, Xingjie

    2012-01-01

    The search for alternative plasmonic materials with improved optical properties, easier fabrication and integration capabilities over those of the traditional materials such as silver and gold could ultimately lead to real-life applications for plasmonics and metamaterials. In this work, we show...... that titanium nitride could perform as an alternative plasmonic material in the visible and near-infrared regions. We demonstrate the excitation of surface-plasmon-polaritons on titanium nitride thin films and discuss the performance of various plasmonic and metamaterial structures with titanium nitride...... as the plasmonic component. We also show that titanium nitride could provide performance that is comparable to that of gold for plasmonic applications and can significantly outperform gold and silver for transformation-optics and some metamaterial applications in the visible and near-infrared regions....

  5. Integrated tool for fabrication of electronic components by laser direct write

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Scott A.; Zhang, Chengping; Kegresse, Todd; Liu, David

    2002-06-01

    A prototype workstation has been developed that allows the fabrication of passive electronic components at low temperatures using a laser direct-write process. The work station combines a variety of laser processing techniques onto a single, integrated platform. These techniques include material deposition, laser micromachining, laser sintering, and laser trimming. One particular process, referred to as 'mill and fill', combines the laser micromachining ability of the tool with 'off-the-shelf' conductor pastes to allow the fabrication of high density metalization at very low temperatures. The present work describes the details of the 'mill and fill' process and shows examples of prototype devices fabricated using this technique.

  6. Subwavelength Plasmonic Waveguides and Plasmonic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxi Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the fast development of microfabrication technology and advanced computational tools, nanophotonics has been widely studied for high-speed data transmission, sensitive optical detection, manipulation of ultrasmall objects, and visualization of nanoscale patterns. As an important branch of nanophotonics, plasmonics has enabled light-matter interactions at a deep subwavelength length scale. Plasmonics, or surface plasmon based photonics, focus on how to exploit the optical property of metals with abundant free electrons and hence negative permittivity. The oscillation of free electrons, when properly driven by electromagnetic waves, would form plasmon-polaritons in the vicinity of metal surfaces and potentially result in extreme light confinement. The objective of this article is to review the progress of subwavelength or deep subwavelength plasmonic waveguides, and fabrication techniques of plasmonic materials.

  7. Fabrication of Au- and Ag–SiO{sub 2} inverse opals having both localized surface plasmon resonance and Bragg diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erola, Markus O.A.; Philip, Anish; Ahmed, Tanzir; Suvanto, Sari; Pakkanen, Tuula T., E-mail: Tuula.Pakkanen@uef.fi

    2015-10-15

    The inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} containing metal nanoparticles can have both the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metal nanoparticles and the Bragg diffraction of inverse opal crystals of SiO{sub 2}, which are very useful properties for applications, such as tunable photonic structures, catalysts and sensors. However, effective processes for fabrication of these films from colloidal particles have rarely been reported. In our study, two methods for preparation of inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} with three different crystal sizes and containing gold or silver nanoparticles (NPs) via self-assembly using electrostatic interactions and capillary forces are reported. The Bragg diffraction of inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} in the presence and absence of the template was measured and predicted on the basis of with UV–vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The preparation methods used provided good-quality inverse opal SiO{sub 2} films containing highly dispersed, plasmonic AuNPs or AgNPs and having both Bragg diffractions and LSPRs. - Graphical abstract: For syntheses of SiO{sub 2} inverse opals containing Au/Ag nanoparticles two approaches and three template sizes were employed. Self-assembly of template molecules and metal nanoparticles occurred using electrostatic interactions and capillary forces. Both the Bragg diffraction of the photonic crystal and the localized surface plasmon resonance of Au/Ag nanoparticles were detected. - Highlights: • Fabrication methods of silica inverse opals containing metal nanoparticles studied. • Three template sizes used to produce SiO{sub 2} inverse opals with Au/Ag nanoparticles. • PS templates with Au nanoparticles adsorbed used in formation of inverse opals. • Ag particles infiltrated in inverse opals with capillary and electrostatic forces. • Bragg diffractions of IOs and surface plasmon resonances of nanoparticles observed.

  8. Fabrication of the helical field coil components for the advanced toroidal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, M.J.; Whitson, J.C.; Banks, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    The fabrication techniques used to manufacture the major components of the helical field (HF) coil segments for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) are described. The major components of an HF coil segment are 14 water-cooled, copper conductors and a T-shaped stainless steel support member (or ''tee''). Twenty-four of these segments were used in the fabrication of two coils for the ATF experiment. The helical shape, accurate position requirements, large size, and potential for high cost required unique approaches to the fabrication of these components. One method of fabrication was to use 44-mm-thick (standard size) plate to form the base and leg of the tee and to join the sections by welding. Because of the tolerance requirements, a thicker plate (70 mm) was used and then contour machined to the final shape. The second approach, conducted in parallel with the first, was to cast the tee as a single piece. The first attempts were to make the casting larger than required, then machine it to final size and shape. The cost of machining either the welded tee or the cast tee was extremely high, so several prototypes were fabricated until a cast tee that required no contour machining was produced. The shape and positional requirements were also the major problems in fabricating the copper conductors, or turns. The approach taken was to make an accurate fixture and position the turns in the fixture, then anneal to remove residual stresses and form the copper turns to the shape of the fixture. The lessons learned in pursuing these fabrication methods are presented. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Fabrication of 3D components by laser-aided direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Jyotirmoy; Qi, Huan

    2005-03-01

    Breinan and Kear first reported fabrication of three-dimensional metallic components via layer by layer laser cladding in 1978 and subsequently a patent was issued to Brown et al. in 1982. Recently, various groups are working world wide on different types of layered manufacturing techniques for fabrication of near net shape metallic components. Integration of lasers with multi-axis presently available CNC machines, CAD/CAM, sensors and powder metal delivery through co-axial nozzles along with the laser beam are the main innovations for fabrication of 3-Dimensional components. Continuous corrective measures during the manufacturing process are necessary to fabricate net shape functional parts with close tolerances and acceptable residual stress. The closed loop Direct Metal Deposition(DMD) System, using an optical feedback loop along with a CNC working under the instructions from a CAD/CAM software, indicate that it can produce three dimensional components directly from the CAD data eliminating intermediate machining and reduces final machining considerably. This technology is now being commercialized.

  10. A facile method of fabricating PbBi alloy nanowires with controlled component proportion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xue-wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Tianjin Key Lab for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, Tianjin 300384 (China); He, Zhao-cheng; Li, Ju-shan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Yuan, Zhi-hao, E-mail: zhyuan@tjut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Key Laboratory of Display Materials and Photoelectric Devices (Tianjin University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • A method of high temperature melting is developed to fabricate PbBi nanowires. • The composition controllable and homogeneous PbBi nanowires can be synthesized. • The component proportion is controlled by adjusting electrodeposition time. • Pores of AAO play an important role during the formation of alloy nanowires. - Abstract: The ability of controlled component proportion for metallic alloy nanowires is still rather limited even after well over a decade of intensive research efforts. Here, a very simple method of high temperature melting in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide templates is developed to fabricate low melting point metallic alloy nanowires, in which the component proportion of elements can be controlled by adjusting electrodeposition time in the separate electrolytes. Taking the fabrication of PbBi alloy nanowires as example, we show how to control the uniform composition and component proportion of metallic alloy nanowires. The PbBi alloy nanowire arrays with three different atomic ratios of Bi–10 at.%, 30 at.%, 80 at.% respectively are successfully fabricated. The morphologies and composition of PbBi alloy nanowires are investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy equipped with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy analyzer, and the crystal structures are determined by X-ray diffractometer. These results of experiments indicate that the composition controllable and homogeneous alloy nanowire arrays can be synthesized using this new method.

  11. Triangular metal wedges for subwavelength plasmon-polariton guiding at telecom wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Volkov, V.S.; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard

    2008-01-01

    . Using scanning near-field optical imaging at the wavelengths in the range of 1.43 - 1.52 µm, we demonstrate low-loss (propagation length ~ 120 µm) and well-confined (mode width ≅ 1.3 µm) wedge plasmon-polariton guiding along triangular 6-µm-high and 70.5°- angle gold wedges. Experimental observations......We report on subwavelength plasmon-polariton guiding by triangular metal wedges at telecom wavelengths. A high-quality fabrication procedure for making gold wedge waveguides, which is also mass- production compatible offering large-scale parallel fabrication of plasmonic components, is developed...

  12. Effect of components (polymer, plasticizer and solvent as a variable in fabrication of diclofenac transdermal patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetna Modi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery influence consumer acceptance and marked increase in bioavailability of some drugs which undergoes hepatic first-pass metabolism. Fabrication of transdermal patch requires lots of attention regarding the amount of components used for it. Because of varied nature of polymer and plasticizer, transdermal patches have different properties and different drug release. This study is on the basis to evaluate the amount to be needed for fabrication of diclofenac transdermal patch. Study shows that Hydroxy Propyl Methyl Cellulose has great influence on transdermal patch, if it is used alone in combination with glycerin or PEG-4000 plasticizer.

  13. Effect of components (polymer, plasticizer and solvent) as a variable in fabrication of diclofenac transdermal patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Chetna

    2012-03-01

    Transdermal drug delivery influence consumer acceptance and marked increase in bioavailability of some drugs which undergoes hepatic first-pass metabolism. Fabrication of transdermal patch requires lots of attention regarding the amount of components used for it. Because of varied nature of polymer and plasticizer, transdermal patches have different properties and different drug release. This study is on the basis to evaluate the amount to be needed for fabrication of diclofenac transdermal patch. Study shows that Hydroxy Propyl Methyl Cellulose has great influence on transdermal patch, if it is used alone in combination with glycerin or PEG-4000 plasticizer.

  14. Backside configured surface plasmonic enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun, E-mail: xuejun-lu@uml.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Vaillancourt, Jarrod [Applied NanoFemto Technologies, LLC, 181 Stedman St. 2, Lowell, MA 01851 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    In this work, we fabricated, measured and compared the quantum dots infrared photodetector enhancement by the top- and backside- configured plasmonic structures. The backside configured plasmonic structure can provide much higher device performance enhancement. Furthermore, the excitation of the surface plasmonic waves by the top- and backside- configured plasmonic structures was analyzed. Detailed simulation results of the electric field at different wavelength from top illumination and backside illumination were provided. The stronger electric field from the backside illumination attributed to the higher enhancement.

  15. Plasmonics in buried structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, I; García de Abajo, F J

    2009-10-12

    We describe plasmon propagation in silica-filled coupled nanovoids fully buried in gold. Propagation bands and band gaps are shown to be tunable through the degree of overlap and plasmon hybridization between contiguous voids. The effect of disorder and fabrication imperfections is thoroughly investigated. Our work explores a novel paradigm for plasmon photonics relying on plasmon modes in metal-buried structures, which can benefit from long propagation distances, cancelation of radiative losses, minimum crosstalk between neighboring waveguides, and maximum optical integration in three-dimensional arrangements.

  16. Fabrication of diffractive optical components for an extreme ultraviolet shearing interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, S.J. (Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)); Tennant, D.M. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, New Jersey 07733 (United States)); Tan, Z. (AT T Bell Laboratories, 510E Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)); Bjorkholm, J.E. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, New Jersey 07733 (United States))

    1994-11-01

    We have constructed four optical components for use in an extreme ultraviolet shearing interferometer which will operate at a wavelength of 13.4 nm. The components that have been constructed include transmission diffractive optical components such as a Fresnel zone plate, angled gratings, and two-frequency gratings, as well as pinhole apertures. All the components are fabricated in 110 nm of Ge, which is supported by a 0.5--0.7-[mu]m-thick membrane of Si. The patterns were fabricated by first evaporating Ge and then spinning 100 nm polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) onto the Si membranes. The desired patterns were exposed in the PMMA resist using electron beam lithography. Custom interative computer programs generated the patterns used to control the exposure. After developing the PMMA resist the Ge layer was etched using a reactive ion etching technique. Electron microscopy of the finished components show that the smallest features in our components are cleanly constructed, and the linewidths and placement of the features meet the desired accuracy.

  17. Fabrication of directional solidification components of nickel-base superalloys by laser metal forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Feng; Weidong Huang; Darong Chen; Xin Lin; Haiou Yang

    2004-01-01

    Straight plates, hollow columns, ear-like blade tips, twist plates with directional solidification microstructure made of Rene 95 superalloys were successfully fabricated on Nickel-base superalloy and DD3 substrates, respectively. The processing conditions for production of the parts with corresponding shapes were obtained. The fabrication precision was high and the components were compact. The solidification microstructure of the parts was analyzed by optical microscopy. The results show that the solidification microstructure is composed of columnar dendrites, by epitaxial growth onto the directional solidification substrates. The crystallography orientation of the parts was parallel to that of the substrates. The primary arm spacing was about 10 μm, which is in the range of superfine dendrites, and the secondary arm was small or even degenerated. It is concluded that the laser metal forming technique provides a method to manufacture directional solidification components.

  18. Silica optical fiber technology for devices and components design, fabrication, and international standards

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, Kyunghwan

    2012-01-01

    From basic physics to new products, Silica Optical Fiber Technology for Device and Components examines all aspects of specialty optical fibers. Moreover, the inclusion of the latest international standards governing optical fibers enables you to move from research to fabrication to commercialization. Reviews all the latest specialty optical fiber technologies, including those developed for high capacity WDM applications; broadband fiber amplifiers; fiber filleters based on periodic coupling; fiber branching devices; and fiber terminations Discusses key differences among sing

  19. Simulation, Analysis, and Fabrication of Miniaturized Components with Applications in Optical Interconnects and Parallel Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlfeld, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Optics and miniaturization of components are both key technologies supporting the progress in many multidisciplinary areas and enabling products with more functionality at reduced size and costs. Two applications of microscoptic integrations in the field of optical communications and parallel microscopy are investigated. This thesis also deals with light propagation in geometrical optics and scalar wave optics, both in homogeneous and inhomogeneous media. The fabrication and optimization of ...

  20. Channel plasmon polariton propagation in nanoimprinted V-groove waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Fernandez-Cuesta, I.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of optical characterization of metal V-groove waveguides using scanning near-field microscopy, showing broadband transmission with subwavelength confinement and propagation lengths exceeding 100 mu m. An updated fabrication method using a combination of UV and nanoimprint l...... lithography is presented. The developed approach is mass-production compatible, adaptable to different designs, and offers wafer-scale parallel fabrication of plasmonic components based on profiled metal surfaces....

  1. The fabrication of a bifunctional oxygen electrode without carbon components for alkaline secondary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephen W. T.; Thompson, Stephen J.; Li, Xiaohong; Gorman, Scott F.; Pletcher, Derek; Russell, Andrea E.; Walsh, Frank C.; Wills, Richard G. A.

    2014-08-01

    The fabrication of a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) without carbon components is described. It is therefore suitable for use as a bifunctional oxygen electrode in alkaline secondary batteries. The electrode is fabricated in two stages (a) the formation of a PTFE-bonded nickel powder layer on a nickel foam substrate and (b) the deposition of a NiCo2O4 spinel electrocatalyst layer by dip coating in a nitrate solution and thermal decomposition. The influence of modifications to the procedure on the performance of the GDEs in 8 M NaOH at 333 K is described. The GDEs can support current densities up to 100 mA cm-2 with state-of-the-art overpotentials for both oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction. Stable performance during >50 successive, 1 h oxygen reduction/evolution cycles at a current density of 50 mA cm-2 has been achieved.

  2. On-line monitoring of one-step laser fabrication of micro-optical components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliá, J E; Soriano, J C

    2001-07-01

    The use of an on-line monitoring method based on photoelasticity techniques for the fabrication of micro-optical components by means of controlled laser heating is described. From this description it is possible to show in real time the mechanical stresses that form the microelement. A new parameter, stressed area, is introduced that quantifies the stresses of a microelement during its fabrication, facilitating a deeper understanding of the physical phenomena involved in the process as well as being a useful test of quality. It also permits the stress produced in the manufacturing process and the optical properties of the final microelement to be correlated. The results for several microlenses monitored with this technique are presented.

  3. Plasmonic Gold Helices for the visible range fabricated by oxygen plasma purification of electron beam induced deposits

    CERN Document Server

    Haverkamp, Caspar; Jäckle, Sara; Manzoni, Anna; Christiansen, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) currently provides the only direct writing technique for truly three-dimensional nanostructures with geometrical features below 50 nm. Unfortunately, the depositions from metal-organic precursors suffer from a substantial carbon content. This hinders many applications, especially in plasmonics where the metallic nature of the geometric surfaces is mandatory. To overcome this problem a post-deposition treatment with oxygen plasma at room temperature was investigated for the purification of gold containing EBID structures. Upon plasma treatment, the structures experience a shrinkage in diameter of about 18 nm but entirely keep their initial shape. The proposed purification step results in a core-shell structure with the core consisting of mainly unaffected EBID material and a gold shell of about 20 nm in thickness. These purified structures are plasmonically active in the visible wavelength range as shown by dark field optical microscopy on helical nanostructures. Most no...

  4. Graphene-protected copper and silver plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kravets, V. G.; Jalil, R.; Kim, Y. J.

    2014-01-01

    suitable for plasmonic applications. To this end, there has been a continuous search for alternative plasmonic materials that are also compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Here we show that copper and silver protected by graphene are viable candidates. Copper films covered...... with one to a few graphene layers show excellent plasmonic characteristics. They can be used to fabricate plasmonic devices and survive for at least a year, even in wet and corroding conditions. As a proof of concept, we use the graphene-protected copper to demonstrate dielectric loaded plasmonic...... waveguides and test sensitivity of surface plasmon resonances. Our results are likely to initiate wide use of graphene-protected plasmonics....

  5. Fabrication of Plasmonic Nanorod-Embedded Dipeptide Microspheres via the Freeze-Quenching Method for Near-Infrared Laser-Triggered Drug-Delivery Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Hakan; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Babur, Esra; Duman, Memed; Aydin, Halil M; Demirel, Gokhan

    2016-05-09

    Control of drug release by an external stimulus may provide remote controllability, low toxicity, and reduced side effects. In this context, varying physical external stimuli, including magnetic and electric fields, ultrasound, light, and pharmacological stimuli, have been employed to control the release rate of drug molecules in a diseased region. However, the design and development of alternative on-demand drug-delivery systems that permit control of the dosage of drug released via an external stimulus are still required. Here, we developed near-infrared laser-activatable microspheres based on Fmoc-diphenylalanine (Phe-Phe) dipeptides and plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs) via a simple freeze-quenching approach. These plasmonic nanoparticle-embedded microspheres were then employed as a smart drug-delivery platform for native, continuous, and pulsatile doxorubicin (DOX) release. Remarkable sustained, burst, and on-demand DOX release from the fabricated microspheres were achieved by manipulating the laser exposure time. Our results demonstrate that AuNR-embedded dipeptide microspheres have great potential for controlled drug-delivery systems.

  6. Optical Isolator Utilizing Surface Plasmons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yuasa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of usage of surface plasmons in a new design of an integrated optical isolator has been studied. In the case of surface plasmons propagating at a boundary between a transition metal and a double-layer dielectric, there is a significant difference of optical loss for surface plasmons propagating in opposite directions. Utilizing this structure, it is feasible to fabricate a competitive plasmonic isolator, which benefits from a broad wavelength operational bandwidth and a good technological compatibility for integration into the Photonic Integrated Circuits (PIC. The linear dispersion relation was derived for plasmons propagating in a multilayer magneto-optical slab.

  7. Terahertz superconducting plasmonic hole array

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Gu, Jianqiang; Xing, Qirong; Zhang, Weili

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate thermally tunable superconductor hole array with active control over their resonant transmission induced by surface plasmon polaritons . The array was lithographically fabricated on high temperature YBCO superconductor and characterized by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy. We observe a clear transition from the virtual excitation of the surface plasmon mode to the real surface plasmon mode. The highly tunable superconducting plasmonic hole arrays may have promising applications in the design of low-loss, large dynamic range amplitude modulation, and surface plasmon based terahertz devices.

  8. Fabrication of surface plasmon resonance sensor surface with control of the nonspecific adsorption and affinity for the detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene using an antifouling copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eYatabe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated a surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor using a hydrophilic polymer for the highly sensitive detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT. The hydrophilic polymer was made from mono-2-(methacryloyloxyethylsuccinate (MES and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP. The detection of TNT was carried out by displacement assay with the SPR measurement. In displacement assay, the affinity between anti-TNT antibody and the sensor surface, affects to the sensitivity. In the SPR measurement, nonspecific adsorption should be controlled because SPR sensor cannot discriminate between specific and nonspecific adsorption. Therefore, the affinity and nonspecific adsorption were controlled by changing the ratio of HEMA to MES. A detection limit of 0.4 ng/ml (ppb for TNT was achieved using a sensor surface with the lowest affinity without nonspecific adsorption.

  9. Molecular plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a novel approach, this book provides a unique ""molecular perspective"" on plasmonics, concisely presenting the fundamentals and applications in a way suitable for beginners entering this hot field as well as for experienced researchers and practitioners. It begins by introducing readers to the optical effects that occur at the nanoscale and particularly their modification in the presence of biomolecules, followed by a concise yet thorough overview of the different methods for the actual fabrication of nanooptical materials. Further chapters address the relevant nanooptics, as well as

  10. 10 CFR Appendix O to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant... Appendix O to Part 110—Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority Note: Nuclear fuel elements are manufactured from source or...

  11. Fabrication and electrochemical performance of solid oxide fuel cell components by atmospheric and suspension plasma spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Wei-sheng; YANG Yun-zhen; ZHANG Hai-ou; WANG Gui-lan

    2009-01-01

    The theory of functionally graded material (FGM) was applied in the fabrication process of PEN (Positive- Electrolyte-Negative),the core component of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC).To enhance its electrochemical performance,the functionally graded PEN of planar SOFC was prepared by atmospheric plasma spray (APS).The cross-sectional SEM micrograph and element energy spectrum of the resultant PEN were analyzed.Its interface resistance was also compared with that without the graded layers to investigate the electrochemical performance enhanced by the functionally graded layers.Moreover,a new process,suspension plasma spray (SPS) was applied to preparing the SOFC electrolyte.Higher densification of the coating by SPS,1.61%,is observed,which is helpful to effectively improve its electrical conductivity.The grain size of the electrolyte coating fabricated by SPS is also smaller than that by APS,which is more favourable to obtain the dense electrolyte coatings.To sum up,all mentioned above can prove that the hybrid process of APS and SPS could be a better approach to fabricate the PEN of SOFC stacks,in which APS is for porous electrodes and SPS for dense electrolyte.

  12. Improving Target Repeatability Yields Broader Results in Component Fabrication and Overall Build

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sallee; Gamboa, Eliseo; Gillespie, Robb; Huntington, Channing; Krauland, Christine; Kuranz, Carolyn; di Stefano, Carlos; Susalla, Peter; Lairson, Bruce; Elsner, Fred; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R. Paul

    2012-10-01

    The University of Michigan has been fabricating targets for high energy density experiments since 2003. Our experiments study physics relevant to laboratory astrophysics. Machined acrylic structures serve as a backbone supporting all the components on our targets, as well as providing us with a method that eases our build. A most vital component to nearly every target we build, is shielding. Employing techniques to bend gold foils, enables complex geometries and eliminates seams that possibly allow unwanted emission in our diagnostics. Many of our experiments explore the dynamics of a radiative shock launched into xenon or argon gas. Polyimide (PI) tubing confines the gas and is transmissive to the diagnostic x-rays used to probe the experiment. Recent interest in the shock dynamics of non-axisymmetric shocks has lead to the development of PI tubes with non-circular cross sections. We present the techniques we use to produce repeatable targets as well as recent improvements in our techniques.

  13. Mechanically tunable terahertz graphene plasmonics using soft metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Xin; Zang, Jianfeng

    2016-12-01

    This letter presents a new approach to continuously tune the resonances of graphene plasmons in terahertz soft metasurface. The continuous tunability of plasmon resonance is either unachievable in conventional plasmonic materials like noble metals or requires gate voltage regulation in graphene. Here we investigate a simplest form of terahertz metasurface, graphene nanoribbon arrays (GNRAs), and demonstrate the graphene plasmon resonance modes can be tailored by mechanical deformation of the elastomeric substrate using finite element method (FEM). By integrating the electric doping with substrate deformation, we have managed to tune the resonance wavelength from 13.7 to 50.6 μm. The 36.9 μm tuning range is nearly doubled compared with that by electric doping regulation only. Moreover, we observe the plasmon coupling effect in GNRAs on waved substrate and its evolution with substrate curvature. A new decoupling mechanism enabled by the out-of-plane separation of the adjacent ribbons is revealed. The out-of-plane setup of plasmonic components extends the fabrication of plasmonic devices into three-dimensional space, which simultaneously increases the nanoribbon density and decreases the coupling strength. Our findings provide an additional degree of freedom to design reconfigurable metasurfaces and metadevices.

  14. Concentrating Solar Power Central Receiver Panel Component Fabrication and Testing FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, Michael W [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne; Miner, Kris [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

    2013-03-30

    The objective of this project is to complete a design of an advanced concentrated solar panel and demonstrate the manufacturability of key components. Then confirm the operation of the key components under prototypic solar flux conditions. This work is an important step in reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from a central receiver solar power plant. The key technical risk to building larger power towers is building the larger receiver systems. Therefore, this proposed technology project includes the design of an advanced molten salt prototypic sub-scale receiver panel that can be utilized into a large receiver system. Then complete the fabrication and testing of key components of the receive design that will be used to validate the design. This project shall have a significant impact on solar thermal power plant design. Receiver panels of suitable size for utility scale plants are a key element to a solar power tower plant. Many subtle and complex manufacturing processes are involved in producing a reliable, robust receiver panel. Given the substantial size difference between receiver panels manufactured in the past and those needed for large plant designs, the manufacture and demonstration on prototype receiver panel components with representative features of a full-sized panel will be important to improving the build process for commercial success. Given the thermal flux limitations of the test facility, the panel components cannot be rendered full size. Significance changes occurred in the projects technical strategies from project initiation to the accomplishments described herein. The initial strategy was to define cost improvements for the receiver, design and build a scale prototype receiver and test, on sun, with a molten salt heat transport system. DOE had committed to constructing a molten salt heat transport loop to support receiver testing at the top of the NSTTF tower. Because of funding constraints this did not happen. A subsequent plan to

  15. Plasmonic nanoholes as SERS devices for biosensing applications: An easy route for nanostructures fabrication on glass substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Candeloro, Patrizio

    2016-12-26

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been largely exploited in the last decade for biochemical and biomedical research. But some issues still require attention before transferring SERS to bioclinical routinely practices, such as reproducibility, quantitative analysis and signal background interference. In this work we propose an easy and cheap route, based on a template stripping technique, for producing plasmonic nanostructured films with SERS capabilities. We focus our attention to nanoholes in a continuous gold film, conversely to the majority of the literature which is dealing with individual nanostructures. Plasmon resonances occur at the holes edges, thus enabling the possibility of SERS signals from biomolecules and the potential application as biosensors. One advantage of the nanoholes patterned film is the optical-subdiffraction pitch, which prevents any Raman and/or fluorescence signal arising from the bottom slide. This effect paves the way to standard glass slides, much cheaper than CaF2 ones, as suitable substrates for SERS devices, without any interfering signal coming from the glass itself.

  16. Plasmonic gold helices for the visible range fabricated by oxygen plasma purification of electron beam induced deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Caspar; Höflich, Katja; Jäckle, Sara; Manzoni, Anna; Christiansen, Silke

    2017-02-01

    Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) currently provides the only direct writing technique for truly three-dimensional nanostructures with geometrical features below 50 nm. Unfortunately, the depositions from metal-organic precursors suffer from a substantial carbon content. This hinders many applications, especially in plasmonics where the metallic nature of the geometric surfaces is mandatory. To overcome this problem a post-deposition treatment with oxygen plasma at room temperature was investigated for the purification of gold containing EBID structures. Upon plasma treatment, the structures experience a shrinkage in diameter of about 18 nm but entirely keep their initial shape. The proposed purification step results in a core-shell structure with the core consisting of mainly unaffected EBID material and a gold shell of about 20 nm in thickness. These purified structures are plasmonically active in the visible wavelength range as shown by dark field optical microscopy on helical nanostructures. Most notably, electromagnetic modeling of the corresponding scattering spectra verified that the thickness and quality of the resulting gold shell ensures an optical response equal to that of pure gold nanostructures.

  17. Scalable, "Dip-and-Dry" Fabrication of a Wide-Angle Plasmonic Selective Absorber for High-Efficiency Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Jyotirmoy; Wang, Derek; Overvig, Adam C; Shi, Norman N; Paley, Daniel; Zangiabadi, Amirali; Cheng, Qian; Barmak, Katayun; Yu, Nanfang; Yang, Yuan

    2017-08-28

    A galvanic-displacement-reaction-based, room-temperature "dip-and-dry" technique is demonstrated for fabricating selectively solar-absorbing plasmonic-nanoparticle-coated foils (PNFs). The technique, which allows for facile tuning of the PNFs' spectral reflectance to suit different radiative and thermal environments, yields PNFs which exhibit excellent, wide-angle solar absorptance (0.96 at 15°, to 0.97 at 35°, to 0.79 at 80°), and low hemispherical thermal emittance (0.10) without the aid of antireflection coatings. The thermal emittance is on par with those of notable selective solar absorbers (SSAs) in the literature, while the wide-angle solar absorptance surpasses those of previously reported SSAs with comparable optical selectivities. In addition, the PNFs show promising mechanical and thermal stabilities at temperatures of up to 200 °C. Along with the performance of the PNFs, the simplicity, inexpensiveness, and environmental friendliness of the "dip-and-dry" technique makes it an appealing alternative to current methods for fabricating selective solar absorbers. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Design and fabrication of an angle-scanning based platform for the construction of surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiandong; Cao, Baiqiong; Wang, Shun; Li, Jianwei; Wei, Wensong; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xinran; Zhu, Juanhua; Jiang, Min; Sun, Xiaohui; Chen, Ruipeng; Ma, Liuzheng

    2016-03-01

    A sensing system for an angle-scanning optical surface-plasmon-resonance (SPR) based biosensor has been designed with a laser line generator in which a P polarizer is embedded to utilize as an excitation source for producing the surface plasmon wave. In this system, the emitting beam from the laser line generator is controlled to realize the angle-scanning using a variable speed direct current (DC) motor. The light beam reflected from the prism deposited with a 50 nm Au film is then captured using the area CCD array which was controlled by a personal computer (PC) via a universal serial bus (USB) interface. The photoelectric signals from the high speed digital camera (an area CCD array) were converted by a 16 bit A/D converter before it transferred to the PC. One of the advantages of this SPR biosensing platform is greatly demonstrated by the label-free and real-time bio-molecular analysis without moving the area CCD array by following the laser line generator. It also could provide a low-cost surface plasmon resonance platform to improve the detection range in the measurement of bioanalytes. The SPR curve displayed on the PC screen promptly is formed by the effective data from the image on the area CCD array and the sensing responses of the platform to bulk refractive indices were calibrated using various concentrations of ethanol solution. These ethanol concentrations indicated with volumetric fraction of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%, respectively, were experimented to validate the performance of the angle-scanning optic SPR biosensing platform. As a result, the SPR sensor was capable to detect a change in the refractive index of the ethanol solution with the relative high linearity at the correlation coefficient of 0.9842. This greatly enhanced detection range is obtained from the position relationship between the laser line generator and the right-angle prism to allow direct quantification of the samples over a wide range of concentrations.

  19. A facile strategy to fabricate plasmonic Cu modified TiO{sub 2} nano-flower films for photocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2} to methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Enzhou; Qi, Lulu; Bian, Juanjuan; Chen, Yihan [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, No. 229 Taibai North Road, Xi’an 710069 (China); Hu, Xiaoyun [Department of Physics, Northwest University, No. 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an 710069 (China); Fan, Jun, E-mail: fanjun@nwu.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, No. 229 Taibai North Road, Xi’an 710069 (China); Liu, Hanchen; Zhu, Changjun; Wang, Qiuping [School of Science, Xi' an Polytechnic University, No. 19 Jinhua South Road, Xi’an 710048 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Photoreduction of CO{sub 2} to CH{sub 3}OH over plasmonic Cu/TiO{sub 2} film. - Highlights: • Cu nanoparticles modified TiO{sub 2} nano-flower film was prepared by a facile strategy. • Cu nanoparticles can enhance the light absorption and the Raman scattering of TiO{sub 2}. • Cu nanoparticles can effectively restrain the recombination of the charge carriers. • A synergistic mechanism is proposed for photocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2} on Cu/TiO{sub 2} film. - Abstract: Cu nanoparticles (NPs) deposited TiO{sub 2} nano-flower films were fabricated using a combination of a hydrothermal method and a microwave-assisted reduction process. The investigations indicated that Cu NPs and TiO{sub 2} film both exhibit visible light harvesting properties based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Cu NPs and unique nanostructures of TiO{sub 2} film. Fluorescence quenching was observed because the recombination of charge carriers was effectively suppressed by Cu NPs deposition. The experimental results indicate that Cu/TiO{sub 2} films exhibit better activity for the photocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2} due to the charge transfer property and LSPR effect of Cu NPs. The CH{sub 3}OH production rate reached 1.8 μmol cm{sup −2} h{sup −1} (energy efficiency was 0.8%) over 0.5 Cu/TiO{sub 2} film under UV and visible light irradiation, which was 6.0 times higher than that observed over pure TiO{sub 2} film. In addition, a tentative photocatalytic mechanism is proposed to understand the experimental results over the Cu modified TiO{sub 2} nano-flower films.

  20. Antibacterial performance of polypropylene nonwoven fabric wound dressing surfaces containing passive and active components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhirong; Du, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyu; Chen, Hao; Sun, Miao; Yan, Shunjie; Luan, Shifang; Yin, Jinghua

    2016-03-01

    A growing number of wound dressing-related nosocomial infections necessitate the development of novel antibacterial strategies. Herein, polypropylene non-woven fabric (PPNWF) was facilely modified with passive and active antibacterial components, namely photografting polymerization both N-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers, and the introduction of guanidine polymer through the reaction between active amino groups and epoxy groups. The modified samples were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Water contact angle measurement, antibacterial test, platelet and red blood cell adhesion were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity, antibacterial properties and hemocompatibility of the samples. It was found that the antibacterial properties were obviously enhanced, meanwhile significantly suppressing platelet and red blood cell adhesion after the above modification. This PPNWF samples that possess antifouling and antimicrobial properties, have great potential in wound dressing applications.

  1. Engineered Self-Assembly of Plasmonic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    A critical need in nanotechnology is the development of new tools and methods to organize, connect, and integrate solid-state nanocomponents. Self-assembly - where components spontaneously organize themselves - can be carried out on a massively parallel scale to construct large-scale architectures using solid-state nanocrystal building blocks. I will present our recent work on the synthesis and self-assembly of nanocrystals for plasmonics, where light is propagated, manipulated, and confined by solid-state components that are smaller than the wavelength of light itself. We show the organization of polymer-grafted metal nanocrystals into hierarchical nanojunction arrays that possess intense ``hot spots'' due to electromagnetic field localization. We also show that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can serve as a new class of plasmonic building blocks, where shape and carrier density can be actively tuned to engineer plasmon resonances. These examples demonstrate that nanocrystals possess unique electromagnetic properties that rival top-down structures, and the potential of self-assembly for fabricating designer plasmonic materials.

  2. A probabilisitic based failure model for components fabricated from anisotropic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chengfeng

    The nuclear moderator for high temperature nuclear reactors are fabricated from graphite. During reactor operations graphite components are subjected to complex stress states arising from structural loads, thermal gradients, neutron irradiation damage, and seismic events. Graphite is a quasi-brittle material. Two aspects of nuclear grade graphite, i.e., material anisotropy and different behavior in tension and compression, are explicitly accounted for in this effort. Fracture mechanic methods are useful for metal alloys, but they are problematic for anisotropic materials with a microstructure that makes it difficult to identify a "critical" flaw. In fact cracking in a graphite core component does not necessarily result in the loss of integrity of a nuclear graphite core assembly. A phenomenological failure criterion that does not rely on flaw detection has been derived that accounts for the material behaviors mentioned. The probability of failure of components fabricated from graphite is governed by the scatter in strength. The design protocols being proposed by international code agencies recognize that design and analysis of reactor core components must be based upon probabilistic principles. The reliability models proposed herein for isotropic graphite and graphite that can be characterized as being transversely isotropic are another set of design tools for the next generation very high temperature reactors (VHTR) as well as molten salt reactors. The work begins with a review of phenomenologically based deterministic failure criteria. A number of this genre of failure models are compared with recent multiaxial nuclear grade failure data. Aspects in each are shown to be lacking. The basic behavior of different failure strengths in tension and compression is exhibited by failure models derived for concrete, but attempts to extend these concrete models to anisotropy were unsuccessful. The phenomenological models are directly dependent on stress invariants. A set of

  3. Design and Fabrication Technique of the Key Components for Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Song, Ki Nam; Kim, Yong Wan

    2006-12-15

    The gas outlet temperature of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may be beyond the capability of conventional metallic materials. The requirement of the gas outlet temperature of 950 .deg. C will result in operating temperatures for metallic core components that will approach very high temperature on some cases. The materials that are capable of withstanding this temperature should be prepared, or nonmetallic materials will be required for limited components. The Ni-base alloys such as Alloy 617, Hastelloy X, XR, Incoloy 800H, and Haynes 230 are being investigated to apply them on components operated in high temperature. Currently available national and international codes and procedures are needed reviewed to design the components for HTGR/VHTR. Seven codes and procedures, including five ASME Codes and Code cases, one French code (RCC-MR), and on British Procedure (R5) were reviewed. The scope of the code and code cases needs to be expanded to include the materials with allowable temperatures of 950 .deg. C and higher. The selection of compact heat exchangers technology depends on the operating conditions such as pressure, flow rates, temperature, but also on other parameters such as fouling, corrosion, compactness, weight, maintenance and reliability. Welding, brazing, and diffusion bonding are considered proper joining processes for the heat exchanger operating in the high temperature and high pressure conditions without leakage. Because VHTRs require high temperature operations, various controlled materials, thick vessels, dissimilar metal joints, and precise controls of microstructure in weldment, the more advanced joining processes are needed than PWRs. The improved solid joining techniques are considered for the IHX fabrication. The weldability for Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 using GTAW and SMAW processes was investigated by CEA.

  4. Investigation of Springback Associated with Composite Material Component Fabrication (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Project 94-09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzie, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research project was to examine processing and design parameters in the fabrication of composite components to obtain a better understanding and attempt to minimize springback associated with composite materials. To accomplish this, both processing and design parameters were included in a Taguchi-designed experiment. Composite angled panels were fabricated, by hand layup techniques, and the fabricated panels were inspected for springback effects. This experiment yielded several significant results. The confirmation experiment validated the reproducibility of the factorial effects, error recognized, and experiment as reliable. The material used in the design of tooling needs to be a major consideration when fabricating composite components, as expected. The factors dealing with resin flow, however, raise several potentially serious material and design questions. These questions must be dealt with up front in order to minimize springback: viscosity of the resin, vacuum bagging of the part for cure, and the curing method selected. These factors directly affect design, material selection, and processing methods.

  5. Antibacterial performance of polypropylene nonwoven fabric wound dressing surfaces containing passive and active components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Zhirong, E-mail: xinzhirong2012@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Du, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyu; Chen, Hao; Sun, Miao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Yan, Shunjie [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Luan, Shifang, E-mail: sfluan@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Yin, Jinghua [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PNVP and PHMG components were covalently immobilized on PP{sub NWF} surface. • PP{sub NWF}-g-PNVP-PHMG possessed bacterial adhesion-resistant and bactericidal capabilities. • PP{sub NWF}-g-PNVP-PHMG obviously suppressed platelet and red blood cell adhesion. - Abstract: A growing number of wound dressing-related nosocomial infections necessitate the development of novel antibacterial strategies. Herein, polypropylene non-woven fabric (PP{sub NWF}) was facilely modified with passive and active antibacterial components, namely photografting polymerization both N-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers, and the introduction of guanidine polymer through the reaction between active amino groups and epoxy groups. The modified samples were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Water contact angle measurement, antibacterial test, platelet and red blood cell adhesion were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity, antibacterial properties and hemocompatibility of the samples. It was found that the antibacterial properties were obviously enhanced, meanwhile significantly suppressing platelet and red blood cell adhesion after the above modification. This PP{sub NWF} samples that possess antifouling and antimicrobial properties, have great potential in wound dressing applications.

  6. Graphene-protected copper and silver plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravets, V. G.; Jalil, R.; Kim, Y.-J.; Ansell, D.; Aznakayeva, D. E.; Thackray, B.; Britnell, L.; Belle, B. D.; Withers, F.; Radko, I. P.; Han, Z.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Novoselov, K. S.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics has established itself as a branch of physics which promises to revolutionize data processing, improve photovoltaics, and increase sensitivity of bio-detection. A widespread use of plasmonic devices is notably hindered by high losses and the absence of stable and inexpensive metal films suitable for plasmonic applications. To this end, there has been a continuous search for alternative plasmonic materials that are also compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Here we show that copper and silver protected by graphene are viable candidates. Copper films covered with one to a few graphene layers show excellent plasmonic characteristics. They can be used to fabricate plasmonic devices and survive for at least a year, even in wet and corroding conditions. As a proof of concept, we use the graphene-protected copper to demonstrate dielectric loaded plasmonic waveguides and test sensitivity of surface plasmon resonances. Our results are likely to initiate wide use of graphene-protected plasmonics. PMID:24980150

  7. Flexible, fibre-addressable surface-plasmon-resonance chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Faqrul; Chau, Kenneth J.

    2012-02-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors exploit optical coupling to surface plasmons, light waves bound to a metal surface. In the most common configuration, a SPR sensor is used with an external light source, optical components to polarize incident light and guide light to and from a metal surface, a coupling device to convert free-space light into surface plasmons and back into free-space light, and a light detector. The light source, the optical components, and the light detector are external to the SPR device, and the coupling structure is often integrated directly with the surface-plasmon-sustaining metal surface. The requirement of several external components restricts the miniaturization of SPR devices and prohibits low-cost implementation. To address these limitations, we design, fabricate, and test a new SPR device chip that is fibre-addressable, does not require a discrete coupling structure, and integrates light delivery, light polarization control, surface plasmon coupling onto a thin, flexible substrate. Our SPR chip is constructed from a thin gold layer deposited on top of a clear plastic sheet, which is then optically connected from the bottom surface onto a plastic linear polarizer sheet. Two cleaved fibres, one to input light and the other to collect reflected light, are then optically attached to SPR device. We experimentally characterize the SPR device and find good agreement between our measurements and a theoretical model based on transfer matrix formalism.

  8. Fabrication of tunable plasmonic substrates using a table-top gold coater and a hot plate, their optical characterization, and surface enhanced Raman activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, A.; Krishnan, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple scalable technique for repeatable fabrication of large area (cm2) electromagnetic hot spots using tunable Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) substrates and their k-space microscopic imaging characterization. The substrates were fabricated simply using a low vacuum air plasma scanning electron microscope gold coater and annealing using a hot plate. The measured permittivity profile and optical transmission characteristics of such substrates showed large changes before and after annealing, with clear changes in the occurrence and position of the LSPR in the visible spectrum. Furthermore, the LSPR wavelength of these substrates was tuned from 537 nm to 630 nm using cyclic deposition and annealing. It was observed that every anneal step could be used to blue shift the resonance, while a deposition step could be used to red shift the resonance, thus giving rise to a wide tunability. We also present the k-space images of the substrates using narrowband fluorescence leakage radiation microscopy and broadband polarization microscopy. The enhanced scattering in these substrates was clearly imaged in the k-space, and the color content in the broadband k-space images correlates well with the spectral characteristics of these substrates that can be used in commercial quality testing without a spectrometer. The optical characteristics of the substrates were attributed to the morphology evolution verified using scanning probe microscopy. A single particle model based simulation was used to evaluate the optical response. The substrates were then tested for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) activity using control experiments involving Rhodamine 6G dye in PMMA matrix of different concentrations with analyte volumes of approximately 200 pl and analytical enhancements of >3 ×104 (net enhancement >1.8 ×107 ) were obtained. The limit of detection was ≈ 10-8 M in low volume (≈200 pl) analyte, reaching the regime of few molecule detection. To

  9. Absorption Properties of Simply Fabricated All-Metal Mushroom Plasmonic Metamaterials Incorporating Tube-Shaped Posts for Multi-Color Uncooled Infrared Image Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinpei Ogawa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wavelength-selective infrared (IR absorbers have attracted considerable interest due to their potential for a wide range of applications. In particular, they can be employed as advanced uncooled IR sensors that identify objects through their radiation spectra. Herein, we propose a mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorber incorporating tube-shaped metal posts (MPMAT for use in the long-wavelength IR (LWIR region. The MPMAT design consists of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate via tube-shaped metal posts. Both the micropatches and posts can be constructed simultaneously as a result of the tube-shaped structure of the metal post structure; thus, the fabrication procedure is both simple and low cost. The absorption properties of these MPMATs were assessed both theoretically and experimentally, and the results of both investigations demonstrated that these devices exhibit suitable levels of LWIR absorption regardless of the specific tube-shaped structures employed. It was also found to be possible to tune the absorption wavelength by varying the micropatch width and the inner diameter of the tube-shaped metal posts, and to obtain absorbance values of over 90%. Focal plane array structures based on such MPMATs could potentially serve as high-performance, low-cost, multi-spectral uncooled IR image sensors.

  10. Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M.S. Azzam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the nanoclay composites were fabricated using the synthesized poly 6-(3-aminophenoxy hexane-1-thiol, poly 8-(3-aminophenoxy octane-1-thiol and poly 10-(3-aminophenoxy decane-1-thiol surfactants with gold nanoparticles. The polymeric thiol surfactants were first assembled on gold nanoparticles and then impregnated into the clay matrix. Different spectroscopic and microscopic techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, Scanning electron microscope (SEM and Transmission microscope (TEM were used to characterize the fabricated nanoclay composites. The results showed that the polymeric thiol surfactants assembled on gold nanoparticles are located in the interlayer space of the clay mineral and affected the clay structure.

  11. Microstructures, Forming Limit and Failure Analyses of Inconel 718 Sheets for Fabrication of Aerospace Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajun Prasad, K.; Panda, Sushanta Kumar; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Sen, Mainak; Murty, S. V. S. Naryana; Sharma, Sharad Chandra

    2017-02-01

    Recently, aerospace industries have shown increasing interest in forming limits of Inconel 718 sheet metals, which can be utilised in designing tools and selection of process parameters for successful fabrication of components. In the present work, stress-strain response with failure strains was evaluated by uniaxial tensile tests in different orientations, and two-stage work-hardening behavior was observed. In spite of highly preferred texture, tensile properties showed minor variations in different orientations due to the random distribution of nanoprecipitates. The forming limit strains were evaluated by deforming specimens in seven different strain paths using limiting dome height (LDH) test facility. Mostly, the specimens failed without prior indication of localized necking. Thus, fracture forming limit diagram (FFLD) was evaluated, and bending correction was imposed due to the use of sub-size hemispherical punch. The failure strains of FFLD were converted into major-minor stress space (σ-FFLD) and effective plastic strain-stress triaxiality space (ηEPS-FFLD) as failure criteria to avoid the strain path dependence. Moreover, FE model was developed, and the LDH, strain distribution and failure location were predicted successfully using above-mentioned failure criteria with two stages of work hardening. Fractographs were correlated with the fracture behavior and formability of sheet metal.

  12. A study on embedded resistor components fabricated by laser micro-cladding and rapid prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Huiling [Wuhan National Laboratory of Optoelectronics, National Engineering Research Center for Laser Processing, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan-430074 (China)]. E-mail: scape_lhl@sohu.com; Zeng Xiaoyan [Wuhan National Laboratory of Optoelectronics, National Engineering Research Center for Laser Processing, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan-430074 (China)]. E-mail: xyzeng@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2006-08-25

    With the rapid development of IC and packaging, electronic devices are required to be smaller, to have a high-density integration, to become multifunction and to be of lower cost and high-reliability. Thick-film technology is not able to meet the current developing demands because of its shortcomings, such as the limit of pattern resolution, the severe torsion and delay of high-speed signal transmission. The speed and quality of signal transmission will be improved if embedded resistor components are directly integrated in the multiplayer substrate of multi-chip or laminated module, and high-density integration and reliability are achieved because the short interconnection and the less soldering point. In this paper, a technique named laser micro-cladding and rapid prototype is used to directly fabricate embedded resistor units on the multiplayer ceramic substrate without using a mask and high-temperature sintering, and without trimming resistor, which will simplify processing and decrease cost as well as improving high-speed and reliable performance.

  13. Microstructures, Forming Limit and Failure Analyses of Inconel 718 Sheets for Fabrication of Aerospace Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajun Prasad, K.; Panda, Sushanta Kumar; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Sen, Mainak; Murty, S. V. S. Naryana; Sharma, Sharad Chandra

    2017-04-01

    Recently, aerospace industries have shown increasing interest in forming limits of Inconel 718 sheet metals, which can be utilised in designing tools and selection of process parameters for successful fabrication of components. In the present work, stress-strain response with failure strains was evaluated by uniaxial tensile tests in different orientations, and two-stage work-hardening behavior was observed. In spite of highly preferred texture, tensile properties showed minor variations in different orientations due to the random distribution of nanoprecipitates. The forming limit strains were evaluated by deforming specimens in seven different strain paths using limiting dome height (LDH) test facility. Mostly, the specimens failed without prior indication of localized necking. Thus, fracture forming limit diagram (FFLD) was evaluated, and bending correction was imposed due to the use of sub-size hemispherical punch. The failure strains of FFLD were converted into major-minor stress space ( σ-FFLD) and effective plastic strain-stress triaxiality space ( ηEPS-FFLD) as failure criteria to avoid the strain path dependence. Moreover, FE model was developed, and the LDH, strain distribution and failure location were predicted successfully using above-mentioned failure criteria with two stages of work hardening. Fractographs were correlated with the fracture behavior and formability of sheet metal.

  14. Experimental and numerical optical characterization of plasmonic copper nanoparticles embedded in ZnO fabricated by ion implantation and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Khai Q. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Hoa Sen University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Jazan University, P.O. Box 114, 45142 Jazan (Saudi Arabia); Nguyen, Hieu P.T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ 07102 (United States); Ngo, Quang Minh [Institute of Material Sciences, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Canimoglu, Adil [Nigde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, Nigde (Turkey); Can, Nurdogan, E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Jazan University, P.O. Box 114, 45142 Jazan (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-05

    Here we describe the successfully fabrication of metal nanoparticle crystals by implanting copper (Cu) ions into single zinc oxide (ZnO) crystals with ion energy of 400 keV at ion doses of 1 × 10{sup 16} to 1 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. After implantation and post-annealing treatment, the Cu implanted ZnO produces a broad range of luminescence emissions, ranging from green to yellow. A green luminescence peak at 550 nm could be ascribed to the isolated Cu ions. The changes in luminescence emission bands between the initial implant and annealed suggest that the implants give rise to clustering Cu nanoparticles in the host matrix but that the annealing process dissociates these. Numerical modelling of the Cu nanoparticles was employed to simulate their optical properties including the extinction cross section, electron energy loss spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence. We demonstrate that the clustering of nanoparticles generates Fano resonances corresponding to the generation of multiple resonances, while the isolation of nanoparticles results in intensity amplification. - Highlights: • We present the fabrication of metal nanoparticle crystals by implanting Cu into ZnO. • The luminescence properties were studied at different annealing temperature. • Numerical modelling of the Cu nanoparticles was employed. • We demonstrate that the clustering of nanoparticles generates Fano resonances.

  15. Nanoscale photonics using coupled hybrid plasmonic architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles; Su, Yiwen; Helmy, Amr S.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic waveguides, which support surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, offer strong field confinement and are ideal for the design of integrated nano-scale photonic devices. However, due to free-carrier absorption in the metal, the enhanced mode confinement inevitably entails an increase in the waveguide loss. This lowers the device figure-of-merit achievable with passive plasmonic components and in turn hinders the performance of active plasmonic components such as optical modulators.

  16. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasmonics FOCUS ON PLASMONICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey; García-Vidal, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging field in optics dealing with the so-called surface plasmons whose extraordinary properties are being both analyzed from a fundamental point of view and exploited for numerous technological applications. Surface plasmons associated with surface electron density oscillations decorating metal-dielectric interfaces were discovered by Rufus Ritchie in the 1950s. Since the seventies, the subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields as well as their enhancement inherent to the surface plasmon excitation has been widely used for spectroscopic purposes. Recent advances in nano-fabrication, characterization and modelling techniques have allowed unique properties of these surface electromagnetic modes to be explored with respect to subwavelength field localization and waveguiding, opening the path to truly nanoscale plasmonic optical devices. This area of investigation also has interesting links with research on photonic band gap materials and the field of optical metamaterials. Nowadays, plasmonics can be seen as a mature interdisciplinary area of research in which scientists coming from different backgrounds (chemistry, physics, optics and engineering) strive to discover and exploit new and exciting phenomena associated with surface plasmons. The already made and forthcoming discoveries will have impacts in many fields of science and technology, including not only photonics and materials science but also computation, biology and medicine, among others. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is intended to cover all the aforementioned capabilities of surface plasmons by presenting a current overview of state-of-the-art advances achieved by the leading groups in this field of research. The below list of articles represents the first contributions to the collection and further additions will appear soon. Focus on Plasmonics Contents Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes Reuben M Bakker, Vladimir P Drachev

  18. Highly efficient plasmonic tip design for plasmon nanofocusing in near-field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umakoshi, Takayuki; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) combined with plasmon nanofocusing is a powerful nano-analytical tool due to its attractive feature of efficient background suppression as well as light energy compression to the nanoscale. In plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM, the metallic tip plays an important role in inducing plasmon nanofocusing. It is, however, very challenging to control plasmonic properties of tips for plasmon nanofocusing with existing tip fabrication methods, even though the plasmonic properties need to be adjusted to experimental environments such as the sample or excitation wavelength. In this study, we propose an efficient tip design and fabrication which enable one to actively control plasmonic properties for efficient plasmon nanofocusing. Because our method offers flexibility in the material and structure of tips, one can easily modify the plasmonic properties depending on the requirements. Importantly, through optimization of the plasmonic properties, we achieve almost 100% reproducibility in plasmon nanofocusing in our experiments. This new approach of tip fabrication makes plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM practical and reliable, and opens doors for many scientists working in related fields.

  19. Plasmonic Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Ryan T.

    2014-01-01

    The unique optical properties of plasmon resonant nanostructures enable exploration of nanoscale environments using relatively simple optical characterization techniques. For this reason, the field of plasmonics continues to garner the attention of the biosensing community. Biosensors based on propagating surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) in films are the most well-recognized plasmonic biosensors, but there is great potential for the new, developing technologies to surpass the robustness and ...

  20. Coupling of Surface Plasmons and Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Nanophotonics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanti, Sriharsha V.

    The goal of this thesis is to engineer the interaction between surface plasmons and semiconductor nanocrystals for nanophotonic applications. Plasmonic metals support surface plasmon polaritons, hybrid photon and electron waves that propagate along a metal-dielectric interface. Unlike photons, surface plasmons can be confined in sub-diffraction geometries. This has two important consequences: 1) optical devices can be designed at the nanoscale, and 2) the high density of electromagnetic fields allows study of enhanced light-matter interactions. Surface plasmons have been exploited to demonstrate components of optoelectronic circuits, optical antennas, surface enhanced spectroscopy, enhanced fluorescence from fluorophores, and nanolasers. Despite the advances, surface plasmon losses limit their propagation lengths to tens of micrometers in the visible wavelengths, hindering many applications. Recently, the template-stripping approach was shown to fabricate metal films that exhibit larger grains and smoother surface, reducing the grain boundary and roughness scattering. To further improve the plasmonic properties, we investigate the importance of deposition conditions in the template-stripping approach. We provide insight and recipes to enhance the plasmonic performance of the most commonly used metals in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared. We also explore the potential of low temperatures to improve the performance of metal films, where the electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering should be reduced. This sets a limit on the minimum loss metals can exhibit. Using this knowledge, we study the optical properties of quantum-confined semiconductor nanocrystals near metal structures. Semiconductor nanocrystals have many attractive characteristics that make them suitable for solid-state lighting and solar cells among others. Specifically, CdSe nanocrystals have been heavily studied for their large absorption and emission cross-sections, size dependent

  1. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, V V

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for a construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  2. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, V. V.; Guzatov, D. V.

    2007-11-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for the construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  3. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 2: summary report: Shear web component fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, J. H.; Smith, D. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication of two shear web test elements and three large scale shear web test components are reported. In addition, the fabrication of test fixtures for the elements and components is described. The center-loaded beam test fixtures were configured to have a test side and a dummy or permanent side. The test fixtures were fabricated from standard extruded aluminum sections and plates and were designed to be reuseable.

  4. Fabrication Methods and Performance of Low-Permeability Microfluidic Components for a Miniaturized Wearable Drug Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescher, Mark J; Swan, Erin E Leary; Fiering, Jason; Holmboe, Maria E; Sewell, William F; Kujawa, Sharon G; McKenna, Michael J; Borenstein, Jeffrey T

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we describe low-permeability components of a microfluidic drug delivery system fabricated with versatile micromilling and lamination techniques. The fabrication process uses laminate sheets which are machined using XY milling tables commonly used in the printed-circuit industry. This adaptable platform for polymer microfluidics readily accommodates integration with silicon-based sensors, printed-circuit, and surface-mount technologies. We have used these methods to build components used in a wearable liquid-drug delivery system for in vivo studies. The design, fabrication, and performance of membrane-based fluidic capacitors and manual screw valves provide detailed examples of the capability and limitations of the fabrication method. We demonstrate fluidic capacitances ranging from 0.015 to 0.15 μL/kPa, screw valves with on/off flow ratios greater than 38 000, and a 45× reduction in the aqueous fluid loss rate to the ambient due to permeation through a silicone diaphragm layer.

  5. Fabrication of plasmonic AgBr/Ag nanoparticles-sensitized TiO2 nanotube arrays and their enhanced photo-conversion and photoelectrocatalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyao; Qiao, Jianlei; Jin, Rencheng; Xu, Xiaohui; Gao, Shanmin

    2015-03-01

    Plasmonic photosensitizer AgBr/Ag nanospheres supported on TiO2 nanotube arrays (TiO2 NTs) are prepared by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique followed by photoreduction methods. The structural and surface morphological properties of AgBr/Ag nanoparticles sensitized TiO2 NTs and their photoelectrochemical performance are investigated and discussed. A detailed formation mechanism of the TiO2 NTs/AgBr/Ag is proposed. The TiO2 NTs/AgBr/Ag exhibit excellent photocurrent and photoelectrocatalytic activities under visible light irradiation. Efficient utilization of solar energy to create electron-hole pairs is attributed to the significant visible light response and surface plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles. This finding indicates that the high photosensitivity of the TiO2 NTs-based surface plasmon resonance materials could be applied toward the development of new plasmonic visible-light-sensitive photovoltaic fuel cells and photocatalysts.

  6. Nonlinear organic plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Fainberg, B D

    2015-01-01

    Purely organic materials with negative and near-zero dielectric permittivity can be easily fabricated. Here we develop a theory of nonlinear non-steady-state organic plasmonics with strong laser pulses. The bistability response of the electron-vibrational model of organic materials in the condensed phase has been demonstrated. Non-steady-state organic plasmonics enable us to obtain near-zero dielectric permittivity during a short time. We have proposed to use non-steady-state organic plasmonics for the enhancement of intersite dipolar energy-transfer interaction in the quantum dot wire that influences on electron transport through nanojunctions. Such interactions can compensate Coulomb repulsions for particular conditions. We propose the exciton control of Coulomb blocking in the quantum dot wire based on the non-steady-state near-zero dielectric permittivity of the organic host medium.

  7. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed.

  8. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``On-site Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  9. FABRICATION AND REPAIR OF ION SOURCE COMPONENTS IN THE 80 keV NEUTRAL BEAM LINES FOR DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRUNLOH,H.J; BUSATH,J.L; CALLIS,R.W; CHIU,H.K; DiMARTINO,M; HONG,R; KLASEN,R; MOELLER,C.P; ROBINSON,J.I; STRECKERT,H.H; TAO,R; TRESTER,P.W

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 After 8 years of operation, leaks began to develop in critical components of the ion sources of the 80 keV neutral beam lines in DIII-D. Operational adjustments were made that seemed to remedy the problems, but five years later leaks began occurring again, this time with greater frequency. Failures occurred in the stainless steel bellows and molybdenum rails of the grid rail modules as well as in the Langmuir probes. Failure analyses identified several root causes of the leaks and operational adjustments were again made to mitigate the problems, but the rash of failures depleted the program's supply of spare grid rail modules and probes and removed one of the ion sources from regular operation. Fifteen years after their original fabrication, the ion source components were no longer commercially available. In 2001, a program was initiated to fabricate new grid rail modules, including new molybdenum grid rails, bellows, and stainless steel grid rail holders, as well as new Langmuir probes. In parallel, components removed from service due to leaks were to be repaired with new rails and bellows and returned to service. An overview of the root causes of the service failures is offered, details of the repair processes are described, and a summary and evaluation of the fabrication procedures for the new molybdenum rails, grid modules, and Langmuir probes are given.

  10. Novel materials, fabrication techniques and algorithms for microwave and THz components, systems and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Min

    This dissertation presents the investigation of several additive manufactured components in RF and THz frequency, as well as the applications of gradient index lens based direction of arrival (DOA) estimation system and broadband electronically beam scanning system. Also, a polymer matrix composite method to achieve artificially controlled effective dielectric properties for 3D printing material is studied. Moreover, the characterization of carbon based nano-materials at microwave and THz frequency, photoconductive antenna array based Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) near field imaging system, and a compressive sensing based microwave imaging system is discussed in this dissertation. First, the design, fabrication and characterization of several 3D printed components in microwave and THz frequency are presented. These components include 3D printed broadband Luneburg lens, 3D printed patch antenna, 3D printed multilayer microstrip line structure with vertical transition, THz all-dielectric EMXT waveguide to planar microstrip transition structure and 3D printed dielectric reflectarrays. Second, the additive manufactured 3D Luneburg Lens is employed for DOA estimation application. Using the special property of a Luneburg lens that every point on the surface of the Lens is the focal point of a plane wave incident from the opposite side, 36 detectors are mounted around the surface of the lens to estimate the direction of arrival (DOA) of a microwave signal. The direction finding results using a correlation algorithm show that the averaged error is smaller than 1º for all 360 degree incident angles. Third, a novel broadband electronic scanning system based on Luneburg lens phased array structure is reported. The radiation elements of the phased array are mounted around the surface of a Luneburg lens. By controlling the phase and amplitude of only a few adjacent elements, electronic beam scanning with various radiation patterns can be easily achieved

  11. Low-loss CMOS copper plasmonic waveguides at the nanoscale (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Y.; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I.; Kirtaev, Roman V.; Volkov, Valentyn S.

    2016-05-01

    Implementation of optical components in microprocessors can increase their performance by orders of magnitude. However, the size of optical elements is fundamentally limited by diffraction, while miniaturization is one of the essential concepts in the development of high-speed and energy-efficient electronic chips. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are widely considered to be promising candidates for the next generation of chip-scale technology thanks to the ability to break down the fundamental diffraction limit and manipulate optical signals at the truly nometer scale. In the past years, a variety of deep-subwavelength plasmonic structures have been proposed and investigated, including dielectric-loaded SPP waveguides, V-groove waveguides, hybrid plasmonic waveguides and metal nanowires. At the same time, for practical application, such waveguide structures must be integrated on a silicon chip and be fabricated using CMOS fabrication process. However, to date, acceptable characteristics have been demonstrated only with noble metals (gold and silver), which are not compatible with industry-standard manufacturing technologies. On the other hand, alternative materials introduce enormous propagation losses due absorption in the metal. This prevents plasmonic components from implementation in on-chip nanophotonic circuits. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time that copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a CMOS compatible process can outperform gold waveguides showing the same level of mode confinement and lower propagation losses. At telecommunication wavelengths, the fabricated ultralow-loss deep-subwavelength hybrid plasmonic waveguides ensure a relatively long propagation length of more than 50 um along with strong mode confinement with the mode size down to lambda^2/70, which is confirmed by direct scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) measurements. These results create the backbone for design and development of high

  12. Free-standing chiral plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Eunice Sok Ping; Deng, Jie; Wu, Siji; Khoo, Eng Huat; Liu, Yan Jun

    2014-11-01

    Chiral plasmonic nanostructures offer the ability to achieve strong optical circular dichroism (CD) activity over a broad spectral range, which has been challenging for chiral molecules. Chiral plasmonic nanostructures have been extensively studied based on top-down and bottom-up fabrication techniques. Particularly, in the top-down electron-beam lithography, 3D plasmonic nanostructure fabrication involves layer-by-layer patterning and complex alignment, which is time-consuming and causes many defects in the structures. Here, we present a free-standing 3D chiral plamonic nanostructures using the electron-beam lithography technique with much simplified fabrication processes. The 3D chiral plasmonic nanostructures consist of a free-standing ultrathin silicon nitride membrane with well-aligned L-shape metal nanostructures on one side and disk-shape ones on the other side. The free-standing membrane provides an ultra-smooth metal/dielectric interface and uniformly defines the gap between the upper and lower layers in an array of chiral nanostructures. Such free-standing chiral plasmonic nanostructures exhibit strong CD at optical frequencies, which can be engineered by simply changing the disk size on one side of the membrane. Experimental results are in good agreement with the finite-difference time-domain simulations. Such free-standing chiral plasmonics holds great potential for chirality analysis of biomolecules, drugs, and chemicals.

  13. Modern plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Maradudin, Alexei A; Barnes, William L

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics is entering the curriculum of many universities, either as a stand alone subject, or as part of some course or courses. Nanotechnology institutes have been, and are being, established in universities, in which plasmonics is a significant topic of research. Modern Plasmonics book offers a comprehensive presentation of the properties of surface plasmon polaritons, in systems of different structures and various natures, e.g. active, nonlinear, graded, theoretical/computational and experimental techniques for studying them, and their use in a variety of applications. Contains materia

  14. A fiber-integrated optical component fabricated via photopolymerization: Mode-selective grating coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümer, Can; Dinleyici, M. Salih

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate a mode-selective directional coupler based on a grating structure, which is fabricated by laser direct-writing on a photopolymer thin film. The device is implemented on the flat planar surface of the D-Fiber, enabling fiber integration, where an Acrylamide/Polyvinyl Alcohol based photopolymer material is used in the fabrication of the device. While the refractive index modulation properties of the polymer material are well known, surface relief and corrugation properties due to photopolymerization are investigated in this study. Theoretical model of the device is presented together with the optimization and simulation results of the final device; experimental results have been found to be in good agreement with simulations.

  15. Construction and testing of advanced ceramic fabric radiator components to 1000 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Bates, J.M.; Webb, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    For a number of years, the authors have been studying the application of advanced ceramic fabric materials to spacecraft heat rejection systems. Their studies indicated that significant mass and launch volume savings could be realized through such application, but concrete evidence to support this contention was lacking. Last year they presented preliminary test data that supported their claims (Antoniak and Webb 1989). Recent pressure, heat transfer, and wicking tests and analyses confirm the earlier results.

  16. Advanced Manufacturing of an Aircraft Component (Fish-Head: A Technology Review on the Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Minhat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Airbus fish-head is machined using a 5-axis Computerized Numerical Control (CNC milling machine, which consists of many complex shapes that are built into it. A conventional CNC machining requires tremendous effort in programming and investment due to the increasing in features complexity of the fish-head to be machined. An alternative method through advanced manufacturing processes namely vacuum casting, Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM and three dimensional printing (3DP is reviewed. The fish-head prototypes are manufactured through the concept of reverse engineering and rapid prototyping. The fish-head master pattern is digitized using a three dimensional laser scanner and edited using a surface modelling software to generate the Standard Triangulation Language (STL, which is common to most rapid prototyping (RP machines. The fish-head prototypes are fabricated through FDM and 3DP using the STL data files, whereas the master pattern is used to fabricated silicone mould for vacuum casting. The quality of the prototypes is accessed in terms of dimensional accuracy and time to produce a single prototype. The dimensional accuracy is analysed using coordinate measuring machine (CMM. The dimensional accuracy error is found to be less than 5%. However, all prototypes require secondary surface treatment processing in order to achieve the desired surface roughness quality. All three prototypes can be manufactured less than 24 hours per prototype. The advanced manufacturing processes allows parts to be fabricated similar to parts manufactured through CNC but at a lower cost and faster.

  17. Plasmonic band gap cavities on biharmonic gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Seckin Senlik, S.; Aydinli, Atilla

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we have experimentally demonstrated the formation of plasmonic band gap cavities in infrared and visible wavelength range. The cavity structure is based on a biharmonic metallic grating with selective high dielectric loading. A uniform metallic grating structure enables strong surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation and a superimposed second harmonic component forms a band gap for the propagating SPPs. We show that a high dielectric superstructure can dramatically perturb the optical properties of SPPs and enables the control of the plasmonic band gap structure. Selective patterning of the high index superstructure results in an index contrast in and outside the patterned region that forms a cavity. This allows us to excite the SPPs that localize inside the cavity at specific wavelengths, satisfying the cavity resonance condition. Experimentally, we observe the formation of a localized state in the band gap and measure the dispersion diagram. Quality factors as high as 37 have been observed in the infrared wavelength. The simplicity of the fabrication and the method of testing make this approach attractive for applications requiring localization of propagating SPPs.

  18. Plasmonic films based on colloidal lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bin; Yu, Ye; Möhwald, Helmuth; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Bai

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the field of plasmonic films fabricated by colloidal lithography. Compared with conventional lithography techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam lithography, the unconventional colloidal lithography technique with advantages of low-cost and high-throughput has made the fabrication process more efficient, and moreover brought out novel films that show remarkable surface plasmon features. These plasmonic films include those with nanohole arrays, nanovoid arrays and nanoshell arrays with precisely controlled shapes, sizes, and spacing. Based on these novel nanostructures, optical and sensing performances can be greatly enhanced. The introduction of colloidal lithography provides not only efficient fabrication processes but also plasmonic films with unique nanostructures, which are difficult to be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques.

  19. Plasmonic Colors: Toward Mass Production of Metasurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mäkela, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic metasurface coloration has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to its industrial potential. So far, demonstrations have been limited to small patterned areas fabricated using expensive techniques with limited scalability. This study elevates the technology beyond...

  20. Improvement of the Fabrication Accuracy of Fiber Tip Microoptical Components via Mode Field Expansion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Albertas Zukauskas; Vasileia Melissinaki; Dalia Kaskelyte; Maria Farsari; Mangirdas Malinauskas

    2014-01-01

      A novel method to overcome the problem of accurately centering microoptical components built by direct laser writing on the tip of a single mode optical fiber is presented, and it includes employing...

  1. Near Net Shape Fabrication Technology for Shape Memory Alloy Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I effort proposes to develop an innovative, affordable processing route for larger-sized shape memory alloy (SMA) components. Despite significant...

  2. Focused ion beam techniques for fabricating geometrically-complex components and devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Adams, David Price; Hodges, V. Carter; Vasile, Michael J.

    2004-03-01

    We have researched several new focused ion beam (FIB) micro-fabrication techniques that offer control of feature shape and the ability to accurately define features onto nonplanar substrates. These FIB-based processes are considered useful for prototyping, reverse engineering, and small-lot manufacturing. Ion beam-based techniques have been developed for defining features in miniature, nonplanar substrates. We demonstrate helices in cylindrical substrates having diameters from 100 {micro}m to 3 mm. Ion beam lathe processes sputter-define 10-{micro}m wide features in cylindrical substrates and tubes. For larger substrates, we combine focused ion beam milling with ultra-precision lathe turning techniques to accurately define 25-100 {micro}m features over many meters of path length. In several cases, we combine the feature defining capability of focused ion beam bombardment with additive techniques such as evaporation, sputter deposition and electroplating in order to build geometrically-complex, functionally-simple devices. Damascene methods that fabricate bound, metal microcoils have been developed for cylindrical substrates. Effects of focused ion milling on surface morphology are also highlighted in a study of ion-milled diamond.

  3. Integration of Multiple Components in Polystyrene-based Microfluidic Devices Part 1: Fabrication and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alicia S.; Anderson, Kari B.; Halpin, Stephen T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas C.; Spence, Dana M.; Martin, R. Scott

    2012-01-01

    In Part I of a two-part series, we describe a simple, and inexpensive approach to fabricate polystyrene devices that is based upon melting polystyrene (from either a Petri dish or powder form) against PDMS molds or around electrode materials. The ability to incorporate microchannels in polystyrene and integrate the resulting device with standard laboratory equipment such as an optical plate reader for analyte readout and micropipettors for fluid propulsion is first described. A simple approach for sample and reagent delivery to the device channels using a standard, multi-channel micropipette and a PDMS-based injection block is detailed. Integration of the microfluidic device with these off-chip functions (sample delivery and readout) enables high throughput screens and analyses. An approach to fabricate polystyrene-based devices with embedded electrodes is also demonstrated, thereby enabling the integration of microchip electrophoresis with electrochemical detection through the use of a palladium electrode (for a decoupler) and carbon-fiber bundle (for detection). The device was sealed against a PDMS-based microchannel and used for the electrophoretic separation and amperometric detection of dopamine, epinephrine, catechol, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. Finally, these devices were compared against PDMS-based microchips in terms of their optical transparency and absorption of an anti-platelet drug, clopidogrel. Part I of this series lays the foundation for Part II, where these devices were utilized for various on-chip cellular analysis. PMID:23120747

  4. Fabricating Superior NiAl Bronze Components through Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghong Ding

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cast nickel aluminum bronze (NAB alloy is widely used for large engineering components in marine applications due to its excellent mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Casting porosity, as well as coarse microstructure, however, are accompanied by a decrease in mechanical properties of cast NAB components. Although heat treatment, friction stir processing, and fusion welding were implemented to eliminate porosity, improve mechanical properties, and refine the microstructure of as-cast metal, their applications are limited to either surface modification or component repair. Instead of traditional casting techniques, this study focuses on developing NAB components using recently expanded wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM. Consumable welding wire is melted and deposited layer-by-layer on substrates producing near-net shaped NAB components. Additively-manufactured NAB components without post-processing are fully dense, and exhibit fine microstructure, as well as comparable mechanical properties, to as-cast NAB alloy. The effects of heat input from the welding process and post-weld-heat-treatment (PWHT are shown to give uniform NAB alloys with superior mechanical properties revealing potential marine applications of the WAAM technique in NAB production.

  5. Digital Plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Gjonaj, Bergin; Johnson, Patrick M; Mosk, Allard P; Kuipers, Kobus; Lagendijk, Ad

    2010-01-01

    The field of plasmonics offers a route to control light fields with metallic nanostructures through the excitation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs). These surface waves, bound to a metal dielectric interface, tightly confine electromagnetic energy. Active control over SPPs has potential for applications in sensing, photovoltaics, quantum communication, nano circuitry, metamaterials and super-resolution microscopy. We achieve here a new level of control of plasmonic fields using a digital spatial light modulator. Optimizing the plasmonic phases via feedback we focus SPPs at a freely pre-chosen point on the surface of a nanohole array with high resolution. Digital addressing and scanning of SPPs without mechanical motion will enable novel interdisciplinary applications of advanced plasmonic devices in cell microscopy, optical data storage and sensing.

  6. Plasmonic Nanoguides and Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Modern communication systems dealing with huge amounts of data at ever increasing speed try to utilize the best aspects of electronic and optical circuits. Electronic circuits are tiny but their operation speed is limited, whereas optical circuits are extremely fast but their sizes are limited by diffraction. Waveguide components utilizing surface plasmon (SP) modes were found to combine the huge optical bandwidth and compactness of electronics, and plasmonics thereby began to be considered as the next chip-scale technology. In this book, the authors concentrate on the SP waveguide configurati

  7. A silicon-based electrical source of surface plasmon polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R J; van Loon, R V A; Brunets, I; Schmitz, J; Polman, A

    2010-01-01

    After decades of process scaling driven by Moore's law, the silicon microelectronics world is now defined by length scales that are many times smaller than the dimensions of typical micro-optical components. This size mismatch poses an important challenge for those working to integrate photonics with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics technology. One promising solution is to fabricate optical systems at metal/dielectric interfaces, where electromagnetic modes called surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) offer unique opportunities to confine and control light at length scales below 100 nm (refs 1, 2). Research groups working in the rapidly developing field of plasmonics have now demonstrated many passive components that suggest the potential of SPPs for applications in sensing and optical communication. Recently, active plasmonic devices based on III-V materials and organic materials have been reported. An electrical source of SPPs was recently demonstrated using organic semiconductors by Koller and colleagues. Here we show that a silicon-based electrical source for SPPs can be fabricated using established low-temperature microtechnology processes that are compatible with back-end CMOS technology.

  8. Design and Fabrication of Functional Contact Lenses with Integrated Light Emitting and Photovoltaic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingley, Andrew

    This dissertation presents progress toward the realization of functional contact lenses. Two primary goals of the functional contact lens project are to create displays for augmented reality and to create sensors to measure biomolecules in tears. First, work on contact lens displays is described, detailing the steps and process optimization required to fabricate fully functional contact lenses and culminating in the wireless activation of a single pixel contact lens display in vivo on a rabbit under general anesthesia. Next, solar cells designed to conform to a sphere for use with contact lens biosensors are described. To measure analytes in the tear film using electrochemical methods, contact lenses would require embedded sensors, electronics, antennas or LEDs for communication, and power sources. Ideally, a contact lens biosensor would be autonomous, provide regular readings, and operate during normal daily activity, thus requiring power continuously. Photovoltaic structures could provide continuous power for autonomous contact lens systems that could store sensor readings and communicate data when occasionally queried.

  9. Process chain for fabrication of anisotropic optical functional surfaces on polymer components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Dongya; Zhang, Yang; Regi, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    . In order to implement the traceability ofthe manufacturing process, the geometry and dimension of the micro structure on the tool and the replica were assessed viametrological methods. The functionality of the anisotropic surfaces on the polymer replicas were evaluated by a gonioreflectometerand image......This paper aims to introduce a process chain for fabrication of anisotropic optical functional surfaces on polymer products. Thesurface features under investigation are composed of micro serrated ridges. The scope was to maximize the visible contrast betweenhorizontally orthogonal textured surfaces...... from a certain viewing angle. The process chain comprised three steps: tooling, replicationand quality assurance. Tooling was achieved by precision micro milling. Replication processes such as injection moulding, hotembossing, blow moulding, etc. were employed according to the specific type of product...

  10. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, M. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    On December 30, 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. In September 1995 this contract ended and a second contract was issued for us to continue this ICF target support work. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. During this period, GA and our partners WJ Schafer Associates (WJSA) and Soane Technologies, Inc. (STI) were assigned 14 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct {open_quotes}Onsite Support{close_quotes} at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). We fabricated and delivered over 800 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. We produced nearly 1,200 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We also delivered over 100 flat foil targets for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and SNLA in FY96. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require capsules containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. We are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Substantial progress has been made on ways to both create and characterize viable layers. During FY96, significant progress was made in the design of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA.

  11. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development report. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinman, D. [ed.

    1994-03-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities which took place under this contract during the period of October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. During this period, GA was assigned 18 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included ``Capabilities Activation`` and ``Capabilities Demonstration`` to enable us to begin production of glass and composite polymer capsules. Capsule delivery tasks included ``Small Glass Shell Deliveries`` and ``Composite Polymer Capsules`` for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We also were asked to provide direct ``Onsite Support`` at LLNL and LANL. We continued planning for the transfer of ``Micromachining Equipment from Rocky Flats`` and established ``Target Component Micromachining and Electroplating Facilities`` at GA. We fabricated over 1100 films and filters of 11 types for Sandia National Laboratory and provided full-time onsite engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to make targets for the Naval Research Laboratory. We investigated spherical interferometry, built an automated capsule sorter, and developed an apparatus for calorimetric measurement of fuel fill for LLNL. We assisted LANL in the ``Characterization of Opaque b-Layered Targets.`` We developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process.

  12. Plasmonic metasurfaces for coloration of plastic consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Jeppe S; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Christiansen, Alexander B; Yazdi, Sadegh; Grajower, Meir; Taha, Hesham; Levy, Uriel; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, N Asger

    2014-08-13

    We present reflective plasmonic colors based on the concept of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) for plastic consumer products. In particular, we bridge the widely existing technological gap between clean-room fabricated plasmonic metasurfaces and the practical call for large-area structurally colored plastic surfaces robust to daily life handling. We utilize the hybridization between LSPR modes in aluminum nanodisks and nanoholes to design and fabricate bright angle-insensitive colors that may be tuned across the entire visible spectrum.

  13. Plasmonic Metasurfaces for Coloration of Plastic Consumer Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Christiansen, Alexander Bruun;

    2014-01-01

    We present reflective plasmonic colors based on the concept of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) for plastic consumer products. In particular, we bridge the widely existing technological gap between clean-room fabricated plasmonic metasurfaces and the practical call for large......-area structurally colored plastic surfaces robust to daily life handling. We utilize the hybridization between LSPR modes in aluminum nanodisks and nanoholes to design and fabricate bright angle-insensitive colors that may be tuned across the entire visible spectrum....

  14. Plasmonic nanograting enhanced quantum dots excitation for cellular imaging on-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Gauri; Lee, Youngkyu; Chen, Peng; Zhang, John X. J.

    2015-09-01

    We present the design and integration of a two-dimensional (2D) plasmonic nanogratings structure on the electrode of colloidal quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes (QDLEDs) as a compact light source towards arrayed on-chip imaging of tumor cells. Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) were used as the emission layer due to their unique capabilities, including multicolor emission, narrow bandwidth, tunable emission wavelengths, and compatibility with silicon fabrication. The nanograting, based on a metal-dielectric-metal plasmonic waveguide, aims to enhance the light intensity through the resonant reflection of surface plasmon (SP) waves. The key parameters of plasmonic nanogratings, including periodicity, slit width, and thicknesses of the metal and dielectric layers, were designed to tailor the frequency bandgap such that it matches the wavelength of operation. We fabricated QDLEDs with the integrated nanogratings and demonstrated an increase in electroluminescence intensity, measured along the direction perpendicular to the metal electrode. We found an increase of 34.72% in QDLED electroluminescence intensity from the area of the pattern and an increase of 32.63% from the photoluminescence of QDs deposited on a metal surface. We performed ex vivo transmission-mode microscopy to evaluate the nucleus-cytoplasm ratios of MDA-MB 231 cultured breast cancer cells using QDLEDs as the light source. We showed wavelength dependent imaging of different cell components and imaging of cells at higher magnification using enhanced emission from QDLEDs with integrated plasmonic nanogratings.

  15. Molecular coupling of light with plasmonic waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzyk, Anton; Toppari, J Jussi; Hakala, Tommi K; Tikkanen, Hanna; Kunttu, Henrik; Torma, Paivi

    2007-01-01

    We use molecules to couple light into and out of microscale plasmonic waveguides. Energy transfer, mediated by surface plasmons, from donor molecules to acceptor molecules over ten micrometer distances is demonstrated. Also surface plasmon coupled emission from the donor molecules is observed at similar distances away from the excitation spot. The lithographic fabrication method we use for positioning the dye molecules allows scaling to nanometer dimensions. The use of molecules as couplers between far-field and near-field light offers the advantages that no special excitation geometry is needed, any light source can be used to excite plasmons and the excitation can be localized below the diffraction limit. Moreover, the use of molecules has the potential for integration with molecular electronics and for the use of molecular self-assembly in fabrication. Our results constitute a proof-of-principle demonstration of a plasmonic waveguide where signal in- and outcoupling is done by molecules.

  16. Plasmonic Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kan

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonics and metamaterials have attracted considerable attention over the past decade, owing to the revolutionary impacts that they bring to both the fundamental physics and practical applications in multiple disciplines. Although the two fields initially advanced along their individual trajectories in parallel, they started to interfere with each other when metamaterials reached the optical regime. The dynamic interplay between plasmonics and metamaterials has generated a number of innovative concepts and approaches, which are impossible with either area alone. This review presents the fundamentals, recent advances and future perspectives in the emerging field of plasmonic metamaterials, aiming to open up new exciting opportunities for nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  17. The status of ceramic turbine component fabrication and quality assurance relevant to automotive turbine needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richerson, D.W.

    2000-02-01

    This report documents a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) with guidance from the Ceramics Division of the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP). DOE and the automotive companies have funded extensive development of ceramic materials for automotive gas turbine components, the most recent effort being under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program.

  18. Active Molecular Plasmonics: Controlling Plasmon Resonances with Molecular Switches

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yue Bing

    2009-02-11

    A gold nanodisk array, coated with bistable, redox-controllable [2]rotaxane molecules, when exposed to chemical oxidants and reductants, undergoes switching of its plasmonic properties reversibly. By contrast, (i) bare gold nanodisks and (ii) disks coated with a redox-active, but mechanically inert, control compound do not display surface-plasmon-based switching. Along with calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory, these experimental observations suggest that the nanoscale movements within surface-bound “molecular machines” can be used as the active components in plasmonic devices.

  19. Design, Analysis and Fabrication of Secondary Structural Components for the Habitat Demonstration Unit-Deep Space Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Russell W.; Langford, William M.

    2012-01-01

    In support of NASA s Habitat Demonstration Unit - Deep Space Habitat Prototype, a number of evolved structural sections were designed, fabricated, analyzed and installed in the 5 meter diameter prototype. The hardware consisted of three principal structural sections, and included the development of novel fastener insert concepts. The articles developed consisted of: 1) 1/8th of the primary flooring section, 2) an inner radius floor beam support which interfaced with, and supported (1), 3) two upper hatch section prototypes, and 4) novel insert designs for mechanical fastener attachments. Advanced manufacturing approaches were utilized in the fabrication of the components. The structural components were developed using current commercial aircraft constructions as a baseline (for both the flooring components and their associated mechanical fastener inserts). The structural sections utilized honeycomb sandwich panels. The core section consisted of 1/8th inch cell size Nomex, at 9 lbs/cu ft, and which was 0.66 inches thick. The facesheets had 3 plys each, with a thickness of 0.010 inches per ply, made from woven E-glass with epoxy reinforcement. Analysis activities consisted of both analytical models, as well as initial closed form calculations. Testing was conducted to help verify analysis model inputs, as well as to facilitate correlation between testing and analysis. Test activities consisted of both 4 point bending tests as well as compressive core crush sequences. This paper presents an overview of this activity, and discusses issues encountered during the various phases of the applied research effort, and its relevance to future space based habitats.

  20. Fabrication and optical properties of nanostructured plasmonic Al2O3/Au-Al2O3/Al2O3 metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkali, H.; Blanco, E.; Domínguez, M.; Garitaonandia, J. S.

    2017-08-01

    Discontinuous multilayer (DML) thin films, which consist of nano-granular metals (NGMs) embedded in a dielectric matrix, have attracted significant interest as engineered plasmonic metamaterials. In this study, a systematic layer-by-layer deposition of three-dimensional sub-wavelength periodic plasmonic DML structures via the radio frequency sputtering of a composite target has been reported. The overall optical response of the DML films composed of Au-Al2O3 NGM homogenous layers, which are periodically sandwiched between two amorphous Al2O3 layers, are studied using reflection spectroscopic ellipsometry and transmission spectroscopy techniques. By applying the analytical optical approaches based on multiple Gaussian oscillators, ambient DML sub-wavelength structures have been successfully modeled. As a result, the effects of the size and shape of the Au nanoparticles as well as of the surrounding and interfacial media on their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) are elucidated, and the related films thickness and effective optical constants are determined. Interestingly, during the examination of resonance frequencies and dielectric functions, the obtained DML structures exhibit unusual characteristics that are different from those of their NGM constituents due to the electromagnetic interactions of the NGM layers with the LSPR, which represent metamaterial features.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of powder metallurgy tantalum components prepared by high compaction pressure technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngmoo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Agency for Defense Development, Yuseong, P.O. Box 35, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34186, Republic of Korea. (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jaewon [Samsung Electronics, 129 Samsung-ro, Youngtong-gu, Suwon 16677 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ho Jin, E-mail: hojinryu@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Soon Hyung, E-mail: shhong@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The present study has investigated the consolidation behaviors of tantalum powders during compaction and sintering, and the characteristics of sintered components. For die compaction, the densification behaviors of the powders are simulated by finite element analyses based on the yield function proposed by Shima and Oyane. Accordingly, the green density distribution for coarser particles is predicted to be more uniform because they exhibits higher initial relative tap density owing to lower interparticle friction. It is also found that cold isostatic pressing is capable of producing higher dense compacts compared to the die pressing. However, unlike the compaction behavior, the sintered density of smaller particles is found to be higher than those of coarser ones owing to their higher specific surface area. The maximum sintered density was found to be 0.96 of theoretical density where smaller particles were pressed isostatically at 400 MPa followed by sintering at 2000 °C. Moreover, the effects of processing conditions on grain size and texture were also investigated. The average grain size of the sintered specimen is 30.29 μm and its texture is less than 2 times random intensity. Consequently, it is concluded that the higher pressure compaction technique is beneficial to produce high dense and texture-free tantalum components compared to hot pressing and spark plasma sintering. - Highlights: • Higher Ta density is obtained from higher pressure and sintering temperature. • High compaction method enables P/M Ta to achieve the density of 16.00 g·cm{sup −3}. • A P/M Ta component with fine microstructure and random orientation is developed.

  2. Fabrication and Characterizations of Materials and Components for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells and Water Electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Prag, Carsten Brorson; Li, Qingfeng

    The worldwide development of fuel cells and electrolysers has so far almost exclusively addressed either the low temperature window (20-200 °C) or the high temperature window (600-1000 °C). This work concerns the development of key materials and components of a new generation of fuel cells...... might be used. One of the key materials in the fuel cell and electrolyser systems is the electrolyte. Proton conducting materials such as cesium hydrogen phosphates, zirconium hydrogen phosphates and tin pyrophosphates have been investigated by others and have shown interesting potential....

  3. Plasmonic Au islands on polymer nanopillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoben, Wout; Brongersma, Sywert H; Crego-Calama, Mercedes, E-mail: wout.knoben@imec-nl.nl [Holst Centre/IMEC, High Tech Campus 31, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-07-22

    The refractive index sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance sensors can be improved by placing the plasmonic metal particles on pillars instead of on a planar substrate. In this paper, a simple and versatile colloidal lithography method for the fabrication of plasmonic Au islands on top of polymer nanopillars is described. The pillar height is controlled by varying the thickness of the initial polymer film. An increased pillar height results in a blue shift of the absorption spectrum of the Au islands. This is explained by a decreased effective refractive index around the islands. For pillars higher than approximately 40 nm no further blue shift is observed, in agreement with the decay length of the electromagnetic field around the islands. Pillar-supported Au islands were also fabricated on a flexible foil, demonstrating the potential of the method described here for the fabrication of flexible plasmonic substrates. Benefits and limitations of the method and of using polymers as the pillar material are discussed.

  4. Mesoscopic quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Lykke

    This thesis reports research on quantum dots coupled to dielectric and plasmonic nano-structures by way of nano-structure fabrication, optical measurements, and theoretical modeling. To study light-matter interaction, plasmonic gap waveguides with nanometer dimensions as well as samples for studies...... of quantum dots in proximity to semiconductor/air and semiconductor/metal interfaces, were fabricated. We measured the decay dynamics of quantum dots near plasmonic gap waveguides and observed modied decay rates. The obtainable modications with the fabricated structures are calculated to be too small...... for the spontaneous emission of mesoscopic quantum emitters is developed. The light-matter interaction is in this model modied beyond the dipole expectancy and found to both suppress and enhance the coupling to plasmonic modes in excellent agreement with our measurements. We demonstrate that this mesoscopic effect...

  5. In-Built Customised Mechanical Failure of 316L Components Fabricated Using Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Ilie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The layer-by-layer building methodology used within the powder bed process of Selective Laser Melting facilitates control over the degree of melting achieved at every layer. This control can be used to manipulate levels of porosity within each layer, effecting resultant mechanical properties. If specifically controlled, it has the potential to enable customisation of mechanical properties or design of in-built locations of mechanical fracture through strategic void placement across a component, enabling accurate location specific predictions of mechanical failure for fail-safe applications. This investigation examined the process parameter effects on porosity formation and mechanical properties of 316L samples whilst maintaining a constant laser energy density without manipulation of sample geometry. In order to understand the effects of customisation on mechanical properties, samples were manufactured with in-built porosity of up to 3% spanning across ~1.7% of a samples’ cross-section using a specially developed set of “hybrid” processing parameters. Through strategic placement of porous sections within samples, exact fracture location could be predicted. When mechanically loaded, these customised samples exhibited only ~2% reduction in yield strength compared to samples processed using single set parameters. As expected, microscopic analysis revealed that mechanical performance was closely tied to porosity variations in samples, with little or no variation in microstructure observed through parameter variation. The results indicate that there is potential to use SLM for customising mechanical performance over the cross-section of a component.

  6. Quantum Plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Martin-Cano, Paloma A. Huidobro, Esteban Moreno; Diego Martin-Cano; Huidobro, Paloma A.; Esteban Moreno; Garcia-Vidal, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum plasmonics is a rapidly growing field of research that involves the study of the quantum properties of light and its interaction with matter at the nanoscale. Here, surface plasmons - electromagnetic excitations coupled to electron charge density waves on metal-dielectric interfaces or localized on metallic nanostructures - enable the confinement of light to scales far below that of conventional optics. In this article we review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical inve...

  7. Plasmonic photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuming; Chen, Yu Lim; Liu, Ru-Shi; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-04-01

    Plasmonic photocatalysis has recently facilitated the rapid progress in enhancing photocatalytic efficiency under visible light irradiation, increasing the prospect of using sunlight for environmental and energy applications such as wastewater treatment, water splitting and carbon dioxide reduction. Plasmonic photocatalysis makes use of noble metal nanoparticles dispersed into semiconductor photocatalysts and possesses two prominent features-a Schottky junction and localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR). The former is of benefit to charge separation and transfer whereas the latter contributes to the strong absorption of visible light and the excitation of active charge carriers. This article aims to provide a systematic study of the fundamental physical mechanisms of plasmonic photocatalysis and to rationalize many experimental observations. In particular, we show that LSPR could boost the generation of electrons and holes in semiconductor photocatalysts through two different effects-the LSPR sensitization effect and the LSPR-powered bandgap breaking effect. By classifying the plasmonic photocatalytic systems in terms of their contact form and irradiation state, we show that the enhancement effects on different properties of photocatalysis can be well-explained and systematized. Moreover, we identify popular material systems of plasmonic photocatalysis that have shown excellent performance and elucidate their key features in the context of our proposed mechanisms and classifications.

  8. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997. During this period, GA and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 13 formal tasks in support of the ICF program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct {open_quotes}Onsite Support{close_quotes} at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). Over 700 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels were fabricated and delivered to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. More than 1600 glass and plastic target capsules were produced for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). Nearly 2000 various target foils and films were delivered for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY97. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. This project is part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. During FY97, significant progress was made in the design and component testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. This included major design changes, reduction in equipment, and process simplifications. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  9. Functionalisation of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting with a bioactive compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Kilsby, Samuel [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Goodridge, Ruth D., E-mail: Ruth.Goodridge@nottingham.ac.uk [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Christie, Steven D.R. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Edmondson, Steve [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Hague, Richard J.M. [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Surface modification of an implant with a biomolecule is used to improve its biocompatibility and to reduce post-implant complications. In this study, a novel approach has been used to functionalise phosphonic acid monolayers with a drug. Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting (SLM) were functionalised with Paracetamol (a pharmaceutically relevant biomolecule) using phosphonic acid based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The attachment, stability of the monolayers on the SLM fabricated surface and functionalisation of SAMs with Paracetamol were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface wettability measurements. The obtained results confirmed that SAMs were stable on the Ti6Al4V surface for over four weeks and then began to desorb from the surface. The reaction used to functionalise the phosphonic acid monolayers with Paracetamol was noted to be successful. Thus, the proposed method has the potential to immobilise drugs/proteins to SAM coated surfaces and improve their biocompatibility and reduce post-implant complications. - Graphical abstract: A significant change in the contact angle confirming the immobilisation of Paracetamol. (a) Before self-assembled monolayer (SAM) attachment, (b) after SAM attachment and (c) after the immobilisation of Paracetamol to the SAMs. - Highlights: • Ti6Al4V parts were fabricated using selective laser melting (SLM). • Monolayers used to modify the SLM surface were stable for over 28 days (in-vitro). • Surface roughness did not have a significant impact on the monolayer stability. • Paracetamol was successfully immobilised to the adsorbed monolayers. • Caution required before selecting Paracetamol as a model drug.

  10. Functionalisation of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting with a bioactive compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan; Kilsby, Samuel; Goodridge, Ruth D; Christie, Steven D R; Edmondson, Steve; Hague, Richard J M

    2015-01-01

    Surface modification of an implant with a biomolecule is used to improve its biocompatibility and to reduce post-implant complications. In this study, a novel approach has been used to functionalise phosphonic acid monolayers with a drug. Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting (SLM) were functionalised with Paracetamol (a pharmaceutically relevant biomolecule) using phosphonic acid based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The attachment, stability of the monolayers on the SLM fabricated surface and functionalisation of SAMs with Paracetamol were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface wettability measurements. The obtained results confirmed that SAMs were stable on the Ti6Al4V surface for over four weeks and then began to desorb from the surface. The reaction used to functionalise the phosphonic acid monolayers with Paracetamol was noted to be successful. Thus, the proposed method has the potential to immobilise drugs/proteins to SAM coated surfaces and improve their biocompatibility and reduce post-implant complications.

  11. Plasmonic percolation: Plasmon-manifested dielectric-to-metal transition

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huanjun

    2012-08-28

    Percolation generally refers to the phenomenon of abrupt variations in electrical, magnetic, or optical properties caused by gradual volume fraction changes of one component across a threshold in bicomponent systems. Percolation behaviors have usually been observed in macroscopic systems, with most studies devoted to electrical percolation. We report on our observation of plasmonic percolation in Au nanorod core-Pd shell nanostructures. When the Pd volume fraction in the shell consisting of palladium and water approaches the plasmonic percolation threshold, ∼70%, the plasmon of the nanostructure transits from red to blue shifts with respect to that of the unshelled Au nanorod. This plasmonic percolation behavior is also confirmed by the scattering measurements on the individual core-shell nanostructures. Quasistatic theory and numerical simulations show that the plasmonic percolation originates from a positive-to-negative transition in the real part of the dielectric function of the shell as the Pd volume fraction is increased. The observed plasmonic percolation is found to be independent of the metal type in the shell. Moreover, compared to the unshelled Au nanorods with similar plasmon wavelengths, the Au nanorod core-Pd shell nanostructures exhibit larger refractive index sensitivities, which is ascribed to the expulsion of the electric field intensity from the Au nanorod core by the adsorbed Pd nanoparticles. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Plasmon-enhanced UV photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Yuika, E-mail: yuika@ap.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kawata, Satoshi [Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kumamoto, Yasuaki [Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Taguchi, Atsushi [Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2014-02-10

    We report plasmonic nanoparticle enhanced photocatalysis on titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) in the deep-UV range. Aluminum (Al) nanoparticles fabricated on TiO{sub 2} film increases the reaction rate of photocatalysis by factors as high as 14 under UV irradiation in the range of 260–340 nm. The reaction efficiency has been determined by measuring the decolorization rate of methylene blue applied on the TiO{sub 2} substrate. The enhancement of photocatalysis shows particle size and excitation wavelength dependence, which can be explained by the surface plasmon resonance of Al nanoparticles.

  13. Surface magneto plasmons and their applications in the infrared frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Bin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their promising properties, surface magneto plasmons have attracted great interests in the field of plasmonics recently. Apart from flexible modulation of the plasmonic properties by an external magnetic field, surface magneto plasmons also promise nonreciprocal effect and multi-bands of propagation, which can be applied into the design of integrated plasmonic devices for biosensing and telecommunication applications. In the visible frequencies, because it demands extremely strong magnetic fields for the manipulation of metallic plasmonic materials, nano-devices consisting of metals and magnetic materials based on surface magneto plasmon are difficult to be realized due to the challenges in device fabrication and high losses. In the infrared frequencies, highly-doped semiconductors can replace metals, owning to the lower incident wave frequencies and lower plasma frequencies. The required magnetic field is also low, which makes the tunable devices based on surface magneto plasmons more practically to be realized. Furthermore, a promising 2D material-graphene shows great potential in infrared magnetic plasmonics. In this paper, we review the magneto plasmonics in the infrared frequencies with a focus on device designs and applications. We investigate surface magneto plasmons propagating in different structures, including plane surface structures and slot waveguides. Based on the fundamental investigation and theoretical studies, we illustrate various magneto plasmonic micro/nano devices in the infrared, such as tunable waveguides, filters, and beam-splitters. Novel plasmonic devices such as one-way waveguides and broad-band waveguides are also introduced.

  14. Fabrication of a Ag/Bi3TaO7 Plasmonic Photocatalyst with Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity for Degradation of Tetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bifu; Xu, Dongbo; Li, Di; Wu, Guoling; Wu, Miaomiao; Shi, Weidong; Chen, Min

    2015-08-12

    A novel Ag/Bi3TaO7 plasmonic photocatalyst has been prepared by a simple photoreduction process. The as-prepared Ag/Bi3TaO7 photocatalyst exhibited an enhanced photocatalytic activity for the degradation of tetracycline (TC) compared to that of a bare Bi3TaO7 catalyst. The 1 wt % Ag-loaded Bi3TaO7 sample showed the highest photocatalytic efficiency for TC degradation (85.42%) compared with those of the other samples. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be ascribed to the synergistic effect of the surface plasmon resonance caused by Ag nanoparticles. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy demonstrated that the incorporation of silver nanoparticles onto the Bi3TaO7 surface promoted the separation of photogenerated carriers. In addition, an electron spin resonance (ESR) and trapping experiment revealed that the photoinduced active species hydroxyl radical and superoxide radical were the main active species in the photocatalytic process of TC degradation. The photocatalytic reaction mechanism was discussed by active species trapping and ESR analysis.

  15. Plasmonic Paper as a Novel Chem/Bio Detection Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Limei

    /LSPR sensors is rationalized by numerous advantages such as (i) high specific surface area resulting in large dynamic range (ii) excellent wicking properties for rapid uptake and transport of analytes to test domains (iii) compatibility with conventional printing approaches, enabling multi-analyte plasmonic sensors (iv) significant reduction in cost (v) smaller sample volume requirement (vi) easy disposability. In this work, we have introduced novel SERS and LSPR substrates based on conventional filter paper decorated with plasmonic nanostructures, called plasmonic paper. A flexible SERS substrate based on common filter paper adsorbed with gold nanostructures allows conformal contact with real-world surfaces, enabling rapid trace detection. To realize multifunctional SERS substrates, paper substrates were cut into star-shaped structures and the fingers were differentially functionalized with polyelectrolytes that allows separation and pre-concentration of different components of a complex sample in a small surface area by taking advantage of the properties of cellulose paper and shape-enhanced capillary effect. Plasmonic paper can also serve as a novel LSPR biosensing platform by decorating the paper substrate with biofunctionalized nanostructures. Furthermore, calligraphy approach was employed to create well-isolated test domains on paper substrates using functionalized plasmonic nanostructures as ink for multiplexed chemical sensing and label-free biosensing. These plasmonic paper substrates exhibit excellent sample collection efficiency and do not require complex fabrication processes. This class of substrates is expected to have applications not only to first responders and military personal but also to several areas of medical, food analysis, and environmental research.

  16. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, M. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. During the period, GA was assigned 17 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. This year they achieved full production capabilities for the micromachining, dimensional characterization and gold plating of hohlraums. They fabricated and delivered 726 gold-plated mandrels of 27 different types to LLNL and 48 gold-plated mandrels of two different types to LANL. They achieved full production capabilities in composite capsule production ad delivered in excess of 240 composite capsules. They continuously work to improve performance and capabilities. They were also directed to dismantle, remove, and disposition all equipment at the previous contractor (KMSF) that had radioactive contamination levels low enough that they could be exposed to the general public without radiological constraints. GA was also directed to receive and store the tritium fill equipment. They assisted LANL in the development of techniques for characterization of opaque targets. They developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at NIF and the Omega Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or D-T fuel. They continued engineering and assembly of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments.

  17. Dispersion engineering of surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Isroel M; Bendoym, Igor; Jung, Young U; Golovin, Andrii B; Crouse, David T

    2013-12-30

    In this work, it is shown how the shapes of surface plasmon dispersion curves can be engineered by manipulating the distribution of the electromagnetic fields in multilayer structures, which themselves are controlled by the free electron density in metal-like materials, such as doped semiconductors in the THz spectral range. By having a nonuniform free electron density profile, reduced relative to that in typical bulk metals, the electromagnetic fields of surface plasmons are distributed in different metallic materials that have different complex dielectric permittivities. As the in-plane component of surface plasmon's wave-vector increases, they become more confined to a particular layer of the multilayer structure and have energies that are predictable by considering the permittivity of the layer in which the fields are most concentrated. Unusual and arbitrary shapes of surface plasmon dispersion curves can be designed, including stair steps and dovetails shapes.

  18. Terahertz plasmonic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemat-Nasser, Syrus C; Amirkhizi, Alireza V; Padilla, Willie J; Basov, Dimitri N; Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Bruzewicz, Derek; Whitesides, George

    2007-03-01

    The dielectric response of a polymer matrix composite can be substantially modified and tuned within a broad frequency band by integrating within the material an artificial plasmon medium composed of periodically distributed, very thin, electrically conducting wires. In the microwave regime, such plasmon/polymer composites have been studied analytically, computationally, and experimentally. This work reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of similar composites for operation at terahertz frequencies. Such composites require significant reduction in the thickness and spacing of the wires. We used numerical modeling to design artificial effective plasmonic media with turn-on frequencies in the terahertz range. Prototype samples were produced by lithographically embedding very thin gold strips into a PDMS [poly(dimethylsiloxane)] matrix. These samples were characterized with a Fourier-transform infrared interferometer using the frequency-dependent transmission and Kramers-Kronig relations to determine the electromagnetic properties. We report the characterization results for a sample, demonstrating excellent agreement between theory, computer design, and experiment. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the possibility of creating composites with tuned dielectric response at terahertz frequencies.

  19. Boundary effects in finite size plasmonic crystals: focusing and routing of plasmonic beams for optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, M I; Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Thomsen, B C; Bayvel, P; Zayats, A V

    2015-11-06

    Plasmonic crystals, which consist of periodic arrangements of surface features at a metal-dielectric interface, allow the manipulation of optical information in the form of surface plasmon polaritons. Here we investigate the excitation and propagation of plasmonic beams in and around finite size plasmonic crystals at telecom wavelengths, highlighting the effects of the crystal boundary shape and illumination conditions. Significant differences in broad plasmonic beam generation by crystals of different shapes are demonstrated, while for narrow beams, the propagation from a crystal onto the smooth metal film is less sensitive to the crystal boundary shape. We show that by controlling the boundary shape, the size and the excitation beam parameters, directional control of propagating plasmonic modes and their behaviour such as angular beam splitting, focusing power and beam width can be efficiently achieved. This provides a promising route for robust and alignment-independent integration of plasmonic crystals with optical communication components.

  20. Ultra-compact plasmonic waveguide modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia

    -compatible materials, both passive and active plasmonic waveguide components are important. Among other proposed plasmonic waveguides and modulators, the structures where the dielectric core is sandwiched between metal plates have been shown as one of the most compact and efficient layout. Because of the tight mode...... confinement that can be achieved in metal-insulator-metal structures, they provide a base for extremely fast and efficient ultracompact plasmonic devices, including modulators, photodetectors, lasers and amplifiers. The main result of this thesis is a systematic study of various designs of plasmonic......Metal-dielectric interfaces can support the waves known as surface plasmon polaritons, which are tightly coupled to the interface and allow manipulation of light at the nanoscale. Plasmonics as a subject which studies such waves enables the merge between two major technologies: nanometer...

  1. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings.

  2. Interface controlled growth of nanostructures in discontinuous Ag and Au thin films fabricated by ion beam sputter deposition for plasmonic applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Brahma; M Ghanashyam Krishna

    2012-08-01

    The growth of discontinuous thin films of Ag and Au by low energy ion beam sputter deposition is reported. The study focuses on the role of the film–substrate in determining the shape and size of nanostructures achieved in such films. Ag films were deposited using Ar ion energy of 150 eV while the Au films were deposited with Ar ion energies of 250–450 eV. Three types of interfaces were investigated in this study. The first set of film–substrate interfaces consisted of Ag and Au films grown on borosilicate glass and carbon coated Cu grids used as substrates. The second set of films was metallic bilayers in which one of the metals (Ag or Au) was grown on a continuous film of the other metal (Au or Ag). The third set of interfaces comprised of discontinuous Ag and Au films deposited on different dielectrics such as SiO2, TiO2 and ZrO2. In each case, a rich variety of nanostructures including self organized arrays of nanoparticles, nanoclusters and nanoneedles have been achieved. The role of the film–substrate interface is discussed within the framework of existing theories of thin film nucleation and growth. Interfacial nanostructuring of thin films is demonstrated to be a viable technique to realize a variety of nanostructures. The use of interfacial nanostructuring for plasmonic applications is demonstrated. It is shown that the surface Plasmon resonance of the metal nanostructures can be tuned over a wide range of wavelengths from 400 to 700 nm by controlling the film–substrate interface.

  3. On the plasmonic photovoltaic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeen, Syed; Lee, Joun; Lee, Woo-Ram; Singh, Nirala; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2014-06-24

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity by photovoltaics is currently a mature science and the foundation of a lucrative industry. In conventional excitonic solar cells, electron-hole pairs are generated by light absorption in a semiconductor and separated by the "built in" potential resulting from charge transfer accompanying Fermi-level equalization either at a p-n or a Schottky junction, followed by carrier collection at appropriate electrodes. Here we report a stable, wholly plasmonic photovoltaic device in which photon absorption and carrier generation take place exclusively in the plasmonic metal. The field established at a metal-semiconductor Schottky junction separates charges. The negative carriers are high-energy (hot) electrons produced immediately following the plasmon's dephasing. Some of the carriers are energetic enough to clear the Schottky barrier or quantum mechanically tunnel through it, thereby producing the output photocurrent. Short circuit photocurrent densities in the range 70-120 μA cm(-2) were obtained for simulated one-sun AM1.5 illumination with devices based on arrays of parallel gold nanorods, conformally coated with 10 nm TiO2 films and fashioned with a Ti metal collector. For the device with short circuit currents of 120 μA cm(-2), the internal quantum efficiency is ∼2.75%, and its wavelength response tracks the absorption spectrum of the transverse plasmon of the gold nanorods indicating that the absorbed photon-to-electron conversion process resulted exclusively in the Au, with the TiO2 playing a negligible role in charge carrier production. Devices fabricated with 50 nm TiO2 layers had open-circuit voltages as high as 210 mV, short circuit current densities of 26 μA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.3. For these devices, the TiO2 contributed a very small but measurable fraction of the charge carriers.

  4. Plasmonic sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic sensors typically rely on detection of changes in the refractive index of the surrounding medium. Here, an alternative approach is reported based on electrical surface screening and controlled dissolution of ultrasmall silver nanoparticles (NPs; R < 5 nm) that can result in a great incr...

  5. Plasmonic candle: towards efficient nanofocusing with channel plasmon polaritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, V S; Gosciniak, J; Bozhevolnyi, S I [Institute of Sensors, Signals and Electrotechnics (SENSE), University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Alle 1, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Rodrigo, S G; MartIn-Moreno, L [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon and Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, CSIC - Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Garcia-Vidal, F J [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Devaux, E; Ebbesen, T W [ISIS, CNRS UMR 7006, Universite Louis Pasteur, 8 allee Monge, BP 70028, 67083 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: vsv@sense.sdu.dk

    2009-11-15

    Channel plasmon polaritons (CPPs) propagating along the bottom of V-grooves cut into a metal were recently shown to exhibit strong confinement combined with low propagation loss, a feature that makes this guiding configuration very promising for the realization of ultracompact photonic components. Here, we present a comprehensive study of radiation nanofocusing with CCPs propagating along subwavelength metal grooves that are terminated with various types of tapers of different lengths. Tapered V-grooves are fabricated in a gold film using a focused ion beam milling technique, with the tapering being realized by gradually decreasing the groove width and/or depth (in different way for different structures), and characterized at telecom wavelengths with a collection scanning near-field optical microscope. Efficient CPP nanofocusing is directly demonstrated featuring a field intensity enhancement of up to {approx}130 for optimal taper configurations. Experimental observations are found to be concurrent with three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic simulations, predicting the possibility of reaching an intensity enhancement of {approx}1200 and opening thereby exciting perspectives for practical applications of CPP nanofocusing.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of fabrication of Cu mono-component metallic glass by physical vapor deposition on Zr substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yang; Cui, Fenping

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the single-component Cu metallic glass was fabricated by the physical vapor deposition on the Zr (0001) crystal substrate at 100 K using the classical molecular dynamic simulation. The same deposition process was performed on the Cu (1 0 0) and Ni (1 0 0) crystal substrate for comparison, only the Cu crystal deposited layer with the fcc structure can be obtained. When depositing the Cu atoms on the Zr substrate at 300 K, the crystal structure was formed, which indicates that except the suitable substrate, low temperature is also a key factor for the amorphous structure formation. The Cu liquid quenching from 2000 K to 100 K were also simulated with the cooling rate 1012 K/s to form the Cu glass film in this work. The Cu metallic glass from the two different processes (physical vapor deposition and rapid thermal quenching from liquid) revealed the same radial distribution function and X-ray diffraction pattern, but the different microstructure from the coordination number and Voronoi tessellation...

  7. Development and Characterization of the Bonding and Integration Technologies Needed for Fabricating Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig,Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding technology, titanium interlayers (coatings and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness, and processing time were investigated. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases. In the diffusion bonds, an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner interlayers of pure titanium and/or longer processing times resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Nondestructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  8. Energy Levels of Coupled Plasmonic Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Pu Liu; Xin-Li Zhu; Jia-Sen Zhang; Jun Xu; Yamin Leprince-Wang; Da-Peng Yu

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the hybridization of the plasmonic modes in directly coupled whispering gallery cavities fabricated on silver films and present the mode patterns and energy levels using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy.Although the energy of the most antisymmetrically coupled modes is higher than that of the corresponding symmetrically coupled ones,the contrary cases happen for small quantum number modes.We attribute the phenomenon to the different surface plasmon polariton paths between the symmetrically and antisymmetrically coupled modes.These results provide an understanding of the resonant properties in coupled plasmonic cavities,which have potential applications in nanophotonic devices.

  9. Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Tot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique case of metaplastic breast carcinoma with an epithelial component showing tumoral necrosis and neuroectodermal stromal component is described. The tumor grew rapidly and measured 9 cm at the time of diagnosis. No lymph node metastases were present. The disease progressed rapidly and the patient died two years after the diagnosis from a hemorrhage caused by brain metastases. The morphology and phenotype of the tumor are described in detail and the differential diagnostic options are discussed.

  10. Plasmonic Solar Cells: From Rational Design to Mechanism Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yoon Hee; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Seokhyoung; Quan, Li Na; Chung, Kyungwha; Kim, Dong Ha

    2016-12-28

    Plasmonic effects have been proposed as a solution to overcome the limited light absorption in thin-film photovoltaic devices, and various types of plasmonic solar cells have been developed. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art progress on the design and fabrication of plasmonic solar cells and their enhancement mechanism. The working principle is first addressed in terms of the combined effects of plasmon decay, scattering, near-field enhancement, and plasmonic energy transfer, including direct hot electron transfer and resonant energy transfer. Then, we summarize recent developments for various types of plasmonic solar cells based on silicon, dye-sensitized, organic photovoltaic, and other types of solar cells, including quantum dot and perovskite variants. We also address several issues regarding the limitations of plasmonic nanostructures, including their electrical, chemical, and physical stability, charge recombination, narrowband absorption, and high cost. Next, we propose a few potentially useful approaches that can improve the performance of plasmonic cells, such as the inclusion of graphene plasmonics, plasmon-upconversion coupling, and coupling between fluorescence resonance energy transfer and plasmon resonance energy transfer. This review is concluded with remarks on future prospects for plasmonic solar cell use.

  11. Plasmonic colour generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Yang, Joel K. W.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic colours are structural colours that emerge from resonant interactions between light and metallic nanostructures. The engineering of plasmonic colours is a promising, rapidly emerging research field that could have a large technological impact. We highlight basic properties of plasmonic...

  12. Edge plasmons and cut-off behavior of graphene nano-ribbon waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Haowen; Teng, Jinghua; Palacios, Tomás; Chua, Soojin

    2016-07-01

    Graphene nano-ribbon waveguides with ultra-short plasmon wavelength are a promising candidate for nanoscale photonic applications. Graphene edge plasmons are the fundamental and lowest losses mode. Through finite element method, edge plasmons show large effective refractive index and strong field confinement on nanoscale ribbons. The edge plasmons follow a k1/2 dispersion relation. The wavelengths of the edge plasmons and center plasmons differ by a fixed factor. The width of edge plasmon is inversely proportional to wave vector of edge plasmon kedge. Edge defects associate with graphene nano-ribbon induce extra losses and reduce the propagation length. Cut-off width of edge plasmons reduces with increasing frequency. Cut-off width of center plasmon is enlarged by edge component but the enlargement effect diminishing with the increase of kedge. The results are important for the application of graphene plasmon towards ultra-compact photonic devices.

  13. Design, fabrication and testing of a marketable waterwall component. Final technical report, 1 September 1978-31 August 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, T.J.; Habib, V.

    1979-08-01

    One Design, Inc., has designed and developed modular waterwall components that make up a system for passive solar space heating using a south-facing thermal storage wall. The modules can also be used as thermal mass storage for roof apertures and for greenhouse applications. The modules are constructed of fiberglass reinforced polyester and each is 95 inches long, 16.5 inches wide and 24.5 inches tall. Each module contains 94 gallons or 784 pounds of water. When stacked behind south glazing, they provide 52 Btu//sup 0/F per square foot of net glazed area. A stack of four modules has a height of 93.5 inches, suitable for an 8-foot interior ceiling; a stack of five modules is 116.5 inches high, suitable for a 10-foot interior ceiling. The modules are designed to stack on one another without requiring additional hardware and nest inside each other to reduce shipping costs. Prototype modules were fabricated and subjected to structural tests. They were found to be capable of supporting at least 4.8 times the load imposed by a five tank stack, well above the recommended safety factor of 2. Long term purity of the water in the containers was tested and evaluated and found to be within acceptable limits. Prototype modules were installed in One Design's Star Tannery House near Winchester, Virginia, and performance was extensively monitored from January to April, 1979. Based on the performance during the period, it has been estimated that the passive solar heating contribution would be 79.5% of the house's total heating requirement.

  14. Optimizing performance of plasmonic devices for photonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenzveig, Tiberiu; Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating thermo-optic plasmonic devices for variable optical attenuation and/or low-frequency (kHz) signal modulation. Results of finite-element simulations and experimental characterization of prototype devices indicate that a plasmonic device can reach speci...

  15. A Variable Single Photon Plasmonic Beamsplitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Niels Møller; Kumar, Shailesh; Huck, Alexander

    Plasmonic structures can both be exploited for scaling down optical components beyond the diffraction limit and enhancing andcollecting the emission from a single dipole emitter. Here, we experimentally demonstrate adiabatic coupling between two silvernanowires using a nitrogen vacancy center...

  16. Distributed optical fiber surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenxin Cao; Lenan Wu; Dayong Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ The relationships of the resonant wavelength of optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors to the modulation layer refractive index, thickness and the refractive index of the bulk medium are obtained by using theoretical calculation model of optical fiber SPR sensors under certain conditions, which indicates that resonant wavelength of the sensors is approximately linear with modulation layer thickness. Based on the linear relationship, multiple SPR sensors with different resonant wavelengths can be fabricated in a single optical fiber named as distributed optical fiber surface plasmon resonance sensors (DOFSPRSs).Experimental results are presented, showing that it is practical to fabricate more than one SPR sensors in a single optical fiber.

  17. Near-field characterization of plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenin, Volodymyr

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis presents investigation of plasmonic waveguides and waveguiding components by means of scanning near-field optical microscopy characterizations, far-field optical observations, and numerical simulations. The plasmonic waveguiding attracts huge interest due to several reasons: 1...... simply by changing geometric parameters of the waveguide, keeping in mind the trade-off between confinement and propagation losses. A broad variety of plasmonic waveguides and waveguide components, including antennas for coupling the light in/out of the waveguide, requires correspondent characterization...

  18. Photothermal probing of plasmonic hotspots with nanomechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Wu, Kaiyu; Rindzevicius, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures (hotspots) are key components e.g. in plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy, plasmonic solar cells, or as nano heat sources. The characterization of single hotspots is still challenging due to a lack of experimental tools. We present the direct photothermal probing and mapping...... of single plasmonic nanoslits via the thermally induced detuning of nanomechanical string resonators. A maximum relative frequency detuning of 0.5 % was measured for a single plasmonic nanoslit for a perpendicularly polarized laser with a power of 1350 nW. Finally, we show the photothermal scan over...

  19. Surface chemistry of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan, E-mail: Jayasheelan.Vaithilingam@nottingham.ac.uk [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Prina, Elisabetta [School of Pharmacy, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Goodridge, Ruth D.; Hague, Richard J.M. [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Edmondson, Steve [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Rose, Felicity R.A.J. [School of Pharmacy, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Christie, Steven D.R. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) has previously been shown to be a viable method for fabricating biomedical implants; however, the surface chemistry of SLM fabricated parts is poorly understood. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the surface chemistries of (a) SLM as-fabricated (SLM-AF) Ti6Al4V and (b) SLM fabricated and mechanically polished (SLM-MP) Ti6Al4V samples and compared with (c) traditionally manufactured (forged) and mechanically polished Ti6Al4V samples. The SLM–AF surface was observed to be porous with an average surface roughness (Ra) of 17.6 ± 3.7 μm. The surface chemistry of the SLM-AF was significantly different to the FGD-MP surface with respect to elemental distribution and their existence on the outermost surface. Sintered particles on the SLM-AF surface were observed to affect depth profiling of the sample due to a shadowing effect during argon ion sputtering. Surface heterogeneity was observed for all three surfaces; however, vanadium was witnessed only on the mechanically polished (SLM-MP and FGD-MP) surfaces. The direct and indirect 3T3 cell cytotoxicity studies revealed that the cells were viable on the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V parts. The varied surface chemistry of the SLM-AF and SLM-MP did not influence the cell behaviour. - Highlights: • Surface chemistry of selective laser melted (SLM) Ti6Al4V parts was compared with conventionally forged Ti6Al4V parts. • The surface elemental compositions of the SLM as-fabricated surfaces were significantly different to the forged surface. • Surface oxide-layer of the SLM as-fabricated was thicker than the polished SLM surfaces and the forged Ti6Al4V surfaces.

  20. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaioannou, S.; Kalavrouziotis, D.; Vyrsokinos, K.;

    2012-01-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a "naturally" energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry....... The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce...... active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4310 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM...

  1. Terahertz optoelectronics with surface plasmon polariton diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Raj K; Genov, Dentcho A

    2014-05-09

    The field of plasmonics has experience a renaissance in recent years by providing a large variety of new physical effects and applications. Surface plasmon polaritons, i.e. the collective electron oscillations at the interface of a metal/semiconductor and a dielectric, may bridge the gap between electronic and photonic devices, provided a fast switching mechanism is identified. Here, we demonstrate a surface plasmon-polariton diode (SPPD) an optoelectronic switch that can operate at exceedingly large signal modulation rates. The SPPD uses heavily doped p-n junction where surface plasmon polaritons propagate at the interface between n and p-type GaAs and can be switched by an external voltage. The devices can operate at transmission modulation higher than 98% and depending on the doping and applied voltage can achieve switching rates of up to 1 THz. The proposed switch is compatible with the current semiconductor fabrication techniques and could lead to nanoscale semiconductor-based optoelectronics.

  2. Plasmonics based VLSI processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Bhattacharya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In continuum to my previous paper titled‘Implementation of plasmonics in VLSI’, this paperattempts to explore further, the actual physicalrealization of an all-plasmonic chip. In this paper,various methods of plasmon-basedphotolithography have been discussed and anobservation is made w.r.t the cost effectiveness andease of adaptability. Also, plasmonics based activeelement has been discussed which would helpunravel further arenas ofapproaches and methodstowards the realization of an all-plasmonic chip.

  3. Surface chemistry of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan; Prina, Elisabetta; Goodridge, Ruth D; Hague, Richard J M; Edmondson, Steve; Rose, Felicity R A J; Christie, Steven D R

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) has previously been shown to be a viable method for fabricating biomedical implants; however, the surface chemistry of SLM fabricated parts is poorly understood. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the surface chemistries of (a) SLM as-fabricated (SLM-AF) Ti6Al4V and (b) SLM fabricated and mechanically polished (SLM-MP) Ti6Al4V samples and compared with (c) traditionally manufactured (forged) and mechanically polished Ti6Al4V samples. The SLM-AF surface was observed to be porous with an average surface roughness (Ra) of 17.6±3.7μm. The surface chemistry of the SLM-AF was significantly different to the FGD-MP surface with respect to elemental distribution and their existence on the outermost surface. Sintered particles on the SLM-AF surface were observed to affect depth profiling of the sample due to a shadowing effect during argon ion sputtering. Surface heterogeneity was observed for all three surfaces; however, vanadium was witnessed only on the mechanically polished (SLM-MP and FGD-MP) surfaces. The direct and indirect 3T3 cell cytotoxicity studies revealed that the cells were viable on the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V parts. The varied surface chemistry of the SLM-AF and SLM-MP did not influence the cell behaviour.

  4. Implementation of Plasmonics in VLSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Bhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This Paper presents the idea of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI using Plasmonic Waveguides.Current VLSI techniques are facing challenges with respect to clock frequencies which tend to scale up, making it more difficult for the designers to distribute and maintain low clock skew between these high frequency clocks across the entire chip. Surface Plasmons are light waves that occur at a metal/dielectric interface, where a group of electrons is collectively moving back and forth. These waves are trapped near the surface as they interact with the plasma of electrons near the surface of the metal. The decay length of SPs into the metal is two orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength of the light in air. This feature of SPs provides the possibility of localization and the guiding of light in sub wavelength metallic structures, and it can be used to construct miniaturized optoelectronic circuits with sub wavelength components. In this paper, various methods of doing the same have been discussed some of which include DLSPPW’s, Plasmon waveguides by self-assembly, Silicon-based plasmonic waveguides etc. Hence by using Plasmonic chips, the speed, size and efficiency of microprocessor chips can be revolutionized thus bringing a whole new dimension to VLSI design.

  5. Implementation of Plasmonics in VLSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Bhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This Paper presents the idea of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI using Plasmonic Waveguides. Current VLSI techniques are facing challenges with respect to clock frequencies which tend to scale up, making it more difficult for the designers to distribute and maintain low clock skew between these high frequency clocks across the entire chip. Surface Plasmons are light waves that occur at a metal/dielectric interface, where a group of electrons is collectively moving back and forth. These waves are trapped near the surface as they interact with the plasma of electrons near the surface of the metal. The decay length of SPs into the metal is two orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength of the light in air. This feature of SPs provides the possibility of localization and the guiding of light in sub wavelength metallic structures, and it can be used to construct miniaturized optoelectronic circuits with sub wavelength components. In this paper, various methods of doing the same have been discussed some of which include DLSPPW’s, Plasmon waveguides by self-assembly, Silicon-based plasmonic waveguides etc. Hence by using Plasmonic chips, the speed, size and efficiency of microprocessor chips can be revolutionized thus bringing a whole new dimension to VLSI design.

  6. Engineering optical properties using plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth

    Plasmonic nanostructures can be engineered to take on unusual optical properties not found in natural materials. The optical responses of plasmonic materials are functions of the structural parameters and symmetry of the nanostructures, material parameters of the nanostructure and its surroundings and the incidence angle, frequency and polarization state of light. The scattering and hence the visibility of an object could be reduced by coating it with a plasmonic material. In this thesis, presented is an optical frequency scattering cancelation device composed of a silicon nanorod coated by a plasmonic gold nanostructure. The principle of operation was theoretically analyzed using Mie theory and the device design was verified by extensive numerical simulations. The device was fabricated using a combination of nanofabrication techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam milling. The optical responses of the scattering cancelation device and a control sample of bare silicon rod were directly visualized using near-field microscopy coupled with heterodyne interferometric detection. The experimental results were analyzed and found to match very well with theoretical prediction from numerical simulations thereby validating the design principles and our implementation. Plasmonic nanostructures could be engineered to exhibit unique optical properties such as Fano resonance characterized by narrow asymmetrical lineshape. We present dynamic tuning and symmetry lowering of Fano resonances in plasmonic nanostructures fabricated on flexible substrates. The tuning of Fano resonance was achieved by application of uniaxial mechanical stress. The design of the nanostructures was facilitated by extensive numerical simulations and the symmetry lowering was analyzed using group theoretical methods. The nanostructures were fabricated using electron beam lithography and optically characterized for various mechanical stress. The experimental results were in good

  7. Flame-Retarding of Cotton/Polyester Blended Yarn Fabrics Using Two-Component Sequential Treatment; Nidankai shori ni yoru men/poriesuteru konboshifu no nannenka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubokawa, Hiroo. [Textile Research Institute of Gunma Prefecture, Gunma (Japan)

    1999-01-10

    Cotton/polyester (C/P) blended yarn fabrics were treated with several flame retardants used for poly (ethylene terephthalate)(PET) using pad-dry-cure method. The relationships between the chemical structures of the flame retardants and their partition into PET fibers were investigated. When tetrabromobisphenol A (TBP-A) was tested, the amount of sorption increased with increasing concentration of TBP-A in treating acetone solution, and reached 4.0%o.w.f. (% on the weight of the fibre) at 10 wt%. THis treated fabric was again treated with a flame retardant for cotton, Pyrovatex CP New, which contains dimethyl 2-(N-hydroxymethylcarbamovl)ethylphosphonate as a main component. However, sufficient flame retardancy was not obtained. The second partition of TBP-A to cotton during heating was thought to lower the sorption efficiency of Pyrovatex CP New. Based on this assumption, for the case of the two-component sequential treatment, the Pyrovatex CP New treatment, which generates covalent bonds with hydroxy groups of cellulose, should be carried out prior to the TBP-A treatment. When a C/P blended yarn fabric was treated with Pyrovatex CP New and then with TBP-A, the amount of sorption of Pyrovatex CP New was 9.6%o.w.f. and the amount of sorption of TBP-A was 4.6%o.w.f. The limiting oxygen index of the treated fabric was 27.2%, a sufficient value for flame retardancy. Fromthis result, it was concluded that the practica flame-retardant finishing of c/p blended yarn fabrics could be carried out by using a simple finishing machine. (author)

  8. On-chip detection of radiation guided by dielectric-loaded plasmonic waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Zhanghua; Mazurski, Noa; Desiatov, Boris; Beermann, Jonas; Albrektsen, Ole; Levy, Uriel; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel approach for on-chip electrical detection of the radiation guided by dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides (DLSPPW) and DLSPPW-based components. The detection is realized by fabricating DLSPPW components on the surface of a gold (Au) pad supported by a silicon (Si) substrate supplied with aluminum pads facilitating electrical connections, with the gold pad being perforated in a specific locations below the DLSPPWs in order to allow a portion of the DLSPPW-guided radiation to leak into the Si-substrate, where it is absorbed and electrically detected. We present two-dimensional photocurrent maps obtained when the laser beam is scanning across the gold pad containing the fabricated DLSPPW components that are excited via grating couplers located at the DLSPPW tapered terminations. By comparing photocurrent signals obtained when scanning over a DLSPPW straight waveguide with those related to a DLSPPW racetrack resonator, we first determine the background signal level and then the...

  9. Self-assembled plasmonic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlig, Stefan; Cunningham, Alastair; Dintinger, José; Scharf, Toralf; Bürgi, Thomas; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays for the sake of convenience most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by top-down nanofabrication technologies. This offers great degrees of freedom to tailor the geometry with unprecedented precision. However, it often causes disadvantages as well. The structures available are usually planar and periodically arranged. Therefore, bulk plasmonic structures are difficult to fabricate and the periodic arrangement causes undesired effects, e.g., strong spatial dispersion is observed in metamaterials. These limitations can be mitigated by relying on bottom-up nanofabrication technologies. There, self-assembly methods and techniques from the field of colloidal nanochemistry are used to build complex functional unit cells in solution from an ensemble of simple building blocks, i.e., in most cases plasmonic nanoparticles. Achievable structures are characterized by a high degree of nominal order only on a short-range scale. The precise spatial arrangement across larger dimensions is not possible in most cases; leading essentially to amorphous structures. Such self-assembled nanostructures require novel analytical means to describe their properties, innovative designs of functional elements that possess a desired near- and far-field response, and entail genuine nanofabrication and characterization techniques. Eventually, novel applications have to be perceived that are adapted to the specifics of the self-assembled nanostructures. This review shall document recent progress in this field of research. Emphasis is put on bottom-up amorphous metamaterials. We document the state-of-the-art but also critically assess the problems that have to be overcome.

  10. A high-performance and low cost SERS substrate of plasmonic nanopillars on plastic film fabricated by nanoimprint lithography with AAO template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Zhang, Qian; Lu, Yuanshen; Du, Wei; Li, Bin; Cui, Yushuang; Yuan, Changsheng; Zhan, Peng; Ge, Haixiong; Wang, Zhenling; Chen, Yanfeng

    2017-06-01

    As a powerful spectroscopy technique, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can provide non-destructive and sensitive characterization down to a single molecular level. Aiming to the main challenges of high-performance SERS-active substrates for their real-world applications involving the ultra-sensitive and reproducible signals detection and signal uniformity with large-area, herein, a facile and reliable strategy based on combination of thermal imprinting polycarbonate (PC) film with porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) mold and E-beam evaporation of gold is provided to fabricate a high-quality SERS-active substrate consisting of ultra-dense hot-spots with large-area uniformity. Two kinds of sub-10 nm gaps were obtained, including the nanogaps between the neighboring gold coated PC-nanopillars and those between gold on the top of the nanopillars and that on the base, which actually build up a three-dimensional (3D) hot-spot network for high-performance SERS detection. The effect of structural parameters on SERS enhancement was investigated numerically and experimentally, and by optimizing the structural parameters, a remarkable average SERS enhancement factor up to of 1.4×108 is achieved and it shows an excellent reproducibility with a relative standard deviation of 18%, which allows for enhanced practicability in the application of quantitative biochemical detection.

  11. Surface Plasmon Resonance Studies on Molecular Imprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoping Lin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular imprinted polymer (MIP members were fabricated with the print molecule L-phenylalanine ethyl ester. The elution and adsorption procedures were investigated by surface plasmon resonance in situ. The changes of refractive angle during elution procedure suggest that the MIP is prepared on the base of the non-covalent interactions. This MIP member sensor can achieve enantioselective recognition.

  12. Noble metal nanowires: from plasmon waveguides to passive and active devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Surbhi; Hafner, Jason H; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan; Nordlander, Peter

    2012-11-20

    Using chemical synthesis, researchers can produce noble metal nanowires with highly regular, crystalline properties unachievable by alternative, top-down nanofabrication methods. Sitting at the intersection of nanochemistry and nanooptics, noble metal nanowires have generated intense and growing research interest. These nanostructures combine subwavelength transverse dimensions (50-100 nm) and longitudinal dimensions that can reach tens of micrometers or more, which makes them an ideal platform to launch surface plasmon waves by direct illumination of one end of the structure. Because of this property, researchers are using noble metal nanowires as a tool for fundamental studies of subwavelength plasmon-based optics and the properties of surface plasmon guided wave propagation in highly confined geometries below the classical optical diffraction limit. In this Account, we review some of the recent developments in plasmonic nanowire fabrication, nanowire plasmon imaging, and nanowire optical components and devices. The addition of an adjacent nanowire, substrate, or other symmetry-breaking defect can enable the direct coupling of light to and from free space to the guided waves on a nanowire structure. Such structures lead to more complex nanowire-based geometries with multiple optical inputs and outputs. Additional nanowire imaging methods are also possible: plasmon propagation on nanowires produces intense near-field diffraction, which can induce fluorescence in nearby quantum dots or photobleach adjacent molecules. When the nanowire is deposited on a dielectric substrate, the plasmon propagation along chemically synthesized nanowires exceeds 10 μm, which makes these structures useful in nonlocal applications such as remote surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensing. Nanowires can be used as passive optical devices, which include, for example, polarization manipulators, linear polarization rotators, or even broadband linear-to-circular polarization

  13. Plasmonic lateral forces on chiral spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Canaguier-Durand, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    We show that the optical force exerted on a finite size chiral sphere by a surface plasmon mode has a component along a direction perpendicular to the plasmon linear momentum. We reveal how this chiral lateral force, pointing in opposite directions for opposite enantiomers, stems from an angular-to-linear crossed momentum transfer involving the plasmon transverse spin angular momentum density and mediated by the chirality of the sphere. Our multipolar approach allows us discussing the inclusion of the recoil term in the force on a small sphere taken in the dipolar limit and observing sign inversions of the lateral chiral force when the size of the sphere increases.

  14. Tunable plasmonic nanostructures: From fundamental nanoscale optics to surface-enhanced spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui

    In this thesis, I demonstrate the rational design and controllable fabrication of a series of novel plasmonic nanostructures with judiciously tailored optical properties including perfect nanoshells, roughened subwavelength particles, prolate nanoshells known as nanorice, and non-concentric nanoshells known as nanoeggs. All of these nanostructures are very important subwavelength nanoscale optical components that can be utilized to manipulate light in unique ways. The most striking feature of these nanoparticles is their geometrically tunable plasmon resonances, which can be harnessed for widespread applications. I have also utilized these nanostructures as the building blocks to construct self-assembled multinanoparticle systems, such as nanoshell heterodimers, nanosphere arrays and nanoshell arrays. I have further developed multifunctional molecular sensing platforms using these nanoengineered plasmonic structures as substrates for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, realizing integrated analytical chemistry lab-on-a-chip. Applying the Plasmon Hybridization model as design principles to experimentally realizable nanostructures results in a thorough understanding of the origin of the geometry-dependent optical properties observed in these nanosystems. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method also provides a powerful platform for the numerical simulation of local- and far-field optical properties of these nanostructures.

  15. Reviews in plasmonics 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    Reviews in Plasmonics 2010, the first volume of the new book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of Plasmonics and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in surface plasmon phenomena and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of Plasmonics. Reviews in Plasmonics offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the Plasmonic

  16. Deep lithography with protons Modelling and predicting the performances of a novel fabrication technology for micro-optical components

    CERN Document Server

    Volckaerts, B; Veretennicoff, I; Thienpont, H

    2002-01-01

    We developed a simulation package that predicts 3D-dose distributions in proton irradiated poly(methylmetacrylate) samples considering primary energy transfer and scattering phenomena. In this paper, we apply this code to predict the surface flatness and maximum thickness of micro-optical and mechanical structures fabricated with deep lithography with protons (DLP). We compare these simulation results with experimental data and highlight the fundamental differences between DLP and deep X-ray lithography.

  17. Ultrafast optical switching of infrared plasmon polaritons in high-mobility graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, G. X.; Wang, L.; Goldflam, M. D.; Wagner, M.; Fei, Z.; McLeod, A. S.; Liu, M. K.; Keilmann, F.; Özyilmaz, B.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Hone, J.; Fogler, M. M.; Basov, D. N.

    2016-04-01

    The success of metal-based plasmonics for manipulating light at the nanoscale has been empowered by imaginative designs and advanced nano-fabrication. However, the fundamental optical and electronic properties of elemental metals, the prevailing plasmonic media, are difficult to alter using external stimuli. This limitation is particularly restrictive in applications that require modification of the plasmonic response at sub-picosecond timescales. This handicap has prompted the search for alternative plasmonic media, with graphene emerging as one of the most capable candidates for infrared wavelengths. Here we visualize and elucidate the properties of non-equilibrium photo-induced plasmons in a high-mobility graphene monolayer. We activate plasmons with femtosecond optical pulses in a specimen of graphene that otherwise lacks infrared plasmonic response at equilibrium. In combination with static nano-imaging results on plasmon propagation, our infrared pump-probe nano-spectroscopy investigation reveals new aspects of carrier relaxation in heterostructures based on high-purity graphene.

  18. Direct Photonic-Plasmonic Coupling and Routing in Single Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Rouxue; Pausauskie, Peter; Huang, Jiaxing; Yang, Piedong

    2009-10-20

    Metallic nanoscale structures are capable of supporting surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), propagating collective electron oscillations with tight spatial confinement at the metal surface. SPPs represent one of the most promising structures to beat the diffraction limit imposed by conventional dielectric optics. Ag nano wires have drawn increasing research attention due to 2D sub-100 nm mode confinement and lower losses as compared with fabricated metal structures. However, rational and versatile integration of Ag nanowires with other active and passive optical components, as well as Ag nanowire based optical routing networks, has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate that SPPs can be excited simply by contacting a silver nanowire with a SnO2 nanoribbon that serves both as an unpolarized light source and a dielectric waveguide. The efficient coupling makes it possible to measure the propagation-distance-dependent waveguide spectra and frequency-dependent propagation length on a single Ag nanowire. Furthermore, we have demonstrated prototypical photonic-plasmonic routing devices, which are essential for incorporating low-loss Ag nanowire waveguides as practical components into high-capacity photonic circuits.

  19. Basics of quantum plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a topical review of the theoretical research on the quantum theory of plasmons and plasmon-photon interaction. The plasmons are defined as the quanta of the quantized plasmonic field. The corresponding classical plasmonic field was constructed on the basis of the study of collective oscillations of the electron gas in the solid. The electron-electron Coulomb interaction is taken into account. The explicit forms of the plasmon-photon interaction Lagrangian in canonical quantum mechanics and the plasmon-photon interaction action functional in the functional integral approach are derived. They all show that the interaction processes are nonlocal ones. The physical origin of the nonlocality is the complex structure of plasmons as composite quasiparticles: they cannot be considered as point particles, as was assumed in all phenomenological theories.

  20. Immobilisation of an antibacterial drug to Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, School of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Kilsby, Samuel [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Goodridge, Ruth D., E-mail: Ruth.Goodridge@nottingham.ac.uk [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, School of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Christie, Steven D.R. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Edmondson, Steve [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Hague, Richard J.M. [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, School of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: The potential integration of selective laser melting (SLM) with surface modification using self-assembled monolayers for biomedical application has been investigated. Ciprofloxacin{sup ®} was functionalised to the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V surface. Sustained release of the drug under in-vitro condition was witnessed. The inhibition zones showed the eluted drug was active against Staphylococcus aureus (a) and Escherichia coli (b) upon its release from the SLM fabricated part. - Highlights: • Parts fabricated using selective laser melting were coated with Ciprofloxacin{sup ®}. • The total amount of drug coated was approximately 1 μg/cm{sup 2}. • The coating was highly stable under oxidative conditions. • In-vitro studies showed a sustained release of the drug for over 42 days. • Ciprofloxacin{sup ®} eluted from the Ti6Al4V surface inhibited bacterial growth. - Abstract: Bacterial infections from biomedical implants and surgical devices are a major problem in orthopaedic, dental and vascular surgery. Although the sources of contaminations that lead to bacterial infections are known, it is not possible to control or avoid such infections completely. In this study, an approach to immobilise Ciprofloxacin{sup ®} (an antibacterial drug) to phosphonic acid based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) adsorbed on a selectively laser melted (SLM) Ti6Al4V structure, has been presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and static water contact angle measurements confirmed the attachment of SAMs and the drug. Results showed that Ciprofloxacin{sup ®} is highly stable under the oxidative conditions used in this study. In-vitro stability was estimated by immersing the Ciprofloxacin{sup ®} immobilised substrates in 10 mM of Tris–HCl buffer (pH-7.4) for 42 days. The Tris–HCl buffer was analysed using UV–vis spectrophotometry at 7, 14, 28 and 42 day time intervals to determine the release of the immobilised drug. The drug was observed to

  1. Plasmonics fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Stefan Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Considered a major field of photonics, plasmonics offers the potential to confine and guide light below the diffraction limit and promises a new generation of highly miniaturized photonic devices. This book combines a comprehensive introduction with an extensive overview of the current state of the art. Coverage includes plasmon waveguides, cavities for field-enhancement, nonlinear processes and the emerging field of active plasmonics studying interactions of surface plasmons with active media.

  2. Microstructural architecture developed in the fabrication of solid and open-cellular copper components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Diana Alejandra

    The fabrication of Cu components were first built by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) from low-purity, atomized Cu powder containing a high density of Cu2O precipitates leading to a novel example of precipitate-dislocation architecture. These microstructures exhibit cell-like arrays (1-3microm) in the horizontal reference plane perpendicular to the build direction with columnar-like arrays extending from ~12 to >60 microm in length and corresponding spatial dimensions of 1-3 microm. These observations were observed by the use of optical metallography, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness measurements were taken both on the atomized powder and the Cu components. The hardness for these architectures ranged from ~HV 83 to 88, in contrast to the original Cu powder microindentation hardness of HV 72 and the commercial Cu base plate hardness of HV 57. These observations were utilized for the fabrication of open-cellular copper structures by additive manufacturing using EBM and illustrated the ability to fabricate some form of controlled microstructural architecture by EBM parameter alteration or optimizing. The fabrication of these structures ranged in densities from 0.73g/cm3 to 6.67g/cm3. These structures correspond to four different articulated mesh arrays. While these components contained some porosity as a consequence of some unmelted regions, the Cu2O precipitates also contributed to a reduced density. Using X-ray Diffraction showed the approximate volume fraction estimated to be ~2%. The addition of precipitates created in the EBM melt scan formed microstructural arrays which contributed to hardening contributing to the strength of mesh struts and foam ligaments. The measurements of relative stiffness versus relative density plots for Cu compared very closely with Ti-6Al-4V open cellular structures - both mesh and foams. The Cu reticulated mesh structures exhibit a slope of n = 2 in contrast to a slope of n = 2

  3. Plasmonic color tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Yun, Hansik; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Hwi

    2016-03-01

    In general, color filter is an optical component to permit the transmission of a specific color in cameras, displays, and microscopes. Each filter has its own unchangeable color because it is made by chemical materials such as dyes and pigments. Therefore, in order to express various colorful images in a display, one pixel should have three sub-pixels of red, green, and blue colors. Here, we suggest new plasmonic structure and method to change the color in a single pixel. It is comprised of a cavity and a metal nanoaperture. The optical cavity generally supports standing waves inside it, and various standing waves having different wavelength can be confined together in one cavity. On the other hand, although light cannot transmit sub-wavelength sized aperture, surface plasmons can propagate through the metal nanoaperture with high intensity due to the extraordinary transmission. If we combine the two structures, we can organize the spatial distribution of amplitudes according to wavelength of various standing waves using the cavity, and we can extract a light with specific wavelength and amplitude using the nanoaperture. Therefore, this cavity-aperture structure can simultaneously tune the color and intensity of the transmitted light through the single nanoaperture. We expect that the cavity-apertures have a potential for dynamic color pixels, micro-imaging system, and multiplexed sensors.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance in super-periodic metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Haisheng

    Surface plasmon resonances in periodic metal nanostructures have been investigated over the past decade. The periodic metal nanostructures have served as new technology platforms in fields such as biological and chemical sensing. An existing method to determine the surface plasmon resonance properties of these metal nanostructures is the measurement of the light transmission or reflection from these nanostructures. The measurement of surface plasmon resonances in either the transmission or reflection allows one to resolve the surface plasmon resonance in metal nanostructures. In this dissertation, surface plasmon resonances in a new type of metal nanostructures were investigated. The new nanostructures were created by patterning traditional periodic nanohole and nanoslit arrays into diffraction gratings. The patterned nanohole and 11anoslit arrays have two periods in the structures. The new nanostructures are called "super-periodic" nanostructures. With rigorous finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical simulations, surface plasmon resonances in super-periodic nanoslit and nanohole arrays were investigated. It was found that by creating a super-period in periodic metal nanostructures, surface plasmon radiations can be observed in the non-zero order diffractions. This discovery presents a new method of characterizing the surface plasmon resonances in metal nanostructures. Super-periodic gold nanoslit and nanohole arrays were fabricated with the electron beam lithography technique. The surface plasmon resonances were measured in the first order diffraction by using a CCD. The experimental results confirm well with the FDTD numerical simulations.

  5. Plasmonic-photonic crystal coupled nanolaser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Taiping; Jamois, Cecile; Chevalier, Celine; Feng, Di; Belarouci, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a hybrid photonic-plasmonic nanolaser that combines the light harvesting features of a dielectric photonic crystal cavity with the extraordinary confining properties of an optical nano-antenna. In that purpose, we developed a novel fabrication method based on multi-step electron-beam lithography. We show that it enables the robust and reproducible production of hybrid structures, using fully top down approach to accurately position the antenna. Coherent coupling of the photonic and plasmonic modes is highlighted and opens up a broad range of new hybrid nanophotonic devices.

  6. Aluminum plasmonic metamaterials for structural color printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fei; Gao, Jie; Stan, Liliana; Rosenmann, Daniel; Czaplewski, David; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-06-01

    We report a structural color printing platform based on aluminum plasmonic metamaterials supporting near perfect light absorption and narrow-band spectral response tunable across the visible spectrum to realize high-resolution, angle-insensitive color printing with high color purity and saturation. Additionally, the fabricated metamaterials can be protected by a transparent polymer thin layer for ambient use with further improved color performance. The demonstrated structural color printing with aluminum plasmonic metamaterials offers great potential for relevant applications such as security marking and information storage.

  7. Realization of Desired Plasmonic Structures via a Direct Laser Writing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Quang Cong; Luong, Mai Hoang; Tran, Thi Mo; Remmel, Jacqueline; Do, Minh Thanh; Kieu, Duy Manh; Ghasemi, Rasta; Nguyen, Duc Tho; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-11-01

    We present a recent investigation of fabrication of desired plasmonic structures. First, the polymeric templates were realized by a simple and low-cost fabrication technique based on direct laser writing with a continuous-wave laser source. The plasmonic structures have been then realized by two methods, namely, a combination of gold evaporation and lift-off techniques, and a combination of gold sputtering and thermal annealing techniques. Each method presents its own advantages. Numerous metallic submicro- and nano-structures have been realized, which should be very interesting for different applications, such as high-transmission bandpass filters, plasmonic data storage, and plasmonic photonic devices.

  8. Quasi-periodic distribution of plasmon modes in two-dimensional Fibonacci arrays of metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallapiccola, Ramona; Gopinath, Ashwin; Stellacci, Francesco; Dal Negro, Luca

    2008-04-14

    In this paper we investigate for the first time the near-field optical behavior of two-dimensional Fibonacci plasmonic lattices fabricated by electron-beam lithography on transparent quartz substrates. In particular, by performing near-field optical microscopy measurements and three dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain simulations we demonstrate that near-field coupling of nanoparticle dimers in Fibonacci arrays results in a quasi-periodic lattice of localized nanoparticle plasmons. The possibility to accurately predict the spatial distribution of enhanced localized plasmon modes in quasi-periodic Fibonacci arrays can have a significant impact for the design and fabrication of novel nano-plasmonics devices.

  9. 3D plasmonic nanostar structures for recyclable SERS applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirumamilla, Manohar; Gopalakrishnan, Anisha; Toma, Andrea;

    2015-01-01

    Nanofabrication of metallic nanostructures/nanoparticles enables the detection of analyte molecules at ultra-low concentrations with the aid of plasmon induced hot-spots. The high fabrication cost and large fabrication time of nanostructures limit their usage in practical applications. Here we pr...

  10. Investigation of nanogap localized field enhancement in gold plasmonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debu, Desalegn Tadesse; Bauman, Stephen; Saylor, Cameron; Novak, Eric; French, David; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Nanogaps between plasmonic structures allow confining the localized electric field with moreenhancements. Based on previously implemented two-step lithography process, we introducea nano-masking technique to fabricate nanostructrues and nanogaps for various geometrical patterns. This new method can fabricate gold nanostructures as well as nanogaps that are less than 10nm, below the limiting scale of lithography. Simulation from finite element method (FEM) shows strong gap dependence of optical properties and peak enhancement of these devices. The fabricated plasmonic nanostructure provides wide range of potential future application including highly sensitive optical antenna, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and biosensing.

  11. Plasmonic Metallurgy Enabled by DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael B; Ku, Jessie C; Lee, Byeongdu; Mirkin, Chad A; Schatz, George C

    2016-04-13

    Mixed silver and gold plasmonic nanoparticle architectures are synthesized using DNA-programmable assembly, unveiling exquisitely tunable optical properties that are predicted and explained both by effective thin-film models and explicit electrodynamic simulations. These data demonstrate that the manner and ratio with which multiple metallic components are arranged can greatly alter optical properties, including tunable color and asymmetric reflectivity behavior of relevance for thin-film applications.

  12. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  13. Plasmonic Demultiplexer and Guiding

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Chenglong

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional plasmonic demultiplexers for surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), which consist of concentric grooves on a gold film, are proposed and experimentally demonstrated to realize light-SPP coupling, effective dispersion and multiple-channel SPP guiding. A resolution as high as 10 nm is obtained. The leakage radiation microscopy imaging shows that the SPPs of different wavelengths are focused and routed into different SPP strip waveguides. The plasmonic demultiplexer can thus serve as a wavelength division multiplexing element for integrated plasmonic circuit and also as a plasmonic spectroscopy or filter.

  14. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  15. Plasmonic nanoprobes for stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cortes, Emiliano; Sinclair, Hugo G; Guldbrand, Stina; Peveler, William J; Davies, Timothy; Parrinello, Simona; Görlitz, Frederik; Dunsby, Chris; Neil, Mark A A; Sivan, Yonatan; Parkin, Ivan P; French, Paul M; Maier, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles influence the absorption and emission processes of nearby emitters due to local enhancements of the illuminating radiation and the photonic density of states. Here, we use the plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticles in order to enhance the stimulated depletion of excited molecules for super-resolved microscopy. We demonstrate stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy with gold nanorods with a long axis of only 26 nm and a width of 8 nm that provide an enhancement of the resolution compared to fluorescent-only probes without plasmonic components irradiated with the same depletion power. These novel nanoparticle-assisted STED probes represent a ~2x10^3 reduction in probe volume compared to previously used nanoparticles and we demonstrate their application to the first plasmon-assisted STED cellular imaging. We also discuss their current limitations.

  16. Optically tunable plasmonic color filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. J.; Si, G. Y.; Leong, E. S. P.; Wang, B.; Danner, A. J.; Yuan, X. C.; Teng, J. H.

    2012-04-01

    We fabricated sub-wavelength patterned gold plasmonic nanostructures on a quartz substrate through the focused ion beam (FIB) technique. The perforated gold film demonstrated optical transmission peaks in the visible range, which therefore can be used as a plasmonic color filter. Furthermore, by integrating a layer of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with the gold nanostructure to form a hybrid system, we observed a red-shift of transmission peak wavelength. More importantly, the peak intensity can be further enhanced more than 10% in transmittance due to the refractive index match of the media on both sides of it. By optically pumping the hybrid system using a UV light, nematic-isotropic phase transition of the LCs was achieved, thus changing the effective refractive index experienced by the impinging light. Due to the refractive index change, the transmission peak intensity was modulated accordingly. As a result, an optically tunable plasmonic color filter was achieved. This kind of color filters could be potentially applied to many applications, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors, liquid crystal display devices, light emitting diodes, etc.

  17. Spoof Plasmon Hybridization

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Shen, Xiaopeng; Maier, Stefan A; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    Plasmon hybridization between closely spaced nanoparticles yields new hybrid modes not found in individual constituents, allowing for the engineering of resonance properties and field enhancement capabilities of metallic nanostructure. Experimental verifications of plasmon hybridization have been thus far mostly limited to optical frequencies, as metals cannot support surface plasmons at longer wavelengths. Here, we introduce the concept of 'spoof plasmon hybridization' in highly conductive metal structures and investigate experimentally the interaction of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) in adjacent metal disks corrugated with subwavelength spiral patterns. We show that the hybridization results in the splitting of spoof plasmon modes into bonding and antibonding resonances analogous to molecular orbital rule and plasmonic hybridization in optical spectrum. These hybrid modes can be manipulated to produce enormous field enhancements (larger than 5000) by tuning the separation between disks or alte...

  18. Reviews in plasmonics 2016

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Reviews in Plasmonics 2016, the third volume of the new book series from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of Plasmonics and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year’s progress in surface plasmon phenomena and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews in sufficient detail to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of Plasmonics. Reviews in Plasmonics offers an essential source of reference material for any lab working in the Plasmonics field and related areas. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of Plasmonics will find it an invaluable resource.

  19. Reviews in plasmonics 2015

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Reviews in Plasmonics 2015, the second volume of the new book series from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of Plasmonics and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year’s progress in surface plasmon phenomena and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews in sufficient detail to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of Plasmonics. Reviews in Plasmonics offers an essential source of reference material for any lab working in the Plasmonics field and related areas. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of Plasmonics will find it an invaluable resource.

  20. Plasmonic metagratings for simultaneous determination of Stokes parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Pors, Anders; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2016-01-01

    Measuring light's state of polarization is an inherently difficult problem, since the phase information between orthogonal polarization states is typically lost in the detection process. In this work, we bring to the fore the equivalence between normalized Stokes parameters and diffraction contrasts in appropriately designed phase-gradient birefringent metasurfaces and introduce a concept of all-polarization birefringent metagratings. The metagrating, which consists of three interweaved metasurfaces, allows one to easily analyze an arbitrary state of light polarization by conducting simultaneous (i.e., parallel) measurements of the correspondent diffraction intensities that reveal immediately the Stokes parameters of the polarization state under examination. Based on plasmonic metasurfaces operating in reflection at the wavelength of 800 nm, we design and realize phase-gradient birefringent metasurfaces and the correspondent metagrating, while experimental characterization of the fabricated components convinc...

  1. Plasmonics in the UV range with Rhodium nanocubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Gutiérrez, Y.; Li, P.; Barreda, Á. I.; Watson, A. M.; Alcaraz de la Osa, R.; Finkelstein, G.; González, F.; Ortiz, D.; Saiz, J. M.; Sanz, J. M.; Everitt, H. O.; Liu, J.; Moreno, F.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonics in the UV-range constitutes a new challenge due to the increasing demand to detect, identify and destroy biological toxins, enhance biological imaging, and characterize semiconductor devices at the nanometer scale. Silver and aluminum have an efficient plasmonic performance in the near UV region, but oxidation reduces its performance in this range. Recent studies point out rhodium as one of the most promising metals for this purpose: it has a good plasmonic response in the UV and, as gold in the visible, it presents a low tendency to oxidation. Moreover, its easy fabrication through chemical means and its potential for photocatalytic applications, makes this material very attractive for building plasmonic tools in the UV. In this work, we will show an overview of our recent collaborative research with rhodium nanocubes (NC) for Plasmonics in the UV.

  2. Nanoscale 2.5-dimensional surface patterning with plasmonic lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Howon; Park, Changhoon; Oh, Seonghyeon; Hahn, Jae W

    2017-08-29

    We report an extension of plasmonic lithography to nanoscale 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) surface patterning. To obtain the impulse response of a plasmonic lithography system, we described the field distribution of a point dipole source generated by a metallic ridge aperture with a theoretical model using the concepts of quasi-spherical waves and surface plasmon-polaritons. We performed deconvolution to construct an exposure map of a target shape for patterning. For practical applications, we fabricated several nanoscale and microscale structures, such as a cone, microlens array, nanoneedle, and a multiscale structure using the plasmonic lithography system. We verified the possibility of applying plasmonic lithography to multiscale structuring from a few tens of nanometres to a few micrometres in the lateral dimension. We obtained a root-mean-square error of 4.7 nm between the target shape and the patterned shape, and a surface roughness of 11.5 nm.

  3. Plasmonic resonances in nanostructured transparent conducting oxide films

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jongbum; Emani, Naresh K; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCO) are emerging as possible alternative constituent materials to replace noble metals such as silver and gold for low-loss plasmonic and metamaterial (MMs) applications in the near infrared (NIR) regime. The optical characteristics of TCOs have been studied to evaluate the functionalities and potential of these materials as metal substitutes in plasmonic and MM devices, even apart from their usual use as electrode materials. However, patterning TCOs at the nanoscale, which is necessary for plasmonic and MM devices, is not well-studied. This paper investigates nanopatterning processes for TCOs, especially the lift-off technique with electron-beam lithography, and the realization of plasmonic nanostructures with TCOs. By employing the developed nanopatterning process, we fabricate 2D-periodic arrays of TCO nanodisks and characterize the material's plasmonic properties to evaluate the performance of TCOs as metal substitutes. Light-induced collective oscillations of the free elec...

  4. Two-path plasmonic interferometer with integrated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Aizin, Gregory

    2016-03-29

    An electrically tunable terahertz two-path plasmonic interferometer with an integrated detection element can down convert a terahertz field to a rectified DC signal. The integrated detector utilizes a resonant plasmonic homodyne mixing mechanism that measures the component of the plasma waves in-phase with an excitation field that functions as the local oscillator in the mixer. The plasmonic interferometer comprises two independently tuned electrical paths. The plasmonic interferometer enables a spectrometer-on-a-chip where the tuning of electrical path length plays an analogous role to that of physical path length in macroscopic Fourier transform interferometers.

  5. Long-range plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y; Ishii, Satoshi; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2015-11-30

    We study plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and hyperbolic multilayer claddings. The proposed design provides better performance in terms of propagation length and mode confinement in comparison to conventional designs, such as metal-insulator-metal and insulator-metal-insulator plasmonic waveguides. We show that the proposed structures support long-range surface plasmon modes, which exist when the permittivity of the core matches the transverse effective permittivity component of the metamaterial cladding. In this regime, the surface plasmon polaritons of each cladding layer are strongly coupled, and the propagation length can be on the order of a millimeter.

  6. Long-range plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi;

    2015-01-01

    We study plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and hyperbolic multilayer claddings. The proposed design provides better performance in terms of propagation length and mode confinement in comparison to conventional designs, such as metal-insulator-metal and insulator-metal-insulator plasmonic...... waveguides. We show that the proposed structures support long-range surface plasmon modes, which exist when the permittivity of the core matches the transverse effective permittivity component of the metamaterial cladding. In this regime, the surface plasmon polaritons of each cladding layer are strongly...

  7. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Kotsifaki, Domna G; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dep...

  8. Critical coupling in plasmonic resonator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-08-01

    We report critical coupling of electromagnetic waves to plasmonic cavity arrays fabricated on Moiré surfaces. Dark field plasmon microscopy imaging and polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection measurements reveal the critical coupling conditions of the cavities. The critical coupling conditions depend on the superperiod of the Moiré surface, which also defines the coupling between the cavities. Complete transfer of the incident power can be achieved for traveling wave plasmonic resonators, which have a relatively short superperiod. When the superperiod of the resonators increases, the coupled resonators become isolated standing wave resonators in which complete transfer of the incident power is not possible. Analytical and finite difference time domain calculations support the experimental observations.

  9. Development of and verification test integral reactor major components - Development of manufacturing process and fabrication of prototype for SG and CEDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Park, Hwa Kyu; Kim, Yong Kyu; Choi, Yong Soon; Kang, Ki Su; Hyun, Young Min [Korea Heavy Industries and Construction Co., LTD., Changwon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    Integral SMART(System integrated Modular Advanced Reactor) type reactor is under conceptual design. Because major components is integrated within in a single pressure vessel, compact design using advanced technology is essential. It means that manufacturing process for these components is more complex and difficult. The objective of this study is to confirm the possibility of manufacture of Steam Generator, Control Element Drive Mechanism(CEDM) and Reactor Assembly which includes Reactor Pressure Vessel, it is important to understand the design requirement and function of the major components. After understanding the design requirement and function, it is concluded that the helical bending and weld qualification of titanium tube for Steam Generator and the applicability of electron beam weld for CEDM step motor parts is the critical to fabricate the components. Therefore, bending mock-up and weld qualification of titanium tube was performed and the results are quite satisfactory. Also, it is concluded that electron beam welding technique can be applicable to the CEDM step motor part. (author). 22 refs., 14 figs., 46 tabs.

  10. The influence of the forced movement of components on the structure in fabricated AlSi/CrxCy composite castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dulęba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication and microstructure of the AlSi11 matrix composite containing 10 % volume fraction of CrFe30C8 particles were presented in this paper. Composite suspension was manufactured by using mechanical stirring. During stirring process the temperature of liquid metal, time of mixing and rotational speed of mixer were fixed. After stirring process composite suspension was gravity cast into shell mould. The composites were cast, applying simultaneously an electromagnetic field. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of changes in the frequency of the current power inductor on the morphology of the reinforcing phase in the aluminum matrix. The concept is based on the assumption that a chromium-iron matrix of CrFe30C8 particles dissolves and residual carbide phases will substantially strengthen the composite. The microstructure and interface structure of the AlSi11/CrFe30C8 composite has been studied by optical microscopy, scanning microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  11. Plasmonic Transmission Gratings – Fabrication and Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sierant, Aleksandra; Jany, Benedykt; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobrosława

    realization is given by the use of a metallic diffraction grating, where the diffracted light couples to the SPP. Here, we propose metallic periodic transmission gratings, processed onto a glass substrate, with various periods and fill factors. The gratings are milled in a plain gold layer with a focused ion...... beam (FIB) microscope, using gallium and a neutralizing electron beam. We investigate the SPP coupling strength with respect to varying top layers and under collimated, oblique-angled excitation, with respect to the effect of finite gratings as opposed to perfect periodicity. We characterize...

  12. Electrical Modulation of Fano Resonance in Plasmonic Nanostructures Using Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emani, Naresh K.; Chung, Ting-Fung; Kildishev, Alexander V.;

    2014-01-01

    Pauli blocking of interband transistions gives rise to tunable optical properties in single layer graphene (SLG). This effect is exploited in a graphene-nanoantenna hybrid device where Fano resonant plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated on top of a graphene sheet. The use of Fano resonant......-element simulations. Our approach can be used for development of next generation of tunable plasmonic and hybrid nanophotonic devices....

  13. Nano-plasmonic antennas in the near infrared regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitch, N; Ginzburg, P; Orenstein, M

    2012-02-22

    Plasmonic nano-antennas constitute a central research topic in current science and engineering with an enormous variety of potential applications. Here we review the recent progress in the niche of plasmonic nano-antennas operating in the near infrared part of the spectrum which is important for a variety of applications. Tuning of the resonance into the near infrared regime is emphasized in the perspectives of fabrication, measurement, modeling, and analytical treatments, concentrating on the vast recent achievements in these areas.

  14. Deep-UV plasmonics of indium (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Yasuaki; Saito, Yuika; Taguchi, Atsushi; Honda, Mitsuhiro; Kawata, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Deep-UV (DUV) plasmonics can expand the possibilities of DUV-based techniques (i.e. UV lithography, UV spectroscopy, UV imaging, UV disinfection). Here we present that indium is useful for research of DUV plasmonics. According to dielectric function, indium and aluminum are low-loss, DUV plasmonic metals, of which the imaginary parts are far smaller than those of other metals (i.e. rhodium, platinum) in the DUV range. Additionally, the real parts in the whole DUV range are close to but smaller than -2, allowing efficient generation of surface plasmon polaritons on an indium or aluminum nanosphere. In comparison to aluminum, indium provides a distinctive feature for fabricating DUV-resonant substrates. It is highly apt to form a grainy deposition film on a standard, optically transparent substrate (i.e. fused silica). The surface plasmon resonance wavelength becomes promptly tailored by simply varying the deposition thickness of the films, resulting in different grain sizes. Thus, we fabricated indium-coated substrates having different plasmon resonance wavelengths by varying the deposition thicknesses from 10 to 50 nm. DUV resonance Raman scattering of adenine molecules was best enhanced using the 25 nm deposition thickness substrates by the factor of 2. Furthermore, the FDTD calculation simulated the electromagnetic field enhancement over a grainy, indium-coated fused silica substrate. Both results indicate how indium plays an indispensable role in study of DUV plasmonics.

  15. Propagation of plasmons in designed single crystalline silver nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Shailesh; Lu, Ying-Wei; Huck, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate propagation of plasmons in single crystalline silver nanostructures fabricated using a combination of a bottom-up and a top-down approach. Silver nanoplates of thickness around 65 nm and a surface area of about 100 μm2 are made using a wet chemical method. Silver nanotips...... and nanowires are then sculptured by focused ion beam milling. The plasmons are excited by using the fluorescence from the redeposited silver clusters during the milling process. Propagation of plasmons in the nanowires is observed in the visible spectral region. We also observe a cavity effect by measuring...

  16. Rabi-like splitting from large area plasmonic microcavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Hosseini Alast

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rabi-like splitting was observed from a hybrid plasmonic microcavity. The splitting comes from the coupling of cavity mode with the surface plasmon polariton mode; anti-crossing was observed alongside the modal conversional channel on the reflection light measurement. The hybrid device consists of a 10x10 mm2 ruled metal grating integrated onto the Fabry-Perot microcavity. The 10x10 mm2 ruled metal grating fabricated from laser interference and the area is sufficiently large to be used in the practical optical device. The larger area hybrid plasmonic microcavity can be employed in polariton lasers and biosensors.

  17. Plasmon field effect transistor: A novel sensing platform for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri Kojori, Hossein

    The interest in plasmons, associated with nanostructured metals, has remarkably increased in the past decade. A Recent improvement in fabrication techniques to create well-controlled nanostructures also contributed to the rapid development of plasmonic applications, such as meta-materials, nonlinear optics, photovoltaic devices, biomedical sensors, medical therapies and spectroscopy. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is one of the successful applications, which is widely used in biomedical research. On the other hand, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is also widely studied in a broad range of applications. The distinct property of LSPR is a tailored and sharp absorption/scattering peaks depending on the shape and sizes of the metal nanostructures. In addition, plasmonics can enable integration of high speed optical circuit by taking the advantages from the current electronics and optics technologies. Thus, plasmonics is considered as a solution for the next generation systems that offers ultra-high speed data processing. In this dissertation, we will introduce a novel plasmon field effect transistor (FET) that enables direct detection and efficient amplification of plasmon energy. This FET has several advantages such as electrical isolation of plasmon absorber nanostructures from a sensing and drug screening. Currently, we have proof of concept for the antigen-antibody bonding using the plasmon field effect transistor. We will develop a multiplexing capable plasmon FET sensing platform by integrating an array of plasmon FETs with microfluidic channels to detect cancer biomarkers.

  18. Dark Field Imaging of Plasmonic Resonator Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinli, Atilla; Balci, Sinan; Karademir, Ertugrul; Kocabas, Coskun

    2012-02-01

    We present critical coupling of electromagnetic waves to plasmonic cavity arrays fabricated on Moir'e surfaces. The critical coupling condition depends on the superperiod of Moir'e surface, which also defines the coupling between the cavities. Complete transfer of the incident power can be achieved for traveling wave plasmonic resonators, which have relatively short superperiod. When the superperiod of the resonators increases, the coupled resonators become isolated standing wave resonators in which complete transfer of the incident power is not possible. Dark field plasmon microscopy imaging and polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection measurements reveal the critical coupling conditions of the cavities. We image the light scattered from SPPs in the plasmonic cavities excited by a tunable light source. Tuning the excitation wavelength, we measure the localization and dispersion of the plasmonic cavity mode. Dark field imaging has been achieved in the Kretschmann configuration using a supercontinuum white light laser equipped with an acoustooptic tunable filter. Polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection and dark field imaging measurements are correlated and found to be in agreement with FDTD simulations.

  19. Induced transparency by coupling of Tamm and defect states in tunable terahertz plasmonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, Gregory C; Allen, S James; Grine, Albert D; Bethke, Don; Reno, John L; Shaner, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystals and metamaterials have emerged as two classes of tailorable materials that enable precise control of light. Plasmonic crystals, which can be thought of as photonic crystals fabricated from plasmonic materials, Bragg scatter incident electromagnetic waves from a repeated unit cell. However, plasmonic crystals, like metamaterials, are composed of subwavelength unit cells. Here, we study terahertz plasmonic crystals of several periods in a two dimensional electron gas. This plasmonic medium is both extremely subwavelength ($\\approx \\lambda/100$) and reconfigurable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Weakly localized crystal surface states known as Tamm states are observed. By introducing an independently controlled plasmonic defect that interacts with the Tamm states, we demonstrate a frequency agile electromagnetically induced transparency phenomenon. The observed 50% ${\\it in-situ}$ tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges should be realizable in materials such as graph...

  20. Laser implantation of plasmonic nanostructures into glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Simon J.; Beliatis, Michail J.; Stolojan, Vlad; Silva, S. Ravi. P.

    2013-01-01

    A laser direct-writing method producing high-resolution patterns of gold, silver and alloy plasmonic nanoparticles implanted into the surface of glass substrates is demonstrated, by scanning a pulsed UV laser beam across selected areas of ultra-thin metal films. The nanoparticles are incorporated beneath the surface of the glass and hence the patterns are scratch-resistant. The physical mechanisms controlling the process are investigated and we demonstrate that this technique can be used to fabricate a wide range of plasmonic optical structures such as wavelength selected diffraction gratings and high-density substrates for lab-on-chip surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.A laser direct-writing method producing high-resolution patterns of gold, silver and alloy plasmonic nanoparticles implanted into the surface of glass substrates is demonstrated, by scanning a pulsed UV laser beam across selected areas of ultra-thin metal films. The nanoparticles are incorporated beneath the surface of the glass and hence the patterns are scratch-resistant. The physical mechanisms controlling the process are investigated and we demonstrate that this technique can be used to fabricate a wide range of plasmonic optical structures such as wavelength selected diffraction gratings and high-density substrates for lab-on-chip surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33629d

  1. Integrated Plasmonic Metasurfaces for Spectropolarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei Ting; Foreman, Matthew R; Liao, Chun Yen; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Wu, Pei Ru; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic metasurfaces, i.e. nano-structured thin metallic films, are promising candidates for development of compact nanoscale photonic devices, since they afford simultaneous control over the phase, momentum, amplitude and polarization of incident light. Integration of multiple metasurfaces affords optical functionality unrealisable with conventional planar photonic devices. In this work we demonstrate the principle of an integrated plasmonic metasurface (IPM) device by designing a spectropolarimeter that diffracts light with given polarization states into well-defined spatial domains. By capturing the diffracted light, the polarization state of the incident light can be fully determined using a single IPM avoiding the need for many optical components. The dispersive nature of the device provides simultaneous access to both polarization and spectral information. Our proposed IPM is robust, compact and fully compatible with today's semiconductor manufacturing technology, promising many applications in polari...

  2. Nano-plasmonic exosome diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyungsoon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Castro, Cesar M; Lee, Hakho

    2015-06-01

    Exosomes have emerged as a promising biomarker. These vesicles abound in biofluids and harbor molecular constituents from their parent cells, thereby offering a minimally-invasive avenue for molecular analyses. Despite such clinical potential, routine exosomal analysis, particularly the protein assay, remains challenging, due to requirements for large sample volumes and extensive processing. We have been developing miniaturized systems to facilitate clinical exosome studies. These systems can be categorized into two components: microfluidics for sample preparation and analytical tools for protein analyses. In this report, we review a new assay platform, nano-plasmonic exosome, in which sensing is based on surface plasmon resonance to achieve label-free exosome detection. Looking forward, we also discuss some potential challenges and improvements in exosome studies.

  3. Technological studies for plasmonic metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomescu, Roxana; Kusko, Cristian; Dinescu, Adrian; Bita, Bogdan; Popescu, Marian

    2016-12-01

    This work will present the technological processes necessary to experimentally obtain plasmonic metasurfaces for developing flat optical components or diffractive optical elements (DOE) which have reflexion functionalities. This class of metasurfaces offers the possibility to manipulate the beam shape using an array of metallic nanoscale elements patterned on a substrate. The main feature of these structures is that one can manipulate the phase behavior by modifying some of the geometrical parameters of the nano-antennas in order to achieve the required phase shift values for the desired applications. The first important step in experimentally obtaining a plasmonic metasurface structures is the electron beam lithography (EBL) followed by the lift-off method. Due to the small sizes of the gold nano-antennas and tight periodicity of the array a number of impediments can emerge in experimentally obtaining such geometries which can be overcome by the parameter optimization of the employed technologies.

  4. 3D Microstructural Architectures for Metal and Alloy Components Fabricated by 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, E.; Murr, L. E.; Amato, K. N.; Hernandez, J.; Shindo, P. W.; Gaytan, S. M.; Ramirez, D. A.; Medina, F.; Wicker, R. B.

    The layer-by-layer building of monolithic, 3D metal components from selectively melted powder layers using laser or electron beams is a novel form of 3D printing or additive manufacturing. Microstructures created in these 3D products can involve novel, directional solidification structures which can include crystallographically oriented grains containing columnar arrays of precipitates characteristic of a microstructural architecture. These microstructural architectures are advantageously rendered in 3D image constructions involving light optical microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy observations. Microstructural evolution can also be effectively examined through 3D image sequences which, along with x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis in the x-y and x-z planes, can effectively characterize related crystallographic/texture variances. This paper compares 3D microstructural architectures in Co-base and Ni-base superalloys, columnar martensitic grain structures in 17-4 PH alloy, and columnar copper oxides and dislocation arrays in copper.

  5. Innovative concepts for lightweight and manufacturing friendly vehicle components based on glassfibre fabric reinforced thermoplastics; Innovative Leichtbau- und Fertigungskonzepte fuer Fahrzeugstrukturbauteile mit glasgewebeverstaerkten Thermoplasten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehn, R. [BMW AG, EW-1, Muenchen (Germany); Seidl, F.; Peis, R.

    1995-12-31

    Fabric as well as knit reinforced thermoplastics (GF-T) are engineering composites possessing material and manufacturing potentials predestinating them for well selected applications of highly loaded vehicle components, e.g. structural frameworks of a slidedoor and a safety seat. Economical viable manufacturing of complex thermoformed GF-T space frames can be succesfully achieved under series relevant conditions by using a cost efficient thermoforming process, a joining step based on high frequency welding and the usage of recycled GF-T material manufactured by an injection-press moulding process. Detailed calculations of the economical conditions have been proven, that competitive part cost are strongly depending on acceptable material cost. An attractive solution to gain this objective can be obtained by using novel reinforced fabrics based on textile impregnated knits. (orig.) [Deutsch] Glasgewebe und -gestrickverstaerkte, technische Thermoplaste (GF-T) weisen als `Engineering Composites` werkstoff- und fertigungsspezifische Potentiale auf, die sie fuer ausgewaehlte Fahrzeugtragstrukturen, z.B. fuer einen im Crahsfall hochbelasteten Sicherheitssitz und eine Seitentuer, praedestinieren. Eine wirtschaftliche Fertigung von komplex geformten GF-T-Tragrahmen gelingt unter seriennahen Bedingungen, wenn ein kostenguenstiges Thermoformverfahren und ein Fuegeverfahren, basierend auf einem HF-Schweissprozess, und Spritzpressteile aus GF-T-Recyclat eingesetzt werden. Wirtschaftlichkeitsbetrachtungen fuer GF-T-Fahrzeugstrukturteile haben gezeigt, dass konkurrenzfaehige Gesamtkosten nur bei akzeptablen GF-T-Halbzeugkosten erreichbar sind. Ein aussichtsreicher Weg dahin ist mit dem Einsatz von textiltechnisch impraegnierten GF-T-Gestricken/Gewirken gegeben. (orig.)

  6. Phase Diagram Calculation and Fabrication of Multi-component Zirconia-Based Ceramics%多元氧化锆基陶瓷材料的相图计算和制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄水根; 李麟

    2005-01-01

    @@ Ceria-yttria co-doped zirconia-based multi-components ceramics, with superfine alumina dispersed in the matrix, possess excellent fracture toughness,strength and thermal stability. However, the mechanical properties and microstructure are strongly dependent on the composition and the fabrication procedure, especially the composition of zirconia containing multi-component ceramics.

  7. Plasmon cross transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrzynski, Leonard; Akjouj, Abdellatif; Li, Changsheng, E-mail: Abdellatif.Akjouj@univ-lille1.fr [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille1, Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie, Unite de Physique, Batiment P5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-09-14

    Plasmon cross transmission avoids the frontal collision between two plasmons traveling in opposite directions along a guide. The guide is made out of equidistant identical metal dots. Thanks to two resonator dots, the plasmon frontal impact is avoided by transmission of the two plasmons from the input guide to an output one. The resonator and guide dots are identical in size and metal composition. The dipole-dipole interactions are restricted to first nearest neighbors. A convenient metal doping is assumed to compensate exactly all attenuations. The parameters are the nearest neighbor distances between the dots. These distances are rescaled to the chain nearest neighbor distance d. The system has two symmetry mirror planes. This simple model enables us to obtain two analytic tuning relations for the plasmon cross transmission. The intensities of the transmitted signals versus kd, where k is the plasmon propagation vector, are also given. (paper)

  8. Metal/Semiconductor hybrid nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ruibin; Li, Benxia; Fang, Caihong; Wang, Jianfang

    2014-08-20

    Hybrid nanostructures composed of semiconductor and plasmonic metal components are receiving extensive attention. They display extraordinary optical characteristics that are derived from the simultaneous existence and close conjunction of localized surface plasmon resonance and semiconduction, as well as the synergistic interactions between the two components. They have been widely studied for photocatalysis, plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy, biotechnology, and solar cells. In this review, the developments in the field of (plasmonic metal)/semiconductor hybrid nanostructures are comprehensively described. The preparation of the hybrid nanostructures is first presented according to the semiconductor type, as well as the nanostructure morphology. The plasmonic properties and the enabled applications of the hybrid nanostructures are then elucidated. Lastly, possible future research in this burgeoning field is discussed.

  9. Preliminary construction of integral analysis for characteristic components in complex matrices by in-house fabricated solid-phase microextraction fibers combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhentao; Hou, Wenqian; Liu, Xiuming; Wang, Mingfeng; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-08-26

    Integral analysis plays an important role in study and quality control of substances with complex matrices in our daily life. As the preliminary construction of integral analysis of substances with complex matrices, developing a relatively comprehensive and sensitive methodology might offer more informative and reliable characteristic components. Flavoring mixtures belonging to the representatives of substances with complex matrices have now been widely used in various fields. To better study and control the quality of flavoring mixtures as additives in food industry, an in-house fabricated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was prepared based on sol-gel technology in this work. The active organic component of the fiber coating was multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with hydroxyl-terminated polydimethyldiphenylsiloxane, which integrate the non-polar and polar chains of both materials. In this way, more sensitive extraction capability for a wider range of compounds can be obtained in comparison with commercial SPME fibers. Preliminarily integral analysis of three similar types of samples were realized by the optimized SPME-GC-MS method. With the obtained GC-MS data, a valid and well-fit model was established by partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) for classification of these samples (R2X=0.661, R2Y=0.996, Q2=0.986). The validity of the model (R2=0.266, Q2=-0.465) has also approved the potential to predict the "belongingness" of new samples. With the PLS-DA and SPSS method, further screening out the markers among three similar batches of samples may be helpful for monitoring and controlling the quality of the flavoring mixtures as additives in food industry. Conversely, the reliability and effectiveness of the GC-MS data has verified the comprehensive and efficient extraction performance of the in-house fabricated fiber.

  10. Plasmon coupling in vertical split-ring resonator metamolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pin Chieh; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Chen, Wei Ting; Huang, Yao-Wei; Liao, Chun Yen; Liu, Ai Qun; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Sun, Greg; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen a number of interesting designs proposed and implemented to generate artificial magnetism at optical frequencies using plasmonic metamaterials, but owing to the planar configurations of typically fabricated metamolecules that make up the metamaterials, the magnetic response is mainly driven by the electric field of the incident electromagnetic wave. We recently fabricated vertical split-ring resonators (VSRRs) which behave as magnetic metamolecules sensitive to both incident electric and magnetic fields with stronger induced magnetic dipole moment upon excitation in comparison to planar SRRs. The fabrication technique enabled us to study the plasmon coupling between VSRRs that stand up side by side where the coupling strength can be precisely controlled by varying the gap in between. The resulting wide tuning range of these resonance modes offers the possibility of developing frequency selective functional devices such as sensors and filters based on plasmon coupling with high sensitivity. PMID:26043931

  11. Plasmonic substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbing; Zhao, Xinchu; Yi, Zhifeng; Glushenkov, Alexey M; Kong, Lingxue

    2017-09-01

    As an advanced analytical tool, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has broad applications in identification of colorants in paints and glazes, hazard detection to ensure food safety, biomedicine and diagnosis, environmental monitoring, detection of explosives and forensic science. In this review, main types of plasmonic substrates, which include solid substrate with metallic nanostructures and chemically synthesized noble metal colloids, and their fabrication methods are reviewed. The design principles for fabrication of ultrasensitive plasmonic substrates for SERS are presented on the basis of published literature. Finally, various applications of SERS substrates are described, indicating the potential of this technique in practical applications. As an ultrasensitive detection method, SERS is at the core of a rapidly expanding research field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental Studies of Selected Aqueous Electrochemical Systems Relevant for Materials Processing in the Fabrications of Microelectronic Components and Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xingzhao

    A broad range of electrochemical techniques are employed in this dissertation to investigate a selected set of aqueous electrochemical systems that are relevant for materials processing in the fabrication of microelectronic devices and direct alcohol fuel cells. In terms of technical applications, this work covers three main experimental systems: (i) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), (ii) electro-less nickel deposition, and (iii) direct alkaline glycerol fuel cells. The first two areas are related to electronic device fabrications and the third topic is related to cost-effective energy conversion. The common electrochemical aspect of these different systems is that, in all these cases the active material characteristics are governed by complex (often multi-step) reactions occurring at metal-liquid (aqueous) interfaces. Electro-analytical techniques are ideally suited for studying the detailed mechanisms of such reactions, and the present investigation is largely focused on developing adequate analytical strategies for probing these reaction mechanisms. In the fabrication of integrated circuits, certain steps of materials processing involve CMP of Al deposited on thin layers of diffusion barrier materials like Ta/TaN, Co, or Ti/TiN. A specific example of this situation is found in the processing of replacement metal gates used for high-k/metal-gate transistors. Since the commonly used barrier materials are nobler than Al, the Al interface in contact with the barrier can become prone to galvanic corrosion in the wet CMP environment. Using model systems of coupon electrodes and two specific barrier metals, Ta and Co, the electrochemical factors responsible for these corrosion effects are investigated here in a moderately acidic (pH = 4.0) abrasive-free solution. The techniques of cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy are combined with strategic measurements of galvanic currents and open circuit potentials (OCPs). L-ascorbic acid (AA) is employed as a

  13. Terahertz spectroscopy of two-dimensional subwavelength plasmonic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, Abul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Houtong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Jiaguang [OSU; Lu, Xinchao [OSU; Zhang, Weili [OSU

    2009-01-01

    The fascinating properties of plasmonic structures have had significant impact on the development of next generation ultracompact photonic and optoelectronic components. We study two-dimensional plasmonic structures functioning at terahertz frequencies. Resonant terahertz response due to surface plasmons and dipole localized surface plasmons were investigated by the state-of-the-art terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) using both transmission and reflection configurations. Extraordinary terahertz transmission was demonstrated through the subwavelength metallic hole arrays made from good conducting metals as well as poor metals. Metallic arrays m!lde from Pb, generally a poor metal, and having optically thin thicknesses less than one-third of a skin depth also contributed in enhanced THz transmission. A direct transition of a surface plasmon resonance from a photonic crystal minimum was observed in a photo-doped semiconductor array. Electrical controls of the surface plasmon resonances by hybridization of the Schottkey diode between the metallic grating and the semiconductor substrate are investigated as a function of the applied reverse bias. In addition, we have demonstrated photo-induced creation and annihilation of surface plasmons with appropriate semiconductors at room temperature. According to the Fano model, the transmission properties are characterized by two essential contributions: resonant excitation of surface plasmons and nonresonant direct transmission. Such plasmonic structures may find fascinating applications in terahertz imaging, biomedical sensing, subwavelength terahertz spectroscopy, tunable filters, and integrated terahertz devices.

  14. Micro-Fabrication and Circuit Optimization for Magnetic Components of High-Efficiency DC-DC Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Rui

    Magnetic components are essential parts of power converters. Inductors with magnetic cores are investigated. An eddy current loss model for pot-core inductors is developed with finite elemental analysis (FEA). The reliability of inductors using magnetic cores in a high-temperature environment is investigated. Working in up to 150°C circumstance for a short periods is not destructive for the inductors. Optimization of toroidal inductors in a DC-DC converter is investigated. Parasitic capacitance and the capacitive loss in toroidal inductors are modeled. Standard circuit optimization is performed to explore the energy conversion efficiency of the toroidal inductors. Thermal analysis, light-load efficiency and relative permeability of the toroidal inductor design are also investigated. The toroidal inductor can achieve about 85% efficiency for 3 A DC current and 1 W/mm2 power density. Inductor-only efficiency of toroidal inductors is investigated with revised model. At 100 MHz operating frequency, toroidal inductors can achieve more than 97% inductor efficiency with power density range of 0.7 W/mm2 to 6 W/mm2. The performance of our nanograngular magnetic core is dependent on the angle of the poling magnetic field compared to the field during operation. Experiments on a serious of samples show that the poling angle can deviate by up to 15 degrees from ideal with only a small penalty in performance. The field-angle experiment is intended to prove integrated toroidal inductor process possible. A magnetic fixture model is proposed for large-scale toroidal inductor processing.

  15. AFM reconstruction of complex-shaped chiral plasmonic nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Kondratov, Alexey V; Gainutdinov, Radmir V

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the optical metamaterial phenomena has the plasmonic nature and their investigation requires very accurate knowledge of the fabricated structures shape with a focus on the periodical features. We describe a consistent approach to the shape reconstruction of the plasmonic nanostructures. This includes vertical and tilted spike AFM probes fabrication, AFM imaging and specific post-processing. We studied a complex-shaped chiral metamaterial and conclude that the described post-processing routine extends possibilities of the existing deconvolution algorithms in the case of periodical structures with known rotational symmetry, by providing valuable information about periodical features.

  16. Functionalization of Gold-plasmonic Devices for Protein Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Battista, E.

    2017-07-13

    Here we propose a straightforward method to functionalize gold nanostructures by using an appropriate peptide sequence already selected toward gold surfaces and derivatized with another sequence for the capture of a molecular target. Large scale 3D-plasmonic devices with different nanostructures were fabricated by means of direct nanoimprint technique. The present work is aimed to address different innovative aspects related to the fabrication of large-area 3D plasmonic arrays, their direct and easy functionalization with capture elements, and their spectroscopic verifications through enhanced Raman and enhanced fluorescence techniques.

  17. Plasmon-assisted optoelectrofluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndukaife, Justus C.; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Agwu Nnanna, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    By harnessing the photo-induced heating of a single plasmonic nanostructure and AC E-field in our research at the interface between plasmonics and optofluidics we demonstrate on-demand fluid flow control with unparalleled micron per second-scale velocities. © 2015 OSA....

  18. Coupling non invasive and fast sampling of proteins from work of art surfaces to surface plasmon resonance biosensing: Differential and simultaneous detection of egg components for cultural heritage diagnosis and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, S; Carretti, E; Dei, L; Baglioni, P; Minunni, M

    2016-11-15

    Despite the wide application of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to a broad area of interests, from environment to food analysis, from drug discovery to diagnostics, its exploitation in cultural heritage conservation is still unexplored. Water-based highly viscous polymeric dispersions (HVPD) composed by partially hydrolyzed polyvinyl acetate (PVA), borax, and water, were recently developed and successfully applied for the selective removal of surface degradation patinas (i.e. protein materials, natural resins etc.) from paintings of historical and artistic interest. This approach is here coupled for the first time to a SPR biosensor to simultaneously recognize albumen, yolk, or their mixtures in HVPD extracts. Ovalbumin and immunoglobulin Y are selected as analytes for egg white and yolk recognition, respectively. The biosensor was first characterized on standard analytes within the range 0-400mgL(-1) and then on fresh and dried egg albumen and yolk down to 2·10(^4) and 1·10(^5) dilution factors, respectively. Once optimized, the biosensor was combined to the HVPD application on simulated and real art samples for the evaluation of hen egg presence in the extract, i.e. albumen, yolk, or their co-presence in the matrix. For a contemporary 'sacred icon', realized by the traditional egg tempera procedure described by Cennino Cennini, the biosensor successfully distinguished different uses of egg components for the realization of painted and gilded areas, i.e. yolk and albumen, respectively. Finally, a XVIII century italian painting whose the realization technique is unknown, was tested confirming its egg tempera-based realization technique.

  19. On the optical properties of plasmonic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Langhammer, Christoph; Apell, S. Peter

    2014-12-01

    We report on the optical properties of plasmonic glasses which are metal-dielectric composites composed of metallic inclusions in a host dielectric medium. The investigated structures are of quasi-random nature, described by the pair correlation function, featuring a minimum center-to-center distance between metallic inclusions and long range randomness. Plasmonic glasses exhibiting short-range order only may be fabricated using bottom-up, self-assembly methods and have been utilized in a number of applications such as plasmonic sensing or plasmon-enhanced solar harvesting, and may be also employed for certain non-linear applications. It is therefore important to quantify their properties. Using theoretical methods we investigate optical of 1D, 2D, and 3D structures composed of amorphous distributions of metallic spheres. It is shown, that the response of the constituent element, i.e. the single sphere localized surface plasmon resonance, is modified by the scattered fields of the other spheres in such a way that its peak position, peak amplitude, and full-width at half-maximum exhibit damped oscillations. The oscillation amplitude is set by the particle density and for the peak position may vary by up to 0.3 eV in the optical regime. Using a modified coupled dipole approach we calculate the effective (average) polarizability of plasmonic glasses and discuss their spectra as a function of the dimensionality, angle of incidence and polarization, and the minimum center-to-center distance. The analytical model is complemented and validated by T-Matrix calculations of the optical cross-sections of amorphous arrays of metallic spheres obtained using a modification of the Random Sequential Adsorption algorithm for lines, surfaces, and volumes.

  20. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications.

  1. Ultraviolet and visible range plasmonics of a topological insulator

    CERN Document Server

    Ou, Jun-Yu; Adamo, Giorgio; Sulaev, Azat; Wang, Lan; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2014-01-01

    The development of metamaterials, data processing circuits and sensors for the visible and UV parts of the spectrum is hampered by the lack of low-loss media supporting plasmonic excitations and drives the intense search for plasmonic materials beyond noble metals. By studying plasmonic nanostructures fabricated on the surface of topological insulator $\\mbox{Bi}_{1.5}\\mbox{Sb}_{0.5}\\mbox{Te}_{1.8}\\mbox{Se}_{1.2}$ we found that it is orders of magnitude better plasmonic material than gold and silver in the blue-UV range. Metamaterial fabricated from $\\mbox{Bi}_{1.5}\\mbox{Sb}_{0.5}\\mbox{Te}_{1.8}\\mbox{Se}_{1.2}$ show plasmonic resonances from 350 nm to 550 nm while surface gratings exhibit cathodoluminescent peaks from 230 nm to 1050 nm. The negative permittivity underpinning plasmonic response is attributed to the combination of bulk interband transitions and surface contribution of the topologically protected states. The importance of our result is in the identification of new mechanisms of negative permittiv...

  2. 3D 打印技术应用于加工微靶零件%3D printing technology for the fabrication of micro target components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向友来; 杜艾; 谢志勇; 叶君健; 张志华; 周斌

    2016-01-01

    Three commercial 3-dimension printers were used to fabricate micro target components with metal and resin ma-terials.A titanium metal target frame was fabricated by EOSINT M290 3D printer by the means of Laser Sintering.Resin target frames,microcavity and cylinder were fabricated by Object 30 Pro 3D printer through Polyjet means using polypropylene resin as printing material.The surface of microcavity,cylinder and slice designed with periodic pattern were fabricated by Freeform Pico 3D printer through the means of stereo lithography apparatus applying wax resin as printing material.The size and surface mor-phology of samples were characterized by optical microscope and laser scanning confocal microscope.The results show that the line roughness of titanium metal target frame is 7.3-1 7.79 μm and it decreased to 0.87-1.66 μm after polishing.The root mean square roughness (RMS)of resin frame is 2.88 μm.The RMS of the end surface of microcavity and cylinder is 2.03 μm;the de-viation between measured value and designed value of streak pattern period on the microcavity and cylinder side is 1.40% and that of amplitude is 55.50%.The RMS of slice component is 4.87 μm,the deviation of modulation pattern period is 0.80% and that of the amplitude is 3.60%.Application of commercial 3D printer to fabricate micro target components,with high efficiency and low cost provides a new approach for the manufacturing of target components used in inertial confinement fusion experiment.%采用三种商业3D 打印机尝试加工了金属材质和树脂材质的微型靶零件。通过 EOSINT M2903D 打印机以激光烧结的方式加工了钛金属靶架;通过 Object 30 Pro 3D 打印机以聚丙烯树脂为材料,通过喷射打印的方式加工了构型复杂的树脂靶架;通过 Freeform Pico 3D 打印机以蜡质树脂为材料,通过光固化成型的加工方式,获得了微腔、圆柱和平面元件,并在其表面设计了周期性图形结构。采用光学工具显

  3. Enhanced Nonlinear Effects in Metamaterials and Plasmonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Argyropoulos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we provide an overview of the anomalous and enhanced nonlinear effects available when optical nonlinear materials are combined inside plasmonic waveguide structures. Broad, bistable and all-optical switching responses are exhibited at the cut-off frequency of these waveguides, characterized by reduced Q-factor resonances. These phenomena are due to the large field enhancement obtained inside specific plasmonic gratings, which ensures a significant boosting of the nonlinear operation. Several exciting applications are proposed, which may potentially lead to new optical components and add to the optical nanocircuit paradigm.

  4. Color changing plasmonic surfaces utilizing liquid crystal (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Daniel; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2016-09-01

    Plasmonic structural color has recently garnered significant interest as an alternative to the organic dyes standard in print media and liquid crystal displays. These nanostructured metallic systems can produce diffraction limited images, be made polarization dependent, and exhibit resistance to color bleaching. Perhaps even more advantageous, their optical characteristics can also be tuned, post-fabrication, by altering the surrounding media's refractive index parallel to the local plasmonic fields. A common material with which to achieve this is liquid crystal. By reorienting the liquid crystal molecules through external electric fields, the optical resonances of the plasmonic filters can be dynamically controlled. Demonstrations of this phenomenon, however, have been limited to modest shifts in plasmon resonance. Here, we report a liquid crystal-plasmonic system with an enhanced tuning range through the use of a shallow array of nano-wells and high birefringent liquid crystal. The continuous metallic nanostructure maximizes the overlap between plasmonic fields and liquid crystal while also allowing full reorientation of the liquid crystal upon an applied electric field. Sweeping over structural dimensions and voltages results in a color palette for these dynamic reflective pixels that can further be exploited to create color tunable images. These advances make plasmonic-liquid crystal systems more attractive candidates for filter, display, and other tunable optical technologies.

  5. Ultraviolet surface plasmon-mediated low temperature hydrazine decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Siying; Sheldon, Matthew T.; Atwater, Harry A. [Thomas J. Watson Laboratories of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Liu, Wei-Guang; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William Andrew [Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-01-12

    Conventional methods require elevated temperatures in order to dissociate high-energy nitrogen bonds in precursor molecules such as ammonia or hydrazine used for nitride film growth. We report enhanced photodissociation of surface-absorbed hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) molecules at low temperature by using ultraviolet surface plasmons to concentrate the exciting radiation. Plasmonic nanostructured aluminum substrates were designed to provide resonant near field concentration at λ = 248 nm (5 eV), corresponding to the maximum optical cross section for hydrogen abstraction from N{sub 2}H{sub 4}. We employed nanoimprint lithography to fabricate 1 mm × 1 mm arrays of the resonant plasmonic structures, and ultraviolet reflectance spectroscopy confirmed resonant extinction at 248 nm. Hydrazine was cryogenically adsorbed to the plasmonic substrate in a low-pressure ambient, and 5 eV surface plasmons were resonantly excited using a pulsed KrF laser. Mass spectrometry was used to characterize the photodissociation products and indicated a 6.2× overall enhancement in photodissociation yield for hydrazine adsorbed on plasmonic substrates compared with control substrates. The ultraviolet surface plasmon enhanced photodissociation demonstrated here may provide a valuable method to generate reactive precursors for deposition of nitride thin film materials at low temperatures.

  6. Distillation of photon entanglement using a plasmonic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Motoki; Bechu, Muriel; Tame, Mark; Kaya Özdemir, Şahin; Ikuta, Rikizo; Güney, Durdu Ö.; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yang, Lan; Wegener, Martin; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly emerging platform for quantum state engineering with the potential for building ultra-compact and hybrid optoelectronic devices. Recent experiments have shown that despite the presence of decoherence and loss, photon statistics and entanglement can be preserved in single plasmonic systems. This preserving ability should carry over to plasmonic metamaterials, whose properties are the result of many individual plasmonic systems acting collectively, and can be used to engineer optical states of light. Here, we report an experimental demonstration of quantum state filtering, also known as entanglement distillation, using a metamaterial. We show that the metamaterial can be used to distill highly entangled states from less entangled states. As the metamaterial can be integrated with other optical components this work opens up the intriguing possibility of incorporating plasmonic metamaterials in on-chip quantum state engineering tasks. PMID:26670790

  7. Excitation of a surface plasmon with an elastomeric grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, A.; Dâna, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2006-07-01

    We report on a new method to excite surface plasmon polaritons on a thin metal slab surface using an elastomeric grating which is fabricated by replica molding technique. The grating is placed on the metal surface which creates a periodic perturbation on the surface matching the momentum of the incident light to that of the surface plasmon. The conformal contact between the metal surface and the elastomeric grating changes the dielectric medium periodically and allows the observation of an effective surface plasmon polariton at the metal-air and metal-polymer interfaces of the grating. To clarify the nature of the observed plasmon, comparison of the elastomeric grating with elastomeric slabs was performed with the attenuated total reflection method.

  8. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  9. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Shinpei, E-mail: Ogawa.Shimpei@eb.MitsubishiElectric.co.jp; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji [Advanced Technology R and D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, 8-1-1 Tsukaguchi-Honmachi, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-8661 (Japan); Kimata, Masafumi [College of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  10. Tapered dielectric structure in metal as a wavelength-selective surface plasmon polariton focuser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yang; Zhao Qing; Liao Zhi-Min; Yu Da-Peng

    2009-01-01

    Symmetric tapered dielectric structures in metal have demonstrated applications such as the nanofocusing of surface plasmon polaxitons, as well as the waveguiding of V-channel polaxitons. Yet the fabrication of smooth-surfaced tapered structure remains an obstacle to most researchers. We have successfully developed a handy method to fabricate metal-sandwiched tapered nanostructures simply with electron beam lithography. Though these structures are slightly different from conventional symmetric V-shaped structures, systematic simulations show that similar functionality of surface plasmon polaxiton nanofocusing can still be achieved, When parameters are properly selected, wavelengthselective nanofocusing of surface plasmon polaritons can be obtained.

  11. Surface Plasmon Polaritons of Two-Dimensional Three-Order Dendritic Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏凤; 周鲁卫

    2011-01-01

    We study surface plasmon polaritons excited on two-dimensional three-order dendritic structures. Previous studies show that split ring resonators (SRRs) can be used to obtain magnetic resonance, thus sustairdng surface waves behaving like surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). In this paper, we obtain detailed results on surface plasmon polaritons of several different grating structures and theoretically prove that this kind of structures can sustain SPPs. Besides, since dendritic structures can be fabricated by double template-assisted electrochemical deposition, it is worth noting that fabrication of SPP-based materials might be much easier.

  12. Plasmonics based micro/nano manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Quincy

    Since the advent of the Information Age, there has been an ever growing demand to continually shrink and reduce the cost of semiconductor products. To meet this demand, a great amount of research has been done to improve our current micro/nano manufacturing processes and develop the next generation of semiconductor fabrication techniques. High throughput, low cost, smaller features, high repeatability, and the simplification of the manufacturing processes are all targets that researchers continually strive for. To this day, there are no perfect systems capable of simultaneously achieving all of these targets. For this reason, much research time is spent improving and developing new techniques in hopes of developing a system that will incorporate all of these targets. While there are numerous techniques being investigated and developed every year, one of the most promising areas of research that may one day be capable of achieving our desired targets is plasmonics. Plasmonics, or the study of the free electron oscillations in metals, is the driving phenomena in the applications reported in this paper. In chapter 2, the formation of ordered gold nanoparticles on a silicon substrate through the use of energetic surface plasmons is reported. Utilizing a gold/alumina nano-hole antenna and 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser system, semi-periodic gold nanoparticles were deposited onto the surface of a silicon substrate. The novel technique is simpler, faster, and safer than any known gold nanoparticle deposition technique reported in literature. The implementation of this technique has potential wide-ranging applications in photovoltaic cells, medical products, and many others. In chapter 3, a low cost lithography technique utilizing surface plasmons is reported. In this technique, a plasmonic photomask is created by coating a pre-made porous alumina membrane with a thin aluminum layer. A coherent, 337 nm UV laser source is used to expose the photomask and excite surface plasmons along

  13. Fluorescence microscopy imaging of cells with a plasmonic dish integrally molded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, Keiko; Sasakawa, Chisato; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Kiyosue, Kazuyuki; Hosokawa, Chie; Nishii, Junji; Oike, Makoto; Kakinuma, Norihiro

    2016-03-01

    A plastic dish with a wavelength-scale periodic structure at a bottom panel was integrally molded and coated with thin metal films. The integrally molded dish called plasmonic dish was applied to bioimaging under a fluorescence microscope. On the plasmonic substrate, the enhanced electric field based on a grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance (GC-SPR) can provide an enhanced fluorescence. In this study, two kinds of cells, human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and neuronal cells, were observed in our plasmonic dish. Fluorescence images of HEK cells were above 10 times brighter than those obtained on a conventional glass-bottomed dish. Neuronal cells were successfully cultured for 10 d on the plasmonic dish integrally molded, and in fluorescence images with transmitted light, a higher contrast was obtained than in epifluorescence images. The plasmonic dish integrally molded, as well as that fabricated by the UV nanoimprint method, was also found to be useful for sensitive bioimaging.

  14. Photo-generated THz antennas: All-optical control of plasmonic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiou, Giorgos; Mulder, Peter; Bauhuis, Gerard J; Schermer, John J; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon polaritons in conducting structures give rise to enhancements of electromagnetic local fields and extinction efficiencies. Resonant conducting structures are conventionally fabricated with a fixed geometry that determines their plasmonic response. Here, we challenge this conventional approach by demonstrating the photo-generation of plasmonic materials (THz plasmonic antennas) on a flat semiconductor layer by the structured optical illumination through a spatial light modulator. Free charge carriers are photo-excited only on selected areas, which enables the definition of different plasmonic antennas on the same sample by simply changing the illumination pattern, thus without the need of physically structuring the sample. These results open a wide range of possibilities for an all-optical spatial and temporal control of resonances on plasmonic surfaces and the concomitant control of THz extinction and local field enhancements.

  15. Pushing graphene plasmon polaritons to the near-infrared window by block copolymer nanolithography

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhongli; Almdal, Kristoffer; Mortensen, N Asger; Xiao, Sanshui; Ndoni, Sokol

    2016-01-01

    Due to strong mode-confinement, long propagation-distance, and unique tunability, graphene plasmon polaritons have been widely explored in the mid-infrared and terahertz windows. However, it remains a big challenge to push graphene plasmons to shorter wavelengths in order to integrate graphene plasmon concepts with existing mature technologies in the near-infrared region. We investigate localized graphene plasmons supported by graphene nanodisk arrays, which are fabricated by a fully scalable block copolymer (BCP) self-assembly method. BCP masks with well-ordered vertically oriented cylinder or monolayer packed sphere morphologies are utilized to pattern graphene over centimeter scale dimensions. By carefully controlling the dry-etching time and by choosing an appropriate BCP mask, the wavelength of the localized graphene plasmons can be pushed down to and even below 2 um. Our results show a promising way to promote graphene plasmons for both fundamental studies and potential applications in the near-infrared...

  16. Plasmonic-Electronic Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    resonances in two dimensional electron gases. Tunable plasmon absorption resonances were observed and studied in InP-based and GaN -based HEMTs . The...Resonant terahertz absorption by plasmons in grating-gate GaN HEMT structures,” A. V. Muravjov, D. B. Veksler, X. Hu, R. Gaska, N. Pala, H. Saxena...Nov. 2009, Singapore. 4. “Terahertz Plasmons in Grating-Gate AlGaN/ GaN HEMTs ,” A.V. Muravjov, D.B. Veksler, V.V. Popov, M.S. Shur, N. Pala, X. Hu, R

  17. Plasmonics in Topological Insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ping Lai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With strong spin-orbit coupling, topological insulators have an insulating bulk state, characterized by a band gap, and a conducting surface state, characterized by a Dirac cone. Plasmons in topological insulators show high frequency-tunability in the mid-infrared and terahertz spectral regions with transverse spin oscillations, also called “spin-plasmons”. This paper presents a discussion and review of the developments in this field from the fundamental theory of plasmons in bulk, thin-film, and surface-magnetized topological insulators to the techniques of plasmon excitation and future applications.

  18. Conformal plasmonic and hyperbolic metamaterials (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Conor T.; Smalley, Joseph S. T.; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Sirbuly, Donald J.; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-09-01

    The majority of plasmonic and metamaterials research utilizes noble metals such as gold and silver which commonly operate in the visible region. However, these materials are not well suited for many applications due to their low melting temperature and polarization response at longer wavelengths. A viable alternative is aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO); a high melting point, low loss, visibly transparent conducting oxide which can be tuned to show strong plasmonic behavior in the near-infrared region. Due to it's ultrahigh conformality, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful tool for the fabrication of the nanoscale features necessary for many nanoplasmonic and optical metamaterials. Despite many attempts, high quality, low loss AZO has not been achieved with carrier concentrations high enough to support plasmonic behavior at the important telecommunication wavelengths (ca. 1550 nm) by ALD. Here, we present a simple process for synthesizing high carrier concentration, thin film AZO with low losses via ALD that match the highest quality films created by all other methods. We show that this material is tunable by thermal treatment conditions, altering aluminum concentration, and changing buffer layer thickness. The use of this process is demonstrated by creating hyperbolic metamaterials with both a multilayer and embedded nanowire geometry. Hyperbolic dispersion is proven by negative refraction and numerical calculations in agreement with the effective medium approximation. This paves the way for fabricating high quality hyperbolic metamaterial coatings on high aspect ratio nanostructures that cannot be created by any other method.

  19. Laser printing of resonant plasmonic nanovoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchmizhak, A.; Vitrik, O.; Kulchin, Yu.; Storozhenko, D.; Mayor, A.; Mirochnik, A.; Makarov, S.; Milichko, V.; Kudryashov, S.; Zhakhovsky, V.; Inogamov, N.

    2016-06-01

    Hollow reduced-symmetry resonant plasmonic nanostructures possess pronounced tunable optical resonances in the UV-vis-IR range, being a promising platform for advanced nanophotonic devices. However, the present fabrication approaches require several consecutive technological steps to produce such nanostructures, making their large-scale fabrication rather time-consuming and expensive. Here, we report on direct single-step fabrication of large-scale arrays of hollow parabolic- and cone-shaped nanovoids in silver and gold thin films, using single-pulse femtosecond nanoablation at high repetition rates. The lateral and vertical size of such nanovoids was found to be laser energy-tunable. Resonant light scattering from individual nanovoids was observed in the visible spectral range, using dark-field confocal microspectroscopy, with the size-dependent resonant peak positions. These colored geometric resonances in far-field scattering were related to excitation and interference of transverse surface plasmon modes in nanovoid shells. Plasmon-mediated electromagnetic field enhancement near the nanovoids was evaluated via finite-difference time-domain calculations for their model shapes simulated by three-dimensional molecular dynamics, and experimentally verified by means of photoluminescence microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.Hollow reduced-symmetry resonant plasmonic nanostructures possess pronounced tunable optical resonances in the UV-vis-IR range, being a promising platform for advanced nanophotonic devices. However, the present fabrication approaches require several consecutive technological steps to produce such nanostructures, making their large-scale fabrication rather time-consuming and expensive. Here, we report on direct single-step fabrication of large-scale arrays of hollow parabolic- and cone-shaped nanovoids in silver and gold thin films, using single-pulse femtosecond nanoablation at high repetition rates. The lateral and vertical size of such nanovoids was

  20. Detection of single amino acid mutation in human breast cancer by disordered plasmonic self-similar chain

    KAUST Repository

    Coluccio, M. L.

    2015-09-04

    Control of the architecture and electromagnetic behavior of nanostructures offers the possibility of designing and fabricating sensors that, owing to their intrinsic behavior, provide solutions to new problems in various fields. We show detection of peptides in multicomponent mixtures derived from human samples for early diagnosis of breast cancer. The architecture of sensors is based on a matrix array where pixels constitute a plasmonic device showing a strong electric field enhancement localized in an area of a few square nanometers. The method allows detection of single point mutations in peptides composing the BRCA1 protein. The sensitivity demonstrated falls in the picomolar (10−12 M) range. The success of this approach is a result of accurate design and fabrication control. The residual roughness introduced by fabrication was taken into account in optical modeling and was a further contributing factor in plasmon localization, increasing the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensors. This methodology developed for breast cancer detection can be considered a general strategy that is applicable to various pathologies and other chemical analytical cases where complex mixtures have to be resolved in their constitutive components.

  1. Detection of single amino acid mutation in human breast cancer by disordered plasmonic self-similar chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Das, Gobind; Nicastri, Annalisa; Perri, Angela Mena; Candeloro, Patrizio; Perozziello, Gerardo; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Gongora, Juan Sebastian Totero; Alrasheed, Salma; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Limongi, Tania; Cuda, Giovanni; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2015-09-01

    Control of the architecture and electromagnetic behavior of nanostructures offers the possibility of designing and fabricating sensors that, owing to their intrinsic behavior, provide solutions to new problems in various fields. We show detection of peptides in multicomponent mixtures derived from human samples for early diagnosis of breast cancer. The architecture of sensors is based on a matrix array where pixels constitute a plasmonic device showing a strong electric field enhancement localized in an area of a few square nanometers. The method allows detection of single point mutations in peptides composing the BRCA1 protein. The sensitivity demonstrated falls in the picomolar (10(-12) M) range. The success of this approach is a result of accurate design and fabrication control. The residual roughness introduced by fabrication was taken into account in optical modeling and was a further contributing factor in plasmon localization, increasing the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensors. This methodology developed for breast cancer detection can be considered a general strategy that is applicable to various pathologies and other chemical analytical cases where complex mixtures have to be resolved in their constitutive components.

  2. Nanostructured Transparent Conductive Oxide Films for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jongbum; Zhao, Yang; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    Transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) as substitutes to metals could offer many advantages for low-loss plasmonic and metamaterial (MM) applications in the near infrared (NIR) regime. By employing a lift-off process, we fabricated 2D-periodic arrays of TCO nanodisks and characterized the material'...

  3. Engineering Plasmonic Nanopillar Arrays for Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kaiyu

    This Ph.D. thesis presents (i) an in-depth understanding of the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the nanopillar arrays (NPs) for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and (ii) systematic ways of optimizing the fabrication process of NPs to improve their SERS efficiencies. Thi...

  4. Surface plasmon polariton beam focusing with parabolic nanoparticle chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya P.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the focusing of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) beams with parabolic chains of gold nanoparticles fabricated on thin gold films. SPP focusing with different parabolic chains is investigated in the wavelength range of 700–860 nm, both experimentally and theoretically. Mapping of SPP...

  5. Interferometric Measurement of Far Infrared Plasmons via Resonant Homodyne Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, Gregory C; Allen, S James; Grine, Albert D; Bethke, Don; Reno, John L; Shaner, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    We present an electrically tunable terahertz two dimensional plasmonic interferometer with an integrated detection element that down converts the terahertz fields to a DC signal. The integrated detector utilizes a resonant plasmonic homodyne mixing mechanism that measures the component of the plasma waves in-phase with an excitation field functioning as the local oscillator. Plasmonic interferometers with two independently tuned paths are studied. These devices demonstrate a means for developing a spectrometer-on-a-chip where the tuning of electrical length plays a role analogous to that of physical path length in macroscopic Fourier transform interferometers.

  6. Optical antennas and plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Q-Han

    2009-01-01

    Optical antenna is a nanoscale miniaturization of radio or microwave antennas that is also governed by the rule of plasmonics. We introduce various types of optical antenna and make an overview of recent developments in optical antenna research. The role of local and surface plasmons in optical antenna is explained through antenna resonance and resonance conditions for specific metal structures are explicitly obtained. Strong electric field is shown to exist within a highly localized region o...

  7. Plasmonic Graphene Transparent Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    www.MaterialsViews.com www.advopticalmat.de FU LL P A P ER Guowei Xu,* Jianwei Liu, Qian Wang , Rongqing Hui, Zhijun Chen, Victor A. Maroni, and Judy Wu Plasmonic...decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UU...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS surface plasmon, graphene, transparent conductors Guowei Xu, Jianwei Liu, Qian

  8. Plasmonic Structural Colors for Plastic Consumer Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Today colorants, such as pigments or dyes, are used to color plastic-based consumer products, either as base for solid colored bulk polymer or in inks for surface decoration. After usage, the products must be mechanically sorted by color before recycling, limiting any large-scale efficient...... recycling effort. As an alternative to chemistry-based coloring, nano-scale structural coloring has been proposed to reduce the number of materials needed and to increase pattern resolution. Here colors are created by structural based light-matter interactions in the surface. Thereby, the sorting by color...... can be avoided in the recycling state. Plasmon color technology based on aluminum has recently been firmly established as a route towards structural coloring of polymeric materials. We report on the fabrication of colors by localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) using roll-to-roll printing...

  9. Localized plasmons in graphene-coated nanospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Wubs, Martijn;

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the electromagnetic response of a spherical object coated by a conductive film, here exemplified by a graphene coating. Applying the framework of Mie-Lorenz theory augmented to account for a conductive boundary condition, we derive the multipole scattering c...... cross section and local density of states. Recent demonstrations of fabricated spherical graphene nanostructures make our study directly relevant to experiments.......We present an analytical derivation of the electromagnetic response of a spherical object coated by a conductive film, here exemplified by a graphene coating. Applying the framework of Mie-Lorenz theory augmented to account for a conductive boundary condition, we derive the multipole scattering...... for the localized plasmons. We consider graphene coatings of both dielectric and conducting spheres, where the graphene coating in the former case introduces the plasmons and in the latter case modifies in interesting ways the existing ones. Finally, we discuss our analytical results in the context of extinction...

  10. 涤/锦/棉/氨纶多组分纤维功能性面料染整工艺探讨%Dyeing and finishing process of polyester/ polyamide/ cotton/ spandex multi-component fibers functional fabric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周勇; 李春光; 吕建品; 徐惠娟; 王海花

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme cold-batch and low temperature pretreatment were used to solve the wrinkling problem of polyester/polyamide/cotton/spandex multi-component fibers fabric. The potential damage of hole on the fabric caused by low temperature oxygen bleaching was also solved. And the fluffy and soft-feeling semi-finished product was obtained. Disperse dyes with high washing fastness were selected to solve the high washing fastness of multi-component fibers fabric. The continuous pad dyeing process with acid dyes was developed and the uniform dyeing quality was obtained by adjusting three kinds of fiber hue. The functional composite finishing of fabric was carried out to increase the hydrophilic soil-release finishing on the base of outstanding fabric smoothness. The wearing comfort and washable fabric performances were achieved, improving wearability of the fabric.%采用生物酶冷堆及低温前处理工艺解决涤棉锦氨纶多纤维织物的褶皱问题,同时解决了低温氧漂中潜在破洞的损伤,半成品手感柔软、蓬松;染色工序优选高水洗牢度分散染料,解决多纤维织物的高水洗色牢度,开发酸性染料的长车轧染工艺,通过3种纤维色相调整,获得均匀、饱满的染色实物质量;在获得优良的织物外观平整度的基础上,对面料功能性复合整理,增加亲水易去污整理,使面料穿着舒适、历久常新,提高了织物的服用性能.

  11. Optimizing the fabrication process and interplay of device components of polymer solar cells using a field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, Sergii; Pershin, Anton; Baeurle, Stephan A

    2015-05-14

    Both the device composition and fabrication process are well-known to crucially affect the power conversion efficiency of polymer solar cells. Major advances have recently been achieved through the development of novel device materials and inkjet printing technologies, which permit to improve their durability and performance considerably. In this work, we demonstrate the usefulness of a recently developed field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm to investigate the influence of the material characteristics, like, e.g., electrode surfaces, polymer architectures, and impurities in the active layer, as well as post-production treatments, like, e.g., electric field alignment, on the photovoltaic performance of block-copolymer solar-cell devices. Our study reveals that a short exposition time of the polymer bulk heterojunction to the action of an external electric field can lead to a low photovoltaic performance due to an incomplete alignment process, leading to undulated or disrupted nanophases. With increasing exposition time, the nanophases align in direction to the electric field lines, resulting in an increase of the number of continuous percolation paths and, ultimately, in a reduction of the number of exciton and charge-carrier losses. Moreover, we conclude by modifying the interaction strengths between the electrode surfaces and active layer components that a too low or too high affinity of an electrode surface to one of the components can lead to defective contacts, causing a deterioration of the device performance. Finally, we infer from the study of block-copolymer nanoparticle systems that particle impurities can significantly affect the nanostructure of the polymer matrix and reduce the photovoltaic performance of the active layer. For a critical volume fraction and size of the nanoparticles, we observe a complete phase transformation of the polymer nanomorphology, leading to a drop of the internal quantum efficiency. For other particle-numbers and -sizes

  12. Optimizing the fabrication process and interplay of device components of polymer solar cells using a field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, Sergii; Pershin, Anton; Baeurle, Stephan A.

    2015-05-01

    Both the device composition and fabrication process are well-known to crucially affect the power conversion efficiency of polymer solar cells. Major advances have recently been achieved through the development of novel device materials and inkjet printing technologies, which permit to improve their durability and performance considerably. In this work, we demonstrate the usefulness of a recently developed field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm to investigate the influence of the material characteristics, like, e.g., electrode surfaces, polymer architectures, and impurities in the active layer, as well as post-production treatments, like, e.g., electric field alignment, on the photovoltaic performance of block-copolymer solar-cell devices. Our study reveals that a short exposition time of the polymer bulk heterojunction to the action of an external electric field can lead to a low photovoltaic performance due to an incomplete alignment process, leading to undulated or disrupted nanophases. With increasing exposition time, the nanophases align in direction to the electric field lines, resulting in an increase of the number of continuous percolation paths and, ultimately, in a reduction of the number of exciton and charge-carrier losses. Moreover, we conclude by modifying the interaction strengths between the electrode surfaces and active layer components that a too low or too high affinity of an electrode surface to one of the components can lead to defective contacts, causing a deterioration of the device performance. Finally, we infer from the study of block-copolymer nanoparticle systems that particle impurities can significantly affect the nanostructure of the polymer matrix and reduce the photovoltaic performance of the active layer. For a critical volume fraction and size of the nanoparticles, we observe a complete phase transformation of the polymer nanomorphology, leading to a drop of the internal quantum efficiency. For other particle-numbers and -sizes

  13. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects.

  14. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsifaki, D G; Kandyla, M; Lagoudakis, P G

    2016-05-19

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects.

  15. Plasmonic fluorescence enhancement of DBMBF2 monomers and DBMBF2-toluene exciplexes using al-hole arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, T.M.; Bochenkov, V.E.; Espinoza, J.D.A.; Smits, E.C.P.; Muzafarov, A.M.; Kononevich, Y.N.; Sutherland, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of aluminum hole arrays fabricated via colloidal lithography were investigated. By tuning the hole diameter and hole spacing independently, their influence on the Bloch wave-surface plasmon polariton (BW-SPP) and localized surface plasmon resonances resonances (LSPR) could be

  16. Plasmonic black metals via radiation absorption by two-dimensional arrays of ultra-sharp convex grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, Jonas; Eriksen, René L.; Stær, Tobias Holmgaard;

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic black surfaces formed by two-dimensional arrays of ultra-sharp convex metal grooves, in which the incident radiation is converted into gap surface plasmon polaritons (GSPPs) and subsequently absorbed (via adiabatic nanofocusing), are fabricated and investigated experimentally for gold...

  17. The role of colloidal plasmonic nanostructures in organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, C R; Honold, T; Gujar, T P; Retsch, M; Fery, A; Karg, M; Thelakkat, M

    2016-08-17

    Plasmonic particles can contribute via multiple processes to the light absorption process in solar cells. These particles are commonly introduced into organic solar cells via deposition techniques such as spin-coating or dip-coating. However, such techniques are inherently challenging to achieve homogenous surface coatings as they lack control of inter-particle spacing and particle density on larger areas. Here we introduce interface assisted colloidal self-assembly as a concept for the fabrication of well-defined macroscopic 2-dimensional monolayers of hydrogel encapsulated plasmonic gold nanoparticles. The monolayers showed a pronounced extinction in the visible wavelength range due to localized surface plasmon resonance with excellent optical homogeneity. Moreover this strategy allowed for the investigation of the potential of plasmonic monolayers at different interfaces of P3HT:PCBM based inverted organic solar cells. In general, for monolayers located anywhere underneath the active layer, the solar cell performance decreased due to parasitic absorption. However with thick active layers, where low hole mobility limited the charge transport to the top electrode, the plasmonic monolayer near that electrode spatially redistributed the light and charge generation close to the electrode led to an improved performance. This work systematically highlights the trade-offs that need to be critically considered for designing an efficient plasmonically enhanced organic solar cell.

  18. T-matrix method in plasmonics: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2013-07-01

    Optical properties of isolated and coupled plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are of great interest for many applications in nanophotonics, nanobiotechnology, and nanomedicine owing to rapid progress in fabrication, characterization, and surface functionalization technologies. To simulate optical responses from plasmonic nanostructures, various electromagnetic analytical and numerical methods have been adapted, tested, and used during the past two decades. Currently, the most popular numerical techniques are those that do not suffer from geometrical and composition limitations, e.g., the discrete dipole approximation (DDA), the boundary (finite) element method (BEM, FEM), the finite difference time domain method (FDTDM), and others. However, the T-matrix method still has its own niche in plasmonic science because of its great numerical efficiency, especially for systems with randomly oriented particles and clusters. In this review, I consider the application of the T-matrix method to various plasmonic problems, including dipolar, multipolar, and anisotropic properties of metal NPs; sensing applications; surface enhanced Raman scattering; optics of 1D-3D nanoparticle assemblies; plasmonic particles and clusters near and on substrates; and manipulation of plasmonic NPs with laser tweezers.

  19. Nanophotonic interactions between organic excitons and plasmonic metasurfaces (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Deirdre M.

    2016-09-01

    Thin-film organic semiconductor materials are emerging as energy-efficient, versatile alternatives to inorganic semiconductors for display and solid-state lighting applications. Additionally, thin-film organic laser and photovoltaic technologies, while not yet competitive with inorganic semiconductor-based analogues, can exhibit small device embodied energies (due to comparatively low temperature and low energy-use fabrication processes) which is of interest for reducing overall device cost. To improve energy conversion efficiency in thin-film organic optoelectronics, light management using nanophotonic structures is necessary. Here, our recent work on improving light trapping and light extraction in organic semiconductor thin films using nanostructured silver plasmonic metasurfaces will be presented [1,2]. Numerous optical phenomena, such as absorption induced scattering, out-of-plane waveguiding and morphology-dependent surface plasmon outcoupling, are identified due to exciton-plasmon coupling between the organic semiconductor and the metasurface. Interactions between localized and propagating surface plasmon polaritons and the excitonic transitions of a variety of organic conjugated polymer materials will be discussed and ways in which these interactions may be optimized for particular optoelectronic applications will be presented. [1] C. E. Petoukhoff, D. M. O'Carroll, Absorption-Induced Scattering and Surface Plasmon Out-Coupling from Absorber-Coated Plasmonic Metasurfaces. Nat. Commun. 6, 7899-1-13 (2015). [2] Z. Shen, D. M. O'Carroll, Nanoporous Silver Thin Films: Multifunctional Platforms for Influencing Chain Morphology and Optical Properties of Conjugated Polymers. Adv. Funct. Mater. 25, 3302-3313 (2015).

  20. Engineering plasmon dispersion relations : hybrid nanoparticle chain - substrate plasmon polaritons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaijen, Paul J.; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    We consider the dispersion relations of the optical excitations in a chain of silver nanoparticles situated above a metal substrate and show that they are hybrid plasmon polaritons, composed of localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons. We demonstrate a strong dependence of the syste

  1. Gap Surface Plasmon Waveguide Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Grøndahl; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic waveguides supporting gap surface plasmons (GSPs) localized in a dielectric spacer between metal films are investigated numerically and the waveguiding properties at telecommunication wavelengths are presented. Especially, we emphasize that the mode confinement can advantageously...

  2. Plasmon resonant gold-coated liposomes for spectrally coded content release

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Sarah J.; Troutman, Timothy S.; Romanowski, Marek

    2009-01-01

    We have recently introduced liposome-supported plasmon resonant gold nanoshells (Troutman et al., Adv. Mater. 2008, 20, 2604–2608). These plasmon resonant gold-coated liposomes are degradable into components of a size compatible with renal clearance, potentially enabling their use as multifunctional agents in applications in nanomedicine, including imaging, diagnostics, therapy, and drug delivery. The present research demonstrates that laser illumination at the wavelength matching the plasmon...

  3. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  4. Controlling plasmon-enhanced luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, H.

    2007-01-01

    Plasmons are collective oscillations of the free electrons in a metal or an ionized gas. Plasmons dominate the optical properties of noble-metal nanoparticles, which enables a variety of applications. This thesis focuses on plasmon-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) and optically

  5. High-Q plasmonic bottle microresonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, M. Narizee; Ding, Ming; Murugan, G. Senthil; Zervas, Michalis N.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a hybrid plasmonic bottle microresonator (PBMR) which supports whispering gallery modes (WGMs) along with surface plasmon waves (SPWs) for high performance optical sensor applications. The BMR was fabricated through "soften-and-compress" technique with a thin gold layer deposited on top of the resonator. A polarization-resolved measurement was set-up in order to fully characterize the fabricated PBMR. Initially, the uncoated BMR with waist diameter of 181 μm, stem diameter of 125 μm and length of 400 μm was fabricated and then gold film was deposited on the surface. Due to surface curvature, the gold film covering half of the BMR had a characteristic meniscus shape and maximum thickness of 30 nm. The meniscus provides appropriately tapered edges which facilitate the adiabatic transformation of BMR WGMs to SPWs and vice versa. This results in low transition losses, which combined with partially-metal-coated resonator, can result in high hybrid-PBMR Q's. The transmission spectra of the hybrid PBMR are dramatically different to the original uncoated BMR. Under TE(TM) excitation, the PBMR showed composite resonances with Q of ~2100(850) and almost identical ~ 3 nm FSR. We have accurately fitted the observed transmission resonances with Lorentzian-shaped curves and showed that the TE and TM excitations are actually composite resonances comprise of two and three partially overlapping resonances with Q's in excess of 2900 and 2500, respectively. To the best of our knowledge these are the highest Qs observed in plasmonic microcavities.

  6. Experimental demonstration of CMOS-compatible long-range dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polariton waveguides (LR-DLSPPWs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zektzer, R.; Desiatov, B.; Mazurski, N.;

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of long-range dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polariton waveguides (LR-DLSPPWs) that are compatible with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The demonstrated waveguide configuration represents...

  7. Strongly Confined Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons Waveguiding Enabled by Planar Staggered Plasmonic Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Longfang; Xiao, Yifan; Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Liang; Cai, Guoxiong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to achieving highly efficient and strongly confined spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) waveguides at subwavelength scale enabled by planar staggered plasmonic waveguides (PSPWs). The structure of these new waveguides consists of an ultrathin metallic strip with periodic subwavelength staggered double groove arrays supported by a flexible dielectric substrate, leading to unique staggered EM coupling and waveguiding phenomenon. The spoof SPP propagation properties, including dispersion relations and near field distributions, are numerically investigated. Furthermore, broadband coplanar waveguide (CPW) to planar staggered plasmonic waveguide (PSPW) transitions are designed to achieve smooth momentum matching and highly efficient spoof SPP mode conversion. By applying these transitions, a CPW-PSPW-CPW structure is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the PSPW’s propagation performance at microwave frequencies. The investigation results show the proposed PSPWs have excellent performance of deep subwavelength spoof SPPs confinement, long propagation length and low bend loss, as well as great design flexibility to engineer the propagation properties by adjusting their geometry dimensions and material parameters. Our work opens up a new avenue for development of various advanced planar integrated plasmonic devices and circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes.

  8. Wavelength selective uncooled infrared sensor by plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Okada, Kazuya; Fukushima, Naoki; Kimata, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    A wavelength selective uncooled infrared (IR) sensor using two-dimensional plasmonic crystals (2D PLCs) has been developed. The numerical investigation of 2D PLCs demonstrates that the wavelength of absorption can be mainly controlled by the period of the surface structure. A microelectromechanical systems-based uncooled IR sensor with 2D PLCs as the IR absorber was fabricated through a complementary metal oxide semiconductor and a micromachining technique. The selective enhancement of responsivity was observed at the wavelength that coincided with the period of the 2D-PLC absorber.

  9. Surface Plasmon Nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Brongersma, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    The development of advanced dielectric photonic structures has enabled tremendous control over the propagation and manipulation of light. Structures such as waveguides, splitters, mixers, and resonators now play a central role in the telecommunications industry. This book will discuss an exciting new class of photonic devices, known as surface plasmon nanophotonic structures. Surface plasmons are easily accessible excitations in metals and semiconductors and involve a collective motion of the conduction electrons. These excitations can be exploited to manipulate electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies ("light") in new ways that are unthinkable in conventional dielectric structures. The field of plasmon nanophotonics is rapidly developing and impacting a wide range of areas including: electronics, photonics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The book will highlight several exciting new discoveries that have been made, while providing a clear discussion of the underlying physics, the nanofabrication issues...

  10. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    CERN Document Server

    Emboras, Alexandros; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most - a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully i...

  11. Topographical coloured plasmonic coins

    CERN Document Server

    Guay, Jean-Michel; Côté, Guillaume; Charron, Martin; Ramunno, Lora; Berini, Pierre; Weck, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    The use of metal nanostructures for colourization has attracted a great deal of interest with the recent developments in plasmonics. However, the current top-down colourization methods based on plasmonic concepts are tedious and time consuming, and thus unviable for large-scale industrial applications. Here we show a bottom-up approach where, upon picosecond laser exposure, a full colour palette independent of viewing angle can be created on noble metals. We show that colours are related to a single laser processing parameter, the total accumulated fluence, which makes this process suitable for high throughput industrial applications. Statistical image analyses of the laser irradiated surfaces reveal various distributions of nanoparticle sizes which control colour. Quantitative comparisons between experiments and large-scale finite-difference time-domain computations, demonstrate that colours are produced by selective absorption phenomena in heterogeneous nanoclusters. Plasmonic cluster resonances are thus fo...

  12. Multifunctional cell therapeutics with plasmonic nanobubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Kashinath, Shruti; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2012-03-01

    We report our new discovery of the nanophenomenon called plasmonic nanobubbles to devise faster, safer and more accurate ways of manipulating the components of human tissue grafts. The reported work facilitates future cell and gene therapies by allowing specific cell subsets to be positively or negatively selected for culture, genetic engineering or elimination. The technology will have application for a wide range of human tissues that can be used to treat a multiplicity of human diseases.

  13. Experimental observation of plasmons in a graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate graphene-plasmon polariton excitation in a continuous graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating. The subwavelength silicon grating is fabricated by a nanosphere lithography technique with a self-assembled nanosphere array...... as a template. Measured transmission spectra illustrate the excitation of graphene-plasmon polaritons, which is further supported by numerical simulations and theoretical prediction of plasmon-band diagrams. Our grating-assisted coupling to graphene-plasmon polaritons forms an important platform for graphene...

  14. Plasmonic photosensitization of a wide band gap semiconductor: converting plasmons to charge carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeen, Syed; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo; Moses, Daniel; Lee, Joun; Moskovits, Martin

    2011-12-14

    A fruitful paradigm in the development of low-cost and efficient photovoltaics is to dope or otherwise photosensitize wide band gap semiconductors in order to improve their light harvesting ability for light with sub-band-gap photon energies.(1-8) Here, we report significant photosensitization of TiO2 due to the direct injection by quantum tunneling of hot electrons produced in the decay of localized surface-plasmon polaritons excited in gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) embedded in the semiconductor (TiO2). Surface plasmon decay produces electron-hole pairs in the gold.(9-15) We propose that a significant fraction of these electrons tunnel into the semiconductor's conduction band resulting in a significant electron current in the TiO2 even when the device is illuminated with light with photon energies well below the semiconductor's band gap. Devices fabricated with (nonpercolating) multilayers of AuNPs in a TiO2 film produced over 1000-fold increase in photoconductance when illuminated at 600 nm over what TiO2 films devoid of AuNPs produced. The overall current resulting from illumination with visible light is ∼50% of the device current measured with UV (ℏω>Eg band gap) illumination. The above observations suggest that plasmonic nanostructures (which can be fabricated with absorption properties that cover the full solar spectrum) can function as a viable alternative to organic photosensitizers for photovoltaic and photodetection applications.

  15. A comparative study of semiconductor-based plasmonic metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, Gururaj V; 10.1016/j.metmat.2010.11.001

    2011-01-01

    Recent metamaterial (MM) research faces several problems when using metal-based plasmonic components as building blocks for MMs. The use of conventional metals for MMs is limited by several factors: metals such as gold and silver have high losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) ranges and very large negative real permittivity values, and in addition, their optical properties cannot be tuned. These issues that put severe constraints on the device applications of MMs could be overcome if semiconductors are used as plasmonic materials instead of metals. Heavily doped, wide bandgap oxide semiconductors could exhibit both a small negative real permittivity and relatively small losses in the NIR. Heavily doped oxides of zinc and indium were already reported to be good, low loss alternatives to metals in the NIR range. Here, we consider these transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) as alternative plasmonic materials for many specific applications ranging from surface-plasmon-polariton waveguides to MMs with hype...

  16. Handbook of molecular plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Sala, Fabio Della

    2013-01-01

    While several reviews and books on surface nanophotonics and fluorescence spectroscopy are available, an updated focus on molecular plasmonics, including both theoretical methods and experimental aspects, is still lacking. This handbook is a comprehensive overview on the physics of the plasmon-emitter interaction, ranging from electromagnetism to quantum mechanics, from metal-enhanced fluorescence to surface-enhanced Raman scattering, from optical microscopy to synthesis of metal nanoparticles, filling the gap in the literature of this merging field. It allows experimentalists to have a solid

  17. Plasmons in QED vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, E. Yu.; Kudrin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The problem of longitudinal oscillations of an electric field and a charge polarization density in a quantum electrodynamics (QED) vacuum is considered. Within the framework of semiclassical analysis, we calculate time-periodic solutions of bosonized (1 +1 )-dimensional QED (massive Schwinger model). Applying the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition, we determine the mass spectrum of charge-zero bound states (plasmons) which correspond in quantum theory to the found classical solutions. We show that the existence of such plasmons does not contradict any fundamental physical laws and study qualitatively their excitation in a (3 +1 )-dimensional real world.

  18. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    -beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...... that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours...

  19. Plasmonic transparent conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Andreas C.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.

    2016-09-01

    Many of today's technological applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, displays, and touch screens, require materials that are simultaneously optically transparent and electrically conducting. Here we explore transparent conductors based on the excitation of surface plasmons in nanostructured metal films. We measure both the optical and electrical properties of films perforated with nanometer-scale features and optimize the design parameters in order to maximize optical transmission without sacrificing electrical conductivity. We demonstrate that plasmonic transparent conductors can out-perform indium tin oxide in terms of both their transparency and their conductivity.

  20. A facile fabrication of plasmonic g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag ternary heterojunction visible-light photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Kai, E-mail: daikai940@chnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, 235000 (China); Lv, Jiali [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, 235000 (China); Lu, Luhua, E-mail: lhlu@cug.edu.cn [Faculty of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074 (China); Liang, Changhao [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, 235000 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Physics and Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Geng, Lei; Zhu, Guangping [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, 235000 (China)

    2016-07-01

    It's important to reduce recombination of electrons and holes and enhance charge transfer through fine controlled interfacial structure. In this work, novel graphitic-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})/Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag ternary photocatalyst has been synthesized by deposition of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} onto g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} template and followed by sun light reduction of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} into Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag. As-prepared g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag presented significantly enhanced photocatalytic performance in degrading methylene blue (MB) under 410 nm LED light irradiation. Metallic Ag{sup 0} is used as plasmonic hot spots to generate high energy charge carriers. Optimal g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} content has been confirmed to be 40 wt%, corresponding to apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant kapp of 0.0298 min{sup −1}, which is 3.3 times and 37.3 times more than that of pure g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}, respectively. This novel ternary g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag structure material is an ideal candidate in environmental treatment and purifying applications. - Graphical abstract: A high efficient plasmonic graphitic-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag ternary nanocomposite photocatalyst was synthesized. - Highlights: • g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag ternary nanocomposite photocatalyst was prepared. • g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag showed high photocatalytic activity. • g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag showed long reusable life.

  1. Nonlinear Refractory Plasmonics with Titanium Nitride Nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Lili; Bagheri, Shahin; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Hentschel, Mario; Zgrabik, Christine M; Metzger, Bernd; Linnenbank, Heiko; Hu, Evelyn L; Giessen, Harald

    2016-09-14

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a novel refractory plasmonic material which can sustain high temperatures and exhibits large optical nonlinearities, potentially opening the door for high-power nonlinear plasmonic applications. We fabricate TiN nanoantenna arrays with plasmonic resonances tunable in the range of about 950-1050 nm by changing the antenna length. We present second-harmonic (SH) spectroscopy of TiN nanoantenna arrays, which is analyzed using a nonlinear oscillator model with a wavelength-dependent second-order response from the material itself. Furthermore, characterization of the robustness upon strong laser illumination confirms that the TiN antennas are able to endure laser irradiation with high peak intensity up to 15 GW/cm(2) without changing their optical properties and their physical appearance. They outperform gold antennas by one order of magnitude regarding laser power sustainability. Thus, TiN nanoantennas could serve as promising candidates for high-power/high-temperature applications such as coherent nonlinear converters and local heat sources on the nanoscale.

  2. Arbitrary bending plasmonic light waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

    2014-01-17

    We demonstrate the generation of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams along arbitrary caustic curvatures. These plasmonic beams are excited by free-space beams through a two-dimensional binary plasmonic phase mask, which provides the missing momentum between the two beams in the direction of propagation and sets the required phase for the plasmonic beam in the transverse direction. We examine the cases of paraxial and nonparaxial curvatures and show that this highly versatile scheme can be designed to produce arbitrary plasmonic self-accelerating beams. Several different plasmonic beams, which accelerate along polynomial and exponential trajectories, are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally, with a direct measurement of the plasmonic light intensity using a near-field scanning optical microscope.

  3. Arbitrary Bending Plasmonic Light Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Itai

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams along arbitrary caustic curvatures. These plasmonic beams are excited by free-space beams through a two-dimensional binary plasmonic phase mask, which provides the missing momentum between the two beams in the direction of propagation, and sets the required phase for the plasmonic beam in the transverse direction. We examine the cases of paraxial and non-paraxial curvatures and show that this highly versatile scheme can be designed to produce arbitrary plasmonic self-accelerating beams. Several different plasmonic beams, which accelerate along polynomial and exponential trajectories, are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally, with a direct measurement of the plasmonic light intensity using a near-field-scanning-optical-microscope.

  4. Terahertz Nonlinearity in Graphene Plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; Winnerl, Stephan; Sushkov, Andrei B; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E; Mittendorff, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength graphene structures support localized plasmonic resonances in the terahertz and mid-infrared spectral regimes. The strong field confinement at the resonant frequency is predicted to significantly enhance the light-graphene interaction, which could enable nonlinear optics at low intensity in atomically thin, sub-wavelength devices. To date, the nonlinear response of graphene plasmons and their energy loss dynamics have not been experimentally studied. We measure and theoretically model the terahertz nonlinear response and energy relaxation dynamics of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons. We employ a THz pump-THz probe technique at the plasmon frequency and observe a strong saturation of plasmon absorption followed by a 10 ps relaxation time. The observed nonlinearity is enhanced by two orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned graphene with no plasmon resonance. We further present a thermal model for the nonlinear plasmonic absorption that supports the experimental results.

  5. Synthesis and surface plasmonic properties of ultra-thick silver nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jiaojiao; Wu, Fan; Fan, Fengru; Wang, Wenhui; Xu, Zhongfeng; Li, Fuli

    2016-06-29

    Metallic nanowires (NWs) possess significant potential for applications in integrated photonic and electronic devices at the nanoscale. Considering the manipulation of NWs and energy loss associated with surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) modes which serve as signal carriers in the nanophotonic devices, NWs with large diameters are significant. In this work, we report a successive multi-step polyol process approach for the synthesis of ultra-thick silver nanowires (Ag NWs) and investigate their energy loss. Thin Ag NWs prepared in the first step are used as seeds for the further growth of thick Ag NWs in the subsequent steps, where Ag NWs with diameter as large as 1820 nm have been prepared. We further investigate the SPP propagation properties of these thick Ag NWs, and find that energy loss is decreased in Ag NWs with improved diameter. Our experimental results are important for the design and fabrication of SPP-based nanophotonic components and circuits.

  6. Efficient graphene based electro-optical modulator enabled by interfacing plasmonic slot and silicon waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Yunhong; Zhu, Xiaolong; Hu, Hao; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Mortensen, N Asger; Xiao, Sanshui

    2016-01-01

    Graphene based electro-absorption modulators involving dielectric optical waveguides or resonators have been widely explored, suffering however from weak graphene-light interaction due to poor overlap of optical fields with graphene layers. Surface plasmon polaritons enable light concentration within subwavelength regions opening thereby new avenues for strengthening graphene-light interactions. Through careful optimization of plasmonic slot waveguides, we demonstrate efficient and compact graphene-plasmonic modulators that are interfaced with silicon waveguides and thus fully integrated in the silicon-on-insulator platform. By advantageously exploiting low-loss plasmonic slot-waveguide modes, which weakly leak into a substrate while feature strong fields within the two-layer-graphene covered slots in metal, we have successfully achieved a tunability of 0.13 dB/{\\mu}m for our fabricated graphene-plasmonic waveguide modulators with low insertion loss, which significantly exceeds the performance of previously r...

  7. Direct photocatalysis for organic synthesis by using plasmonic-metal nanoparticles irradiated with visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qi; Jaatinen, Esa; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in direct-use plasmonic-metal nanoparticles (NPs) as photocatalysts to drive organic synthesis reactions under visible-light irradiation have attracted great interest. Plasmonic-metal NPs are characterized by their strong interaction with visible light through excitation of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Herein, we review recent developments in direct photocatalysis using plasmonic-metal NPs and their applications. We focus on the role played by the LSPR of the metal NPs in catalyzing organic transformations and, more broadly, the role that light irradiation plays in catalyzing the reactions. Through this, the reaction mechanisms that these light-excited energetic electrons promote will be highlighted. This review will be of particular interest to researchers who are designing and fabricating new plasmonic-metal NP photocatalysts by identifying important reaction mechanisms that occur through light irradiation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Engineering photonic and plasmonic light emission enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Nathaniel

    Semiconductor photonic devices are a rapidly maturing technology which currently occupy multi-billion dollar markets in the areas of LED lighting and optical data communication. LEDs currently demonstrate the highest luminous efficiency of any light source for general lighting. Long-haul optical data communication currently forms the backbone of the global communication network. Proper design of light management is required for photonic devices, which can increase the overall efficiency or add new device functionality. In this thesis, novel methods for the control of light propagation and confinement are developed for the use in integrated photonic devices. The first part of this work focuses on the engineering of field confinement within deep subwavelength plasmonic resonators for the enhancement of light-matter interaction. In this section, plasmonic ring nanocavities are shown to form gap plasmon modes confined to the dielectric region between two metal layers. The scattering properties, near-field enhancement and photonic density of states of nanocavity devices are studied using analytic theory and 3D finite difference time domain simulations. Plasmonic ring nanocavities are fabricated and characterized using photoluminescence intensity and decay rate measurements. A 25 times increase in the radiative decay rate of Er:Si02 is demonstrated in nanocavities where light is confined to volumes as small as 0.01( ln )3. The potential to achieve lasing, due to the enhancement of stimulated emission rate in ring nanocavities, is studied as a route to Si-compatible plasmon-enhanced nanolasers. The second part of this work focuses on the manipulation of light generated in planar semiconductor devices using arrays of dielectric nanopillars. In particular, aperiodic arrays of nanopillars are engineered for omnidirectional light extraction enhancement. Arrays of Er:SiNx, nanopillars are fabricated and a ten times increase in light extraction is experimentally demonstrated

  9. Plasmonics for emerging quantum technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2017-01-01

    Expanding the frontiers of information processing technologies and, in particular, computing with ever-increasing speed and capacity has long been recognized as an important societal challenge, calling for the development of the next generation of quantum technologies. With its potential to exponentially increase computing power, quantum computing opens up possibilities to carry out calculations that ordinary computers could not finish in the lifetime of the universe, whereas optical communications based on quantum cryptography become completely secure. At the same time, the emergence of Big Data and the ever-increasing demands of miniaturization and energy-saving technologies bring about additional fundamental problems and technological challenges to be addressed in scientific disciplines dealing with light-matter interactions. In this context, quantum plasmonics represents one of the most promising and fundamental research directions and, indeed, the only one that enables the ultimate miniaturization of photonic components for quantum optics when being taken to extreme limits in light-matter interactions.

  10. Chlorine triggered de-alloying of AuAg@Carbon nanodots: Towards fabrication of a dual signalling assay combining the plasmonic property of bimetallic alloy nanoparticles and photoluminescence of carbon nanodots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Zahra; Safavi, Afsaneh; Abdollahi, Seyyed Hossein

    2017-03-22

    Integration of Au-Ag alloy and fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) into a single platform resulted in a new dual sensing assay for chlorine. Selective etching of Ag from AuAg@C-dots was transformed into: (i) colorimetric signal by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) tuning of the alloy and (ii) fluorimetric signal by perturbation of fluorescence energy transfer between C-dots and alloy nanoparticles. Fast oxidizing of silver atoms incorporated in the bimetallic structure induced by chlorine resulted in selective de-alloying of bimetallic hybrid nanoparticles and an intense visible change of the colloidal dispersion color. On the other hand, the systematic change in Au/Ag ratio strongly affected the emission intensity of C-dots in the hybrid structure leading to an enhancement in the fluorescence signal. Thus, the assay enables the detection of chlorine both under visible and UV lights with high sensitivity. The detection limit (DL) values were calculated as 6.2 × 10(-7) M and 5.1 × 10(-7) M through colorimetric and fluorimetric pathways, respectively. Most importantly, it was demonstrated to be selective over common cations, anions and some reactive oxygen species (ROS). This assay was successfully applied to the determination of chlorine concentration in bleach solution and tap water. It is robust and is suitable for cost effective chlorine measurement in environmental samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Plasmonic properties and applications of metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Yurong

    Plasmonic properties and the related novel applications are studied on various types of metallic nano-structures in one, two, or three dimensions. For 1D nanostructure, the motion of free electrons in a metal-film with nanoscale thickness is confined in its normal dimension and free in the other two. Describing the free-electron motion at metal-dielectric surfaces, surface plasmon polariton (SPP) is an elementary excitation of such motions and is well known. When further perforated with periodic array of holes, periodicity will introduce degeneracy, incur energy-level splitting, and facilitate the coupling between free-space photon and SPP. We applied this concept to achieve a plasmonic perfect absorber. The experimentally observed reflection dip splitting is qualitatively explained by a perturbation theory based on the above concept. If confined in 2D, the nanostructures become nanowires that intrigue a broad range of research interests. We performed various studies on the resonance and propagation of metal nanowires with different materials, cross-sectional shapes and form factors, in passive or active medium, in support of corresponding experimental works. Finite- Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulations show that simulated results agrees well with experiments and makes fundamental mode analysis possible. Confined in 3D, the electron motions in a single metal nanoparticle (NP) leads to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) that enables another novel and important application: plasmon-heating. By exciting the LSPR of a gold particle embedded in liquid, the excited plasmon will decay into heat in the particle and will heat up the surrounding liquid eventually. With sufficient exciting optical intensity, the heat transfer from NP to liquid will undergo an explosive process and make a vapor envelop: nanobubble. We characterized the size, pressure and temperature of the nanobubble by a simple model relying on Mie calculations and continuous medium assumption. A

  12. Versatile Micropatterning of Plasmonic Nanostructures by Visible Light Induced Electroless Silver Plating on Gold Nanoseeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Hironou, Asami; Shen, ZhengJun; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2016-09-14

    A versatile fabrication technique for plasmonic silver (Ag) nanostructures that uses visible light exposure for micropatterning and plasmon resonance tuning is presented. The surface of a glass substrate modified with gold (Au) nanoseeds by a thermal dewetting process was used as a Ag plating platform. When a solution containing silver nitrate and sodium citrate was dropped on the Au nanoseeds under visible light exposure, the plasmon-mediated reduction of Ag ions was induced on the Au nanoseeds to form Ag nanostructures. The plasmon resonance spectra of Ag nanostructures were examined by an absorption spectral measurement and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. Some examples of Ag nanostructure patterning were demonstrated by means of light exposure through a photomask, direct writing with a focused laser beam, and the interference between two laser beams. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was conducted with fabricated Ag nanostructures.

  13. 2012 PLASMONICS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JUNE 10-15, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engheta, Nader

    2012-06-15

    The focus of this meeting is on recent advances in science and engineering of plasmonic optics and its applications in the design of novel devices and components. The impacts of plasmonic phenomena on other disciplines such as chemistry, biology, medicine and engineering will also be discussed.

  14. On-Chip Single-Plasmon Nanocircuit Driven by a Self-Assembled Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofei; Jiang, Ping; Razinskas, Gary; Huo, Yongheng; Zhang, Hongyi; Kamp, Martin; Rastelli, Armando; Schmidt, Oliver G; Hecht, Bert; Lindfors, Klas; Lippitz, Markus

    2017-07-12

    Quantum photonics holds great promise for future technologies such as secure communication, quantum computation, quantum simulation, and quantum metrology. An outstanding challenge for quantum photonics is to develop scalable miniature circuits that integrate single-photon sources, linear optical components, and detectors on a chip. Plasmonic nanocircuits will play essential roles in such developments. However, for quantum plasmonic circuits, integration of stable, bright, and narrow-band single photon sources in the structure has so far not been reported. Here we present a plasmonic nanocircuit driven by a self-assembled GaAs quantum dot. Through a planar dielectric-plasmonic hybrid waveguide, the quantum dot efficiently excites narrow-band single plasmons that are guided in a two-wire transmission line until they are converted into single photons by an optical antenna. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fully on-chip plasmonic nanocircuits for quantum optical applications.

  15. Effect of graphene on plasmonic metasurfaces at infrared wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Shinpei, E-mail: Ogawa.Shimpei@eb.MitsubishiElectric.co.jp; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Ueno, Masashi [Advanced Technology R and D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, 8-1-1 Tsukaguchi-Honmachi, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-8661 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Significant enhancement of infrared transmittance by the presence of a graphene layer on a plasmonic metasurface (PLM) has been demonstrated. PLMs with different configurations were fabricated, and their transmittance with and without graphene was compared. Selective enhancement by graphene occurred at the plasmon resonance wavelength. The degree of enhancement was found to depend on the width of the gap between the periodic metal regions in the PLM. A maximum enhancement of ∼210% was achieved at a wavelength of 10 μm. The ability to achieve such a drastic increase in transmittance at the plasmon resonant wavelength is expected to lead to improvements in the performance of energy collecting devices and optical sensors.

  16. Effect of graphene on plasmonic metasurfaces at infrared wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinpei Ogawa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Significant enhancement of infrared transmittance by the presence of a graphene layer on a plasmonic metasurface (PLM has been demonstrated. PLMs with different configurations were fabricated, and their transmittance with and without graphene was compared. Selective enhancement by graphene occurred at the plasmon resonance wavelength. The degree of enhancement was found to depend on the width of the gap between the periodic metal regions in the PLM. A maximum enhancement of ∼210% was achieved at a wavelength of 10 μm. The ability to achieve such a drastic increase in transmittance at the plasmon resonant wavelength is expected to lead to improvements in the performance of energy collecting devices and optical sensors.

  17. Surface roughness effects on aluminium-based ultraviolet plasmonic nanolasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chou, Yu-Hsun; Chou, Bo-Tsun; Hong, Kuo-Bin; Shih, Jheng-Hong; Lin, Sheng-Di; Lu, Tien-Chang; Lin, Tzy-Rong

    2017-01-01

    We systematically investigate the effects of surface roughness on the characteristics of ultraviolet zinc oxide plasmonic nanolasers fabricated on aluminium films with two different degrees of surface roughness. We demonstrate that the effective dielectric functions of aluminium interfaces with distinct roughness can be analysed from reflectivity measurements. By considering the scattering losses, including Rayleigh scattering, electron scattering, and grain boundary scattering, we adopt the modified Drude-Lorentz model to describe the scattering effect caused by surface roughness and obtain the effective dielectric functions of different Al samples. The sample with higher surface roughness induces more electron scattering and light scattering for SPP modes, leading to a higher threshold gain for the plasmonic nanolaser. By considering the pumping efficiency, our theoretical analysis shows that diminishing the detrimental optical losses caused by the roughness of the metallic interface could effectively lower (~33.1%) the pumping threshold of the plasmonic nanolasers, which is consistent with the experimental results.

  18. Plasmonic lasing of nanocavity embedding in metallic nanoantenna array

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Cheng; Ni, Yuan; Li, Mingzhuo; Mao, Lei; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Douguo; Ming, Hai; Wang, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanolasers have ultrahigh lasing thresholds, especially those devices for which all three dimensions are truly subwavelength. Because of a momentum mismatch between the propagating light and localized optical field of the subwavelength nanocavity, poor optical pumping efficiency is another important reason for the ultrahigh threshold but is normally always ignored. Based on a cavity-embedded nanoantenna array design, we demonstrate a room-temperature low-threshold plasmonic nanolaser that is robust, reproducible, and easy-to-fabricate using chemical-template lithography. The mode volume of the device is~0.22({\\lambda}/2n)3 (here,{\\lambda} is resonant wavelength and n is the refractive index), and the experimental lasing threshold produced is ~2.70MW/mm2. The lasing polarization and the function of nanoantenna array are investigated in detail. Our work provides a new strategy to achieve room-temperature low-threshold plasmonic nanolasers of interest in applications to biological sensoring and informa...

  19. Exploring plasmonic coupling in hole-cap arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Schmidt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasmonic coupling between gold caps and holes in thin films was investigated experimentally and through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD calculations. Sparse colloidal lithography combined with a novel thermal treatment was used to control the vertical spacing between caps and hole arrays and compared to separated arrays of holes or caps. Optical spectroscopy and FDTD simulations reveal strong coupling between the gold caps and both Bloch Wave-surface plasmon polariton (BW-SPP modes and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR-type resonances in hole arrays when they are in close proximity. The interesting and complex coupling between caps and hole arrays reveals the details of the field distribution for these simple to fabricate structures.

  20. Nonlinear Phase Control and Anomalous Phase Matching in Plasmonic Metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, Euclides; Prior, Yehiam

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces, and in particular those containing plasmonic-based metallic elements, constitute a particularly attractive set of materials. By means of modern nanolithographic fabrication techniques, flat, ultrathin optical elements may be constructed. However, in spite of their strong optical nonlinearities, plasmonic metasurfaces have so far been investigated mostly in the linear regime. Here we introduce full nonlinear phase control over plasmonic elements in metasurfaces. We show that for nonlinear interactions in a phase-gradient nonlinear metasurface a new anomalous nonlinear phase matching condition prevails, which is the nonlinear analog of the generalized Snell law demonstrated for linear metasurfaces. This phase matching condition is very different from the other known phase matching schemes. The subwavelength phase control of optical nonlinearities provides a foundation for the design of flat nonlinear optical elements based on metasurfaces. Our demonstrated flat nonlinear elements (i.e. lenses) act...

  1. Manipulating surface plasmon waves by transformation optics: Design examples of a beam squeezer, bend,and omnidirectional absorber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhen-Zhong; Feng Yi-Jun; Wang Zheng-Bin; Zhao Jun-Ming; Jiang Tian

    2013-01-01

    We present several design examples of how to apply transformation optics and curved space under coordinate transformarion to manipulating the surface plasmon waves in a controlled manner.We demonstrate in detail the design procedure of the plasmonic wave squeezer,in-plane bend and omnidirectional absorber.We show that the approximation method of modifying only the dielectric material of a dielectric-metal surface of the plasmonic device could lead to acceptable performance,which facilitates the fabrication of the device.The functionality of the proposed plasmonic device is verified using three-dimensional full-wave electromagnetic simulations.Aiming at practical realization,we also show the design of a plasmonic in-plane bend and omnidirectional absorber by an alternative transformation scheme,which results in a simple device structure with a tapered isotropic dielectric cladding layer on the top of the metal surface that can be fabricated with existing nanotechnology.

  2. Observation of Hot Electrons in Surface-Wave Plasmas Excited by Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ye-Lin; CHEN Zhao-Quan; LIU Ming-Hai; HONG Ling-Li; LI Ping; ZHENG Xiao-Liang; XIA Guang-Qing; HU Xi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) are studied in the planar-type surface-wave plasma (SWP)caused by resonant excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a single cylindrical probe.Sustained plasma characteristics can be considered as a bi-Maxwellian EEDF,which correspond to a superposition of the bulk low-temperature electron and the high-energy electron beam-like part.The beam component energy is pronounced at about 10eV but the bulk part is lower than 3.5eV.The hot electrons included in the proposed plasmas play a significant role in plasma heating and further affect the discharge chemistry.During the past several years,in the fabrication ofamorphous or crystalline silicon films,diamond film synthesis and carbon nanotube growth,the large-area overdense plasma source has been useful.In electronic device fabrication techniques such as etching,ashing or plasma chemical vapor deposition,overdense electrons and radicals are required,especially hot electrons.Among the various plasma devices,the planar-type surface-wave plasma (SWP) source is an advanced plasma source,which is a type of promising plasma source satisfying the above rigorous requirements for large-area plasma processing.%The electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) are studied in the planar-type surface-wave plasma (SWP) caused by resonant excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a single cylindrical probe. Sustained plasma characteristics can be considered as a bi-Maxwellian EEDF, which correspond to a superposition of the bulk low-temperature electron and the high-energy electron beam-like part. The beam component energy is pronounced at about 10 eV but the bulk part is lower than 3.5 eV. The hot electrons included in the proposed plasmas play a significant role in plasma heating and further affect the discharge chemistry.

  3. Enhanced vibrational spectroscopy, intracellular refractive indexing for label-free biosensing and bioimaging by multiband plasmonic-antenna array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Kuang; Chang, Ming-Hsuan; Wu, Hsieh-Ting; Lee, Yao-Chang; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-10-15

    In this study, we report a multiband plasmonic-antenna array that bridges optical biosensing and intracellular bioimaging without requiring a labeling process or coupler. First, a compact plasmonic-antenna array is designed exhibiting a bandwidth of several octaves for use in both multi-band plasmonic resonance-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy and refractive index probing. Second, a single-element plasmonic antenna can be used as a multifunctional sensing pixel that enables mapping the distribution of targets in thin films and biological specimens by enhancing the signals of vibrational signatures and sensing the refractive index contrast. Finally, using the fabricated plasmonic-antenna array yielded reliable intracellular observation was demonstrated from the vibrational signatures and intracellular refractive index contrast requiring neither labeling nor a coupler. These unique features enable the plasmonic-antenna array to function in a label-free manner, facilitating bio-sensing and imaging development.

  4. An Open-Source Building System with Digitally Fabricated Components: A design- and production process that makes optimal use of the predicted next industrial revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoutjesdijk, P.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    With digital fabrication, our hardware is starting to bear greater resemblance to software. This paper explores the potential of processes used in the development of open-source software for the field of Architecture. The developed design process is connected to a building system that provides new i

  5. Plasmonics light modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are waves propagating at the interface between a metal and a dielectric and, due to their tight confinement, may be used for nanoscale control of the light propagation. Thus, photonic integrated circuits can benefit from devices using SPPs because of their highly...

  6. Photocatalysis: Plasmonic solar desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Li, Yat

    2016-06-01

    The sustainability of many existing desalination technologies is questionable. Plasmon-mediated solar desalination has now been demonstrated for the first time, using an aluminium structure that absorbs photons spanning the 200 nm to 2,500 nm wavelength range, and is both cheap and 'clean'.

  7. Aluminum for Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    in plasmon-enhanced light harvesting,14 photocatalysis ,511 surface- enhanced spectroscopies,1216 optics-based sensing,1722 nonlinear optics,2326...optical response of Al nanoparticles has appeared inconsistent relative to calculated spectra, even forwell-characterized geometries. Some studies have...model- ing their optical response. These results pro- vide a method for estimating the metallic purity of aluminum nanoparticles directly from their

  8. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications.

  9. Cathodoluminescence plasmon microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuttge, M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are electromagnetic waves that are strongly coupled to the collective oscillation of free electrons at an interface between a dielectric and a metal. Strong confinement of the electromagnetic field and tunability of SPP dispersion allow two-dimensional optics. This

  10. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    -beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...

  11. Near-field investigation of a plasmonic-photonic hybrid nanolaser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Taiping; Callard, Ségolène; jamois, Cecile; Letartre, Xavier; Chevalier, Celine; Rojo-Romeo, Pedro; Devif, Brice; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We report an approach of realization and characterization of a novel plasmonic-photonic hybrid nanodevice. The device comprises a plasmonic nano-antenna (NA) and a defect mode based PC cavity, and were fabricated based on a multi-step electron-beam lithography. The laser emission of the devices was demonstrated and the coupling conditions between the NA and PC cavity were investigated in near-field level.

  12. Self-assembly of highly efficient, broadband plasmonic absorbers for solar steam generation

    OpenAIRE

    Lin ZHOU; Tan, Yingling; Ji, Dengxin; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Pei; Xu, Jun; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Yu, Zongfu; Zhu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The study of ideal absorbers, which can efficiently absorb light over a broad range of wavelengths, is of fundamental importance, as well as critical for many applications from solar steam generation and thermophotovoltaics to light/thermal detectors. As a result of recent advances in plasmonics, plasmonic absorbers have attracted a lot of attention. However, the performance and scalability of these absorbers, predominantly fabricated by the top-down approach, need to be further improved to e...

  13. Midinfrared Plasmon-Enhanced Spectroscopy with Germanium Antennas on Silicon Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, Leonetta; Sakat, Emilie; Frigerio, Jacopo; Samarelli, Antonio; Gallacher, Kevin; Calandrini, Eugenio; Isella, Giovanni; Paul, Douglas J; Ortolani, Michele; Biagioni, Paolo

    2015-11-11

    Midinfrared plasmonic sensing allows the direct targeting of unique vibrational fingerprints of molecules. While gold has been used almost exclusively so far, recent research has focused on semiconductors with the potential to revolutionize plasmonic devices. We fabricate antennas out of heavily doped Ge films epitaxially grown on Si wafers and demonstrate up to 2 orders of magnitude signal enhancement for the molecules located in the antenna hot spots compared to those located on a bare silicon substrate. Our results set a new path toward integration of plasmonic sensors with the ubiquitous CMOS platform.

  14. Overview of the Characteristics of Micro- and Nano-Structured Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoungho Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of bio-chemical sensing devices has been greatly improved by the development of surface plasmon resonance (SPR based sensors. Advancements in micro- and nano-fabrication technologies have led to a variety of structures in SPR sensing systems being proposed. In this review, SPR sensors (from typical Kretschmann prism configurations to fiber sensor schemes with micro- or nano-structures for local light field enhancement, extraordinary optical transmission, interference of surface plasmon waves, plasmonic cavities, etc. are discussed. We summarize and compare their performances and present guidelines for the design of SPR sensors.

  15. Magnesium as Novel Material for Active Plasmonics in the Visible Wavelength Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterl, Florian; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Walter, Ramon; Griessen, Ronald; Tittl, Andreas; Giessen, Harald

    2015-12-09

    Investigating new materials plays an important role for advancing the field of nanoplasmonics. In this work, we fabricate nanodisks from magnesium and demonstrate tuning of their plasmon resonance throughout the whole visible wavelength range by changing the disk diameter. Furthermore, we employ a catalytic palladium cap layer to transform the metallic Mg particles into dielectric MgH2 particles when exposed to hydrogen gas. We prove that this transition can be reversed in the presence of oxygen. This yields plasmonic nanostructures with an extinction spectrum that can be repeatedly switched on or off or kept at any intermediate state, offering new perspectives for active plasmonic metamaterials.

  16. On-chip sub-terahertz surface plasmon polariton transmission lines with mode converter in CMOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuan; Yu, Hao; Wen, Jincai; Apriyana, Anak Agung Alit; Li, Nan; Luo, Yu; Sun, Lingling

    2016-07-21

    An on-chip low-loss and high conversion efficiency plasmonic waveguide converter is demonstrated at sub-THz in CMOS. By introducing a subwavelength periodic corrugated structure onto the transmission line (T-line) implemented by a top-layer metal, surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) are established to propagate signals with strongly localized surface-wave. To match both impedance and momentum of other on-chip components with TEM-wave propagation, a mode converter structure featured by a smooth bridge between the Ground coplanar waveguide (GCPW) with 50 Ω impedance and SPP T-line is proposed. To further reduce area, the converter is ultimately simplified to a gradual increment of groove with smooth gradient. The proposed SPP T-lines with the converter is designed and fabricated in the standard 65 nm CMOS process. Both near-field simulation and measurement results show excellent conversion efficiency from quasi-TEM to SPP modes in a broadband frequency range. The converter achieves wideband impedance matching (CMOS technology.

  17. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepage Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A surface plasmon resonance (SPR scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The surface roughness of the substrate layer is examined for different dielectrics and deposition methods. The Au layer, on which the plasmonic modes are propagating and the biosensing occurs, is also examined. The surface roughness and dielectric values for various deposition rates of very thin Au films are measured. We also investigate an interferometric SPR setup where, due to the power flux transfer between plasmon modes, the specific choice of grating coupler can either decrease or increase the plasmon propagation length.

  18. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Dominic; Carrier, Dominic; Jiménez, Alvaro; Beauvais, Jacques; Dubowski, Jan J

    2011-05-17

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The surface roughness of the substrate layer is examined for different dielectrics and deposition methods. The Au layer, on which the plasmonic modes are propagating and the biosensing occurs, is also examined. The surface roughness and dielectric values for various deposition rates of very thin Au films are measured. We also investigate an interferometric SPR setup where, due to the power flux transfer between plasmon modes, the specific choice of grating coupler can either decrease or increase the plasmon propagation length.

  19. Ultrafast Surface Plasmonic Switch in Non-Plasmonic Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Bévillon, E; Recoules, V; Zhang, H; Li, C; Stoian, R

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast carrier excitation can drastically affect electronic structures and induce brief surface plasmonic response in non-plasmonic metals, potentially creating a plasmonic switch. Using first-principles molecular dynamics and Kubo-Greenwood formalism for laser-excited tungsten we show that carrier heating mobilizes d electrons into collective inter and intraband transitions leading to a sign flip in the imaginary optical conductivity, activating plasmonic properties for the initial non-plasmonic phase. The drive for the optical evolution can be visualized as an increasingly damped quasi-resonance at visible frequencies for pumping carriers across a chemical potential located in a d-band pseudo-gap with energy-dependent degree of occupation. The subsequent evolution of optical indices for the excited material is confirmed by time-resolved ultrafast ellipsometry. The large optical tunability extends the existence spectral domain of surface plasmons in ranges typically claimed in laser se...

  20. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-11-03

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius.

  1. Plasma induced by pulsed laser and fabrication of silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Wei-Qi; Dong, Tai-Ge; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liu Shi-Rong; Huang, Zhong-Mei; Miao, Xin-Jian; Lv, Quan; Qin, Chao-Jian

    2015-08-01

    It is interesting that in preparing process of nanosilicon by pulsed laser, the periodic diffraction pattern from plasmonic lattice structure in the Purcell cavity due to interaction between plasmons and photons is observed. This kind of plasmonic lattice structure confined in the cavity may be similar to the Wigner crystal structure. Emission manipulation on Si nanostructures fabricated by the plasmonic wave induced from pulsed laser is studied by using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The electronic localized states and surface bonding are characterized by several emission bands peaked near 600 nm and 700 nm on samples prepared in oxygen or nitrogen environment. The electroluminescence wavelength is measured in the telecom window on silicon film coated by ytterbium. The enhanced emission originates from surface localized states in band gap due to broken symmetry from some bonds on surface bulges produced by plasmonic wave in the cavity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11264007 and 61465003).

  2. Hollow plasmonic antennas for broadband SERS spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Gabriele C; Malerba, Mario; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Miele, Ermanno; Dipalo, Michele; Ferrara, Lorenzo; De Angelis, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The chemical environment of cells is an extremely complex and multifaceted system that includes many types of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and various other components. With the final aim of studying these components in detail, we have developed multiband plasmonic antennas, which are suitable for highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and are activated by a wide range of excitation wavelengths. The three-dimensional hollow nanoantennas were produced on an optical resist by a secondary electron lithography approach, generated by fast ion-beam milling on the polymer and then covered with silver in order to obtain plasmonic functionalities. The optical properties of these structures have been studied through finite element analysis simulations that demonstrated the presence of broadband absorption and multiband enhancement due to the unusual geometry of the antennas. The enhancement was confirmed by SERS measurements, which showed a large enhancement of the vibrational features both in the case of resonant excitation and out-of-resonance excitation. Such characteristics indicate that these structures are potential candidates for plasmonic enhancers in multifunctional opto-electronic biosensors.

  3. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Based on Smart Phone Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Shimeng; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Hanqi; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-10

    We demonstrate a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on smart phone platforms. The light-weight optical components and sensing element are connected by optical fibers on a phone case. This SPR adaptor can be conveniently installed or removed from smart phones. The measurement, control and reference channels are illuminated by the light entering the lead-in fibers from the phone's LED flash, while the light from the end faces of the lead-out fibers is detected by the phone's camera. The SPR-sensing element is fabricated by a light-guiding silica capillary that is stripped off its cladding and coated with 50-nm gold film. Utilizing a smart application to extract the light intensity information from the camera images, the light intensities of each channel are recorded every 0.5 s with refractive index (RI) changes. The performance of the smart phone-based SPR platform for accurate and repeatable measurements was evaluated by detecting different concentrations of antibody binding to a functionalized sensing element, and the experiment results were validated through contrast experiments with a commercial SPR instrument. This cost-effective and portable SPR biosensor based on smart phones has many applications, such as medicine, health and environmental monitoring.

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Based on Smart Phone Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Shimeng; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Hanqi; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on smart phone platforms. The light-weight optical components and sensing element are connected by optical fibers on a phone case. This SPR adaptor can be conveniently installed or removed from smart phones. The measurement, control and reference channels are illuminated by the light entering the lead-in fibers from the phone’s LED flash, while the light from the end faces of the lead-out fibers is detected by the phone’s camera. The SPR-sensing element is fabricated by a light-guiding silica capillary that is stripped off its cladding and coated with 50-nm gold film. Utilizing a smart application to extract the light intensity information from the camera images, the light intensities of each channel are recorded every 0.5 s with refractive index (RI) changes. The performance of the smart phone-based SPR platform for accurate and repeatable measurements was evaluated by detecting different concentrations of antibody binding to a functionalized sensing element, and the experiment results were validated through contrast experiments with a commercial SPR instrument. This cost-effective and portable SPR biosensor based on smart phones has many applications, such as medicine, health and environmental monitoring.

  5. Polymer-based chips for surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obreja, Paula; Cristea, Dana; Kusko, Mihai; Dinescu, Adrian

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a design and low-cost techniques for polymer-based chips for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. To obtain a polymer chip with a prism, microchannels and a chamber at microscale dimensions, replication techniques in polymers with controlled refractive index have been developed. Photoresist, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and epoxy resin were used. Silicon dioxide/silicon-based molds have been obtained by anisotropic etching of silicon, and glass prisms were used as masters for replication. The photoresist molds were obtained by optical lithography and were used to obtain the microchannels and the chamber. A liquid prepolymer (PDMS, Sylgard 184) with curing agent at a ratio of 10:1 was used, and a special technique was developed in order to fabricate the components of the structure at the same time. For the deposition and direct patterning of the metallic layers onto the polymer surface, different methods were experimented with, including sputtering. The materials and techniques used to achieve SPR sensors are presented, and the possibilities and limitations of the technology are discussed.

  6. Fibre optic surface plasmon resonance sensor system designed for smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Kort; Roth, Bernhard

    2015-06-29

    A fibre optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor system for smartphones is reported, for the first time. The sensor was fabricated by using an easy-to-implement silver coating technique and by polishing both ends of a 400 µm optical fibre to obtain 45° end-faces. For excitation and interrogation of the SPR sensor system the flash-light and camera at the back side of the smartphone were employed, respectively. Consequently, no external electrical components are required for the operation of the sensor system developed. In a first application example a refractive index sensor was realised. The performance of the SPR sensor system was demonstrated by using different volume concentrations of glycerol solution. A sensitivity of 5.96·10(-4) refractive index units (RIU)/pixel was obtained for a refractive index (RI) range from 1.33 to 1.36. In future implementations the reported sensor system could be integrated in a cover of a smartphone or used as a low-cost, portable point-of-care diagnostic platform. Consequently it offers the potential of monitoring a large variety of environmental or point-of-care parameters in combination with smartphones.

  7. Plasmonic coupling in single flower-like gold nanoparticle assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Luo; Lacie Dube; Yadong Zhou; Shengli Zou; Jing Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) arises when light interacts with metallic nanoparticles (NPs). When nanoparticles (NPs) assemble together, the plasmon coupling effect between the NPs often leads to new features in the LSPR of the assembled structure. Understanding the plasmon coupling in the complex assemblies will greatly benefit the development of new plasmonic devices. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a 3D structure using two different sized Au NPs as building blocks. This 3D structure was achieved by manipulating the binding efficiency of ligands linking the NPs, and proper choice of the NP size. The assembled structure is flower-like structure, with one 130 nm Au NP in the center, and several 40 nm Au NPs attaching as“petals”. Single particle dark-field scattering measurements of the individual assemblies were performed, together with electrodynamics simulations. The experimental and theoretical studies show that, the plasmonic coupling lead to broadening of the LSPR and additional peaks, depending on the number and 3D arrangement of the 40 nm NPs around the center 130 nm NP.

  8. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging has in the past been applied to the characterization of thin films. In this study we apply the surface plasmon technique not to determine macroscopic spatial variations but rather to determine average microscopic information. Specifically, we deduce the dielectric properties of the surrounding gel matrix and information concerning the dynamics of the gelation process from the visible absorption characteristics of colloidal metal nanoparticles contained in aerogel pores. We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Because the dielectric constant of the metal particles is linked to that of the host matrix at the surface plasmon resonance, any change 'in the dielectric constant of the material surrounding the metal nanoparticles results in a shift in the surface plasmon wavelength. During gelation the surface plasmon resonance shifts to the red as the average or effective dielectric constant of the matrix increases. Conversely, formation of an aerogel or xerogel through supercritical extraction or evaporation of the solvent produces a blue shift in the resonance indicating a decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix. From the magnitude of this shift we deduce the average fraction of air and of silica in contact with the metal particles. The surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction may thus be determined.

  9. Single-Molecule Detection in Nanogap-Embedded Plasmonic Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biyan Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce nanogap-embedded silver plasmonic gratings for single-molecule (SM visualization using an epifluorescence microscope. This silver plasmonic platform was fabricated by a cost-effective nano-imprint lithography technique, using an HD DVD template. DNA/ RNA duplex molecules tagged with Cy3/Cy5 fluorophores were immobilized on SiO 2 -capped silver gratings. Light was coupled to the gratings at particular wavelengths and incident angles to form surface plasmons. The SM fluorescence intensity of the fluorophores at the nanogaps showed approximately a 100-fold mean enhancement with respect to the fluorophores observed on quartz slides using an epifluorescence microscope. This high level of enhancement was due to the concentration of surface plasmons at the nanogaps. When nanogaps imaged with epifluorescence mode were compared to quartz imaged using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy, more than a 30-fold mean enhancement was obtained. Due to the SM fluorescence enhancement of plasmonic gratings and the correspondingly high emission intensity, the required laser power can be reduced, resulting in a prolonged detection time prior to photobleaching. This simple platform was able to perform SM studies with a low-cost epifluorescence apparatus, instead of the more expensive TIRF or confocal microscopes, which would enable SM analysis to take place in most scientific laboratories.

  10. Plasmonic coupling in single flower-like gold nanoparticle assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR arises when light interacts with metallic nanoparticles (NPs. When nanoparticles (NPs assemble together, the plasmon coupling effect between the NPs often leads to new features in the LSPR of the assembled structure. Understanding the plasmon coupling in the complex assemblies will greatly benefit the development of new plasmonic devices. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a 3D structure using two different sized Au NPs as building blocks. This 3D structure was achieved by manipulating the binding efficiency of ligands linking the NPs, and proper choice of the NP size. The assembled structure is flower-like structure, with one 130 nm Au NP in the center, and several 40 nm Au NPs attaching as “petals”. Single particle dark-field scattering measurements of the individual assemblies were performed, together with electrodynamics simulations. The experimental and theoretical studies show that, the plasmonic coupling lead to broadening of the LSPR and additional peaks, depending on the number and 3D arrangement of the 40 nm NPs around the center 130 nm NP.

  11. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    OpenAIRE

    Lepage Dominic; Carrier Dominic; Jiménez Alvaro; Beauvais Jacques; Dubowski Jan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral r...

  12. Nanomanipulation and controlled self-assembly of metal nanoparticles and nanocrystals for plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Hung-Ying; Lin, Meng-Hsien; Sun, Liuyang; Li, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-21

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) associated with metallic nanostructures offer unique possibilities for light concentration beyond the diffraction limit, which can lead to strong field confinement and enhancement in deep subwavelength regions. In recent years, many transformative plasmonic applications have emerged, taking advantage of the spectral and spatial tunability of LSPRs enabled by near-field coupling between constituent metallic nanostructures in a variety of plasmonic metastructures (dimers, metamolecules, metasurfaces, metamaterials, etc.). For example, the "hot spot" formed at the interstitial site (gap) between two coupled metallic nanostructures in a plasmonic dimer can be spectrally tuned via the gap size. Capitalizing on these capabilities, there have been significant advances in plasmon enhanced or enabled applications in light-based science and technology, including ultrahigh-sensitivity spectroscopies, light energy harvesting, photocatalysis, biomedical imaging and theranostics, optical sensing, nonlinear optics, ultrahigh-density data storage, as well as plasmonic metamaterials and metasurfaces exhibiting unusual linear and nonlinear optical properties. In this review, we present two complementary approaches for fabricating plasmonic metastructures. We discuss how meta-atoms can be assembled into unique plasmonic metastructures using a variety of nanomanipulation methods based on single- or multiple-probes in an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical tweezers, and focused electron-beam nanomanipulation. We also provide a few examples of nanoparticle metamolecules with designed properties realized in such well-controlled plasmonic metastructures. For the spatial controllability on the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales, we show that controlled self-assembly is the method of choice to realize scalable two-dimensional, and three-dimensional plasmonic metastructures. In the section of applications

  13. Template-stripped asymmetric metallic pyramids for tunable plasmonic nanofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukulappurath, Sudhir; Johnson, Timothy W; Lindquist, Nathan C; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel scheme for plasmonic nanofocusing with internally illuminated asymmetric metallic pyramidal tips using linearly polarized light. A wafer-scale array of sharp metallic pyramids is fabricated via template stripping with films of different thicknesses on opposing pyramid facets. This structural asymmetry is achieved through a one-step angled metal deposition that does not require any additional lithography processing and when internally illuminated enables the generation of plasmons using a Kretschmann-like coupling method on only one side of the pyramids. Plasmons traveling toward the tip on one side will converge at the apex, forming a nanoscale "hotspot." The asymmetry is necessary for these focusing effects since symmetric pyramids display destructive plasmon interference at the tip. Computer simulations confirm that internal illumination with linearly polarized light at normal incidence on these asymmetric pyramids will focus optical energy into nanoscale volumes. Far-field optical experiments demonstrate large field enhancements as well as angle-dependent spectral tuning of the reradiated light. Because of the low background light levels, wafer-scale fabrication, and a straightforward excitation scheme, these asymmetric pyramidal tips will find applications in near-field optical microscopy and array-based optical trapping.

  14. Plasmonic Route to Reconfigurable Polarization Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L; Tang, X M; Wang, S M; Wang, Q J; Zhu, S N

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon polariton (SPP) as a bounded mode on a metal/dielectric interface intrinsically has a definite transverse magnetic (TM) polarization that usually lacks further manipulations. However, the in-plane longitudinal components of SPP field can produce versatile polarization states when two orthogonal propagating SPP interfere with each other. Here, we demonstrated a plasmonic polarization router by designing appropriate nanohole arrays that can selectively scatter the interfered SPP fields to desired light beams. It is well proved that our device is able to reconfigure a certain input polarization to all kinds of states with respect to a scattered light. Accompanied with a composite phase modulation by diffractions, multiple focusing beams with different polarization states are simultaneously achieved, promising the possibility in polarization multiplexing and related signal processing. Our design offers a new route for achieving full control of the optical polarizations as well as the optical spin-...

  15. Intrinsic nonlinear response of surface plasmon polaritons

    CERN Document Server

    Im, Song-Jin; Kim, Gum-Hyok

    2015-01-01

    We offer a model to describe the intrinsic nonlinear response of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Relation of the complex nonlinear coefficient of SPPs to the third-order nonlinear susceptibility of the metal is provided. As reported in a recent study, gold is highly lossy and simultaneously highly nonlinear due to interband absorption and interband thermo-modulation at a wavelength shorter than 700 nm. The effect of the high loss of the metal on the SPP nonlinear propagation is taken into account in our model. With the model we show difference in sign of real and imaginary parts between the nonlinear propagation coefficient and the nonlinear susceptibility of component material for the first time to our knowledge. Our model could have practical importance in studying plasmonic devices utilizing the nonlinear phase modulation and the nonlinear absorption of SPPs. For example, it allows one to extract the complex nonlinear susceptibility of gold through a measurement of SPP nonlinear propagation at the visib...

  16. Tunable Dipole Surface Plasmon Resonances of Silver Nanoparticles by Cladding Dielectric Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaotong; Li, Dabing; Sun, Xiaojuan; Li, Zhiming; Song, Hang; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Yiren

    2015-07-28

    The tunability of surface plasmon resonance can enable the highest degree of localised surface plasmon enhancement to be achieved, based on the emitting or absorbing wavelength. In this article, tunable dipole surface plasmon resonances of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are realized by modification of the SiO2 dielectric layer thicknesses. SiO2 layers both beneath and over the Ag NPs affected the resonance wavelengths of local surface plasmons (LSPs). By adjusting the SiO2 thickness beneath the Ag NPs from 5 nm to 20 nm, the dipole surface plasmon resonances shifted from 470 nm to 410 nm. Meanwhile, after sandwiching the Ag NPs by growing SiO2 before NPs fabrication and then overcoating the NPs with various SiO2 thicknesses from 5 nm to 20 nm, the dipole surface plasmon resonances changed from 450 nm to 490 nm. The SiO2 cladding dielectric layer can tune the Ag NP surface charge, leading to a change in the effective permittivity of the surrounding medium, and thus to a blueshift or redshift of the resonance wavelength. Also, the quadrupole plasmon resonances were suppressed by the SiO2 cladding layer because the dielectric SiO2 can suppress level splitting of surface plasmon resonances caused by the Ag NP coupling effect.

  17. Plasmon-Exciton-Polariton Lasing

    CERN Document Server

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Fernández-Domínguez, Antonio I; Feist, Johannes; Rodriguez, Said Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh; Garcia-Vidal, Francisco J; Gómez-Rivas, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Strong coupling of Frenkel excitons with surface plasmons leads to the formation of bosonic quasi-particles known as plasmon-exciton-polaritons (PEPs).Localized surface plasmons in nanoparticles are lossy due to radiative and nonradiative decays, which has hampered the realization of polariton lasing in a plasmonic system, i.e., PEP lasing. These losses can be reduced in collective plasmonic resonances supported by arrays of nanoparticles. Here we demonstrate PEP lasing in arrays of silver nanoparticles by showing the emergence of a threshold in the photoluminescence accompanied by both a superlinear increase of the emission and spectral narrowing. We also observe a reduction of the threshold by increasing the coupling between the molecular excitons and the resonances supported by the array despite the reduction of the quantum efficiency of the emitters. The coexistence of bright and dark collective modes in this plasmonic system allows for a 90?-change of polarization in the emission beyond the threshold.

  18. Optical security features and filters using plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallinet, Benjamin; Lütolf, Fabian; Duempelmann, Luc; Basset, Guillaume; Luu-Dinh, Angélique; Schnieper, Marc; Bosshard, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonics involves the interaction of light with metallic structures at the nanoscale, which enables in particular the generation of strong reflection and absorption effects in the visible and near infrared range. The fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures using ultra-violet (UV) imprint and thin metallic coatings is reported. Wafer-scale fabrication and process compatibility with cost-efficient roll-to-roll production are demonstrated, which paves the road towards an industrial implementation. The color, phase, polarization and direction of the transmitted light are controlled by tuning the process parameters and the symmetry of the nanostructures. A family of devices is presented, for which the potential for sensing, filtering, anticounterfeiting and optical security is evaluated.

  19. Research of photolithography technology based on surface plasmon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hai-Hua; Chen Jian; Wang Qing-Kang

    2010-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a new process of the photolithography technology,used to fabricate simply fine patterns,by employing surface plasmon character.The sub-wavelength periodic silica structures with uniform silver film are used as the exposure mask.According to the traditional semiconductor process,the grating structures are fabricated at exposing wavelength of 436 nm.At the same time,it provides additional and quantitative support of this technique based on the finite-difference time-domain method.The results of the research show that surface plasmon characteristics of metals can be used to increase the optical field energy distribution differences through the silica structures with silver film,which directly impact on the exposure of following photosensitive layer in different regions.

  20. Broadband circularly polarizing dichroism with high efficient plasmonic helical surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingpei; Zhao, Xiaonan; Li, Ruibin; Zhu, Aijiao; Chen, Linghua; Lin, Yu; Cao, Bing; Zhu, Xiaojun; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-05-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a broadband and high efficient circularly polarizing dichroism using a simple single-cycle and single-helical plasmonic surface array arranged in square lattice. Two types of helical surface structures (partially or completely covered with a gold film) are investigated. It is shown that the circular polarization dichroism in the mid-IR range (3µm - 5µm) can reach 80% (when the surface is partially covered with gold) or 65% (when the surface is completely covered with gold) with a single-cycle and single-helical surface. Experimental fabrications of the proposed helical plasmonic surface are implemented with direct 3D laser writing followed by electron beam evaporation deposition of gold. The experimental evaluations of the circular polarization dichroism are in excellent agreement with the simulation. The proposed helical surface structure is of advantages of easy-fabrication, high-dichroism and scalable to other frequencies as a high efficient broadband circular polarizer.

  1. Controllable Femtosecond Laser-Induced Dewetting for Plasmonic Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Shishkin, Ivan I; Zuev, Dmitriy A; Mozharov, Alexey M; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A

    2015-01-01

    Dewetting of thin metal films is one of the most widespread method for functional plasmonic nanostructures fabrication. However, simple thermal-induced dewetting does not allow to control degree of nanostructures order without additional lithographic process steps. Here we propose a novel method for lithography-free and large-scale fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures via controllable femtosecond laser-induced dewetting. The method is based on femtosecond laser surface pattering of a thin film followed by a nanoscale hydrodynamical instability, which is found to be very controllable under specific irradiation conditions. We achieve control over degree of nanostructures order by changing laser irradiation parametrs and film thickness. This allowed us to exploit the method for the broad range of applications: resonant light absorbtion and scattering, sensing, and potential improving of thin-film solar cells.

  2. Subwavelength Plasmonic Color Printing Protected for Ambient Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, Alexander Sylvester; Pors, Anders Lambertus; Albrektsen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate plasmonic color printing with subwavelength resolution using circular gap-plasmon resonators (GPRs) arranged in 340 nm period arrays of square unit cells and fabricated with single-step electron-beam lithography. We develop a printing procedure resulting in correct single-pixel color...... reproduction, high color uniformity of colored areas, and high reproduction fidelity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, due to inherent stability of GPRs with respect to surfactants, the fabricated color print can be protected with a transparent dielectric overlay for ambient use without destroying its...... coloring. Using finite-element simulations, we uncover the physical mechanisms responsible for color printing with GPR arrays and suggest the appropriate design procedure minimizing the influence of the protection layer....

  3. Plasmonic-Based Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy: Application to Molecular Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shaopeng; Shan, Xiaonan; Li, Jinghong; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-01-01

    Plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (P-EIS) is developed to investigate molecular binding on surfaces. Its basic principle relies on the sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) signal on surface charge density, which is modulated by applying an AC potential to a SPR chip surface. The AC component of the SPR response gives the electrochemical impedance, and the DC component provides the conventional SPR detection. The plasmonic-based impedance measured over a range of frequency is in quantitative agreement with the conventional electrochemical impedance. Compared to the conventional SPR detection, P-EIS is sensitive to molecular binding taking place on the chip surface, and less sensitive to bulk refractive index changes or non-specific binding. Moreover, this new approach allows for simultaneous SPR and surface impedance analysis of molecular binding processes. PMID:22122514

  4. Searching for better plasmonic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, P.; Ishii, S.; Naik, G.;

    2010-01-01

    Plasmonics is a research area merging the fields of optics and nanoelectronics by confining light with relatively large free-space wavelength to the nanometer scale - thereby enabling a family of novel devices. Current plasmonic devices at telecommunication and optical frequencies face significant...... challenges due to losses encountered in the constituent plasmonic materials. These large losses seriously limit the practicality of these metals for many novel applications. This paper provides an overview of alternative plasmonic materials along with motivation for each material choice and important aspects...

  5. An Introduction to Graphene Plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, P.A.D.; Peres, N. M. R.

    This book is meant as an introduction to graphene plasmonics and aims at the advanced undergraduate and graduate students entering the field of plasmonics in graphene. In it different theoretical methods are introduced, starting with an elementary description of graphene plasmonics and evolving...... the chapters to get acquainted with the field of plasmonics in graphene or reading the chapters and studying the appendices to get a working knowledge of the topic. The study of the material in this book will bring the students to the forefront of the research in this field....

  6. Nonlinear plasmonic antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeeb Bin Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to traditional optical elements, plasmonic antennas made from nanostructured metals permit the localization of electromagnetic fields on length scales much smaller than the wavelength of light. This results in huge amplitudes for the electromagnetic field close to the antenna being conducive for the observation of nonlinear effects already at moderate pump powers. Thus, these antennas exhibit a promising potential to achieve optical frequency conversion and all-optical control of light at the nano-scale. This opens unprecedented opportunities for ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, sensing devices, on-chip optical frequency conversion, nonlinear optical metamaterials, and novel photon sources. Here, we review some of the recent advances in exploiting the potential of plasmonic antennas to realize robust nonlinear applications.

  7. Surface Plasmon Singularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Martínez-Niconoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to compare the physical features of the electromagnetic field, we describe the synthesis of optical singularities propagating in the free space and on a metal surface. In both cases the electromagnetic field has a slit-shaped curve as a boundary condition, and the singularities correspond to a shock wave that is a consequence of the curvature of the slit curve. As prototypes, we generate singularities that correspond to fold and cusped regions. We show that singularities in free space may generate bifurcation effects while plasmon fields do not generate these kinds of effects. Experimental results for free-space propagation are presented and for surface plasmon fields, computer simulations are shown.

  8. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individ...

  9. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, A.; Niegemann, J.; Ma, P.; Haffner, C; Pedersen, A.; Luisier, M.; Hafner, C.; Schimmel, T.; Leuthold, J.

    2016-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore’s law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocat...

  10. Linear and Nonlinear Plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Capretti, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In the present Thesis, the electromagnetic properties of metal nanostructures are theoretically and experimentally investigated, for applications ranging from chemical sensing to integrated optical devices. Collective resonances of the conduction electrons occur on the surface of metal particles with nanoscale sizes, if visible or infrared light interacts with them. These resonances, usually referred to as Localized Surface Plasmons (LSPs), are able to confine the incident light into regions...

  11. In-situ resist colloidal lithography for affordable plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenkov, Vladimir E.

    2017-09-01

    A recently developed extension of Sparse Colloidal Lithography, an In-situ Resist Colloidal Lithography method is presented. The technique is based on in-situ deposition of structured resist layer having low adhesion to target material to form nanoparticles of desired shape. A high potential of the method is demonstrated by the examples of fabricated plasmonic nanostructures with different shapes, including concentric and non-concentric rings, disks and chiral comma-like particles.

  12. Optical properties of surface plasmon resonances of coupled metallic nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, Elizabeth J; Cubukcu, Ertugrul; Capasso, Federico

    2007-06-11

    We present a systematic study of optical antenna arrays, in which the effects of coupling between the antennas, as well as of the antenna length, on the reflection spectra are investigated and compared. Such arrays can be fabricated on the facet of a fiber, and we propose a photonic device, a plasmonic optical antenna fiber probe, that can potentially be used for in-situ chemical and biological detection and surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

  13. Surface plasmon polariton band gap structures: implications to integrated plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Volkov, V. S.; Østergaard, John Erland

    2001-01-01

    PBG-based components within a few hundred micrometers, we realized that other two-dimensional waves, e.g., surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), might be employed for the same purpose. The SPP band gap (SPPBG) has been observed for the textured silver surfaces by performing angular measurements...... of the surface reflectivity. Here we report the results of our experimental and theoretical investigations of waveguiding in the SPPBG structures....

  14. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  15. Plasmonic optical nanotweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Rehab; El Maklizi, Mahmoud; Ismail, Yehea; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic grating structures can be used in many applications such as nanolithography and optical trapping. In this paper, we used plasmonic grating as optical tweezers to trap and manipulate dielectric nano-particles. Different plasmonic grating structures with single, double, and triple slits have been investigated and analyzed. The three configurations are optimized and compared to find the best candidate to trap and manipulate nanoparticles. The three optimized structures results in capability to super focusing and beaming the light effectively beyond the diffraction limit. A high transverse gradient optical force is obtained using the triple slit configuration that managed to significantly enhance the field and its gradient. Therefore, it has been chosen as an efficient optical tweezers. This structure managed to trap sub10nm particles efficiently. The resultant 50KT potential well traps the nano particles stably. The proposed structure is used also to manipulate the nano-particles by simply changing the angle of the incident light. We managed to control the movement of nano particle over an area of (5μm x 5μm) precisely. The proposed structure has the advantage of trapping and manipulating the particles outside the structure (not inside the structure such as the most proposed optical tweezers). As a result, it can be used in many applications such as drug delivery and biomedical analysis.

  16. Plasmonic ZnO/Ag embedded structures as collecting layers for photogenerating electrons in solar hydrogen generation photoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao Ming; Chen, Chih Kai; Tseng, Ming Lun; Wu, Pin Chieh; Chang, Chia Min; Cheng, Liang-Chien; Huang, Hsin Wei; Chan, Ting Shan; Huang, Ding-Wei; Liu, Ru-Shi; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-09-09

    A new fabrication strategy in which Ag plasmonics are embedded in the interface between ZnO nanorods and a conducting substrate is experimentally demonstrated using a femtosecond-laser (fs-laser)-induced plasmonic ZnO/Ag photoelectrodes. This fs-laser fabrication technique can be applied to generate patternable plasmonic nanostructures for improving their effectiveness in hydrogen generation. Plasmonic ZnO/Ag nanostructure photoelectrodes show an increase in the photocurrent of a ZnO nanorod photoelectrodes by higher than 85% at 0.5 V. Both localized surface plasmon resonance in metal nanoparticles and plasmon polaritons propagating at the metal/semiconductor interface are available for improving the capture of sunlight and collecting charge carriers. Furthermore, in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy is performed to monitor the plasmonic-generating electromagnetic field upon the interface between ZnO/Ag nanostructures. This can reveal induced vacancies on the conduction band of ZnO, which allow effective separation of charge carriers and improves the efficiency of hydrogen generation. Plasmon-induced effects enhance the photoresponse simultaneously, by improving optical absorbance and facilitating the separation of charge carriers.

  17. Graphene plasmonics: physics and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shenyang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmon in graphene possesses many unique properties. It originates from the collective motion of massless Dirac fermions, and the carrier density dependence is distinctively different from conventional plasmons. In addition, graphene plasmon is highly tunable and shows strong energy confinement capability. Most intriguingly, as an atom-thin layer, graphene and its plasmon are very sensitive to the immediate environment. Graphene plasmons strongly couple to polar phonons of the substrate, molecular vibrations of the adsorbates, and lattice vibrations of other atomically thin layers. In this review, we present the most important advances in graphene plasmonics field. The topics include terahertz plasmons, mid-infrared plasmons, plasmon-phonon interactions, and potential applications. Graphene plasmonics opens an avenue for reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces; it is an exciting and promising new subject in the nanophotonics and plasmonics research field.

  18. Nanoimprint lithography for nanodevice fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelo, Steven; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-09-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a compelling technique for low cost nanoscale device fabrication. The precise and repeatable replication of nanoscale patterns from a single high resolution patterning step makes the NIL technique much more versatile than other expensive techniques such as e-beam or even helium ion beam lithography. Furthermore, the use of mechanical deformation during the NIL process enables grayscale lithography with only a single patterning step, not achievable with any other conventional lithography techniques. These strengths enable the fabrication of unique nanoscale devices by NIL for a variety of applications including optics, plasmonics and even biotechnology. Recent advances in throughput and yield in NIL processes demonstrate the potential of being adopted for mainstream semiconductor device fabrication as well.

  19. Nanoimprint lithography for nanodevice fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelo, Steven; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a compelling technique for low cost nanoscale device fabrication. The precise and repeatable replication of nanoscale patterns from a single high resolution patterning step makes the NIL technique much more versatile than other expensive techniques such as e-beam or even helium ion beam lithography. Furthermore, the use of mechanical deformation during the NIL process enables grayscale lithography with only a single patterning step, not achievable with any other conventional lithography techniques. These strengths enable the fabrication of unique nanoscale devices by NIL for a variety of applications including optics, plasmonics and even biotechnology. Recent advances in throughput and yield in NIL processes demonstrate the potential of being adopted for mainstream semiconductor device fabrication as well.

  20. A surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for detecting a dioxin precursor using a gold binding polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soh, N; Tokuda, T.; Watanabe, T.

    2003-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensor was developed for monitoring 2,4-dichlorophenol, a known dioxin precursor, using an indirect competitive immunoassay. The SPR sensor was fabricated by immobilizing a gold-thin layer on the surface of an SPR sensor chip with an anti-(2,4-dichloroph......A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensor was developed for monitoring 2,4-dichlorophenol, a known dioxin precursor, using an indirect competitive immunoassay. The SPR sensor was fabricated by immobilizing a gold-thin layer on the surface of an SPR sensor chip with an anti-(2...

  1. Plasmon assisted synthesis of highly fluorescing silver quantum cluster/polymer composites for biochemical sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, J. P.; Mogensen, K. B.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics is combined with polymer synthesis for rapid fabrication of highly fluorescing silver quantum cluster/polymer composites inside microfluidic channels. UV-light assisted synthesis of polymers has been investigated by a number of groups previously [1], however, plasmon assisted synthesis...... has not been presented before. This should allow highly localized fabrication of porous polymers that are defined by the location of the nanoplasmonic metal film. Silver quantum clusters (AgQCs) consisting of 2-10 atoms can be highly fluorescing in the visible wavelength range and possess a greater...

  2. Plasmon assisted synthesis of highly fluorescing silver quantum cluster / polymer composites for biochemical sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, J.P.; Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2014-01-01

    has not been presented before. This should allow highly localized fabrication of porous polymers that are defined by the location of the nanoplasmonic metal film. Silver quantum clusters (AgQCs) consisting of 2-10 atoms can be highly fluorescing in the visible wavelength range and possess a much......Plasmonics is combined with polymer synthesis for rapid fabrication of highly fluorescing silver quantum cluster / polymer composites inside microfluidic channels. UV-light assisted synthesis of polymers has been investigated by a number of groups previously [1], however, plasmon assisted synthesis...

  3. Tunable Omnidirectional Surface Plasmon Resonance in Cylindrical Plasmonic Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi; WANG Bing; ZHOU Zhi-Ping

    2008-01-01

    @@ The tunable omnidirectional surface plasmon resonance in the optical range is theoretically demonstrated in a cylindrical plasmonic crystal by using rigorous coupled-wave analysis.The cylindrical plasmonic crystal consists of an infinite chain of two-dimensional cylindrical metal-dielectric-dielectric-metal structures.The dispersion relation of the cylindrical plasmonic crystal is obtained by calculating the absorptance as a function of a TM-polarized incident plane wave and its in-plane wave vector.The omnidirectional surface plasmon resonance can be tuned from UV region to visible region by adjusting the thickness of the cylindrical dielectric layers.The absorption spectrum of the infinite chain of nanocylinders is also investigated for comparison.

  4. Nonlinear plasmonic amplification via dissipative soliton-plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Albert

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution we introduce a strategy for the compensation of plasmonic losses based on a recently proposed nonlinear mechanism: the resonant interaction between surface plasmon polaritons and spatial solitons propagating in parallel along a metal/dielectric/Kerr structure. This mechanism naturally leads to the generation of a quasiparticle excitation, the so-called soliplasmon resonance. We analyze the role played by the effective nonlinear coupling inherent to this system and how this can be used to provide a mechanism of quasiresonant nonlinear excitation of surface plasmon polaritons. We will pay particular attention to the introduction of asymmetric linear gain in the Kerr medium. The unique combination of nonlinear propagation, nonlinear coupling, and gain give rise to a scenario for the excitation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons with distinguishing characteristics. The connection between plasmonic losses and soliplasmon resonances in the presence of gain will be discussed.

  5. Review of Plasmonic Nanocomposite Metamaterial Absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Keshavarz Hedayati

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic metamaterials are artificial materials typically composed of noble metals in which the features of photonics and electronics are linked by coupling photons to conduction electrons of metal (known as surface plasmon. These rationally designed structures have spurred interest noticeably since they demonstrate some fascinating properties which are unattainable with naturally occurring materials. Complete absorption of light is one of the recent exotic properties of plasmonic metamaterials which has broadened its application area considerably. This is realized by designing a medium whose impedance matches that of free space while being opaque. If such a medium is filled with some lossy medium, the resulting structure can absorb light totally in a sharp or broad frequency range. Although several types of metamaterials perfect absorber have been demonstrated so far, in the current paper we overview (and focus on perfect absorbers based on nanocomposites where the total thickness is a few tens of nanometer and the absorption band is broad, tunable and insensitive to the angle of incidence. The nanocomposites consist of metal nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric matrix with a high filling factor close to the percolation threshold. The filling factor can be tailored by the vapor phase co-deposition of the metallic and dielectric components. In addition, novel wet chemical approaches are discussed which are bio-inspired or involve synthesis within levitating Leidenfrost drops, for instance. Moreover, theoretical considerations, optical properties, and potential application of perfect absorbers will be presented.

  6. Plasmonic SERS biosensing nanochips for DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hoan T; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Fales, Andrew M; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-03-01

    The development of rapid, cost-effective DNA detection methods for molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) has been receiving increasing interest. This article reviews several DNA detection techniques based on plasmonic-active nanochip platforms developed in our laboratory over the last 5 years, including the molecular sentinel-on-chip (MSC), the multiplex MSC, and the inverse molecular sentinel-on-chip (iMS-on-Chip). DNA probes were used as the recognition elements, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used as the signal detection method. Sensing mechanisms were based on hybridization of target sequences and DNA probes, resulting in a distance change between SERS reporters and the nanochip's plasmonic-active surface. As the field intensity of the surface plasmon decays exponentially as a function of distance, the distance change in turn affects SERS signal intensity, thus indicating the presence and capture of the target sequences. Our techniques were single-step DNA detection techniques. Target sequences were detected by simple delivery of sample solutions onto DNA probe-functionalized nanochips and measuring the SERS signal after appropriate incubation times. Target sequence labeling or washing to remove unreacted components was not required, making the techniques simple, easy-to-use, and cost-effective. The usefulness of the nanochip platform-based techniques for medical diagnostics was illustrated by the detection of host genetic biomarkers for respiratory viral infection and of the dengue virus gene.

  7. Volume plasmon of bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Su, Dong; Spence, John C. H.; Zhou, Shifeng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of the bulk plasmon of Bi nanoparticles supported by a SiO 2 matrix using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The blue shifts of plasmon peak in small particles were observed. However, the degree of shift was much smaller than the previous study in the literature and cannot be interpreted by the quantum confinement.

  8. Interference effects with surface plasmons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzmin, Nikolay Victorovich

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon is a purely two-dimensional electromagnetic excitation bound to the interface between metal and dielectric and quickly decaying away from it. A surface plasmon is able to concentrate light on sub-wavelength scales – a feature that is attractive for nano-photonics and integrated

  9. Photothermal modification of plasmonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    There is presented a method for geometrically modifying plasmonic structures on a support structure, such as for printing or recording, said method comprising changing a geometry specifically of plasmonic structures, wherein said changing the geometry is carried out by photothermally melting...

  10. Nanofabrication results of a novel cascaded plasmonic superlens: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyu; Fu, Liwei; Frenner, Karsten; Osten, Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    To learn about the challenges, difficulties and technological steps in fabrication of a metal lens, a cascaded plasmonic superlens was fabricated in this paper and then its subwavelength imaging capability is demonstrated. First, we developed separately the fabrication and characterization procedures for each part in the cascaded superlens structure (composed of a planar plasmonic lens and a double layer meander structure) to show the precise fabricating process and results. Then the two parts of the cascaded structure were stacked together on the top of a double-slit object. First a larger slit width of 400 nm and a slit distance of 800 nm were used for easily obtaining a larger transmittance intensity distribution. The results show a good agreement between the experiment and simulation. Then a double-slit with width of 100 nm and distance of 180 nm were used to further test the resolving power of the superlens. The captured images show that the desired subwavelength resolution in the far field can be realized with the fabricated superlens.

  11. A comparative study of semiconductor-based plasmonic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Recent metamaterial (MM) research faces several problems when using metal-based plasmonic components as building blocks for MMs. The use of conventional metals for MMs is limited by several factors: metals such as gold and silver have high losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) ranges...

  12. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  13. Experience of Producing Three Components Fiber Blended Jacquard Stripe Fabric%三组分纤维混纺提花条格织物的生产体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党美娟; 乔莉英; 代瑞

    2012-01-01

    探讨精梳棉Tencel圣麻混纺提花条格织物的生产技术要点.通过对该织物风格特征及生产难点进行分析,认为,浆纱时采用“小张力、低伸长、求被覆、贴毛羽”的工艺路线,合理设定各区张力,保证双织轴经纱张力一致;穿综时合理配置工艺,加强操作人员培训;织造时采用“中后梁、小开口”的工艺原则,保证梭口清晰,尽量减少织机张力,最终使织制该织物时的织机效率由原来的70%提高到80%,入库一等品率达到99%.%Technology key points of producing combed cotton Tencel shengma blended jacquaid stripe fabric were discussed. Fabric styles and difficulties in production were analyzed. It is considered that processing of less tension and elongation,more coating and less hairiness should be adopted,tension in each area should be set rationally to ensure same tension in two-beam warping. In heald,processing should be set properly,operation of personel training should be strengthened. In weaving,processing of middle back beam and smaller shed should be selected to ensure shed clear and reduce loom tension. Finally loo efficiency can be improved from 70% to 80% , storage first-class product rate can reach 99%.

  14. Engineering Gold Nanorod-Based Plasmonic Nanocrystals for Optical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals have a unique ability to support localized surface plasmon resonances and exhibit rich and intriguing optical properties. Engineering plasmonic nanocrystals can maximize their potentials for specific applications. In this dissertation, we developed three unprecedented Au nanorod-based plasmonic nanocrystals through rational design of the crystal shape and/or composition, and successfully demonstrated their applications in light condensation, photothermal conversion, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The “Au nanorod-Au nanosphere dimer” nanocrystal was synthesized via the ligand-induced asymmetric growth of a Au nanosphere on a Au nanorod. This dimeric nanostructure features an extraordinary broadband optical absorption in the range of 400‒1400nm, and it proved to be an ideal black-body material for light condensation and an efficient solar-light harvester for photothermal conversion. The “Au nanorod (core) @ AuAg alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was built through the epitaxial growth of homogeneously alloyed AuAg shells on Au nanorods by precisely controlled synthesis. The resulting core-shell structured, bimetallic nanorods integrate the merits of the AuAg alloy with the advantages of anisotropic nanorods, exhibiting strong, stable and tunable surface plasmon resonances that are essential for SERS applications in a corrosive environment. The “high-index faceted Au nanorod (core) @ AuPd alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was produced via site-specific epitaxial growth of AuPd alloyed horns at the ends of Au nanorods. The AuPd alloyed horns are bound with high-index side facets, while the Au nanorod concentrates an intensive electric field at each end. This unique configuration unites highly active catalytic sites with strong SERS sites into a single entity and was demonstrated to be ideal for in situ monitoring of Pd-catalyzed reactions by SERS. The synthetic strategies developed here are promising towards the fabrication of

  15. Partial Polarization in Interfered Plasmon Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martínez Vara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the polarization features for plasmon fields generated by the interference between two elemental surface plasmon modes, obtaining a set of Stokes parameters which allows establishing a parallelism with the traditional polarization model. With the analysis presented, we find the corresponding coherence matrix for plasmon fields incorporating to the plasmon optics the study of partial polarization effects.

  16. Efficiency of local surface plasmon polariton excitation on ridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, I.P.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Brucoli, G.

    2008-01-01

    The issue of efficient local coupling of light into surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes is an important concern in miniaturization of plasmonic components. Here we present experimental and numerical investigations of efficiency of local SPP excitation on gold ridges of rectangular profile...... positioned on a gold film. The excitation is accomplished by illuminating the metal surface normally with a focused laser beam. Wavelength dependence and dependence of the efficiency on geometrical parameters of ridges are examined. Using leakage radiation microscopy, the efficiency of ˜20% is demonstrated...

  17. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. The OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasma physics and accelerator physics. PMID:28164998

  18. Fabrication and characterization of fiber optical components for application in guiding, sensing and molding of THz and mid-IR radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhorova, Anna

    The terahertz (THz) range refers to electromagnetic waves with frequencies between 100 GHz and 10 THz, or wavelengths between 3 mm and 30 µm. Light between radio waves and infrared has some unique properties. Within the scope of this work I would like to address three main research topics. In Chapter 2, I describe fabrication method and THz characterization of composite films containing either aligned metallic (tin alloy) microwires or chalcogenide As2Se3 microwires. The microwire arrays are made by stack-and-draw fiber fabrication technique using multi-step co-drawing of low-melting-temperature metals or semiconductor glasses together with polymers. Fibers are then stacked together and pressed into composite films. Transmission through metamaterial films is studied in the whole THz range (0.1-20 THz) using a combination of FTIR and TDS. Metal containing metamaterials are found to have strong polarizing properties, while semiconductor containing materials are polarization independent and could have a designable high refractive index. Using the transfer matrix theory, it was shown how to retrieve the complex polarization dependent refractive index of the composite films. We then detail the selfconsistent algorithm for retrieving the optical properties of the metal alloy used in the fabrication of the metamaterial layers by using an effective medium approximation. Finally, we study challenges in fabrication of metamaterials with sub-micrometer metallic wires by repeated stack-and-draw process by comparing samples made using 2, 3 and 4 consecutive drawings. When using metallic alloys we observe phase separation effects and nano-grids formation on small metallic wires. In Chapter 3, we have studied fabrication and bacteria detection application of the lowloss subwavelength THz microstructured fibers. One of the key difficulties in the design of terahertz waveguides lies in the fact that almost all materials are highly absorbing in the terahertz region. Since the

  19. High sensitivity plasmonic biosensor based on nanoimprinted quasi 3D nanosquares for cell detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuyan; Li, Hualin; Yang, Mengsu; Pang, Stella W.

    2016-07-01

    Quasi three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructures consisting of Au nanosquares on top of SU-8 nanopillars and Au nanoholes on the bottom were developed and fabricated using nanoimprint lithography with simultaneous thermal and UV exposure. These 3D plasmonic nanostructures were used to detect cell concentration of lung cancer A549 cells, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Nanoimprint technology has the advantage of producing high uniformity plasmonic nanostructures for such biosensors. Multiple resonance modes were observed in these quasi 3D plasmonic nanostructures. The hybrid coupling of localized surface plasmon resonances and Fabry-Perot cavity modes in the quasi 3D nanostructures resulted in high sensitivity of 496 nm/refractive index unit. The plasmonic resonance peak wavelength and sensitivity could be tuned by varying the Au thickness. Resonance peak shifts for different cells at the same concentration were distinct due to their different cell area and confluency. The cell concentration detection limit covered a large range of 5 × 102 to 1 × 107 cells ml-1 with these new plasmonic nanostructures. They also provide a large resonance peak shift of 51 nm for as little as 0.08 cells mm-2 of RPE cells for high sensitivity cell detection.

  20. Plasmonic pumping of excitonic photoluminescence in hybrid MoS2-Au nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmaei, Sina; Mlayah, Adnen; Arbouet, Arnaud; Girard, Christian; Léotin, Jean; Lou, Jun

    2014-12-23

    We report on the fabrication of monolayer MoS2-coated gold nanoantennas combining chemical vapor deposition, e-beam lithography surface patterning, and a soft lift-off/transfer technique. The optical properties of these hybrid plasmonic-excitonic nanostructures are investigated using spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Off- and in-resonance plasmonic pumping of the MoS2 excitonic luminescence showed distinct behaviors. For plasmonically mediated pumping, we found a significant enhancement (∼65%) of the photoluminescence intensity, clear evidence that the optical properties of the MoS2 monolayer are strongly influenced by the nanoantenna surface plasmons. In addition, a systematic photoluminescence broadening and red-shift in nanoantenna locations is observed which is interpreted in terms of plasmonic enhanced optical absorption and subsequent heating of the MoS2 monolayers. Using a temperature calibration procedure based on photoluminescence spectral characteristics, we were able to estimate the local temperature changes. We found that the plasmonically induced MoS2 temperature increase is nearly four times larger than in the MoS2 reference temperatures. This study shines light on the plasmonic-excitonic interaction in these hybrid metal/semiconductor nanostructures and provides a unique approach for the engineering of optoelectronic devices based on the light-to-current conversion.