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Sample records for fa409 full-depth asphalt-concrete

  1. VISCOELASTIC STRUCTURAL MODEL OF ASPHALT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bogomolov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The viscoelastic rheological model of asphalt concrete based on the generalized Kelvin model is offered. The mathematical model of asphalt concrete viscoelastic behavior that can be used for calculation of asphalt concrete upper layers of non-rigid pavements for strength and rutting has been developed. It has been proved that the structural model of Burgers does not fully meet all the requirements of the asphalt-concrete.

  2. Controlling conductivity of asphalt concrete with graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Electrically conductive asphalt concrete has a huge potential for various multifunctional applications such as : self-healing, self-sensing, and deicing. In order to utilize the full spectrum of applications of electrically conductive : asphalt compo...

  3. Properties of sulfur-extended asphalt concrete

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    Gladkikh Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, increased functional reliability of asphalt concrete coatings associated with various modifying additives that improve the durability of pavements. Promising builder is a technical sulfur. Asphalt concrete, made using a complex binder consisting of petroleum bitumen and technical sulfur, were calledsSulfur-Extended Asphalt Concrete. Such asphalt concrete, due to changes in the chemical composition of particulate and bitumen, changes the intensity of the interaction at the interface have increased rates of physical and mechanical properties. There was a lack of essential knowledge concerning mechanical properties of the sulfur-bituminous concrete with such an admixture; therefore, we had carried out the necessary examination. It is revealed that a new material satisfies local regulations in terms of compressive and tensile strength, shear resistance, and internal friction.

  4. Electrical and mechanical properties of asphalt concrete containing conductive fibers and fillers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Yang, Jun; Liao, Hui; Chen, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Electrically conductive asphalt concrete has the potential to satisfy multifunctional applications. Designing such asphalt concrete needs to balance the electrical and mechanical performance of asphalt concrete. The objective of this study is to design electrically conductive asphalt concrete

  5. Evaluation of recycled asphaltic concrete : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    This report describes a project in which approximately 6,200 tons (5,630 Mg) of asphaltic concrete were recycled through a conventional asphalt batch plant. During the construction of the project, a buildup of asphalt-coated fines occurred in the dry...

  6. Mix Proportion Design of Asphalt Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianhu; Gao, Lingling; Du, Shoujun

    2017-12-01

    Based on the gradation of AC and SMA, this paper designs a new type of anti slide mixture with two types of advantages. Chapter introduces the material selection, ratio of ore mixture ratio design calculation, and determine the optimal asphalt content test and proportioning design of asphalt concrete mix. This paper introduces the new technology of mix proportion.

  7. Steady-State Creep of Asphalt Concrete

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    Alibai Iskakbayev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the experimental investigation of the steady-state creep process for fine-grained asphalt concrete at a temperature of 20 ± 2 °С and under stress from 0.055 to 0.311 MPa under direct tension and was found to occur at a constant rate. The experimental results also determined the start, the end point, and the duration of the steady-state creep process. The dependence of these factors, in addition to the steady-state creep rate and viscosity of the asphalt concrete on stress is satisfactorily described by a power function. Furthermore, it showed that stress has a great impact on the specific characteristics of asphalt concrete: stress variation by one order causes their variation by 3–4.5 orders. The described relations are formulated for the steady-state of asphalt concrete in a complex stressed condition. The dependence is determined between stress intensity and strain rate intensity.

  8. Characterization of Failure and Permanent Deformation Behaviour of Asphalt Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Asphalt concrete is a viscoelastic material consisting of aggregates, filler and bitumen. The response of asphalt concrete is highly dependent on temperature, loading rate and confining pressure. Permanent deformation is one of the most important distresses developing during the flexible pavement

  9. Fatigue Behavior of Modified Asphalt Concrete Pavement

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    saad I. Sarsam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue cracking is the most common distress in road pavement. It is mainly due to the increase in the number of load repetition of vehicles, particularly those with high axle loads, and to the environmental conditions. In this study, four-point bending beam fatigue testing has been used for control and modified mixture under various micro strain levels of (250 μƐ, 400 μƐ, and 750 μƐ and 5HZ. The main objective of the study is to provide a comparative evaluation of pavement resistance to the phenomenon of fatigue cracking between modified asphalt concrete and conventional asphalt concrete mixes (under the influence of three percentage of Silica fumes 1%, 2%, 3% by the weight of asphalt content, and (changing in the percentage of asphalt content by (0.5% ± from the optimum. The results show that when Silica fumes content was 1%, the fatigue life increases by 17%, and it increases by 46% when Silica fumes content increases to 2%, and that fatigue life increases to 34 % when Silica fumes content increases to 3% as compared with control mixture at (250 μƐ, 20°C and optimum asphalt content. From the results above, we can conclude the optimum Silica fumes content was 2%. When the asphalt content was 4.4%, the fatigue life has increased with the use of silica fumes by (50%, when asphalt content was 5.4%, the additives had led to increasing the fatigue life by (69%, as compared with the conventional asphalt concrete pavement.

  10. Characterisation of Asphalt Concrete Using Nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbhuiya, Salim; Caracciolo, Benjamin

    2017-07-18

    In this study, nanoindentation was conducted to extract the load-displacement behaviour and the nanomechanical properties of asphalt concrete across the mastic, matrix, and aggregate phases. Further, the performance of hydrated lime as an additive was assessed across the three phases. The hydrated lime containing samples have greater resistance to deformation in the mastic and matrix phases, in particular, the mastic. There is strong evidence suggesting that hydrated lime has the most potent effect on the mastic phase, with significant increase in hardness and stiffness.

  11. THE FATIGUE DURABILITY OF THE MODIFIED ASPHALT CONCRETE UNDER THE EFFECT OF INTENSIVE TRAFFIC LOADS

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    Yuri KALGIN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of prediction of the service life of asphalt concrete surface constructed with modified asphalt concrete application onto a traffic lane is examined. Asphalt concrete behaviour in road surface under the traffic loads was analysed. There were shown The results of experiments and their mathematical analysis of the assessment of standard and modified cold asphalt concrete fatigue life on road surface were shown. The service life of an asphalt concrete surface covered with standard and modified cold asphalt concrete is examined. The prediction has been received with an account of stress relaxation processes in asphalt concrete pavement and unevenness of traffic load application.

  12. Quality control of recycled asphaltic concrete : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    This study examined the variations found in recycled asphaltic concrete mix based upon plant quality control data and verification testing. The data was collected from four recycled hot-mix projects constructed in 1981. All plant control and acceptan...

  13. Density measurement verification for hot mix asphalt concrete pavement construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) requires a minimum density for the construction of dense-graded hot mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) pavements to ensure the likelihood that the pavement will not experience distresses that reduce the expected se...

  14. Density measurement verification for hot mixed asphalt concrete pavement construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) requires a minimum density for the construction of dense-graded hot mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) pavements to ensure the likelihood that the pavement will not experience distresses that reduce the expected se...

  15. Assessment of Quality of Asphalt Concrete used in Road ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWASOGO

    subjected to bitumen extraction and sieve analysis, hot mix Marshall Stability and flow tests, penetration and ... asphalt concrete as well as other structures of the flexible pavement. ... High-quality road networks are very important to the.

  16. DURABILITY OF ASPHALT CONCRETE MIXTURES USING DOLOMITE AGGREGATES

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    Imad Al-Shalout

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the durability of asphalt concrete, including the effects of different gradations, compaction temperatures and immersion time on the durability potential of mixtures. The specific objectives of this study are: to investigate the effect of compaction temperature on the mechanical properties of asphalt concrete mixtures; investigate the effect of bitumen content and different aggregate gradations on the durability potential of bituminous mixtures.

  17. Interfacial debonding of ice-asphalt concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazawa, E.; Mizoue, Y. (Hiroshima Univ., Hiroshima (Japan)); Kojima, T. (Hitachi Chemical Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-09-20

    Series of experimental investigations were carried out to clarify the bonding mechanism between ice and asphalt and to develop a new technique to reduce bonding resistance. The surface bonding resistance was measured by three methods and the main variables taken into consideration have been surface energy, surface roughness and stiffness of asphalt. Surface energy was varied by using various water repellents and the stiffness of the concrete was varied by mixing rubber particles. Correlations of the three variables were studied and the following results have been obtained. Decreasing of surface energy and increasing of deformability of asphalt concrete has been the effective method to decrease the bonding between ice and asphalt. For the case of water repellent coated surface, shear debonding strength has been linearly related to the energy required for debonding by dynamic tension and the shear debonding strength has decreased with the decrease in roughness of pavement. In the case of surface without using repellent, shear debonding strength has not been influenced by surface energy and roughness of pavement. 6 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. An investigation of waste foundry sand in asphalt concrete mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakis, Recep; Koyuncu, Hakan; Demirbas, Ayhan

    2006-06-01

    A laboratory study regarding the reuse of waste foundry sand in asphalt concrete production by replacing a certain portion of aggregate with WFS was undertaken. The results showed that replacement of 10% aggregates with waste foundry sand was found to be the most suitable for asphalt concrete mixtures. Furthermore, the chemical and physical properties of waste foundry sand were analysed in the laboratory to determine the potential effect on the environment. The results indicated that the investigated waste foundry sand did not significantly affect the environment around the deposition

  19. SYSTEM FOR CONTROLLING ELECTRIC DRIVE OF ASPHALT CONCRETE MIXING PLANT

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    A. S. Surmak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed to evaluate quality of asphalt concrete mixture through definition of current component variable of a drive motor and measurement of its derivative sign. In order to carry out final determination of mixture uniformity a transducer on the basis of a nuclear magnetic resonance is applied. Block diagram of the system is presented and algorithm of its operation is given in the paper. In addition to improvement of the finished product quality the application of the system makes it possible to reduce bitumen consumption used for production of asphalt concrete.

  20. Asphalt concrete modified by rubber crumbs in transport construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhovny, G. S.; Karpenko, AV

    2018-03-01

    High-temperature and low-temperature characteristics of the rubber-bitumen binder and rubber asphalt concrete based on it are researched. The determination method of binder’s low-temperature characteristics is offered. The estimation of binder’s and pavement’s stability against technological and operational aging is evaluated. Estimation of environmental and economic aspects of using rubber crumbs is made. The possibility of using rubber crumbs as modifier of organic binder for production of asphalt concrete on its base is justified.

  1. Steel slag in hot mix asphalt concrete : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    In September 1994, steel slag test and control sections were constructed in Oregon to evaluate the use of steel slag in hot mix asphalt concrete (HMAC). This report covers the construction and five-year performance of a pavement constructed with 30% ...

  2. Crack repair of asphalt concrete with induction energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García, A.; Schlangen, E.; Ven, M. van de; Vliet, D. van

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the healing rates of asphalt courses increase with the temperature. A new method, induction heating, is used in this paper to increase the lifetime of asphalt concrete pavements. Mastic will be first made electrically conductive by the addition of conductive fibers. Then it

  3. Mechanical Properties of Hot Mix Crumb Rubber Modified Asphalt Concrete Using Waste Tire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nak Seok; Lee, Woo Yeol [Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea)

    1998-06-30

    Wheel tracking and ravelling tests were conducted on the hot mix crumb rubber modified asphalt concrete using waste tire to evaluate the mechanical properties in comparison with conventional asphalt concrete. According to the test results, the modified product was superior to the conventional one by 50% in the resistance of permanent deformation and by 15% in the resistance of durability. The experimental results should recommend that the waste tire is positively recycled for asphalt concrete. (author). 11 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs.

  4. The use of waste materials in asphalt concrete mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncan, Mustafa; Tuncan, Ahmet; Cetin, Altan

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) the effects of rubber and plastic concentrations and rubber particle sizes on properties of asphalt cement, (b) on properties of asphalt concrete specimens and (c) the effects of fly ash, marble powder, rubber powder and petroleum contaminated soil as filler materials instead of stone powder in the asphalt concrete specimens. One type of limestone aggregate and one penetration-graded asphalt cement (75-100) were used. Three concentrations of rubber and plastic (i.e. 5%, 10% and 20% of the total weight of asphalt cement), three rubber particle sizes (i.e. No. 4 [4.75mm] - 20 [0.85 mm], No. 20 [0.85mm] - 200 [0.075mm] and No. 4 [4.75mm] - 200 [0.075mm]) and one plastic particle size (i.e. No. 4 [4.75mm] - 10 [2.00mm]) were also used. It was found that while the addition of plastic significantly increased the strength of specimens, the addition of rubber decreased it. No. 4 [4.75mm] - 200 [0.075mm] rubber particles showed the best results with respect to the indirect tensile test. The Marshall stability and indirect tensile strength properties of plastic modified specimens increased. Marble powder and fly ash could be used as filler materials instead of stone powder in the asphalt concrete pavement specimens.

  5. Asphalt Concrete Mixtures: Requirements with regard to Life Cycle Assessment

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    Jan Mikolaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Design of asphalt concrete, required properties of constituent materials and their mixing ratios, is of tremendous significance and should be implemented with consideration given to the whole life cycle of those materials and the final construction. Conformity with requirements for long term performance of embedded materials is the general objective of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA. Therefore, within the assessment, material properties need to be evaluated with consideration given to the whole service life—from the point of embedding in the construction until their disposal or recycling. The evaluation focuses on verification of conformity with criteria set for these materials and should guarantee serviceability and performance during their whole service life. Recycling and reuse of asphalt concrete should be preferred over disposal of the material. This paper presents methodology for LCA of asphalt concrete. It was created to ensure not only applicability of the materials in the initial stage, at the point of their embedding, but their suitability in terms of normatively prescribed service performance of the final construction. Methods described and results are presented in a case study for asphalt mixture AC 11; I design.

  6. Effect of Material Composition and Environmental Condition on Thermal Characteristics of Conductive Asphalt Concrete

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    Pan Pan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive asphalt concrete with high thermal conductivity has been proposed to improve the solar energy collection and snow melting efficiencies of asphalt solar collector (ASC. This paper aims to provide some insight into choosing the basic materials for preparation of conductive asphalt concrete, as well as determining the evolution of thermal characteristics affected by environmental factors. The thermal properties of conductive asphalt concrete were studied by the Thermal Constants Analyzer. Experimental results showed that aggregate and conductive filler have a significant effect on the thermal properties of asphalt concrete, while the effect of asphalt binder was not evident due to its low proportion. Utilization of mineral aggregate and conductive filler with higher thermal conductivity is an efficient method to prepare conductive asphalt concrete. Moreover, change in thermal properties of asphalt concrete under different temperature and moisture conditions should be taken into account to determine the actual thermal properties of asphalt concrete. There was no noticeable difference in thermal properties of asphalt concrete before and after aging. Furthermore, freezing–thawing cycles strongly affect the thermal properties of conductive asphalt concrete, due to volume expansion and bonding degradation.

  7. Modelling of Asphalt Concrete Stiffness in the Linear Viscoelastic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Grzegorz; Iwański, Marek

    2017-10-01

    Stiffness modulus is a fundamental parameter used in the modelling of the viscoelastic behaviour of bituminous mixtures. On the basis of the master curve in the linear viscoelasticity range, the mechanical properties of asphalt concrete at different loading times and temperatures can be predicted. This paper discusses the construction of master curves under rheological mathematical models i.e. the sigmoidal function model (MEPDG), the fractional model, and Bahia and co-workers’ model in comparison to the results from mechanistic rheological models i.e. the generalized Huet-Sayegh model, the generalized Maxwell model and the Burgers model. For the purposes of this analysis, the reference asphalt concrete mix (denoted as AC16W) intended for the binder coarse layer and for traffic category KR3 (5×105 controlled strain mode. The fixed strain level was set at 25με to guarantee that the stiffness modulus of the asphalt concrete would be tested in a linear viscoelasticity range. The master curve was formed using the time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP). The stiffness modulus of asphalt concrete was determined at temperatures 10°C, 20°C and 40°C and at loading times (frequency) of 0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 20 Hz. The model parameters were fitted to the rheological models using the original programs based on the nonlinear least squares sum method. All the rheological models under analysis were found to be capable of predicting changes in the stiffness modulus of the reference asphalt concrete to satisfactory accuracy. In the cases of the fractional model and the generalized Maxwell model, their accuracy depends on a number of elements in series. The best fit was registered for Bahia and co-workers model, generalized Maxwell model and fractional model. As for predicting the phase angle parameter, the largest discrepancies between experimental and modelled results were obtained using the fractional model. Except the Burgers model, the model matching quality was

  8. Aggregate Toughness/Abrasion Resistance and Durability/Soundness Tests Related to Asphalt Concrete Performance in Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The properties of aggregates used in asphalt concretes are very important to the performance of the pavements in which the asphalt concretes are used. Often pavement distress, such as stripping and rutting, can be traced directly to the aggregates us...

  9. Stress Regression Analysis of Asphalt Concrete Deck Pavement Based on Orthogonal Experimental Design and Interlayer Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuntao; Feng, Jianhu; Wang, Hu; Hong, Shidi; Zheng, Supei

    2018-03-01

    A three-dimensional finite element box girder bridge and its asphalt concrete deck pavement were established by ANSYS software, and the interlayer bonding condition of asphalt concrete deck pavement was assumed to be contact bonding condition. Orthogonal experimental design is used to arrange the testing plans of material parameters, and an evaluation of the effect of different material parameters in the mechanical response of asphalt concrete surface layer was conducted by multiple linear regression model and using the results from the finite element analysis. Results indicated that stress regression equations can well predict the stress of the asphalt concrete surface layer, and elastic modulus of waterproof layer has a significant influence on stress values of asphalt concrete surface layer.

  10. Evaluation of Colemanite Waste as Aggregate Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete

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    Nihat MOROVA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study usability of waste colemanite which is obtained after cutting block colemanite for giving proper shape to blocks as an aggregate in hot mix asphalt. For this aim asphalt concrete samples were prepared with four different aggregate groups and optimum bitumen content was determined. First of all only limestone was used as an aggregate. After that, only colemanite aggregate was used with same aggregate gradation. Then, the next step of the study, Marshall samples were produced by changing coarse and fine aggregate gradation as limestone and colemanite and Marshall test were conducted. When evaluated the results samples which produced with only limestone aggregate gave the maximum Marshall Stability value. When handled other mixture groups (Only colemanite, colemanite as coarse aggregate-limestone as fine aggregate, colemanite as fine aggregate-limestone as coarse aggregate all groups were verified specification limits. As a result, especially in areas where there is widespread colemanite waste, if transportation costs did not exceed the cost of limestone, colemanite stone waste could be used instead of limestone in asphalt concrete mixtures as fine aggregate

  11. PROSPECTS FOR APPLICATION OF COMPLEX-MODIFIED SAND ASPHALT CONCRETE IN ROAD CONSTRUCTION

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    D. Yu. Alexandrov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a possibility to use sand asphalt concrete as a material for protection of asphalt concrete and cement concrete road pavements against affection of external destructive factors. Advantages and disadvantages of sand asphalt concrete road pavements have been determined in the paper. The paper provides recommendations on improvement of sand asphalt concrete properties and contains an analysis of possible variants for usage of complex-modified sand asphalt concrete in the road construction. It has been noted that according to its potentially possible physical and mechanical properties activated quartz sand being micro-reinforced by dispersive industrial wastes is considered as an efficient component for creation of constructive layers in road asphalt concrete pavements. The paper reveals only specific aspects of the efficient application of quartz sand in road asphalt concrete. The subject of the paper loоks rather interesting for regions where there are no rock deposits for obtaining broken-stone ballast but there is rather significant spreading of local quarts sand. Its successful application is connected with the necessity to develop special equipment for physical and chemical activation of sand grain surface that permits strongly to increase an adhesive strength in the area of phase separation within the “bitumen–SiO2” system. The considered problem is a topical one and its solution will make it possible to local sand in a maximum way and partially to exclude application of broken stone in road construction.

  12. The effects of coarse aggregate cleanliness and moisture content on asphalt concrete compactability and moisture susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-31

    Twelve field projects were studied where forty-four locations were evaluated to assess the cause or : causes of asphalt concrete that exhibits tender zone characteristics (i.e. instability during compaction) and to : investigate the tendency of...

  13. Use of rubber crumb for preparation of asphalt-concrete mixtures

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    Yerbol Tileuberdi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article use of rubber crumb from spent tire for preparation of rubber-bitumen compounds is investigated. Then the rubber-bitumen compositions are used in composition of asphalt concrete mixes .

  14. INFLUENCE OF POLYMERIC-DISPERSED REINFORCEMENT ADDITIVES ON THE PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF ASPHALT CONCRETE

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    Chernov Sergey Anatolevych

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The technique and results of the studies of the influence of a polymeric-dispersed reinforcement additive on the performance characteristics of road hot asphalt concrete, namely, its resistance to fatigue failures, rutting and development of residual deformation are described. It is shown that the proposed method of modification of asphalt-concrete mixtures ensures an increase in the durability of layers of pavement road surface.

  15. A study on engineering characteristics of asphalt concrete using filler with recycled waste lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Do, Hwang; Hee Mun, Park; Suk keun, Rhee

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on determining the engineering characteristics of asphalt concrete using mineral fillers with recycled waste lime, which is a by-product of the production of soda ash (Na(2)CO(3)). The materials tested in this study were made using a 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% mixing ratio based on the conventional mineral filler ratio to analyze the possibility of using recycled waste lime. The asphalt concretes, made of recycled waste lime, hydrated lime, and conventional asphalt concrete, were evaluated through their fundamental engineering properties such as Marshall stability, indirect tensile strength, resilient modulus, permanent deformation characteristics, moisture susceptibility, and fatigue resistance. The results indicate that the application of recycled waste lime as mineral filler improves the permanent deformation characteristics, stiffness and fatigue endurance of asphalt concrete at the wide range of temperatures. It was also determined that the mixtures with recycled waste lime showed higher resistance against stripping than conventional asphalt concrete. It was concluded from various test results that a waste lime can be used as mineral filler and, especially, can greatly improve the resistance of asphalt concrete to permanent deformation at high temperatures.

  16. Effect of water on the triaxial response under monotonic loading of asphalt concrete used in dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaxiola Hernández, Alberto; Ossa López, Alexandra

    2018-01-01

    Embankment dams with asphalt concrete cores have been constructed on practically all continents with satisfactory results. Nowadays many advantages, such as the mechanical strength, are known that makes asphalt concrete a competitive alternative for the construction of the impervious elements of dams. However, the current available information does not describe the effect of prolonged contact between asphalt concrete and water on the structure of an embankment dam. In this research cylindrical asphalt concrete specimens with a void content similar to that used in impervious barriers of dams were fabricated and submerged in water for a prolonged period to simulate the conditions experienced by asphalt concrete placed inside an embankment dam as its core material. Subsequently, triaxial compression tests were conducted on the specimens. The results indicated that the asphalt concrete exhibited a reduction in strength because of the saturation process to which the material was subjected. However, no changes were observed in the mechanical response to prolonged contact with water for periods of up to 12 months.

  17. How to transform an asphalt concrete pavement into a solar turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García, Alvaro; Partl, Manfred N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We create a system for harvesting energy from asphalt concrete. • We create an artificial porosity in the asphalt concrete. • We connect a chimney to this porosity. • Differences in temperature produce an air flow. • This air flow serves also for cooling down the pavement. - Abstract: Asphalt concrete can absorb a considerable amount of the incident solar radiation. For this reason asphalt roads could be used as solar collectors. There have been different attempts to achieve this goal. All of them have been done by integrating pipes conducting liquid, through the structure of the asphalt concrete. The problem of this system is that all pipes need to be interconnected: if one is broken, the liquid will come out and damage the asphalt concrete. To overcome these limitations, in this article, an alternative concept is proposed:parallel air conduits, where air can circulate will be integrated in the pavement structure. The idea is to connect these artificial pore volumes in the pavement to an updraft or to a downdraft chimney. Differences of temperature between the pavement and the environment can be used to create an air flow, which would allow wind turbines to produce an amount of energy and that would cool the pavement down in summer or even warm it up in winter. To demonstrate that this is possible, an asphalt concrete prototype has been created and basics calculations on the parameters affecting the system have been done. It has been found that different temperatures, volumes of air inside the asphalt and the difference of temperature between the asphalt concrete and the environment are critical to maximize the air flow through the pavement. Moreover, it has been found that this system can be also used to reduce the heat island effect

  18. Determination of Stone-Mastic Asphalt Concrete Durability

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    Yastremsky, D. A.; Abaidullina, T. N.; Chepur, P. V.

    2018-05-01

    The paper is focused on determination of durability of the stone-mastic asphalt (SMA) concrete, containing various stabilizing additives: "Armidon" (authors’ development) and "Viatop". At the first stage of experiments, the APA method was used to determine the rutting in the SMA containing these additives. Strength test for only top layers of asphalt concrete surface is insufficient for the calculation of the pavement fatigue resistance limits. Due to this fact, a comprehensive approach was employed which incorporates the interaction of the surface and subgrade natural soil. To analyze the road surface stress-strain state and to determine the durability margin, a numerical model was used (describes the processes of fatigue life). The model was developed basing on the finite element method (FEM) in the ANSYS program. Conducted studies and numerical calculations allowed obtaining the minimum and maximum stress values in the structure affected zones and in the zones of plastic deformations occurrence in artificial and natural bases. It allows predicting deformation processes during repeated wheel loads caused by moving vehicles. In course of studies, the results of static stresses in the pavement were also obtained.

  19. Evaluation of moisture damage in asphalt concrete with CRM motorcycle tire waste passing #50 sieve size

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    Siswanto, Henri; Supriyanto, Bambang; Pranoto, Pranoto; Chandra, Pria Rizky; Hakim, Arief Rahman

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this experimental research is to evaluate moisture damage in Asphalt Concrete (AC) with Crumb Rubber Modified (CRM) motorcycle tire waste passing #50 and retaining #100 sieve size. Two gradations were used in this research, the first gradation is usual for asphalt concrete base (ACB) and the second gradation is for asphalt concrete wearing course (ACWC). Marshall testing apparatus was used for testing the Marshall specimens. Seven levels of CRM content were used, namely 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, 3%, 4.5% and 6% by weight of mixtures. Retained stability represent the level of moisture damage of AC pavement. The result indicates that addition CRM to the AC mixture increases their the stability to a maximum value and subsequent addition decrease the stability. The addition CRM to AC decreases their moisture damage susceptibility. AC with 1% CRM is the best asphalt-CRM mix.

  20. Modified composite material developed on the basis of no-fines asphalt concrete

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    Mikhasek Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Being a composite material, asphalt concrete is widely used in hydraulic engineering and road construction. The paper proves one of asphalt concrete modification, which includes first creating a skeleton of no-fines concrete and then its washing-down with bituminous materials by a hot procedure, can be successfully used in hydraulic structures Modified composite material based on no-fines asphalt concrete has a harder skeleton because of links from cement stone and has a technological advantage, as through the proposed technology it allows to reduce the cost of filling porous spaces. This technology allows to conclude that concrete aggregate with size fractions of 120 mm or less and frost resistance of 50 cycles and less can be recommended for fastening of slopes.

  1. Performance of asphaltic concrete incorporating styrene butadiene rubber subjected to varying aging condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Faisal Mohammed; Jaya, Ramadhansyah Putra; Mohamed, Azman; Hassan, Norhidayah Abdul; Rosni, Nurul Najihah Mad; Mohamed, Abdullahi Ali; Agussabti

    2017-12-01

    The influence of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) on asphaltic concrete properties at different aging conditions was presented in this study. These aging conditions were named as un-aged, short-term, and long-term aging. The conventional asphalt binder of penetration grade 60/70 was used in this work. Four different levels of SBR addition were employed (i.e., 0 %, 1 %, 3 %, and 5 % by binder weight). Asphalt concrete mixes were prepared at selected optimum asphalt content (5 %). The performance was evaluated based on Marshall Stability, resilient modulus, and dynamic creep tests. Results indicated the improving stability and permanent deformation characteristics that the mixes modified with SBR polymer have under aging conditions. The result also showed that the stability, resilient modulus, and dynamic creep tests have the highest rates compared to the short-term aging and un-aged samples. Thus, the use of 5 % SBR can produce more durable asphalt concrete mixtures with better serviceability.

  2. Using ESEM to analyze the microscopic property of basalt fiber reinforced asphalt concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei Gao

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available The basalt fiber staggered distribution in the asphalt concrete matrix and the bonding situation between asphalt are analyzed by images collected using field emission environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM test equipment. The results show that bonding of the fiber and the asphalt binder is very good and there is a strong binding force of chemical bonding connections between the two; the lipophilicity of basalt fiber is very good, the wrapped cover ability of asphalt for fiber is very strong; basalt fiber forms the local space network structure in the asphalt concrete matrix, effectively overcome the relative slip between the particles, connect the damaged parts into a whole; basalt fiber across internal micropores, and the internal defects in material can be remedied. At the same time, crack resistance mechanism of the fiber to internal micro cracks is qualitatively explained according to the magnitude of the stress intensity factor Kf. Keywords: Road engineering, Asphalt concrete, Basalt fiber, Microscopic analysis

  3. POROUS-MASTIC ASPHALT-CONCRETE MIXTURES AND THEIR UTILIZATION HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khudokonenko Anton Aleksandrovich

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject: a rapid increase in the traffic intensity and freight traffic on motor roads leads to premature destruction of road surfaces. At the same time, the actual service life of asphalt-concrete pavements rarely exceeds 4-5 years and in most cases is only 2-3 years. Most intensively defects and fractures appear on asphalt-concrete pavements in the early spring. Nowadays the overhaul intervals for the road surface coverings are significantly lower than those given by the regulatory requirements. One of the main reasons for this phenomenon is the use of obsolete technologies based on traditional materials whose properties are inadequate to resist stresses and deformations arising in the coating. This is especially evident in the climatic conditions of the south of the European part of Russia, where the upper layers of the roadway experience a much wider range of temperatures. Tighter requirements for the initial road-building materials and timely repair of the coatings allow us to increase the service life of motor roads. Research objectives: the aim of the study is to develop a new type of asphalt-concrete, such as porous-mastic one. Materials and methods: the work was carried out based on observations and published sources, a method of theoretical study and analysis. Results: the domestic and foreign experience of using the given asphalt concrete for the top layer of the coating was considered. The technology of preparation and laying of a porous-mastic asphalt-concrete mixture is presented and its advantages and disadvantages are shown. Conclusions: increasing the longevity of highways is an important and urgent task and it can be solved, in particular, due to the wide use of new technologies and non-traditional building materials that allow us to improve the quality of asphalt-concrete pavement and prolong its overhaul intervals.

  4. Nanosized carbon modifier used to control plastic deformations of asphalt concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysotskaya, M. A.; Shekhovtsova, S. Yu; Barkovsky, D. V.

    2018-03-01

    Aspects related to plastic track, the formation of which directly depends on the properties of the binder in the composition of asphalt concrete, are considered in this article. The effect of primary carbon nanomaterials on the quality of polymer and bitumen binder in comparison with the traditional binder including cross-linking agent is evaluated. The influence of binders on the resistance to the track formation of type B asphalt concrete is studied. To quantify the service life of surfacing, a calculation method based on the criteria for the resistance of surfacing material to plastic deformations is used.

  5. Laboratory investigation of the performances of cement and fly ash modified asphalt concrete mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suched Likitlersuang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of filler materials on volumetric and mechanical performances of asphalt concrete was investigated in this study. The AC60/70 asphalt binder incorporating with cement and fly ash as filler materials was mixed with limestone following the Marshall mix design method. The filler contents of cement and/or fly ash were varied. The non-filler asphalt concrete mixtures of the AC60/70 and the polymer modified asphalt were prepared for the purpose of comparison. The investigation programme includes the indirect tensile test, the resilient modulus test and the dynamic creep test. The tests are conducted under the humid temperate environments. All tests were then carried out under standard temperature (25 °C and high temperature (55 °C by using a controlled temperature chamber via the universal testing machine. The wet-conditioned samples were prepared to investigate the moisture susceptibility. Results show that cement and/or fly ash were beneficial in terms of improved strength, stiffness and stripping resistance of asphalt mixture. In addition, the combined use of cement and fly ash can enhance rutting resistance at wet and high temperature conditions. The results indicate that the strength, stiffness and moisture susceptibility performances of the asphalt concrete mixtures improved by filler are comparable to the performance of the polymer modified asphalt mixture. Keywords: Asphalt concrete, Filler, Resilient modulus, Dynamic creep test, Moisture susceptibility

  6. Specifications and Construction Methods for Asphalt Concrete and Other Plant-Mix Types, 3rd Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphalt Inst., College Park, MD.

    The purpose of this publication is to assist engineers in the analysis, design and control of paving projects that use asphalt concrete and other asphalt plant-mixes. The scope of this new third edition has been enlarged, and changes necessitated by advances in asphalt technology have been incorporated. Chapters I and II and Appendices A and B…

  7. Quality control analysis : part IV : field simulation of asphaltic concrete specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-02-01

    The report present some of the major findings, from a simulated study of statistical specifications, on three asphaltic concrete projects representing a total of approximately 30, 000 tons of hot mix. The major emphasis of the study has been on the a...

  8. Investigation on the temperature of the asphalt-concrete facing of embankment dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Adam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asphalt concrete is a traditional material used for the constructions of upstream sealing of reservoir dams, particularly in upper reservoirs of pumped storage hydroelectric plants. The asphalt layer is often exposed to significant fluctuations of temperature caused, for example, by heating the facing from the sun and by its subsequent rapid cooling by water during reservoir periodical filling. To better understand the physical phenomena and behaviour of the facing in terms of vapour diffusion, the state of stress, etc., it is necessary to know temperature phenomena in the asphalt facing. This paper describes the measurement of temperature in the asphalt facing of the Dlouhe Strane pumped storage hydroelectric plant and its evaluation using 1D numerical model of heat flow in the asphalt concrete facing. Numerical simulation for selected load scenarios enabled the temperature phenomena that take place in the construction of the asphalt-concrete facing to be quantified. The analysis shows that during insolation, the asphalt facing is exposed to the significant temperature rise on its surface and also over its whole thickness. Similarly during frost weather the facing becomes frozen in its entire thickness. During the day cycle the temperature in the asphalt layers changes significantly. However, the temperature in the underlying rockfill dam body becomes steady approximately at the depth of 1.0 m. Keywords: Asphalt concrete facing, Temperature distribution analysis, Embankment dam

  9. Recycling of asphalt concrete : Oregon's first hot mix project : interim report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-11-01

    The need to reduce fuel consumption and conserve natural resources have been items of ever-increasing importance during recent years. This report discusses a project in which almost 50,000 tons of asphalt concrete placed to carry detour traffic durin...

  10. Evaluation of recycled hot mix asphalt concrete on Route 220 : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the performance of an approximately 8-mi section of roadway on which the rod two layers of asphalt concrete were milled, recycled through a conventional asphalt batch plant, and relaid. The recycled mix consisted of about 40% re...

  11. Modeling of Cyclic Strength for the Asphalt Concrete Considering Damage Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alibai Iskakbayev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The expression is obtained for determination of cyclic tensile strength for asphalt concrete, which considers damage accumulation and history of loading, using the long-term strength curve for asphalt concrete obtained according to the test results of more than 110 samples to failure at stresses from 0.05 to 0.31 MPa and by introduction of damage kernel in this paper. Cyclic strength depends on the stress, parameters of long-term strength, frequency of loading, durations of loading and relax periods, and ratio of loading period to the long-term strength. Evaluation of accuracy for the obtained expression for the cyclic strength has been performed by comparison with the results of a series for experimental tests of asphalt concrete samples at a temperature of 22 °С and cyclic loading conditions. The stress is 0.31 MPa, and the durations of loading and relax periods are 5 and 60 s, respectively. Calculations performed with the obtained expressions at real road conditions (the stress is 0.31 MPa, and the durations of loading and relax periods are 0.1 and 9.9 s respectively showed the possibility of its use for the prediction of fatigue (multicyclic strength of an asphalt concrete pavement for a highway.

  12. Study of lime vs. no lime in cold in-place recycled asphalt concrete pavements : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    The resilient characteristics of cold in-place recycled asphalt concrete with and without lime were examined. Six core samples were obtained from a site two months after construction; six months later, six additional core samples were obtained from t...

  13. Marshall properties of asphalt concrete using crumb rubber modified of motorcycle tire waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswanto, Henri; Supriyanto, Bambang; Pranoto, Chandra, Pria Rizky; Hakim, Arief Rahman

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to explain the effect of Crumb Rubber Modified (CRM) of motorcycle tire waste on Marshall properties of asphalt mix. Two types of aggregate gradation, asphalt concrete wearing course (ACWC) and asphalt concrete base (ACB), and CRM passing #50 sieve size were used. Seven levels of CRM content were investigated in this study, namely 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, 3%, 4.5%, and 6% by weight of aggregate. Marshall test is conducted on Marshall specimens. The specimens are tested in their optimum binder content (OBC). The results indicate that CRM addition of motorcycle tire waste increases the Marshall stability of the both mix, ACWC and ACB. In addition, 1% CRM addition of motorcycle tire waste of the total mix weight is the best mix.

  14. Influence of Temperature Upon Permanent Deformation Parameters of Asphalt Concrete Mixes

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    Amjad Hamad Albayati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of asphalt concrete pavement has affected by many factors, the temperature is the most important environmental one which has a large effect on the structural behavior of flexible pavement materials. The main cause of premature failure of pavement is the rutting, Due to the viscoelastic nature of the asphalt cement, rutting is more pronounced in hot climate areas because the viscosity of the asphalt binder which is inversely related to rutting is significantly reduced with the increase in temperature resulting in a more rut susceptible paving mixtures. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of temperatures variations on the permanent deformation parameters (permanent strain (p, intercept (a, slope (b, Alpha and Mu as well as resilient strain (r and resilient modulus (Mr. To achieve this objective, one aggregate gradation with 12.5mm nominal maximum size, two grades of asphalt cements (40-50 and 60-70 brought form Al- Daurah refinery, limestone dust filler has been used to prepare the asphalt concrete mixtures. 30 Marshall specimens were prepared to determine the optimum asphalt cement content. Thereafter, 30 cylindrical asphalt concrete specimens (102mm in diameter and 203 mm in height are prepared in optimum asphalt cement and optimum ±0.5 percent. The prepared specimens were used in uniaxial repeated load test to evaluate the permanent deformation parameters of asphalt concrete mixes under the following testing temperature (5, 15, 25, 40 and 60c. The test result analyses appeared that Mr is decrease 51 percent when temperature increased from 5 c to 25 c and then decrease 22 percent with further increase in temperature from 25 c to 60 c. Also, the Alpha value decreases by a factor of 1.25 and 1.13 when temperature increases from 5 c to 25 c and 25 c to 60 c, espectively. Finally, statistical models were developed to predict the Alpha and Mu parameters of permanent deformation.

  15. Effect of Natural Sand Percentages on Fatigue Life of Asphalt Concrete Mixture

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    Nahla Yassub Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The design of a flexible pavement requires the knowledge of the material properties which are characterized by stiffness and fatigue resistance. The fatigue resistance relates the number of load cycles to failure with the strain level applied to the asphalt mixture. The main objective of this research is the evaluation of the fatigue life of asphalt mixtures by using two types of fine aggregate having different percentages. In this study, two types of fine aggregate were used natural sand (desert sand and crushed sand. The crushed sand was replaced by natural sand (desert sand with different percentages (0%, 25%, 75% and 100% by the weight of the sand (passing sieve No.8 and retained on sieve No.200 and one type of binder (40/50 penetration from Al-Daurah refinery. The samples of beams were tested by four point bending beam fatigue test at the control strain mode (250, 500 and 750 microstrain while the loading frequency (5Hz and testing temperature (20oC according to (AASHTO T321. The experimental work showed that fatigue life (Nf and initial flexural stiffness increased when control strain decreased for asphalt mixtures. Acceptable fatigue life at 750 microstrain was obtained with asphalt concrete mixtures containing 100% crushed sand as well as asphalt concrete contained 25% natural sand. The asphalt concrete contained 100% and 75% of natural sand exhibited high fatigue life at low level of microstrain (250. The main conclusion of this study found that best proportion of natural sand to be added to an asphaltic concrete mixture is falling within the range (0% and 25% by weight of fraction (passing No.8 and retained on No.200 sieve .

  16. Evaluating The Performance of Asphalt Concrete Mixes by Utilizing Carbon Black as Asphalt Modifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaa Faleh Al.ani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon black produced from several factories in Iraq is expected to provide a reinforcing agent for asphalt paving materials. Carbon black has many characteristics that distinguish  it from conventional mineral fillers, as well as their different function in pavement mixtures. Theory and exercise advanced  in the inclusive utilize of carbon black as a reinforcing agent for rubber has led to concept of asphalt reinforcement. The very fine particles of micro filler added in different contents will be dispersed in asphalt cement improving the mechanical properties of asphalt concrete mixes. In this Four percentages rates were utilized; 0, 3, 6, and 9 percent adding to asphalt grade (60-70. Mixes of asphalt concrete were destined at their optimum asphalt content (OAC then experienced to assess their engineering characteristics that contain moisture of damage, permanent deformation, modulus of resilient and characteristics of fatigue. These characteristics have been assessed utilizing indirect tensile strength, uniaxial repeated loading and repeated flexural beam tests. Mixtures improved with carbon black were existed to have amended permanent deformation and fatigue characteristics, else exhibited high resilient modulus and lower moisture susceptibility. Result showed that a rate changed from 3 to 9 percent has shown an increase in resilient modulus for increment of carbon black and modulus of resilient for mixes with 9 percent carbon black was 1.4 times that for mixes with 0 percent carbon black. The altering of carbon black from a range (3-9 percent has modified the fatigue property of the asphalt concrete mixes as determined by flexural test, Significantly, to modify the asphalt concrete manner taken the  percent of carbon black 6, and to produce the mixes more durable , higher resistance to distresses by adding the local knowledge.

  17. Design and Properties of Asphalt Concrete Mixtures Using Renewable Bioasphalt Binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, A.; Djumari; Irfansyah, P. A.; Shidiq, A. M.; Wibisono, I. S.; Fauzy, M. N.; Hadi, F. N.

    2017-02-01

    The needs of petroleum asphalt as materials for pavement is very large, while the petroleum classified as natural resources that cannot be renewable. As a result of petroleum dwindling and prices tend to be more expensive. So that requiring other alternative materials as a substitute for conventional asphalt derived from biomass or often called bioasphalt. This study aims to know the volumetric and Marshall characteristics on Asphalt Cement ( AC ) using the Damar asphalt modification to substitute 60/70 penetration asphalt as a binder. The volumetric and Marshall characteristic are porosity, density, flow, stability, and Marshall quotient. The characteristic of asphalt concrete at optimum bitumen content are compared to the conditions from highway agency 1987 and the general specification of asphalt concrete Bina Marga 2010 the third revision. The research uses experimental method in the laboratory with the samples made using the dasphalt modification as binder and incorporating the aggregate gradation no. VII SNI 03-1737-1989. The research is using 15 samples divided into 5 contents of damar asphalt, they are 5%, 5,5%, 6%, 6,5%, dan 7%. Tests carried out using Marshall test equipment to get the value of flow and stability and then be searched the value of optimum damar asphalt content. The result of asphalt concrete analysis using dasphalt modification as binder gives the value of optimum dasphalt content at 5,242%. The most characteristics already met the requirements and specifications.

  18. Investigation of Properties of Asphalt Concrete Containing Boron Waste as Mineral Filler

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    Cahit GÜRER

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the manufacture of compounds in the boron mining industry a large quantity of waste boron is produced which has detrimental effects on the environment. Large areas have to be allocated for the disposal of this waste. Today with an increase in infrastructure construction, more efficient use of the existing sources of raw materials has become an obligation and this involves the recycling of various waste materials. Road construction requires a significant amount of raw materials and it is possible that substantial amounts of boron-containing waste materials can be recycled in these applications. This study investigates the usability of boron wastes as filler in asphalt concrete. For this purpose, asphalt concrete samples were produced using mineral fillers containing 4%, 5%, 6%, 7% and 8% boron waste as well as a 6% limestone filler (6%L as the control sample. The Marshall Design, mechanical immersion and Marshall Stability test after a freeze-thaw cycle and indirect tensile stiffness modulus (ITSM test were performed for each of the series. The results of this experimental study showed that boron waste can be used in medium and low trafficked asphalt concrete pavements wearing courses as filler.

  19. Characteristics and applications of high-performance fiber reinforced asphalt concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Philip

    Steel fiber reinforced asphalt concrete (SFRAC) is suggested in this research as a multifunctional high performance material that can potentially lead to a breakthrough in developing a sustainable transportation system. The innovative use of steel fibers in asphalt concrete is expected to improve mechanical performance and electrical conductivity of asphalt concrete that is used for paving 94% of U. S. roadways. In an effort to understand the fiber reinforcing mechanisms in SFRAC, the interaction between a single straight steel fiber and the surrounding asphalt matrix is investigated through single fiber pull-out tests and detailed numerical simulations. It is shown that pull-out failure modes can be classified into three types: matrix, interface, and mixed failure modes and that there is a critical shear stress, independent of temperature and loading rate, beyond which interfacial debonding will occur. The reinforcing effects of SFRAC with various fiber sizes and shapes are investigated through indirect tension tests at low temperature. Compared to unreinforced specimens, fiber reinforced specimens exhibit up to 62.5% increase in indirect tensile strength and 895% improvements in toughness. The documented improvements are the highest attributed to fiber reinforcement in asphalt concrete to date. The use of steel fibers and other conductive additives provides an opportunity to make asphalt pavement electrically conductive, which opens up the possibility for multifunctional applications. Various asphalt mixtures and mastics are tested and the results indicate that the electrical resistivity of asphaltic materials can be manipulated over a wide range by replacing a part of traditional fillers with a specific type of graphite powder. Another important achievement of this study is development and validation of a three dimensional nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model that is capable of simulating both linear and nonlinear viscoelasticity of asphaltic materials. The

  20. Generation of urban road dust from anti-skid and asphalt concrete aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervahattu, Heikki; Kupiainen, Kaarle J; Räisänen, Mika; Mäkelä, Timo; Hillamo, Risto

    2006-04-30

    Road dust forms an important component of airborne particulate matter in urban areas. In many winter cities the use of anti-skid aggregates and studded tires enhance the generation of mineral particles. The abrasion particles dominate the PM10 during springtime when the material deposited in snow is resuspended. This paper summarizes the results from three test series performed in a test facility to assess the factors that affect the generation of abrasion components of road dust. Concentrations, mass size distribution and composition of the particles were studied. Over 90% of the particles were aluminosilicates from either anti-skid or asphalt concrete aggregates. Mineral particles were observed mainly in the PM10 fraction, the fine fraction being 12% and submicron size being 6% of PM10 mass. The PM10 concentrations increased as a function of the amount of anti-skid aggregate dispersed. The use of anti-skid aggregate increased substantially the amount of PM10 originated from the asphalt concrete. It was concluded that anti-skid aggregate grains contribute to pavement wear. The particle size distribution of the anti-skid aggregates had great impact on PM10 emissions which were additionally enhanced by studded tires, modal composition, and texture of anti-skid aggregates. The results emphasize the interaction of tires, anti-skid aggregate, and asphalt concrete pavement in the production of dust emissions. They all must be taken into account when measures to reduce road dust are considered. The winter maintenance and springtime cleaning must be performed properly with methods which are efficient in reducing PM10 dust.

  1. Natural asphalt modified binders used for high stiffness modulus asphalt concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilski, Marcin; Słowik, Mieczysław

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a set of test results supporting the possibility of replacing, in Polish climate conditions, hard road 20/30 penetration grade bitumen used in the binder course and/or base course made of high stiffness modulus asphalt concrete with binders comprising of 35/50 or 50/70 penetration grade bitumens and additives in the form of natural Gilsonite or Trinidad Epuré asphalts. For the purpose of comparing the properties of the discussed asphalt binders, values of the Performance Grade have been determined according to the American Superpave system criteria.

  2. Recycling of polyethylene terephthalate (PET plastic bottle wastes in bituminous asphaltic concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo Olatunbosun Sojobi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research sheds light on the concept of eco-friendly road construction which comprises eco-design, eco-extraction, eco-manufacturing, eco-construction, eco-rehabilitation, eco-maintenance, eco-demolition, and socioeconomic empowerment. It also revealed the challenges being faced in its adoption and the benefits derivable from its application. Furthermore, the effects of recycling PET plastic bottle wastes produced in North Central Nigeria in bituminous asphaltic concrete (BAC used in flexible pavement construction were also evaluated. The mix design consists of 60/70 penetration-grade asphaltic concrete (5%, 68% coarse aggregate, 6% fine aggregate, and 21% filler using the dry process at 170°C. The optimum bitumen content (OBC for conventional BAC was obtained as 4% by weight of total aggregates and filler. Polymer-coated aggregate (PCA-modified BAC seems preferable because it has the potential to utilize more plastic wastes with a higher optimum plastic content (OPC of 16.7% by weight of total aggregates and filler compared to that of 9% by weight of OBC achieved by PMB-BAC. For both PMB- and PCA-modified BAC, an increase in air void, void in mineral aggregate, and Marshall stability were observed. Eco-friendly road construction which recycles PET wastes should be encouraged by government considering its potential environmental and economic benefits.

  3. Investigation of statistical relationship between dynamic modulus and thermal strength of asphalt concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, A.; Gular, M.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic modulus is a performance indicator for asphalt concrete and is used to qualify asphalt mixtures based on stress-strain characteristics under repeated loading. Moreover, the low temperature cracking of asphalt concrete mixes are measured in terms of fracture strength and fracture temperature. Dynamic modulus test was selected as one of the simple performance tests in the AASHTO 2002 guidelines to rate mixtures according to permanent deformation performance. However, AASHTO 2002 guidelines is silent in relating dynamic modulus values to low temperature cracking, probably because of weak correlations reported between these two properties. The present study investigates the relation between these two properties under the influence of aggregate type and mix gradation. Mixtures were prepared with two types of aggregate and gradations, while maintaining the binder type and air voids constant. The mixtures were later tested for dynamic modulus and fracture strength using thermal stress restrained specimen test (TSRST). Results indicate that there exists a fair correlation between the thermal fracture strength and stiffness at a selected test temperature and frequency level. These correlations are highly dependent upon the type of aggregate and mix gradation. (author)

  4. Fracture resistance of asphalt concrete modified with crumb rubber at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Razmi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to obtain fracture toughness of asphalt concrete modified by Crumb Rubber (CR and Sasobit at low temperatures. First, Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR test was performed on unmodified binder (binder 60/70, binder 60/70 + 3%Sasobit and 20%CR + 3%Sasobit modified asphalt binder to find how each modifier affect asphalt binder stiffness and relaxation rate at low temperatures. Mixed mode I/II fracture tests were conducted by cracked Semi-Circular Bending (SCB specimens and the critical stress intensity factors were calculated for pure mode I, mixed mode I/II and pure mode II conditions. Results of BBR tests indicated that 20%CR + 3%Sasobit reduces stiffness and the m-value increase at low temperatures. As a result, 20%CR + 3%Sasobit has positive effect on low temperatures performance by improving thermal cracking resistance. Also, according to the fracture toughness test results, the Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA mixture containing 20% CR, shows higher resistance against crack growth than WMA mixture. It was found that mixed mode I/II can be more detrimental than pure mode I and II conditions. Keywords: Crumb rubber, Asphalt concrete, Bending Beam Rheometer, Fracture resistance, Semi-circular bending test

  5. Design Method and Cost-Benefit Analysis of Hybrid Fiber Used in Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiwei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber, as an additive, can improve the performance of asphalt concrete and be widely studied, but only a few works have been done for hybrid fiber. This paper presents a new and convenient method to design hybrid fiber and verifies hybrid fiber’s superiority in asphalt pavement engineering. Firstly, this paper expounds the design method used as its applied example with the hybrid fiber composed of lignin, polyester, and polypropylene fibers. In this method, a direct shear device (DSD is used to measure the shear damage energy density (SDED of hybrid fiber modified asphalts, and range and variance statistical analysis are applied to determine the composition proportion of hybrid fiber. Then, the engineering property of hybrid fiber reinforced asphalt concrete (AC-13 is investigated. Finally, a cost-benefit model is developed to analyze the advantage of hybrid fiber compared to single fibers. The results show that the design method employed in this paper can offer a beneficial reference. A combination of 1.8% of lignin fiber and 2.4% of polyester fiber plus 3.0% polypropylene fiber presented the best reinforcement of the hybrid fiber. The cost-benefit model verifies that the hybrid fiber can bring about comprehensive pavement performance and good economy.

  6. Investigating the Effects of Nanoclay and Nylon Fibers on the Mechanical Properties of Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Taherkhani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effects of reinforcement by randomly distributed nylon fibers and addition of nanoclay on some engineering properties of a typical asphalt concrete. The properties of asphalt concrete reinforced by different percentages of 25 mm nylon fibers have been compared with those of the mixtures containing different percentages of nanoclay and those in which both the fibers and nanoclay have been included. Engineering properties, including Marshall stability, resilient modulus, dynamic creep and fatigue life have been studied. Nylon fibers have been used in different percentages of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4% (by the weight of total mixture, and nanoclay has been used in 2, 4 and 7% (by the weight of bitumen. It is found that the addition of fibers is more effective than the nanoclay for increasing the resistance against fatigue cracking. However, nanoclay improves the resistance of the mixture against permanent deformation better than the nylon fibers. The results also show that the mixture reinforced by 0.4% of nylon fibers and containing 7% of nanoclay has the highest resilient modulus, Marshall stability and fatigue life. However, the mixture containing only 7% of nanoclay has the highest resistance against permanent deformation.

  7. Investigating the Properties of Asphalt Concrete Containing Glass Fibers and Nanoclay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Taherkhani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The performance of asphaltic pavements during their service life is highly dependent on the mechanical properties of the asphaltic layers. Therefore, in order to extend their service life, scientists and engineers are constantly trying to improve the mechanical properties of the asphaltic mixtures. One common method of improving the performance of asphaltic mixtures is using different types of additives. This research investigated the effects of reinforcement by randomly distributed glass fibers and the simultaneous addition of nanoclayon some engineering properties of asphalt concrete have been investigated. The properties of a typical asphalt concrete reinforced by different percentages of glass fibers were compared with those containing both the fibers and nanoclay. Engineering properties, including Marshall stability, flow, Marshall quotient, volumetric properties and indirect tensile strength were studied. Glass fibers were used in different percentages of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6% (by weight of total mixture, and nanoclay was used in 2, 4 and 6% (by the weight of bitumen. It was found that the addition of fibers proved to be more effective than the nanoclay in increasing the indirect tensile strength. However, nanoclay improved the resistance of the mixture against permanent deformation better than the glass fibers. The results also showed that the mixture reinforced by 0.2% of glass fiber and containing 6% nanoclay possessed the highest Marshall quotient, and the mixture containing 0.6% glass fibers and 2% nanoclay possessedthe highest indirect tensile strength.

  8. Influence of Hydrated Lime on the Properties and Permanent Deformation of the Asphalt Concrete Layers in Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Tameemi Ahmed F.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flexible or asphalt concrete pavement is the paving system most widely adopted all over the world. It has been recognized that there are many different types of the factors affecting the performance and durability of asphalt concrete pavement, including the service conditions, such as: the variation of temperature from mild to extremes and the repeated excessive axle loading as well as the inadequate quality of the raw materials. All of these when combined together are going to accelerate the occurrence of distresses in flexible pavement such as permanent deformation and fatigue cracking. As the result, there has an urgent need to enhance the ability of asphalt concrete mixture to resist distresses happened in pavement. Use of additives is one of the techniques adopted to improve pavement properties. It has been found that hydrated lime might be one of the effective additives because it is widely available and relatively cheap compared to other modifiers like polymers. This paper presents an experimental study of the hydrated-lime modified asphalt concrete mixtures. Five different percentages of the hydrated lime additive were investigated, namely (1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3 percent. The hydrated lime additive was used as partial replacement of limestone filler by total weight of the aggregate. The designed Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA concretes are for the application of three pavement courses, i.e. Surface, Leveling and Base. These mixtures are designed and tested following Marshall procedure and uniaxial repeated loading to evaluate permanent deformation at different temperatures of 20°C, 40°C and 60°C. The experimental results show that the addition of hydrated lime as a partial replacement of ordinary limestone mineral filler results a significant improvement on mechanical properties and the resistant to permanent deformation of the designed asphalt concrete mixtures.

  9. Effect of tack coat on bonding characteristics at interface between asphalt concrete layers; Asphalt concrete no sokan fuchaku ni okeru tack concrete no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachiya, Y. [Port and Harbour Research Inst., Kanagawa (Japan); Umeno, S. [Ministry of Transport, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, K. [Nagaoka National College of Technology, Niigata (Japan)

    1997-08-20

    The effect of tack coat on bonding characteristics at the interface between surface and base layers was studied for airport asphalt pavement. In a fracture behavior, shear stress is first caused by horizontal loading at the interface between surface and base layers, resulting in peeling of the layers in the case of poor bonding. Further loading under the above condition results in fracture of asphalt concrete layers by bending or tensile actions. The bonding strength between layers decreases with an increase in interval of construction between surface and base layers, while the bonding strength between layers increases with sufficient curing of tack coat. Curing for 1 hour in the daytime and 6 hours or more in the nighttime is sufficient for evaporation of water content in asphalt emulsion. The use of conventional asphalt emulsion for the sandy interface as tack coat deduces the bonding strength in the case of poor curing. Asphalt emulsion containing high-penetration rubber can improve the bonding strength. 12 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Laboratory Performance Evaluation of High Modulus Asphalt Concrete Modified with Different Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate comprehensive performance of high modulus asphalt concrete (HMAC and propose common values for establishing evaluation system. Three gradations with different modifiers were conducted to study the high and low temperature performance, shearing behavior, and water stability. The laboratory tests for HMAC included static and dynamic modulus tests, rutting test, uniaxial penetration test, bending test, and immersion Marshall test. Dynamic modulus test results showed that modifier can improve the static modulus and the improvements were remarkable at higher temperature. Moreover, modulus of HMAC-20 was better than those of HMAC-16 and HMAC-25. The results of performance test indicated that HMAC has good performance to resist high temperature rutting, and the resistances of the HMAC-20 and HMAC-25 against rutting were better than that of HMAC-16. Then, the common values of dynamic stability were recommended. Furthermore, common values of HMAC performance were established based on pavement performance tests.

  11. PECULIAR FEATURES OF HEAT-HUMIDITY MODE PERTAINING TO POROUS LAYERS OF ASPHALT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Verenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of experimental investigations and points out the fact that conventional approaches to design and calculations of road pavements that presuppose application of porous asphalt concrete on compact bedding can cause some deformations and destructions initiated due to humidity migration in large internal material pores and lead to material destruction during warm season of the year when water is characterized by high activity. Such processes result in bitumen washing-out, white spot occurrence on the pavement and quick destruction of the pavement.The paper proposes to reconsider existing approaches to design and calculation of road pavements, estimation of reliability and service-ability levels of the applied construction materials. In particular it is necessary to calculate a road pavement with respect to thermo-physical action while excluding condensate and humidity accumulation in porous materials. 

  12. Multiscale imaging and characterization of the effect of mixing temperature on asphalt concrete containing recycled components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, M C; Griffa, M; Bressi, S; Partl, M N; Tebaldi, G; Poulikakos, L D

    2016-10-01

    When producing asphalt concrete mixture with high amounts of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), the mixing temperature plays a significant role in the resulting spatial distribution of the components as well as on the quality of the resulting mixture, in terms of workability during mixing and compaction as well as in service mechanical properties. Asphalt concrete containing 50% RAP was investigated at mixing temperatures of 140, 160 and 180°C, using a multiscale approach. At the microscale, using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy the RAP binder film thickness was visualized and measured. It was shown that at higher mixing temperatures this film thickness was reduced. The reduction in film thickness can be attributed to the loss of volatiles as well as the mixing of RAP binder with virgin binder at higher temperatures. X-ray computer tomography was used to characterize statistically the distribution of the RAP and virgin aggregates geometric features: volume, width and shape anisotropy. In addition using X-ray computer tomography, the packing and spatial distribution of the RAP and virgin aggregates was characterized using the nearest neighbour metric. It was shown that mixing temperature may have a positive effect on the spatial distribution of the aggregates but did not affect the packing. The study shows a tendency for the RAP aggregates to be more likely distributed in clusters at lower mixing temperatures. At higher temperatures, they were more homogeneously distributed. This indicates a higher degree of blending both at microscale (binder film) and macroscale (spatial distribution) between RAP and virgin aggregates as a result of increasing mixing temperatures and the ability to quantify this using various imaging techniques. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Effect of Lime Addition Methods on Performance Related Properties of Asphalt Concrete Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Hamd Khalil Albayati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, some of the newly constructed asphalt concrete pavements in Baghdad as well as other cities across Iraq showed premature failures with consequential negative impact on both roadway safety and economy. Frequently, load associated mode of failure (rutting and fatigue as well as, occasionally, moisture damage in some poorly drained sections are the main failure types found in those newly constructed road. In this research, hydrated lime was introduced into asphalt concrete mixtures of wearing course in two methods. The first one was the addition of dry lime on dry aggregate and the second one was the addition of dry lime on saturated surface dry aggregate moisturized by 2.0 to 3.0 percent of water. For each type of addition, five different percentages of lime as a partial replacement of ordinary limestone mineral filler were used; these were; 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3 percent by weight of aggregate besides a control mixture that did not contain lime. Marshall Mix design method was used and the performance properties of moisture damage, resilient modulus, permanent deformation and fatigue characteristics were evaluated using indirect tensile strength, uniaxial repeated loading and repeated flexural beam tests. Also, VESYS5W software was implemented to evaluate the pavements performance in terms of rut depth and fatigue area for a typical pavement structure. The main conclusion withdrawn from this research revealed that the use of 2.5 percent hydrated lime in dry addition method and wet addition method showed an improved fatigue and permanent deformation characteristics, lower moisture susceptibility and high resilient modulus.

  14. Use of plastic waste (poly-ethylene terephthalate) in asphalt concrete mixture as aggregate replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Abolfazl; Ganjidoust, Hossein; Maghanaki, Amir Abedin

    2005-08-01

    One of the environmental issues in most regions of Iran is the large number of bottles made from poly-ethylene terephthalate (PET) deposited in domestic wastes and landfills. Due to the high volume of these bottles, more than 1 million m3 landfill space is needed for disposal every year. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the possibility of using PET waste in asphalt concrete mixes as aggregate replacement (Plastiphalt) to reduce the environmental effects of PET disposal. For this purpose the mechanical properties of plastiphalt mixes were compared with control samples. This study focused on the parameters of Marshall stability, flow, Marshall quotient (stability-to-flow ratio) and density. The waste PET used in this study was in the form of granules of about 3 mm diameter which would replace (by volume) a portion of the mineral coarse aggregates of an equal size (2.36-4.75 mm). In all prepared mixes the determined 6.6% optimum bitumen content was used. In this investigation, five different percentages of coarse aggregate replacement were used. The results showed that the aggregate replacement of 20% by volume with PET granules would result in a reduction of 2.8% in bulk compacted mix density. The value of flow in the plastiphalt mix was lower than that of the control samples. The results also showed that when PET was used as partial aggregate replacement, the corresponding Marshall stability and Marshall quotient were almost the same as for the control samples. According to most of specification requirement, these results introduce an asphalt mix that has properties that makes it suitable for practical use and furthermore, the recycling of PET for asphalt concrete roads helps alleviate an environmental problem and saves energy.

  15. Calculation of the temperature of asphalt concrete at making the joints of multilane road pavement of non-rigid type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giyasov Botir Iminzhonovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The construction quality of road surface of non-rigid type essentially depend on providing the temperature regimes in the process of laying and packing of hot asphalt concrete mixtures. In order to provide the required characteristics of asphalt concrete due to the surface width it is necessary to provide the temperature regimes of hot asphalt concrete mixture in the zones of lane connection. The hot mixture is promptly cooling right after laying within several minutes, which results, according to the construction technology and the specific conditions of work production, in temperature abuse of the mixture at joints of the lanes at packing. The authors present the analysis of the technology of arranging multilane road surface by one paver with the possibility of heating the surface lane edge with the temperature of the adjacent lane. The results of the studies of the production conditions effect on the temperature of edge heating of the previously laid lanes, and the time required to achieve the maximum heating temperature depending on the relative thickness of coating layers.

  16. Development of high stability hot mix asphalt concrete with hybrid binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Hirato

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cost reduction of public works projects has been desired due to severe financial circumstances. Therefore, asphalt pavement has been requested to extend its life. Semi-flexible pavement or epoxy asphalt pavement, which has high rutting resistance and oil resistance, may be applied to the place where these performances ae demanded. However, special technique is required in manufacturing and construction. In addition, these materials have also raised a problem that they cannot be recycled. Meanwhile, conventional asphalt pavement has several drawbacks. It is vulnerable to rutting caused by traffic load and damage caused by petroleum oils such as gasoline or motor oil. The materials used in asphalt mixtures were studied for improving the durability of asphalt mixture. A high stability asphalt concrete was developed which has equal or superior performance to semi-flexible pavement and epoxy asphalt pavement. In this paper, the process of selecting the substance and the characteristics evaluation of the developed mixtures ae described. Furthermore, an inspection result as well as follow-up survey of the performance of the developed mixtures obtained from trial and actual construction is shown.

  17. Experimental investigation of the fatigue behaviour of asphalt concrete mixtures containing waste iron powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabani, M.; Mirabdolazimi, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → This paper presents the first model of the fatigue behaviour of iron-asphalt mixtures in the world. → This model is able to describe the fatigue behaviour of iron-asphalt under dynamic loading. → Coarse surface, high stiffness and angularity of iron powder lead to enhanced fatigue performance. → The model illustrates that the use of iron powder has a considerable effect on tensile strain of HMA. → The use of this type of waste material could be a helpful solution for less polluted environment. - Abstract: The use of additives and admixtures in the construction of asphalt concrete pavements to strengthen them against dynamic loads has increased considerably in recent years. Recent research has shown that employing desirable waste materials in hot mix asphalts (HMAs) improves their dynamic properties noticeably. The study of some special cases, such as the addition of blast furnace slag and metallic materials of waste electronic instruments to HMA, has led to a considerable increase in the ability of HMAs to tolerate fatigue phenomena and repeated loading. Based on experimental studies, a model is proposed to describe the fatigue behaviour of asphalt mixtures containing waste iron powder. The results of this research show an important increase in the strength of asphalt mixtures containing waste iron powder against fatigue phenomena in comparison to conventional HMAs.

  18. Asphalt Mixture for the First Asphalt Concrete Directly Fastened Track in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Hyeok Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research has been initiated to develop the asphalt mixtures which are suitable for the surface of asphalt concrete directly fastened track (ADFT system and evaluate the performance of the asphalt mixture. Three aggregate gradations which are upper (finer, medium, and below (coarser. The nominal maximum aggregate size of asphalt mixture was 10 mm. Asphalt mixture design was conducted at 3 percent air voids using Marshall mix design method. To make impermeable asphalt mixture surface, the laboratory permeability test was conducted for asphalt mixtures of three different aggregate gradations using asphalt mixture permeability tester. Moisture susceptibility test was conducted based on AASHTO T 283. The stripping percentage of asphalt mixtures was measured using a digital camera and analyzed based on image analysis techniques. Based on the limited research results, the finer aggregate gradation is the most suitable for asphalt mixture for ADFT system with the high TSR value and the low stripping percentage and permeable coefficient. Flow number and beam fatigue tests for finer aggregate asphalt mixture were conducted to characterize the performance of asphalt mixtures containing two modified asphalt binders: STE-10 which is styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS polymer and ARMA which is Crum rubber modified asphalt. The performance tests indicate that the STE-10 shows the higher rutting life and fatigue life.

  19. Impact of Aggregate Gradation and Filler Type on Marshall Properties of Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saad I. Sarsam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As asphalt concrete wearing course (ACWC is the top layer in the pavement structure, the material should be able to sustain stresses caused by direct traffic loading. The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of aggregate gradation and mineral filler type on Marshall Properties. A detailed laboratory study is carried out by preparing asphalt mixtures specimens using locally available materials including asphalt binder (40-50 penetration grade, two types of aggregate gradation representing SCRB and ROAD NOTE 31 specifications and two types of mineral filler including limestone dust and coal fly ash. Four types of mixtures were prepared and tested. The first type included SCRB specification and limestone dust, the second type included SCRB specification and coal fly ash, the third types included ROAD NOTE 31 specification and limestone dust and the fourth type included ROAD NOTE 31 specification and coal fly ash. The optimum asphalt content of each type of mixtures was determined using Marshall Method of mix design. 60 specimen were prepared and tested with dimension of 10.16 cm in diameter and 6.35 cm in height. Results of this study indicated that aggregate gradation and filler type have a significant effect on optimum asphalt content and Marshall Properties. From the experimental data, it was observed that the value of Marshall Stability is comparatively higher when using fly ash as filler as compared to limestone dust.

  20. Development of probabilistic fatigue curve for asphalt concrete based on viscoelastic continuum damage mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to its roots in fundamental thermodynamic framework, continuum damage approach is popular for modeling asphalt concrete behavior. Currently used continuum damage models use mixture averaged values for model parameters and assume deterministic damage process. On the other hand, significant scatter is found in fatigue data generated even under extremely controlled laboratory testing conditions. Thus, currently used continuum damage models fail to account the scatter observed in fatigue data. This paper illustrates a novel approach for probabilistic fatigue life prediction based on viscoelastic continuum damage approach. Several specimens were tested for their viscoelastic properties and damage properties under uniaxial mode of loading. The data thus generated were analyzed using viscoelastic continuum damage mechanics principles to predict fatigue life. Weibull (2 parameter, 3 parameter and lognormal distributions were fit to fatigue life predicted using viscoelastic continuum damage approach. It was observed that fatigue damage could be best-described using Weibull distribution when compared to lognormal distribution. Due to its flexibility, 3-parameter Weibull distribution was found to fit better than 2-parameter Weibull distribution. Further, significant differences were found between probabilistic fatigue curves developed in this research and traditional deterministic fatigue curve. The proposed methodology combines advantages of continuum damage mechanics as well as probabilistic approaches. These probabilistic fatigue curves can be conveniently used for reliability based pavement design. Keywords: Probabilistic fatigue curve, Continuum damage mechanics, Weibull distribution, Lognormal distribution

  1. Laboratory Study on the Fatigue Resistance of Asphaltic Concrete Containing Titanium Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buhari Rosnawati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the fatigue performance of modified asphalt mixture using Indirect Tensile Fatigue Test. Titanium Dioxide (TiO2 powder in a form of rutile was used for producing asphalt concrete with lower mixing and compaction temperature compared to conventional hot mix asphalt without reducing its physical and mechanical also resistance to fatigue. The characteristic of the asphalt and modified asphalt was evaluated using penetration test, softening test and rotational viscosity test. Titanium dioxide of 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10% by weight of asphalt has been incorporated into unaged 80/100 asphalt mix in order to improvise its performance and to fulfill the objectives of this experimental study. As a result, TiO2 as an additive is potential to decrease the penetration and increasing the softening point of the asphalt. In terms of fatigue performance testing, addition TiO2 additive does help in improving the fatigue properties as it shows greater result than the control asphalt. In conclusion, TiO2 is great in improving fatigue properties.

  2. Laboratory Study on the Fatigue Resistance of Asphaltic Concrete Containing Titanium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhari, Rosnawati; Ezree Abdullah, Mohd; Khairul Ahmad, Mohd; Azhar Tajudin, Saiful; Khatijah Abu Bakar, Siti

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the fatigue performance of modified asphalt mixture using Indirect Tensile Fatigue Test. Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) powder in a form of rutile was used for producing asphalt concrete with lower mixing and compaction temperature compared to conventional hot mix asphalt without reducing its physical and mechanical also resistance to fatigue. The characteristic of the asphalt and modified asphalt was evaluated using penetration test, softening test and rotational viscosity test. Titanium dioxide of 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10% by weight of asphalt has been incorporated into unaged 80/100 asphalt mix in order to improvise its performance and to fulfill the objectives of this experimental study. As a result, TiO2 as an additive is potential to decrease the penetration and increasing the softening point of the asphalt. In terms of fatigue performance testing, addition TiO2 additive does help in improving the fatigue properties as it shows greater result than the control asphalt. In conclusion, TiO2 is great in improving fatigue properties.

  3. Developing the elastic modulus measurement of asphalt concrete using the compressive strength test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Arief; Suparma, Latif Budi; Mulyono, Agus Taufik

    2017-11-01

    Elastic modulus is a fundamental property of an asphalt mixture. An analytical method of the elastic modulus is needed to determine the thickness of flexible pavement. It has a role as one of the input values on a stress-strain analysis in the finite element method. The aim of this study was to develop the measurement of the elastic modulus by using compressive strength testing. This research used a set of specimen mold tool and Delta Dimensi software to record strain changes occurring in the proving ring of compression machine and the specimens. The elastic modulus of the five types of aggregate gradation and 2 types of asphalt were measured at optimum asphalt content. Asphalt Cement 60/70 and Elastomer Modified Asphalt (EMA) were used as a binder. Manufacturing success indicators of the specimens used void-in-the-mix (VIM) 3-5 % criteria. The success rate of the specimen manufacturing was more than 76%. Thus, the procedure and the compressive strength test equipment could be used for the measurement of the elastic modulus. The aggregate gradation and asphalt types significantly affected the elastic modulus of the asphalt concrete.

  4. Fatigue Life Prediction of High Modulus Asphalt Concrete Based on the Local Stress-Strain Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulian Zheng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Previously published studies have proposed fatigue life prediction models for dense graded asphalt pavement based on flexural fatigue test. This study focused on the fatigue life prediction of High Modulus Asphalt Concrete (HMAC pavement using the local strain-stress method and direct tension fatigue test. First, the direct tension fatigue test at various strain levels was conducted on HMAC prism samples cut from plate specimens. Afterwards, their true stress-strain loop curves were obtained and modified to develop the strain-fatigue life equation. Then the nominal strain of HMAC course determined using finite element method was converted into local strain using the Neuber method. Finally, based on the established fatigue equation and converted local strain, a method to predict the pavement fatigue crack initiation life was proposed and the fatigue life of a typical HMAC overlay pavement which runs a risk of bottom-up cracking was predicted and validated. Results show that the proposed method was able to produce satisfactory crack initiation life.

  5. Improving of Water Resistance of Asphalt Concrete Wearing Course Using Latex-Bitumen Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siswanto Henri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that presence of water in a bituminous mix is a critical factor which can lead to premature failure of flexible pavements. This requires solutions one of which is to formulate an asphalt mix that has a high resistance to moisture and one way to do this is to mix latex with the asphalt mix. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the effect of water on Marshall stability of asphalt concrete wearing course (ACWC made with a latex-bitumen binder. Latex-bitumen was mixed with aggregate and four levels of latex content were investigated in this study, namely, 0%, 2%, 4% and 6% respectively by weight of asphalt. Wet procces was used in the blending of mixtures. The procedure used to obtain the optimum binder contents conformed to the Marshall procedure (SNI 06-2489-1991. Six Marshall specimens at optimum binder content were prepared for each binder mix investigated. Three of six specimens from each group were tested under Marshall standards. The remaining specimens were tested by immersion in a bath at 60°C for 24 hours. The Marshall index of retained stability was used to evaluate the effect of water on the Marshall stability of ACWC. The results indicated that the addition of up to 4% latex to ACWC mix increased the retained Marshall stability, whereas the addition of latex above 4% decreased the retained stability of the mixture. The addition of 4% CRM significantly improved the retained stability of the mixture and was the best latex – ACWC mix.

  6. Development of a stress-mode sensitive viscoelastic constitutive relationship for asphalt concrete: experimental and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mohammad M.; Tabatabaee, Nader; Jahanbakhsh, H.; Jahangiri, Behnam

    2017-08-01

    Asphalt binder is responsible for the thermo-viscoelastic mechanical behavior of asphalt concrete. Upon application of pure compressive stress to an asphalt concrete specimen, the stress is transferred by mechanisms such as aggregate interlock and the adhesion/cohesion properties of asphalt mastic. In the pure tensile stress mode, aggregate interlock plays a limited role in stress transfer, and the mastic phase plays the dominant role through its adhesive/cohesive and viscoelastic properties. Under actual combined loading patterns, any coordinate direction may experience different stress modes; therefore, the mechanical behavior is not the same in the different directions and the asphalt specimen behaves as an anisotropic material. The present study developed an anisotropic nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive relationship that is sensitive to the tension/compression stress mode by extending Schapery's nonlinear viscoelastic model. The proposed constitutive relationship was implemented in Abaqus using a user material (UMAT) subroutine in an implicit scheme. Uniaxial compression and indirect tension (IDT) testing were used to characterize the viscoelastic properties of the bituminous materials and to calibrate and validate the proposed constitutive relationship. Compressive and tensile creep compliances were calculated using uniaxial compression, as well as IDT test results, for different creep-recovery loading patterns at intermediate temperature. The results showed that both tensile creep compliance and its rate were greater than those of compression. The calculated deflections based on these IDT test simulations were compared with experimental measurements and were deemed acceptable. This suggests that the proposed viscoelastic constitutive relationship correctly demonstrates the viscoelastic response and is more accurate for analysis of asphalt concrete in the laboratory or in situ.

  7. Modification of asphaltic concrete with a mineral polymeric additive based on butadiene-styrene rubber and chemically precipitated calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Niftaliev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of asphaltic concrete with a mineral polymeric additive based on butadiene – styrene rubber and chemically precipitated calcium carbonate. This paper presents the results of the study of physical – mechanical and service properties of the asphaltic concrete modified with the mineral polymeric composition. Calcium carbonate is used both as a filler and a coagulant. The chalk was preliminarily ground and hydrophobizated by stearic acid. These operations contribute to even distribution of the filler and interfere with lump coagulation. As a result of the experiments, it was found that the best results were obtained by combining the operations of dispersion and hydrophobization. The optimal amount of stearic acid providing the finest grinding in a ball mill is a content from 3 to 5% by weight. The optimal grinding time of the filler was found (4–6 hours. With increasing dispersion time the particles form agglomerates. Filling the butadiene styrene latex with the hydrophobic fine-grained calcium carbonate was carried out in the laboratory mixer. As a result of the experimental works, it was found that the best distribution of the filler takes place with ratio of rubber: chalk – 100:400. The resulting modifier was subjected to the thermal analysis on the derivatograph to determine its application temperature interval. A marked reduction in weight of the mineral polymeric modifier begins at 350 °C. Thus, high temperature of the modifier destruction allows to use it at the temperature of the technological process of asphaltic concrete preparation (up to 170 °C. It was found that an increase in the amount of the carbonate filler in the rubber SKS 30АRК significantly increases its thermal resistance and connection of the polymer with the chalk in the composition.

  8. Influence of DAD-TA temperature-reducing additive on physical and mechanical properties of bitumen and compaction of asphalt concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadykina, V. V.; Akimov, A. E.; Trautvain, A. I.; Kholopov, V. S.

    2018-03-01

    The paper is devoted to the use of DAD-TA temperature-reducing additive for the preparation and pouring of asphalt concrete mixes at reduced temperatures. It also shows positive influence of the modified bitumen on the efficiency of organo-mineral composite compaction at reduced temperatures. Physical and mechanical properties of asphalt concrete with the use of bitumen modified by DAD-TA additive including indicators characterizing road surfacing life are presented. Arguments to use this material from the point of view of its production technology and environmental impact are given.

  9. Validation of a dynamic modulus predictive equation on the basis of spanish asphalt concrete mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateos, A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic modulus is defined as the ratio of peak cyclic stress to peak cyclic strain under harmonic loading. It is one of the most important properties of asphalt mixtures, since it determines the strain response characteristics as a function of loading rate and temperature. Different simplified models exist that can predict this variable from mixture composition and binder rheological data, with Witczak and Hirsh models being the most widely accepted. These models have been evaluated in the present study, on the basis of 352 data points from eight asphalt concrete mixtures that were tested between −5 and 60 °C. A new model is also formulated which improves predictions of the previous ones for Spanish mixtures, even though it is a relatively simple equation that requires very limited binder rheological data compared to Witczak and Hirsch models.El módulo dinámico es la relación entre los picos de tensión y deformación bajo carga armónica. Es una de las propiedades más importantes de las mezclas bituminosas, ya que determina la respuesta deformacional en función de la velocidad de carga y la temperatura. Existen diferentes modelos simplificados que permiten predecir esta variable a partir de la composición de la mezcla y de las características reológicas del betún, siendo los de Witczak y el de Hirsch los más ampliamente aceptados. Dichos modelos han sido evaluados en el presente estudio a partir de 352 puntos procedentes de ocho mezclas tipo hormigón bituminoso que fueron ensayadas entre −5 y 60 °C. Así mismo, se ha formulado un nuevo modelo que mejora las predicciones de los anteriores para las mezclas españolas, aun tratándose de una ecuación relativamente simple que requiere una mínima información reológica del betún en comparación con los modelos de Witczak y Hirsch.

  10. In-Place Recycling and Reclamation of Asphaltic Concrete Pavements in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Full-depth reclamation has been defined by the Asphalt Recycling and Reclaiming Association as a rehabilitation technique in which the full thickness of the asphalt pavement and a predetermined portion of the underlying material (base, subbase, an...

  11. Asphalt Concrete for Cold Regions, A Comparative Laboratory Study and Analysis of Mixtures Containing Soft and Hard Grades of Asphalt Cement,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Justification January 1980 BY Distribution Availabilit CodesIAvail an~d/or Dist special Prepa red for DIRECTORATE OF MILITARY PROGRAMS OFFICE, CHIEF OF...of water on the resilient modulus of asphalt treated mixes. Proecedinfp 4. Asphalt concrete mixes using the Tilton aggregates Association of Asphalt

  12. Full depth bituminous recycling of I-70, Thomas County, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In 1990, 13 full depth asphalt pavement test sections were built on a portion of I-70 in Thomas County, Kansas. Various combinations of hot mix and cold recycle mixes with different additives were used to build the test sections. Two of the test sect...

  13. Basic Performance of Fibre Reinforced Asphalt Concrete with Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement Produced In Low Temperatures with Foamed Bitumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomicz-Kowalska, Anna; Iwański, Mateusz M.; Mrugała, Justyna

    2017-10-01

    During the reconstruction of road pavements, the reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), which is obtained through milling of the worn out existing asphalt, is commonly used for producing new base courses in cold recycling processes. Two of these techniques are most popular: one using mineral-cement-emulsion mixes and one utilizing mineral cement mixes with foamed bitumen. Additionally, some amounts of RAP can be incorporated into traditional hot mix asphalt. The demand for energy efficient and environmentally friendly solutions however, results in a need for development of new techniques that would result in cheaper and more reliable solutions with smaller carbon footprint. The reduction of processing temperatures with simultaneous incorporation of reclaimed material is the most efficient way of obtaining these objectives, but it often results in the overall decrease of bituminous mix quality. The paper presents the possibility of using RAP for producing asphalt concrete in warm mix asphalt (WMA) production process by the use of foamed bitumen modified with Fischer-Tropsch synthetic wax and polymer-basalt fibers. Additionally, a series of reference mixtures were produced to investigate the effects of the additives and of the warm process. The carried out analyses and tests shown that the experimental warm mix asphalt produced with RAP and foamed bitumen returned satisfactory performance. The introduction of synthetic F-T wax in the warm foam bitumen mixes resulted in a significantly improved compaction levels and moisture and frost resistance and the addition of polymer-basalt fibers has further improved the permanent deformation resistance of the mixes. All of the designed and tested mixes have fulfilled the requirements for binding course asphalt concrete with medium traffic loads.

  14. Deformation behavior and load limits of asphaltic concrete under the conditions of cores in embankment dams; Deformationsverhalten und Belastungsgrenzen des Asphaltbetons unter den Bedingungen von Staudammkerndichtungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, U.

    1998-12-31

    Based on the analysis of existing dams with asphaltic diaphragm and investigations in the three-phase-system of asphaltic concrete a recipe for the composition of asphaltic cores is recommended. For the construction, rest and operating period of an embankment dam the load and the reaction of the asphaltic concrete cores as well as the appearing stress and deformations are described. Extensive material testings have been performed and at 41 asphaltic concrete specimens triaxial stress controlled pressure and creeping tests have been carried out. The evaluation of the triaxial tests led to proportions of the main stress and deformation limits as criteria of breaking. Under application of the standard equation for nonlinear viscoelastic element-laws a rheonom element formulation was developed from the experiment data and transformed into its differential form. With this approach the stress and deformation behavior of watertight asphaltic diaphragm can be precalculated for a period up to 10 years. The applicability of this approach, which can be also used within FE-calculations as well, is illustrated in four examples. (orig.) [Deutsch] Nach der Analyse bestehender Staudaemme mit Asphaltbetonkerndichtung und Untersuchungen zum Dreiphasensystem Asphaltbeton wird eine Rezepturempfehlung fuer den Asphaltkerndichtungsbau aufgestellt. Fuer die Bau-, Ruhe- und Betriebsphase eines Staudammes werden die Beanspruchungen und Reaktionen der Asphaltbetonkerndichtung sowie die auftretenden Spannungen und Verformungen beschrieben. Nach umfangreichen Materialpruefungen sind an 41 Asphaltbetonpruefkoerpern triaxiale spannungsgesteuerte Druck-Kriechversuche durchgefuehrt worden. Die Auswertung der Triaxialversuche ergab ein Grenzhauptspannungsverhaeltnis und Deformationsgrenzen als Bruchkriterien. Unter Verwendung der Standarformulierung fuer nichtlineare viskoelastische Stoffgesetze wurde aus den Versuchsdaten ein rheonomer Stoffansatz entwickelt und in seine differentielle Form

  15. Determination of the heating temperature of potholes surface on road pavement in the process of repairs using hot asphalt concrete mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giyasov Botir Iminzhonovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the process of roads construction the necessary transport and operational characteristics should be achieved, which depend on the quality of the applied, material and technologies. Under the loads of transport means and the influence of weather conditions on the road pavement deformations and destructions occur, which lead to worsening of transport and operational characteristics, decrease of operational life of the road and they are often the reason of road accidents. According to the data of the Strategic Research Center of "Rosgosstrah" more than 20 % of road accidents in Russia occur due to bad quality of road pavement. One of the main directions in traffic security control and prolongation of operational life for road pavement of non-rigid type is road works, as a result of which defects of pavement are eliminated and in case of timely repairs of high quality the operational life of the road increases for several years. The most widely used material for non-rigid pavement repairs is hot road concrete mixes and in case of adherence to specifications they provide high quality of works. The authors investigate the problems of hot asphalt concrete mixes for repairs of road surfaces of non-rigid type. The results of the study hot asphalt concrete mix’s temperature regimes are offered in case of repair works considering the temperature delivered to the work site and the ambient temperature depending on the type of mix and class of bitumen.

  16. The urban heat island effect, its causes, and mitigation, with reference to the thermal properties of asphalt concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerani, Abbas; Bakaric, Jason; Jeffrey-Bailey, Tristan

    2017-07-15

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a phenomenon that affects many millions of people worldwide. The higher temperatures experienced in urban areas compared to the surrounding countryside has enormous consequences for the health and wellbeing of people living in cities. The increased use of manmade materials and increased anthropogenic heat production are the main causes of the UHI. This has led to the understanding that increased urbanisation is the primary cause of the urban heat island. The UHI effect also leads to increased energy needs that further contribute to the heating of our urban landscape, and the associated environmental and public health consequences. Pavements and roofs dominate the urban surface exposed to solar irradiation. This review article outlines the contribution that pavements make to the UHI effect and analyses localized and citywide mitigation strategies against the UHI. Asphalt Concrete (AC) is one of the most common pavement surfacing materials and is a significant contributor to the UHI. Densely graded AC has low albedo and high volumetric heat capacity, which results in surface temperatures reaching upwards of 60 °C on hot summer days. Cooling the surface of a pavement by utilizing cool pavements has been a consistent theme in recent literature. Cool pavements can be reflective or evaporative. However, the urban geometry and local atmospheric conditions should dictate whether or not these mitigation strategies should be used. Otherwise both of these pavements can actually increase the UHI effect. Increasing the prevalence of green spaces through the installation of street trees, city parks and rooftop gardens has consistently demonstrated a reduction in the UHI effect. Green spaces also increase the cooling effect derived from water and wind sources. This literature review demonstrates that UHI mitigation techniques are best used in combination with each other. As a result of the study, it was concluded that the current mitigation

  17. Effects of crumb rubber content and curing time on the properties of asphalt concrete and stone mastic asphalt using dry process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.T. Tai Nguyen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Along with the rapid increase in the number of road vehicles, a large amount of waste tires have been created, causing negative effects to the environment. Many attempts have been made to effectively reduce this type of solid waste including the reuse of recycled rubber powder from waste tires as an additive for improving the performance of asphalt mixtures. In this work, the authors aim to study the effects of crumb rubber (CR on the mechanical properties, especially the rutting resistance, of CR modified asphalt concrete (AC and stone mastic asphalt (SMA by varying two factors-namely, the content of additive and the curing time. The dimension of used CR ranges from 0 to 2.36 mm, which is not too coarse for promoting the CR–bitumen interaction and not too fine for facilitating the production of CR. The content of CR was increased gradually from 0 to 3% to examine the effects of CR content on the engineering properties and determine the optimal content in the mixture. It was observed that the optimal content is 1.5–2%, while the optimal curing time that contributes to the maximal increase in the mechanical characteristics of both mixtures could not be determined. In the range of 0–5 h of curing time, the longer the asphalt mixture is maintained at a high temperature, the better the performance of mixture will be. Ageing was found to have influence on the performance of asphalt mixtures; however, its effects are not as important as those of CR modification. Keywords: Crumb rubber, Dry process, Asphalt concrete, SMA, Curing time

  18. Structural evaluation of asphalt pavements with full-depth reclaimed base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Currently, MnDOT pavement design recommends granular equivalency, GE = 1.0 for non-stabilized full-depth : reclamation (FDR) material, which is equivalent to class 5 material. For stabilized full-depth reclamation (SFDR), : there was no guideline for...

  19. Preliminary evaluation of physical and chemical characterization of waste palm oil shell as cool material replaced in asphaltic concrete as fine aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, M. A. M.; Anting, N.; Shahidan, S.; Lee, Y. Y.; Din, M. F. Md; Khalid, F. S.; Nazri, W. M. H. W.

    2017-11-01

    Malaysia is one of the biggest producer of palm oil product and currently as main source of economy for the country. During the production of crude palm oil, a large amount of waste material is generated, such as palm oil fibres, palm oil shells and empty fruit bunches. Palm oil shell aggregate (POSA) is identified as a material that shows good potential to be used as a fine aggregate replacement in asphaltic concrete. On other hand, the chemical compound that exist in the Palm Oil Shell (POS) have shown a good potential as reflective component in cool-material. The purpose of this study is to obtain the physical and chemical properties of palm oil shell. The result shows the apparent particle density of Palm Oil Shell is 1.6 mg/m3. The specific gravity of palm oil shell was obtained with the value 1.6 and the water absorption amount of palm oil shell recorded from this study was 25.1%. The X-Ray Fluorescence study shows that palm oil shell contains the highest amount of SiO2 (46.412 wt%) and the second highest amount of Fe2O3 (34.016 wt%), both is the main output of relectivity compound. As a conclusion, waste palm oil shell has a potential to be used as alternative material for fine aggregate replacement. Besides that, the amount of chemical element that consist in palm oil shell which high in SiO2 and Fe2O3, promising the benefit to mitigate urban heat island as a cooling material agent.

  20. Recommendations for Longitudinal Post-Tensioning in Full-Depth Precast Concrete Bridge Deck Panels

    OpenAIRE

    Bowers, Susan Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Full-depth precast concrete panels offer an efficient alternative to traditional cast-in-place concrete for replacement or new construction of bridge decks. Research has shown that longitudinal post-tensioning helps keep the precast bridge deck in compression and avoid problems such as leaking, cracking, spalling, and subsequent rusting on the beams at the transverse panel joints. Current design recommendations suggest levels of initial compression for precast concrete decks in a very limit...

  1. FULL-DEPTH COADDS OF THE WISE AND FIRST-YEAR NEOWISE-REACTIVATION IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, Aaron M. [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lang, Dustin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Schlegel, David J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Near Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) Reactivation mission released data from its first full year of observations in 2015. This data set includes ∼2.5 million exposures in each of W1 and W2, effectively doubling the amount of WISE imaging available at 3.4 μ m and 4.6 μ m relative to the AllWISE release. We have created the first ever full-sky set of coadds combining all publicly available W1 and W2 exposures from both the AllWISE and NEOWISE-Reactivation (NEOWISER) mission phases. We employ an adaptation of the unWISE image coaddition framework, which preserves the native WISE angular resolution and is optimized for forced photometry. By incorporating two additional scans of the entire sky, we not only improve the W1/W2 depths, but also largely eliminate time-dependent artifacts such as off-axis scattered moonlight. We anticipate that our new coadds will have a broad range of applications, including target selection for upcoming spectroscopic cosmology surveys, identification of distant/massive galaxy clusters, and discovery of high-redshift quasars. In particular, our full-depth AllWISE+NEOWISER coadds will be an important input for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument selection of luminous red galaxy and quasar targets. Our full-depth W1/W2 coadds are already in use within the DECam Legacy Survey (DECaLS) and Mayall z-band Legacy Survey (MzLS) reduction pipelines. Much more work still remains in order to fully leverage NEOWISER imaging for astrophysical applications beyond the solar system.

  2. Carbon fiber reinforced asphalt concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahromi, Saeed G.

    2008-01-01

    Fibers are often used in the manufacture of other materials. For many years, they have been utilized extensively in numerous applications in civil engineering. Fiber-reinforcement refers to incorporating materials with desired properties within some other materials lacking those properties. Use of fibers is not a new phenomenon, as the technique of fiber-reinforced bitumen began early as 1950. In all industrialized countries today, nearly all concretes used in construction are reinforced. A multitude of fibers and fiber materials are being introduced in the market regularly. The present paper presents characteristics and properties of carbon fiber-reinforced asphalt mixtures, which improve the performance of pavements. To evaluate the effect of fiber contents on bituminous mixtures, laboratory investigations were carried out on the samples with and without fibers. During the course of this study, various tests were undertaken, applying Marshall Test indirect tensile test, creep test and resistance to fatigue cracking by using repeated load indirect tensile test. Carbon fiber exhibited consistency in results and as such it was observed that the addition of fiber does affect the properties of bituminous mixtures, i.e. an increase in its stability and decrease in the flow value as well as an increase in voids in the mix. Results indicate that fibers have the potential to resist structural distress in pavement, in the wake of growing traffic loads and thus improve fatigue by increasing resistance to cracks or permanent deformation. On the whole, the results show that the addition of carbon fiber will improve some of the mechanical properties like fatigue and deformation in the flexible pavement. (author)

  3. Incorporating the transverse profile of the wearing course into the control of the hot in-place recycling of asphalt concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Michalina; Huuskonen-Snicker, Eeva; Alanaatu, Pauli; Aromaa, Kalle; Savarnya, Abhishek; Pellinen, Terhi; Das, Animesh

    2018-05-01

    The hot in-place recycling (HIR) of asphalt concrete (AC) is one of the least CO2 emissive reuse techniques. It allows for 100% reuse of material in-situ in the same application, at a reduced need for the material transport to and back from the construction site, as well as the reduced price in comparison with the fresh wearing course overlay. Finland uses the technique predominantly to fill wheel path ruts caused by the studded tire abrasion, to retain structural capacity and prevent hydroplaning. During the HIR process, the aged AC material is heated up in-situ, milled to the approximate depth of 40 mm, blended with fresh AC admixture and rejuvenator. However, the amount of the aged material and the amount of the aged bitumen that undergoes rejuvenation depends on the pavement transverse profile. The rut depth, width and shape determine the minimum volume of admixture necessary for refill during the process in order to retain the structural capacity, as well as the amount of the aged binder requiring rejuvenation. In favor of achieving homogenous rheological properties in the final product, the proportion between the aged binder and the fresh binder should be controlled, as it influences the required amount of rejuvenator. Therefore, the rut cross-sectional area and furthermore, the rut volume is one of the previously unrecognized or ignored major variables of the hot in-place recycling process in Finland that should be incorporated to the HIR process control. This article demonstrates the methodology of incorporating the transverse road profile measurements by 17 vehicle-mounted laser sensors into the calculation of required rejuvenator amounts. This can be done during the procurement preparation phase or during the paving work as a continuous in-situ process control. In the rheological optimization the apparent Newtonian viscosity concept and the rotational viscosity are utilized in the viscosity based blending equation, which then allows the use of oily

  4. The effect of protease inhibitors on the induction of osteoarthritis-related biomarkers in bovine full-depth cartilage explants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yi; Zheng, Qinlong; Jiang, Mengmeng

    2015-01-01

    contribution of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 to cartilage degradation upon catabolic stimulation; ii) To investigate the effect of regulating the activities of key enzymes by mean of broad-spectrum inhibitors. Methods Bovine full-depth cartilage explants stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF...... protease for the generation of 374ARGS aggrecan fragment in the TNF-α/OSM stimulated bovine cartilage explants. This study addresses the need to determine the roles of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 in human articular degradation in OA and hence identify the attractive target for slowing down human cartilage......Objective The specific degradation of type II collagen and aggrecan by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, -13 and ADAMTS-4 and -5 (aggrecanase-1 and -2) in the cartilage matrix is a critical step in pathology of osteoarthritis (OA). The aims of this study were: i) To investigate the relative...

  5. Quality control analysis : part I : asphaltic concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-11-01

    This report deals with the statistical evaluation of results from several hot mix plants to determine the pattern of variability with respect to bituminous hot mix characteristics. : Individual tests results when subjected to frequency distribution i...

  6. Induction Healing of Porous Asphalt Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Porous asphalt shows excellent performance in both noise reduction and water drainage. Although porous asphalt has these great qualities, its service life is much shorter (sometimes only half) compared to dense graded asphalt roads. Ravelling, which is the loss of aggregate particles from the

  7. Extending the Lifespan of Porous Asphalt Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Porous Asphalt (PA) concrete is widely used as a surfacing layer on highways in the Netherlands. The service life of PA wearing courses is limited because of the fact that it is vulnerable to raveling. The possibilities of applying preventive maintenance to PA wearing courses by means of spraying

  8. Assessment of Asphalt Concrete Reinforcement Grid in Flexible Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    successfully used as interlayers include asphalt rubber and geotextiles, and the applica- tion of recycling techniques to rework the upper 2–4 in. of the...from a set of weights dropped from increasingly greater predetermined heights onto a rubber buffer system connected to a 12 in. diameter segmented...pavement temperature at depth, IR = the infrared pavement surface temperature (°C), D = the asphalt depth to estimate the temperature (mm), 1

  9. Effects of street tree shade on asphalt concrete pavement performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.G. McPherson; J. Muchnick

    2005-01-01

    Forty-eight street segments were paired into 24 high-and low-shade pairs in Modesto, California, U.S. Field data were collected to calculate a Pavement Condition Index (PCI) and Tree Shade Index (TSI) for each segment. Statistical analyses found that greater PCI was associated with greater TSI, indicating that tree shade was partially responsible for reduced pavement...

  10. Research note : field control of asphalt concrete paving mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop information and evaluate new methods for controlling quality of the AC mixture in the mat. Specifically, this research project evaluated a gyratory compactor in the field laboratory to determine mix quality. Spec...

  11. Characteristic Asphalt Concrete Wearing Course (ACWC) Using Variation Lime Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, R. A.; Pramesti, F. P.; Setyawan, A.

    2018-03-01

    This research use of lime filler Sukaraja expected add durability layers of concrete pavement is asphalt damage caused by the weather and load traffic. This study attempts to know how much value characteristic Marshall on a mixture of concrete asphalt using lime filler. This research uses experimental methods that is with a pilot to get results, thus will look filler utilization lime on construction concrete asphalt variation in filler levels 2 %, 3 %, 4 %.The results showed that the use of lime filler will affect characteristic a mixture of concrete asphalt. The more filler chalk used to increase the value of stability. On the cretaceous filler 2 % value of stability is 1067,04 kg. When lime filler levels added to the levels of filler 4 %, the value of stability increased to 1213,92 kg. The flexibility increased the number of filler as levels lime 2 % to 4 % suggests that are conducted more stiff mix.

  12. Investigating the creep properties of asphaltic concrete containing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hasan Taherkhani

    2018-03-10

    Mar 10, 2018 ... A three-stage model, developed was fitted to the dynamic ... This indicates that the rutting resistance of such asphalt ... drug delivery [23]. .... Different mathematical ... viour of asphaltic materials and prediction of flow number. A.

  13. Choosing mineral carrier of nanoscale additives for asphalt concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inozemtsev Sergey Sergeevich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available At present time the operation life of the majority of roads is essentially shorter than required. The reason for it is the increase in traffic intensity and axle loads of automobile transport. The obvious reasons for early wear of roads are the low quality of the components used and low industrial standards while producing asphalt pavement. In this paper the mineral material was selected as a carrier of nanoscale additives for asphalt. The optimal modes for grinding mineral materials were identified, which provide correspondence of their structure parameters with the developed model. The influence of different mineral nanomodifier carriers on the structure formation processes was estimated. It is shown that among a number of mineral materials diatomite has high activity in relation to the bitumen, because it has a highly porous structure. It is also shown that as a result of lighter fractions of bitumen adsorption on the border of phase interface, diatomite and bitumen changes from the free state to the film, and solvate shell of bitumen is saturated with asphaltenes. With the help of IR spectroscopy the authors defined the nature of the diatomite and bitumen interaction and proved that in the process of their interaction there occurs physical adsorption with additional absorption of bitumen components into the pore space of diatomite grains.

  14. Assessment of Quality of Asphalt Concrete used in Road ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWASOGO

    to layers beneath without compromising durability. The premature failure of road pavement shortly after construction or rehabilitation without meeting its designed life span has become a major challenge to highway engineers, contractors and the government in Nigeria. A study carried out by Federal Road Safety Corps of ...

  15. Utilizing Lab Tests to Predict Asphalt Concrete Overlay Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    A series of five experimental projects and three demonstration projects were constructed to better understand the performance of pavement overlays using various levels of asphalt binder replacement (ABR) from reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), recycle...

  16. Risk management of low air void asphalt concrete mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Various forms of asphalt pavement distress, such as rutting, shoving and bleeding, can be attributed, in many cases, to low air voids in : the mixtures during production and placement. The occurrence of low air void contents during plant production m...

  17. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  18. A simple test procedure for evaluating low temperature crack resistance of asphalt concrete : executive summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Low temperature cracking is one of the major : distress modes in asphalt pavement and is : disastrous to pavement performance and service : life. A poor riding surface leads to an increase in : maintenance and eventual early replacement of : the pave...

  19. A simple test procedure for evaluating low temperature crack resistance of asphalt concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The current means of evaluating the low temperature cracking resistance of HMA relies on extensive test : methods that require assumptions about material behaviors and the use of complicated loading equipment. The purpose : of this study was to devel...

  20. The effect of mixing sequence on the workability and indirect tensile strength of asphalt concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuilen, J.; Gaarkeuken, B.; Vliet, D. van; Poot, M.

    2017-01-01

    The KGO mixing method was developed 40 years ago. Instead of adding the bitumen at the end of the mixing cycle, the bitumen was poured down first together with the larger aggregates. After mixing the bitumen with the larger aggregates, the reamining aggregates were mixed down. As benefits of the KGO

  1. Utilization of recycled asphalt concrete with warm mix asphalt and cost-benefit analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julide Oner

    Full Text Available The asphalt paving industries are faced with two major problems. These two important challenges are generated with an increase in demand for environmentally friendly paving mixtures and the problem of rapidly rising raw materials. Recycling of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP is a critical necessity to save precious aggregates and reduce the use of costly bitumen. Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA technology provides not only the option of recycling asphalt pavement at a lower temperature than the temperature maintained in hot mixtures but also encourages the utilization of RAP and therefore saves energy and money. This paper describes the feasibility of utilizing three different WMA additives (organic, chemical and water containing at recommended contents with different percentages of RAP. The mechanical properties and cost-benefit analysis of WMA containing RAP have been performed and compared with WMA without RAP. The results indicated that, 30%, 10% and 20% can be accepted as an optimum RAP addition related to organic, chemical and water containing additives respectively and organic additive with 30% RAP content has an appreciable increase in tensile strength over the control mix. It was also concluded that the RAP with WMA technology is the ability to reduce final cost compared to HMA and WMA mixtures.

  2. Utilization of recycled asphalt concrete with warm mix asphalt and cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner, Julide; Sengoz, Burak

    2015-01-01

    The asphalt paving industries are faced with two major problems. These two important challenges are generated with an increase in demand for environmentally friendly paving mixtures and the problem of rapidly rising raw materials. Recycling of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) is a critical necessity to save precious aggregates and reduce the use of costly bitumen. Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) technology provides not only the option of recycling asphalt pavement at a lower temperature than the temperature maintained in hot mixtures but also encourages the utilization of RAP and therefore saves energy and money. This paper describes the feasibility of utilizing three different WMA additives (organic, chemical and water containing) at recommended contents with different percentages of RAP. The mechanical properties and cost-benefit analysis of WMA containing RAP have been performed and compared with WMA without RAP. The results indicated that, 30%, 10% and 20% can be accepted as an optimum RAP addition related to organic, chemical and water containing additives respectively and organic additive with 30% RAP content has an appreciable increase in tensile strength over the control mix. It was also concluded that the RAP with WMA technology is the ability to reduce final cost compared to HMA and WMA mixtures.

  3. On the combined effect of moisture diffusion and cyclic pore pressure generation in asphalt concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varveri, A.; Scarpas, A.; Collop, A.; Erkens, S.M.J.G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new moisture conditioning protocol which attempts to distinguish the contributions of long- and short-term moisture damage, i.e. moisture diffusion and cyclic pore pressure generation, in asphalt mixtures is presented. The capability of the proposed protocol to rank various asphalt

  4. Assessment of asphalt concrete reinforcement grid in flexible pavements : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This report investigated the application of accepted methods of pavement structural evaluation to independently assess the potential structural benefit of asphalt geogrid reinforcement of an operational flexible highway pavement. The asphalt interlay...

  5. Review of warm mix rubberized asphalt concrete : Towards a sustainable paving technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Liu, X.; Apostolidis, P.; Scarpas, Athanasios

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, transportation agencies and the general public alike are demanding increased considerations of sustainability in transport infrastructure. Warm mix asphalt (WMA) is developed for reducing energy consumptions and emissions in asphalt paving industry. In addition, the use of

  6. Installation report : evaluation of recycled hot mix asphaltic concrete on Route 220.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    This report describes a project in which the bituminous pavement on an approximately 8-mi. (13-km) section of roadway was removed, recycled through a conventional asphalt batch plant, and relaid. The project was accomplished with little difficulty an...

  7. Investigation of the use of recycled polymer-modified asphalt in asphaltic concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-30

    This report presents issues associated with recycling polymer modified asphalt cements (PMACs), particularly blending aged PMAC with new PMAC. A styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) PMAC was selected and graded using the Superpave Performance Grading (PG)...

  8. Time resolved analysis of water drainage in porous asphalt concrete using neutron radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulikakos, L D; Sedighi Gilani, M; Derome, D; Jerjen, I; Vontobel, P

    2013-07-01

    Porous asphalt as a road surface layer controls aquaplaning as rain water can drain through its highly porous structure. The process of water drainage through this permeable layer is studied using neutron radiography. Time-resolved water configuration and distribution within the porous structure are reported. It is shown that radiography depicts the process of liquid water transport within the complex geometry of porous asphalt, capturing water films, filled dead end pores and water islands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modelling absorption in porous asphalt concrete for oblique incident sound waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer-Krijnen, Marieke; Wijnant, Ysbrand H.; de Boer, Andries; Sas, P; Moens, D.; Denayer, H.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical model to predict the sound absorption of porous asphalt has been developed. The approach is a combination between a microstructural approach and a finite element approach. The model used to describe the viscothermal properties of the air inside the pores of the asphalt is the low reduced

  10. Modeling of Comparative Performance of Asphalt Concrete under Hammer, Gyratory, and Roller Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad I. Sarsam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to develop predictive models using SPSS software (version 18 for Marshall Test results of asphalt mixtures compacted by Hammer, Gyratory, and Roller compaction. Bulk density of (2.351 gm/cc, at OAC of (4.7 % was obtained as a benchmark after using Marshall Compactor as laboratory compactive effort with 75-blows. Same density was achieved by Roller and Gyratory Compactors using its mix designed methods. A total of (75 specimens, for Marshall, Gyratory, and Roller Compactors have been prepared, based on OAC of (4.7 % with an additional asphalt contents of more and less than (0.5 % from the optimum value. All specimens have been subjected to Marshall Test. Mathematical models obtained indicated that variation of Marshall Stiffness is based on the variation of air voids. All of these models depend on asphalt cement content too.

  11. Evaluation of binder aging and its influence in aging of hot mix asphalt concrete : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    TxDOT Project 0-6009 was a comprehensive interdisciplinary research effort that has developed the ability : to predict asphalt oxidative hardening over time and pavement depth, and the impact of this hardening on : mixture durability. The many interr...

  12. On the representative volume element of asphalt concrete at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasteanu, Mihai; Cannone Falchetto, Augusto; Velasquez, Raul; Le, Jia-Liang

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of characterizing asphalt mixtures' rheological and failure properties at low temperatures by means of the Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) is investigated in this paper. The main issue is the use of thin beams of asphalt mixture in experimental procedures that may not capture the true behavior of the material used to construct an asphalt pavement.

  13. Assessment of dynamic modulus of high density polypropylene waste fiber reinforcement in asphalt concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan S. OTUOZE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional asphalt tests like Hveem and Marshall tests are at best mere characterization than effective test of pavement field performance because of complex viscoelastic behavior of asphalt. Mechanical properties otherwise called simple performance tests (SPT are performance criteria of asphalt. Dynamic modulus among other SPT’s like permanent deformation, fatigue cracking, thermal cracking, moisture susceptibility, shear and friction properties; determines stress-strain to time-temperature relationships that imparts on strength, service life and durability. The test followed the recommendations of NCHRP 1-37a (2004 and mixes were prepared using 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% HDPP contents. The parameters tested for dynamic modulus, /E*/, are stiffness, recoverable strain (ε, and phase angle (ξ. Time – temperature superposition (TTS called master curve was fitted using sigmoidal curve to interpolate the parameters beyond measured data set so as to observe the viscoelastic behavior outside the physical properties. The performance of 0.5% HDPP asphalt is better enhanced than the conventional asphalt to improve upon strength, service and durability.

  14. ADDITIVES FOR COLD ASPHALT-CONCRETE MADE FROM EMULSION-MINERAL MIXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Vavilov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the additives use for cold asphalt emulsion mixes. Urgency of the issue consists in the necessity of usage justification and regulation of additive for cold mixes properties adjustment. The article is represented as the general result of analysis of regulatory, literary and other sources related to additive using for CAEM.The main part of the article proposes and justifies the classification of CAEM additives according to their functional purpose (the main purpose of additive: increasing of strength, water resistance, durability, regulating curing and technological modifiers. Depending on the purpose the criteria of technical efficiency of additive using are presented. For each criteria provided the methods determining one or more quality indicators. The quality indicator changing is indicator of additive efficiency. There is provided the formula determining the efficiency of CAEM curing period reduction additives. As an example provided efficiency calculation and evaluation of additives for regulation (acceleration CAEM curing according to the previously published experimental data. The efficiency of curing regulating additives was determined according to the function of temporal changes of CAEM compressing strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity.The article provides the example list of materials that could be or currently used as additives for cold mixes. The conclusion states that proposed classification and criteria give base to purposive regulation of cold asphalt emulsion mixture compositions and their properties.

  15. Thermodynamics between RAP/RAS and virgin aggregates during asphalt concrete production : a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In hot-mix asphalt (HMA) plants, virgin aggregates are heated and dried separately before being mixed with : RAP/RAS and virgin asphalt binder. RAP/RAS materials are not heated or dried directly by a burner to avoid : burning of aged binder coating o...

  16. Evaluation of Moisture Damage and Stripping of Asphalt Concrete Prepared With New Additives of Polymer Modified Bitumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim H. Al-Humeidawi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The moisture induced damage and stripping are two of common reasons of premature failure of flexible pavement. The current research involved an extensive experimental investigation on two types of polymers (Novolac and PVA as modifiers in order to produce Polymer Modified Bitumen (PMB. Different ratios of both additives were investigated for rheological properties of binder and mechanical properties of Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA. The rheological properties of PMB were evaluated by penetration, softening point, ductility and thin film oven tests. The mechanical properties of HMA were assessed by Marshall Stability test, Retained Marshall Stability test, indirect tensile strength test, Tensile Strength Ratio (TSR, and striping test. The results of tests showed that the Novolac modifier improves the cohesion properties of binder and the adhesion of binder to aggregate. The PVA modifier mainly improves the adhesion of binder to aggregate with less degree of that of using Novolac. Both modifiers significantly improve moisture sensitivity and decrease the stripping of HMA. Also, the results showed that the addition of 2% of Novolac to binder to produce PMB represents the optimum option. The HMA with PMB Novolac 2% improves the Marshall Stability, Retained Marshall Stability, and TSR by 45%, 14% and 44% respectively. The very small amount of these additives compared with mix components and their reasonable price make them a superior and practical solution for premature failure of flexible pavement.

  17. Evaluation of precut transverse cracks for an asphalt concrete pavement in interior Alaska (Moose Creek - Richardson Highway).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Road-width thermal cracks (major transverse cracks) are perhaps the most noticeable form of crack-related damage on AC pavements : throughout colder areas of Alaska. The main objective of this study is to recommend design strategies and construction ...

  18. Laboratorium Study of Asphalt Starbit E-55 Polymer Modified Application on Asphalt Concrete Wearing Course (Ac-Wc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damianus Kans Pangaraya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The conventional asphalt road has almost been considered fail to serve the transportation needs. It is indicated by the occurrence of premature damage which is caused by vehicle load and climate. Starbit E-55, the polymer modified bitumen, is formulated to meet the requirement of transport development. Considering those needs, it is important to investigate the feasibility level of that modified bitumen as alternate asphalt instead of the conventional one. This research began with the measurement of the properties of hard layered AC-WC Starbit E-55, then comparing the result to 60/70 penetration of Pertamina asphalt. The next step is then, to determine the converted value so as to be close to that of Pertamina (60/70 penetration. This step is conducted by applying durability and ITS tests on the mixture. Result of the tests showed that hard layered AC-WC Starbit E-55 has better characteristic at 5.7% optimum level asphalt and 6.4% of Pertamina asphalt (60/70 penetration. Starbit E-55 converted level within hard-layered ACWC is 5.6%. The performance test result on immersion with variance of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days shows that durability value of Starbit E-55 AC-WC has better performance. During the process, Starbit E-55 required 15.38% higher energy consumption.

  19. Correlation of the manual compaction hammer with mechanical hammers for the Marshall method of design for asphaltic concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish, through a series of correlations, the compactive effort (number of blows) needed using the mechanical hammers to yield similar physical properties obtained with 75 blows of the manual hammer.

  20. Three-dimensional modeling and simulation of asphalt concrete mixtures based on X-ray CT microstructure images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hainian Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available X-ray CT (computed tomography was used to scan asphalt mixture specimen to obtain high resolution continuous cross-section images and the meso-structure. According to the theory of three-dimensional (3D reconstruction, the 3D reconstruction algorithm was investigated in this paper. The key to the reconstruction technique is the acquisition of the voxel positions and the relationship between the pixel element and node. Three-dimensional numerical model of asphalt mixture specimen was created by a self-developed program. A splitting test was conducted to predict the stress distributions of the asphalt mixture and verify the rationality of the 3D model.

  1. Optimization of Life Cycle Extension of Asphalt Concrete Mixtures in regard to Material Properties, Structural Design, and Economic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mikolaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Design of ACM life cycle is defined with respect to traffic load acting on the pavement and road class for a period of about 20 years. In practice, reconstruction is usually pending until the end of the life cycle after which the reconstruction takes place and the original materials are replaced by new materials. Life cycle of the pavement construction in road structure is significantly longer than that of the ACM; it is therefore necessary to consider ACM from a long term viewpoint, that is, exceeding their life expectancy. This paper describes a methodology which consists of analytical calculations, experimental measurements, and optimization of the ACM life cycle with the use of a rehabilitation action to provide new physical properties of pavement surfacing in different periods of the original life cycle. The aim is to attain maximal economic effectiveness, by minimizing financial costs for rehabilitation and maintenance and economic costs of road user. Presented method allows deriving optimal life cycle from various rehabilitation alternatives for particular ACM with the fact that all the necessary parameters are derived from specific experimental measurements and calculations. The method is applicable to all types of ACM materials; however, for each material, it is necessary to carry out the necessary measurements and tests. The article describes the methodology and case study results for a particular type of ACM material.

  2. Evaluation of binder aging and its influence in aging of hot mix asphalt concrete : literature review and experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Binder oxidation in pavements and its impact on pavement performance has been addressed by : numerous laboratory studies of binder oxidation chemistry, reaction kinetics, and hardening and its impact on : mixture fatigue. Studies also have included s...

  3. Comparison of sampling and test methods for determining asphalt content and moisture correction in asphalt concrete mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify the difference, if any, in AASHTO and OSHD test procedures and results. This report addresses the effect of the size of samples taken in the field and evaluates the methods of determining the moisture content...

  4. Aging of Bitumen and Asphalt Concrete : Comparing State of the Practice and Ongoing Developments in the United States and Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, Sandra; Porot, L; Gläser, R; Glover, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a crucial factor in pavement performance and being able to determine its effect on a mixture is necessary to link its initial properties to the properties over time in order to ensure the intended service life. This is becoming more important now that climate change leads to increased

  5. Osuya and Mohammed (23)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    Keywords:Sawdust Ash, Asphaltic Concrete, Asphaltic Concrete Properties. ABSTRACT. 431. INTRODUCTION ... stone dust, cement and lime are used as fillers. (Tomar et al., 2013). ..... Marble Waste Dust in the Mixture of. Asphaltic Concrete.

  6. Multi-parametric characterization of mode I fracture toughness of asphalt concrete: Influence of void and RA contents, binder and aggregate types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saannibe Ciryle Somé

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the fracture toughness (KIc in mode I cracking using semi-circular bending test (SCB. Experiment has been performed to investigate the influence of bitumen grade (using P15/25 and P50/70 bitumens, reclaimed asphalt (RA content (using 0%, 20% and 40% RA contents and temperature (using −20 °C, −5 °C, 10 °C test temperatures, through ANOVA. Additional investigations have been performed: (i to evaluate the effect of the use of polymer modified bitumen (PMB, (ii to evaluate the effect compactness using 5% and 8% air void contents, (iii to evaluate the effect of aggregate type using siliceous-limestone and porphyry aggregates. The results show an important decrease in KIc when temperature increases from −5 °C to 10 °C and a slight decrease between −20 °C and −5 °C. The results also show that increasing RA content increases slightly the KIc. It was found from the ANOVA that the influent parameters can be ranked as follows: temperature, RA content and binder grade. The investigations show that PMB increases the KIc value than pure bitumens. Porphyry aggregates increase the KIc by about 16% than silica-limestone aggregates at low temperatures between −20 °C and −5 °C. However, this ranking is slightly inverted at 10 °C. In addition, KIc decreases by about 12% at 10 °C with an increase in air voids (by 5% to 8%. Void content effect is more significant at −5 °C and 10 °C, and negligible at −20 °C. Keywords: Fracture toughness, SCB, Bituminous mixture, Reclaimed asphalt

  7. Performance of Asphalt Concrete Wearing Course (AC-WC) Utilizing Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement from Cold Milling Bound with 80/100 Pen Asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanya, I. N. A.; Suweda, I. W.; Putra, G. K.

    2018-03-01

    Demands on natural aggregate materials for road pavement can be reduced by utilizing reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). This research was aimed at evaluating the performance of AC-WC mixture using RAP materials from cold milling, bound with 80/100 pen asphalt. The RAP aggregate gradation was adjusted by adding the required amount of natural aggregates to meet the specification in Indonesia. The RAP and added aggregates were hotmixed and compacted with Marshall hummer at 2×75 blows. The asphalt content were varied. It was found that the optimum asphalt content was 6.05 % with the following Marshall characteristics: stability 1237.08 kg; flow 3.36 mm; Marshall quotient 324,73kg/mm; void in mix (VIM) 3,360%; void in mineral aggregate (VMA) 15.103; and void filled with bitumen (VFB) 77.759% and residual stability 91.04; all met the Indonesian specification. The cantabro abration loss (CAL) at 30°C was 9,02%. The indirect tensile stiffness modulus (ITSM) at 20 °C was 7961.4 MPa; dynamic creep with 100 kPa pressure at 40°C gave slope 0.0112 microsstrain/pulse which is suitable for heavy load traffic. The fatigue test results was obtained at increased stress level, i.e. at 900, 1100, and 1300 kPa. Based on the equation derived from the fatigue strain and repeated loading relationship, at 100 microstrain (με) the repeated load was 434,661.58 times, and at one million (106) repeated loading, the samples could withstand strain of 92,38 microstrain. The performance of the samples were overall better than AC-WC mixture using virgin aggregates bound with 60/70 pen asphalt.

  8. Evaluation of warm mix technologies for use in asphalt rubber - asphaltic concrete friction courses (AR\\0x2010ACFC) : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this research project was to determine whether warm mix asphalt (WMA) technologies can be : used by the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) for the production of an asphalt rubberasphaltic : concrete friction course (AR...

  9. Use of rubber asphalt binder with graded aggregate for seal coats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    It has been known that incorporating rubber particles into asphalt can improve highway pavement performance. This paper describes a test program on pavement construction using asphalts containing recycled rubber. During the summer 1978, eight test sections were constructed in parts of the Saskatchewan road system to evaluate seal coats using rubber-asphalt as a binder membrane and a graded aggregate as protective cover. Test sections were chosen to represent typical road surface types and different states of repair for each type. These types included prime subgrade, cold-mix on subgrade, primed granular base course, asphaltic concrete on granular base, and full depth asphaltic concrete. Problems with construction materials, techniques, and equipment are discussed. Performance and economics were evaluated to determine whether low cost cold mix and current seal coat surfaces could be replaced successfully and economically by this method of construction. It was shown that use of reclaimed rubber for rubberized asphalt seal coats on Saskatechewan highways is a practical construction application. The economic justification for rubber asphalt seals will be determined after a full assessment of performance. Initial indications are that Saskatchewan graded aggregates are a suitable cover material for the rubberized asphalt membranes used in the trials. 8 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Response to Question Concerning whether the Requirements for Preconstruction Review of New or Modified Air Pollution Sources Apply to the Relocation of an Existing Asphalt Concrete Plant when such Relocation does not Result in any Increase in Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  11. Accelerated testing for studying pavement design and performance (FY 2002) : performance of foamed asphalt stabilized base in full depth reclaimed asphalt pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    This report covers the Fiscal Year 2002 project conducted at the Accelerated Testing Laboratory at Kansas : State University. The project was selected and funded by the Midwest Accelerated Testing Pooled Fund Program , : which includes Iowa, Kansas, ...

  12. Research Article Special Issue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2017-11-10

    Nov 10, 2017 ... ABSTRACT. Coconut shell (CS) is an agricultural waste en study was conducted to evaluate the stiffnes asphaltic concrete containing CS as an aggreg the bitumen penetration grade 60/70 was us replacements namely 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% asphaltic concrete performances were charact the correlation ...

  13. 78 FR 26847 - Including Specific Pavement Types in Federal-aid Highway Traffic Noise Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ...: dense-graded asphaltic concrete (DGAC), open-graded asphaltic concrete (OGAC), and Portland cement... involved in what the highway noise industry refers to as ``low noise pavements'' or ``quieter pavements... several national workshops, trainings, and informational outreach pieces on this topic. In 2005, the FHWA...

  14. Meso Mechanical Analysis of AC Mixture Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldekidan, M.F.; Huurman, M.; Vaccari, E.; Poot, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing research into performance modeling of Asphalt Concrete (AC) mixtures using meso mechanics approaches is being undertaken at Delft University of Technology (TUD). The approach has already been successfully employed for evaluating the long term performance of porous asphalt concrete. The work

  15. Effects of conductive fillers on temperature distribution of asphalt pavements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Mingyu; Wu Shaopeng; Zhang Yuan; Wang Hong

    2010-01-01

    The sun provides a cheap and abundant source of clean and renewable energy. Solar cells have been used to capture this energy and generate electricity. A more useful form of the solar cell would be asphalt pavements, which get heated up by solar radiation. Graphite powders are utilized as thermal conductive fillers to make an asphalt collector conductive so as to improve the efficiency of the asphalt collector. Accounting for the important application conditions and evaluating the effects of the heat conductive materials and the solar energy absorbability of the conductive asphalt collector, a finite element model has been developed to predict temperature distributions in the conductive asphalt solar collector. In this study, an experimental validation exercise was conducted using the measured data taken from full-depth asphalt slabs. Validation results showed that the model can satisfactorily predict the temperature distributions in asphalt concrete slabs. The optimal depth is 25-50 mm for placing pipes that serve as the heat exchanger. Meanwhile, the effect of the surroundings on the solar energy potential of the asphalt collector was noticeable.

  16. Evaluation of Various Tack Coat Materials Using Interface Shear Device and Recommendations on a Simplified Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The performance of pavement interface bonds affects the integrity of pavement structures. In current practice, tack coats are used to ensure sufficient bonding between asphalt concrete (AC) layers as well as AC and concrete or aggregate base layers. ...

  17. Introduction of fracture resistance to the design and evaluation of open graded friction courses in Florida : final report, July 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    A dog-bone direct tension test (DBDT) to accurately determine tensile properties of asphalt concrete, : including OGFC, was conceived, developed and validated. Resilient modulus, creep, and strength tests : were performed at multiple temperatures on ...

  18. Mechanistic Evaluation of the Effect of Calcium Carbide Waste on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWASOGO

    amounts of wastes from ceramic, steel industry and coal-fired power plants every year. ... slag dust, hydrated lime, hydraulic cement, fly ash, loess or other suitable ..... (2011). The. Effect of using Glass Powder Filler on Hot Asphalt Concrete.

  19. Research Article Special Issue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2017-11-10

    Nov 10, 2017 ... m replacement as an aggregate in the asphaltic concrete. stiffness; density; flow. ..... chemical and physical properties of coconut shell in asphalt mixture. ... coconut shell concrete beam behavior under torsion.Materials and ...

  20. Performance evaluation of thin wearing courses through scaled accelerated trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the permanent deformation (rutting) and fatigue performance of : several thin asphalt concrete wearing courses using a scaled-down accelerated pavement testing device. The accelerated testing : was ...

  1. Latex improvement of recycled asphalt pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennon, C.

    1982-08-01

    The performance of a single unmodified milled recycled asphalt concrete was compared to milled asphalt concrete modified by addition of three types of rubber latex. Latex was added at 2, 3, 5, and 8 percent latex by weight of asphalt in the asphalt concrete. Lattices used were a styrene butadiene (SBR), a natural rubber (NR), an acrylonitrile butadiene (NBR), and four varieties of out of specification SBR lattices. Marshall tests, while indecisive, showed a modest improvement in properties of SBR and NR added material at 3 and 5 percent latex. Addition of NBR latex caused deterioration in Marshall stability and flow over that of control. Repeated load tests were run using the indirect tensile test, analyzed by the VESYS program, which computes life of pavements. Repeated load tests showed improvement in asphalt concrete life when 3 and 5 percent SBR was added. Improvement was also shown by the out of specification SBR.

  2. AC/CRC adjacent lane surfacing : construction report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Asphaltic Concrete (AC) and Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) are common roadway materials used in Oregon. In a recent construction project -- Poverty Flats/Mecham Section -- the Oregon State Highway Division (OSHD) designed, as part of the project, a "...

  3. Effect of moisture and freeze-thaw on mechanical properties of CRM asphalt mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nak-Seok; Cho, Kee-Ju [Kyonggi University, Suwon(Korea)

    2000-06-30

    This paper presents the experimental test results on moisture and freeze-thaw resistance of hot mix crumb rubber modified (CRM) asphalt concrete mixture. To compare the differences in mechanical properties of conventional and CRM asphalt concretes, various tests were conducted under different moisture conditions and freeze-thaw cycles. Marshall mix design was also performed to determine the optimum asphalt contents for the both asphalt concrete mixtures. Test results revealed that the moisture and freeze-thaw resistance of CRM asphalt mixture was superior to the conventional asphalt concrete. As a result, it is considered that the utilization of waste tires in asphalt pavements has the potential of minimizing the damage due to the moisture and freeze-thaw. (author). 9 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  4. Performance assessment of warm mix asphalt (WMA) pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) is a new technology that was introduced in Europe in 1995. WMA offers several advantages over : conventional asphalt concrete mixtures, including: reduced energy consumption, reduced emissions, improved or more uniform : binder...

  5. Performance Assessment of Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) Pavements : Executive Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) is a new technology which was : introduced in 1995 in Europe. WMA is gaining attention all : over the world because it offers several advantages over : conventional asphalt concrete mixes. The benefits include: : (1) Reduced en...

  6. Pavement service life extension due to asphalt surface treatment interlayer : research project capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) has been : using asphalt surface treatment (AST) interlayers over soil cement base courses : as a means to mitigate shrinkage cracks from reflecting through the asphaltic : concrete (A...

  7. Adjusting Asphalt Mixes for Increased Durability and Implementation of a Performance Tester to Evaluate Fatigue Cracking of Asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-17

    Cracking is a common failure mechanism in asphalt concrete pavement structures. It is one of the main reasons for large road maintenance and rehabilitation expenditures, as well as reduced user comfort and increased fuel consumption due to high road ...

  8. Improving the sustainability of asphalt pavements through developing a predictive model with fundamental material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    This study presents the numerical implementation and validation of general constitutive relationships for describing the : nonlinear behavior of asphalt concrete mixes. These constitutive relationships incorporate nonlinear viscoelasticity and : visc...

  9. Work plan for special design features and crack sealing maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Alaska DOT&PF wants to construct and maintain asphalt concrete (AC) paved highways in a way that minimizes roadway lifecycle costs while preserving acceptable : performance. Thermal cracking is a natural feature of most paved Alaska roadways that...

  10. Experimental Evaluation of Anti-Stripping Additives Mixing in Road Surface Pavement Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Tienfuan Kerh; Yu-Min Wang; Yulern Lin

    2005-01-01

    Most road surfaces in Taiwan are paved with asphalt concrete but the phenomena of rutting, cracking and stripping of the pavement are frequently occurring due to the effects of traffic flow, thermal variation and water erosion caused by rain. In this study, a series of experiments were performed to examine the effectiveness of anti-stripping fillers, which include; rock flour, rock flour with 1% lime and rock flour with 1% cement, respectively, in the mixture of asphalt concrete. The experime...

  11. Operational properties of nanomodified stone mastic asphalt

    OpenAIRE

    Inozemtsev Sergey Sergeevich; Korolev Evgeniy Valer’evich

    2015-01-01

    In order to prolong the lifetime and to improve the quality of pavements made of asphalt concrete it is necessary to apply innovative solutions in the process of design of such building materials. In order to solve the problem of low durability of asphalt concrete a modifier was proposed, which consists of diatomite, iron hydroxide sol (III) and silica sol. Application of the diatomite with nanoscale layer of nanomodifier allows getting a stone mastic asphalt, which has high values of physica...

  12. CALCULATION PECULIARITIES OF RE-PROCESSED ROAD COVERING UNIT COST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilyara Kyazymovna Izmaylova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article there are considered questions of economic expediency of non-waste technology application for road covering repair and restoration. Determined the conditions of asphalt-concrete processing at plants. Carried out cost changing analysis of asphalt granulate considering the conditions of transportation and preproduction processing. Given an example of expense calculation of one conventional unit of asphalt-concrete mixture volume preparation with and without processing.

  13. Impact of the Superpave hot mix asphalt properties on its permanent deformation behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qasim Zahra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In Iraq, the severity of rutting has increased in asphalt pavements possibly due to the increase in truck axle loads, tyre pressure, and high pavement temperature in summer. As of late, Superpave has been accounted as an enhanced system for performance based design, analysis of asphalt pavement performance prediction for asphalt concrete mixes. In this research the development of permanent deformation in asphalt concrete under repeated loadings was investigated, Wheel-Tracking apparatus has been used in a factorial testing program during which 44 slab samples were tested to simulate actual pavement. The objectives of the present research include; investigating the main factors affecting rutting in asphalt concrete mixture, quantifying the effect of SBS polymer and steel reinforcement on asphalt concrete mixtures in addition to studying the effect of variables on the asphalt concrete mixes against moisture sensitivity. It has been determined that that increasing of compaction temperature from 110 to 150°C will decrease the permanent deformation by 20.5 and 15.6 percent for coarse and fine gradation control asphalt mixtures, respectively. While the permanent deformation decreases by 21.3 percent when the compaction temperature is increased from 110 to 150°C for coarse gradation SBS modified asphalt mixtures.

  14. Towards high-performance materials for road construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladkikh, V.; Korolev, E.; Smirnov, V.

    2017-10-01

    Due to constant increase of traffic, modern road construction is in need of high-performance pavement materials. The operational performance of such materials can be characterized by many properties. Nevertheless, the most important ones are resistance to rutting and resistance to dynamical loads. It was proposed earlier to use sulfur extended asphalt concrete in road construction practice. To reduce the emission of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide during the concrete mix preparation and pavement production stages, it is beneficial to make such a concrete on the base of complex sulfur modifier. In the present work the influence of the complex modifier to mechanical properties of sulfur extended asphalt concrete was examined. It was shown that sulfur extended asphalt concrete is of high mechanical properties. It was also revealed that there as an anomalous negative correlations between strain capacity, fatigue life and fracture toughness.

  15. Investigation on Tensile Strength Ratio (TSR Specimen to Predict Moisture Sensitivity of Asphalt Pavements Mixture and Using Polymer to Reduce Moisture Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Aziz Hameed Al-Shaybani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Moisture damage of asphalt concrete is defined as losing the strength and Permanence caused by the active presence of moisture.The most common technique to reduce moisture damage is using modifiers with the asphalt binder or the aggregate.The goal of this study was to explore the effect of various modifiers of polymer on the moisture susceptibility mixture of asphaltic concrete pavement. Modifiers included in this research selected two kinds of polymers Crumb Rubber No 50 (CR No 50 and Methyl Methacrylates (MMA(which are available in the local markets in Iraq and have been used in three percentages for each type. These percentages are (5, 10 and 15% for (CR No 50 and (2.5, 5 and 7.5(% for (MMA.Each type of these polymers is blended with asphalt by wet process at constant blending times for a suitable range of temperatures. The experimental works showed that all polymers modified mixtures have indirect tensile strength higher than control asphalt mixtures, its about (2-15 %, dependent on different type of polymer and polymer concentration under predicted suitable blending time.Test results of indirect tensile strength indicated betterment in modifying the proprieties of mixture, the increased resistance mixture of asphalt concrete pavement versus moisture damage, and reduced the effect of water on asphalt concrete properties. The final result is the addition of (10% CR No 50 and (5% MMA to asphalt mixtures showed an improved mixture of asphalt concrete properties and produced strong mixtures for road construction.One model is predicted for tensile strength ratio [TSR]to estimate the effects of polymer modification on moisture susceptibility mixture of asphalt concrete.

  16. Modelling of pavement materials on steel decks using the five-point bending test: Thermo mechanical evolution and fatigue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, L; Houel, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the modelling of wearing courses on steel orthotropic decks such as the Millau viaduct in France. This is of great importance when dealing with durability: due to the softness of such a support, the pavement is subjected to considerable strains that may generate top-down cracks in the layer at right angles of the orthotropic plate stiffeners and shear cracks at the interface between pavement and steel. Therefore, a five-point bending fatigue test was developed and improved since 2003 at the ENTPE laboratory, to test different asphalt concrete mixes. This study aims at modelling the mechanical behavior of the wearing course throughout the fatigue test by a finite element method (Comsol Multiphysics software). Each material - steel, sealing sheet, asphalt concrete layer - is considered and modelled. The modelling of asphalt concrete is complex since it is a heterogeneous material, a viscoelastic medium and it thermosensitive. The actual characteristics of the asphalt concrete (thermo physical parameter and viscoelastic complex modulus) are determined experimentally on cylindrical cores. Moreover, a damage law based on Miner's damage is included in the model. The modelling of the fatigue test leads to encouraging results. Finally, results from the model are compared to the experimental data obtained from the five-point bending fatigue test device. The experimental data are very consistent with the numerical simulation.

  17. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties Using Functionally Graded Viscoelastic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Eshan V.

    2009-01-01

    Asphalt concrete pavements are inherently graded viscoelastic structures. Oxidative aging of asphalt binder and temperature cycling due to climatic conditions being the major cause of non-homogeneity. Current pavement analysis and simulation procedures dwell on the use of layered approach to account for these non-homogeneities. The conventional…

  18. Temperature induced healing in strained bituminous materials observed by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahar, S.N.; Schmets, A.J.M.; Scarpas, A.; Schitter, G.

    2013-01-01

    Bitumen is the binder in the composite material named asphalt concrete. Under cyclic mechanical loading of traffic passing over the pavement, eventually damage will initiate in the pavement, leading to eventual structural failure. This damaging process is accelerated by time dependent change of the

  19. Phase-Separation Characteristics of Bitumen and their Relation to Damage-Healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahar, S.N.

    2016-01-01

    During the service life of flexible asphalt pavements, asphalt concrete degrades due to traffic loading and environmental conditions like temperature, rain, oxidation, ultraviolet-radiation from the sun. All these environmental factors have adverse effects on the performance of bitumen, which is the

  20. The crack growth mechanism in asphaltic mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.M.J.; Hopman, P.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The crack growth mechanism in asphalt concrete (Ac) mixes is studied. In cyclic tests on several asphaltic mixes crack growth is measured, both with crack foils and with cOD-gauges. It is found that crack growth in asphaltic mixes is described by three processes which are parallel in time: cohesive

  1. 76 FR 49303 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Minnesota; Rules Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... during the Regional Office normal hours of operation, and special arrangements should be made for... the obsolete AIRS database, and to remove the implied hierarchy of emission factor sources. Other... operation and monitoring. In Minn. R. 7011.0900-0922, MPCA amended the asphalt concrete plant rules by...

  2. Determination of mechanical properties of materials used in WAY-30 test pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The US Route 30 bypass of Wooster, Ohio, in Wayne County, WAY-30, was constructed to demonstrate two types of : extended service pavements, a long-life Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement on the eastbound lanes and an asphalt : concrete (AC...

  3. Aging of Asphalt Symposium, September 17th 2014, Delft, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, S.M.J.G.; Scarpas, A.; Blab, R.; Glaser, R.; Glover, C.; Oeser, M.; Porot, L.; Soenen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Technical specifications for the asphalt concrete properties are developed to be able to specify mixtures that will perform well in pavement applications. Being able to identify and determine properties related to pavement performance in practice is crucial for both road authorities and contractors,

  4. Aging of Asphalt Symposium : Delft, the Netherlands September 17th 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, Sandra; Scarpas, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    Technical specifications for the asphalt concrete properties are developed to be able to specify mixtures that will perform well in pavement applications. Being able to identify and determine properties related to pavement performance in practice is crucial for both road authorities and contractors,

  5. Recycling of paint-contaminated grit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, R; al-Alawi, D; al-Nabhani, M; Pillay, A E; al-Hamdi, A

    2001-08-01

    The impact on the environment of using paint-contaminated grit (PCG) as a partial or full replacement for sand in Portland cement mortar and asphalt concrete mixtures was investigated. The grit waste material originated from abrasive blasting of offshore steel structures. There is a major environmental concern regarding the safe disposal of the spent blasting abrasives that contain paint chips or paint particles and other debris removed from the surface of the steel structures. This work investigated the potential reuse of PCG in Portland cement concrete (PCC) and hot mix asphalt concrete. Several studies were conducted to establish the integrity of the materials containing the recycled grit. These included the chemical and physical characterization of natural sand and PCG, the assay of leaches associated with the grit material for hazardous metal contaminants, such as Cr, Cd and Pb, and the assessment of the mechanical properties of the PCG-substituted mortars by applying special tests (such as Marshall stability and determination of the flow properties) to the PCG-substituted asphalt concrete mixtures. The overall results demonstrated that the potential reuse of PCG in PCC and asphalt concrete mixtures would not pose any environmental threat and could produce several benefits, such as reduced disposal costs, protection of water sources from improper disposal practices and reduced costs in the production of natural aggregates and asphalt cement.

  6. Advanced evaluation of asphalt mortar for induction healing purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolidis, P.; Liu, X.; Scarpas, Athanasios; Kasbergen, C.; van de Ven, M.F.C.

    2016-01-01

    Induction heating technique is an innovative asphalt pavement maintenance method that is applied to inductive asphalt concrete mixes in order to prevent the formation of macro-cracks by increasing locally the temperature of asphalt. The development of asphalt mixes with improved electrical and

  7. Use of waste crushed glass for the production of hot-mix asphalt

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available presents the development and evaluation of a new asphalt concrete mix that utilizes a sustainable crushed glass as a replacement material of a natural aggregate. The ultimate goal is to produce a cost-effective asphalt wearing course with comparative...

  8. Mechanistic evaluation of the effect of calcium carbide waste on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcium Carbide Waste (CCW) was used as an alternative to traditional Portland cement mineral filler in hot mix asphalt concrete to rid its disposal problem. Its effect on mechanical properties of hot mix asphalt was assessed using the Marshall method of mix design. Using the optimum bitumen content determined from ...

  9. Direct Tensile Test to Assess Healing in Asphalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegwater, G.A.; Scarpas, Athanasios; Erkens, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Asphalt concrete has the advantageous ability to heal. During rest
    periods, damage present In the material is restored to a certain extent.
    Healing of the material can be observed in iis regaining of strength
    and stiffness after rest periods. In this paper, a new test method is

  10. Direct tensile test to assess healing in asphalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegwater, G.A.; Scarpas, T.; Erkens, S.

    2016-01-01

    Asphalt concrete has the advantageous ability to heal. During rest periods, damage present in the material is restored to a certain extent. Healing of the material can be observed in its regaining of strength and stiffness after rest periods. In this paper, a new test method is presented. It was

  11. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH OF PROCESSING OF DUMP SAND-CLAY MIXES BY THE CENTRIFUGAL AND SHOCK CRUSHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Vorobev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of experimental research of processing of centrifugal and shock crushing of dump sandy-clay mixes are given. Use of products of processing of received mixes in foundry production and in production of asphalt concrete mixes allows to exclude transportation of the mix to dumping.

  12. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. SIAMARK AFROOZI. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 43 Issue 2 February 2018 pp 24. Investigating the creep properties of asphaltic concrete containing nano-silica · HASAN TAHERKHANI SIAMARK AFROOZI · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. This study was aimed at investigating the ...

  13. Stiffness modulus and creep properties of the coconut shell in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coconut shell (CS) is an agricultural waste engineered into a road construction material. This study was conducted to evaluate the stiffness modulus and dynamic creep properties of the asphaltic concrete containing CS as an aggregate replacement. A mixture design incorporating the bitumen penetration grade 60/70 was ...

  14. Characteristics of permanent deformation rate of warm mix asphalt with additives variation (BNA-R and zeolite)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahjuningsih, Nurul; Hadiwardoyo, Sigit Pranowo; Sumabrata, R. Jachrizal

    2017-06-01

    Permanent deformation is one of the criteria of failure on asphalt concrete mixture. The nature of the bitumen melt at high temperatures, this condition causes the asphalt concrete mixture tends to soften due to an increase in temperature of the road surface. The increase in surface temperature and the load wheel that has repeated itself on the same trajectory causes deformation groove has formed. Conditions rutting due to permanent deformation has resulted in inconvenience to the passengers and can lead to high costs of road maintenance. On the road planning process required a prediction of the rate of the permanent deformation of asphalt concrete mixtures. It is important to know early on the road surface damage due to vehicle load and surface temperature during service life. Asphalt has been mixed with the additive BNA-R and Zeolite intended to make variations in the characteristics of bitumen in this study. This variation is further combined with variations in the composition of aggregate in order to obtain a combination of asphalt-aggregate mixture. This mixture using warm mix, and to determine the permanent deformation of asphalt mix with material combinations was performed through the wheel tracking test machine with 3,780 cycles or 7,560 tracks for 3 hours. Another analysis to determine the characteristics of asphalt concrete mixtures have also been carried out changes in the surface temperature at the time of the test track. From the results of the test track to nearly 8 thousand passes has seen permanent deformation characteristics of asphalt concrete mixture with a variation of the characteristics of bitumen and aggregate variation. Groove of deformation due to a wheel load from the initial until the last passes shows that there are influence of compaction temperature on the variation of bitumen and aggregate composition to the relationship of permanent deformation of the wheel groove, especially on the road surface temperature changes.

  15. History of dams at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.P.; Wilson, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    Since the production of nuclear material at SRS for weapons required large quantities of cooling water, a series of canals, dikes, and dams were constructed to provide conveyance systems and reservoirs. This paper presents a brief overview of the history of the construction of the dams and dikes. Attention is given to the use of asphaltic concrete for 30 years (and its maintenance and repair) to line the banks of dikes and the upstream slopes of dams to prevent erosion and possible failure. The ability of asphaltic concrete in preventing dam/dike failure was proven. Benefits and drawbacks to the use of this material are discussed based on the extensive experience at SRS

  16. Application of surplus and waste materials in roads pavement making

    OpenAIRE

    Mousavi, S. M.; Fazli, A. H.; Rouzmehr, F.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays there are a lot of problems about surpluses and debris made by humans all around the world. Lots of these surpluses seriously harm our natural environment. Reuse of this kind of materials in other processes like building constructions or pavement help our natural environment in every aspect. Asphalt concrete is the main part of pavements in most parts of the world with an increasing rate of production in need of more ways and roads. In this paper we will provide...

  17. Using Value-Focused Thinking to Evaluate the Practicality of Porous Pavement Parking Areas on Air Force Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    data for conventional systems was obtained mainly through the RS Means Assemblies Cost Data book (Balboni, 2005) while Bruce Ferguson’s Porous...Pavements book provided much of the information for porous systems (Ferguson, 2005). Additional information regarding pavement maintenance, inspection...Jacobs, M. M. J., Stet, M. J. A., & Molenaar , A. A. A. (2002). Decision model for the use of polymer modified binders in asphalt concrete for airfields

  18. Cooler reflective pavements give benefits beyond energy savings: durability and illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomerantz, Melvin; Akbari, Hashem; Harvey, John T.

    2000-01-01

    City streets are usually paved with asphalt concrete because this material gives good service and is relatively inexpensive to construct and maintain. We show that making asphalt pavements cooler, by increasing their reflection of sunlight, may lead to longer lifetime of the pavement, lower initial costs of the asphalt binder, and savings on street lighting and signs. Excessive glare due to the whiter surface is not likely to be a problem

  19. Influence of Road Surface Microtexture on Thin Water Film Traction

    OpenAIRE

    BEAUTRU , Yannick; Kane , Malal; Do , Minh Tan; Cerezo , Véronique

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the contribution of road surface microtexture to the relationship between tire/road friction and water depth. The main objectives are the estimation of local water depths trapped at the tire/road interface and the definition of a critical water depth which can be used for driver assistance and information systems. Tests are performed in laboratory. Specimens are slabs made of asphalt concrete and mosaics composed of coarse aggregates. The aggregate mosaics are sandblaste...

  20. ECONOMY OF A NON-WASTE ROAD REPAIRING AND COVERING TECHNOLOGY IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilyara Kyazymovna Izmaylova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article questions the economic feasibility of the use of a non-waste repairing and restoration technology for the road surfaces. While writing this article there were conducted several analyses, for example: analysis of consumption volumes of mineral components of asphalt mixtures based on the geography of the commodity market, analysis of changes in cost of materials considering transport conditions. Also defined the conditions and preferential types of asphalt concrete processing in different countries.

  1. Evolution of tyre/road noise research in India: Investigations using statistical pass-by method and noise trailer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Khan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research study was to investigate and analyze the acoustical characteristics of asphalt concrete and cement concrete surface types by two noise measurement techniques: statistical pass-by (SPB and Close Proximity (CPX methods. A noise trailer was devised and manufactured as part of the CPX methodology to evaluate tyre/pavement noise interaction at source. Two national highway test sections covering over 11 km of asphalt and cement concrete surfaces were selected to carry out the noise measurements, and the effects of vehicle speeds and/or sizes on the overall noise profiles were investigated. The major contribution of this first of its kind study in India was the utilization of sophisticated tools and techniques to measure the tyre/pavement interaction noise at source through CPX, which helped correlate the influence of road surfaces on the generation of overall road traffic noise using SPB technique. The SPB method noise profiles revealed that the noise pressure levels increased with increasing vehicle speeds and weights. The noise trailer CPX findings corroborated the results obtained from the SPB method in that cement concrete surface produced a higher noise at source than that of the asphalt concrete surface by about 5 dBA. Further, there was about 5 dBA differential in noise between SPB and CPX methods for cement concrete pavement sections; also, there was about 10 dBA differential in noise between the two methods for asphalt concrete pavement stretches. Keywords: Tyre/road noise, Statistical pass-by, Close proximity, Noise trailer, Asphalt concrete, Cement concrete

  2. Small Business Opportunities with the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    surface (plastic, metal, painted metal, roughened asphalt, concrete, ceramics, wood, vegetation , clothing, and much more) • Collector material...Cotton (Military Textile) Other (porous) •Fiberglass • Terra Cotta •Concrete •Asphalt •Ceramic Other (nonporous) •Glass •Porcelain...Dimethyl Phosphate • Silicone Oil • Vegetable Oil Agents/Simulants Successfully Tested on Surfaces Surface Sampler Prototype 22 Surface Sampling

  3. Contributory Factors Related to Permanent Deformation of Hot Asphalt Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Husein Abd

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Permanent deformation (Rutting of asphalt pavements which appears in many roads in Iraq, have caused a major impact on pavement performance by reducing the useful service life of pavement and creating services hazards for highway users. The main objective of this research is investigating the effect of some contributory factors related to permanent deformation of asphalt concrete mixture. To meet the objectives of this research, available local materials are used including asphalt binder, aggregates, mineral filler and modified asphalt binder. The Superpave mix design system was adopted with varying volumetric compositions. The Superpave Gyratory Compactor was used to compact 24 asphalt concrete cylindrical specimens. To collect the required data and investigate the development of permanent deformation in asphalt concrete under repeated loadings, Wheel-Tracking apparatus has been used in a factorial testing program during which 44 slab samples; with dimensions of 400×300×50 mm; were tested to simulate . actual pavement. Based on wheel-tracking test results, it has been concluded that increasing the compaction temperature from 110 to 150ºC caused a decreasing in permanent deformation by 20.5 and 15.6 percent for coarse and fine gradation control asphalt mixtures respectively. While the permanent deformation decreased about 21.3 percent when the compaction temperature is increased from 110 to 150ºC for coarse gradation asphalt mixtures modified with styrene butadiene styrene SBS with 3 percent by asphalt binder weight.

  4. Delamination detection in reinforced concrete using thermal inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Grande, N K; Durbin, P F.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of thermal inertia mapping for bridge deck inspections. Using pulsed thermal imaging, we heat-stimulated surrogate delaminations in reinforced concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Using a dual-band infrared camera system, we measured thermal inertia responses of Styrofoam implants under 5 cm of asphalt, 5 cm of concrete, and 10 cm of asphalt and concrete. We compared thermal maps from solar-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs with thermal inertia maps from flash-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Thermal inertia mapping is a tool for visualizing and quantifying subsurface defects. Physically, thermal inertia is a measure of the resistance of the bridge deck to temperature change. Experimentally, it is determined from the inverse slope of the surface temperature versus the inverse square root of time. Mathematically, thermal inertia is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity. Thermal inertia mapping distinguishes delaminated decks which have below-average thermal inertias from normal or shaded decks. Key Words: Pulsed Thermal Imaging, Thermal Inertia, Detection Of Concrete Bridgedeck Delaminations

  5. Evaluation and Study the Effect of Additives and Other Factors on Tensile Strength of Asphalt Paving Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa Khaleel A. Al-Baiti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of asphaltic concrete to cracking is dependent upon its tensile strength and flexibility characteristics. Also the low tensile strength has recognized as a major contributor to other performance problems. The fatigue life of mixtures decreases exponentially with decreasing of tensile strength. This trend is justified by the loss in stiffness and thereby initiating cracks and stripping. The main objective of this research is intended to study the effect of different variables related with the used materials and the external conditions on the tensile strength and predict a model of indirect tensile strength in asphalt concrete paving materials under the local prevailing conditions and investigate the effect of percent of additives of (Polyestrene resins and Hydrated Lime to enhance the resistance ability of asphalt concrete mixture against distresses. The main affected factors; soaking, asphalt content, compaction, aggregate maximum size and temperature, influence on the indirect tensile strength and presented through a statistics analysis model for tensile strength in asphalt mixture

  6. Performance of Hot Mix Asphalt Mixture Incorporating Kenaf Fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainin, M. R.; Idham, M. K.; Yaro, N. S. A.; Hussein, S. O. A. E.; Warid, M. N. M.; Mohamed, A.; Naqibah, S. N.; Ramadhansyah, P. J.

    2018-04-01

    Kenaf fibre has been recognised to increase the strength of concrete, but its application in asphalt concrete is still unanswered. This research investigated the performance of Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) incorporated with different percentages of kenaf fibre (0.1 %, 0.2% and 0.3% by weight of dry aggregate) in term of resilient modulus, rutting performance using Asphalt Pavement analyser (APA) and moisture damage using the Modified Lottman test (AASHTO-T283). The fibre was interweaved to a diameter of about 5-10 mm and length of 30 mm which is three times the nominal maximum aggregate size used in the mix. Asphaltic mixtures of asphalt concrete (AC) 10 were prepared and compacted using Marshall compactor which were subsequently tested to evaluate the resilient modulus and moisture susceptibility. Twelve cylindrical specimens (150mm diameter) from AC10, two control samples with two modified ones for each percentage of kenaf fibres compacted using Gyratory compactor were used for rutting test using APA. The laboratory results reveal that the addition of kenaf fibres slightly reduce the resilient modulus of the mixes and that asphaltic mix with 0.3% kenaf fibre can mitigate both rutting and moisture damage which makes the pavement more sustain to the loads applied even in the presence of water. 0.3% kenaf fibre content is considered to be the optimal content which had the least rut depth and the highest TSR of 81.07%. Based on grid analysis, addition of 0.3% kenaf fibre in asphaltic concrete was recommended in modifying the samples.

  7. Hanford protoype surface barrier status report: FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, G.W.; Freeman, H.D.; Walters, W.H. Jr.; Ligotke, M.W.; Campbell, M.D.; Ward, A.L.; Link, S.O.; Smith, S.K.; Gilmore, B.G.; Romine, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    A full-scale prototype surface barrier has been constructed at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The prototype barrier has been built to evaluate design, construction, and performance features of a surface barrier that may be used for in-place disposal of wastes at the Hanford Site. The design basis and construction of the prototype have been documented. A testing and monitoring plan has been published outlining specific tests planned for the prototype. The current report describes initial testing activities conducted in FY 1994 and outlines activities for testing and monitoring at the prototype barrier in the future. Asphalt permeability was tested during construction of the prototype in April and May 1994. Cores taken from the asphalt concrete layer were tested in the laboratory and found to have hydraulic conductivities below 1E-09 cm/s. Field measurements of hydraulic conductivity taken on the asphalt concrete using a specially-designed falling head permeameter were more than ten times higher than those from core tests. The higher values are attributed to transient flow through the permeameter seal. In spite of this difficulty, the more rapid field measurements (1-day tests in the field compared to 3 months in the laboratory) gave values as low as IE-09 cm/s and averaged about IE-08 cm/s. Samples of fluid-applied asphalt material, used as a sealant on the asphalt concrete layer, were. tested in the laboratory and found to have hydraulic conductivities below IE-10 cm/s. Measurements of hydraulic conductivity taken on an adjacent asphalt test pad using a sealed double-ring infiltrometer (SDRI) were initiated in September 1994 and are expected to be completed in November 1994. Construction of the prototype surface barrier was completed in August 1994

  8. A Research on Low Modulus Distributed Fiber Optical Sensor for Pavement Material Strain Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingjian; Wang, Linbing; Hou, Yue; Yan, Guannan

    2017-10-19

    The accumulated irreversible deformation in pavement under repeated vehicle loadings will cause fatigue failure of asphalt concrete. It is necessary to monitor the mechanical response of pavement under load by using sensors. Previous studies have limitations in modulus accommodation between the sensor and asphalt pavement, and it is difficult to achieve the distributed monitoring goal. To solve these problems, a new type of low modulus distributed optical fiber sensor (DOFS) for asphalt pavement strain monitoring is fabricated. Laboratory experiments have proved the applicability and accuracy of the newly-designed sensor. This paper presents the results of the development.

  9. Regulations Enforcement Mechanisms for Sustainable Housing Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsan Rasheed Mohammed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of asphalt concrete pavement has affected by many factors, the temperature is the most important environmental one which has a large effect on the structural behavior of flexible pavement materials. The main cause of premature failure of pavement is the rutting, Due to the viscoelastic nature of the asphalt cement, rutting is more pronounced in hot climate areas because the viscosity of the asphalt binder which is inversely related to rutting is significantly reduced with the increase in temperature resulting in a more rut susceptible paving mixtures. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of temperatures variations on the permanent deformation parameters (permanent strain (p, intercept (a, slope (b, Alpha and Mu as well as resilient strain (r and resilient modulus (Mr. To achieve this objective, one aggregate gradation with 12.5mm nominal maximum size, two grades of asphalt cements (40-50 and 60-70 brought form Al- Daurah refinery, limestone dust filler has been used to prepare the asphalt concrete mixtures. 30 Marshall specimens were prepared to determine the optimum asphalt cement content. Thereafter, 30 cylindrical asphalt concrete specimens (102mm in diameter and 203 mm in height are prepared in optimum asphalt cement and optimum ±0.5 percent. The prepared specimens were used in uniaxial repeated load test to evaluate the permanent deformation parameters of asphalt concrete mixes under the following testing temperature (5, 15, 25, 40 and 60̊c. The test result analyses appeared that Mr is decrease 51 percent when temperature increased from 5 ̊c to 25 ̊c and then decrease 22 percent with further increase in temperature from 25 ̊c to 60 ̊c. Also, the Alpha value decreases by a factor of 1.25 and 1.13 when temperature increases from 5 ̊c to 25 ̊c and 25 ̊c to 60 ̊c, respectively. Finally, statistical models were developed to predict the Alpha and Mu parameters of permanent deformation.

  10. Extending the Service Life of Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendt, Ivan

    2018-03-01

    The cost of road construction and expenditures on the maintenance of pavements, i.e., their whole life cost, represents a lot of money. The paper describes a procedure for a pavement management system with degradation models and estimates the length of time for the rehabilitation of an asphalt pavement. Using a theory of pavement mechanics, we calculated the stresses and strains on the layers of two pavement models. High modulus asphalt concrete, an asphalt mix with a high binder content, and an asphalt mix with binder modifications are new road building materials. Prolonging the time for the rehabilitation of pavements is possible.

  11. Use of stabilized bottom ash for bound layers of road pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraldo, Emanuele; Saponaro, Sabrina; Careghini, Alessandro; Mariani, Edoardo

    2013-05-30

    This paper reports about the lab scale results obtained by using stabilized bottom ash (SBA) from an Italian municipal solid waste incinerator as aggregates in cement-bound mixes and asphalt concretes for road pavements. The investigation focused on SBA content. From the road construction point of view, performance related to compaction, volumetric and mechanical properties were assessed. The environmental aspects were investigated performing leaching tests. The results suggested that SBA satisfied the environmental Italian law for reuse of non-hazardous waste but affected significantly the stress-strain behavior of the final products. Therefore a maximum percentage of 10% was suggested. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of rubber crumbs in cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longvinenko, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    Rubber crumb obtained from worn out tires has been increasingly used over the last 15-20 years, especially in manufacture of asphalt and cement concrete mixtures. This review pays principal attention to application of the rubber crumb to cement concrete mixtures. Use of the rubber crumb in cement concrete is not as successful as in asphalt concrete mixtures, due to incompatibility problems linked to chemical composition and a significant difference in rigidity between the rubber crumb and concrete mixture aggregates. Different methods are proposed and studied to mitigate the adverse influence and increase the beneficial effects of the rubber crumb when added to cement concrete.

  13. NASA diagonal-braked test vehicle evaluation of traction characteristics of grooved and ungrooved runway surfaces at Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida, 8-9 May 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Two runways were evaluated under artificially wetted conditions with the NASA diagonal-braked vehicle (DBV). Results of the evaluation which included a pavement drainage analysis, a pavement skid resistance analysis, and a DBV wet/dry stopping distance ratio analysis indicated that the ungrooved runway surfaces had poor water drainage characteristics and poor skid resistance under wet conditions at high speeds especially in rubbercoated areas of the runways. Grooving runways to a transverse 1-1/4 x 1/4 x 1/4 inch pattern greatly improved both the water drainage and pavement skid resistance capability of these asphaltic concrete surfaces.

  14. EFFECTS OF PAVEMENT SURFACE TEMPERATURE ON THE MODIFICATION OF URBAN THERMAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARAT, Adebayo-Aminu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Urban centres continue to experience escalating average summer temperature over the last fifty years. Temperature in the urban core cites have been rising due to rapid growth of urbanization in the latter half of the twentieth century (Akbari et al., 1989. Outdoor experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of different movement of materials on the urban thermal environment. Meteorological conditions such as air temperature, pavement surface temperature, Relative humidity and wind velocity were recorded to determine temperature differences among Asphalt/concrete, interlocking bricks and grass surfaces.

  15. Stability of earth dam with a vertical core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orekhov Vyacheslav Valentinovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth dam with impervious element in the form of asphaltic concrete core is currently the most promising type of earth dams (due to simple construction technology and universal service properties of asphaltic concrete and is widely used in the world. However, experience in the construction and operation of high dams (above 160 m is not available, and their work is scarcely explored. In this regard, the paper discusses the results of computational prediction of the stress-strain state and stability of a high earth dam (256 m high with the core. The authors considered asphaltic concrete containing 7 % of bitumen as the material of the core. Gravel was considered as the material of resistant prisms. Design characteristics of the rolled asphaltic concrete and gravel were obtained from the processing of the results of triaxial tests. The calculations were performed using finite element method in elastoplastic formulation and basing on the phased construction of the dam and reservoir filling. The research shows, that the work of embankment dam with vertical core during filling of the reservoir is characterized by horizontal displacement of the lower resistant prism in the tailrace and the formation of a hard wedge prism descending along the core in the upper resistant prism. The key issue of the safety assessment is to determine the safety factor of the overall stability of the dam, for calculation of which the destruction of the earth dam is necessary, which can be done by reducing the strength properties of the dam materials. As a results of the calculations, the destruction of the dam occurs with a decrease in the strength characteristics of the materials of the dam by 2.5 times. The dam stability depends on the stability of the lower resistant prism. The destruction of its slope occurs on the classical circular-cylindrical surface. The presence of a potential collapse surface in the upper resistant prism (on the edges of the descending wedge does

  16. The valorization of the plastic waste to the rheological characteristics of bituminous mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucherba, Mohammed; Kriker, Abdelouahed; Kebaili, Nabil

    2017-02-01

    The valorization of materials used at the end of the cycle currently constitutes one of the major challenges for the state for the safeguarding of the environment. Indeed, plastic waste from their obstruction and weak biodegradability often constitutes a threat for health, nature and the environment. The present study treats a mining method and valorization of these wastes in the road, where this waste is incorporated in the pure bitumen of asphalt concretes using the Dry process. The vital objective of this work is to see their impact on the mechanical behavior of these concretes using the Marshall Test and NAT.

  17. Alternate cover materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    As an effort to enhance compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater standards, several special studies are being performed by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to identify and evaluate various design features that may reduce groundwater-related releases from tailings piles. The objective of this special study is to assess the suitability of using alternate cover materials (other than geomembranes) as infiltration barriers in Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project piles to minimize leachate generation. The materials evaluated in this study include various types of asphalts, concretes, and a sodium bentonite clay/polypropylene liner system

  18. Cost-benefit analysis of the construction of different flexible pavement structures considering the axle load and type of binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Dotto Bueno

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The status of Brazilian highways reflects a deficient pavement performance when they are subjected to loadings imposed by heavy traffic. Current legislation, as enacted by Contran (National Traffic Council, has increased the axle weight limit for cargo vehicles by up to 10%. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine a cost-benefit ratio by using different types of structures, asphalt binders and load intensities. Typical pavements were determined and then analyzed by the software AEMC (SisPav to obtain the horizontal tensile strain (εt values at the bottom of the asphalt concrete layer and, later, the NFATIGUE value. It was found that the increase in weight, within values covered by legislation, might result in a reduction of approximately 50% in the NFATIGUE value for the pavement structures analyzed. As for economic impact, the same weight increase caused a mean increase of 120% in the cost of repeated loading on pavement structures (R$ NFATIGUE-1. It was also observed that structures with more robust asphalt concrete layers can provide the best R$ NFATIGUE-1 ratios. The best results for granular materials were found with thinner layers, associated with a thicker coating. The benefits of modified binders were shown by the analyses of the best structural options: both the polymer-modified binder and the rubber asphalt binder offer significant structural and economic improvements to the structure.

  19. Mechanical behavior of flexible pavements undergoing thermal gradients - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v33i3.10848

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazielli Vassoler

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The proper structural understanding of a pavement should consider, according to the pavement mechanics, the aspects related to the traffic load, the environment and material properties. When asphaltic materials are used, the stress/strain relationships and the dependencies of load-time and temperature are key parameters for understanding flexible pavement performance. In this study, we employed the finite elements method to calculate stress/strain in flexible pavements structures considering temperature variation. The input data includes material stiffness, which is function of temperature and changes with position and time. The pavement temperature is obtained through the heat transfer differential equation, applying the Laplace transform and its numerical inversion. The finite elements grid was generated by the software ANSYS® and imported by the software MATLAB®. In order to determine the stiffness of the first layer (asphalt concrete we used the average of four nodes, depending on the each node temperature. The result evidences the importance of thermal gradients for the pavement analysis, both for the fatigue cracking and the accumulation of plastic deformations. The use of unique modulus for asphalt concrete layer generates results far from reality.

  20. Application of mechanistic empirical approach to predict rutting of superpave mixtures in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qasim Zaynab

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In Iraq rutting is considered as a real distress in flexible pavements as a result of high summer temperature, and increased axle loads. This distress majorly affects asphalt pavement performance, lessens the pavement useful service life and makes serious hazards for highway users. Performance of HMA mixtures against rutting using Mechanistic- Empirical approach is predicted by considering Wheel-Tracking test and employing the Superpave mix design requirements. Roller Wheel Compactor has been locally manufactured to prepare slab specimens. In view of study laboratory outcomes that are judged to be simulative of field loading conditions, models are developed for predicting permanent strain of compacted samples of local asphalt concrete mixtures after considering the stress level, properties of local material and environmental impacts variables. All in all, laboratory results were produced utilizing statistical analysis with the aid of SPSS software. Permanent strain models for asphalt concrete mixtures were developed as a function of: number of passes, temperature, asphalt content, viscosity, air voids and additive content. Mechanistic Empirical design approach through the MnPAVE software was applied to characterize rutting in HMA and to predict allowable number of loading repetitions of mixtures as a function of expected traffic loads, material properties, and environmental temperature.

  1. Volumetric Analysis and Performance of Hot Mix Asphalt with Variable Rap Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Ahmad Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP to the asphalt concrete mixture for highway construction offer many benefits including energy consumption, conservation of natural resources and preservation of the environment to associated emissions. This paper presents a study on performance of Hot Mix Asphalt with variable RAP content. The study is carried out to evaluate the Marshall Properties and Performance of RAP-Asphalt mixes using conventional asphaltic concrete mix AC14. Marshall Mix Design Method was used to produce control mix (0% RAP and RAP-Asphalt mixes samples which consist of 15% RAP, 25% RAP and 35% RAP in accordance with Specifications for Road Works of Public Works Department, Malaysia. The Marshall Properties analysis was performed to ensure compliance with Marshall Requirements, The resilient modulus test was performed to measure the stiffness of the mixes while Modified Lottman test was conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of these mixes. The results obtained showed that there were no substantial difference in Marshall Properties, moisture susceptibility and indirect tensile strength between RAP-Asphalt mixes with the control mix. The test results indicated that recycled mixes performed as good as the performance of conventional HMA in terms of moisture susceptibility and resilient modulus. It is recommended that further research be carried out for asphalt mixes containing more than 35% of RAP material.

  2. The use of Crumb Rubber as Substitute of Fine Aggregate for Hot Asphalt Mixture using Polymer Modified Bitumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, A.; Nugroho, S. K.; Irsyad, A. M.; Mutaqo, H. F.; Ramadhan, P.; Sumarsono, A.; Pramesti, F. P.

    2018-03-01

    The development of road pavement to fulfilled the need of modern life is not only focused on heavy duty road, but also a light duty road for the convenience of road users according to its function. For example the use of pavement on the jogging track, rail crossing, playground and so on. Due to the need of an alternative and the innovation of a comfortable pavement layer, but sufficiently strong in holding the load on the layer. The alternative innovation that can be used for the respective requirement is the utilization of waste old tires as substitute material in pavement construction. In this case the use of crumb rubber made from old tire rubber as an 100% fine aggregate substitute on the asphalt mixtures is investigated. To improve the strength and durability of the mixtures, the addition of polymer modified bitumen was incorporated. The two types of asphalt mixture selected in this study by using a continuous gradation of asphalt concrete and a gap gradation of hot roll asphalt. Testing to be implemented in this research is volumetric characteristics, Marshall characteristics, resistance to abrasion and impact and permeability. Replacement of fine aggregate with crumb rubber on asphalt concrete mixture with 60/70 penetration grade bitumen and polymer modified asphalt SBS E-55 in this research are expected to be an alternative in improving the quality of pavement and overcoming the environmental problems by reuse the waste materials.

  3. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CONCEPT OF AUTOMATION AND INTELLECTUALIZATION OF MANAGEMENT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanchura Vladimir Ivanovich

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Subject: management of operating modes of road-building machines, taking into account the implementation of the concept of information modeling of the road. We have reviewed the status and the development problems for directions of improving the control systems of road-construction machine processes. In this work we focus on the road construction stage “laying asphalt-concrete - compaction”, the effective control of which can lead to significant improvement in the quality of road surfaces, increase of durability and reduction of defects in pavements. Research objectives: rationale and directions of realization of the concept of intellectualization of the road construction management. Materials and methods: analysis of the shortcomings of construction of asphalt-concrete pavements, analysis of the methods of workflow management of road-building machines. Results: we have substantiated the methodological background for the development of intellectual control systems of road-building machines. Conclusions: we considered possible ways of introducing the concept of intellectualization of management systems for road-building machines.

  4. Operational properties of nanomodified stone mastic asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inozemtsev Sergey Sergeevich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to prolong the lifetime and to improve the quality of pavements made of asphalt concrete it is necessary to apply innovative solutions in the process of design of such building materials. In order to solve the problem of low durability of asphalt concrete a modifier was proposed, which consists of diatomite, iron hydroxide sol (III and silica sol. Application of the diatomite with nanoscale layer of nanomodifier allows getting a stone mastic asphalt, which has high values of physical and mechanical properties and allows refusing from expensive stabilizing additive. Mineral filler was replaced by diatomite, which has been modified by iron hydroxide sol (III and silica sol. Modified diatomite allows sorption of bitumen and increase the cohesive strength and resistance to shear at positive temperatures. The modified asphalt has higher resistance to rutting at high temperature, abrasion resistance at low temperature and impact of climatic factors: alternate freezing and thawing, wetting-drying, UV and IR radiations. It is achieved by formation of solid and dense bitumen film at the phase interface and controlling the content of light fractions of the bitumen. The modifier consists of sol of iron hydroxide, which blocks the oxidation and polymerization of bitumen during operation. The proposed material allows controlling the initial structure formation of stone mastic asphalt. It was shown that modern test methods allow assessing the durability of asphalt in the design phase compositions.

  5. Field investigation of skid resistance degradation of asphalt pavement during early service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghao Miao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents a field investigation into the skid resistance degradation of asphalt pavement during early service. Field tests were conducted 7 times during more than 2 years. There are 2 highway sections included in the field tests, which cover 4 asphalt surface types, i.e., dense asphalt concrete (DAC, rubber asphalt concrete (RAC, stone matrix asphalt (SMA, and ultra-thin wearing course (UTWC. Macrotexture and friction data were collected using the sand patch method and the dynamic friction tester respectively. The degradation of the mean texture depth (MTD and the friction coefficient at slip speed of 60 km/h (DFT60 were analyzed. The international friction index (IFI was also calculated using the friction coefficient at slip speed of 20 km/h (DFT20 with MTD to evaluate the skid resistance degradation. The UTWC has relatively good skid resistance even after 7.4 × 106 standard vehicle passes. The SMA has very stable friction performance which maintains almost the same friction level after 4.61 × 106 standard vehicle passes. The DAC and RAC have relatively poor friction performance while the RAC has better macrotexture. The changing trends of skid resistance with traffic wear can be fitted by a logarithmic model for all surface types. The SMA and UTWC have relatively clear relationship between DFT20 and MTD, while the RAC and the DAC show more complex. Keywords: Asphalt pavement, Skid resistance, Degradation, International friction index

  6. Laboratory evaluation of long-term anti-icing performance and moisture susceptibility of chloride-based asphalt mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulian Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to investigate the long-term anti-icing performance and moisture susceptibility of chloride-based asphalt mixture. Two experiments (the natural and accelerated dissolving-out methods were conducted on the Marshall samples and their salt releasing amount were determined based on the density measurement of the aqueous solution with a hydrometer. In addition, the impact of anti-icing agents (MFL on the mixture water stability was also investigated. Results show that a similar tendency in both methods was observed and the salt dissolution history was generally divided into three phases. Most notably, compared with the natural dissolving-out experiment the accelerated test was more effective and time-saving. Moreover, asphalt concrete with MFL performed poorer water damage resistance than the conventional asphalt concrete and the residual stability of the former declined more dramatically than the later. Finally, based on the 60 °C dissolving-out experiment, a model to predict the effective working time of the anti-icing asphalt pavement was proposed subsequently. Keywords: Asphalt mixture, Chloride, Long-term anti-icing performance, Moisture susceptibility

  7. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Franesqui

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA. The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled “Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves” (Franesqui et al., 2017 [1].

  8. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franesqui, Miguel A; Yepes, Jorge; García-González, Cándida

    2017-08-01

    This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA). The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled "Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves" (Franesqui et al., 2017) [1].

  9. Polyfunctional Modifiers for Bitumen and Bituminous Materials with High Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alim Feizrakhmanovich Kemalov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade increase in capacity and the intensity of vehicular traffic has increased manifoldly, including heavy trucks, super singles, and higher tire pressures, resulting in significant increase of dynamic loads on the road surface which in turn lead to high quality requirements for bitumen in order to avoid premature wear and failure of asphalt concrete pavements. One of the possibilities to increase the quality of bitumen is to use special additives and modifiers that can provide a high adhesion to mineral filler and inhibit the aging and degradation processes in the asphalt coating. To achieve this, in the present study composite modifiers based on bisimidazolines derivatives were synthesized. The developed polyfunctional modifier (PFM of complex action provides enhanced thermal stability, significantly improves the adhesion between bitumen binder and aggregates, and also improves the physical-mechanical properties of the asphalt concrete. Based on the test results it is recommended to use the synthesized samples of the PFM additive with complex action in asphalt mixtures for road paving.

  10. Application of Conductive Materials to Asphalt Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Viet Vo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Snow-melting pavement technique is an advanced preservation method, which can prevent the forming of snow or ice on the pavement surface by increasing the temperature using an embedded heating system. The main scope of this study is to evaluate the impact of conductive additives on the heating efficiency. The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity were considered to investigate effects of conductive additives, graphite, and carbon fibers on the snow-melting ability of asphalt mixtures. Also, the distribution of the conductive additives within the asphalt concrete body was investigated by microstructural imaging. An actual test was applied to simulate realistic heating for an asphalt concrete mixture. Thermal testing indicated that graphite and carbon fibers improve the snow-melting ability of asphalt mixes and their combination is more effective than when used alone. As observed in the microstructural image, carbon fibers show a long-range connecting effect among graphite conductive clusters and gather in bundles when added excessively. According to the actual test, adding the conductive additives helps improve snow-melting efficiency by shortening processing time and raising the surface temperature.

  11. Fatigue and rutting lives in flexible pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ebrahim Abu El-Maaty Behiry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Flexible pavement is designed based on axle load limits and climatic conditions. The Egyptian code has specified certain load limits that should not be exceeded. The overweight trucks cause severe deterioration to the pavement and thus reduce its life. The study aims at studying the effect of axle load increase, and the variation in pavement modulus, on the overall pavement life. The research uses the BISAR software and the Egyptian environmental and pavement materials conditions to estimate the tensile strains occurring under the asphalt concrete (AC layer and the compressive strains above the subgrade surface. The results revealed that tensile and compressive strain increased with increasing axle loads and decreased with increasing asphalt layer modulus thus the violating trucks should be unloaded when their weights exceed certain limits. Base thickness and subgrade resilient modulus were the key elements which control the equilibrium between fatigue and rutting lives.

  12. Recycling of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement in Portland Cement Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Al-Oraimi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP is the result of removing old asphalt pavement material. RAP consists of high quality well-graded aggregate coated with asphalt cement. The removal of asphalt concrete is done for reconstruction purposes, resurfacing, or to obtain access to buried utilities. The disposal of RAP represents a large loss of valuable source of high quality aggregate. This research investigates the properties of concrete utilizing recycled reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP. Two control mixes with normal aggregate were designed with water cement ratios of 0.45 and 0.5. The control mixes resulted in compressive strengths of 50 and 33 MPa after 28 days of curing. The coarse fraction of RAP was used to replace the coarse aggregate with 25, 50, 75, and 100% for both mixtures. In addition to the control mix (0%, the mixes containing RAP were evaluated for slump, compressive strength, flexural strength, and modulus of elasticity. Durability was evaluated using surface absorption test.

  13. Effect of using fly ash as alternative filler in hot mix asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Mistry

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of using fly ash (FA in asphalt mixture as replacement of common filler. In view of the same, samples were prepared for different bitumen content (3.5−6.5% at 0.5% increments by using 2% hydrated lime (HL in control mix as well as varying percentage of FA ranging from 2 to 8% as alternative filler in modified mixes. The optimum bitumen content (OBC was then determined for all the mix by Marshall mix design. Experimental results indicated higher stability value with lower OBC for the mixture having 4% FA as optimum filler content in comparison with conventional mix and standard specification. So this study discuss the feasibility of using FA as alternative filler instead of HL in asphalt concrete mix by satisfying the standard specification.

  14. Ageing and temperature effect on the fatigue performance of bituminous mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. López-Montero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ageing of asphalt mixes, together with their exposure to low temperatures, causes a progressive increase of cracking. In this paper, the effect of ageing and temperature on the fatigue of asphalt concretes made with two types of binders, conventional (50/70 and polymer modified bitumen (PMB, is studied. For this purpose, specimens previously subjected to an accelerated laboratory ageing process were tested by a strain sweep test at different temperatures (-5ºC, 5ºC and 20°C. Results were compared with the obtained from the unaged specimens showing the relative importance of ageing, temperature and type of bitumen on the parameters that determine the fatigue life of the mixture. The mixtures behaviour becomes more brittle with ageing and the decrease of temperature. However, ageing hardly has an effect on fatigue at lower temperatures. In general, mixtures made with polymer modified bitumen have a better fatigue performance to ageing and temperature.

  15. Mechanistic Evaluation of the Effect of Calcium Carbide Waste on Properties of Asphalt Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Isa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium Carbide Waste (CCW was used as an alternative to traditional Portland cement mineral filler in hot mix asphalt concrete to rid its disposal problem. Its effect on mechanical properties of hot mix asphalt was assessed using the Marshall method of mix design. Using the optimum bitumen content determined from Marshall Test, Portland cement used as mineral filler was partially replaced with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50% CCW by dry weight. Results of tests indicated an increase in stability, voids in mineral aggregates, Marshall Stiffness and reduction in flow, unit weight, voids filled with binder when the percentage of CCW increases. Based on results of tests, partial replacement of Portland cement with 40% CCW could be used in asphalt production. This will ensure economy in asphalt production and promote disposal of CCW which constitute environmental hazards.

  16. Heat island and spatio-temporal changes of temperature in the city of Bogota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, L; Ramirez, A; Dominguez, E.

    2010-01-01

    The planet Earth, as a whole, has experienced a warming process caused principally by the accumulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Otherwise, it has been well demonstrated that thermic islands exist inside of cities, essentially as a result of the replacement of forest areas with urban materials such as asphalt, concrete, bricks, etc. Based on this foundation, this research evaluated the minimum, median and maximum temperature changes that occurred in the city of Bogota over the last 40 years. This research makes evident the presence of a heat island 3o Cover the periphery median temperature in most of the city. There were also periods with increases and decreases in city temperatures, not affected in its main tendency by the Nino Phenomena which in contrast affected the periphery.

  17. Influence of tyre-road contact model on vehicle vibration response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múčka, Peter; Gagnon, Louis

    2015-09-01

    The influence of the tyre-road contact model on the simulated vertical vibration response was analysed. Three contact models were compared: tyre-road point contact model, moving averaged profile and tyre-enveloping model. In total, 1600 real asphalt concrete and Portland cement concrete longitudinal road profiles were processed. The linear planar model of automobile with 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) was used. Five vibration responses as the measures of ride comfort, ride safety and dynamic load of cargo were investigated. The results were calculated as a function of vibration response, vehicle velocity, road quality and road surface type. The marked differences in the dynamic tyre forces and the negligible differences in the ride comfort quantities were observed among the tyre-road contact models. The seat acceleration response for three contact models and 331 DOF multibody model of the truck semi-trailer was compared with the measured response for a known profile of test section.

  18. Rubber modification of asphalt binders and mixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, G.; Hesp, S.A.M. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    The physical properties of asphalt binders and concrete, modified with waste rubber tire, were examined. In an experiment designed to address the concern of waste disposal of scrap rubber, a control asphalt, devulcanized rubber modified asphalt and a crumb rubber modified asphalt were used to make asphalt concrete mixes. The three mixes were subjected to a thermal stress test to determine their low temperature fracture temperatures and strengths. Results were discussed in terms of the binder material used. At high service temperatures, the addition of 10% devulcanized rubber was found to have no beneficial effect, whereas the addition of 10% 80 mesh crumb rubber produced a modest improvement in performance. At low temperatures, the addition of devulcanized rubber produced increased resistance to cracking up to 90%. The addition of 10% 80 mesh crumb rubber increased fracture toughness by a factor of 3.3 times. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Evaluation of high pressure water blast with rotating spray bar for removing paint and rubber deposits from airport runways, and review of runway slipperiness problems created by rubber contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, W. B.; Griswold, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    A high pressure water blast with rotating spray bar treatment for removing paint and rubber deposits from airport runways is studied. The results of the evaluation suggest that the treatment is very effective in removing above surface paint and rubber deposits to the point that pavement skid resistance is restored to trafficked but uncontaminated runway surface skid resistance levels. Aircraft operating problems created by runway slipperiness are reviewed along with an assessment of the contributions that pavement surface treatments, surface weathering, traffic polishing, and rubber deposits make in creating or alleviating runway slipperiness. The results suggest that conventional surface treatments for both portland cement and asphaltic concrete runways are extremely vulnerable to rubber deposit accretions which can produce runway slipperiness conditions for aircraft operations as or more slippery than many snow and ice-covered runway conditions. Pavement grooving surface treatments are shown to be the least vulnerable to rubber deposits accretion and traffic polishing of the surface treatments examined.

  20. Properties of concrete containing scrap-tire rubber--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Rafat; Naik, Tarun R

    2004-01-01

    Solid waste management is one of the major environmental concerns in the United States. Over 5 billion tons of non-hazardous solid waste materials are generated in USA each year. Of these, more than 270 million scrap-tires (approximately 3.6 million tons) are generated each year. In addition to this, about 300 million scrap-tires have been stockpiled. Several studies have been carried out to reuse scrap-tires in a variety of rubber and plastic products, incineration for production of electricity, or as fuel for cement kilns, as well as in asphalt concrete. Studies show that workable rubberized concrete mixtures can be made with scrap-tire rubber. This paper presents an overview of some of the research published regarding the use of scrap-tires in portland cement concrete. The benefits of using magnesium oxychloride cement as a binder for rubberized concrete mixtures are also presented. The paper details the likely uses of rubberized concrete.

  1. Inverted base pavements: construction and performance

    KAUST Repository

    Papadopoulos, Efthymios

    2017-05-11

    Inverted base pavements involve a well-compacted granular aggregate base built between a thin asphalt concrete layer and a cement-treated base. Inverted base pavements can be constructed using conventional equipment and procedures but require proper quality control. This study reviews the extensive South African experience and case histories in the USA. Accumulating evidence suggests that inverted base pavements are a viable alternative and can outperform conventional pavements at a lower cost. Inverted base pavements rely on the complementary interaction between layers. The cement-treated base provides a stiff foundation for efficient compaction and constrains the deformation of the stress-sensitive granular aggregate base. The thin asphalt surface layer deforms as a membrane and develops low tensile stress. Additional large-scale field tests should be conducted to assess the performance of inverted base pavement designs in a wide range of conditions relevant to the USA.

  2. A dissipated energy comparison to evaluate fatigue resistance using 2-point bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Maggiore

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is the main failure mode in pavement engineering. Typically, micro-cracks originate at the bottom of asphalt concrete layer due to horizontal tensile strains. Micro-cracks start to propagate towards the upper layers under repeated loading which can lead to pavement failure. Different methods are usually used to describe fatigue behavior in asphalt materials such as: phenomenological approach, fracture mechanics approach and dissipated energy approach. This paper presents a comparison of fatigue resistances calculated for different dissipated energy models using 2-point bending (2PB at IFSTTAR in Nantes. 2PB tests have been undertaken under different loading and environmental conditions in order to evaluate the properties of the mixtures (stiffness, dissipated energy, fatigue life and healing effect.

  3. A discrete element model for damage and fracture of geomaterials under fatigue loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaofeng; Koval, Georg; Chazallon, Cyrille

    2017-06-01

    Failure processes in geomaterials (concrete, asphalt concrete, masonry, etc.) under fatigue loading (repeated moving loads, cycles of temperature, etc.) are responsible for most of the dysfunctions in pavements, brick structures, etc. In the beginning of the lifetime of a structure, the material presents only inner defects (micro cracks, voids, etc.). Due to the effect of the cyclic loading, these small defects tend to grow in size and quantity which damage the material, reducing its stiffness. With a relatively high number of cycles, these growing micro cracks become large cracks, which characterizes the fracture behavior. From a theoretical point of view, both mechanisms are treated differently. Fracture is usually described locally, with the propagation of cracks defined by the energy release rate at the crack tip; damage is usually associated to non-local approaches. In the present work, damage and fracture mechanics are combined in a local discrete element approach.

  4. Automation for Crushing and Screening Equipment to Produce Graded Paving Crushed Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Anatoly; Velichkin, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    This paper offers analysis of factors related to production and storage of graded crushed stone, which adversely impact the service life and wear resistance of asphalt-concrete motor road pavements. The paper describes external and technology-related parameters that may cause changes of the preset ratio in graded crushed stone. Control factors are described that ensure the formulated fraction ratio in crushed stone by controlling the operation mode of the crushing and screening equipment. The paper also contains an ACS flow chart for crushing and screening equipment engaged in continuous closed-cycle two-stage technology. Performance of the ACS to maintain the preset fractionated crushed stone ratio has been confirmed with a mathematical model.

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF PRESERVATIVE FOR PROTECTION OF CONCRETE PAVEMENT OF HIGHWAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pshembaev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Disadvantages of road concrete pavement quite well known professionals-standards. They were mainly low elasticity modulus asphaltic concrete, as well as a fairly rapid aging of asphalt concrete core component-bitumen. And, as a consequence, is relatively low durability of the coating, the need for frequent repair. To some extent, cement concrete cover signifi cantly outperform this index of asphalt, convinces experience roads of Germany, the United States and other countries. The correct structure of concrete, overall compliance technology laying concrete, comprehensive quality control production  work, sufficient technical personnel qualifications provide long defect-free work road re-coated. However, violations by manufacture of works or in the process of exploitation, particularly in the harsh conditions of freezing and thawing, saturation-drying, especially under the influence of salts-defrosting, cause defects, reduce its durability. There are two directions of increase of durability of the coating. Firstly, it is the primary protection is the creation of concrete with minimal possible on data components mixture water cement ratio that provides reception of concrete with minimum porosity and consequently with maximum durability. Secondly, the secondary protection, providing increased resistance already ready-mixed concrete cover external aggressive actions. In this case against the background of other ways quite promising looks impregnation of the surface concrete integrated structure. Composition must contain multiple components, primarily water repellents, preventing penetration of fluid into the body of the concrete, and finely dispersed silica sol in particular silica, providing reduction of the porosity of the surface layers of concrete by interacting with the free calcium hydroxide. The problem of optimization of impregnation structure and is dedicated to this work.

  6. A review of centrifugal testing of gasoline contamination and remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegoda, Jay N; Hu, Liming

    2011-08-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) containing gasoline represent a significant public health hazard. Virtually undetectable to the UST owner, gasoline leaks can contaminate groundwater supplies. In order to develop remediation plans one must know the extent of gasoline contamination. Centrifugal simulations showed that in silty and sandy soils gasoline moved due to the physical process of advection and was retained as a pool of free products above the water table. However, in clayey soils there was a limited leak with lateral spreading and without pooling of free products above the water table. Amount leaked depends on both the type of soil underneath the USTs and the amount of corrosion. The soil vapor extraction (SVE) technology seems to be an effective method to remove contaminants from above the water table in contaminated sites. In-situ air sparging (IAS) is a groundwater remediation technology for contamination below the water table, which involves the injection of air under pressure into a well installed into the saturated zone. However, current state of the art is not adequate to develop a design guide for site implementation. New information is being currently generated by both centrifugal tests as well as theoretical models to develop a design guide for IAS. The petroleum contaminated soils excavated from leaking UST sites can be used for construction of highway pavements, specifically as sub-base material or blended and used as hot or cold mix asphalt concrete. Cost analysis shows that 5% petroleum contaminated soils is included in hot or cold mix asphalt concrete can save US$5.00 production cost per ton of asphalt produced.

  7. Recycling of petroleum-contaminated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, R; Ba-Omar, M; Pillay, A E; Roos, G; al-Hamdi, A

    2001-08-01

    The environmental impact of using petroleum-contaminated sand (PCS) as a substitute in asphalt paving mixtures was examined. An appreciable component of PCS is oily sludge, which is found as the dregs in oil storage tanks and is also produced as a result of oil spills on clean sand. The current method for the disposal of oily sludge is land farming. However, this method has not been successful as an oil content of reuse of the sludge in asphalt paving mixtures was therefore considered as an alternative. Standard tests and environmental studies were conducted to establish the integrity of the materials containing the recycled sludge. These included physical and chemical characterization of the sludge itself, and an assessment of the mechanical properties of materials containing 0%, 5%, 22% and 50% oily sludge. The blended mixtures were subjected to special tests, such as Marshall testing and the determination of stability and flow properties. The experimental results indicated that mixtures containing up to 22% oily sludge could meet the necessary criteria for a specific asphalt concrete wearing course or bituminous base course. To maximize the assay from the recycled material, the environmental assessment was restricted to the 50% oily sludge mixture. Leachates associated with this particular mixture were assayed for total organic residue and certain hazardous metal contaminants. The results revealed that the organics were negligible, and the concentrations of the metals were not significant. Thus, no adverse environmental impact should be anticipated from the use of the recycled product. Our research showed that the disposal of oily sludge in asphalt paving mixtures could possibly yield considerable savings per tonne of asphalt concrete, and concurrently minimize any direct impact on the environment.

  8. A Review of Centrifugal Testing of Gasoline Contamination and Remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay N. Meegoda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs containing gasoline represent a significant public health hazard. Virtually undetectable to the UST owner, gasoline leaks can contaminate groundwater supplies. In order to develop remediation plans one must know the extent of gasoline contamination. Centrifugal simulations showed that in silty and sandy soils gasoline moved due to the physical process of advection and was retained as a pool of free products above the water table. However, in clayey soils there was a limited leak with lateral spreading and without pooling of free products above the water table. Amount leaked depends on both the type of soil underneath the USTs and the amount of corrosion. The soil vapor extraction (SVE technology seems to be an effective method to remove contaminants from above the water table in contaminated sites. In-situ air sparging (IAS is a groundwater remediation technology for contamination below the water table, which involves the injection of air under pressure into a well installed into the saturated zone. However, current state of the art is not adequate to develop a design guide for site implementation. New information is being currently generated by both centrifugal tests as well as theoretical models to develop a design guide for IAS. The petroleum contaminated soils excavated from leaking UST sites can be used for construction of highway pavements, specifically as sub-base material or blended and used as hot or cold mix asphalt concrete. Cost analysis shows that 5% petroleum contaminated soils is included in hot or cold mix asphalt concrete can save US$5.00 production cost per ton of asphalt produced.

  9. Noisiness of the Surfaces on Low-Speed Roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladyslaw Gardziejczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traffic noise is a particular threat to the environment in the vicinity of roads. The level of the noise is influenced by traffic density and traffic composition, as well as vehicle speed and the type of surface. The article presents the results of studies on tire/road noise from passing vehicles at a speed of 40–80 kph, carried out by using the statistical pass-by method (SPB, on seven surfaces with different characteristics. It has been shown that increasing the speed from 40 kph to 50 kph contributes to the increase in the maximum A-weighted sound pressure level by about 3 dB, regardless of the type of surface. For larger differences in speed (30 kph–40 kph increase in noise levels reaches values about 10 dB. In the case of higher speeds, this increase is slightly lower. In this article, special attention is paid to the noisiness from surfaces made of porous asphalt concrete (PAC, BBTM (thin asphalt layer, and stone mastic asphalt (SMA with a maximum aggregate size of 8 mm and 5 mm. It has also been proved that surfaces of porous asphalt concrete, within two years after the commissioning, significantly contribute to a reduction of the maximum level of noise in the streets and roads with lower speed of passing cars. Reduction of the maximum A-weighted sound pressure level of a statistical car traveling at 60 kph reaches values of up to about 6 dB, as compared with the SMA11. Along with the exploitation of the road, air voids in the low-noise surface becomes clogged and acoustic properties of the road decrease to a level similar to standard asphalt.

  10. Quantification of the inherent uncertainty in the relaxation modulus and creep compliance of asphalt mixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Hussein A.; Chehab, Ghassan R.; Najjar, Shadi S.

    2017-08-01

    Advanced material characterization of asphalt concrete is essential for realistic and accurate performance prediction of flexible pavements. However, such characterization requires rigorous testing regimes that involve mechanical testing of a large number of laboratory samples at various conditions and set-ups. Advanced measurement instrumentation in addition to meticulous and accurate data analysis and analytical representation are also of high importance. Such steps as well as the heterogeneous nature of asphalt concrete (AC) constitute major factors of inherent variability. Thus, it is imperative to model and quantify the variability of the needed asphalt material's properties, mainly the linear viscoelastic response functions such as: relaxation modulus, E(t), and creep compliance, D(t). The objective of this paper is to characterize the inherent uncertainty of both E(t) and D(t) over the time domain of their master curves. This is achieved through a probabilistic framework using Monte Carlo simulations and First Order approximations, utilizing E^{*} data for six AC mixes with at least eight replicates per mix. The study shows that the inherent variability, presented by the coefficient of variation (COV), in E(t) and D(t) is low at small reduced times, and increases with the increase in reduced time. At small reduced times, the COV in E(t) and D(t) are similar in magnitude; however, differences become significant at large reduced times. Additionally, the probability distributions and COVs of E(t) and D(t) are mix dependent. Finally, a case study is considered in which the inherent uncertainty in D(t) is forward propagated to assess the effect of variability on the predicted number of cycles to fatigue failure of an asphalt mix.

  11. Carbon Nanomaterials for Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporotskova Irina Vladimirovna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of developing and modernizing the roads in Russia and in the Volgograd region in particular, is based on need of expanding the directions of scientific research on road and transport complexes. They have to be aimed at the development of the theory of transport streams, traffic safety increase, and, first of all, at the application of original methods of road development and modernization, introduction of modern technologies and road-building materials.On the basis of the analysis of the plans for transportation sphere development in the Volgograd region assuming the need to apply the new technologies allowing to create qualitative paving, the authors propose the technology of creating a heavy-duty paving with the use of carbon nanomaterial. The knowledge on strengthening the characteristics of carbon nanotubes is a unique material for nanotechnology development which allowed to assume the analysis of general information about asphalt concrete. The analysis showed that carbon nanotubes can be used for improvement of operational characteristics of asphalt concrete, and it is possible to carry out additives of nanotubes in hot as well as in cold bitumen. The article contains the basic principles of creation of the new road material received by means of bitumen reinforcing by carbon nanotubes. The structures received by the offered technique binding on the basis of the bitumens modified by carbon nanomaterial can be used for coverings and bases on highways of all categories in all road and climatic zones of Russia. The technical result consists in increasing the durability and elasticity of the received asphalt covering, and also the increase of water resistance, heat resistance and frost resistance, the expansion of temperature range of its laying in the field of negative temperatures.

  12. The review of patents in the area of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. Part 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLASOV Vladimir Alexeevich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The inventions in the area of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials produce a profound effect in construction, housing and communal services and adjacent economic fields. The invention «The method to produce body of oriented carbon nanotubes on the surface of base plate (RU 2561616» refers to the technologies for production of body of carbon nanotubes on the surface of base plate. The flow of actuation gas is formed in the reaction chamber. The flow contains carrying gas, gas hydrocarbon and predecessor of catalyst for synthesis of carbon nanotubes. In some cases, when implementing invention, the flow of inert gas is directed to the surface of the base plate. This gas flow shades the zone of synthesis of carbon nanotubes from air when its pressure exceeds the pressure of actuation gas flow. The method provides the body of oriented carbon nanotubes on the base plates with big surface: up to several square metres. The invention «Composition of mixture for asphaltic concrete (RU 2561435» refers to the construction production in highway industry and can be applied in manufacture of asphaltic concrete including nanotechnologies. The specialists may be also interested in the following nanotechnological inventions: the method to modify carbon nanomaterials (RU 2548083; nanofiber polymer material (RU 2543377; the method to produce nanosuspensions for manufacture of polymer nanocomposite (RU 2500695; the method to strengthen metal products to obtain nanostructured surface layers (RU 2527511; the method to form heat-resistant nanocomposite coating on the surface of the products made of heat-resistant nickel alloys (RU 2549813; the method to apply nanodiamond material by means of combined electromechanical treatment (RU 2530432; the method to produce soot with content of fullerens and nanotubes made of gas carbon raw material (RU 2531291; the method to produce powders of zinc oxide with surface modification for usage in construction sealing materials (RU

  13. Development of asphaltic mix with waste products use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugin Konstantin Georgievich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The trend of high growth of the vehicle fleet in Russia along with the positive impact on the socio-economic development of the country has a number of adverse consequences, one of which is the high accident rate on the roads. The paper considers modern way to provide the safe vehicles flow with the use of colored asphalt, which is a kind of hot asphalt and can have a variety of colors, which consists of coloring pigments. The conventional method of coloring the asphalt mix is produced by adding color rubble or pigmenting additives. The task, which was put forward, was the establishment of such road concrete mix, from which, without the use of primary materials and without increasing the consumption of bitumen, asphalt concrete road surfaces of acceptable strength could be obtained. As a pigment the dust of gas purification system of electrical furnace DSP - 60 of «Kamastal» plant, Perm, was used. The composition of the dust waste from the furnace consists of metal oxides and silicates. Dust-gas-cleaning is a fine powder with a high specific surface (1.2…2.5 thousand cm /g and bulk density of 3.7…4.2 g/cm . The powder color is dark brown. The density of the ready colored asphalt samples is 2.47...2.49 g/cm , and water saturation is 3.50…3.55 %. As a result of the research the diagrams of the dependence of road concrete mix’s water saturation from dust percentage and a diagram of dependence of concrete mixes’ durability from dust percentage at t = 20° and 50° C were built. After analyzing the obtained curves it can be concluded that the increase of the percentage of dust leads to increase of water saturation of road concrete mix and reduced strength. Thus, the developed asphalt concrete mix allows visually separating the lanes on the road, it has the relevant regulatory requirements durability and water resistance. This mixture corresponds to the type B mark III and can be used in regions I, II, and partly III of road-climatic zones

  14. Behaviour of Dairy Cows, Useful Indicator in Assessing Animal Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Cristina Andronie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to establish the manner in which the flooring type may influence the welfare levelsin dairy cows by assessment of laminitis incidence and animals’ behaviour. 42 dairy cows were grouped based on theshelter floor surface: concrete with straw bedding, asphalted concrete with straw bedding and concrete plus shavings.The behaviour was assessed through direct observation and laminitis incidence was established by numericalassessment of locomotion prior or following milking.The results have indicated an increase of laminitis incidence by 15-25 % in B and C lot and was absent in A lot. Thelarge number of diseases was recorded on concrete floors with shavings bedding (53%. The behavioural displays ofthe cows suffering from laminitis were different from the healthy ones, as their resting behaviour outside the stallswas more prevalent (17.6% compared to 8.8% while the feeding behaviour was less present (10.1% compared to14.7%. Likewise, the socializing behaviour was more active in these animals, compared to the healthycows.

  15. Analysis of pavement serviceability for the Aashto Design Method: The Chilean Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solminihac, Hernan De; Salsilli, R.; Bengoa, E.; Kohler, E.

    2003-01-01

    Serviceability is an indicator that represents the level of service a pavement provides to the users. This subjective opinion is closely related to objective aspects, which can be measured on the pavement's surface. This research aims specifically at relating serviceability results obtained by a 9-member evaluation panel, representing general public as closely as possible to parameters (particularly of roughness) measured within instruments on 30, 25 and 11 road sections of asphalt concrete, Portland cement concrete and asphalt overlay respectively. Results show that prediction of serviceability is quite accurate based on roughness evaluation, while also revealing that, by comparison to studies in more developed countries, Chileans are seemingly more tolerant, in that they assign a somewhat high rating to ride quality. Furthermore, visible distress does not have a significant influence on serviceability values for Chilean users. A ratio between International Roughness Index (IRI) and Serviceability, as defined by AASHTO, was developed and may be used in this design method. Results for the final pavement condition of urban pavements were obtained (IRI-asphalt final=5.9, IRI-concrete final=8.1). (author)

  16. Strain transfer analysis of optical fiber based sensors embedded in an asphalt pavement structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huaping; Xiang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Asphalt pavement is vulnerable to random damage, such as cracking and rutting, which can be proactively identified by distributed optical fiber sensing technology. However, due to the material nature of optical fibers, a bare fiber is apt to be damaged during the construction process of pavements. Thus, a protective layer is needed for this application. Unfortunately, part of the strain of the host material is absorbed by the protective layer when transferring the strain to the sensing fiber. To account for the strain transfer error, in this paper a theoretical analysis of the strain transfer of a three-layered general model has been carried out by introducing Goodman’s hypothesis to describe the interfacial shear stress relationship. The model considers the viscoelastic behavior of the host material and protective layer. The effects of one crack in the host material and the sensing length on strain transfer relationship are been discussed. To validate the effectiveness of the strain transfer analysis, a flexible asphalt-mastic packaged distributed optical fiber sensor was designed and tested in a laboratory environment to monitor the distributed strain and appearance of cracks in an asphalt concrete beam at two different temperatures. The experimental results indicated that the developed strain transfer formula can significantly reduce the strain transfer error, and that the asphalt-mastic packaged optical fiber sensor can successfully monitor the distributed strain and identify local cracks. (paper)

  17. Effects of Asphalt Mix Design Properties on Pavement Performance: A Mechanistic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Abu Abdo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of hot mix asphalt material properties on the performance of flexible pavements via mechanistic approach. 3D Move Analysis software was utilized to determine rutting and cracking distresses in an asphalt concrete (AC layer. Fourteen different Superpave mixes were evaluated by utilizing results of the Dynamic Modulus (|E⁎| Test and the Dynamic Shear Modulus (|G⁎| Test. Results showed that with the increase of binder content, the tendency of rutting in AC layer increased. However, with the increase of binder content, the cracking of AC layer lessened. Furthermore, when different binder grades were evaluated, results showed that with the increase of the upper binder grade number, rutting decreased, and with the increase of the lower binder grade number, rutting increased. Furthermore, analysis showed that with the increase of the lower binder grade number, higher percent of bottom up cracks would result. As a result of the analysis, binder grade should not be solely considered for cracking in AC layer; binder content and aggregate structure play a big role. Finally, results illustrated that the mechanistic approach is a better tool to determine the performance of asphalt pavement than commonly used methods.

  18. Studi Karakteristik Campuran Aspal Beton Lapis Aus (AC-WC Menggunakan Aspal Penetrasi 60/70 dengan Penambahan Lateks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Arya Thanaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Asphalt on pavement in long term may undergo hardening, so it needs addition of additive that can make it remain flexible. This experiment tried to produce asphalt concrete wearing course (AC-WC using asphalt penetration 60/70 with the addition of latex, with aim to know the characteristic of AC-WC mix at the optimum of asphalt content with addition of  latex in variation of 0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% of the total binder. Latex was initially mixed with the asphalt, then the aggregates were proportioned based on ideal grading. The samples were produced in hotmix process. The density of latex was found 0.977 with dry rubber content of 61.95%. The optimum of asphalt content that was 5.7%, where all Marshall characteristics were met. It was chosen the mix with 4% latex by total binder where all properties of asphalt binder were still met. It was obtained that the Stability value  was 1439.26 kg (≥ 800 kg, Flow 3.84 mm (2-4 mm, Marshall Quotient 379.66 kg / mm (≥ 250 kg / mm, VIM  4.437% (3-5%, VMA 15.280% (≥ 15%, VFB 70.961 (≥ 65%. The mixture that contains latex had better resistance to deformation under dynamic creep loading at 40 °C.

  19. Incorporation of Rubber Powder as Filler in a New Dry-Hybrid Technology: Rheological and 3D DEM Mastic Performances Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Vignali

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of crumb rubber as modifier or additive within asphalt concretes has allowed obtaining mixtures able to bind high performances to recovery and reuse of discarded tires. To date, the common technologies that permit the reuse of rubber powder are the wet and dry ones. In this paper, a dry-hybrid technology for the production of Stone Mastic Asphalt mixtures is proposed. It allows the use of the rubber powder as filler, replacing part of the limestone one. Fillers are added and mixed with a high workability bitumen, modified with SBS (styrene-butadiene-styrene polymer and paraffinic wax. The role of rubber powder and limestone filler within the bituminous mastic has been investigated through two different approaches. The first one is a rheological approach, which comprises a macro-scale laboratory analysis and a micro-scale DEM simulation. The second, instead, is a performance approach at high temperatures, which includes Multiple Stress Creep Recovery tests. The obtained results show that the rubber works as filler and it improves rheological characteristics of the polymer modified bitumen. In particular, it increases stiffness and elasticity at high temperatures and it reduces complex modulus at low temperatures.

  20. Alternative Fillers for the Production of Bituminous Mixtures: A Screening Investigation on Waste Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Sangiorgi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in the demand for using recycled materials in construction because of the lack and limitation of available natural resources. A number of industrial and domestic waste products are being used in the replacement of traditional materials for road construction, and many studies have been carried out in recent years on the use of different recycled materials in substitution of conventional fillers in Asphalt Concretes (AC. The aim of this laboratory research is to analyze the physical characteristics of three different recycled fillers and compare them with those of a traditional limestone filler. The alternative fillers presented in this paper are: a waste bleaching clay that comes from two consecutive stages in the industrial process for decolouring vegetable oils and producing biogas (Ud filler, a dried mud waste from a tungsten mine (MW filler and a recycled glass powder (Gl filler. Results show significant differences between the fillers, and, in particular, Rigden Voids (RV seem to have the largest potential influence on the rheology of ACs.

  1. Measuring Carbon Footprint of Flexible Pavement Construction Project in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatmoko, Jati Utomo Dwi; Hidayat, Arif; Setiawati, Apsari; Prasetyo, Stefanus Catur Adi

    2018-02-01

    Road infrastructure in Indonesia is mainly dominated by flexible pavement type. Its construction process, however, has raised concerns in terms of its environment impacts. This study aims to track and measure the carbon footprint of flexible pavement. The objectives are to map the construction process in relation to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, to quantify them in terms of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) as generated by the process of production and transportation of raw materials, and the operation of plant off-site and on-site project. Data collection was done by having site observations and interviews with project stakeholders. The results show a total emissions of 70.888 tonnes CO2e, consisting of 34.248 tonnes CO2e (48.31%) off-site activities and 36.640 tonnes CO2e (51.687%) on-site activities. The two highest CO2e emissions were generated by the use of plant for asphalt concrete laying activities accounted 34.827 tonnes CO2e (49.130%), and material transportation accounted 24.921 (35.155%). These findings provide a new perspective of the carbon footprint in flexible pavement and suggest the urgent need for the use of more efficient and environmentally friendly plant in construction process as it shows the most significant contribution on the CO2e. This study provides valuable understanding on the environmental impact of typical flexible pavement projects in Indonesia, and further can be used for developing green road framework.

  2. Improving Asphalt Mixtures Performance by Mitigating Oxidation Using Anti-Oxidants Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessouky, Samer; Diaz, Manuel

    Polymer modified additives are typically used to improve rheological properties of asphalt binder as well as mechanical properties of asphalt concrete mix. In this study, polymer-modified binder PG70-22 is mixing with two co-polymers enhanced with anti-oxidant agents namely; Solution Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SSBR) and Solution Ethylene-Butylene/Styrene (SEBS). The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of those additives into the rheological properties of the asphalt binder using temperature sweep test and mechanical properties of asphalt mixes. The aging index is determined to evaluate the role of additives to reduce brittleness after aging of the binder. The performance of asphalt mixes were characterized by Hamburg Wheel Tracking Test for moisture damage, Beam Fatigue Test for fatigue properties and Flow Number Test for rutting performance. It is found that the asphalt mixes with enhanced binders are improving its rutting and moisture resistance but decreased its fatigue life compared to the control mix.

  3. Research on construction technology for orthotropic steel deck pavement of Haihe River Chunyi Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y. C.; Qian, Z. D.; Zhang, M.

    2017-01-01

    In order to ensure the good service quality of orthotropic steel deck pavement of Haihe River Chunyi Bridge in Tianjin, and to reduce the occurrence of pavement diseases like lateral and longitudinal cracks, the key working procedures such as steel deck cleaning, anticorrosive coating, bonding layer spraying, seam cutting, epoxy asphalt concrete’s mixing, transportation, paving and compaction were studied. The study was based on the main features of epoxy asphalt concrete which is the pavement materials of Haihe River Chunyi Bridge, and combined with the basic characteristics and construction conditions of Haihe River Chunyi Bridge. Furthermore, some processing measures like controlling time and temperature, continuous paving with two pavers, lateral feeding, and improving the compaction method were proposed. The project example shows that the processing measures can effectively solve the technical difficulties in the construction of orthotropic steel deck pavement of Haihe River Chunyi Bridge, can greatly improve the construction speed and quality, and can provide reference for the same kinds of orthotropic steel deck pavement construction.

  4. Remediation and recycling of oil-contaminated soil beneath a large above-ground storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, G.

    1994-01-01

    While retrofitting a large 30-year-old, above-ground petroleum storage tank, Southern California Edison Company (SCE) discovered that soil beneath the fixed-roof, single-bottom tank was contaminated with 40,000 gallons of number-sign 6 fuel oil. The steel tank was left in place during the excavation and remediation of the contaminated soil to retain the operating permit. The resulting 2,000 tons of contaminated aggregate was recycled to make asphalt concrete for paving the tank basin and the remaining 5,600 tons of oily soil was thermally treated on site for use as engineered fill at another location. This successful operation provided an economical cleanup solution for a common leakage problem of single-lined tanks and eliminated the long-term liability of Class 1 landfill disposal. As a pro-active environmental effort, this paper shares SCE's site assessment procedure, reveals the engineering method developed to stabilize the tank, discusses the soil treatment technologies used, describes the problems encountered and lessons learned during the cleanup, discloses the costs of the operation, and offers guidelines and recommendations for similar tank remediation. This paper does not describe the work or costs for removing or replacing the tank bottom

  5. Solar One demolition and remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Solar One was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of generating electrical energy from solar power using a central receiver concept. An array of heliostats focused sunlight onto a central receiver, which superheated water to produce steam. Although Solar One was successful, the oil-based Thermal Storage System (TSS), used to store heat energy for power generation at night, was not efficient. When the TSS was demolished for the installation of a more efficient molten salt system, a major effort was made to salvage or recycle all of its equipment and materials. During TSS demolition, approximately 7 tons of aluminum shielding and 205 tons of steel were salvaged as scrap metal; 200 tons of concrete was used for erosion protection along the Mohave River banks; 150,000 gallons of oil was recycled and 100 tons of equipment was salvaged for use at other facilities. During remediation, approximately 9,000 tons of oil contaminated sand, gravel and soil was recycled into approximately 10,000 tons of asphalt concrete and used to pave a nearby 5-acre parking lot at Barstow College. This not only reduced project remediation costs, but also met environmental requirements and provided a much needed community service. Of the estimated 11,864 tons of equipment and material from the TSS, less than 1% was disposed of at a landfill

  6. Electric radiant heating: A hot item in home comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemieux, G. [Britech Corp., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2003-12-01

    Electric radiant heating as a floor warming system and its growing popularity in home comfort are discussed. Price can be as low as $2.00 per square foot; cost of operation may be as little as 30 cents per square foot per year, depending on time of use and local hydro rates. The use of radiant cable heating is said to have surged in popularity; it provides the same warmth and comfort as more expensive hydronic systems. Radiant cable is simple and inexpensive to install since unlike hydronic systems, it requires no complicated mechanical system with boiler, heat exchanger, valves, pumps and extensive controls. Nevertheless, prospective end users are warned to make sure that the cable is sturdy, tough, has multiple layers of protection with a thick grounding system and conductor core. In addition to heating floors, electric heating cables can also be used for snow and ice control and for melting in driveways and gutters. In these type of installations heavy duty cables are used which are installed under asphalt, concrete or interlocking stones. Thirty watts per square foot per hour is the typical requirement for melting snow and ice. Based on average electricity prices in Ontario, melting snow on an 800 square foot driveway would cost about $2.20 per hour. Assuming five hours for the system to clear the driveway, installing a heating system under the driveway could be an economically viable solution for the home owner, providing freedom from ice, the inconvenience of shovelling snow, and saving time and money.

  7. Pavement noise measurements in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zofka, Ewa; Zofka, Adam; Mechowski, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of the On-Board Sound Intensity (OBSI) system to measure tire-pavement noise in Poland. In general, sources of noise emitted by the modern vehicles are the propulsion noise, aerodynamic resistance and noise generated at the tire-pavement interface. In order to capture tire-pavement noise, the OBSI system uses a noise intensity probe installed in the close proximity of that interface. In this study, OBSI measurements were performed at different types of pavement surfaces such as stone mastic asphalt (SMA), regular asphalt concrete (HMA) as well as Portland cement concrete (PCC). The influence of several necessary OBSI measurement conditions were recognized as: testing speed, air temperature, tire pressure and tire type. The results of this study demonstrate that the OBSI system is a viable and robust tool that can be used for the quality evaluation of newly built asphalt pavements in Poland. It can be also applied to generate reliable input parameters for the noise propagation models that are used to assess the environmental impact of new and existing highway corridors.

  8. Advanced LWIR hyperspectral sensor for on-the-move proximal detection of liquid/solid contaminants on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Jay P.; Dixon, John; Dupuis, Julia R.; Cosofret, Bogdan R.; Marinelli, William J.

    2017-05-01

    Sensor technologies capable of detecting low vapor pressure liquid surface contaminants, as well as solids, in a noncontact fashion while on-the-move continues to be an important need for the U.S. Army. In this paper, we discuss the development of a long-wave infrared (LWIR, 8-10.5 μm) spatial heterodyne spectrometer coupled with an LWIR illuminator and an automated detection algorithm for detection of surface contaminants from a moving vehicle. The system is designed to detect surface contaminants by repetitively collecting LWIR reflectance spectra of the ground. Detection and identification of surface contaminants is based on spectral correlation of the measured LWIR ground reflectance spectra with high fidelity library spectra and the system's cumulative binary detection response from the sampled ground. We present the concepts of the detection algorithm through a discussion of the system signal model. In addition, we present reflectance spectra of surfaces contaminated with a liquid CWA simulant, triethyl phosphate (TEP), and a solid simulant, acetaminophen acquired while the sensor was stationary and on-the-move. Surfaces included CARC painted steel, asphalt, concrete, and sand. The data collected was analyzed to determine the probability of detecting 800 μm diameter contaminant particles at a 0.5 g/m2 areal density with the SHSCAD traversing a surface.

  9. A rapid, strong, and convergent genetic response to urban habitat fragmentation in four divergent and widespread vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Semple Delaney

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization is a major cause of habitat fragmentation worldwide. Ecological and conservation theory predicts many potential impacts of habitat fragmentation on natural populations, including genetic impacts. Habitat fragmentation by urbanization causes populations of animals and plants to be isolated in patches of suitable habitat that are surrounded by non-native vegetation or severely altered vegetation, asphalt, concrete, and human structures. This can lead to genetic divergence between patches and in turn to decreased genetic diversity within patches through genetic drift and inbreeding.We examined population genetic patterns using microsatellites in four common vertebrate species, three lizards and one bird, in highly fragmented urban southern California. Despite significant phylogenetic, ecological, and mobility differences between these species, all four showed similar and significant reductions in gene flow over relatively short geographic and temporal scales. For all four species, the greatest genetic divergence was found where development was oldest and most intensive. All four animals also showed significant reduction in gene flow associated with intervening roads and freeways, the degree of patch isolation, and the time since isolation.Despite wide acceptance of the idea in principle, evidence of significant population genetic changes associated with fragmentation at small spatial and temporal scales has been rare, even in smaller terrestrial vertebrates, and especially for birds. Given the striking pattern of similar and rapid effects across four common and widespread species, including a volant bird, intense urbanization may represent the most severe form of fragmentation, with minimal effective movement through the urban matrix.

  10. Coal-tar-based parking lot sealcoat: An unrecognized source of PAH to settled house dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Wilson, J.T.; Musgrove, M.; Burbank, T.L.; Ennis, T.E.; Bashara, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite much speculation, the principal factors controlling concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in settled house dust (SHD) have not yet been identified. In response to recent reports that dust from pavement with coaltar-based sealcoat contains extremely high concentrations of PAH, we measured PAH in SHD from 23 apartments and in dust from their associated parking lots, one-half of which had coal-tar-based sealcoat (CT). The median concentration of total PAH (T-PAH) in dust from CT parking lots (4760 ??g/g, n = 11) was 530 times higher than that from parking lots with other pavement surface types (asphalt-based sealcoat, unsealed asphalt, concrete [median 9.0 ??g/g, n = 12]). T-PAH in SHD from apartments with CT parking lots (median 129 ??g/g) was 25 times higher than that in SHD from apartments with parking lots with other pavement surface types (median 5.1 ??g/g). Presence or absence of CT on a parking lot explained 48% of the variance in log-transformed T-PAH in SHD. Urban land-use intensity near the residence also had a significant but weaker relation to T-PAH. No other variables tested, including carpeting, frequency of vacuuming, and indoor burning, were significant. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Evaluation of Fatigue Life of CRM-Reinforced SMA and Its Relationship to Dynamic Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha Salim Mashaan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test, dynamic creep (repeated load creep, and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa. Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture.

  12. Evaluation of fatigue life of CRM-reinforced SMA and its relationship to dynamic stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati; Koting, Suhana

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture.

  13. WAC Bennett Dam - the characterization of a crest sinkhole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R.A.; Gaffran, P.C. [British Columbia Hydro, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Watts, B.D. [Klohn-Crippen Consultants Ltd., Richmond, BC (Canada); Sobkowicz, J.C. [Thurber Engineering Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kupper, A.G. [AGRA Earth and Environmental, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1998-11-01

    In June, 1996, a small hole was discovered in the asphaltic concrete road on the crest of the 183 m high WAC Bennett Dam on the Peace River in northeastern British Columbia. Examination of the hole resulted in a sinkhole on the dam crest. The sinkhole was 2.5 m in diameter and 7 m deep. Speculation was that the cavity was likely associated in some way with a buried survey benchmark tube. An investigation was immediately planned and executed to characterize the sinkhole, to determine the extent of damage and the safety status of this very large dam. British Columbia`s Dam Safety Regulator made the decision to lower the reservoir level. During the reservoir drawdown, various surface geophysical techniques were used to investigate the condition of the dam beyond the sinkholes. Intrusive investigations of the sinkhole were also planned. This involved trial drilling and downhole geophysical surveys in intact portions of the core at locations far from the sinkhole. The objectives and criteria developed for the investigation program are summarized. Scope of key activities at the sinkhole and important lessons learned during the investigation are also described. 9 refs., 15 figs.

  14. Potential to use waste tires as supplemental fuel in pulp and paper mill boilers, cement kilns and in road pavement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlaz, M.A.; Eleazer, W.E. II (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Whittle, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the recycling potential of waste tires as an energy source and for use in road pavement. North Carolina, U.S.A., is used as a case study. Scrap tires may be burned for supplemental fuel in pulp and paper mill boilers and cement kilns. Five pulp and paper mill boilers in North Carolina could consume over 90% of the 6 million tires generated annually in the state. Cement kilns located within 400 km of North Carolina population centers could consume about 6.6 million tires annually. Based on the quantity of pavement laid in North Carolina, non-proprietary and proprietary versions of asphalt rubber concrete have the potential to consume 1.8 and 7.2 million tires, respectively. Rubber modified asphalt concrete has the potential to consume up to 16.5 million tires. However, technological and economic limitations suggest that large scale implementation is unlikely for the short term. Environmental considerations pertaining to each alternative are discussed. (author)

  15. Application of waste tires to asphalt pavement. Improvement of adhesion of asphalt with rubber particles; Haitaiya no asphalt hoso eno tekiyo. Asphalt to gomu ryushi no fuchakusei no kairyo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaoka, I. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1994-10-10

    With an objective to apply waste tires to asphalt pavement, an experiment was carried out to improve adhesion of asphalt with rubber particles by using polymers. The state of interface on rubber particle and asphalt mixture was observed by a scanning electron microscope. As a result, it was found that the surface of untreated rubber particles is not bonded with the asphalt, but polymer treated mixture was found to have the affinity of rubber particles with asphalt improved. Tensile bonding strength was tested on rubber plates and asphalt. The result revealed that the polymer-reformed mixture has two times as large tensile bonding strength as that of the untreated mixture. With regard to the characters of asphalt mixture mixed with rubber particles, the stability shows a decreasing trend as compared with the standard asphalt concrete, but presents an excellent performance in wear. The fluidity resistance value is inferior to the standard, but not as great as presenting a problem under normal using environment, where its applicability as a road paving material was verified. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Ultra Low Noise Poroelastic Road Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy A. Ejsmont

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Noise is one of the most important environmental problems related to road traffic. During the last decades, the noise emitted by the engines and powertrains of vehicles was greatly reduced and tires became a clearly dominant noise source. The article describes the concept of low noise poroelastic road surfaces that are composed of mineral and rubber aggregate bound by polyurethane resin. Those surfaces have a porous structure and are much more flexible than standard asphalt or cement concrete pavements due to high content of rubber aggregate and elastic binder. Measurements performed in several European countries indicate that such surfaces decrease tire/road noise between 7 dB and 12 dB with respect to reference surfaces such as dense asphalt concrete or stone matrix asphalt. Furthermore, poroelastic road surfaces ascertain the rolling resistance of car tires, which is comparable to classic pavements. One of the unforeseen properties of the poroelastic road surfaces is their ability to decrease the risks related to car fires with fuel spills. The article presents the road and laboratory results of noise, rolling resistance, and fire tests performed on a few types of poroelastic road surfaces.

  17. Bituminous breeds oil of Binagady deposite of Azerbaijan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djabbarova, L.U.; Ibadov, N.A.; Akhmedbekova, S.

    2010-11-01

    Full text: Processing of such kinds of raw materials like natural bituminous breeds and combustible shales at present represents as a new and perspective direction for satisfaction of growing demand with motor fuels and chemical raw materials. There are 200 million tons of bituminous breeds in 11 deposits in Azerbaijan. Bitumenkeeping soils can be used while road construction in natural form, as a component of asphalt concrete mixes for coverings and basis. Bitumens are irreplaceable waterproofing material that has a wide use in a nuclear power industry by the help of if its resistance to radiation impact, for entombment of radioactive materials. There were presented the results of carried out works about experimental researches of formation laws of gaseous products from bituminous breeds of Kirmaki deposit site of Azerbaijan. Radiation-thermal transformations of bituminous breeds and liquid products of their thermal decomposition have been studied in a wide range of temperature change, absorbed dose and dose capacity. Formation kinetics had been studied, radiation chemical outputs defined, also the structure of gaseous products of disintegration. [ru

  18. Sustainability assessment and prioritisation of bottom ash management in Macao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sou, W I; Chu, Andrea; Chiueh, P T

    2016-12-01

    In Macao, about 7200 t yr -1 of bottom ash (BA) is generated and conventionally landfilled with construction waste. Because the properties of BA are similar to those of natural aggregates, it is suitable to be recycled as construction material. However, pre-treatment processes for BA reuse may require more resource input and may generate additional environmental impacts. Life cycle assessment, multi-media transport model analysis, cost-benefit analysis and the analytical hierarchy process were conducted to evaluate the impacts of current and potential BA management scenarios regarding environmental, economic, social and regulatory aspects. The five analysed scenarios are as follows: (0) BA buried with construction and demolition waste (current system); (1) pre-treated BA used to replace 25% of the natural aggregate in asphalt concrete; (2) pre-treated BA used to replace 25% of the natural aggregate in cement concrete; (3) pre-treated BA used to replace 25% of cement in cement concrete; and (4) pre-treated BA sent to China, blended with municipal solid waste for landfill. The results reveal the following ranking of the scenarios: 3 > 2 > 0 > 1 > 4. Scenario 3 shows the best conditions for BA recycling, because the quantity of cement concrete output is the highest and this brings the greatest economic benefits. Our use of integrated analysis provides multi-aspect investigations for BA management systems, particularly in accounting for site-specific characteristics. This approach is suitable for application in other non-western regions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Petroleum contaminated soil in Oman: evaluation of bioremediation treatment and potential for reuse in hot asphalt mix concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamrah, Ahmad; Al-Futaisi, Ahmed; Hassan, Hossam; Al-Oraimi, Salem

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study that aims at evaluating the leaching characteristics of petroleum contaminated soils as well as their application in hot mix asphalt concrete. Soil samples are environmentally characterized in terms of their total heavy metals and hydrocarbon compounds and leachability. The total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) present in the PCS before and after treatment was determined to be 6.8% and 5.3% by dry weight, indicating a reduction of 1% in the TPH of PCS due to the current treatment employed. Results of the total heavy metal analysis on soils indicate that the concentrations of heavy metals are lower when extraction of the soil samples is carried out using hexane in comparison to TCE. The results show that the clean soils present in the vicinity of contaminated sites contain heavy metals in the following decreasing order: nickel (Ni), followed by chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and vanadium (V). The current treatment practice employed for remediation of the contaminated soil reduces the concentrations of nickel and chromium, but increases the concentrations of all remaining heavy metals.

  20. Life cycle analysis of urban infrastructures; Toshi infrastructure seibi no lifecycle bunseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagashira, N.; Uchiyama, Y. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    Power supply services, city gas supply services, water supply and drainage services, roads, and buildings were treated as urban infrastructures so as to grasp the resources and CO2 emission consumed in their life cycle. Moreover, the consumption of resources for supporting one person and the emission of CO2 were analyzed to clarify an important point for resource saving and environmental load reduction. The resources used and CO2 emitted for each urban infrastructure were calculated with Kanto districts as a target. For the annual material weight a person, buildings are about 1,200 kg, roads are about 560 kg, and city gas is about 170 kg. Water supply and drainage is about 68 kg, and electric power is about 57 kg. For the annual CO2 emission a person, buildings are about 120 kg-C, roads are about 13 kg-C, and electric power is about 6.6 kg-C. City gas is about 5.3 kg-C, and water supply and drainage is about 4.4 kg-C. In the material weight for each resource, gravel, crushed stone, concrete, and asphalt concrete have a high consumption rate. In CO2 emission, iron, concrete, and gas oil form a high rate. 21 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Assessment of The Asphalt Produced in Some Factories of Asphalt in Al-Hilla City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Karem Abd

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to present an evaluation of  the properties and characteristics of asphalt concrete of several hot mix asphalt (HMA from five factories in Al-Hilla city. The research is divided into two parts. The first part included the laboratory analysis of samples. The second part is evaluation of results according to standard specifications.      The test results included (Asphalt content percent, stability, creep compliance, voids ratio, density, flow, crushed aggregate percent, Loss Angless abrasion and SO3 percent.The results of laboratorial tests indicated that all properties of asphalt mixes were susceptible and possible to be used in the asphaltic roads. The mixes types prepared and tested according to Marshall method. The values of Marshall stability, creep and density are (9.4, 5.4, 9.8, 9, 8.6, (2.5, 2.7, 2.7, 2.6, 2.3 and (2.334, 2.336, 2.337, 2.333, 2.338 with asphalt content between (4.2 to 4.6 % for all asphalt mixes of different factories.

  2. The effect of loading time on flexible pavement dynamic response: a finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hao; Solaimanian, Mansour; Kumar, Tanmay; Stoffels, Shelley

    2007-12-01

    Dynamic response of asphalt concrete (AC) pavements under moving load is a key component for accurate prediction of flexible pavement performance. The time and temperature dependency of AC materials calls for utilizing advanced material characterization and mechanistic theories, such as viscoelasticity and stress/strain analysis. In layered elastic analysis, as implemented in the new Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG), the time dependency is accounted for by calculating the loading times at different AC layer depths. In this study, the time effect on pavement response was evaluated by means of the concept of “pseudo temperature.” With the pavement temperature measured from instrumented thermocouples, the time and temperature dependency of AC materials was integrated into one single factor, termed “effective temperature.” Via this effective temperature, pavement responses under a transient load were predicted through finite element analysis. In the finite element model, viscoelastic behavior of AC materials was characterized through relaxation moduli, while the layers with unbound granular material were assumed to be in an elastic mode. The analysis was conducted for two different AC mixtures in a simplified flexible pavement structure at two different seasons. Finite element analysis results reveal that the loading time has a more pronounced impact on pavement response in the summer for both asphalt types. The results indicate that for reasonable prediction of dynamic response in flexible pavements, the effect of the depth-dependent loading time on pavement temperature should be considered.

  3. The Acoustical Durability of Thin Noise Reducing Asphalt Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Vuye

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of the European Noise Directive, traffic noise action plans have been established. One of those actions is to deepen the knowledge about low noise roads, as they are considered the most cost-efficient measure for traffic noise abatement. Therefore, ten test sections were installed in May 2012 in Belgium, with the objective of integrating Thin noise-reducing Asphalt Layers (TAL in the Flemish road surface policy in a later stage. Eight test sections are paved with TAL with a thickness of a maximum of 30 mm and a maximum content of accessible voids of 18%. The other two sections consist of a Double-layer Porous Asphalt Concrete (DPAC and a Stone Mastic Asphalt (SMA-10 as a reference section. The acoustical quality of the asphalt surfaces has been monitored in time using Statistical Pass-By (SPB and Close-ProXimity (CPX measurements up to 34 months after construction. Texture measurements performed with a laser profilometer are linked to the noise measurement results. Very promising initial noise reductions were found, up to 6 dB(A, but higher than expected acoustic deterioration rates and the presence of raveling led to noise reductions of a max. of 1 dB(A after almost three years. It is shown that the construction process itself has a large influence on the acoustical quality over time.

  4. Investigation of porous asphalt microstructure using optical and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulikakos, L D; Partl, M N

    2010-11-01

    Direct observations of porous asphalt concrete samples in their natural state using optical and electron microscopy techniques led to useful information regarding the microstructure of two mixes and indicated a relationship between microstructure and in situ performance. This paper presents evidence that suboptimal microstructure can lead to premature failure thus making a first step in defining well or suboptimal performing pavements with a bottom-up approach (microstructure). Laboratory and field compaction produce different samples in terms of the microstructure. Laboratory compaction using the gyratory method has produced more microcracks in mineral aggregates after the binder had cooled. Well-performing mixes used polymer-modified binders, had a more homogeneous void structure with fewer elongated voids and better interlocking of the aggregates. Furthermore, well-performing mixes showed better distribution of the mastic and better coverage of the aggregates with bitumen. Low vacuum scanning electron microscopy showed that styrene butadiene styrene polymer modification in binder exists in the form of discontinuous globules and not continuous networks. A reduction in the polymer phase was observed as a result of aging and in-service use. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Aging Influence on Fatigue Characteristics of RAC Mixtures Containing Warm Asphalt Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feipeng Xiao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is an important factor to affect the long-term performance of asphalt pavement. The fatigue life of a typical warm mix asphalt (WMA is generally related to various factors of rheological and mechanical properties of the mixture. The study of the fatigue behavior of the specific rubberized WMA is helpful in recycling the scrap tires and saving energy in terms of the conventional laboratory aging process. This study explores the utilization of the conventional fatigue analysis approach in investigating the cumulative dissipated, stiffness, and fatigue life of rubberized asphalt concrete mixtures containing the WMA additive after a long-term aging process. The aged beams were made with one rubber type (−40 mesh ambient crumb rubber, two aggregate sources, two WMA additives (Asphamin and Sasobit, and tested at 5 and 20ºC. A total of 55 aged fatigue beams were tested in this study. The test results indicated that the addition of crumb rubber extends the fatigue resistance of asphalt binder while WMA additive exhibits a negative effect. The study indicated that the WMA additive generally has an important influence on fatigue life. In addition, test temperature and aggregate source play an important role in determining the cumulative dissipated energy, stiffness, and fatigue life of an aged mixture.

  6. USE OF CRUMB RUBBER FROM USED CAR TIRES IN MINERAL ASPHALT MIXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Plewa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the automotive industry the disposal of used tires is constantly growing problem. Storage of waste rubber is associated with a very long period of decomposition of rubber in the natural conditions. Simultaneously new technologies are developed every year, which in the future may significantly promote recycling of this type of materials. The crumb rubbery modification of the road bitumen is the one of the environmentally safe solutions of rubbery decomposition. Improvement of resistance of the crumb rubbery modification of the road asphalt mixtures is the very important ecological aspect of the future. The article presents the results of research on the fatigue life resistance of asphalt concretes AC16P and AC22P with asphalt-rubber binders. The above analyses have been based on the results of tests of fatigue life of mineral-rubber-asphalt mixes determined by the method of prismatic four-point bending (4PB-PR. Mineral-rubber -asphalt mixes have been diversified according to the amount of the additive of rubber fines in asphalt-rubber binder. On the basis of the test results have been proven improvements functional properties mineral-rubber-asphalt mixes compared with mineral-asphalt mixes with unmodified asphalt.

  7. Effect of Waste Plastic as Bitumen Modified in Asphalt Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Mohd Ezree

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to investigate the engineering properties of the asphalt mixtures containing waste plastic at different percentages i.e. 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% by weight of bitumen. The experimental tests performed in the study were stability, tensile strength, resilient modulus and dynamic creep test. Results showed that the mixture with 4% plastic has the highest stability (184kN. However, the stability slightly decreases with the increase of plastic additive. On the other hand, the highest tensile strength among the modified asphaltic concrete is 1049kPa (8% plastic added. The modified asphalt mixture with 8% plastic has the highest resilient modulus, which is 3422 MPa (25°C and 494Mpa (40°C. Where the highest creep modulus recorded is 73.30Mpa at 8% plastic added. It can be concluded that the addition of 8% plastic gave the highest value properties of asphalt mixture. Finally, it can be said that 8% plastic is the optimum value adding.

  8. Mechanics based model for predicting structure-induced rolling resistance (SRR) of the tire-pavement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, Maryam; Ozer, Hasan; Ziyadi, Mojtaba; Al-Qadi, Imad L.

    2016-11-01

    The structure-induced rolling resistance of pavements, and its impact on vehicle fuel consumption, is investigated in this study. The structural response of pavement causes additional rolling resistance and fuel consumption of vehicles through deformation of pavement and various dissipation mechanisms associated with inelastic material properties and damping. Accurate and computationally efficient models are required to capture these mechanisms and obtain realistic estimates of changes in vehicle fuel consumption. Two mechanistic-based approaches are currently used to calculate vehicle fuel consumption as related to structural rolling resistance: dissipation-induced and deflection-induced methods. The deflection-induced approach is adopted in this study, and realistic representation of pavement-vehicle interactions (PVIs) is incorporated. In addition to considering viscoelastic behavior of asphalt concrete layers, the realistic representation of PVIs in this study includes non-uniform three-dimensional tire contact stresses and dynamic analysis in pavement simulations. The effects of analysis type, tire contact stresses, pavement viscoelastic properties, pavement damping coefficients, vehicle speed, and pavement temperature are then investigated.

  9. Performance Modification of Asphalt Binders using Thermoplastic Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. I. Al-Abdul Wahhab

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to improve the performance of asphalt binders to minimize stress cracking that occurs at low temperatures and plastic deformation at high temperatures. Importation of used asphalt-polymers from abroad, leads to an increase in the total construction cost as compared to the cost if the used polymers were of local origin. The main objective of this research was to modify locally produced asphalt. Ten polymers were identified as potential asphalt modifiers based on their physical properties and chemical composition. After preliminary laboratory evaluation for the melting point of these polymers, five polymers were selected for local asphalt modification. In the initial stage, required mixing time was decided based on the relation between shear loss modulus and mixing time .The optimum polymer content was selected based on Superpave binder performance grade specifications.The suitability of improvement was verified through the evaluation of permanent deformation and fatigue behavior of laboratory prepared asphalt concrete mixes. The results indicated that the rheological properties of the modified binders improved significantly with sufficient polymer content (3%. The aging properties of the modified binders were found to be dependent on the type of polymer.The fatigue life and resistance to permanent deformation were significantly improved due to enhanced binder rheological properties.  Thus, local asphalts can be modified using thermoplastic polymers.

  10. Strain transfer analysis of optical fiber based sensors embedded in an asphalt pavement structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaping; Xiang, Ping

    2016-07-01

    Asphalt pavement is vulnerable to random damage, such as cracking and rutting, which can be proactively identified by distributed optical fiber sensing technology. However, due to the material nature of optical fibers, a bare fiber is apt to be damaged during the construction process of pavements. Thus, a protective layer is needed for this application. Unfortunately, part of the strain of the host material is absorbed by the protective layer when transferring the strain to the sensing fiber. To account for the strain transfer error, in this paper a theoretical analysis of the strain transfer of a three-layered general model has been carried out by introducing Goodman’s hypothesis to describe the interfacial shear stress relationship. The model considers the viscoelastic behavior of the host material and protective layer. The effects of one crack in the host material and the sensing length on strain transfer relationship are been discussed. To validate the effectiveness of the strain transfer analysis, a flexible asphalt-mastic packaged distributed optical fiber sensor was designed and tested in a laboratory environment to monitor the distributed strain and appearance of cracks in an asphalt concrete beam at two different temperatures. The experimental results indicated that the developed strain transfer formula can significantly reduce the strain transfer error, and that the asphalt-mastic packaged optical fiber sensor can successfully monitor the distributed strain and identify local cracks.

  11. Application of viscoelastic continuum damage approach to predict fatigue performance of Binzhou perpetual pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For this study, the Binzhou perpetual pavement test sections constructed in Shandong Province, China, were simulated for long-term fatigue performance using the layered viscoelastic pavement analysis for critical distresses (LVECD finite element software package. In this framework, asphalt concrete was treated in the context of linear viscoelastic continuum damage theory. A recently developed unified fatigue failure criterion that defined the boundaries of the applicable region of the theory was also incorporated. The mechanistic modeling of the fatigue mechanisms was able to accommodate the complex temperature variations and loading conditions of the field pavements in a rigorous manner. All of the material models were conveniently characterized by dynamic modulus tests and direct tension cyclic fatigue tests in the laboratory using cylindrical specimens. By comparing the obtained damage characteristic curves and failure criteria, it is found that mixtures with small aggregate particle sizes, a dense gradation, and modified asphalt binder tended to exhibit the best fatigue resistance at the material level. The 15-year finite element structural simulation results for all the test sections indicate that fatigue performance has a strong dependence on the thickness of the asphalt pavements. Based on the predicted location and severity of the fatigue damage, it is recommended that Sections 1 and 3 of the Binzhou test sections be employed for perpetual pavement design.

  12. Rheological Characterization of Warm-Modified Asphalt Mastics Containing Electric Arc Furnace Steel Slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pasetto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental sustainability of road materials and technologies plays a key role in pavement engineering. In this sense, the use of Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA, that is, a modified asphalt concrete that can be produced and applied at lower temperature, is considered an effective solution leading to environmental and operational benefits. The environmental sustainability of WMA can be further enhanced with the inclusion of steel slag in partial substitution of natural aggregates. Nevertheless, such innovative material applied at lower temperatures containing warm additives and steel slag should be able to guarantee at least the same performance of traditional hot mix asphalts, thus assuring acceptable mechanical properties and durability. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the rheological behaviour of bituminous mastics obtained combining a warm-modified binder and a filler (material passing to 0.063 mm coming from electric arc furnace steel slag. To evaluate the influence of both warm additive and steel slag, a plain binder and limestone filler were also used for comparison purposes. Complex modulus and permanent deformation resistance of bitumens and mastics were assessed using a dynamic shear rheometer. Experimental results showed that steel slag warm mastics assure enhanced performance demonstrating promising applicability.

  13. Promising Technologies of Mining and Processing of Solid Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabaev, Sergey; Ivanov, Seregey; Vakhianov, Evgeniy

    2017-11-01

    The continuing growth in mineral extraction entails an increase in industrial waste, which in turn has a negative impact on the environment. Rubber-tired vehicles, in which the tires wear colossally, is mainly used as a transport for loading, unloading, transportation and other types of work in the extraction of solid minerals. The used tires are not disposed in any way, but are stored in special areas where harmful toxic substances are emitted under the influence of ultraviolet rays. Therefore, a decision was made to find a method for utilization and rational use of industrial waste in the road construction sector. The operating temperature of composite rubber-bituminous binders based on rubber crumb from the used automobile tires is estimated in this paper, which is necessary for assigning technological parameters of production and laying of asphalt-concrete mixtures produced on their basis. It is established that composite rubber-bituminous binders based on rubber chips from the used automobile tires, produced according to the two-stage technology, have the same viscosity as the original petroleum bitumen, at a temperature increased by 20°C.

  14. Promising Technologies of Mining and Processing of Solid Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabaev Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuing growth in mineral extraction entails an increase in industrial waste, which in turn has a negative impact on the environment. Rubber-tired vehicles, in which the tires wear colossally, is mainly used as a transport for loading, unloading, transportation and other types of work in the extraction of solid minerals. The used tires are not disposed in any way, but are stored in special areas where harmful toxic substances are emitted under the influence of ultraviolet rays. Therefore, a decision was made to find a method for utilization and rational use of industrial waste in the road construction sector. The operating temperature of composite rubber-bituminous binders based on rubber crumb from the used automobile tires is estimated in this paper, which is necessary for assigning technological parameters of production and laying of asphalt-concrete mixtures produced on their basis. It is established that composite rubber-bituminous binders based on rubber chips from the used automobile tires, produced according to the two-stage technology, have the same viscosity as the original petroleum bitumen, at a temperature increased by 20°C.

  15. Evaluation of Asphalt Mixture Low-Temperature Performance in Bending Beam Creep Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszczola, Marek; Jaczewski, Mariusz; Rys, Dawid; Jaskula, Piotr; Szydlowski, Cezary

    2018-01-10

    Low-temperature cracking is one of the most common road pavement distress types in Poland. While bitumen performance can be evaluated in detail using bending beam rheometer (BBR) or dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) tests, none of the normalized test methods gives a comprehensive representation of low-temperature performance of the asphalt mixtures. This article presents the Bending Beam Creep test performed at temperatures from -20 °C to +10 °C in order to evaluate the low-temperature performance of asphalt mixtures. Both validation of the method and its utilization for the assessment of eight types of wearing courses commonly used in Poland were described. The performed test indicated that the source of bitumen and its production process (and not necessarily only bitumen penetration) had a significant impact on the low-temperature performance of the asphalt mixtures, comparable to the impact of binder modification (neat, polymer-modified, highly modified) and the aggregate skeleton used in the mixture (Stone Mastic Asphalt (SMA) vs. Asphalt Concrete (AC)). Obtained Bending Beam Creep test results were compared with the BBR bitumen test. Regression analysis confirmed that performing solely bitumen tests is insufficient for comprehensive low-temperature performance analysis.

  16. Mechanical behavior of flexible pavements undergoing thermal gradients - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v33i3.10848 Comportamento mecânico de pavimentos flexíveis submetidos a gradientes térmicos - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v33i3.10848

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Pivoto Specht

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The proper structural understanding of a pavement should consider, according to the pavement mechanics, the aspects related to the traffic load, the environment and material properties. When asphaltic materials are used, the stress/strain relationships and the dependencies of load-time and temperature are key parameters for understanding flexible pavement performance. In this study, we employed the finite elements method to calculate stress/strain in flexible pavements structures considering temperature variation. The input data includes material stiffness, which is function of temperature and changes with position and time. The pavement temperature is obtained through the heat transfer differential equation, applying the Laplace transform and its numerical inversion. The finite elements grid was generated by the software ANSYS® and imported by the software MATLAB®. In order to determine the stiffness of the first layer (asphalt concrete we used the average of four nodes, depending on the each node temperature. The result evidences the importance of thermal gradients for the pavement analysis, both for the fatigue cracking and the accumulation of plastic deformations. The use of unique modulus for asphalt concrete layer generates results far from reality.O adequado entendimento estrutural de um pavimento deve considerar, segundo a mecânica dos pavimentos, os aspectos relacionados aos carregamentos, ao meio físico e às propriedades dos materiais constituintes. No caso de materiais asfálticos, as relações entre tensão e deformação e as dependências do tempo de carregamento e da temperatura são fundamentais para o avanço no entendimento do desempenho de pavimentos flexíveis. Neste trabalho foi utilizando o método de elementos finitos para o cálculo das tensões e deformações em pavimentos flexíveis considerando variações de temperatura. Os dados de entrada incluem a rigidez dos materiais, que é função da temperatura, a qual

  17. A conceptual study on the formulation of a permeable reactive pavement with activated carbon additives for controlling the fate of non-point source environmental organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengyi; Liang, Chenju

    2018-02-01

    To take advantage of the road pavement network where non-point source (NPS) pollution such as benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) from vehicle traffic exhaust via wet and dry atmospheric deposition occurs, the asphalt pavement may be used as a media to control the NPS pollution. An experiment to prepare an adsorptive porous reactive pavement (PRP) was initiated to explore the potential to reduce environmental NPS vehicle pollution. The PRP was prepared and studied as follows: various activated carbons (AC) were initially screened to determine if they were suitable as an additive in the porous asphalt mixture; various mixtures of a selected AC were incorporated with the design of porous asphalt concrete (PAC) to produce PRP, and the PRP formulations were tested to ensure that they comply with the required specifications; qualified specimens were subsequently tested to determine their adsorption capacity for BTEX in aqueous solution, as compared to conventional PAC. The PRP08 and PRP16 samples, named for the design formulations of 0.8% and 1.6% of AC (by wt. in the formulation), exhibited low asphalt drain-down and low abrasion loss and also met all regulated specifications. The BTEX adsorption capacity measurements of PRP08 and PRP16 were 33-46%, 36-51%, 20-22%, and 6-8% respectively, higher than those obtained from PACs. Based on the test results, PRPs showed good physical performance and adsorption and may be considered as a potential method for controlling the transport of NPS vehicle pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring Carbon Footprint of Flexible Pavement Construction Project in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utomo Dwi Hatmoko Jati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Road infrastructure in Indonesia is mainly dominated by flexible pavement type. Its construction process, however, has raised concerns in terms of its environment impacts. This study aims to track and measure the carbon footprint of flexible pavement. The objectives are to map the construction process in relation to greenhouse gas (GHG emissions, to quantify them in terms of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e as generated by the process of production and transportation of raw materials, and the operation of plant off-site and on-site project. Data collection was done by having site observations and interviews with project stakeholders. The results show a total emissions of 70.888 tonnes CO2e, consisting of 34.248 tonnes CO2e (48.31% off-site activities and 36.640 tonnes CO2e (51.687% on-site activities. The two highest CO2e emissions were generated by the use of plant for asphalt concrete laying activities accounted 34.827 tonnes CO2e (49.130%, and material transportation accounted 24.921 (35.155%. These findings provide a new perspective of the carbon footprint in flexible pavement and suggest the urgent need for the use of more efficient and environmentally friendly plant in construction process as it shows the most significant contribution on the CO2e. This study provides valuable understanding on the environmental impact of typical flexible pavement projects in Indonesia, and further can be used for developing green road framework.

  19. Effect Assessment the Impact of Filler Types on the Input Design Parameter of Flexible Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar S. Neham

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To meet the requirements of flexible pavements (safety, economy, limited the stresses on the natural subgrade and a smooth ride, good quality material of surface course must be used so to prevent pavement distresses caused by the different types of loadings (structural and environmental loadings, while the resilient modulus is important input data when flexible pavement was designed, it is selected to show its effect by different types of mineral filler as a partial replacement. In this paving mix, to improve the quality of the mix material and to represent the effect of these replacements materials on the elastic characterization by measuring the resilient modulus of hot mix asphalt (HMA: Fly Ash (FA, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC, Hydrated Lime (HL and Silica Fume (SF are used as a partial percent of filler (Limestone Dust (LSD replacement, where these materials are locally available including (40-50 penetration grade asphalt binder. To achieve the goal of study; asphalt concrete mixes are prepared at their optimum asphalt content using Marshall Method of mix design. Four replacement percent’s were used; 0, 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 percent by total weight of aggregate for each filler types. According to ASTM D4123 criteria (Resilient Modulus was tested by UTM¬25. Mixes modified with (FA, (OPC, (HL and (SF were found to have average improvement in the value of Resilient Modulus by (13.37, 9.63, 11.14, 24.00 % at 1.5 percent of filler replacement and by (24.54, 16.63, 18.73, 38.31 % at 3.0 percent of filler replacement also the percent of improvement is: (39.55, 26.36, 29.82, 58.30 at 4.5percent of filler replacement sequentially.

  20. Characteristics Buton Natural Asphalt-Rubber (BNA-R on the Performance Improvement of Warm Mix Asphalt Using Natural Zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahjuningsih Nurul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The decrease in the ability of service of pavement can be caused by the durability factor in the pavement layer in receiving heavy traffic load and the temperature of the pavement. Permanent deformation is one of the criteria of failure of asphalt mixture. Performance assessment of the asphalt mixture can be observed from the rheological properties of asphalt binder. The use of BNA-R in this study is intended to modify the characteristics of bitumen penetration grade 60 / 70 used in warm mix asphalt. Warm mix asphalt with lower temperatures of mixing and compaction than conventional asphalt mixtures was chosen because it is more environmentally friendly. To reduce the temperature in this warm asphalt technology is achieved by using natural zeolite. Both of these materials are local materials that are widely available in Indonesia. The rheology of asphalt 60/70 modified with BNA-R indicates that the addition of BNA-R in the base asphalt increase the complex modulus value and decrease the phase angle value. These values were related to the performance of mixture in the permanent deformation criteria. Reducing the temperature of mixing and compaction should be balanced with modifying the asphalt binder used. Rutting due to permanent deformation can resulted in inconvenience to the passengers and can lead to high costs of road maintenance. To determine the permanent deformation of asphalt mix with material combinations was performed through the wheel tracking test machine with 3,780 cycles for 3 hours. The results shows that after test track over 7 thousand passes have seen permanent deformation characteristics of asphalt concrete mixture with a variation of the characteristics of bitumen.

  1. A Specified Procedure for Distress Identification and Assessment for Urban Road Surfaces Based on PCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Loprencipe

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a simplified procedure for the assessment of pavement structural integrity and the level of service for urban road surfaces is presented. A sample of 109 Asphalt Concrete (AC urban pavements of an Italian road network was considered to validate the methodology. As part of this research, the most recurrent defects, those never encountered and those not defined with respect to the list collected in the ASTM D6433 have been determined by statistical analysis. The goal of this research is the improvement of the ASTM D6433 Distress Identification Catalogue to be adapted to urban road surfaces. The presented methodology includes the implementation of a Visual Basic for Application (VBA language-based program for the computerization of Pavement Condition Index (PCI calculation with interpolation by the parametric cubic spline of all of the density/deduct value curves of ASTM D6433 distress types. Also, two new distress definitions (for manholes and for tree roots and new density/deduct curve values were proposed to achieve a new distress identification manual for urban road pavements. To validate the presented methodology, for the 109 urban pavements considered, the PCI was calculated using the new distress catalogue and using the ASTM D6433 implemented on PAVERTM. The results of the linear regression between them and their statistical parameters are presented in this paper. The comparison of the results shows that the proposed method is suitable for the identification and assessment of observed distress in urban pavement surfaces at the PCI-based scale.

  2. Measuring Thermal Characteristics of Urban Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Rickman, Doug L.

    1999-01-01

    The additional heating of the air over the city is the result of the replacement of naturally vegetated surfaces with those composed of asphalt, concrete, rooftops and other man-made materials. The temperatures of these artificial surfaces can be 20 to 40 C higher than vegetated surfaces. Materials such as asphalt store much of the sun's energy and remains hot long after sunset. This produces a dome of elevated air temperatures 5 to 8 C greater over the city, compared to the air temperatures over adjacent rural areas. This effect is called the "urban heat island". Urban landscapes are a complex mixture of vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces. It is difficult to take enough temperature measurements over a large city area to characterize the complexity of urban radiant surface temperature variability. However, the use of remotely sensed thermal data from airborne scanners are ideal for the task. In a study funded by NASA, a series of flights over Huntsville, Alabama were performed in September 1994 and over Atlanta, Georgia in May 1997. Analysis of thermal energy responses for specific or discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape (e.g., asphalt, building rooftops, vegetation) requires measurements at a very fine spatial scale (i.e., urban forest in both mitigating the urban heat island effect, in making cities more aesthetically pleasing and more habitable environments, and in overall cooling of the community. In this presentation we will examine the techniques of analyzing remotely sensed data for measuring the effect of various urban surfaces on their contribution to the urban heat island effect.

  3. Management of roads with abnormal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenfang; Huang Jehnying; Chin, Chingjer; Chen Yibin

    2002-01-01

    Several asphalt concrete (AC) roads in Taoyuan County of Taiwan were found radioactively abnormal in 1994. Atomic Energy Council (AEC), the regulatory agency, was asked to take the samples, to perform the radiochemical analysis and dose evaluation as well as to investigate the source of contamination. The cause of high radiation was due to high uranium and thorium concentration slag used in the AC. The dose rate was approximately 1 μSv/hr at the road surface. The maximum annual dose received by pedestrians was estimated at 0.13 mSv (2.5% of annual dose limit of 5 mSv for the public), or approximately 1/15 of the value of annual natural background radiation in the Taiwan area. Consequently, the AEC suggested that there was no need to implement engineering remedy measures to remove the AC surface of the roads. However, upon consideration of socioeconomic condition and public opinion, the local government still decided to remove the contaminated surface of these roads. The AEC helped to formulate the operational procedures for removal and disposal of the AC including the radiation protection program and the disposal site. To date, all the contaminated AC surface of the roads was removed and properly disposed. The contaminated AC roads are a typical example of improper disposal of wastes containing Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM). A new regulation was promulgated by AEC recently to limit the use of slag, coal ash or any other industrial wastes unless its radiation or activity level is below the limit. (author)

  4. Measuring Thermal Characteristics of Urban Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Rickman, Doug L.

    1999-01-01

    The additional heating of the air over the city is the result of the replacement of naturally vegetated surfaces with those composed of asphalt, concrete, rooftops and other man-made materials. The temperatures of these artificial surfaces can be 20 to 40 C higher than vegetated surfaces. Materials such as asphalt store much of the sun's energy and remains hot long after sunset. This produces a dome of elevated air temperatures 5 to 8 C greater over the city, compared to the air temperatures over adjacent rural areas. This effect is called the "urban heat island". Urban landscapes are a complex mixture of vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces. It is difficult to take enough temperature measurements over a large city area to characterize the complexity of urban radiant surface temperature variability. However, the use of remotely sensed thermal data from airborne scanners are ideal for the task. In a study funded by NASA, a series of flights over Huntsville, Alabama were performed in September 1994 and over Atlanta, Georgia in May 1997. Analysis of thermal energy responses for specific or discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape (e.g., asphalt, building rooftops, vegetation) requires measurements at a very fine spatial scale (i.e., energy regimes. Additionally, very fine scale spatial resolution thermal infrared data, such as that obtained from aircraft, are very useful for demonstrating to planning officials, policy makers, and the general populace, what the benefits are of the urban forest in both mitigating the urban heat island effect, in making cities more aesthetically pleasing and more habitable environments, and in overall cooling of the community. In this presentation we will examine the techniques of analyzing remotely sensed data for measuring the effect of various urban surfaces on their contribution to the urban heat island effect.

  5. Steamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan For Corrective Action Unit 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29, Spill/Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (November 2001, Rev. 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

    2001-09-24

    This plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29, Spill/Release Sites, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site, consists of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 12-25-04, UST 12-16-2 Waste Oil Release; CAS 18-25-02, Oil Spills; CAS 18-25-02, Oil Spills; CAS 18-25-03, Oil Spill; CAS 18-25-04, Spill (Diesel Fuel); CAS 29-44-01, Fuel Spill (a & b). Process knowledge is the basis for the development of the conceptual site models (CSMs). The CSMs describe the most probable scenario for current conditions at each site, and define the assumptions that are the basis for the SAFER plan. The assumptions are formulated from historical information and process knowledge. Vertical migration of contaminant(s) of potential concern (COPCs) is expected to be predominant over lateral migration in the absence of any barrier (with asphalt /concrete being the exception at least two of the CASs). Soil is the impacted or potentially impacted media at all the sites, with asphalt and/or concrete potentially impacted at two of the CASs. Radionuclides are not expected at any CAS; hydrocarbons are the primary COPC at each CAS, and can be used to guide the investigation; future land-use scenarios limit use to various nonresidential uses; and exposure scenarios are limited by future land-use scenarios to site workers. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 394 using the SAFER process. On completion of the field activities, a Closure Report will be prepared and submitted to the NDEP for review and approval.

  6. Steamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan For Corrective Action Unit 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29, Spill/Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (November 2001, Rev. 0); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29, Spill/Release Sites, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site, consists of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 12-25-04, UST 12-16-2 Waste Oil Release; CAS 18-25-02, Oil Spills; CAS 18-25-02, Oil Spills; CAS 18-25-03, Oil Spill; CAS 18-25-04, Spill (Diesel Fuel); CAS 29-44-01, Fuel Spill (a and b). Process knowledge is the basis for the development of the conceptual site models (CSMs). The CSMs describe the most probable scenario for current conditions at each site, and define the assumptions that are the basis for the SAFER plan. The assumptions are formulated from historical information and process knowledge. Vertical migration of contaminant(s) of potential concern (COPCs) is expected to be predominant over lateral migration in the absence of any barrier (with asphalt /concrete being the exception at least two of the CASs). Soil is the impacted or potentially impacted media at all the sites, with asphalt and/or concrete potentially impacted at two of the CASs. Radionuclides are not expected at any CAS; hydrocarbons are the primary COPC at each CAS, and can be used to guide the investigation; future land-use scenarios limit use to various nonresidential uses; and exposure scenarios are limited by future land-use scenarios to site workers. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 394 using the SAFER process. On completion of the field activities, a Closure Report will be prepared and submitted to the NDEP for review and approval

  7. Use of recycled plastic in concrete: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Rafat; Khatib, Jamal; Kaur, Inderpreet

    2008-01-01

    Numerous waste materials are generated from manufacturing processes, service industries and municipal solid wastes. The increasing awareness about the environment has tremendously contributed to the concerns related with disposal of the generated wastes. Solid waste management is one of the major environmental concerns in the world. With the scarcity of space for landfilling and due to its ever increasing cost, waste utilization has become an attractive alternative to disposal. Research is being carried out on the utilization of waste products in concrete. Such waste products include discarded tires, plastic, glass, steel, burnt foundry sand, and coal combustion by-products (CCBs). Each of these waste products has provided a specific effect on the properties of fresh and hardened concrete. The use of waste products in concrete not only makes it economical, but also helps in reducing disposal problems. Reuse of bulky wastes is considered the best environmental alternative for solving the problem of disposal. One such waste is plastic, which could be used in various applications. However, efforts have also been made to explore its use in concrete/asphalt concrete. The development of new construction materials using recycled plastics is important to both the construction and the plastic recycling industries. This paper presents a detailed review about waste and recycled plastics, waste management options, and research published on the effect of recycled plastic on the fresh and hardened properties of concrete. The effect of recycled and waste plastic on bulk density, air content, workability, compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, impact resistance, permeability, and abrasion resistance is discussed in this paper.

  8. Characteristics Buton Natural Asphalt-Rubber (BNA-R) on the Performance Improvement of Warm Mix Asphalt Using Natural Zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahjuningsih, Nurul; Pranowo Hadiwardoyo, Sigit; Jachrizal Sumabrata, R.

    2018-03-01

    The decrease in the ability of service of pavement can be caused by the durability factor in the pavement layer in receiving heavy traffic load and the temperature of the pavement. Permanent deformation is one of the criteria of failure of asphalt mixture. Performance assessment of the asphalt mixture can be observed from the rheological properties of asphalt binder. The use of BNA-R in this study is intended to modify the characteristics of bitumen penetration grade 60 / 70 used in warm mix asphalt. Warm mix asphalt with lower temperatures of mixing and compaction than conventional asphalt mixtures was chosen because it is more environmentally friendly. To reduce the temperature in this warm asphalt technology is achieved by using natural zeolite. Both of these materials are local materials that are widely available in Indonesia. The rheology of asphalt 60/70 modified with BNA-R indicates that the addition of BNA-R in the base asphalt increase the complex modulus value and decrease the phase angle value. These values were related to the performance of mixture in the permanent deformation criteria. Reducing the temperature of mixing and compaction should be balanced with modifying the asphalt binder used. Rutting due to permanent deformation can resulted in inconvenience to the passengers and can lead to high costs of road maintenance. To determine the permanent deformation of asphalt mix with material combinations was performed through the wheel tracking test machine with 3,780 cycles for 3 hours. The results shows that after test track over 7 thousand passes have seen permanent deformation characteristics of asphalt concrete mixture with a variation of the characteristics of bitumen.

  9. Solute-specific patterns and drivers of urban stream chemistry revealed by long-term monitoring in Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, A. J.; Woytowitz, E.; Majcher, E.; Rosi, E. J.; Groffman, P.

    2017-12-01

    Urban streams receive a myriad of chemical inputs from the surrounding landscape due to altered lithology (asphalt, concrete), leaky sewage infrastructure, and other human activities (road salt, fertilizer, industrial wastes, wastewater effluent), potentially leading to multiple chemical stressors occurring simultaneously. To evaluate potential drivers of water chemistry change, we used approximately 20 years of weekly water chemistry monitoring data from streams in the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) to quantify trends of annual loads and flow-weighted concentrations for multiple solutes of interest, including nitrate (NO3-), phosphate (PO43-), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), chloride (Cl-), and sulfate (SO42-) and subsequently examined various gray and green infrastructure characteristics at the watershed scale. For example, we quantified annual volume and duration of reported sanitary sewer overflows (SSO) and cumulative storage volume and area of various best management practices (BMPs). Site- and solute-specific trends differed, but across our monitoring network we found evidence for decreasing annual export for multiple solutes. Additionally, we found that changes in gray- and green-infrastructure characteristics were related to changes in water quality at our most downstream (most urban) monitoring site. For example, annual NO3- loads increased with longer cumulative SSO duration, whereas annual PO43- and TP loads decreased with a cumulative BMP area in the watershed. Further, we used same long-term water chemistry data and multivariate analyses to investigate whether urban streams have unique water chemistry fingerprints representing the multiple chemical stressors at a given site, which could provide insight into sources and impacts of water-quality impairment. These analyses and results illustrate the major role gray and green infrastructure play in influencing water quality in urban environments, and illustrate that focusing on a variety of

  10. INTER-PHASE CONTACTS IN BITUMEN-MINERAL SYSTEMS AND THEIR STRENGTHENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. N. Kovalev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Presently bitumen-mineral materials (including asphalt-concrete comprise nearly 98 % for construction of expensive road pavement. Large resources of local minerals (quartz sand and industrial wastes in the form of used molding sand (foundry by-product are widely applied for reduction of their cost. Such approach is economically and ecologically reasonable but it requires its justification because an adhesion interaction in the bitumen-quartz substrate system (with SiO2 more than 95 % is rather poor in natural state and due to water action it is still more decreasing. In this connection an objective necessity arises to modify significantly technology of bitumen-mineral compositions for ensuring reliability of road pavements while using silicon components.All the ideas pertaining to strengthening of adhesion bonds in the “quartz mineral substrate - bitumen” system are traditionally of physical and chemical nature and they presuppose mainly usage of colloidal chemistry methods. The paper considers the matter on the basis of molecular kinetic theory of matter taking into account the fact that there is absence of generally accepted calculations for intermolecular interactions of components in the SiO2 - organic matrix material system.As a theoretical supposition the following well-known regulatory principle in physics is used: as every atom or molecular have its own electromagnetic field then action of external electromagnetic fields initiates their interaction that leads to excitement of electrons, deformations and rupture of chemical bonds. Literature analysis shows that the existing electric bonds between components of the SiO2 - organic matrix material system provide the possibility to apply various electro-physical methods having an effect on these components with the purpose to strengthen their adhesion interaction.The paper investigates matters for determination of bond energy during physical adsorption and adhesion in the SiO2 - organic

  11. Effect of annealing conditions on the molecular properties and wetting of viscoelastic bitumen substrates by liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomé dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Typically, in the production of asphalt concrete, bitumen and mineral aggregates are heated and mixed at temperatures above 100 °C. After the mixing process bitumen ideally coats the mineral aggregates and remains in the form of thin films. Because bitumen is highly temperature sensitive, the study of its properties in terms of chemistry, microstructure and rheology as a function of different annealing conditions is very relevant. The resultant molecular properties have a direct correlation to bitumen macroscopic response to liquids such as water, which is of extreme relevance to the understanding of the detrimental effect of water on asphalt pavements. The wetting characteristics play a crucial role on the extension of detachment of bitumen from the mineral aggregates when asphalt is exposed to wet conditions. Therefore, in this work, the effect of the annealing temperature and cooling history on the chemistry, microstructure and wetting of bitumen films was studied. Crystalline microstructures were identified in bulk and on the surface of the bitumen films. Larger crystals presenting higher crystallinity degree were identified when the annealed bitumen films were cooled slowly. Moreover, higher annealing temperatures increased the oxidation level. The change of the rheological properties due to the alterations of the annealing conditions produced changes in the wetting characteristics. For instance, the advancing motion of a liquid drop on the viscoelastic bitumen substrate presented an intermittent behaviour due to the deformation of bitumen at the liquid-bitumen-air contact line. Consequently, changes in the contact angles were also observed. Keywords: Bitumen, Crystallization, Oxidation, Advancing contact angle, Wetting

  12. Effects of cross-anisotropy and stress-dependency of pavement layers on pavement responses under dynamic truck loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiqul A. Tarefder

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies by the authors have determined pavement responses under dynamic loading considering cross-anisotropy in one layer only, either the cross-anisotropic viscoelastic asphalt concrete (AC layer or the cross-anisotropic stress-dependent base layer, but not both. This study evaluates pavement stress–strain responses considering cross-anisotropy in all layers, i.e. AC, base and subbase, using finite element modeling (FEM technique. An instrumented pavement section on Interstate I-40 near Albuquerque, New Mexico was used in ABAQUS framework as model geometry. Field asphalt cores were collected and tested in the laboratory to determine the cross-anisotropy (n-values defined by horizontal to vertical modulus ratio, and other viscoelastic parameters as inputs of the model incorporated through user defined material interface (UMAT functionality in ABAQUS. Field base and subbase materials were also collected and tested in the laboratory to determine stress-dependent nonlinear elastic model parameters, as inputs of the model, again incorporated through UMAT. The model validation task was carried out using field-measured deflections and strain values under falling weight deflectometer (FWD loads at the instrumented section. The validated model was then subjected to an actual truck loading for studying cross-anisotropic effects. It was observed that horizontal tensile strain at the bottom of the AC layer and vertical strains in all layers decreased with an increase in n-value of the asphalt layer, from n < 1 (anisotropy to n=1 (isotropy. This indicates that the increase in horizontal modulus caused the decrease in layer strains. It was also observed that if the base and subbase layers were considered stress-dependent instead of linear elastic unbound layers, the horizontal tensile strain at the bottom of the asphalt layer increased and vertical strains on top of the base and subbase also increased.

  13. Noise-tolerant inverse analysis models for nondestructive evaluation of transportation infrastructure systems using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Halil; Gopalakrishnan, Kasthurirangan; Birkan Bayrak, Mustafa; Guclu, Alper

    2013-09-01

    The need to rapidly and cost-effectively evaluate the present condition of pavement infrastructure is a critical issue concerning the deterioration of ageing transportation infrastructure all around the world. Nondestructive testing (NDT) and evaluation methods are well-suited for characterising materials and determining structural integrity of pavement systems. The falling weight deflectometer (FWD) is a NDT equipment used to assess the structural condition of highway and airfield pavement systems and to determine the moduli of pavement layers. This involves static or dynamic inverse analysis (referred to as backcalculation) of FWD deflection profiles in the pavement surface under a simulated truck load. The main objective of this study was to employ biologically inspired computational systems to develop robust pavement layer moduli backcalculation algorithms that can tolerate noise or inaccuracies in the FWD deflection data collected in the field. Artificial neural systems, also known as artificial neural networks (ANNs), are valuable computational intelligence tools that are increasingly being used to solve resource-intensive complex engineering problems. Unlike the linear elastic layered theory commonly used in pavement layer backcalculation, non-linear unbound aggregate base and subgrade soil response models were used in an axisymmetric finite element structural analysis programme to generate synthetic database for training and testing the ANN models. In order to develop more robust networks that can tolerate the noisy or inaccurate pavement deflection patterns in the NDT data, several network architectures were trained with varying levels of noise in them. The trained ANN models were capable of rapidly predicting the pavement layer moduli and critical pavement responses (tensile strains at the bottom of the asphalt concrete layer, compressive strains on top of the subgrade layer and the deviator stresses on top of the subgrade layer), and also pavement

  14. Corrosion of low-carbon steel under environmental conditions at Hanford: Two-year soil corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anantatmula, R.P.; Divine, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    At the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, nuclear production reactors were operated from 1944 to 1970. The handling and processing of radioactive nuclear fuels produced a large volume of low-level nuclear wastes, chemical wastes, and a combination of the two (mixed wastes). These materials have historically been packaged in US Department of Transportation (DOT) approved drums made from low-carbon steel, then handled in one of three ways: (A) Before 1970, the drums were buried in the dry desert soil. It was assumed that chemical and radionuclide mobility would be low and that the isolated, government-owned site would provide sufficient protection for employees and the public. (B) After 1970, the drums containing long-lived transuranic radionuclides were protected from premature failure by stacking them in an ordered array on an asphalt concrete pad in the bottom of a burial trench. The array was then covered with a large, 0.28-mm- (011-in.-) thick polyethylene tarp and the trench was backfilled with 1.3 m (4 ft) of soil cover. This burial method is referred to as soil-shielded burial . Other configurations were also employed but the soil-shielded burial method contains most of the transuranic drums. (C) Since 1987, US Department of Energy sites have complied with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulations. These regulations require mixed waste drums to be stored in RCRA compliant large metal sheds with provisions for monitoring. These sheds are provided with forced ventilation but are not heated or cooled

  15. Evaluation of Different Mineral Filler Aggregates for Asphalt Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, Marta; Małaszkiewicz, Dorota; Ignatiuk, Natalia

    2017-10-01

    Mineral filler aggregates play an important role in asphalt mixtures because they fill voids in paving mix and improve the cohesion of asphalt binder. Limestone powder containing over 90% of CaCO3 is the most frequently used type of filler. Waste material from the production of coarse aggregate can be successfully used as a mineral filler aggregate for hot asphalt concrete mixtures as the limestone powder replacement. This paper presents the experimental results of selected properties of filler aggregates which were obtained from rocks with different mineral composition and origin. Five types of rocks were used as a source of the mineral filler aggregate: granite, gabbro, trachybasalt, quartz sandstone and rocks from postglacial deposits. Limestone filler was used in this study as the reference material. The following tests were performed: grading (air jet sieving), quality of fines according to methylene blue test, water content by drying in a ventilated oven, particle density using pyknometer method, Delta ring and ball test, Bitumen Number, fineness determined as Blaine specific surface area. Mineral filler aggregates showed significant differences when they were mixed with bitumen and stiffening effect in Delta ring and ball test was evaluated. The highest values were achieved when gabbro and granite fillers were used. Additionally, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis of grain shape and size was carried out. Significant differences in grain size and shape were observed. The highest non-homogeneity in size was determined for quartz sandstone, gabbro and granite filler. Their Blaine specific surface area was lower than 2800 cm2/g, while for limestone and postglacial fillers with regular and round grains it exceeded 3000 cm2/g. All examined mineral filler aggregates met requirements of Polish National Specification WT-1: 2014 and could be used in asphalt mixtures.

  16. Implementation of solar-reflective surfaces: Materials and utility programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretz, S.; Akbari, H.; Rosenfeld, A.; Taha, H.

    1992-06-01

    This report focuses on implementation issues for using solar-reflective surfaces to cool urban heat islands, with specific examples for Sacramento, California. Advantages of solar-reflective surfaces for reducing energy use are: (1) they are cost-effective if albedo is increased during routine maintenance; (2) the energy savings coincide with peak demand for power; (3) there are positive effects on environmental quality; and (4) the white materials have a long service life. Important considerations when choosing materials for mitigating heat islands are identified as albedo, emissivity, durability, cost, pollution and appearance. There is a potential for increasing urban albedo in Sacramento by an additional 18%. Of residential roofs, we estimate that asphalt shingle and modified bitumen cover the largest area, and that built-up roofing and modified bitumen cover the largest area of commercial buildings. For all of these roof types, albedo may be increased at the time of re-roofing without any additional cost. When a roof is repaired, a solar-reflective roof coating may be applied to significantly increase albedo and extend the life of the root Although a coating may be cost-effective if applied to a new roof following installation or to an older roof following repair, it is not cost-effective if the coating is applied only to save energy. Solar-reflective pavement may be cost-effective if the albedo change is included in the routine resurfacing schedule. Cost-effective options for producing light-colored pavement may include: (1) asphalt concrete, if white aggregate is locally available; (2) concrete overlays; and (3) newly developed white binders and aggregate. Another option may be hot-rolled asphalt, with white chippings. Utilities could promote solar-reflective surfaces through advertisement, educational programs and cost-sharing of road resurfacing.

  17. Experimental investigation of basic oxygen furnace slag used as aggregate in asphalt mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yongjie; Wu, Shaopeng; Hou, Haobo; Zha, Jin

    2006-11-16

    Chinese researchers have commenced a great deal of researches on the development of application fields of basic oxygen steel making furnace slag (BOF slag) for many years. Lots of new applications and properties have been found, but few of them in asphalt mixture of road construction engineering. This paper discussed the feasibility of BOF steel slag used as aggregate in asphalt pavement by two points of view including BOF steel slag's physical and micro-properties as well as steel slag asphalt materials and pavement performances. For the former part, this paper mainly concerned the mechanochemistry and physical changes of the steel slag and studied it by performing XRD, SEM, TG and mercury porosimeter analysis and testing method. In the second part, this paper intended to use BOF steel slag as raw material, and design steel slag SMA mixture. By using traditional rutting test, soak wheel track and modified Lottman test, the high temperature stability and water resistance ability were tested. Single axes compression test and indirect tensile test were performed to evaluate the low temperature crack resistance performance and fatigue characteristic. Simultaneously, by observing steel slag SMA pavement which was paved successfully. A follow-up study to evaluate the performance of the experimental pavement confirmed that the experimental pavement was comparable with conventional asphalt pavement, even superior to the later in some aspects. All of above test results and analysis had only one main purpose that this paper validated the opinion that using BOF slag in asphalt concrete is feasible. So this paper suggested that treated and tested steel slag should be used in a more extensive range, especially in asphalt mixture paving projects in such an abundant steel slag resource region.

  18. Initial Self-Healing Temperatures of Asphalt Mastics Based on Flow Behavior Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasing temperature is a simple and convenient method to accelerate the self-healing process of bitumen. However, bitumen may not achieve the healing capability at lower temperature, and may be aged if temperature is too high. In addition, the bitumen is mixed with mineral filler and formed as asphalt mastic in asphalt concrete, so it is more accurate to study the initial self-healing from the perspective of asphalt mastic. The primary purpose of this research was to examine the initial self-healing temperature of asphalt mastic, which was determined by the flow behavior index obtained from the flow characteristics. Firstly, the texture and geometry characteristics of two fillers were analyzed, and then the initial self-healing temperature of nine types of asphalt mastic, pure bitumen (PB and styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS modified bitumen were determined by the flow behavior index. Results demonstrate that the average standard deviation of gray-scale texture value of limestone filler (LF is 21.24% lower than that of steel slag filler (SSF, showing that the steel slag filler has a better particle distribution and geometry characteristics. Also the initial self-healing temperatures of asphalt mastics with 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 LF-PB volume ratio are 46.5 °C, 47.2 °C and 49.4 °C, which are 1.4 °C, 0.8 °C and 0.4 °C higher than that of asphalt mastics with SSF-PB, but not suitable for the evaluation of asphalt mastic contained SBS modified bitumen because of unique structure and performance of SBS.

  19. Initial Self-Healing Temperatures of Asphalt Mastics Based on Flow Behavior Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Wu, Shaopeng; Tao, Guanyu; Xiao, Yue

    2018-05-29

    Increasing temperature is a simple and convenient method to accelerate the self-healing process of bitumen. However, bitumen may not achieve the healing capability at lower temperature, and may be aged if temperature is too high. In addition, the bitumen is mixed with mineral filler and formed as asphalt mastic in asphalt concrete, so it is more accurate to study the initial self-healing from the perspective of asphalt mastic. The primary purpose of this research was to examine the initial self-healing temperature of asphalt mastic, which was determined by the flow behavior index obtained from the flow characteristics. Firstly, the texture and geometry characteristics of two fillers were analyzed, and then the initial self-healing temperature of nine types of asphalt mastic, pure bitumen (PB) and styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified bitumen were determined by the flow behavior index. Results demonstrate that the average standard deviation of gray-scale texture value of limestone filler (LF) is 21.24% lower than that of steel slag filler (SSF), showing that the steel slag filler has a better particle distribution and geometry characteristics. Also the initial self-healing temperatures of asphalt mastics with 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 LF-PB volume ratio are 46.5 °C, 47.2 °C and 49.4 °C, which are 1.4 °C, 0.8 °C and 0.4 °C higher than that of asphalt mastics with SSF-PB, but not suitable for the evaluation of asphalt mastic contained SBS modified bitumen because of unique structure and performance of SBS.

  20. Linking asphalt binder fatigue to asphalt mixture fatigue performance using viscoelastic continuum damage modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Farinaz; Castorena, Cassie; Kim, Y. Richard

    2016-08-01

    Fatigue cracking is a major form of distress in asphalt pavements. Asphalt binder is the weakest asphalt concrete constituent and, thus, plays a critical role in determining the fatigue resistance of pavements. Therefore, the ability to characterize and model the inherent fatigue performance of an asphalt binder is a necessary first step to design mixtures and pavements that are not susceptible to premature fatigue failure. The simplified viscoelastic continuum damage (S-VECD) model has been used successfully by researchers to predict the damage evolution in asphalt mixtures for various traffic and climatic conditions using limited uniaxial test data. In this study, the S-VECD model, developed for asphalt mixtures, is adapted for asphalt binders tested under cyclic torsion in a dynamic shear rheometer. Derivation of the model framework is presented. The model is verified by producing damage characteristic curves that are both temperature- and loading history-independent based on time sweep tests, given that the effects of plasticity and adhesion loss on the material behavior are minimal. The applicability of the S-VECD model to the accelerated loading that is inherent of the linear amplitude sweep test is demonstrated, which reveals reasonable performance predictions, but with some loss in accuracy compared to time sweep tests due to the confounding effects of nonlinearity imposed by the high strain amplitudes included in the test. The asphalt binder S-VECD model is validated through comparisons to asphalt mixture S-VECD model results derived from cyclic direct tension tests and Accelerated Loading Facility performance tests. The results demonstrate good agreement between the asphalt binder and mixture test results and pavement performance, indicating that the developed model framework is able to capture the asphalt binder's contribution to mixture fatigue and pavement fatigue cracking performance.

  1. Evaluation of liners for a uranium-mill tailings disposal site: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Hale, V.Q.; Barnes, S.M.; Silviera, D.J.

    1981-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy is conducting a program designed to reclaim or stabilize inactive uranium-mill tailings sites. This report presents the status of the Liner Evaluation Program. The purpose of the study was to identify eight prospective lining materials or composites for laboratory testing. The evaluation was performed by 1) reviewing proposed regulatory requirements to define the material performance criteria; 2) reviewing published literature and communicating with industrial and government experts experienced with lining materials and techniques; and 3) characterizing the tailings at three of the sites for calcium concentration, a selection of anions, radionuclides, organic solvents, and acidity levels. The eight materials selected for laboratory testing are: natural soil amended with sodium-saturated montmorillonite (Volclay); locally available clay in conjunction with an asphalt emulsion radon suppression cover; locally available clay in conjunction with a multibarrier radon suppression cover; rubberized asphalt membrane; hydraulic asphalt concrete; chlorosulfonated polyethylene (hypalon) or high-density polyethylene; bentonite, sand and gravel mixture; and catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The materials will be exposed in test units now being constructed to conditions such as wet/dry cycles, temperature cycles, oxidative environments, ion-exchange elements, etc. The results of the tests will identify the best material for field study. The status report also presents the information gathered during the field studies at Grand Junction, Colorado. Two liners, a bentonite, sand and gravel mixture, and a catalytic airblown asphalt membrane, were installed in a prepared trench and covered with tailings. The liners were instrumented and are being monitored for migration of moisture, radionuclides, and hazardous chemicals. The two liner materials will also be subjected to accelerated laboratory tests for a comparative assessment

  2. The study of stiffness modulus values for AC-WC pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, AS; Muis, Z. A.; Iskandar, T. D.

    2018-02-01

    One of the parameters of the asphalt mixture in order for the strength and durability to be achieved as required is the stress-and-strain showing the stiffness of a material. Stiffness modulus is a very necessary factor that will affect the performance of asphalt pavements. If the stiffness modulus value decreases there will be a cause of aging asphalt pavement crack easily when receiving a heavy load. The high stiffness modulus asphalt concrete causes more stiff and resistant to bending. The stiffness modulus value of an asphalt mixture material can be obtained from the theoretical (indirect methods) and laboratory test results (direct methods). For the indirect methods used Brown & Brunton method, and Shell Bitumen method; while for the direct methods used the UMATTA tool. This study aims to determine stiffness modulus values for AC-WC pavement. The tests were conducted in laboratory that used 3 methods, i.e. Brown & Brunton Method, Shell Bitumen Method and Marshall Test as a substitute tool for the UMATTA tool. Hotmix asphalt made from type AC-WC with pen 60/70 using a mixture of optimum bitumen content was 5.84% with a standard temperature variation was 60°C and several variations of temperature that were 30, 40, 50, 70 and 80°C. The stiffness modulus value results obtained from Brown & Brunton Method, Shell Bitumen Method and Marshall Test which were 1374,93 Mpa, 235,45 Mpa dan 254,96 Mpa. The stiffness modulus value decreases with increasing temperature of the concrete asphalt. The stiffness modulus value from the Bitumen Shell method and the Marshall Test has a relatively similar value.The stiffness modulus value from the Brown & Brunton method is greater than the Bitumen Shell method and the Marshall Test, but can not measure the stiffness modulus value at temperature above 80°C.

  3. Evaluating the performance of sustainable perpetual pavements using recycled asphalt pavement in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saud A. Sultan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The vast highways network in China is moving from the phase of construction to the phase of maintenance, and with the introduction of new technique of perpetual pavement in last decade, it is necessary to consider recycling as one of the promising solutions for rehabilitation of old asphalt concrete pavement and ultimately to convert them into perpetual pavements. The aim is to reuse the existing pavement materials for several reasons, mainly to preserve natural resources such as aggregates, and to satisfy economic requirements by reducing the cost of highway construction and rehabilitation. A detailed testing program has been carried out on recycled asphalt pavements materials (RAP to evaluate their mechanical and structural characteristics to be used for the construction and rehabilitation of road pavements. Different types of RAP mixes have been stabilized by Portland cement to find the most suitable one from the point of view of design, construction, economy and environment. The analysis of life cycle costs has been carried out using system analysis and management of pavement program (SAMP5. The analysis of life cycle costs showed that the use of Portland cements with small percentages improves the structural characteristics of recycled asphalt materials to be used as stabilized base pavement layers for new or rehabilitated old road pavements and also for the construction and rehabilitation of perpetual pavements. A large amount of savings in construction and rehabilitation cost has been achieved by the use of stabilized RAP materials in addition to important contributions to the environment and preserving of natural resources.

  4. Use of recycled plastic in concrete: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddique, Rafat; Khatib, Jamal; Kaur, Inderpreet

    2008-01-01

    Numerous waste materials are generated from manufacturing processes, service industries and municipal solid wastes. The increasing awareness about the environment has tremendously contributed to the concerns related with disposal of the generated wastes. Solid waste management is one of the major environmental concerns in the world. With the scarcity of space for landfilling and due to its ever increasing cost, waste utilization has become an attractive alternative to disposal. Research is being carried out on the utilization of waste products in concrete. Such waste products include discarded tires, plastic, glass, steel, burnt foundry sand, and coal combustion by-products (CCBs). Each of these waste products has provided a specific effect on the properties of fresh and hardened concrete. The use of waste products in concrete not only makes it economical, but also helps in reducing disposal problems. Reuse of bulky wastes is considered the best environmental alternative for solving the problem of disposal. One such waste is plastic, which could be used in various applications. However, efforts have also been made to explore its use in concrete/asphalt concrete. The development of new construction materials using recycled plastics is important to both the construction and the plastic recycling industries. This paper presents a detailed review about waste and recycled plastics, waste management options, and research published on the effect of recycled plastic on the fresh and hardened properties of concrete. The effect of recycled and waste plastic on bulk density, air content, workability, compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, impact resistance, permeability, and abrasion resistance is discussed in this paper

  5. Impacts of land use and land cover on surface and air temperature in urban landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, S.; Jenerette, D.

    2015-12-01

    Accelerating urbanization affects regional climate as the result of changing land cover and land use (LCLU). Urban land cover composition may provide valuable insight into relationships among urbanization, air, and land-surface temperature (Ta and LST, respectively). Climate may alter these relationships, where hotter climates experience larger LULC effects. To address these hypotheses we examined links between Ta, LST, LCLU, and vegetation across an urban coastal to desert climate gradient in southern California, USA. Using surface temperature radiometers, continuously measuring LST on standardized asphalt, concrete, and turf grass surfaces across the climate gradient, we found a 7.2°C and 4.6°C temperature decrease from asphalt to vegetated cover in the coast and desert, respectively. There is 131% more temporal variation in asphalt than turf grass surfaces, but 37% less temporal variation in concrete than turf grass. For concrete and turf grass surfaces, temporal variation in temperature increased from coast to desert. Using ground-based thermal imagery, measuring LST for 24 h sequences over citrus orchard and industrial use locations, we found a 14.5°C temperature decrease from industrial to orchard land use types (38.4°C and 23.9°C, respectively). Additionally, industrial land use types have 209% more spatial variation than orchard (CV=0.20 and 0.09, respectively). Using a network of 300 Ta (iButton) sensors mounted in city street trees throughout the region and hyperspectral imagery data we found urban vegetation greenness, measured using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), was negatively correlated to Ta at night across the climate gradient. Contrasting previous findings, the closest coupling between NDVI and Ta is at the coast from 0000 h to 0800 h (highest r2 = 0.6, P urbanized regions of southern California, USA decrease Ta and LST and spatial variation in LST, while built surfaces and land uses have the opposite effect. Furthermore

  6. Estudo de misturas asfálticas com ligante modificado pelo polímero EVA para pavimentos urbanos de Manaus - AM Study of asphalt mixtures containing a binder modified with EVA polymer for use in urban pavements in Manaus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela M. G. D'Antona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A presente pesquisa buscou soluções com materiais alternativos visando à construção de pavimentos urbanos para Manaus (AM com maior vida útil e condizente com as suas condições de serviço, em particular, o seu desempenho mecânico frente às temperaturas regionais. Estudou-se o ligante regional, CAP 50/70, misturado com 4% do polímero EVA, e como partícipe em compósitos asfálticos. A incorporação do mencionado polímero teve como objetivo melhorar suas propriedades reológicas e, por conseguinte, o comportamento mecânico desse compósito - concreto asfáltico, empregado como revestimento nas vias urbanas da Capital do Estado do Amazonas. Os ligantes (virgem e modificado foram caracterizados conforme a especificação da ANP e a metodologia Superpave. As misturas asfálticas foram avaliadas pelo ensaio de fluência por compressão axial, com carregamento dinâmico à temperatura de 40 ºC. O material asfáltico modificado com EVA (AMP EVA demonstrou melhores propriedades reológicas ou equivalentes ao asfalto convencional (REMAN, ao longo de todos os ensaios de caracterização. As misturas alternativas compostas com o CAP modificado (SEVA obtiveram desempenho mecânico superior ao de misturas com cimento asfáltico habitualmente comercializado na região (SMAN.In this research we investigated alternative materials to build urban pavements in Manaus, seeking for pavements with longer lifetime for usage and suitable mechanical properties to withstand the local temperatures. The asphaltic mixtures contained a regional binder, namely CAP 50/70, mixed with 4% of EVA polymer. The incorporation of the latter polymer was aimed at improving the rheological properties of asphaltic concrete used in roads in the Amazonas' capital. The asphalt binders (original and modified were characterized in accordance with the ANP (National Petroleum Agency specification and the Superpave methodology. The asphalt mixtures had their mechanical properties

  7. Cold in-place recycling characterization framework for single or multiple component binder systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Benjamin C.

    Cold in-place recycling (CIR) is a pavement rehabilitation technique which has gained momentum in recent years. This momentum is due partly to its economic and sustainability characteristics, which has led to CIR market expansion. When pavement network deterioration is considered alongside increasing material costs, it is not beyond reason to expect demands on CIR to continue to increase. Historically, single component binder (SCB) systems, those with one stabilization binder (or two if the secondary binder dosage is 1% or less), have dominated the CIR market and could be considered the general state of practice. Common stabilization binders are either bituminous or cementitious. Two example SCB systems would be: 1) 3% portland cement, or 2) 3% asphalt emulsion with 1% hydrated lime. While traditional SCB systems have demonstrated positive economic and sustainability impacts, this dissertation focuses on multiple component binder (MCB) systems (bituminous and cementitious combined) which exhibit the potential to provide better overall economics and performance. Use of MCBs has the potential to alleviate SCB issues to some extent (e.g. cracking with cementitious SCBs, rutting with bituminous SCBs). Furthermore, to fairly represent both binders in an MCB system a universal design method which can accommodate multiple binder types is needed. The main objectives of this dissertation are to develop a universal CIR design framework and, using this framework, characterize multiple SCB and MCB systems. Approximately 1500 CIR specimens were tested herein along with approximately 300 asphalt concrete specimens which serve as a reference data set for CIR characterization. A case study of a high-traffic Mississippi CIR project which included cement SCB and emulsion SCB sections is also presented to support laboratory efforts. Individual components needed to comprise a universal design framework, such as curing protocols, were developed. SCB and MCB characterization indicated

  8. GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

    1999-11-01

    ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

  9. 200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier - 15 Years of Performance Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Link, Steven O.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2009-01-01

    Engineered surface barriers are recognized as a remedial alternative to the removal, treatment and disposal of near-surface contaminants at a variety of waste sites within the DOE complex. One issue impacting their acceptance by stakeholders the use of limited data to predict long-term performance. In 1994, a 2-ha multi-component barrier was constructed over an existing waste disposal site at Hanford using natural materials. Monitoring has been almost continuous for the last 15 yrs and has focused on barrier stability, vegetative cover, plant and animal intrusion, and the components of the water balance, including precipitation, runoff, storage, drainage, and percolation. The total precipitation received from October 1994 through August 2008 was 3311 mm on the northern half (formerly irrigated), and 2638 mm on the southern, non-irrigated half. Water storage in the fine-soil layer shows a cyclic pattern, increasing in the winter and decreasing in the spring and summer to a lower limit of around 100 mm, regardless of precipitation, in response to evapotranspiration. Topographic surveys show the barrier and side slopes to be stable and the pea-gravel admix has proven effective in minimizing erosion through the creation of a desert pavement during deflationary periods. Three runoff events have been observed but the 600-mm design storage capacity has never been exceeded. Total percolation ranged from near zero amounts under the soil-covered plots to over 600 mm under the side slopes. The asphaltic concrete prevented any of this water from reaching the buried waste thereby eliminating the driving force for the contaminant remobilization. Plant surveys show a relatively high coverage of native plants still persists after the initial revegetation although the number of species decreased from 35 in 1994 to 10 in 2009. Ample evidence of insect and small mammal use suggests that the barrier is behaving like a recovering ecosystem. In September 2008, the north half of the

  10. Potential for Potable Water Savings in Buildings by Using Stormwater Harvested from Porous Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Niehuns Antunes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing concern about the scarcity of water resources due to population growth and increased demand for potable water. Thus, the rational use of water has become necessary for the conservation of such resources. The objective of this study is to estimate the potential for potable water savings in buildings of different sectors—residential, public and commercial—in the city of Florianópolis, southern Brazil, by using stormwater harvested from porous pavements. Models were constructed to assess infiltration and rainwater quality; samples of stormwater from a local road were collected to evaluate its quality; and computer simulation was performed to assess the potential for potable water savings and rainwater tank sizing. Draining asphalt concrete slabs with two types of modifiers were used, i.e., tire rubber and SBS polymer—styrene-butadiene-styrene. The Netuno computer programme was used to simulate the potential for potable water savings considering the use of rainwater for non-potable uses such as flushing toilets and urinals, cleaning external areas, and garden watering. Average stormwater infiltration was 85.4%. It was observed that stormwater is not completely pure. From the models, the pH was 5.4 and the concentrations of ammonia, phosphorus, nitrite, and dissolved oxygen were 0.41, 0.14, 0.002, and 9.0 mg/L, respectively. The results for the stormwater runoff of a paved road were 0.23, 0.11, 0.12, 0.08, 1.41, 2.11, 0.02, and 9.0 mg/L for the parameters aluminium, ammonia, copper, chromium, iron, phosphorus, nitrite, and dissolved oxygen, respectively; and the pH was 6.7. In the city of Florianópolis, which has a surface area of paved roads of approximately 11,044,216 m², the potential for potable water savings ranged from 1.2% to 19.4% in the residential sector, 2.1% to 75.7% in the public sector and 6.5% to 70.0% in the commercial sector.

  11. 200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier - 15 Years of Performance Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Link, Steven O.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2009-09-01

    Engineered surface barriers are recognized as a remedial alternative to the removal, treatment and disposal of near-surface contaminants at a variety of waste sites within the DOE complex. One issue impacting their acceptance by stakeholders the use of limited data to predict long-term performance. In 1994, a 2-ha multi-component barrier was constructed over an existing waste disposal site at Hanford using natural materials. Monitoring has been almost continuous for the last 15 yrs and has focused on barrier stability, vegetative cover, plant and animal intrusion, and the components of the water balance, including precipitation, runoff, storage, drainage, and percolation. The total precipitation received from October 1994 through August 2008 was 3311 mm on the northern half (formerly irrigated), and 2638 mm on the southern, non-irrigated half. Water storage in the fine-soil layer shows a cyclic pattern, increasing in the winter and decreasing in the spring and summer to a lower limit of around 100 mm, regardless of precipitation, in response to evapotranspiration. Topographic surveys show the barrier and side slopes to be stable and the pea-gravel admix has proven effective in minimizing erosion through the creation of a desert pavement during deflationary periods. Three runoff events have been observed but the 600-mm design storage capacity has never been exceeded. Total percolation ranged from near zero amounts under the soil-covered plots to over 600 mm under the side slopes. The asphaltic concrete prevented any of this water from reaching the buried waste thereby eliminating the driving force for the contaminant remobilization. Plant surveys show a relatively high coverage of native plants still persists after the initial revegetation although the number of species decreased from 35 in 1994 to 10 in 2009. Ample evidence of insect and small mammal use suggests that the barrier is behaving like a recovering ecosystem. In September 2008, the north half of the

  12. Surface microstructure of bitumen characterized by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaokong; Burnham, Nancy A; Tao, Mingjiang

    2015-04-01

    Bitumen, also called asphalt binder, plays important roles in many industrial applications. It is used as the primary binding agent in asphalt concrete, as a key component in damping systems such as rubber, and as an indispensable additive in paint and ink. Consisting of a large number of hydrocarbons of different sizes and polarities, together with heteroatoms and traces of metals, bitumen displays rich surface microstructures that affect its rheological properties. This paper reviews the current understanding of bitumen's surface microstructures characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microstructures of bitumen develop to different forms depending on crude oil source, thermal history, and sample preparation method. While some bitumens display surface microstructures with fine domains, flake-like domains, and dendrite structuring, 'bee-structures' with wavy patterns several micrometers in diameter and tens of nanometers in height are commonly seen in other binders. Controversy exists regarding the chemical origin of the 'bee-structures', which has been related to the asphaltene fraction, the metal content, or the crystallizing waxes in bitumen. The rich chemistry of bitumen can result in complicated intermolecular associations such as coprecipitation of wax and metalloporphyrins in asphaltenes. Therefore, it is the molecular interactions among the different chemical components in bitumen, rather than a single chemical fraction, that are responsible for the evolution of bitumen's diverse microstructures, including the 'bee-structures'. Mechanisms such as curvature elasticity and surface wrinkling that explain the rippled structures observed in polymer crystals might be responsible for the formation of 'bee-structures' in bitumen. Despite the progress made on morphological characterization of bitumen using AFM, the fundamental question whether the microstructures observed on bitumen surfaces represent its bulk structure remains to be addressed. In addition

  13. Evaluation of Color Settings in Aerial Images with the Use of Eye-Tracking User Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirijovsky, J.; Popelka, S.

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of presented paper is to find the most realistic and preferred color settings for four different types of surfaces on the aerial images. This will be achieved through user study with the use of eye-movement recording. Aerial images taken by the unmanned aerial system were used as stimuli. From each image, squared crop area containing one of the studied types of surfaces (asphalt, concrete, water, soil, and grass) was selected. For each type of surface, the real value of reflectance was found with the use of precise spectroradiometer ASD HandHeld 2 which measures the reflectance. The device was used at the same time as aerial images were captured, so lighting conditions and state of vegetation were equal. The spectral resolution of the ASD device is better than 3.0 nm. For defining the RGB values of selected type of surface, the spectral reflectance values recorded by the device were merged into wider groups. Finally, we get three groups corresponding to RGB color system. Captured images were edited with the graphic editor Photoshop CS6. Contrast, clarity, and brightness were edited for all surface types on images. Finally, we get a set of 12 images of the same area with different color settings. These images were put into the grid and used as stimuli for the eye-tracking experiment. Eye-tracking is one of the methods of usability studies and it is considered as relatively objective. Eye-tracker SMI RED 250 with the sampling frequency 250 Hz was used in the study. As respondents, a group of 24 students of Geoinformatics and Geography was used. Their task was to select which image in the grid has the best color settings. The next task was to select which color settings they prefer. Respondents' answers were evaluated and the most realistic and most preferable color settings were found. The advantage of the eye-tracking evaluation was that also the process of the selection of the answers was analyzed. Areas of Interest were marked around each image in the

  14. Efecto de la disminución de la velocidad vehicular en la durabilidad de una capa asfáltica Effect of reducing traffic speed on the durability of a road asphalt layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Alexander Rondón Quintana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente, en América Latina las vías están experimentando un incremento en el nivel de congestionamiento vehicular en sus vías principales, y con ello una consecuente baja velocidad de marcha. En el artículo se presentan los resultados de una fase experimental desarrollada con el fin de evidenciar el cambio que experimentan las propiedades mecánicas bajo carga repetida de una mezcla densa en caliente tipo MDC-2 cuando se disminuye la velocidad de circulación vehicular. El caso de estudio que se reporta es para mezclas que se fabrican y construyen en Bogotá D.C., Colombia. Como conclusión general se obtiene que al reducir los vehículos la velocidad de circulación sobre una vía en servicio, la mezcla de concreto asfáltico disminuye su rigidez y la resistencia a fatiga. Por ejemplo, disminuir la velocidad de 60 km/h a 30 km/h genera una disminución aproximada de 15,6% en la rigidez de la mezcla analizada y 39,7% en su vida a fatiga.Due to increased congestion on its main routes, the cities of Latin American, have been experiencing a reduction in traffic speed. This article presents the results of research conducted to establish the changes of the mechanical properties under repeated loads that occur in a MDC-2 hot mix asphalt (HMA when the vehicular speed decreases. The studies were carried out using asphalt mixtures produced in the city of Bogotá, Colombia. As a general conclusion, it has been found that by reducing the speed of traffic, the asphalt concrete mixture reduces its stiffness and resistance to fatigue. For example, a reduction of the speed from 60 km/h to 30 km/h results in a reduction of approximately 15.6% in the stiffness of the asphalt mixture and 39.5% in its fatigue life.

  15. The nonlinear Maxwell-type model for viscoelastoplastic materials: simulation of temperature influence on creep, relaxation and strain-stress curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V. Khokhlov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear Maxwell-type constitutive relation with two arbitrary material functions for viscoelastoplastic multi-modulus materials is studied analytically in uniaxial isothermic case to reveal the model abilities and applicability scope and to develop techniques of its identification, tuning and fitting. The constitutive equation is aimed at adequate modeling of the rheological phenomena set which is typical for reonomic materials exhibiting non-linear hereditary properties, strong strain rate sensitivity, secondary creep, yielding at constant stress, tension compression asymmetry and such temperature effects as increase of material compliance, strain rate sensitivity and rates of dissipation, relaxation, creep and plastic strain accumulation with temperature growth. The model is applicable for simulation of mechanical behaviour of various polymers, their solutions and melts, solid propellants, sand-asphalt concretes, composite materials, titanium and aluminum alloys, ceramics at high temperature and so on. To describe the influence of temperature on material mechanical behavior (under isothermic conditions, two scalar material parameters of the model (viscosity coefficient and “modulus of elasticity” are considered as a functions of temperature level. The general restrictions on their properties which are necessary and sufficient for adequate qualitative description of the basic thermomechanical phenomena related to typical temperature influence on creep and relaxation curves, creep recovery curves, creep curves under step-wise loading and quasi-static stress-strain curves of viscoelastoplastic materials are obtained. The restrictions are derived using systematic analytical study of general qualitative features of the theoretic creep and relaxation curves, creep curves under step-wise loading, long-term strength curves and stress-strain curves at constant strain or stress rates generated by the constitutive equation (under minimal

  16. Profile temperature, salinity, and hydrostatic pressure from CTD casts in McMurdo Sound from 2011-11-26 to 2011-12-03 (NCEI Accession 0131073)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Full-depth CTD profiles taken on along-sound and cross-sound transects of McMurdo Sound. Eleven stations with six independent sites were visited.

  17. MDOT innovation leading to faster, longer-lasting pavement repairs : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Current methods of patching pavement must evolve to meet increasing mobility demands. : To address this need, MDOT has been testing a new generation of rapid set full-depth : pavement repair materials. Initial results are promising. The new materials...

  18. Oceanographic data obtained from CTD and current meters as part of the Dynamics of the Loop Current in U.S. Waters project in the Gulf of Mexico from 2009-04-19 to 2011-11-14 (NCEI Accession 0126392)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The study design for the in-situ measurements consisted of an array of nine full-depth (or tall) moorings, six near-bottom moorings, and 25 Pressure Inverted Echo...

  19. Development of precast bridge deck overhang system : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The implementation of full-depth, precast overhang panel systems has the potential to improve constructability, : productivity, and make bridges more economical. Initial testing and analyses reported in the 0-6100-2 report resulted in : a design that...

  20. Preliminary evaluation of the lifecycle costs and market barriers of reflective pavements; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, M.; Koomey, J.G.; Pomerantz, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the life cycle costs and market barriers associated with using reflective paving materials in streets and parking lots as a way to reduce the urban heat island effect. We calculated and compared the life cycle costs of conventional asphalt concrete (AC) pavements to those of other existing pavement technologies with higher reflectivity-portland cement concrete (PCC), porous pavements, resin pavements, AC pavements using light-colored chip seals, and AC pavements using light-colored asphalt emulsion additives. We found that for streets and parking lots, PCC can provide a cost-effective alternative to conventional AC when severely damaged pavements must be completely reconstructed. We also found that rehabilitating damaged AC streets and intersections with thin overlays of PCC (ultra-thin white topping) can often provide a cost-effective alternative to standard rehabilitation techniques using conventional AC. Chip sealing is a common maintenance treatment for low-volume streets which, when applied using light-colored chips, could provide a reflective pavement surface. If the incremental cost of using light-colored chips is low, this chip sealing method could also be cost-effective, but the incremental costs of light-colored chips are as of yet uncertain and expected to vary. Porous pavements were found to have higher life cycle costs than conventional AC in parking lots, but several cost-saving features of porous pavements fell outside the boundaries of this study. Resin pavements were found to be only slightly more expensive than conventional AC, but the uncertainties in the cost and performance data were large. The use of light-colored additives in asphalt emulsion seal coats for parking lot pavements was found to be significantly more expensive than conventional AC, reflecting its current niche market of decorative applications. We also proposed two additional approaches to increasing the reflectivity of conventional AC

  1. GPR applications in Civil Engineering in Spain - state-of-the-art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Gracia, Vega; Solla, Mercedes; Santos-Assunçao, Sonia; Lorenzo, Henrique

    2014-05-01

    assistance to various administrations, public institutions and private companies. What is more, some of the existing private companies have also minor test sites to analyze the behavior of the signal and its propagation depending on the type of asphalt concrete. GPR is used mainly in detection of pipes and urban services and various private companies are specialized in these tasks. Another widespread application is archaeological survey; one private company is also specialized in archaeology evaluations, using GPR combined with magnetometer. Forensic examinations are also common applications in Spain. Other less common applications are: regular inspection of roads, bridges and tunnels, cultural heritage buildings assessment, shallow geology studies and quality control in civil engineering. Acknowledgment The study is a contribution to the EU funded COST Action TU1208, "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar".

  2. Evaluation of density, moisture content and percentage compaction of concrete using direct transmission and backscatter methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attobrah, A. T

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear method widely used in determining the density and moisture content of soil - aggregates, asphalt concretes, roller compacted concretes and Portland cement concretes, is the radiometry technique. Generally, all radiometry systems consist of a source of radiation, the sample being examined and a radiation detector. In operation, a radioactive source and a detector are placed on the same or opposite sides of a concrete sample. A portion of radiation from the source which passes through the concrete sample and reaches the detector produces a series of electrical pulses which when counted gives a measure of the dimensions or physical characteristics of the concrete sample. In this research work, concrete beams were fabricated using a 500 x 225 x 200mm wooden mould whiles a table vibrator was used to consolidate the concrete after placement in the mould. The mass of the beam was determined and the actual density calculated and inputted in the gauge. Measurements were performed on the unhardened and hardened concrete using the backscatter method and the direct transmission method at depths of 50mm, 100mm and 150mm. The measuring times of 15, 60 and 240 second were use to take the measurements. The study provided information on the variation of density with depth and this was observed to be within the range of 0 kg/m 3 to 1 kg/m 3 and 13 kg/m 3 to 23 kg/m 3 for the unhardened concrete samples in which density increased with depth and those in which density decreased with depth respectively. For the hardened concrete sample, the average change in density with depth was between 4 - 11 kg/m 3 for the samples in which density increased with depth and between 11 - 21 kg/m 3 for the samples in which density decreased with depth. The study also provided information about the degree of consolidation of Portland cement concrete which on the average was between 95% - 97% for the unhardened concrete samples and increased to between 97% - 99% for the hardened concrete

  3. Liquid metal level measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, J.C.; Leyland, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    A liquid metal level indicator is described which can be used to measure, in a stainless steel tank, the level of a nuclear reactor coolant such as sodium. The instrument, which is based on the eddy current induction effect, gives readings over substantially the full depth of the tank and indicates the sense of change of level. (U.K.)

  4. Precast concrete elements for accelerated bridge construction : laboratory testing of precast substructure components, Boone County bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Vol. 1-1: In July 2006, construction began on an accelerated bridge project in Boone County, Iowa that was composed of precast substructure : elements and an innovative, precast deck panel system. The superstructure system consisted of full-depth dec...

  5. Dissolved Fe across the Weddell Sea and Drake Passage: impact of DFe on nutrient uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, M.B.; Laan, P.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Middag, R.; Neven, I.; Van Ooijen, J.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript reports the first full depth distributions of dissolved iron (DFe) over a high-resolution Weddell Sea and Drake Passage transect. Very low dissolved DFe concentrations (0.01-0.1 nM range) were observed in the surface waters of the Weddell Sea, and within the Drake Passage polar

  6. Dissolved Fe across the Weddell Sea and Drake Passage : Impact of DFe on nutrient uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, M. B.; Laan, P.; De Baar, H. J. W.; Middag, R.; Neven, I.; Van Ooijen, J.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript reports the first full depth distributions of dissolved iron (DFe) over a high-resolution Weddell Sea and Drake Passage transect. Very low dissolved DFe concentrations (0.01-0.1 nM range) were observed in the surface waters of the Weddell Sea, and within the Drake Passage polar

  7. Impact of the blue mussel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.; Riegman, R.; van der Meer, J.

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of carbon within the Weddell Gyre and its exchanges across the gyre boundaries are investigated with three recent full-depth oceanographic sections enclosing this climatically important region. The combination of carbon measurements with ocean circulation transport estimates from a

  8. Top-down or bottom-up? Assessing crevassing directions on surging glaciers and developments for physically testing glacier crevassing models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, B.; Evans, D. J. A.; Benn, D. I.; Brennan, A. J.

    2012-04-01

    Networks of crevasse squeeze ridges (CSRs) preserved on the forelands of many surging glaciers attest to extensive full-depth crevassing. Full-depth connections have been inferred from turbid water up-welling in crevasses and the formation of concertina eskers however, it has not been clearly established if the crevasses formed from the top-down or the bottom-up. A Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) approach is used to determine the likely propagation direction for Mode I crevasses on seven surging glaciers. Results indicate that, the high extensional surface strain rates are insufficient to promote top-down full-depth crevasses but have sufficient magnitude to penetrate to depths of 4-12 m, explaining the extensive surface breakup accompanying glacier surges. Top-down, full-depth crevassing is only possible when water depth approaches 97% of the crevasse depth. However, the provision of sufficient meltwater is problematic due to the aforementioned extensive shallow surface crevassing. Full-depth, bottom-up crevassing can occur provided basal water pressures are in excess of 80-90% of flotation which is the default for surging and on occasion water pressures may even become artesian. Therefore CSRs, found across many surging glacier forelands and ice margins most likely result from the infilling of basal crevasses formed, for the most part, by bottom-up hydrofracturing. Despite the importance of crevassing for meltwater routing and calving dynamics physically testing numerical crevassing models remains problematic due to technological limitations, changing stress regimes and difficulties associated with working in crevasse zones on glaciers. Mapping of CSR spacing and matching to surface crevasse patterns can facilitate quantitative comparison between the LEFM model and observed basal crevasses provided ice dynamics are known. However, assessing full-depth top-down crevasse propagation is much harder to monitor in the field and no geomorphological record is

  9. Micro-fabrication of three dimensional pyrolysed carbon microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    ; soft baking the photoresist layer; performing a full depth exposure with UV light through a first mask; performing a partial depth exposure with UV light through a second mask; wherein the full depth exposure and the partial depth exposure are aligned to ensure that the first and second latent images...... are connected to each other; post-exposure baking the photoresist layer; and developing the microscale patterned resist template as a free-standing structure of cross-linked resist with lateral hanging structures that are supported by vertical support structures at a free height above the substrate. The method...... is characterized by a soft baking temperature below 70 °C. Repetitive coating and partial depth exposure allows for the fabrication of multiple level laterally interconnected structures. Carbonization of the resist template provides truly three-dimensional carbon microelectrode structures....

  10. Creating LGBTQ-Inclusive Care and Work Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Schenk, Jan

    2018-04-01

    In considering the full depth of inclusion in care and work environments (and developing inclusive engagement skills for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning [LGBTQ] patients and their families), professional development leaders must bring these discussions and shared learnings into the open. Understanding the LGBTQ population's unique needs is essential to providing personalized health care, and inclusive work environments help to foster more inclusive care for this population. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(4):151-153. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Reducing Aerodynamic Drag on Empty Open Cargo Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James C.; Storms, Bruce L.; Dzoan, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Some simple structural modifications have been demonstrated to be effective in reducing aerodynamic drag on vehicles that have empty open cargo bays. The basic idea is to break up the airflow in a large open cargo bay by inserting panels to divide the bay into a series of smaller bays. In the case of a coal car, this involves inserting a small number (typically between two and four) of vertical full-depth or partial-depth panels.

  12. RRS "Discovery" Cruise D279, 04 Apr - 10 May 2004. A Transatlantic hydrography section at 24.5N

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The cruise report describes the acquisition and processing of transatlantic hydrographic, velocity, chemistry and other measurements made during three cruises in Spring 2004 at 24.5°N. Measurements were made from shallow water near Africa to shallow water just off Palm Springs beach on the eastern seaboard of the USA. During the principal cruise, RRS Discovery Cruise D279 (4 April to 10 May 2004), 125 full depth CTD and lowered acoustic Doppler current profiler (LADP) stations were complete...

  13. Thermochemical treatment of radioactive waste by using powder metal fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Ojovan, M.I.; Karlina, O.K.

    2001-01-01

    waste; 4. Processing of irradiated graphite. (1). The decontamination technique based on application of PMF is used in order to decontaminate materials (asphalt, concrete, metal), which usually cannot be decontaminated by conventional methods. A thin layer of PMF covers contaminated materials, thereafter this layer is burned during 10-20 minutes. Temperatures from 300 to 1500 C and higher (depending on the composition of PMF) are overreached in the process of PMF combustion. The radionuclides are volatilised from material being heated, after that cold layer of slag-like products of combustion adsorbs them. This slag has a porous structure with highly developed interface providing adsorption of radionuclides. After cooling the slag is removed mechanically jointly with contamination. The efficiency of decontamination process depends on many parameters however practically complete decontamination can be achieved using appropriate PMF. (2). Thermochemical treatment of spent ion exchange resins is carried out using a modular facility. Wet resins and PMF previously mixed in appropriate ratio are fed into a furnace where the reaction is initiated and combustion proceeds. The metal powder contained in the PMF is in the contact with the resin granules and reacts with the moisture contained in the granules with the resulting release of the great quantity of heat. This heat is sufficient for the moisture to evaporate and the ion exchange resin to be gasified. A high efficiency can be obtained for the incineration of wet ion exchange resins mixed with PMF. PMF provides complete destruction of the organic base of the ion exchange resins with minimal release of hazardous gases and radionuclides into the environment. (3). Dusty waste (like ash residue) requires stabilisation - vitrification in order to ensure safe conditions for transportation and disposal. Vitrification of dusty waste is a process carried out directly in the container for disposal. It consists of intermixing of dusty

  14. Knee Kinetics during Squats of Varying Loads and Depths in Recreationally Trained Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Victoria; Becker, James; Burkhardt, Eric; Cotter, Joshua

    2018-03-06

    The back squat exercise is typically practiced with varying squat depths and barbell loads. However, depth has been inconsistently defined, resulting in unclear safety precautions when squatting with loads. Additionally, females exhibit anatomical and kinematic differences to males which may predispose them to knee joint injuries. The purpose of this study was to characterize peak knee extensor moments (pKEMs) at three commonly practiced squat depths of above parallel, parallel, and full depth, and with three loads of 0% (unloaded), 50%, and 85% depth-specific one repetition maximum (1RM) in recreationally active females. Nineteen females (age, 25.1 ± 5.8 years; body mass, 62.5 ± 10.2 kg; height, 1.6 ± 0.10 m; mean ± SD) performed squats of randomized depth and load. Inverse dynamics were used to obtain pKEMs from three-dimensional knee kinematics. Depth and load had significant interaction effects on pKEMs (p = 0.014). Significantly greater pKEMs were observed at full depth compared to parallel depth with 50% 1RM load (p = 0.001, d = 0.615), and 85% 1RM load (p = 0.010, d = 0.714). Greater pKEMs were also observed at full depth compared to above parallel depth with 50% 1RM load (p = 0.003, d = 0.504). Results indicate effect of load on female pKEMs do not follow a progressively increasing pattern with either increasing depth or load. Therefore, when high knee loading is a concern, individuals are must carefully consider both the depth of squat being performed and the relative load they are using.

  15. Room temperature rechargeable polymer electrolyte batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamgir, M. [EIC Labs., Inc., Norwood, MA (United States); Abraham, K.M. [EIC Labs., Inc., Norwood, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN)- and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC)-based Li{sup +}-conductive thin-film electrolytes have been found to be suitable in rechargeable Li and Li-ion cells. Li/Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub y} and carbon/LiNiO{sub 2} cells fabricated with these electrolytes have demonstrated rate capabilities greater than the C-rate and more than 375 full depth cycles. Two-cell carbon/LiNiO{sub 2} bipolar batteries could be discharged at pulse currents as high as 50 mA/cm{sup 2}. (orig.)

  16. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2. GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem Including Santiago Creek. Volume 1. Seven Oaks Dam. Appendix A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    su0.0001,4 from full depth of west0 wall of 23.656 lb. somple f5 , maso o~s ora atsow below exc Of test pit of teot pit. IL 4+ __ -H.~gv MASS GRADATION MASS...s * -W I * a am9 a a a 0 6 a a a a a a a a a a a Sa ~ ~ ~ o a’ a.1aa a a a a a a a a J . . a a a a acca aO a1 1 1 1 a aa a 1- a a 1 as- Is a1 a a a a

  17. Large-eddy simulation of open channel flow with surface cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.; Tejada-Martínez, A.E.; Martinat, G.; Grosch, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Open channel flow comparable to a shallow tidal ocean flow is simulated using LES. • Unstable stratification is imposed by a constant surface cooling flux. • Full-depth, convection-driven, rotating supercells develop when cooling is applied. • Strengthening of cells occurs corresponding to an increasing of the Rayleigh number. - Abstract: Results are presented from large-eddy simulations of an unstably stratified open channel flow, driven by a uniform pressure gradient and with zero surface shear stress and a no-slip lower boundary. The unstable stratification is applied by a constant cooling flux at the surface and an adiabatic bottom wall, with a constant source term present to ensure the temperature reaches a statistically steady state. The structure of the turbulence and the turbulence statistics are analyzed with respect to the Rayleigh number (Ra τ ) representative of the surface buoyancy relative to shear. The impact of the surface cooling-induced buoyancy on mean and root mean square of velocity and temperature, budgets of turbulent kinetic energy (and components), Reynolds shear stress and vertical turbulent heat flux will be investigated. Additionally, colormaps of velocity fluctuations will aid the visualization of turbulent structures on both vertical and horizontal planes in the flow. Under neutrally stratified conditions the flow is characterized by weak, full-depth, streamwise cells similar to but less coherent than Couette cells in plane Couette flow. Increased Ra τ and thus increased buoyancy effects due to surface cooling lead to full-depth convection cells of significantly greater spanwise size and coherence, thus termed convective supercells. Full-depth convective cell structures of this magnitude are seen for the first time in this open channel domain, and may have important implications for turbulence analysis in a comparable tidally-driven ocean boundary layer. As such, these results motivate further study of the

  18. Tank 101-SY Window E core sample: Interpretation of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    A full depth core sample was taken for tank 241-SY-101 in December 1991 during a time period called ''Window E.'' This was the second full depth core sample from this tank during the year. The core had two major portions that are known as the convective zone and the nonconvective zone. A crust was on the top of tank but as poorly sampled. The analysis of the Window E core sample stressed segment composite chemical analysis instead of segment by segment as in Window C. Adiabatic calorimetry on samples from both cores showed a slow self heating reaction above 150 degrees C on dried samples. The exothermic events were milder than similar synthetic samples. The chemical and physical properties complemented the information from Window C. The Window E material from the convective zone was more viscous than the Window C convective zone material. The nonconvective zone viscosities were similar for both cores. Heating and dilution tests were made to test mitigation concepts

  19. Tank 101-SY Window E core sample: Interpretation of results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    A full depth core sample was taken for tank 241-SY-101 in December 1991 during a time period called ``Window E.`` This was the second full depth core sample from this tank during the year. The core had two major portions that are known as the convective zone and the nonconvective zone. A crust was on the top of tank but as poorly sampled. The analysis of the Window E core sample stressed segment composite chemical analysis instead of segment by segment as in Window C. Adiabatic calorimetry on samples from both cores showed a slow self heating reaction above 150{degrees}C on dried samples. The exothermic events were milder than similar synthetic samples. The chemical and physical properties complemented the information from Window C. The Window E material from the convective zone was more viscous than the Window C convective zone material. The nonconvective zone viscosities were similar for both cores. Heating and dilution tests were made to test mitigation concepts.

  20. An OSSE Study for Deep Argo Array using the GFDL Ensemble Coupled Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, You-Soon; Zhang, Shaoqing; Rosati, Anthony; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Yang, Xiaosong

    2018-03-01

    An observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) using an ensemble coupled data assimilation system was designed to investigate the impact of deep ocean Argo profile assimilation in a biased numerical climate system. Based on the modern Argo observational array and an artificial extension to full depth, "observations" drawn from one coupled general circulation model (CM2.0) were assimilated into another model (CM2.1). Our results showed that coupled data assimilation with simultaneous atmospheric and oceanic constraints plays a significant role in preventing deep ocean drift. However, the extension of the Argo array to full depth did not significantly improve the quality of the oceanic climate estimation within the bias magnitude in the twin experiment. Even in the "identical" twin experiment for the deep Argo array from the same model (CM2.1) with the assimilation model, no significant changes were shown in the deep ocean, such as in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and the Antarctic bottom water cell. The small ensemble spread and corresponding weak constraints by the deep Argo profiles with medium spatial and temporal resolution may explain why the deep Argo profiles did not improve the deep ocean features in the assimilation system. Additional studies using different assimilation methods with improved spatial and temporal resolution of the deep Argo array are necessary in order to more thoroughly understand the impact of the deep Argo array on the assimilation system.

  1. Evaluation of drone brood removal for management of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in colonies of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in the northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, N W

    2005-06-01

    The efficacy of drone brood removal for the management of Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman in colonies of the honey bee, A. mellifera L., was evaluated. Colonies were treated with CheckMite+ in the fall of 2002. The following spring, quantities of bees and brood were equalized, but colonies were not retreated. The brood nest of each colony consisted of 18 full-depth worker combs and two full-depth drone combs. Each worker comb had drone cells. Standard management practices were used throughout the season. Colonies were randomly assigned to one of two groups. In the control group, drone combs remained in place throughout the season. In the treatment group, drone combs were removed on 16 June, 16 July, 16 August, and 16 September and replaced with empty drone combs (16 June) or with drone combs removed on the previous replacement date. In the early fall, the average mite-to-bee ratio in the control group was significantly greater than the corresponding ratio in the treatment group. Drone brood removal did not adversely affect colony health as measured by the size of the worker population or by honey production. Fall worker populations were similar in the two groups. Honey production in treatment colonies was greater than or similar to production in control colonies. These data demonstrate that drone brood removal can serve as a valuable component in an integrated pest management program for V. destructor and may reduce the need for other treatments on a colony-by-colony basis.

  2. Innovative Retrofit Insulation Strategies for Concrete Masonry Foundations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huelman, P. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership; Goldberg, L. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership; Jacobson, R. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership

    2015-05-06

    This study was designed to test a new approach for foundation insulation retrofits, with the goal of demonstrating improved moisture control, improved occupant comfort, and reduced heat loss. Because conducting experimental research on existing below-grade assemblies is very difficult, most of the results are based on simulations. The retrofit approach consists of filling open concrete block cores with an insulating material and adding R-10 exterior insulation that extends 1 ft below grade. The core fill is designed to improve the R-value of the foundation wall and increase the interior wall surface temperature, but more importantly to block convection currents that could otherwise increase moisture loads on the foundation wall and interior space. The exterior insulation significantly reduces heat loss through the most exposed part of the foundation and further increases the interior wall surface temperature. This improves occupant comfort and decreases the risk of condensation. Such an insulation package avoids the full-depth excavation necessary for exterior insulation retrofits, reduces costs, and eliminates the moisture and indoor air quality risks associated with interior insulation retrofits. Retrofit costs for the proposed approach were estimated at roughly half those of a full-depth exterior insulation retrofit.

  3. Aeroelastic Wingbox Stiffener Topology Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Bret K.

    2017-01-01

    This work considers an aeroelastic wingbox model seeded with run-out blade stiffeners along the skins. Topology optimization is conducted within the shell webs of the stiffeners, in order to add cutouts and holes for mass reduction. This optimization is done with a global-local approach in order to moderate the computational cost: aeroelastic loads are computed at the wing-level, but the topology and sizing optimization is conducted at the panel-level. Each panel is optimized separately under stress, buckling, and adjacency constraints, and periodically reassembled to update the trimmed aeroelastic loads. The resulting topology is baselined against a design with standard full-depth solid stiffener blades, and found to weigh 7.43% less.

  4. Preparation of dual-layer coated polyester membranes with nuclear tracks and their wave-absorbing property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Cunxiong; Hu Lian; Ni Bangfa; Tian Weizhi; Fan Qiwen; Xiao Caijin; Nie Peng; Wang Pingsheng; Zhang Guiying; Huang Donghui

    2010-01-01

    Nanometer materials are of importance in developing electromagnetic-wave-absorbing materials. In this work, 16 μm thick polyester membranes were bombarded by 140 MeV 32 S ions from the HI-13 tandem accelerator to produce latent tracks. The bombarded samples were sensitized by DMF and UV light at 360 nm wavelength, before chemical etching by NaOH solution to develop latent tracks into pores in sizes of nanometers or micrometers in full depth of the membrane. The samples were coated with thin layers of barium ferrite and magnesium fluoride by vacuum evaporation. The reflectivity indices were measured at 2-18 GHz. The results indicate that the modified polyester membrane can effectively absorb 8-18 GHz radar waves.(authors)

  5. Evaluation of the ICET Test Stand to Assess the Performance of a Range of Ceramic Media Filter Elements in Support of ASME AG-1 Subsection FO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schemmel, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-26

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are defined as extended-medium, dry-type filters with: (1) a minimum particle removal efficiency of no less than 99.97 percent for 0.3 micrometer particles, (2) a maximum, clean resistance of 1.0 inch water column (in. WC) when operated at 1,000 cubic feet per minute (CFM), and (3) a rigid casing that extends the full depth of the medium. Specifically, ceramic media HEPA filters provide better performance at elevated temperatures, are moisture resistant and nonflammable, can perform their function if wetted and exposed to greater pressures, and can be cleaned and reused. This paper describes the modification and design of a large scale test stand which properly evaluates the filtration characteristics of a range of ceramic media filters challenged with a nuclear aerosol agent in order to develop Section FO of ASME AG-1.

  6. Estimates of wave decay rates in the presence of turbulent currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thais, L. [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, URA-CNRS 1441, Villenauve d' Ascq (France). Lab. de Mecanique; Chapalain, G. [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, URA-CNRS 8577, Villenauve d' Ascq (France). Sedimentologie et Geodynamique; Klopman, G. [Albatros Flow Research, Vollenhove (Netherlands); Simons, R.R. [University College, London (United Kingdom). Civil and Environmental Engineering; Thomas, G.P. [University College, Cork (Ireland). Dept. of Mathematical Physics

    2001-06-01

    A full-depth numerical model solving the free surface flow induced by linear water waves propagating with collinear vertically sheared turbulent currents is presented. The model is used to estimate the wave amplitude decay rate in combined wave current flows. The decay rates are compared with data collected in wave flumes by Kemp and Simons [J Fluid Mech, 116 (1982) 227; 130 (1983) 73] and Mathisen and Madsen [J Geophys Res, 101 (C7) (1996) 16,533]. We confirm the main experimental finding of Kemp and Simons that waves propagating downstream are less damped, and waves propagating upstream significantly more damped than waves on fluid at rest. A satisfactory quantitative agreement is found for the decay rates of waves propagating upstream, whereas not more than a qualitative agreement has been observed for waves propagating downstream. Finally, some wave decay rates in the presence of favourable and adverse currents are provided in typical field conditions. (Author)

  7. Radiation defect distribution in silicon irradiated with 600 keV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazdra, P.; Dorschner, H.

    2003-01-01

    Low-doped n-type float zone silicon was irradiated with 600 keV electrons to fluences from 2x10 13 to 1x10 15 cm -2 . Radiation defects, their introduction rates and full-depth profiles were measured by two complementary methods - the capacitance deep level spectroscopy and the high-voltage current transient spectroscopy. Results show that, in the vicinity of the anode junction, the profile of vacancy-related defect centers is strongly influenced by electric field and an excessive generation of vacancies. In the bulk, the slope of the profile can be derived from the distribution of absorbed dose taking into the account the threshold energy necessary for Frenkel pair formation and the dependency of the defect introduction rate on electron energy

  8. A 16 deg2 survey of emission-line galaxies at z SSP Public Data Release 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masao; Tanaka, Masayuki; Shimakawa, Rhythm; Furusawa, Hisanori; Momose, Rieko; Koyama, Yusei; Silverman, John D.; Kodama, Tadayuki; Komiyama, Yutaka; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lin, Yen-Ting; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ouchi, Masami; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Yabe, Kiyoto

    2018-01-01

    We present initial results from the Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) with Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on a comprehensive survey of emission-line galaxies at z SSP fields suggests that a survey volume of >5 × 105 Mpc3 is essential to overcome cosmic variance. Since the current data have not reached the full depth expected for the HSC-SSP, the color cut in i - NB816 or z - NB921 induces a bias towards star-forming galaxies with large equivalent widths, primarily seen in the stellar mass functions for the H α emitters at z ≈ 0.25-0.40. Even so, the emission-line galaxies clearly cover a wide range of luminosity, stellar mass, and environment, thus demonstrating the usefulness of the narrowband data from the HSC-SSP for investigating star-forming galaxies at z < 1.5.

  9. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) modulates extracellular matrix turnover in cartilage explants ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reker, Ditte; Kjelgaard-Petersen, Cecilie Freja; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie

    2017-01-01

    (ECM) production. To gain further insight into the process of sprifermin in the cartilage tissue, this study aimed at investigating the ECM turnover of articular cartilage explants in a longitudinal manner. Methods: Bovine full-depth articular cartilage explants were stimulated with sprifermin...... by immuno-histochemical detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. ECM turnover was quantified by biomarker ELISAs; ProC2 reflecting type II collagen formation, CS846 reflecting aggrecan formation, active MMP9, C2M and AGNx2 reflecting matrix metalloproteinase activity, and AGNx1 reflecting......, active MMP9 was slightly decreased, and AGNx1 was slightly increased. Over the course of treatment, the temporal order of ECM turnover responses was AGNx1, then ProC2, followed by CS846 and MMP9. Pro-inflammatory activation of the explants diminished the ECM turnover responses otherwise observed under...

  10. Time lapse photography as an approach to understanding glide avalanche activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, Jordy; Peitzsch, Erich H.; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Avalanches resulting from glide cracks are notoriously difficult to forecast, but are a recurring problem for numerous avalanche forecasting programs. In some cases glide cracks are observed to open and then melt away in situ. In other cases, they open and then fail catastrophically as large, full-depth avalanches. Our understanding and management of these phenomena are currently limited. It is thought that an increase in the rate of snow gliding occurs prior to full-depth avalanche activity so frequent observation of glide crack movement can provide an index of instability. During spring 2011 in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA, we began an approach to track glide crack avalanche activity using a time-lapse camera focused on a southwest facing glide crack. This crack melted in-situ without failing as a glide avalanche, while other nearby glide cracks on north through southeast aspects failed. In spring 2012, a camera was aimed at a large and productive glide crack adjacent to the Going to the Sun Road. We captured three unique glide events in the field of view. Unfortunately, all of them either failed very quickly, or during periods of obscured view, so measurements of glide rate could not be obtained. However, we compared the hourly meteorological variables during the period of glide activity to the same variables prior to glide activity. The variables air temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, incoming and reflected long wave radiation, SWE, total precipitation, and snow depth were found to be statistically different for our cases examined. We propose that these are some of the potential precursors for glide avalanche activity, but do urge caution in their use, due to the simple approach and small data set size. It is hoped that by introducing a workable method to easily record glide crack movement, combined with ongoing analysis of the associated meteorological data, we will improve our understanding of when, or if, glide avalanche activity will ensue.

  11. Strength, shrinkage, erodibility and capillary flow characteristics of cement-treated recycled pavement materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Fedrigo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Full-depth recycling with portland cement (FDR-PC has been widely used for pavement rehabilitation; however, doubts remain regarding factors affecting some properties of the recycled material. Aiming on quantifying the effects of those factors on the strength, drying shrinkage, erodibility, capillary rise and absorption of cement-treated mixtures (CTM of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP and graded crushed stone, tests were conducted considering different RAP contents, cement contents, compaction efforts and curing times. Cement addition increased the mixtures strength and reduced their erodibility and capillary flow characteristics, but increased shrinkage. Low cement contents resulted in acceptable strength for CTM, but in high capillary rise and absorption, not being suitable if the layer is exposed to long periods of water soaking. Higher compaction effort led to similar effects as cement addition, counterbalancing low cement contents usage and reducing costs and shrinkage cracking risk. Strength and shrinkage showed higher growth rates at early stages, and then precautions should be taken in order to avoid moisture loss. Increasing RAP content decreased strength; though, RAP effect on the other properties was statistically non-significant, indicating a similar behaviour as CTM without RAP. Considering the studied properties, the mixture with most satisfactory behaviour for field applications was identified. The results highlighted strength is not the only property to be considered when designing FDR-PC mixtures; although presenting acceptable strength, some mixtures may fail due to shrinkage cracking or erosion, when exposed to water content variations. Keywords: Full-depth recycling with cement, Strength, Drying shrinkage, Erodibility, Capillary rise, Absorption

  12. Understanding the Effect of Stratification on Vertical and Temporal Heterogenieties of Cyanobacteria Blooms in Lakes Using a Long Term in-situ Monitoring Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, A.; Guala, M.; Hondzo, M.

    2017-12-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) are made up of potentially toxic freshwater microorganisms called cyanobacteria, because of this they are a ecological and public health hazard. The occurrences of toxic HAB are unpredictable and highly spatially and temporary variable in freshwater ecosystems. To study the abiotic drivers for toxic HAB, a floating research station has been deployed in a hyper-eutrophic lake in Madison Lake, Minnesota, from June-October 2016. This research station provides full depth water quality (hourly) and meteorological monitoring (5 minutes). Water quality monitoring is performed by an autonomously traversed water quality sonde that provides chemical, physical and biological measurements; including phycocyanin, a photosynthetic pigment distinct to cyanobacteria. A bloom of cyanobacteria recorded in the epiliminion in mid-July was driven by prolonged strong thermal stratification in the water column, high surface water temperatures and high phosphate concentrations in the epiliminion. The high biovolume (BV) persisted until late September and was sustained below the surface after stratification weakened, when the thermocline did not confine cyanobacteria-rich layers any more, and cyanobacteria vertical heterogeneities decayed in the water column. High correlations among BV stratification, surface water temperature, and stratification stability informed the development of a quantitative relationship to determine how BV heterogeneities vary with thermal structure in the water column. The BV heterogeneity decreased with thermal stratification stability and surface water temperature, and the dynamic lake stability described by the Lake Number. Finally the location of maximum BV accumulation showed diurnal patterns ie. BV peaks were observed at 1 m depth during the day and deeper layers during the night, which followed patterns in light penetration and thermocline depth. These findings capture cyanobacteria vertical and temporal heterogeneities on a on

  13. Reliability and Validity of the Load-Velocity Relationship to Predict the 1RM Back Squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Harry G; Nosaka, Kazunori; Haff, G Gregory

    2017-07-01

    Banyard, HG, Nosaka, K, and Haff, GG. Reliability and validity of the load-velocity relationship to predict the 1RM back squat. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1897-1904, 2017-This study investigated the reliability and validity of the load-velocity relationship to predict the free-weight back squat one repetition maximum (1RM). Seventeen strength-trained males performed three 1RM assessments on 3 separate days. All repetitions were performed to full depth with maximal concentric effort. Predicted 1RMs were calculated by entering the mean concentric velocity of the 1RM (V1RM) into an individualized linear regression equation, which was derived from the load-velocity relationship of 3 (20, 40, 60% of 1RM), 4 (20, 40, 60, 80% of 1RM), or 5 (20, 40, 60, 80, 90% of 1RM) incremental warm-up sets. The actual 1RM (140.3 ± 27.2 kg) was very stable between 3 trials (ICC = 0.99; SEM = 2.9 kg; CV = 2.1%; ES = 0.11). Predicted 1RM from 5 warm-up sets up to and including 90% of 1RM was the most reliable (ICC = 0.92; SEM = 8.6 kg; CV = 5.7%; ES = -0.02) and valid (r = 0.93; SEE = 10.6 kg; CV = 7.4%; ES = 0.71) of the predicted 1RM methods. However, all predicted 1RMs were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05; ES = 0.71-1.04) from the actual 1RM. Individual variation for the actual 1RM was small between trials ranging from -5.6 to 4.8% compared with the most accurate predictive method up to 90% of 1RM, which was more variable (-5.5 to 27.8%). Importantly, the V1RM (0.24 ± 0.06 m·s) was unreliable between trials (ICC = 0.42; SEM = 0.05 m·s; CV = 22.5%; ES = 0.14). The load-velocity relationship for the full depth free-weight back squat showed moderate reliability and validity but could not accurately predict 1RM, which was stable between trials. Thus, the load-velocity relationship 1RM prediction method used in this study cannot accurately modify sessional training loads because of large V1RM variability.

  14. Fracture Behavior and Properties of Functionally Graded Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, Jeffery; Bordelon, Amanda; Gaedicke, Cristian; Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio

    2008-01-01

    In concrete pavements, a single concrete mixture design is selected to resist mechanical loading without attempting to adversely affect the concrete pavement shrinkage, ride quality, or noise attenuation. An alternative approach is to design distinct layers within the concrete pavement surface which have specific functions thus achieving higher performance at a lower cost. The objective of this research was to address the structural benefits of functionally graded concrete materials (FGCM) for rigid pavements by testing and modeling the fracture behavior of different combinations of layered plain and synthetic fiber-reinforced concrete materials. Fracture parameters and the post-peak softening behavior were obtained for each FGCM beam configuration by the three point bending beam test. The peak loads and initial fracture energy between the plain, fiber-reinforced, and FGCM signified similar crack initiation. The total fracture energy indicated improvements in fracture behavior of FGCM relative to full-depth plain concrete. The fracture behavior of FGCM depended on the position of the fiber-reinforced layer relative to the starter notch. The fracture parameters of both fiber-reinforced and plain concrete were embedded into a finite element-based cohesive zone model. The model successfully captured the experimental behavior of the FGCMs and predicted the fracture behavior of proposed FGCM configurations and structures. This integrated approach (testing and modeling) demonstrates the viability of FGCM for designing layered concrete pavements system

  15. The Reliability of Individualized Load-Velocity Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Harry G; Nosaka, K; Vernon, Alex D; Haff, G Gregory

    2017-11-15

    This study examined the reliability of peak velocity (PV), mean propulsive velocity (MPV), and mean velocity (MV) in the development of load-velocity profiles (LVP) in the full depth free-weight back squat performed with maximal concentric effort. Eighteen resistance-trained men performed a baseline one-repetition maximum (1RM) back squat trial and three subsequent 1RM trials used for reliability analyses, with 48-hours interval between trials. 1RM trials comprised lifts from six relative loads including 20, 40, 60, 80, 90, and 100% 1RM. Individualized LVPs for PV, MPV, or MV were derived from loads that were highly reliable based on the following criteria: intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) >0.70, coefficient of variation (CV) ≤10%, and Cohen's d effect size (ES) 0.05) between trials, movement velocities, or between linear regression versus second order polynomial fits. PV 20-100% , MPV 20-90% , and MV 20-90% are reliable and can be utilized to develop LVPs using linear regression. Conceptually, LVPs can be used to monitor changes in movement velocity and employed as a method for adjusting sessional training loads according to daily readiness.

  16. Toward the Computational Representation of Individual Cultural, Cognitive, and Physiological State: The Sensor Shooter Simulation; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAYBOURN, ELAINE M.; FORSYTHE, JAMES C.

    2001-01-01

    This report documents an exploratory FY 00 LDRD project that sought to demonstrate the first steps toward a realistic computational representation of the variability encountered in individual human behavior. Realism, as conceptualized in this project, required that the human representation address the underlying psychological, cultural, physiological, and environmental stressors. The present report outlines the researchers' approach to representing cognitive, cultural, and physiological variability of an individual in an ambiguous situation while faced with a high-consequence decision that would greatly impact subsequent events. The present project was framed around a sensor-shooter scenario as a soldier interacts with an unexpected target (two young Iraqi girls). A software model of the ''Sensor Shooter'' scenario from Desert Storm was developed in which the framework consisted of a computational instantiation of Recognition Primed Decision Making in the context of a Naturalistic Decision Making model[1]. Recognition Primed Decision Making was augmented with an underlying foundation based on our current understanding of human neurophysiology and its relationship to human cognitive processes. While the Gulf War scenario that constitutes the framework for the Sensor Shooter prototype is highly specific, the human decision architecture and the subsequent simulation are applicable to other problems similar in concept, intensity, and degree of uncertainty. The goal was to provide initial steps toward a computational representation of human variability in cultural, cognitive, and physiological state in order to attain a better understanding of the full depth of human decision-making processes in the context of ambiguity, novelty, and heightened arousal

  17. Observations of brine drainage networks and microstructure of first-year sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, D. M.; Shapiro, L. H.

    1998-09-01

    Brine drainage networks and the microstructure of first-year sea ice have been examined at two locations near Barrow, northern Alaska. A method for obtaining full-depth sections of ice sheets up to 1.8 m thick is presented and shown to provide information on the spatial distribution and geometry of brine drainage networks on a scale of meters. A number of such sections from the two test sites are presented which reveal a greater variety of main channel and side branch configurations than is typically observed in ice grown in the laboratory. Vertical and horizontal micrographs and thin section photographs were obtained in November 1993, and March and May 1994 at a test site in the relatively protected Elson Lagoon. The resulting time series of photographic records provide detailed information on the size, shape, and spatial distribution of the brine- and gas-filled inclusions and a means to quantify their size and shape changes with time. An example of the changes with time in inclusion sizes and aspect ratios in the vertical and horizontal directions for a depth of 0.2 m, with a given thermal history is also presented.

  18. Treatment of oil sands mature fine tailings with silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffett, R.H. [DuPont Canada Inc., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed a method of treating mature fine tailings (MFT) with silica. Rheology modifications with silica treatments were examined. Experimental studies demonstrated a significant slump at 30 minutes after mixing. Flow properties were studied at a 2 degree angle. The MFT thin lift evaporative drying procedure was used to determine the effects of the silica treatments. Methods of using pressure to dewater MFTs were reviewed. The results of a field test conducted to determine the flow behaviour of MFTs treated with low dose silica were presented. Drying characteristics and strength gains were also evaluated. Results of the study showed that the MFTs had a tendency to channel at discharge points. After a 15 day period that included a freeze-thaw the MFTs had cracks that continued to enlarge, full depth cracking, and fine cracking. The field tests demonstrated that in-situ polymerization of silica within the water phase of fluid fine tails provides significant modifications to rheological properties, and that the onset of rheological modification can be controlled over a range of conditions and times. tabs., figs.

  19. Sonourethrography of anterior urethral strictures: assessment of length and degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Jeong, Youn Sin

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed out experience of sonourethrography(SUG) in male anterior urethral strictures to correlate the stricture length and degree seen on SUG with those on urethroscopy, surgery or biopsy. During the recent 6 years,both the retrograde urethrography (RUG) and SUG were preformed in 50 occasions for 47 patients with anteriorurethral stricture, that were subsequently evaluated urethroscopically or at surgery. As a whole, the length of the stricture seen on SUG did not correlate very well with that seen on RGU (r2=0.71, p<0.005). Considering the data from the operation as the gold standard, SUG was more accurate than RUG in depicting the exact stricturelength (r2=0.97 and 0.75 respectively,p<0.005). The shorter the lesion, the more accurate the data obtained.Although SUG certainly identified periurethral tissue, it was not adequate in predicting the depth of spongiofibrosis compared with full-depth biopsies in 20 patients. In conclusion, SUG, a dynamic study, accurately defined the stricture site, number and calibre. When compared with RUG, SUG was more accurate in the measurement of stricture length and in the demonstration of periurethral tissue, making it a valuable method in the evaluation of patients with suspected anterior urethral strictures

  20. Reconnecting fragmented sturgeon populations in North American rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Henriette; Parsley, Michael J.; Cech, Joseph J. Jr.; McLaughlin, R.L.; Forsythe, Patrick S.; Elliott, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of large North American rivers are fragmented by dams that interrupt migrations of wide-ranging fishes like sturgeons. Reconnecting habitat is viewed as an important means of protecting sturgeon species in U.S. rivers because these species have lost between 5% and 60% of their historical ranges. Unfortunately, facilities designed to pass other fishes have rarely worked well for sturgeons. The most successful passage facilities were sized appropriately for sturgeons and accommodated bottom-oriented species. For upstream passage, facilities with large entrances, full-depth guidance systems, large lifts, or wide fishways without obstructions or tight turns worked well. However, facilitating upstream migration is only half the battle. Broader recovery for linked sturgeon populations requires safe “round-trip” passage involving multiple dams. The most successful downstream passage facilities included nature-like fishways, large canal bypasses, and bottom-draw sluice gates. We outline an adaptive approach to implementing passage that begins with temporary programs and structures and monitors success both at the scale of individual fish at individual dams and the scale of metapopulations in a river basin. The challenge will be to learn from past efforts and reconnect North American sturgeon populations in a way that promotes range expansion and facilitates population recovery.

  1. Performance Evaluation of Hot Mix Asphalt with Different Proportions of RAP Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Arshad Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP is old asphalt pavement that has been removed from a road by milling or full depth removal. The use of RAP in hot mix asphalt (HMA eliminates the need to dispose old asphalt pavements and conserves asphalt binders and aggregates, resulting in significant cost savings and benefits to society. This paper presents a study on HMA with different RAP proportions carried out to evaluate the volumetric properties and performance of asphalt mixes containing different proportions of RAP. Marshall Mix Design Method was used to produce control mix (0% RAP and asphalt mixes containing 15% RAP, 25% RAP and 35% RAP in accordance with Specifications for Road Works of Public Works Department, Malaysia for AC14 dense graded asphalt gradation. Volumetric analysis was performed to ensure that the result is compliance with specification requirements. The resilient modulus test was performed to measure the stiffness of the mixes while the Modified Lottman test was conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of these mixes. The Hamburg wheel tracking test was used to evaluate the rutting performance of these mixes. The results obtained showed that there were no substantial difference in Marshall Properties, moisture susceptibility, resilient modulus and rutting resistance between asphalt mixes with RAP and the control mix. The test results indicated that recycled mixes performed as good as the performance of conventional HMA in terms of moisture susceptibility and resilient modulus. It is recommended that further research be carried out for asphalt mixes containing more than 35% RAP material.

  2. Outdoor corrosion of zinc coated carbon steel, determined by thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostini, M.L.; Laguzzi, G.; De Cristofaro, N.; Stroosnijder, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Thin Layer Activation was applied in the frame of a European programme addressed to the evaluation of the corrosion the behaviour of different steels. This included outdoor exposure of zinc coated carbon steel in a rural-marine climatic environment, for a period of several months. The zinc layer of specimens was 10 micrometers thick. For the TLA studies 65Zn radio nuclides were produced along the full depth of the coating, by a cyclotron accelerated deuteron beam. For quantification of the material release, activity versus depth was determined using different thickness of Zn coatings on top the carbon steel. After exposure corrosion product were removed from the surface using a pickling solution and the residual activity was determined by gamma spectrometry. The high sensitivity of the method allowed the evaluation of relatively small thickness losses (i.e. 1.2 micrometer). Thickness loss results, obtained by the TLA method, were compared with those arising from the Atomic Absorption analysis of zinc detected in the pickling solutions. A good agreement was observed between the different methods

  3. Core-logs of the vertical borehole V2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, L.; Egerth, T.; Westlund, B.; Olsson, T.

    1982-08-01

    In the hydrogeological programme of the Stripa Project, borehole V2 was prolonged to a final depth of 822 m. The previous core from 0-471.4 m was relogged. The drill core was logged with regard to rock characteristics, fracture frequency, dipping and filling. The results are presented as core-logs and fracture diagrams. Borehole V2 shows similar characteristics as found in other drillings in the Stripa Mine. It penetrates Stripa granite to its full depth. recorded fractures shows a clear predominance of medium-steep fractures, while flat-lying fractures are more sparsly occuring, a fact which is even more pronounced below 400 m depth. Due to the vertical direction of the borehole, steeply dipping fractures are underestimated in the core. The mean fracture frequency, related to the total length of the core, is 2.1 fractures/m. Chlorite, calcite and epidote are the dominating coating minerals in the fractures, each making up about 25-30 percent of all coated fractures. (Authors)

  4. Double-diffusive convection and baroclinic instability in a differentially heated and initially stratified rotating system: the barostrat instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincze, Miklos; Borcia, Ion; Harlander, Uwe [Department of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU) Cottbus-Senftenberg, Siemens-Halske-Ring 14, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany); Gal, Patrice Le, E-mail: vincze.m@lecso.elte.hu [Institut de Recherche sur les Phénomènes Hors Equilibre, CNRS—Aix-Marseille University—Ecole Centrale Marseille, 49 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13384 Marseille (France)

    2016-12-15

    A water-filled differentially heated rotating annulus with initially prepared stable vertical salinity profiles is studied in the laboratory. Based on two-dimensional horizontal particle image velocimetry data and infrared camera visualizations, we describe the appearance and the characteristics of the baroclinic instability in this original configuration. First, we show that when the salinity profile is linear and confined between two non-stratified layers at top and bottom, only two separate shallow fluid layers can be destabilized. These unstable layers appear nearby the top and the bottom of the tank with a stratified motionless zone between them. This laboratory arrangement is thus particularly interesting to model geophysical or astrophysical situations where stratified regions are often juxtaposed to convective ones. Then, for more general but stable initial density profiles, statistical measures are introduced to quantify the extent of the baroclinic instability at given depths and to analyze the connections between this depth-dependence and the vertical salinity profiles. We find that, although the presence of stable stratification generally hinders full-depth overturning, double-diffusive convection can lead to development of multicellular sideways convection in shallow layers and subsequently to a multilayered baroclinic instability. Therefore we conclude that by decreasing the characteristic vertical scale of the flow, stratification may even enhance the formation of cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies (and thus, mixing) in a local sense. (paper)

  5. On the outflow of dense water from the Weddell and Ross Seas in OCCAM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kerr

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the seasonal and interannual variability of volume transports in the Weddell and Ross Seas using the 1/12° 20-yr simulation of the OCCAM global ocean general circulation model. The average simulated full-depth cumulative volume transports were 28.5 ± 2.9 Sv (1 Sv ≡ 106 m3 s−1 and 13.4 ± 5.2 Sv, across the main export regions of the Weddell and Ross Seas, respectively. The values of mean outflow of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW (defined by neutral density γn ≥ 28.27 kg m−3 from the Weddell and Ross Seas of 10.6 ± 3.1 Sv and 0.5 ± 0.7 Sv, respectively, agree with the range reported in historical observational studies. The export of Weddell Sea dense water in OCCAM is primarily determined by the strength of the Weddell Gyre. Variability in AABW export is predominantly at periods of ~1 yr and 2–4 yr.

  6. Understanding ayurveda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Vaidya Dilip

    2010-01-01

    Ayurveda needs to achieve its full potential both in India and globally. This requires imparting to its students full appreciation of Ayurveda's power and strength, particularly proper understanding of the advantages of applying it to treat chronic and acute diseases. To this end, we explain the necessity of learning Sanskrit as a medium of study, and the advantages of learning the Texts in the traditional way, rather than relying on translations with all the loss of meaning and precision, which that entails. We emphasize the use of Triskandhakosha as a means to fully understand Ayurveda fundamental concepts and technical terms, so that all their shades of meaning are fully understood, and all their usages given in different places in the texts. Only by such methods can full appreciation of Ayurvedic wisdom be achieved, and the full depth and power of its knowledge be applied. Only then will its true status among systems of medicine come to be appreciated, either in India or more widely in the world as a whole.

  7. Understanding Ayurveda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidya Dilip Gadgil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda needs to achieve its full potential both in India and globally. This requires imparting to its students full appreciation of Ayurveda′s power and strength, particularly proper understanding of the advantages of applying it to treat chronic and acute diseases. To this end, we explain the necessity of learning Sanskrit as a medium of study, and the advantages of learning the Texts in the traditional way, rather than relying on translations with all the loss of meaning and precision, which that entails. We emphasize the use of Triskandhakosha as a means to fully understand Ayurveda fundamental concepts and technical terms, so that all their shades of meaning are fully understood, and all their usages given in different places in the texts. Only by such methods can full appreciation of Ayurvedic wisdom be achieved, and the full depth and power of its knowledge be applied. Only then will its true status among systems of medicine come to be appreciated, either in India or more widely in the world as a whole.

  8. Basalt aquifer identification, correlation and sampling activities. History of Wells DB-8, DB-9, DB-10 and DB-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, C.T.

    1979-07-01

    Research core wells have been completed to assist in the characterization of the groundwater regime of the upper confined aquifers found within the basalts of the Hanford Site. These wells were drilled on the Hanford Site for the Long-Term Transuranic Defense Waste Program. They were constructed to assure the Department of Energy that waste management operations will not provide an avenue for offsite migration of radionuclides. This second report details results of confined aquifer drilling activities. The purpose of this report is to document the drilling history of the wells by presenting as-built well construction diagrams and tables listing hole history data, coring records and bit records. Four wells were cored to a maximum depth of 1100 feet and water samples were taken from selected confined aquifers. Full depth was reached on all wells and core recovery was 94% of all formations drilled. Well DB-8 was abandoned after a well screen was destroyed while setting it in the well. Two wells, DB-9 and DB-10 were screened in the Mabton interbed and water was produced from this interval in both wells. Well DB-11 was used to explore for artesian water from the Priest Rapids flow unit on the western edge of the Hanford Site. The water was found at a depth of 1045 feet and now produces makeup water for all Hanford drilling

  9. Ocean Heat Uptake Slows 21st Century Surface Warming Driven by Extratropical Cloud Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, W.; Maroon, E.; Pendergrass, A. G.; Kay, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS), the warming in response to instantaneously doubled CO2, has long been used to compare climate models. In many models, ECS is well correlated with warming produced by transient forcing experiments. Modifications to cloud phase at high latitudes in a state-of-the-art climate model, the Community Earth System Model (CESM), produce a large increase in ECS (1.5 K) via extratropical cloud feedbacks. However, only a small surface warming increase occurs in a realistic 21st century simulation including a full-depth dynamic ocean and the "business as usual" RCP8.5 emissions scenario. In fact, the increase in surface warming is only barely above the internal variability-generated range in the CESM Large Ensemble. The small change in 21st century warming is attributed to subpolar ocean heat uptake in both hemispheres. In the Southern Ocean, the mean-state circulation takes up heat while in the North Atlantic a slowdown in circulation acts as a feedback to slow surface warming. These results show the importance of subpolar ocean heat uptake in controlling the pace of warming and demonstrate that ECS cannot be used to reliably infer transient warming when it is driven by extratropical feedbacks.

  10. Concentration processes under tubesheet sludge piles in nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, F.; Spekkens, P.

    1987-01-01

    The process by which bulk water solutes are concentrated under tubesheet sludge piles in nuclear steam generators was investigated in the laboratory under simulated CANDU operating conditions. Concentration rates were found to depend on the tube heat flux and pile depth, although beyond a critical depth the concentration efficiency decreased. This efficiency could be expressed by a concentration coefficient, and was found to depend also on the sludge pile porosity. Solute concentration profiles in the sludge pile suggested that the concentration mechanism in a high-porosity/permeability pile is characterized by boiling mainly near or at the tube surface, while in low-porosity piles, the change of phase may also become important in the body of the sludge pile. In all cases, the full depth of the pile was active to some extent in the concentration process. As long as the heat transfer under the pile was continued, the solute remained under the pile and slowly migrated toward the bottom. When the heat transfer was stopped, the solute diffused back into the bulk solution at a rate slower than that of the concentration process

  11. The First Brown Dwarf Discovered by the Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 Citizen Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc J.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Schneider, Adam C.; Meisner, Aaron M.; Filippazzo, Joseph C.; Gagne, Jonathan; Trouille, Laura; Silverberg, Steven M.; Castro, Rosa; Fletcher, Bob; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is a powerful tool for finding nearby brown dwarfs and searching for new planets in the outer solar system, especially with the incorporation of NEOWISE and NEOWISE Reactivation data. However, so far, searches for brown dwarfs in WISE data have yet to take advantage of the full depth of the WISE images. To efficiently search this unexplored space via visual inspection, we have launched anew citizen science project, called "Backyard Worlds: Planet 9," which asks volunteers to examine short animations composed of difference images constructed from time-resolved WISE co adds. We report the first new substellar object discovered by this project, WISEA J110125.95+540052.8, a T5.5 brown dwarf located approximately 34 pc from the Sun with a total proper motion of approx.0. "7/ yr. WISEA J110125.95+540052.8 has a WISE W2 magnitude of W2 = 15.37+/- 0.09; our sensitivity to this source demonstrates the ability of citizen scientists to identify moving objects via visual inspection that are 0.9 mag fainter than the W2 single-exposure sensitivity, a threshold that has limited prior motion-based brown dwarf searches with WISE.

  12. Performance Evaluation of Hot Mix Asphalt with Different Proportions of RAP Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamil Arshad, Ahmad; Awang, Haryati; Shaffie, Ekarizan; Hashim, Wardati; Rahman, Zanariah Abd

    2018-03-01

    Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP) is old asphalt pavement that has been removed from a road by milling or full depth removal. The use of RAP in hot mix asphalt (HMA) eliminates the need to dispose old asphalt pavements and conserves asphalt binders and aggregates, resulting in significant cost savings and benefits to society. This paper presents a study on HMA with different RAP proportions carried out to evaluate the volumetric properties and performance of asphalt mixes containing different proportions of RAP. Marshall Mix Design Method was used to produce control mix (0% RAP) and asphalt mixes containing 15% RAP, 25% RAP and 35% RAP in accordance with Specifications for Road Works of Public Works Department, Malaysia for AC14 dense graded asphalt gradation. Volumetric analysis was performed to ensure that the result is compliance with specification requirements. The resilient modulus test was performed to measure the stiffness of the mixes while the Modified Lottman test was conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of these mixes. The Hamburg wheel tracking test was used to evaluate the rutting performance of these mixes. The results obtained showed that there were no substantial difference in Marshall Properties, moisture susceptibility, resilient modulus and rutting resistance between asphalt mixes with RAP and the control mix. The test results indicated that recycled mixes performed as good as the performance of conventional HMA in terms of moisture susceptibility and resilient modulus. It is recommended that further research be carried out for asphalt mixes containing more than 35% RAP material.

  13. Basic data report for drillhole WIPP 12 (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    WIPP 12 is a borehole drilled in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico, to investigate the stratigraphy, structure and lithology in the WIPP area. WIPP 12 was drilled in section 17, T22S,R31E, between November 9 and December 7, 1978. The hole was drilled to a depth of 2785.8 ft. It encountered from top to bottom, 16.2 ft of sand, 3 ft of Mescalero Caliche and 9.6 ft of the Gatuna Formation, all of Quaternary age; 138.2 ft of the Triassic Santa Rosa Formation, 483 ft of the Dewey Lake Red Beds, 326 ft of the Rustler Formation, 1771.5 ft of the Salado Formation, and 48.3 ft of the Castile Formation, all of Permian age. Cores or cuttings were obtained for the entire hole. A suite of geophysical logs, including neutron gamma and density curves, was run to the full depth of WIPP 12. The borehole demonstrated that the elevation of the top of the Castile is about 160' above the same horizon in ERDA 9. The WIPP is a demonstration facility for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste from defense programs. The WIPP will also provide a research facility to investigate the interactions between bedded salt and high level wastes

  14. 3-D visualization and quantitation of microvessels in transparent human colorectal carcinoma [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-An Liu

    Full Text Available Microscopic analysis of tumor vasculature plays an important role in understanding the progression and malignancy of colorectal carcinoma. However, due to the geometry of blood vessels and their connections, standard microtome-based histology is limited in providing the spatial information of the vascular network with a 3-dimensional (3-D continuum. To facilitate 3-D tissue analysis, we prepared transparent human colorectal biopsies by optical clearing for in-depth confocal microscopy with CD34 immunohistochemistry. Full-depth colons were obtained from colectomies performed for colorectal carcinoma. Specimens were prepared away from (control and at the tumor site. Taking advantage of the transparent specimens, we acquired anatomic information up to 200 μm in depth for qualitative and quantitative analyses of the vasculature. Examples are given to illustrate: (1 the association between the tumor microstructure and vasculature in space, including the perivascular cuffs of tumor outgrowth, and (2 the difference between the 2-D and 3-D quantitation of microvessels. We also demonstrate that the optically cleared mucosa can be retrieved after 3-D microscopy to perform the standard microtome-based histology (H&E staining and immunohistochemistry for systematic integration of the two tissue imaging methods. Overall, we established a new tumor histological approach to integrate 3-D imaging, illustration, and quantitation of human colonic microvessels in normal and cancerous specimens. This approach has significant promise to work with the standard histology to better characterize the tumor microenvironment in colorectal carcinoma.

  15. Double-diffusive convection and baroclinic instability in a differentially heated and initially stratified rotating system: the barostrat instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincze, Miklos; Borcia, Ion; Harlander, Uwe; Gal, Patrice Le

    2016-01-01

    A water-filled differentially heated rotating annulus with initially prepared stable vertical salinity profiles is studied in the laboratory. Based on two-dimensional horizontal particle image velocimetry data and infrared camera visualizations, we describe the appearance and the characteristics of the baroclinic instability in this original configuration. First, we show that when the salinity profile is linear and confined between two non-stratified layers at top and bottom, only two separate shallow fluid layers can be destabilized. These unstable layers appear nearby the top and the bottom of the tank with a stratified motionless zone between them. This laboratory arrangement is thus particularly interesting to model geophysical or astrophysical situations where stratified regions are often juxtaposed to convective ones. Then, for more general but stable initial density profiles, statistical measures are introduced to quantify the extent of the baroclinic instability at given depths and to analyze the connections between this depth-dependence and the vertical salinity profiles. We find that, although the presence of stable stratification generally hinders full-depth overturning, double-diffusive convection can lead to development of multicellular sideways convection in shallow layers and subsequently to a multilayered baroclinic instability. Therefore we conclude that by decreasing the characteristic vertical scale of the flow, stratification may even enhance the formation of cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies (and thus, mixing) in a local sense. (paper)

  16. Development of high-speed and wide-angle visible observation diagnostics on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak using catadioptric optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J. H.; Hu, L. Q.; Zang, Q.; Han, X. F.; Shao, C. Q.; Sun, T. F.; Chen, H.; Wang, T. F.; Li, F. J.; Hu, A. L.; Yang, X. F.

    2013-01-01

    A new wide-angle endoscope for visible light observation on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) has been recently developed. The head section of the optical system is based on a mirror reflection design that is similar to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like wide-angle observation diagnostic on the Joint European Torus. However, the optical system design has been simplified and improved. As a result, the global transmittance of the system is as high as 79.6% in the wavelength range from 380 to 780 nm, and the spatial resolution is <5 mm for the full depth of field (4000 mm). The optical system also has a large relative aperture (1:2.4) and can be applied in high-speed camera diagnostics. As an important diagnostic tool, the optical system has been installed on the HT-7 (Hefei Tokamak-7) for its final experimental campaign, and the experiments confirmed that it can be applied to the investigation of transient processes in plasma, such as ELMy eruptions in H-mode, on EAST

  17. Spectroscopic study of nitrogen distribution in N-doped carbon nanotubes and nanofibers synthesized by catalytic ethylene-ammonia decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svintsitskiy, Dmitry A.; Kibis, Lidiya S.; Smirnov, Dmitry A.; Suboch, Arina N.; Stonkus, Olga A.; Podyacheva, Olga Yu.; Boronin, Andrei I.; Ismagilov, Zinfer R.

    2018-03-01

    Carbon and nitrogen species on the surface of carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) and nanofibers (N-CNFs) were studied by X-ray absorption (XAS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) including the analysis of nitrogen distribution over the depth of materials. The study was performed with a series of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes and nanofibers having the platelet-like and herringbone-like morphology. It was shown that the main nitrogen species in the composition of the studied materials are pyridine, pyrrole (and/or amino groups), graphite-like and oxidized states of nitrogen. In distinction to nanofibers, the bamboo-like nanotubes additionally contain molecular nitrogen encapsulated in the internal hollows. Spectral data for different depths of analysis were obtained by varying the energy of incident radiation. Such an approach revealed that N-CNTs are characterized by non-uniform distribution of chemically bound nitrogen species. Thus, nitrogen enrichment was observed on the external surface and in the internal arches of carbon nanotubes. Nitrogen enrichment in the subsurface region was found for N-CNFs, whereas the full depth analysis of N-distribution was limited by a large diameter of nanofibers.

  18. Basic data report for Drillhole WIPP 14 (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Borehole WIPP 14 is an exploratory well drilled in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico, in section 9, T22S,R31E. The borehole was drilled to a depth of 1000.0 ft measured from ground level. It penetrated, from top to bottom, 15.4 ft of Quaternary sands, 125.6 ft of the Triassic Santa Rosa Sandstone, and in the Permian strata, 497.7 ft of the Dewey Lake Red Beds, 312.9 ft of the Rustler Formation and 48.4 ft of the Upper Salado Formation. Seven hundred feet of the well were cored, at consecutive and nonconsecutive 10-ft intervals to a depth of 925.5 ft. Cuttings were collected where core was not taken. Density, gamma ray neutron and caliper logs were run the full depth of the hole. The WIPP is a demonstration facility for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste from defense programs. The WIPP will also provide a research facility to investigate the interactions between bedded salt and high level wastes

  19. Overview of fast algorithm in 3D dynamic holographic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Jia, Jia; Pan, Yijie; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-08-01

    3D dynamic holographic display is one of the most attractive techniques for achieving real 3D vision with full depth cue without any extra devices. However, huge 3D information and data should be preceded and be computed in real time for generating the hologram in 3D dynamic holographic display, and it is a challenge even for the most advanced computer. Many fast algorithms are proposed for speeding the calculation and reducing the memory usage, such as:look-up table (LUT), compressed look-up table (C-LUT), split look-up table (S-LUT), and novel look-up table (N-LUT) based on the point-based method, and full analytical polygon-based methods, one-step polygon-based method based on the polygon-based method. In this presentation, we overview various fast algorithms based on the point-based method and the polygon-based method, and focus on the fast algorithm with low memory usage, the C-LUT, and one-step polygon-based method by the 2D Fourier analysis of the 3D affine transformation. The numerical simulations and the optical experiments are presented, and several other algorithms are compared. The results show that the C-LUT algorithm and the one-step polygon-based method are efficient methods for saving calculation time. It is believed that those methods could be used in the real-time 3D holographic display in future.

  20. The immigrant paradox: immigrants are less antisocial than native-born Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Michael G; Salas-Wright, Christopher P; DeLisi, Matt; Maynard, Brandy R

    2014-07-01

    Although recent research on crime and violence among immigrants suggests a paradox--where immigrants are more socially disadvantaged yet less likely to commit crime--previous research is limited by issues of generalizability and assessment of the full depth of antisocial behavior. We surmount these limitations using data from waves I and II of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and compare immigrants (N = 7,320) from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America to native-born Americans (N = 34,622) with respect to violent and nonviolent forms of antisocial behavior. After controlling for an extensive array of confounds, results indicate that immigrants are significantly less antisocial despite being more likely to have lower levels of income, less education, and reside in urban areas. These findings hold for immigrants from major regions of the world including Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. This study confirms and extends prior research on crime and antisocial behavior, but suggests that it is premature however to think of immigrants as a policy intervention for treating high crime areas.

  1. VUV Fourier-transform absorption study of the Lyman and Werner bands in D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Arno; Dickenson, Gareth D.; Salumbides, Edcel J.; Ubachs, Wim; de Oliveira, Nelson; Joyeux, Denis; Nahon, Laurent

    2012-06-01

    An extensive survey of the D2 absorption spectrum has been performed with the high-resolution VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer employing synchrotron radiation. The frequency range of 90 000-119 000 cm-1 covers the full depth of the potential wells of the B sideset{^1}{+u}{Σ}, B^' } sideset{^1}{+u}{Σ}, and C 1Πu electronic states up to the D(1s) + D(2ℓ) dissociation limit. Improved level energies of rovibrational levels have been determined up to respectively v = 51, v = 13, and v = 20. Highest resolution is achieved by probing absorption in a molecular gas jet with slit geometry, as well as in a liquid helium cooled static gas cell, resulting in line widths of ≈0.35 cm-1. Extended calibration methods are employed to extract line positions of D2 lines at absolute accuracies of 0.03 cm-1. The D 1Πu and B^' ' } sideset{^1}{+u}{Σ} electronic states correlate with the D(1s) + D(3ℓ) dissociation limit, but support a few vibrational levels below the second dissociation limit, respectively, v = 0-3 and v = 0-1, and are also included in the presented study. The complete set of resulting level energies is the most comprehensive and accurate data set for D2. The observations are compared with previous studies, both experimental and theoretical.

  2. Grout to meet physical and chemical requirements for closure at Hanford grout vaults. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout based on portland cement, Class F fly ash, and bentonite clay, for the Hanford Grout Vault Program. The purpose of this grout was to fill the void between a wasteform containing 106-AN waste and the vault cover blocks. Following a successful grout development program, heat output, volume change, and compressive strength were monitored with time in simulated repository conditions and in full-depth physical models. This research indicated that the cold-cap grout could achieve and maintain adequate volume stability and other required physical properties in the internal environment of a sealed vault. To determine if contact with 106-AN liquid waste would cause chemical deterioration of the cold-cap grout, cured specimens were immersed in simulated waste. Over a period of 21 days at 150 F, specimens increased in mass without significant changes in volume. X-ray diffraction of reacted specimens revealed crystallization of sodium aluminum silicate hydrate. Scanning electron microscopy used with X-ray fluorescence showed that clusters if this phase had formed in grout pores, increasing grout density and decreasing its effective porosity. Physical and chemical tests collectively indicate a sealing component. However, the Hanford Grout Vault Program was cancelled before completion of this research. This report summarizes close-out Waterways Experiment Station when the Program was cancelled

  3. Deep data: discovery and visualization Application to hyperspectral ALMA imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merényi, Erzsébet; Taylor, Joshua; Isella, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    Leading-edge telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter and sub-millimeter Array (ALMA), and near-future ones, are capable of imaging the same sky area at hundreds-to-thousands of frequencies with both high spectral and spatial resolution. This provides unprecedented opportunities for discovery about the spatial, kinematical and compositional structure of sources such as molecular clouds or protoplanetary disks, and more. However, in addition to enormous volume, the data also exhibit unprecedented complexity, mandating new approaches for extracting and summarizing relevant information. Traditional techniques such as examining images at selected frequencies become intractable while tools that integrate data across frequencies or pixels (like moment maps) can no longer fully exploit and visualize the rich information. We present a neural map-based machine learning approach that can handle all spectral channels simultaneously, utilizing the full depth of these data for discovery and visualization of spectrally homogeneous spatial regions (spectral clusters) that characterize distinct kinematic behaviors. We demonstrate the effectiveness on an ALMA image cube of the protoplanetary disk HD142527. The tools we collectively name ``NeuroScope'' are efficient for ``Big Data'' due to intelligent data summarization that results in significant sparsity and noise reduction. We also demonstrate a new approach to automate our clustering for fast distillation of large data cubes.

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Inhibitors Targeting Jak and Ikk Have An Anabolic Effect on Type II Collagen Turnover ex Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelgaard-Petersen, Cecilie Freja; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Karsdal, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    be beneficial for the selection of novel anti-inflammatory treatments for RA and iOA. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effect of the anti-inflammatory inhibitors R406 (the active metabolite of Fostamatinib), Tofacitinib, TPCA-1 and SB203580 on the cartilage ECM turnover. Methods...... Full depth bovine cartilage ex vivo cultures were cultured for 3 weeks with OSM [10 ng/mL] and TNFα [2 ng/mL] (O+T) or together with R406, Tofacitinib or TPCA-1 at 10 μM and a two-fold dilution to 0.16 μM. SB203580 was tested at 3 μM, 1 μM and 0.3 μM. As negative control, untreated explants were...... R406, the Jak inhibitor Tofacitinib, and the IKK inhibitor TPCA-1 inhibited the release of ARGS or AGNx1, while the p38 inhibitor, SB203580, had no effect. The turnover of type II collagen was measured by the formation of type II collagen (ProC2) and MMP-mediated degradation of type II collagen (C2M...

  5. Water and soil maintenance of forests, and advancement of retaining and increasing technique of disaster preventing function. Shinrin no suido hozenter dot bosai kino no ijiter dot zoshin gijutsu no kodoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-25

    This paper is a research report concerning the water and soil maintenance and the technical advance of disaster preventing function of forests. As for the water maintenance control to clarify the water maintenance function of forests and to advance retaining and increasing technique, amount of precipitation on valleys and ridges, amount of evapotranspiration in a summer rainy season, underground water in woodlands and water circulating characteristics in montane zones were studied. The amount of evapotranspiration and the crown interception in water drainage area in Tsukuba forest of Japan were surveyed. A formula to estimate the flow rate was derived by surveying the change of flow rate through cutting forests at a riverhead in a heavy snow area and by analyzing data at 29 drainage areas. As for the clarification of the occurring mechanism of a soil disaster and the development of forest conservation technique, a simulation of boulder flow flood at a practical damaged district was carried out and it could be estimated by a tank model that the water level at a collector well fallen down in a landslide area. As for the survey of disaster preventing function of forests and the improvement of disaster preventing means, if damaged trees in frozen damage and discoloration area are pruned, the discoloration becomes very slight. The arborescent trees were selected from the standing tree density or forest physiognomy for the frequent land of full-depth avalanche. Japanese beeches, maples, oaks and Magnolia hypoleuca are suitable for a heavy snowarea. 1 tab.

  6. The ESASSI-08 cruise in the South Scotia Ridge region: preliminary analysis of hydrodynamic and biogeochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis, D.; Flexas, M. M.; Palmer, M.; Jordà, G.; Orsi, A. H.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    The ESASSI-08 oceanographic cruise carried out in January 2008 was the major milestone of ESASSI, the Spanish component of SASSI (a core project of the International Polar Year devoted to study the shelf-slope exchanges in different locations of Antarctica). The sampling strategy of the cruise consisted of 11 full-depth CTD/ADCP sections across the northern and southern slope of the South Scotia Ridge (SSR), between Elephant and Orkney Islands. The sections extend from shelf waters to open sea and the profiles were gathered at an unprecedented spatial resolution over the slope (about 2 nm). Water samples for chemical and biological analysis were also collected at each station; the analyzed parameters include trace gases (CFCs), oxygen isotopes, carbon-related parameters, and nutrients. In this presentation we show the overall distribution of the main variables across the different sections. Namely, we present: a water mass analysis (in terms of potential temperature, salinity and neutral density), estimates of velocities and fluxes across different transects and distributions of biogeochemical parameters. The ultimate aims of the ESASSI project are: 1) to elucidate the fate of the ASF when it enters the SSR from the Weddell Sea; 2) to estimate the shelf-slope exchanges for different parameters; and 3) to quantify the importance of the ventilation associated with intermediate waters flowing over the SSR with respect to the ventilation associated with bottom waters that are blocked by the SSR and flow around the Orkney Plateau.

  7. Habitat heterogeneity of hadal trenches: Considerations and implications for future studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Heather A.; Jamieson, Alan J.

    2018-02-01

    The hadal zone largely comprises a series of subduction trenches that do not form part of the continental shelf-slope rise to abyssal plain continuum. Instead they form geographically isolated clusters of deep-sea (6000-11,000 m water depth) environments. There is a growing realization in hadal science that ecological patterns and processes are not driven solely by responses to hydrostatic pressure, with comparable levels of habitat heterogeneity as observed in other marine biozones. Furthermore, this heterogeneity can be expressed at multiple scales from inter-trench levels (degrees of geographical isolation, and biochemical province), to intra-trench levels (variation between trench flanks and axis), topographical features within the trench interior (sedimentary basins, ridges, escarpments, 'deeps', seamounts) to the substrate of the trench floor (seabed-sediment composition, mass movement deposits, bedrock outcrop). Using best available bathymetry data combined with the largest lander-derived imaging dataset that spans the full depth range of three hadal trenches (including adjacent slopes); the Mariana, Kermadec and New Hebrides trenches, the topographic variability, fine-scale habitat heterogeneity and distribution of seabed sediments of these three trenches have been assessed for the first time. As well as serving as the first descriptive study of habitat heterogeneity at hadal depths, this study also provides guidance for future hadal sampling campaigns taking into account geographic isolation, total trench particulate organic matter flux, maximum water depth and area.

  8. Spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry for phase-sensitive measurement of Faraday rotation at multiple depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yi-Jou; Black, Adam J; Akkin, Taner

    2013-10-10

    We describe a method for differential phase measurement of Faraday rotation from multiple depth locations simultaneously. A polarization-maintaining fiber-based spectral-domain interferometer that utilizes a low-coherent light source and a single camera is developed. Light decorrelated by the orthogonal channels of the fiber is launched on a sample as two oppositely polarized circular states. These states reflect from sample surfaces and interfere with the corresponding states of the reference arm. A custom spectrometer, which is designed to simplify camera alignment, separates the orthogonal channels and records the interference-related oscillations on both spectra. Inverse Fourier transform of the spectral oscillations in k-space yields complex depth profiles, whose amplitudes and phase difference are related to reflectivity and Faraday rotation within the sample, respectively. Information along a full depth profile is produced at the camera speed without performing an axial scan for a multisurface sample. System sensitivity for the Faraday rotation measurement is 0.86 min of arc. Verdet constants of clear liquids and turbid media are measured at 687 nm.

  9. Residual stresses associated with the hydraulic expansion of steam generator tubing into tubesheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middlebrooks, W.B.; Harrod, D.L.; Gold, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Westinghouse has used three different processes for the full depth expansion of tubes into the tube sheets of recirculating nuclear steam generators: mechanical rolling, explosive expansion and hydraulic expansion. Each process aims at expanding tubes tightly to tube sheets, leaving the smallest possible secondary side crevice depth, and minimizing the residual stress in the expanded tubes, all for the purpose of mitigating the effect of corrosion phenomena. The hydraulic expansion process was qualified and has been implemented since 1978, and more than 1.1 million tube ends have been hydraulically expanded into production units. In this paper, the results of the recent analytical studies related to the residual stress in the expanded tubes are summarized. The method of hydraulic expansion is explained, and some important parameters are given. Finite element method, theoretical incremental analysis, tube sheet yielding and residual stress, contact pressure, sensitivity analysis and temperature effect in the central region of tube sheets, and the residual stress in the transition zone are described. (K.I.)

  10. Comparative evaluation of preventive measures against primary side stress corrosion cracking of mill annealed Inconel 600 steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, G.; Hernalsteen, P.

    1986-01-01

    Significant amounts of primary side cracking have been reported in the mechanically expanded area of the tubes of PWR steam generators in Europe, in Japan and to a lesser extent in the USA. The Belgian utilities are faced with the same problem. At Doel 2, where the tubes are rolled for only a part of the tubesheet, primary side cracking appeared in the roll transition. The Doel 3 and Tihange 2 steam generators, whose tubes are expanded for the full depth of the tube sheet, have experienced cracking after about 10 000 h of operation not only in the roll transition but also at roll overlaps. While some leaks and eddy current indications are associated with tubesheet or rolling anomalies, many of them are found on normal tubes. A programme was launched by the Belgian utilities and was further co-sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to develop preventive actions applicable not only to hot steam generators but also to cold steam generators already installed on site. These preventive measures include stress relaxation and metallurgical improvement of the material by an in situ heat treatment of the whole tube sheet (a steam generator model was used to evaluate the feasibility of this treatment), and the introduction of residual compressive stresses on ID by rotopeening or shotpeening without inducing unacceptable tensile stresses on OD. A comparative evaluation of these measures was established on the basis of tests performed on representative mock-ups and specimens. (author)

  11. Restrained Shrinkage Cracking of Fiber-Reinforced High-Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Saradar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Concrete shrinkage and volume reduction happens due to the loss of moisture, which eventually results in cracks and more concrete deformation. In this study, the effect of polypropylene (PP, steel, glass, basalt, and polyolefin fibers on compressive and flexural strength, drying shrinkage, and cracking potential, using the ring test at early ages of high-strength concrete mixtures, was investigated. The restrained shrinkage test was performed on concrete ring specimens according to the ASTM C1581 standard. The crack width and age of restrained shrinkage cracking were the main parameters studied in this research. The results indicated that the addition of fiber increases the compressive strength by 16%, 20%, and 3% at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days, respectively, and increases the flexural toughness index up to 7.7 times. Steel and glass fibers had a better performance in flexural strength, but relatively poor action in the velocity reduction and cracking time of the restrained shrinkage. Additionally, cracks in all concrete ring specimens except for the polypropylene-containing mixture, was developed to a full depth crack. The mixture with polypropylene fiber indicated a reduction in crack width up to 62% and an increasing age cracking up to 84%.

  12. Effects of lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation on expression of growth-associated genes by corticospinal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieberman AR

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation around cell bodies of primary sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells enhances expression of neuronal growth-associated genes and stimulates axonal regeneration. We have asked if inflammation would have similar effects on corticospinal neurons, which normally show little response to spinal cord injury. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS was applied onto the pial surface of the motor cortex of adult rats with or without concomitant injury of the corticospinal tract at C4. Inflammation around corticospinal tract cell bodies in the motor cortex was assessed by immunohistochemistry for OX42 (a microglia and macrophage marker. Expression of growth-associated genes c-jun, ATF3, SCG10 and GAP-43 was investigated by immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridisation. Results Application of LPS induced a gradient of inflammation through the full depth of the motor cortex and promoted c-Jun and SCG10 expression for up to 2 weeks, and GAP-43 upregulation for 3 days by many corticospinal neurons, but had very limited effects on neuronal ATF3 expression. However, many glial cells in the subcortical white matter upregulated ATF3. LPS did not promote sprouting of anterogradely labelled corticospinal axons, which did not grow into or beyond a cervical lesion site. Conclusion Inflammation produced by topical application of LPS promoted increased expression of some growth-associated genes in the cell bodies of corticospinal neurons, but was insufficient to promote regeneration of the corticospinal tract.

  13. The use of reflective and permeable pavements as a potential practice for heat island mitigation and stormwater management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H; Harvey, J T; Holland, T J; Kayhanian, M

    2013-01-01

    To help address the built environmental issues of both heat island and stormwater runoff, strategies that make pavements cooler and permeable have been investigated through measurements and modeling of a set of pavement test sections. The investigation included the hydraulic and thermal performance of the pavements. The permeability results showed that permeable interlocking concrete pavers have the highest permeability (or infiltration rate, ∼0.5 cm s −1 ). The two permeable asphalt pavements showed the lowest permeability, but still had an infiltration rate of ∼0.1 cm s −1 , which is adequate to drain rainwater without generating surface runoff during most typical rain events in central California. An increase in albedo can significantly reduce the daytime high surface temperature in summer. Permeable pavements under wet conditions could give lower surface temperatures than impermeable pavements. The cooling effect highly depends on the availability of moisture near the surface layer and the evaporation rate. The peak cooling effect of watering for the test sections was approximately 15–35 °C on the pavement surface temperature in the early afternoon during summer in central California. The evaporative cooling effect on the pavement surface temperature at 4:00 pm on the third day (25 h after watering) was still 2–7 °C lower compared to that on the second day, without considering the higher air temperature on the third day. A separate and related simulation study performed by UCPRC showed that full depth permeable pavements, if designed properly, can carry both light-duty traffic and certain heavy-duty vehicles while retaining the runoff volume captured from an average California storm event. These preliminarily results indicated the technical feasibility of combined reflective and permeable pavements for addressing the built environment issues related to both heat island mitigation and stormwater runoff management. (letter)

  14. Prediction of performance and evaluation of flexible pavement rehabilitation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Won Wayne Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Five test sections with different additives and strategies were established to rehabilitate a State-maintained highway more effectively in Rhode Island (RI: control, calcium chloride, asphalt emulsion, Portland cement and geogrid. Resilient moduli of subgrade soils and subbase materials before and after full depth rehabilitation were employed as input parameters to predict the performance of pavement structures using AASHTOWare Pavement ME Design (Pavement ME software in terms of rutting, cracking and roughness. It was attempted to use Level 1 input (which includes traffic full spectrum data, climate data and structural layer properties for Pavement ME. Traffic data was obtained from a Weigh-in-Motion (WIM instrument and Providence station was used for collecting climatic data. Volumetric properties, dynamic modulus and creep compliance were used as input parameters for 19 mm (0.75 in. warm mix asphalt (WMA base and 12.5 mm (0.5 in. WMA surface layer. The results indicated that all test sections observed AC top-down (longitudinal cracking except Portland cement section which passed for all criteria. The order in terms of performance (best to worst for all test sections by Pavement ME was Portland cement, calcium chloride, control, geogrid, and asphalt emulsion. It was also observed that all test sections passed for both bottom up and top down fatigue cracking by increasing thickness of either of the two top asphalt layers. Test sections with five different base/subbase materials were evaluated in last two years through visual condition survey and measurements of deflection and roughness to confirm the prediction, but there was no serious distress and roughness. Thus these experiments allowed selecting the best rehabilitation/reconstruction techniques for the particular and/or similar highway, and a framework was formulated to select an optimal technique and/or strategy for future rehabilitation/reconstruction projects. Finally, guidelines for

  15. POOR PROGRESS STUDENTS IN LEARNING MATHEMATICS AS SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL-PEDAGOGICAL PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tatochenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to theoretical substantiation of modern methodical system of Mathematics teaching of poor progressing secondary school pupils. A systematic approach to the study of psycho-pedagogical determinants of poor progress of pupils in math was implemented. The dynamic of interfunctional relationship of structure of educational and informative sphere of poor progressing pupils in mathematics was disclosed and scientific understanding of this process was expanded. The introduction in the educational process of didactic methodical and psychologically balanced methodical control system and correction of poor progressing students’ in Maths improves quality indicators of their permanent knowledge and skills. It allows you to discover the fullness, depth and durability of learning at different stages and levels of education, it contributes to correction, management and partly self-management learning process of poor progressing students in Mathematics, excites them to an active mental activity promotes the development of a conscious attitude to their systematic academic work. The essence of “poor progress” phenomena is observed as well as “educational retardation” of school students during teaching mathematics. Target orientation, the resource potential of the real educational process of poor progressing pupils in Mathematics are determined. Contradictions are singled out and pedagogical conditions of results control of learning outcomes of comprehensive school pupils are proved. An attempt to consider the academic failure of schoolchildren in Mathematics in connection with the main categories of didactics – the content and the learning process was made. Certain shortcomings of teaching and learning activities of students in the study of Mathematics are highlighted as poor progressing elements and gaps. The process and content, enriched with the use of NIT, ensuring the formation of key competencies of lagging behind and

  16. Observations of banding in first-year Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David M.; Eicken, Hajo; Frey, Karoline; Shapiro, Lewis H.

    2004-08-01

    Horizontal banding features, alternating dark and bright horizontal bands apparent in ice cores and stratigraphic cross sections have long been observed in first-year sea ice and are frequently associated with bands of high and low brine or gas porosity. Observations on the land-fast ice near Barrow, Alaska, in recent years have revealed particularly striking banding patterns and prompted a study of their macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. The banding patterns are quantified from photographs of full-depth sections of the ice, and examples are presented from the Chukchi Sea and Elson Lagoon. Statistics on band spacing are presented, and the growth records for three seasons are employed to estimate their time of formation. These data provide insight into the periodicity of the underlying phenomena. Micrographs are used to examine the microstructural variations associated with various banding features and to quantify the geometry of the constituent brine inclusions associated with high- and low-porosity bands. The micrography revealed that the area fraction of brine inclusions varied by a factor of nearly 3 through the more pronounced high- and low-porosity bands. Vertical micrographs obtained shortly after the materials' removal from the ice sheet showed that significantly larger inclusions form abruptly at the start of the high-porosity bands and frequently terminate abruptly at the end of the band. Crystallographic observations indicated that the high-porosity bands supported the nucleation and growth of crystals having substantially different orientations from the very well aligned columnar structure that characterized the bulk of the sheet.

  17. The Search for Hot Jupiters using Red Buttes Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorber, Rebecca L.; Kar, Aman; Hancock, Daniel A.; Leuquire, Jacob D.; Suhaimi, Afiq; Kasper, David; Jang-Condell, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this research is to use the University of Wyoming’s Red Buttes Observatory (RBO) to perform manual, remote, or automated observations of transiting exoplanet candidates. The data contributes to discovery of star systems that include never before identified exoplanets. RBO houses a 0.6-meter telescope and is located approximately 10 miles south of the University of Wyoming’s campus. Our targets are catalogued by the KELT (Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope) Survey, a photometric search for transiting exoplanets around bright main sequence stars. The KELT Follow-up Network (KELT-FUN), a collaboration of small-aperture telescope users located all over the world, confirms new exoplanet candidates. As part of KELT-FUN, students use the RBO to monitor candidates identified by the KELT team. RBO typically detects transits around stars that are 8-12 in V magnitude, with transit durations of ~1-4 hours and full depth relative changes in brightness above 2 mmags. Using AstroImageJ, we process the data and we look for any indication of a transit occurrence in the processed lightcurve which might confirm the presence of the potential exoplanet. Our team has contributed over 50 light curves to KELT-FUN to date. We are able to compare our data with simultaneous observations by other members of KELT-FUN to maximize the utility of our observations. This project gives undergraduates an authentic scientific research experience, learning how to operate an observatory, process data, and participate in a scientific collaboration.

  18. No-touch radiofrequency ablation: A comparison of switching bipolar and switching monopolar ablation in Ex Vivo bovine liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Won; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Sang Min; Hank, Joon Koo

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, efficiency, and safety of no-touch switching bipolar (SB) and switching monopolar (SM) radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using ex vivo bovine livers. A pork loin cube was inserted as a tumor mimicker in the bovine liver block; RFA was performed using the no-touch technique in the SM (group A1; 10 minutes, n = 10, group A2; 15 minutes, n = 10) and SB (group B; 10 minutes, n = 10) modes. The groups were compared based on the creation of confluent necrosis with sufficient safety margins, the dimensions, and distance between the electrode and ablation zone margin (DEM). To evaluate safety, small bowel loops were placed above the liver surface and 30 additional ablations were performed in the same groups. Confluent necroses with sufficient safety margins were created in all specimens. SM RFA created significantly larger volumes of ablation compared to SB RFA (all p < 0.001). The DEM of group B was significantly lower than those of groups A1 and A2 (all p < 0.001). Although thermal injury to the small bowel was noted in 90%, 100%, and 30% of the cases in groups A1, A2, and B, respectively, full depth injury was noted only in 60% of group A2 cases. The no-touch RFA technique is feasible in both the SB and SM modes; however, SB RFA appears to be more advantageous compared to SM RFA in the creation of an ablation zone while avoiding the unnecessary creation of an adjacent parenchymal ablation zone or adjacent small bowel injuries

  19. THE SPITZER DEEP, WIDE-FIELD SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, M. L. N.; Brodwin, M.; Stern, D.; Griffith, R.; Eisenhardt, P.; Gorjian, V.; Kozlowski, S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Bock, J. J.; Borys, C.; Brand, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cool, R.; Cooray, A.; Croft, S.; Dey, A.; Eisenstein, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Ivison, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 deg. 2 in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit-for the first time-the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ∼ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ∼ 1.5. This paper explains the SDWFS observing strategy and data processing, presents the SDWFS mosaics and source catalogs, and discusses some early scientific findings. The publicly released, full-depth catalogs contain 6.78, 5.23, 1.20, and 0.96 x 10 5 distinct sources detected to the average 5σ, 4''-diameter, aperture-corrected limits of 19.77, 18.83, 16.50, and 15.82 Vega mag at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm, respectively. The SDWFS number counts and color-color distribution are consistent with other, earlier Spitzer surveys. At the 6 minute integration time of the SDWFS IRAC imaging, >50% of isolated Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm radio sources and >80% of on-axis XBooetes sources are detected out to 8.0 μm. Finally, we present the four highest proper motion IRAC-selected sources identified from the multi-epoch imaging, two of which are likely field brown dwarfs of mid-T spectral class.

  20. Structural originations of irreversible capacity loss from highly lithiated copper oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, Corey T.; Dmowski, Wojtek; Johannes, Michelle D.; Swider-Lyons, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    We use electrochemistry, high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD) with pair-distribution function analysis (PDF), and density functional theory (DFT) to study the instabilities of Li 2 CuO 2 at varying state of charge. Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns revealed phase evolution from pure Li 2 CuO 2 body-centered orthorhombic (Immm) space group to multiphase compositions after cycling. The PDF showed CuO 4 square chains with varying packing during electrochemical cycling. Peaks in the G(r) at the Cu-O distance for delithiated, LiCuO 2 , showed CuO 4 square chains with reduced ionic radius for Cu in the 3+ state. At full depth of discharge to 1.5 V, CuO was observed in fractions greater than the initial impurity level which strongly affects the reversibility of the lithiation reactions contributing to capacity loss. DFT calculations showed electron removal from Cu and O during delithiation of Li 2 CuO 2 . - Graphical abstract: Structural transformation from Li 2 CuO 2 to delithiated LiCuO 2 . Highlights: → We use experimental techniques and theoretical calculation to study the instabilities of Li 2 CuO 2 . → After initial charge multiphase material persists through charge-discharge cycle. → Precipitation of CuO strongly affects electrode reversibility contributing to capacity loss. → Structural disorganization in Li 2 CuO 2 after cycling is the result of CuO 4 square chain packing. → DFT calculations show electron removal from both Cu and O during delithiation of Li 2 CuO 2 .

  1. Central projections of antennular chemosensory and mechanosensory afferents in the brain of the terrestrial hermit crab (Coenobita clypeatus; Coenobitidae, Anomura)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchina, Oksana; Koczan, Stefan; Harzsch, Steffen; Rybak, Jürgen; Wolff, Gabriella; Strausfeld, Nicholas J.; Hansson, Bill S.

    2015-01-01

    The Coenobitidae (Decapoda, Anomura, Paguroidea) is a taxon of hermit crabs that includes two genera with a fully terrestrial life style as adults. Previous studies have shown that Coenobitidae have evolved a sense of spatial odor localization that is behaviorally highly relevant. Here, we examined the central olfactory pathway of these animals by analyzing central projections of the antennular nerve of Coenobita clypeatus, combining backfilling of the nerve with dextran-coupled dye, Golgi impregnations and three-dimensional reconstruction of the primary olfactory center, the antennular lobe. The principal pattern of putative olfactory sensory afferents in C. clypeatus is in many aspects similar to what have been established for aquatic decapod crustaceans, such as the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. However, there are also obvious differences that may, or may not represent adaptations related to a terrestrial lifestyle. In C. clypeatus, the antennular lobe dominates the deutocerebrum, having more than one thousand allantoid-shaped subunits. We observed two distinct patterns of sensory neuron innervation: putative olfactory afferents from the aesthetascs either supply the cap/subcap region of the subunits or they extend through its full depth. Our data also demonstrate that any one sensory axon can supply input to several subunits. Putative chemosensory (non-aesthetasc) and mechanosensory axons represent a different pathway and innervate the lateral and median antennular neuropils. Hence, we suggest that the chemosensory input in C. clypeatus might be represented via a dual pathway: aesthetascs target the antennular lobe, and bimodal sensilla target the lateral antennular neuropil and median antennular neuropil. The present data is compared to related findings in other decapod crustaceans. PMID:26236202

  2. Topographic instability of flow in a rotating fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. I. Patarashvili

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Here are presented the results of experimental and theoretical studies on a stability of zonal geostrophic flows in the rotating layer of the shallow water. In the experiments, a special apparatus by Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory Georgian Academy of Science was used. This apparatus represents a paraboloid of rotation, which can be set in a regulable rotation around the vertical axis. Maximal diameter of the paraboloid is 1.2 m, radius of curvature in the pole is 0.698 m. In the paraboloid, water spreads on walls as a layer uniform on height under the period of rotation 1.677 s. Against a background of the rotating fluid, the zonal flows are formed by the source-sink system. It consists of two concentric circular perforations on the paraboloid bottom (width is 0.3 cm, radiuses are 8.4 and 57.3 cm, respectively; water can be pumped through them with various velocities and in all directions. It has been established that under constant vertical depth of the rotating fluid the zonal flows are stable. There are given the measurements of the radial profiles for the water level and velocity in the stationary regime. It has been found that zonal flows may lose stability under the presence of the radial gradient of full depth formed by a change of angular velocity of paraboloid rotation. An instability origin results in the loss of flow axial symmetry and in the appearance of self-excited oscillations in the zonal flow. At the given angular velocity of rotation, instability is observed only in the definite range of intensities of the source-sink system. The theoretical estimations are performed in the framework of the equations of the shallow water theory, including the terms describing the bottom friction. It has been shown that the instability of zonal flows found experimentally has a topographical nature and is related with non-monotone dependence of the potential vorticity on radius.

  3. The South China Sea Mesoscale Eddy Experiment (S-MEE) and Its Primary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Tian, J.; Zhao, W.; Qiu, B.

    2016-02-01

    South China Sea (SCS), the largest marginal sea in the northwestern Pacific, have strong eddy activities as revealed by both satellite and in situ observations. The 3D structures of the SCS mesoscale eddies and their lifecycles, including the generation and dissipation processes, are, however, still not well understood at present because of the lack of well-designed field observations. In order to address the above two scientific issues (3D structure and lifecycle of SCS mesoscale eddies), the SCS Mesoscale Eddy Experiment (S-MEE for short) was designed and conducted in the period from October 2013 to June 2014. As part of S-MEE, two bottom-anchored subsurface mooring arrays with one consisting of 10 moorings and the other 7 moorings, were deployed along the historical pathway of the mesoscale eddies in the northern SCS. All the moorings were equipped with ADCPs, RCMs, CTDs and temperature chains to make continues measurements of horizontal current velocity and temperature/salinity in the whole water column. During the S-MEE, a total of 5 distinct mesoscale eddies were observed to cross the mooring arrays, among which one anticyclonic and cyclonic eddy pair was fully captured by the mooring arrays. In addition to moored observations, we also conducted two transects across the center of the anticyclonic eddy and made high-resolution hydrographic and turbulent mixing measurements. Based on the data collected by the S-MEE and concurrent satellite-derived observations, we constructed the full-depth 3D structure of the eddy pair and analyzed its generation and dissipation mechanisms. We found that the eddies extend from the surface to the sea bottom and display prominent tilted structures in the vertical. By conducting an eddy energy budget analysis, we further identified that generation of submesoscale motions constitutes the dominant mechanism for the oceanic eddy dissipation.

  4. A challenge to dSph formation models: are the most isolated Local Group dSph galaxies truly old?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monelli, Matteo

    2017-08-01

    What is the origin of the different dwarf galaxy types? The classification into dwarf irregular (dIrr), spheroidal (dSph), and transition (dT) types is based on their present-day properties. However, star formation histories (SFHs) reconstructed from deep color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) provide details on the early evolution of galaxies of all these types, and indicate only two basic evolutionary paths. One is characterized by a vigorous but brief initial star-forming event, and little or no star formation thereafter (fast evolution), and the other one by roughly continuous star formation until (nearly) the present time (slow evolution). These two paths do not map directly onto the dIrr, dT and dSph types. Thus, the present galaxy properties do not reflect their lifetime evolution. Since there are some indications that slow dwarfs were assembled in lower-density environments than fast dwarfs, Gallart et al (2015) proposed that the distinction between fast and slow dwarfs reflects the characteristic density of the environment where they formed. This scenario, and more generally scenarios where dSph galaxies formed through the interaction with a massive galaxy, are challenged by a small sample of extremely isolated dSph/dT in the outer fringes of the Local Group. This proposal targets two of these objects (VV124, KKR25) for which we will infer their SFH - through a novel technique that combines the information from their RR Lyrae stars and deep CMDs sampling the intermediate-age population - in order to test these scenarios. This is much less demanding on observing time than classical SFH derivation using full depth CMDs.

  5. SPITZER ULTRA FAINT SURVEY PROGRAM (SURFS UP). II. IRAC-DETECTED LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES AT 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 BEHIND STRONG-LENSING CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; Bradač, Maruša; Hoag, Austin; Cain, Benjamin; Lubin, L. M.; Knight, Robert I. [University of California Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Lemaux, Brian C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Brammer, Gabriel B. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Castellano, Marco; Amorin, Ricardo; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Schmidt, Kasper B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Schrabback, Tim [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf Dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Treu, Tommaso [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Linden, Anja von der, E-mail: khhuang@ucdavis.edu, E-mail: astrokuang@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We study the stellar population properties of the IRAC-detected 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 galaxy candidates from the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program. Using the Lyman Break selection technique, we find a total of 17 galaxy candidates at 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 from Hubble Space Telescope images (including the full-depth images from the Hubble Frontier Fields program for MACS 1149 and MACS 0717) that have detections at signal-to-noise ratios  ≥ 3 in at least one of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels. According to the best mass models available for the surveyed galaxy clusters, these IRAC-detected galaxy candidates are magnified by factors of ∼1.2–5.5. Due to the magnification of the foreground galaxy clusters, the rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes M{sub 1600} are between −21.2 and −18.9 mag, while their intrinsic stellar masses are between 2 × 10{sup 8}M{sub ⊙} and 2.9 × 10{sup 9}M{sub ⊙}. We identify two Lyα emitters in our sample from the Keck DEIMOS spectra, one at z{sub Lyα} = 6.76 (in RXJ 1347) and one at z{sub Lyα} = 6.32 (in MACS 0454). We find that 4 out of 17 z ≳ 6 galaxy candidates are favored by z ≲ 1 solutions when IRAC fluxes are included in photometric redshift fitting. We also show that IRAC [3.6]–[4.5] color, when combined with photometric redshift, can be used to identify galaxies which likely have strong nebular emission lines or obscured active galactic nucleus contributions within certain redshift windows.

  6. Solar Irradiance Changes and Phytoplankton Productivity in Earth's Ocean Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Patrick J.; Thomas, Brian C.

    2016-04-01

    Two atmospheric responses to simulated astrophysical ionizing radiation events significant to life on Earth are production of odd-nitrogen species, especially NO2, and subsequent depletion of stratospheric ozone. Ozone depletion increases incident short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVB, 280-315 nm) and longer (>600 nm) wavelengths of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm). On the other hand, the NO2 haze decreases atmospheric transmission in the long-wavelength UVA (315-400 nm) and short-wavelength PAR. Here, we use the results of previous simulations of incident spectral irradiance following an ionizing radiation event to predict changes in terran productivity focusing on photosynthesis of marine phytoplankton. The prediction is based on a spectral model of photosynthetic response, which was developed for the dominant genera in central regions of the ocean (Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), and on remote-sensing-based observations of spectral water transparency, temperature, wind speed, and mixed layer depth. Predicted productivity declined after a simulated ionizing event, but the effect integrated over the water column was small. For integrations taking into account the full depth range of PAR transmission (down to 0.1% of utilizable PAR), the decrease was at most 2-3% (depending on strain), with larger effects (5-7%) for integrations just to the depth of the surface mixed layer. The deeper integrations were most affected by the decreased utilizable PAR at depth due to the NO2 haze, whereas shallower integrations were most affected by the increased surface UV. Several factors tended to dampen the magnitude of productivity responses relative to increases in surface-damaging radiation, for example, most inhibition in the modeled strains is caused by UVA and PAR, and the greatest relative increase in damaging exposure is predicted to occur in the winter when UV and productivity are low.

  7. Crevasse-squeeze ridge corridors: Diagnostic features of late-stage palaeo-ice stream activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David J. A.; Storrar, Robert D.; Rea, Brice R.

    2016-04-01

    A 200-km-long and 10-km-wide linear assemblage of till-filled geometrical ridges on the bed of the Maskwa palaeo-ice stream of the late Wisconsinan southwest Laurentide Ice Sheet are interpreted as crevasse-squeeze ridges (CSR) developed during internal flow unit reorganization, immediately prior to ice stream shutdown. Ridge orientations are predominantly orientated WNW-ESE, with a subordinate WSW-ENE alignment, both indicative of ice fracture development transverse to former ice stream flow, as indicated by NNE-SSW aligned MSGL. Subglacial till injection into basal and/or full depth, mode I and II crevasses occurred at the approximate centreline of the ice stream, in response to extension and fracturing. Landform preservation indicates that this took place during the final stages of ice streaming, immediately prior to ice stream shutdown. This linear zone of ice fracturing therefore likely represents the narrowing of the fast-flowing trunk, similar to the plug flow identified in some surging valley glaciers. Lateral drag between the final active flow unit and the slower moving ice on either side is likely recorded by the up-ice bending of the CSR limbs. The resulting CSR corridor, here related to an individual ice stream flow unit, constitutes a previously unreported style of crevasse infilling and contrasts with two existing CSR patterns: (1) wide arcuate zones of CSRs related to widespread fracturing within glacier surge lobes; and (2) narrow concentric arcs of CSRs and recessional push moraines related to submarginal till deformation at active temperate glacier lobes.

  8. HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELDS FIRST COMPLETE CLUSTER DATA: FAINT GALAXIES AT z ∼ 5-10 FOR UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND COSMIC REIONIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Masafumi; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Kawamata, Ryota; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Oguri, Masamune

    2015-01-01

    We present comprehensive analyses of faint dropout galaxies up to z ∼ 10 with the first full-depth data set of the A2744 lensing cluster and parallel fields observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program. We identify 54 dropouts at z ∼ 5-10 in the HFF fields and enlarge the size of the z ∼ 9 galaxy sample obtained to date. Although the number of highly magnified (μ ∼ 10) galaxies is small because of the tiny survey volume of strong lensing, our study reaches the galaxies' intrinsic luminosities comparable to the deepest-field HUDF studies. We derive UV luminosity functions with these faint dropouts, carefully evaluating by intensive simulations the combination of observational incompleteness and lensing effects in the image plane, including magnification, distortion, and multiplication of images, with the evaluation of mass model dependencies. Our results confirm that the faint-end slope, α, is as steep as –2 at z ∼ 6-8 and strengthen the evidence for the rapid decrease of UV luminosity densities, ρ UV , at z > 8 from the large z ∼ 9 sample. We examine whether the rapid ρ UV decrease trend can be reconciled with the large Thomson scattering optical depth, τ e , measured by cosmic microwave background experiments, allowing a large space of free parameters, such as an average ionizing photon escape fraction and a stellar-population-dependent conversion factor. No parameter set can reproduce both the rapid ρ UV decrease and the large τ e . It is possible that the ρ UV decrease moderates at z ≳ 11, that the free parameters significantly evolve toward high z, or that there exist additional sources of reionization such as X-ray binaries and faint active galactic nuclei

  9. Decadal trends in deep ocean salinity and regional effects on steric sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkey, S. G.; Llovel, W.

    2017-12-01

    We present deep (below 2000 m) and abyssal (below 4000 m) global ocean salinity trends from the 1990s through the 2010s and assess the role of deep salinity in local and global sea level budgets. Deep salinity trends are assessed using all deep basins with available full-depth, high-quality hydrographic section data that have been occupied two or more times since the 1980s through either the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) Hydrographic Program or the Global Ship-Based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP). All salinity data is calibrated to standard seawater and any intercruise offsets applied. While the global mean deep halosteric contribution to sea level rise is close to zero (-0.017 +/- 0.023 mm/yr below 4000 m), there is a large regional variability with the southern deep basins becoming fresher and northern deep basins becoming more saline. This meridional gradient in the deep salinity trend reflects different mechanisms driving the deep salinity variability. The deep Southern Ocean is freshening owing to a recent increased flux of freshwater to the deep ocean. Outside of the Southern Ocean, the deep salinity and temperature changes are tied to isopycnal heave associated with a falling of deep isopycnals in recent decades. Therefore, regions of the ocean with a deep salinity minimum are experiencing both a halosteric contraction with a thermosteric expansion. While the thermosteric expansion is larger in most cases, in some regions the halosteric compensates for as much as 50% of the deep thermal expansion, making a significant contribution to local sea level rise budgets.

  10. Validity of Various Methods for Determining Velocity, Force, and Power in the Back Squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Harry G; Nosaka, Ken; Sato, Kimitake; Haff, G Gregory

    2017-10-01

    To examine the validity of 2 kinematic systems for assessing mean velocity (MV), peak velocity (PV), mean force (MF), peak force (PF), mean power (MP), and peak power (PP) during the full-depth free-weight back squat performed with maximal concentric effort. Ten strength-trained men (26.1 ± 3.0 y, 1.81 ± 0.07 m, 82.0 ± 10.6 kg) performed three 1-repetition-maximum (1RM) trials on 3 separate days, encompassing lifts performed at 6 relative intensities including 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, 90%, and 100% of 1RM. Each repetition was simultaneously recorded by a PUSH band and commercial linear position transducer (LPT) (GymAware [GYM]) and compared with measurements collected by a laboratory-based testing device consisting of 4 LPTs and a force plate. Trials 2 and 3 were used for validity analyses. Combining all 120 repetitions indicated that the GYM was highly valid for assessing all criterion variables while the PUSH was only highly valid for estimations of PF (r = .94, CV = 5.4%, ES = 0.28, SEE = 135.5 N). At each relative intensity, the GYM was highly valid for assessing all criterion variables except for PP at 20% (ES = 0.81) and 40% (ES = 0.67) of 1RM. Moreover, the PUSH was only able to accurately estimate PF across all relative intensities (r = .92-.98, CV = 4.0-8.3%, ES = 0.04-0.26, SEE = 79.8-213.1 N). PUSH accuracy for determining MV, PV, MF, MP, and PP across all 6 relative intensities was questionable for the back squat, yet the GYM was highly valid at assessing all criterion variables, with some caution given to estimations of MP and PP performed at lighter loads.

  11. Cartilage Health in Knees Treated with Metal Resurfacing Implants or Untreated Focal Cartilage Lesions: A Preclinical Study in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Carranza, Nicolas; Hultenby, Kjell; Lagerstedt, Anne Sofie; Schupbach, Peter; Berg, Hans E

    2017-07-01

    Background Full-depth cartilage lesions do not heal and the long-term clinical outcome is uncertain. In the symptomatic middle-aged (35-60 years) patient, treatment with metal implants has been proposed. However, the cartilage health surrounding these implants has not been thoroughly studied. Our objective was to evaluate the health of cartilage opposing and adjacent to metal resurfacing implants. Methods The medial femoral condyle was operated in 9 sheep bilaterally. A metallic resurfacing metallic implant was immediately inserted into an artificially created 7.5 mm defect while on the contralateral knee the defect was left untreated. Euthanasia was performed at 6 months. Six animals, of similar age and study duration, from a previous study were used for comparison in the evaluation of cartilage health adjacent to the implant. Cartilage damage to joint surfaces within the knee, cartilage repair of the defect, and cartilage adjacent to the implant was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Results Six animals available for evaluation of cartilage health within the knee showed a varying degree of cartilage damage with no statistical difference between defects treated with implants or left untreated ( P = 0.51; 95% CI -3.7 to 6.5). The cartilage adjacent to the implant (score 0-14; where 14 indicates no damage) remained healthy in these 6 animals showing promising results (averaged 10.5; range 9-11.5, SD 0.95). Cartilage defects did not heal in any case. Conclusion Treatment of a critical size focal lesion with a metal implant is a viable alternative treatment.

  12. Global assessment of benthic nepheloid layers and linkage with upper ocean dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Wilford D.; Richardson, Mary Jo; Mishonov, Alexey V.

    2018-01-01

    Global maps of the maximum bottom concentration, thickness, and integrated particle mass in benthic nepheloid layers are published here to support collaborations to understand deep ocean sediment dynamics, linkage with upper ocean dynamics, and assessing the potential for scavenging of adsorption-prone elements near the deep ocean seafloor. Mapping the intensity of benthic particle concentrations from natural oceanic processes also provides a baseline that will aid in quantifying the industrial impact of current and future deep-sea mining. Benthic nepheloid layers have been mapped using 6,392 full-depth profiles made during 64 cruises using our transmissometers mounted on CTDs in multiple national/international programs including WOCE, SAVE, JGOFS, CLIVAR-Repeat Hydrography, and GO-SHIP during the last four decades. Intense benthic nepheloid layers are found in areas where eddy kinetic energy in overlying waters, mean kinetic energy 50 m above bottom (mab), and energy dissipation in the bottom boundary layer are near the highest values in the ocean. Areas of intense benthic nepheloid layers include the Western North Atlantic, Argentine Basin in the South Atlantic, parts of the Southern Ocean and areas around South Africa. Benthic nepheloid layers are weak or absent in most of the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic basins away from continental margins. High surface eddy kinetic energy is associated with the Kuroshio Current east of Japan. Data south of the Kuroshio show weak nepheloid layers, but no transmissometer data exist beneath the Kuroshio, a deficiency that should be remedied to increase understanding of eddy dynamics in un-sampled and under-sampled oceanic areas.

  13. The influence of extratropical cloud phase and amount feedbacks on climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, William R.; Kay, Jennifer E.

    2018-04-01

    Global coupled climate models have large long-standing cloud and radiation biases, calling into question their ability to simulate climate and climate change. This study assesses the impact of reducing shortwave radiation biases on climate sensitivity within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The model is modified by increasing supercooled cloud liquid to better match absorbed shortwave radiation observations over the Southern Ocean while tuning to reduce a compensating tropical shortwave bias. With a thermodynamic mixed-layer ocean, equilibrium warming in response to doubled CO2 increases from 4.1 K in the control to 5.6 K in the modified model. This 1.5 K increase in equilibrium climate sensitivity is caused by changes in two extratropical shortwave cloud feedbacks. First, reduced conversion of cloud ice to liquid at high southern latitudes decreases the magnitude of a negative cloud phase feedback. Second, warming is amplified in the mid-latitudes by a larger positive shortwave cloud feedback. The positive cloud feedback, usually associated with the subtropics, arises when sea surface warming increases the moisture gradient between the boundary layer and free troposphere. The increased moisture gradient enhances the effectiveness of mixing to dry the boundary layer, which decreases cloud amount and optical depth. When a full-depth ocean with dynamics and thermodynamics is included, ocean heat uptake preferentially cools the mid-latitude Southern Ocean, partially inhibiting the positive cloud feedback and slowing warming. Overall, the results highlight strong connections between Southern Ocean mixed-phase cloud partitioning, cloud feedbacks, and ocean heat uptake in a climate forced by greenhouse gas changes.

  14. HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELDS FIRST COMPLETE CLUSTER DATA: FAINT GALAXIES AT z ∼ 5-10 FOR UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND COSMIC REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, Masafumi; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kawamata, Ryota; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Oguri, Masamune, E-mail: ishigaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-01-20

    We present comprehensive analyses of faint dropout galaxies up to z ∼ 10 with the first full-depth data set of the A2744 lensing cluster and parallel fields observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program. We identify 54 dropouts at z ∼ 5-10 in the HFF fields and enlarge the size of the z ∼ 9 galaxy sample obtained to date. Although the number of highly magnified (μ ∼ 10) galaxies is small because of the tiny survey volume of strong lensing, our study reaches the galaxies' intrinsic luminosities comparable to the deepest-field HUDF studies. We derive UV luminosity functions with these faint dropouts, carefully evaluating by intensive simulations the combination of observational incompleteness and lensing effects in the image plane, including magnification, distortion, and multiplication of images, with the evaluation of mass model dependencies. Our results confirm that the faint-end slope, α, is as steep as –2 at z ∼ 6-8 and strengthen the evidence for the rapid decrease of UV luminosity densities, ρ{sub UV}, at z > 8 from the large z ∼ 9 sample. We examine whether the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease trend can be reconciled with the large Thomson scattering optical depth, τ{sub e}, measured by cosmic microwave background experiments, allowing a large space of free parameters, such as an average ionizing photon escape fraction and a stellar-population-dependent conversion factor. No parameter set can reproduce both the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease and the large τ {sub e}. It is possible that the ρ{sub UV} decrease moderates at z ≳ 11, that the free parameters significantly evolve toward high z, or that there exist additional sources of reionization such as X-ray binaries and faint active galactic nuclei.

  15. Identification and clonal characterisation of a progenitor cell sub-population in normal human articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Williams

    -based cartilage repair therapies due to its ability to maintain chondrogenicity upon extensive expansion unlike full-depth chondrocytes that lose this ability at only seven population doublings.

  16. Velocity mapping in the Lower Congo River: a first look at the unique bathymetry and hydrodynamics of Bulu Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Oberg, Kevin A.; Gardiner, Ned; Shelton, John

    2009-01-01

    The lower Congo River is one of the deepest, most powerful, and most biologically diverse stretches of river on Earth. The river’s 270 m decent from Malebo Pool though the gorges of the Crystal Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean (498 km downstream) is riddled with rapids, cataracts, and deep pools. Much of the lower Congo is a mystery from a hydraulics perspective. However, this stretch of the river is a hotbed for biologists who are documenting evolution in action within the diverse, but isolated, fish populations. Biologists theorize that isolation of fish populations within the lower Congo is due to barriers presented by flow structure and bathymetry. To investigate this theory, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and American Museum of Natural History teamed up with an expedition crew from National Geographic in 2008 to map flow velocity and bathymetry within target reaches in the lower Congo River using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) and echo sounders. Simultaneous biological and water quality sampling was also completed. This paper presents some preliminary results from this expedition, specifically with regard to the velocity structure andbathymetry. Results show that the flow in the bedrock controlled Bulu reach of the lower Congo is highly energetic. Turbulent and secondary flow structures can span the full depth of flow (up to 165 m), while coherent bank-to-bank cross-channel flow structures are absent. Regions of flow separation near the banks are isolated from one another and from the opposite bank by high shear, high velocity zones with depth-averaged flow velocities that can exceed 4 m/s.

  17. A Pacific hydrographic section at 88°W: Water-property distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Mizuki; Talley, Lynne D.

    1998-06-01

    Full-depth conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD)/hydrographic measurements with high horizontal and vertical resolution were made in February-April 1993 along a line lying at a nominal longitude of 88°W and extending from southern Chile (54°S) to Guatemala (14°N). It crossed five major deep basins (Southeast Pacific, Chile, Peru, Panama, and Guatemala basins) east of the East Pacific Rise. Vertical sections of potential temperature, salinity, potential density, oxygen, silica, phosphate, nitrate, and nitrite are presented to illustrate the structure of the entire water column. Some features of interest found in the sections are described, and an attempt is made to interpret them in terms of the isopycnal property distributions associated with the large-scale ocean circulation. These features include: various near-surface waters observed in the tropical and subtropical regions and the fronts that mark the boundaries of these waters; the possible importance of salt fingering to the downward salt transfer from the high-salinity subtropical water; a shallow thermostad (pycnostad) developed at 16°-18.5°C in the subtropical water; low-salinity surface water in the subantarctic zone west of southern Chile; large domains of extremely low oxygen in the subpycnocline layer on both sides of the equator and a secondary nitrite maximum associated with a nitrate minimum in these low-oxygen domains; high-salinity, low-oxygen, high-nutrient subpycnocline water that is carried poleward along the eastern boundary by the Peru-Chile Undercurrent; the Subantarctic Mode and Antarctic Intermediate waters; middepth isopycnal property extrema observed at the crest of the Sala y Gomez Ridge; influences of the North Pacific and the North Atlantic upon deep waters along the section; and the characteristics and sources of the bottom waters in the five deep basins along the section.

  18. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Tchetina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1–50 μM. Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10–50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA, AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  19. No-touch radiofrequency ablation: A comparison of switching bipolar and switching monopolar ablation in Ex Vivo bovine liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Won; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Sang Min; Hank, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, efficiency, and safety of no-touch switching bipolar (SB) and switching monopolar (SM) radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using ex vivo bovine livers. A pork loin cube was inserted as a tumor mimicker in the bovine liver block; RFA was performed using the no-touch technique in the SM (group A1; 10 minutes, n = 10, group A2; 15 minutes, n = 10) and SB (group B; 10 minutes, n = 10) modes. The groups were compared based on the creation of confluent necrosis with sufficient safety margins, the dimensions, and distance between the electrode and ablation zone margin (DEM). To evaluate safety, small bowel loops were placed above the liver surface and 30 additional ablations were performed in the same groups. Confluent necroses with sufficient safety margins were created in all specimens. SM RFA created significantly larger volumes of ablation compared to SB RFA (all p < 0.001). The DEM of group B was significantly lower than those of groups A1 and A2 (all p < 0.001). Although thermal injury to the small bowel was noted in 90%, 100%, and 30% of the cases in groups A1, A2, and B, respectively, full depth injury was noted only in 60% of group A2 cases. The no-touch RFA technique is feasible in both the SB and SM modes; however, SB RFA appears to be more advantageous compared to SM RFA in the creation of an ablation zone while avoiding the unnecessary creation of an adjacent parenchymal ablation zone or adjacent small bowel injuries.

  20. How fast is the Patagonian shelf-break acidifying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orselli, Iole B. M.; Kerr, Rodrigo; Ito, Rosane G.; Tavano, Virginia M.; Mendes, Carlos Rafael B.; Garcia, Carlos A. E.

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic carbon (Cant) concentration is determined according to the TrOCA method, from carbonate system data and hydrographic parameters collected during two consecutive spring cruises (2007 and 2008) in the Argentinean Patagonian shelf-break zone between 36°S and 50°S. Cant has intruded the water column until intermediate depths, with no Cant below 1000 m, in the deeper waters (i.e., North Atlantic Deep Water and Antarctic Bottom Water) of the Northern sector of the study area (i.e., North of 38°S). The higher Cant concentration is observed in Subantarctic Shelf Water in the Southern region, whereas in the Northern sector both Tropical Water and South Atlantic Central Water are equally affected by Cant intrusion. The Antarctic Intermediate Water represents the depth-limit achieved by Cant penetration, reinforcing the role that this water mass plays as an important vehicle to transport Cant to the oceans interior. The estimated Cant average (± method precision) is 46.6 ± 5.3 μmol kg- 1, considering the full depth of the water column. The ocean acidification state (ΔpH) shows an average (± standard deviation) of - 0.11 ± 0.05, thus, indicating an annual pH reduction of - 0.0010 yr- 1 since the Industrial Revolution (c.a. 1750). The degree of aragonite saturation is lowered towards undersaturation levels of calcite. The Patagonian shelf and shelf-break zones-a strong CO2 sink region in the global ocean-are likely a key area for Cant intrusion in the southwestern South Atlantic Ocean.

  1. In vitro blood flow in a rectangular PDMS microchannel: experimental observations using a confocal micro-PIV system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rui; Wada, Shigeo; Tanaka, Shuji; Takeda, Motohiro; Ishikawa, Takuji; Tsubota, Ken-ichi; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2008-04-01

    Progress in microfabricated technologies has attracted the attention of researchers in several areas, including microcirculation. Microfluidic devices are expected to provide powerful tools not only to better understand the biophysical behavior of blood flow in microvessels, but also for disease diagnosis. Such microfluidic devices for biomedical applications must be compatible with state-of-the-art flow measuring techniques, such as confocal microparticle image velocimetry (PIV). This confocal system has the ability to not only quantify flow patterns inside microchannels with high spatial and temporal resolution, but can also be used to obtain velocity measurements for several optically sectioned images along the depth of the microchannel. In this study, we investigated the ability to obtain velocity measurements using physiological saline (PS) and in vitro blood in a rectangular polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) microchannel (300 microm wide, 45 microm deep) using a confocal micro-PIV system. Applying this combination, measurements of trace particles seeded in the flow were performed for both fluids at a constant flow rate (Re = 0.02). Velocity profiles were acquired by successive measurements at different depth positions to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) information on the behavior of both fluid flows. Generally, the velocity profiles were found to be markedly blunt in the central region, mainly due to the low aspect ratio (h/w = 0.15) of the rectangular microchannel. Predictions using a theoretical model for the rectangular microchannel corresponded quite well with the experimental micro-PIV results for the PS fluid. However, for the in vitro blood with 20% hematocrit, small fluctuations were found in the velocity profiles. The present study clearly shows that confocal micro-PIV can be effectively integrated with a PDMS microchannel and used to obtain blood velocity profiles along the full depth of the microchannel because of its unique 3-D optical sectioning ability

  2. IPUMS: Detailed global data on population characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, T.

    2017-12-01

    Many new and exciting sources of data on human population distributions based on remote sensing, mobile technology, and other mechanisms are becoming available. These new data sources often provide fine scale spatial and/or temporal resolution. However, they typically focus on the location of population, with little or no information on population characteristics. The large and growing collection of data available through the IPUMS family of products complements datasets that provide spatial and temporal detail but little attribute detail by providing the full depth of characteristics covered by population censuses, including demographic, household structure, economic, employment, education, and housing characteristics. IPUMS International provides census microdata for 85 countries. Microdata provide the responses to every census question for each individual in a sample of households. Microdata identify the sub-national geographic unit in which a household is located, but for confidentiality reasons, identified units must include a minimum population, typically 20,000 people. Small-area aggregate data often describe much smaller geographic units, enabling study of detailed spatial patterns of population characteristics. However the structure of aggregate data tables is highly heterogeneous across countries, census years, and even topics within a given census, making these data difficult to work with in any systematic way. A recently funded project will assemble small-area aggregate population and agricultural census data published by national statistical offices. Through preliminary work collecting and cataloging over 10,000 tables, we have identified a small number of structural families that can be used to organize the many different structures. These structural families will form the basis for software tools to document and standardize the tables for ingest into a common database. Both the microdata and aggregate data are made available through IPUMS Terra

  3. Feedwater heater tube-to-tubesheet connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokell, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses some practical aspects of expanded, welded, and welded-and-expanded feedwater heater tube-to-tubesheet joints. It outlines elastic-plastic tube expanding theory. It examines uniform-pressure-expanded tube joint strength and correlating roller-expanded joint strength with wall reduction and rolling torque. For materials subject to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC), it recommends heat treating tube ends before expanding. For materials subject to fatigue and tube-end cracking, it advocates two-stage expanding: (1) expanding enough to create firm tube-hole contact over the full tubesheet thickness; and (2) re-expanding at full pressure or torque. The paper emphasizes the desirability of segregating heats of tubing, mapping the tube-heat locations and making the heat map a permanent part of the heater maintenance file. It recommends when to provide TEMA/HEI Power Plant Standard annular grooves for roller-expanding and provides an equation for determining optimum groove width for uniform-pressure expanding. The paper also reviews welding requirements for welds of tubes to tubesheets. The review covers front-face welding before and after expanding and the reasons for welding first. It outlines current thinking about definitions of strength- and seal-welds of front-face welded joint in terms of their functions and load-carrying abilities. It presents a proposal for determining the required size of strength welds for use in Section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). It shows why welded-and-expanded feedwater heater tube-to-tubesheet joints should be full-strength and full-depth expanded. It makes recommendations for pressure- and leak-testing. This work also proposes the industry consider butt welding the tubes to the steam-side face of the tubesheet as a regular method of tube joining. The results of a survey of manufacturers practices are appended. 30 refs., 14 figs

  4. Nuclear steam generator tube to tubesheet joint optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, Rod

    1999-01-01

    Industry-wide problems with Stress Corrosion Cracking in the Nuclear Steam Generator tube-to-tubesheet joint have led to costly repairs, plugging, and replacement of entire vessels. To improve corrosion resistance, new and replacement Steam Generator developments typically employ the hydraulic tube expansion process (full depth) to minimize tensile residual stresses and cold work at the critical transition zone between the expanded and unexpanded tube. These variables have undergone detailed study using specialized X-ray diffraction and analytical techniques. Responding to increased demands from Nuclear Steam Generator operators and manufacturers to credit the leak-tightness and strength contributions of the hydraulic expansion, various experimental tasks with complimentary analytical modelling were applied to improve understanding and control of tube to hole contact pressure. With careful consideration to residual stress impact, design for strength/leak tightness optimization addresses: Experimentally determined minimum contact pressure levels necessary to preclude incipient leakage into the tube/hole interface. The degradation of contact pressure at surrounding expansions caused by the sequential expansion process. The transient and permanent contact pressure variation associated with tubesheet hole dilation during Steam Generator operation. An experimental/analytical simulation has been developed to reproduce cyclic Steam Generator operating strains on the tubesheet and expanded joint. Leak tightness and pullout tests were performed during and following simulated Steam Generator operating transients. The overall development has provided a comprehensive understanding of the fabrication and in-service mechanics of hydraulically expanded joints. Based on this, the hydraulic expansion process can be optimized with respect to critical residual stress/cold work and the strength/leakage barrier criteria. (author)

  5. Taser X26 discharges in swine: ventricular rhythm capture is dependent on discharge vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Daniel J; Walter, Robert J; Dennis, Andrew J; Margeta, Bosko; Starr, Frederic; Nagy, Kimberly K; Bokhari, Faran; Wiley, Dorion E; Joseph, Kimberly T; Roberts, Roxanne R

    2008-12-01

    Data from our previous studies indicate that Taser X26 stun devices can acutely alter cardiac function in swine. We hypothesized that most transcardiac discharge vectors would capture ventricular rhythm, but that other vectors, not traversing the heart, would fail to capture the ventricular rhythm. Using an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approved protocol, four Yorkshire pigs (25-36 kg) were anesthetized, paralyzed with succinylcholine (2 mg/kg), and then exposed to 10 second discharges from a police-issue Taser X26. For most discharges, the barbed darts were pushed manually into the skin to their full depth (12 mm) and were arranged in either transcardiac (such that a straight line connecting the darts would cross the region of the heart) or non-transcardiac vectors. A total of 11 different vectors and 22 discharge conditions were studied. For each vector, by simply rotating the cartridge 180-degrees in the gun, the primary current-emitting dart was changed and the direction of current flow during the discharge was reversed without physically moving the darts. Echocardiography and electrocardiograms (ECGs) were performed before, during, and after all discharges. p values captured immediately in 52.5% (31 of 59) of the discharges on the ventral surface of the animal. In each of these cases, capture of the ventricular rhythm with rapid ventricular contractions consistent with ventricular tachycardia (VT) or flutter was seen throughout the discharge. A total of 27 discharges were administered with transcardiac vectors and ventricular capture occurred in 23 of these discharges (85.2% capture rate). A total of 32 non-transcardiac discharges were administered ventrally and capture was seen in only eight of these (25% capture rate). Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was seen with two vectors, both of which were transcardiac. In the remaining animals, VT occurred postdischarge until sinus rhythm was regained spontaneously. For most transcardiac vectors

  6. Advancing the practice of systems engineering at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansma, Patti A.; Jones, Ross M.

    2006-01-01

    In FY 2004, JPL launched an initiative to improve the way it practices systems engineering. The Lab's senior management formed the Systems Engineering Advancement (SEA) Project in order to "significantly advance the practice and organizational capabilities of systems engineering at JPL on flight projects and ground support tasks." The scope of the SEA Project includes the systems engineering work performed in all three dimensions of a program, project, or task: 1. the full life-cycle, i.e., concept through end of operations 2. the full depth, i.e., Program, Project, System, Subsystem, Element (SE Levels 1 to 5) 3. the full technical scope, e.g., the flight, ground and launch systems, avionics, power, propulsion, telecommunications, thermal, etc. The initial focus of their efforts defined the following basic systems engineering functions at JPL: systems architecture, requirements management, interface definition, technical resource management, system design and analysis, system verification and validation, risk management, technical peer reviews, design process management and systems engineering task management, They also developed a list of highly valued personal behaviors of systems engineers, and are working to inculcate those behaviors into members of their systems engineering community. The SEA Project is developing products, services, and training to support managers and practitioners throughout the entire system lifecycle. As these are developed, each one needs to be systematically deployed. Hence, the SEA Project developed a deployment process that includes four aspects: infrastructure and operations, communication and outreach, education and training, and consulting support. In addition, the SEA Project has taken a proactive approach to organizational change management and customer relationship management - both concepts and approaches not usually invoked in an engineering environment. This paper'3 describes JPL's approach to advancing the practice of

  7. Shelf sea tidal currents and mixing fronts determined from ocean glider observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Peter M. F.; Berx, Barbara; Gallego, Alejandro; Hall, Rob A.; Heywood, Karen J.; Hughes, Sarah L.; Queste, Bastien Y.

    2018-03-01

    Tides and tidal mixing fronts are of fundamental importance to understanding shelf sea dynamics and ecosystems. Ocean gliders enable the observation of fronts and tide-dominated flows at high resolution. We use dive-average currents from a 2-month (12 October-2 December 2013) glider deployment along a zonal hydrographic section in the north-western North Sea to accurately determine M2 and S2 tidal velocities. The results of the glider-based method agree well with tidal velocities measured by current meters and with velocities extracted from the TPXO tide model. The method enhances the utility of gliders as an ocean-observing platform, particularly in regions where tide models are known to be limited. We then use the glider-derived tidal velocities to investigate tidal controls on the location of a front repeatedly observed by the glider. The front moves offshore at a rate of 0.51 km day-1. During the first part of the deployment (from mid-October until mid-November), results of a one-dimensional model suggest that the balance between surface heat fluxes and tidal stirring is the primary control on frontal location: as heat is lost to the atmosphere, full-depth mixing is able to occur in progressively deeper water. In the latter half of the deployment (mid-November to early December), a front controlled solely by heat fluxes and tidal stirring is not predicted to exist, yet a front persists in the observations. We analyse hydrographic observations collected by the glider to attribute the persistence of the front to the boundary between different water masses, in particular to the presence of cold, saline, Atlantic-origin water in the deeper portion of the section. We combine these results to propose that the front is a hybrid front: one controlled in summer by the local balance between heat fluxes and mixing and which in winter exists as the boundary between water masses advected to the north-western North Sea from diverse source regions. The glider observations

  8. Periglacial complexes in Utopia Planitia: rimless, tiered depressions, (clastically) sorted and unsorted polygonised terrain and an ice-rich mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soare, Richard; Conway, Susan; Gallagher, Colman; Dohm, James; Clifford, Stephen M.; Williams, Jean-pierre

    2016-10-01

    We report the spatial and possible genetic-relationship at the mid-latitudes of Utopia Planitia (45-500N 115-1200E), Mars, of: (a) metre to decametre deep, rimless, tiered depressions; terrain that exhibits (b) (clastically) sorted and (c) unsorted (small-sized) polygons; and, (d) a very youthful, ice-rich mantle. We show that these individual landscape features are separated stratigraphically, this being presented to the Mars community for the first time, and suggest that the stratigraphical separation of these features could be the result of boundary conditions and formation processes that have varied much more widely than has been thought hitherto. In cold-climate and non-glacial regions such as the Yamal Peninsula of eastern Russia and the Tuktoyaktuk Coastlands of northern Canada, landscape assemblages comprised of similar features are referenced as "ice complexes" and are indicative of periglacialism on two fronts: first, the presence of "ice-rich" permafrost or permafrost comprised of "excess ice", i.e. "permafrost" whose pore space is exceeded by the "water ice" within that body of sediment; and, second, antecedently or currently active freeze-thaw cycling, minimally, to the full depth of the "ice-complex" depressions. In the Dry Valleys of the Antarctic, where the atmospheric aridity and cold-temperatures approach those of Mars, ice-vapour diffusion and adsorption cycles are cited as the means by which the near-surface, permafrost, i.e. ≤1m deep, has become ice-cemented. However, the metre to decametre depths of the "ice-complex" depressions on Earth and the morphologically-similar ones on Mars lie beyond the vertical reach of the Antarctic diffusion and adsorption cycles, both empirically and theoretically. By deduction, this points to the freeze-thaw cycling of water to depth, fostered either by exogenic or endogenic means, perhaps playing a more important role in the formation of the possible Martian "ice complexes" than might be expected were

  9. Consequences of using different soil texture determination methodologies for soil physical quality and unsaturated zone time lag estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, O; Vero, S; Ibrahim, T G; Murphy, P N C; Sherriff, S C; Ó hUallacháin, D

    2015-11-01

    Elucidation of when the loss of pollutants, below the rooting zone in agricultural landscapes, affects water quality is important when assessing the efficacy of mitigation measures. Investigation of this inherent time lag (t(T)) is divided into unsaturated (t(u)) and saturated (t(s)) components. The duration of these components relative to each other differs depending on soil characteristics and the landscape position. The present field study focuses on tu estimation in a scenario where the saturated zone is likely to constitute a higher proportion of t(T). In such instances, or where only initial breakthrough (IBT) or centre of mass (COM) is of interest, utilisation of site and depth specific "simple" textural class or actual sand-silt-clay percentages to generate soil water characteristic curves with associated soil hydraulic parameters is acceptable. With the same data it is also possible to estimate a soil physical quality (S) parameter for each soil layer which can be used to infer many other physical, chemical and biological quality indicators. In this study, hand texturing in the field was used to determine textural classes of a soil profile. Laboratory methods, including hydrometer, pipette and laser diffraction methods were used to determine actual sand-silt-clay percentages of sections of the same soil profile. Results showed that in terms of S, hand texturing resulted in a lower index value (inferring a degraded soil) than that of pipette, hydrometer and laser equivalents. There was no difference between S index values determined using the pipette, hydrometer and laser diffraction methods. The difference between the three laboratory methods on both the IBT and COM stages of t(u) were negligible, and in this instance were unlikely to affect either groundwater monitoring decisions, or to be of consequence from a policy perspective. When t(u) estimates are made over the full depth of the vadose zone, which may extend to several metres, errors resulting from

  10. The importance of deep, basinwide measurements in optimized Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation observing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, G. D.; Menary, M. B.; Mecking, J. V.; Moat, B. I.; Johns, W. E.; Andrews, M. B.; Rayner, D.; Smeed, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is a key process in the global redistribution of heat. The AMOC is defined as the maximum of the overturning stream function, which typically occurs near 30°N in the North Atlantic. The RAPID mooring array has provided full-depth, basinwide, continuous estimates of this quantity since 2004. Motivated by both the need to deliver near real-time data and optimization of the array to reduce costs, we consider alternative configurations of the mooring array. Results suggest that the variability observed since 2004 could be reproduced by a single tall mooring on the western boundary and a mooring to 1500 m on the eastern boundary. We consider the potential future evolution of the AMOC in two generations of the Hadley Centre climate models and a suite of additional CMIP5 models. The modeling studies show that deep, basinwide measurements are essential to capture correctly the future decline of the AMOC. We conclude that, while a reduced array could be useful for estimates of the AMOC on subseasonal to decadal time scales as part of a near real-time data delivery system, extreme caution must be applied to avoid the potential misinterpretation or absence of a climate time scale AMOC decline that is a key motivation for the maintenance of these observations.Plain Language SummaryThe Atlantic Overturning Circulation is a system of ocean currents that carries heat northwards in the Atlantic. This heat is crucial to maintaining the mild climate of northwest Europe. The Overturning Circulation is predicted to slow in future in response to man-made climate change. The RAPID program is designed to measure the Overturning Circulation using a number of fixed point observations spanning the Atlantic between the Canary Islands and the Bahamas. We look at whether we could reduce the number of these fixed point observations to continue to get accurate estimates of the overturning strength but for less cost. We conclude that

  11. Vertical structure, biomass and topographic association of deep-pelagic fishes in relation to a mid-ocean ridge system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, T. T.; Porteiro, F. M.; Heino, M.; Byrkjedal, I.; Langhelle, G.; Anderson, C. I. H.; Horne, J.; Søiland, H.; Falkenhaug, T.; Godø, O. R.; Bergstad, O. A.

    2008-01-01

    The assemblage structure and vertical distribution of deep-pelagic fishes relative to a mid-ocean ridge system are described from an acoustic and discrete-depth trawling survey conducted as part of the international Census of Marine Life field project MAR-ECO . The 36-station, zig-zag survey along the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR; Iceland to the Azores) covered the full depth range (0 to >3000 m), from the surface to near the bottom, using a combination of gear types to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the pelagic fauna. Abundance per volume of deep-pelagic fishes was highest in the epipelagic zone and within the benthic boundary layer (BBL; 0-200 m above the seafloor). Minimum fish abundance occurred at depths below 2300 m but above the BBL. Biomass per volume of deep-pelagic fishes over the MAR reached a maximum within the BBL, revealing a previously unknown topographic association of a bathypelagic fish assemblage with a mid-ocean ridge system. With the exception of the BBL, biomass per volume reached a water column maximum in the bathypelagic zone between 1500 and 2300 m. This stands in stark contrast to the general "open-ocean" paradigm that biomass decreases exponentially from the surface downwards. As much of the summit of the MAR extends into this depth layer, a likely explanation for this mid-water maximum is ridge association. Multivariate statistical analyses suggest that the dominant component of deep-pelagic fish biomass over the northern MAR was a wide-ranging bathypelagic assemblage that was remarkably consistent along the length of the ridge from Iceland to the Azores. Integrating these results with those of previous studies in oceanic ecosystems, there appears to be adequate evidence to conclude that special hydrodynamic and biotic features of mid-ocean ridge systems cause changes in the ecological structure of deep-pelagic fish assemblages relative to those at the same depths over abyssal plains. Lacking terrigenous input of

  12. Millennial Scale Variability of the AMOC and its Link to Climate During the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornalley, D. J.; Oppo, D.; Keigwin, L. D.; Hall, I. R.; Moffa Sanchez, P.

    2014-12-01

    Several proxy and modelling studies suggest that there may have been considerable change in the operation the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the Holocene. Yet despite its importance for regional and global climate, the Holocene history of the AMOC is poorly constrained. Improving our knowledge of past AMOC variability will contribute to our general understanding of the dynamics of ocean circulation and the role it may play in causing or amplifying climate variability on millennial timescales. We present Holocene grain-size records in depth transects from Blake Outer Ridge and Cape Hatteras, sampling the full-depth range of the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC), the lower limb of the AMOC. These records will complement a depth-transect of grain-size records sampling the Iceland-Scotland (I-S) overflow, showing Holocene variations that reflect deglacial meltwater forcing in the early Holocene and insolation-forced trends from the middle-to-late Holocene (Thornalley et al., 2013, Climate of the Past). We will also present detailed grain-size records for the last 2,000 years, both in a depth transect of cores off Cape Hatteras, and from cores in the Iceland Basin, sampling the I-S overflow. Our extensive datasets enable us to provide a coherent synthesis of changes in the flow strength of key components of the AMOC on centennial-millennial and orbital timescales, which we can use to develop our understanding of past millennial-scale climate variability. Specific questions to be addressed include: How well coupled are Holocene trends in Iceland-Scotland overflow and the DWBC? How did I-S overflow and the AMOC vary during the last millennia, including the last ~150 years since the end of the Little Ice Age? Initial results suggest a long-term anti-phasing of the Nordic overflows, wherein mid-late Holocene weakening of the I-S overflow has been compensated for by a strengthening of Denmark Strait overflow. We will also report on pronounced

  13. Circulation, mixing, and transport in nearshore Lake Erie in the vicinity of Villa Angela Beach and Euclid Creek, Cleveland, Ohio, September 11-12, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Villa Angela Beach, on the Lake Erie lakeshore near Cleveland, Ohio, is adjacent to the mouth of Euclid Creek, a small, flashy stream draining approximately 23 square miles and susceptible to periodic contamination from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) (97 and 163 CSO events in 2010 and 2011, respectively). Concerns over high concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in water samples taken along this beach and frequent beach closures led to the collection of synoptic data in the nearshore area in an attempt to gain insights into mixing processes, circulation, and the potential for transport of bacteria and other CSO-related pollutants from various sources in Euclid Creek and along the lakefront. An integrated synoptic survey was completed by the U.S. Geological Survey on September 11–12, 2012, during low-flow conditions on Euclid Creek, which followed rain-induced high flows in the creek on September 8–9, 2012. Data-collection methods included deployment of an autonomous underwater vehicle and use of a manned boat equipped with an acoustic Doppler current profiler. Spatial distributions of water-quality measures and nearshore currents indicated that the mixing zone encompassing the mouth of Euclid Creek and Villa Angela Beach is dynamic and highly variable in extent, but can exhibit a large zone of recirculation that can, at times, be decoupled from local wind forcing. Observed circulation patterns during September 2012 indicated that pollutants from CSOs in Euclid Creek and water discharged from three shoreline CSO points within 2,000 feet of the beach could be trapped along Villa Angela Beach by interaction of nearshore currents and shoreline structures. In spite of observed coastal downwelling, denser water from Euclid Creek is shown to mix to the surface via offshore turbulent structures that span the full depth of flow. While the southwesterly longshore currents driving the recirculation pattern along the beach front were observed during the 2011–12

  14. Consequences of using different soil texture determination methodologies for soil physical quality and unsaturated zone time lag estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, O.; Vero, S.; Ibrahim, T. G.; Murphy, P. N. C.; Sherriff, S. C.; Ó hUallacháin, D.

    2015-11-01

    Elucidation of when the loss of pollutants, below the rooting zone in agricultural landscapes, affects water quality is important when assessing the efficacy of mitigation measures. Investigation of this inherent time lag (tT) is divided into unsaturated (tu) and saturated (ts) components. The duration of these components relative to each other differs depending on soil characteristics and the landscape position. The present field study focuses on tu estimation in a scenario where the saturated zone is likely to constitute a higher proportion of tT. In such instances, or where only initial breakthrough (IBT) or centre of mass (COM) is of interest, utilisation of site and depth specific "simple" textural class or actual sand-silt-clay percentages to generate soil water characteristic curves with associated soil hydraulic parameters is acceptable. With the same data it is also possible to estimate a soil physical quality (S) parameter for each soil layer which can be used to infer many other physical, chemical and biological quality indicators. In this study, hand texturing in the field was used to determine textural classes of a soil profile. Laboratory methods, including hydrometer, pipette and laser diffraction methods were used to determine actual sand-silt-clay percentages of sections of the same soil profile. Results showed that in terms of S, hand texturing resulted in a lower index value (inferring a degraded soil) than that of pipette, hydrometer and laser equivalents. There was no difference between S index values determined using the pipette, hydrometer and laser diffraction methods. The difference between the three laboratory methods on both the IBT and COM stages of tu were negligible, and in this instance were unlikely to affect either groundwater monitoring decisions, or to be of consequence from a policy perspective. When tu estimates are made over the full depth of the vadose zone, which may extend to several metres, errors resulting from the use of

  15. PCBs and organochlorine pesticides in blubber biopsies from free-ranging St. Lawrence River Estuary beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas), 1994-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, K.E.; Muir, D.C.G.; Michaud, Robert; Beland, Pierre; Letcher, R.J.; Norstrom, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    Measuring contaminants only in stranded whales may result in overestimation of organochlorines. - For the first time, organochlorine (OC) contaminants were measured in blubber biopsies from free-ranging St. Lawrence River Estuary beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas), to compare contaminant levels to those previously measured in dead stranded belugas. PCBs, DDTs, toxaphene and chlordane-related compounds were the major OC contaminants detected in 44 belugas biopsied in 1994-1998. ΣPCB (the sum of 104 congeners) ranged from 2080 to 128,000 ng/g lipid in males (n=34; minimum estimated ages 8-22 years), and from 148 to 44,100 ng/g lipid in females (n=10; minimum estimated ages 7-22 years). The concentrations of PCBs and OC pesticides in the blubber of these whales overlapped those observed in stranded belugas from an earlier study, and demonstrated comparable age and sex-related trends. However, lower proportions of mirex, HCB, DDTs, and many of the highly chlorinated PCBs occurred in the biopsy samples compared to results for blubber from stranded carcasses. Most major OC compounds were present at lower concentrations in the biopsies, but this does not appear to be solely related to age differences between the two groups, or to emaciation in the stranded whales. Nor does it appear to be associated with the use of superficial biopsies, and the possible stratification of lipids and OCs in the blubber layer. Nevertheless, given these possible confounding factors, and the uncertainty in age estimates for the biopsied whales, the results point to the need for careful interpretation of biopsy results when comparing with data taken from the full depth of the blubber mantle in stranded whales. Taken together, results from both biopsied whales and previously studied stranded belugas indicate that PCB and OC pesticide contamination of St. Lawrence beluga whales may occur across a broader range of levels than previously thought, at least for males which formed the largest

  16. The Instrumented Flux Return Detector of the SuperB Experiment: R&D Studies and First Results of the Fermilab Beam Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreotti, M.; Baldini, W.; Calabrese, R.; Carassiti, V.; Cotta, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Evangelisti, F.; Luppi, E.; Malaguti, R.; Manzali, M.; Melchiorri, M.; Munerato, M.; Santoro, V.; Tommassetti, L.; Benettoni, M.; Dalcorso, F.; Feltresi, E.; Fanin, C.; Gagliardi, N.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Stroili, R.

    SuperB is a super-flavor factory that will be built in Tor Vergata (Italy). The project, recently approved by the Italian Government, and classified as the flagship project of the Italian INFN, foresees the construction of a high intensity asymmetric electron-positron collider and of the related detector. The expected luminosity of 2x1036cm-2 s-1, a factor 100 higher than the last generation of B-factories, will allow the high statistic study of rare decays and, possibly, will allow a deeper insight in the field of new physics. Part of the SuperB apparatus is the Instrumented Flux Return (IFR). This detector exploits the flux return iron structure of the superconducting solenoid as absorber for the identification of muons and neutral hadrons. In more details, It consists of ≃ 92 cm of iron interleaved by 9 layers of highly segmented scintillators. The detection technique is based on relatively inexpensive extruded plastic scintillator bars produced at the FNAL-NICADD facility. The scintillation light is collected through Wave Length Shifting fibers and guided to recently developed devices called Silicon Photon Multipliers used as photodetectors. The use of plastic scintillator as active material ensures reliability, robustness and long term stability while the high granularity and the fast response guarantee a good space-time resolution, extremely important to cope with the expected high particles flux. The readout scheme under evaluation is this manuscript is the double coordinate readout ("BIRO readout") where two layers of orthogonal scintillator bars provide both, the polar and azimuthal coordinate. In order to deeply understand the performances and possible drawbacks of the above technique, a full depth prototype has been designed and built in Ferrara and Padova, and tested at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FBTF) in December 2010. In this paper a comprehensive description of the IFR related R&D studies will be presented. In particular, we will focus on the

  17. Comparison of depth-dose distributions of proton therapeutic beams calculated by means of logical detectors and ionization chamber modeled in Monte Carlo codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzak, Robert [Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Konefał, Adam, E-mail: adam.konefal@us.edu.pl [Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Sokół, Maria; Orlef, Andrzej [Department of Medical Physics, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center, Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland)

    2016-08-01

    The success of proton therapy depends strongly on the precision of treatment planning. Dose distribution in biological tissue may be obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using various scientific codes making it possible to perform very accurate calculations. However, there are many factors affecting the accuracy of modeling. One of them is a structure of objects called bins registering a dose. In this work the influence of bin structure on the dose distributions was examined. The MCNPX code calculations of Bragg curve for the 60 MeV proton beam were done in two ways: using simple logical detectors being the volumes determined in water, and using a precise model of ionization chamber used in clinical dosimetry. The results of the simulations were verified experimentally in the water phantom with Marcus ionization chamber. The average local dose difference between the measured relative doses in the water phantom and those calculated by means of the logical detectors was 1.4% at first 25 mm, whereas in the full depth range this difference was 1.6% for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations less than 2.4% and for the maximum measuring error of 1%. In case of the relative doses calculated with the use of the ionization chamber model this average difference was somewhat greater, being 2.3% at depths up to 25 mm and 2.4% in the full range of depths for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations of 3%. In the dose calculations the ionization chamber model does not offer any additional advantages over the logical detectors. The results provided by both models are similar and in good agreement with the measurements, however, the logical detector approach is a more time-effective method. - Highlights: • Influence of the bin structure on the proton dose distributions was examined for the MC simulations. • The considered relative proton dose distributions in water correspond to the clinical application. • MC simulations performed with the logical detectors and the

  18. Observed 3D Structure, Generation, and Dissipation of Mesoscale Eddies in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Tian, J.; Qiu, B.; Zhao, W.

    2016-12-01

    South China Sea (SCS), the largest marginal sea in the western Pacific, is abundant with strong mesoscale eddies as revealed by both satellite and in situ observations. The 3D structure, generation and dissipation mechanisms of the SCS mesoscale eddies, however, are still not well understood at present due to the lack of well-designed and comprehensive field observations. In order to address the above scientific issues, the SCS Mesoscale Eddy Experiment (S-MEE for short) was designed and conducted in the period from October 2013 to June 2014. As part of S-MEE, two bottom-anchored subsurface mooring arrays with one consisting of 10 moorings and the other 7 moorings, were deployed along the historical pathway of the mesoscale eddies in the northern SCS. All the moorings were equipped with ADCPs, RCMs, CTDs and temperature chains to make continues measurements of horizontal current velocity and temperature/salinity in the whole water column. In addition to moored observations, we also conducted two transects across the center of one anticyclonic eddy (AE) and made high-resolution hydrographic and turbulent mixing measurements. Based on the data collected by the S-MEE, we obtained the full-depth 3D structures of one AE and one cyclonic eddy (CE) and revealed their generation and dissipation mechanisms. For the first time we found that the eddies in the northern SCS extend from the surface to the sea bottom and display prominent tilted structures in the vertical. The AE was suggested to be shed from the Kuroshio current, which intruded into the SCS through Luzon Strait in winter. For the CE, its generation was associated with the barotropic instability of the Kuroshio current. By conducting an eddy energy budget analysis, we further identified that generation of submesoscale motions constitutes the dominant mechanism for the eddy dissipation. The findings in this study, not only provides new insights into the 3D structure of oceanic eddies, but also contributes to

  19. Interannual variability of mass transport in the Canary region from LADCP data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas-Rodríguez, Isis; Hernández-Guerra, Alonso; Vélez-Belchí, Pedro; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio

    2010-05-01

    The variability of the Canary Current is a widely studied topic regarding its role as eastern boundary of the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre. The Canary region provides indeed an interesting study area in terms of estimating variability scales of the Subtropical Gyre as well as the water masses dynamics. RAPROCAN (RAdial PROfunda de CANarias - Canary deep hydrographic section) is a project based on the reaching of these goals through the obtaining of hydrographic measures during cruises taking place approximately along 29°N, to the North of the Canary Archipelago, twice a year since 2006. The full depth sampling carried out allows the study of temperature and salinity distribution and the calculation of mass transports across the section. The transport estimates are compared to those obtained from previous measurements and estimates in the region. Therefore, transports and their variability through the last decade are quantified. The most significant advance made to previous works is the use of LADCP (Lowered Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) data informing the initial geostrophic calculations. Thus, corrections are applied to each geostrophic profile considering the reference velocity obtained from LADCP data. ADCP-referenced transport estimates are obtained, providing a successful comparison between the velocity fields obtained from the hydrographic measures. While this work shows the interannual variability observed in winter since 1997, preliminary results confirm previous hypotheses about the magnitude of the Canary Current. Those results including LADCP data also provide new aspects in the circulation distribution across the Canary Archipelago. Also moored current meter data were taken into account in the up close study of the Current through the Lanzarote Passage. Interesting conclusions were drawn that certify the usefulness of LADCP data in referencing geostrophic calculations, while corroborating the results obtained through this methodology. Hence

  20. Decrease of concentration and colloidal fraction of organic carbon and trace elements in response to the anomalously hot summer 2010 in a humic boreal lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, L S; Pokrovsky, O S; Moreva, O Yu; Chupakov, A V; Zabelina, S A; Klimov, S I; Shorina, N V; Vorobieva, T Ya

    2013-10-01

    The colloidal distribution and size fractionation of organic carbon (OC), major elements and trace elements (TE) were studied in a seasonally stratified, organic-rich boreal lake, Lake Svyatoe, located in the European subarctic zone (NW Russia, Arkhangelsk region). This study took place over the course of 4 years in both winter and summer periods using an in situ dialysis technique (1 kDa, 10 kDa and 50 kDa) and traditional frontal filtration and ultrafiltration (5, 0.22 and 0.025 μm). We observed a systematic difference in dissolved elements and colloidal fractions between summer and winter periods with the highest proportion of organic and organo-ferric colloids (1 kDa-0.22 μm) observed during winter periods. The anomalously hot summer of 2010 in European Russia produced surface water temperatures of approximately 30°C, which were 10° above the usual summer temperatures and brought about crucial changes in element speciation and size fractionation. In August 2010, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) decreased by more than 30% compared to normal period, while the relative proportion of organic colloids decreased from 70-80% to only 20-30% over the full depth of the water column. Similarly, the proportion of colloidal Fe decreased from 90-98% in most summers and winters to approximately 60-70% in August 2010. During this hot summer, measurable and significant (>30% compared to other periods) decreases in the colloidal fractions of Ca, Mg, Sr, Ba, Al, Ti, Ni, As, V, Co, Y, all rare earth elements (REEs), Zr, Hf, Th and U were also observed. In addition, dissolved (organic matter by heterotrophic aerobic bacterioplankton and 3) photo-degradation of DOM and photo-chemical liberation of organic-bound TE. While the first process may have caused significant decreases in the total dissolved concentration of micronutrients (a factor of 2 to 5 for Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd and a factor of >100 for Co), the second and third factors could have brought

  1. Shelf sea tidal currents and mixing fronts determined from ocean glider observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. F. Sheehan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tides and tidal mixing fronts are of fundamental importance to understanding shelf sea dynamics and ecosystems. Ocean gliders enable the observation of fronts and tide-dominated flows at high resolution. We use dive-average currents from a 2-month (12 October–2 December 2013 glider deployment along a zonal hydrographic section in the north-western North Sea to accurately determine M2 and S2 tidal velocities. The results of the glider-based method agree well with tidal velocities measured by current meters and with velocities extracted from the TPXO tide model. The method enhances the utility of gliders as an ocean-observing platform, particularly in regions where tide models are known to be limited. We then use the glider-derived tidal velocities to investigate tidal controls on the location of a front repeatedly observed by the glider. The front moves offshore at a rate of 0.51 km day−1. During the first part of the deployment (from mid-October until mid-November, results of a one-dimensional model suggest that the balance between surface heat fluxes and tidal stirring is the primary control on frontal location: as heat is lost to the atmosphere, full-depth mixing is able to occur in progressively deeper water. In the latter half of the deployment (mid-November to early December, a front controlled solely by heat fluxes and tidal stirring is not predicted to exist, yet a front persists in the observations. We analyse hydrographic observations collected by the glider to attribute the persistence of the front to the boundary between different water masses, in particular to the presence of cold, saline, Atlantic-origin water in the deeper portion of the section. We combine these results to propose that the front is a hybrid front: one controlled in summer by the local balance between heat fluxes and mixing and which in winter exists as the boundary between water masses advected to the north-western North Sea from diverse source

  2. Defining interactions of in-stream hydrokinetic devices in the Tanana River, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J.; Toniolo, H.; Seitz, A. C.; Schmid, J.; Duvoy, P.

    2012-12-01

    and low TKE between Main and 800 indicate that this section of river may be the best site for deploying hydrokinetic devices. Woody debris exists as individual pieces or as large tangled masses on the surface, as full depth vertically oriented debris moving down river and as submerged debris posing a potential hazard to surface or subsurface deployed hydrokinetic devices. Submerged debris consists of logs, root balls, and small (mulch-like) debris. A surface debris diversion device has been tested and shown to be effective at diverting isolated debris and may reduce hazards for surface mounted devices.Figure 1. AHERC Tanana River test site at Nenana, AK.

  3. A submesoscale coherent vortex in the Ligurian Sea: From dynamical barriers to biological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Anthony; Testor, Pierre; Mayot, Nicolas; Prieur, Louis; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Mortier, Laurent; Le Goff, Hervé; Gourcuff, Claire; Coppola, Laurent; Lavigne, Héloïse; Raimbault, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    In June 2013, a glider equipped with oxygen and fluorescence sensors has been used to extensively sample an anticyclonic Submesoscale Coherent Vortex (SCV) in the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean Sea). Those measurements are complemented by full-depth CTD casts (T, S, and oxygen) and water samples documenting nutrients and phytoplankton pigments within the SCV and outside. The SCV has a very homogeneous core of oxygenated waters between 300 and 1200 m formed 4.5 months earlier during the winter deep convection event. It has a strong dynamical signature with peak velocities at 700 m depth of 13.9 cm s-1 in cyclogeostrophic balance. The eddy has a small radius of 6.2 km corresponding to high Rossby number of -0.45. The vorticity at the eddy center reaches -0.8f. Cross-stream isopycnic diffusion of tracers between the eddy core and the surroundings is found to be very limited due to dynamical barriers set by the SCV associated with a diffusivity coefficient of about 0.2 m2 s-1. The deep core is nutrients-depleted with concentrations of nitrate, phosphate, and silicate, 13-18% lower than the rich surrounding waters. However, the nutriclines are shifted of about 20-50 m toward the surface thus increasing the nutrients availability for phytoplankton. Chlorophyll-a concentrations at the deep chlorophyll maximum are subsequently about twice bigger as compared to outside. Pigments further reveal the predominance of nanophytoplankton inside the eddy and an enhancement of the primary productivity. This study demonstrates the important impact of postconvective SCVs on nutrients distribution and phytoplankton community, as well as on the subsequent primary production and carbon sequestration.Plain Language SummaryDue to harsh meteorological conditions in winter, a few places of the world's ocean experience an intense cooling of their surface waters that start to sink in a process called oceanic deep convection. It is crucial for the functioning of the ocean, but also the marine

  4. Ocean heat content variability and change in an ensemble of ocean reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, M. D.; Roberts, C. D.; Balmaseda, M.; Chang, Y.-S.; Chepurin, G.; Ferry, N.; Fujii, Y.; Good, S. A.; Guinehut, S.; Haines, K.; Hernandez, F.; Köhl, A.; Lee, T.; Martin, M. J.; Masina, S.; Masuda, S.; Peterson, K. A.; Storto, A.; Toyoda, T.; Valdivieso, M.; Vernieres, G.; Wang, O.; Xue, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Accurate knowledge of the location and magnitude of ocean heat content (OHC) variability and change is essential for understanding the processes that govern decadal variations in surface temperature, quantifying changes in the planetary energy budget, and developing constraints on the transient climate response to external forcings. We present an overview of the temporal and spatial characteristics of OHC variability and change as represented by an ensemble of dynamical and statistical ocean reanalyses (ORAs). Spatial maps of the 0-300 m layer show large regions of the Pacific and Indian Oceans where the interannual variability of the ensemble mean exceeds ensemble spread, indicating that OHC variations are well-constrained by the available observations over the period 1993-2009. At deeper levels, the ORAs are less well-constrained by observations with the largest differences across the ensemble mostly associated with areas of high eddy kinetic energy, such as the Southern Ocean and boundary current regions. Spatial patterns of OHC change for the period 1997-2009 show good agreement in the upper 300 m and are characterized by a strong dipole pattern in the Pacific Ocean. There is less agreement in the patterns of change at deeper levels, potentially linked to differences in the representation of ocean dynamics, such as water mass formation processes. However, the Atlantic and Southern Oceans are regions in which many ORAs show widespread warming below 700 m over the period 1997-2009. Annual time series of global and hemispheric OHC change for 0-700 m show the largest spread for the data sparse Southern Hemisphere and a number of ORAs seem to be subject to large initialization `shock' over the first few years. In agreement with previous studies, a number of ORAs exhibit enhanced ocean heat uptake below 300 and 700 m during the mid-1990s or early 2000s. The ORA ensemble mean (±1 standard deviation) of rolling 5-year trends in full-depth OHC shows a relatively steady

  5. Effect of double ion implantation and irradiation by Ar and He ions on nano-indentation hardness of metallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Mook, W. M.; Fu, E. G.; Wang, Y.-Q.; Carr, D. G.; Anderoglu, O.; Mara, N. A.; Misra, A.; Harrison, R. P.; Edwards, L.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the authors have investigated the combined effect of a double layer of implantation on four different metallic alloys, ODS steel MA957, Zircaloy-4, Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy and stainless steel 316, by ions of two different species - He and Ar - on the hardening of the surface as measured by nano-indentation. The data was collected for a large number of indentations using the Continuous Stiffness Method or "CSM" mode, applying the indents on the implanted surface. Careful analysis of the data in the present investigations show that the relative hardening due to individual implantation layers can be used to obtain an estimate of the relative hardening effect of a combination of two separate implanted layers of two different species. This combined hardness was found to lie between the square root of the sum of the squares of individual hardening effects, (ΔHA2 + ΔHB2)0.5 as the lower limit and the sum of the individual hardening effects, (ΔHA + ΔHB) as the upper limit, within errors, for all depths measured. The hardening due to irradiation by different species of ions was calculated by subtracting the average hardness vs. depth curve of the un-irradiated or "virgin" material from that of the irradiated material. The combined hardening of the irradiated samples due to Ar and He irradiation was found to be described well by an approximate upper bound given by the simple linear sum of the individual hardening (L) and a lower bound given by the square root of the sum of the squares (R) of the individual hardening effects due to Ar and He irradiation along the full depth of the indentation. The peak of the combined hardness of Ar and He irradiated material appears at the depth predicted by both the R and the L curves, in all samples. The combined hardness increase due to Ar and He irradiation lies near the upper limit (L curve) for the ODS steel MA957, somewhere in between L and R curves for Zircaloy-4, and near the R curve for the stainless steel 316

  6. Phase sensitive multichannel OCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trasischker, W.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis was to develop and improve phase sensitive, multichannel methods for optical coherence tomography (OCT) using light in the 840 nm and 1040 nm regime. Conventional OCT provides purely structural information by illuminating the sample by one beam and recording the backscattered signal with one detection channel. Combination of this approach with a raster scan enables the acquisition of 2D and 3D structural information with a resolution in the micrometer regime. However, sometimes additional image contrast or information is desired. Amongst other approaches, this can be provided by a phase sensitive analysis of the interference pattern. Combining phase sensitivity with the illumination of the sample by more than one beam and/or by recording the data using more than one data acquisition channel allows for even more enhanced imaging. While phase sensitive OCT gives access to additional contrast and information, multichannel OCT can provide higher imaging speed, scan eld size and exible dierential measurements. Amongst the dierential, phase sensitive approaches, Doppler OCT (DOCT) and polarization sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) are two of the most promising OCT modalities. While the former targets information on the movement of backscattering particles, the latter measures alterations of the polarization state of the light induced by the sample. Both techniques provide additional image contrast and are, due to the non-invasive and fast character of OCT, well suited for in vivo imaging of the human eye. In the course of this thesis, two dierent multichannel, phase sensitive OCT systems will be presented. First, a D-OCT system with three dierent sampling beams is described. With a central wavelength of 840 nm these three beams are emitted by three individual laser sources. This eectively eliminates any cross talk and provides the full depth range for each channel. Furthermore, by illuminating the sample from three dierent directions, the absolute

  7. Gravity currents in rotating channels. Part 1. Steady-state theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, J. N.; Linden, P. F.

    2002-04-01

    A theory is developed for the speed and structure of steady-state non-dissipative gravity currents in rotating channels. The theory is an extension of that of Benjamin (1968) for non-rotating gravity currents, and in a similar way makes use of the steady-state and perfect-fluid (incompressible, inviscid and immiscible) approximations, and supposes the existence of a hydrostatic ‘control point’ in the current some distance away from the nose. The model allows for fully non-hydrostatic and ageostrophic motion in a control volume V ahead of the control point, with the solution being determined by the requirements, consistent with the perfect-fluid approximation, of energy and momentum conservation in V, as expressed by Bernoulli's theorem and a generalized flow-force balance. The governing parameter in the problem, which expresses the strength of the background rotation, is the ratio W = B/R, where B is the channel width and R = (g[prime prime or minute]H)1/2/f is the internal Rossby radius of deformation based on the total depth of the ambient fluid H. Analytic solutions are determined for the particular case of zero front-relative flow within the gravity current. For each value of W there is a unique non-dissipative two-layer solution, and a non-dissipative one-layer solution which is specified by the value of the wall-depth h0. In the two-layer case, the non-dimensional propagation speed c = cf(g[prime prime or minute]H)[minus sign]1/2 increases smoothly from the non-rotating value of 0.5 as W increases, asymptoting to unity for W [rightward arrow] [infty infinity]. The gravity current separates from the left-hand wall of the channel at W = 0.67 and thereafter has decreasing width. The depth of the current at the right-hand wall, h0, increases, reaching the full depth at W = 1.90, after which point the interface outcrops on both the upper and lower boundaries, with the distance over which the interface slopes being 0.881R. In the one-layer case, the wall

  8. Using Green's Functions to initialize and adjust a global, eddying ocean biogeochemistry general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, H.; Menemenlis, D.; Hill, C.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Jahn, O.; Wang, D.; Bowman, K.; Zhang, H.

    2015-11-01

    The NASA Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) Flux Project aims to attribute changes in the atmospheric accumulation of carbon dioxide to spatially resolved fluxes by utilizing the full suite of NASA data, models, and assimilation capabilities. For the oceanic part of this project, we introduce ECCO2-Darwin, a new ocean biogeochemistry general circulation model based on combining the following pre-existing components: (i) a full-depth, eddying, global-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm), (ii) an adjoint-method-based estimate of ocean circulation from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II (ECCO2) project, (iii) the MIT ecosystem model "Darwin", and (iv) a marine carbon chemistry model. Air-sea gas exchange coefficients and initial conditions of dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, and oxygen are adjusted using a Green's Functions approach in order to optimize modeled air-sea CO2 fluxes. Data constraints include observations of carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) for 2009-2010, global air-sea CO2 flux estimates, and the seasonal cycle of the Takahashi et al. (2009) Atlas. The model sensitivity experiments (or Green's Functions) include simulations that start from different initial conditions as well as experiments that perturb air-sea gas exchange parameters and the ratio of particulate inorganic to organic carbon. The Green's Functions approach yields a linear combination of these sensitivity experiments that minimizes model-data differences. The resulting initial conditions and gas exchange coefficients are then used to integrate the ECCO2-Darwin model forward. Despite the small number (six) of control parameters, the adjusted simulation is significantly closer to the data constraints (37% cost function reduction, i.e., reduction in the model-data difference, relative to the baseline simulation) and to independent observations (e.g., alkalinity). The adjusted air-sea gas

  9. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  10. Decrease of concentration and colloidal fraction of organic carbon and trace elements in response to the anomalously hot summer 2010 in a humic boreal lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokova, L.S.; Pokrovsky, O.S.; Moreva, O.Yu.; Chupakov, A.V.; Zabelina, S.A.; Klimov, S.I.; Shorina, N.V.; Vorobieva, T.Ya.

    2013-01-01

    The colloidal distribution and size fractionation of organic carbon (OC), major elements and trace elements (TE) were studied in a seasonally stratified, organic-rich boreal lake, Lake Svyatoe, located in the European subarctic zone (NW Russia, Arkhangelsk region). This study took place over the course of 4 years in both winter and summer periods using an in situ dialysis technique (1 kDa, 10 kDa and 50 kDa) and traditional frontal filtration and ultrafiltration (5, 0.22 and 0.025 μm). We observed a systematic difference in dissolved elements and colloidal fractions between summer and winter periods with the highest proportion of organic and organo-ferric colloids (1 kDa–0.22 μm) observed during winter periods. The anomalously hot summer of 2010 in European Russia produced surface water temperatures of approximately 30 °C, which were 10° above the usual summer temperatures and brought about crucial changes in element speciation and size fractionation. In August 2010, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) decreased by more than 30% compared to normal period, while the relative proportion of organic colloids decreased from 70–80% to only 20–30% over the full depth of the water column. Similarly, the proportion of colloidal Fe decreased from 90–98% in most summers and winters to approximately 60–70% in August 2010. During this hot summer, measurable and significant (> 30% compared to other periods) decreases in the colloidal fractions of Ca, Mg, Sr, Ba, Al, Ti, Ni, As, V, Co, Y, all rare earth elements (REEs), Zr, Hf, Th and U were also observed. In addition, dissolved ( 100 for Co), the second and third factors could have brought about the decrease of allochthonous DOC concentration as well as the concentration and proportion of organic and organo-mineral colloidal forms of non-essential low-soluble trace elements present in the form of organic colloids (Al, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, Th, Pb, all REEs). It can be hypothesized that climate warming in

  11. Improved Fatigue Performance of Threaded Drillstring Connections by Cold Rolling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristoffersen, Steinar

    2002-01-01

    The research work presented in this thesis is concerned with analytical, numerical and experimental studies of the effect of cold rolling on the fatigue behaviour of threaded drillstring connections. A comprehensive literature study is made of the various effects on the fatigue behaviour of residual stresses introduced by mechanical deformation of notched components. Some of the effects studied are cyclic hardening behaviour after prestraining, cyclic creep, fatigue initiation in prestrained materials, short cracks and crack growth models including crack closure. Residual stresses were introduced in the surface of a smooth pipe by a rolling device to simulate a cold rolling process and verify the calculated residual stresses by measurements. Strain hardening and contact algorithm of the two bodies were incorporated in the FE analyses. Two significant errors were found in the commercial software package for residual stress evaluation, Restran v. 3.3.2a also called SINT, when using the Schajer method. The Schajer algorithm is the only hole-drilling algorithm without theoretical shortcomings, and is recommended when measuring large residual stress gradients in the depth direction. Using the Schajer method solved by in-house Matlab-routines good agreement between measured residual stress gradients and residual stress gradients from FE analyses was found. Full scale fatigue tests were performed on pipes cut from used drillstrings with notches of similar geometry as threads used in drillstring connections. The simulated threads consisted of four full depth helix notches with runouts at the surface. The pipe threads were cold rolled and fatigue tested in a full-scale four-point rotating bending fatigue testing rig. The test results showed that cold rolling had an effect on the crack initiation period. A major part of the fatigue life was with cracks observed at the notch root, but due to the increased fatigue crack propagation resistance the final fracture initiated at

  12. The EuroSITES network: Integrating and enhancing fixed-point open ocean observatories around Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampitt, Richard S.; Larkin, Kate E.; EuroSITES Consortium

    2010-05-01

    EuroSITES is a 3 year (2008-2011) EU collaborative project (3.5MEuro) with the objective to integrate and enhance the nine existing open ocean fixed point observatories around Europe (www.eurosites.info). These observatories are primarily composed of full depth moorings and make multidisciplinary in situ observations within the water column as the European contribution to the global array OceanSITES (www.oceansites.org). In the first 18 months, all 9 observatories have been active and integration has been significant through the maintenance and enhancement of observatory hardware. Highlights include the enhancement of observatories with sensors to measure O2, pCO2, chlorophyll, and nitrate in near real-time from the upper 1000 m. In addition, some seafloor missions are also actively supported. These include seafloor platforms currently deployed in the Mediterranean, one for tsunami detection and one to monitor fluid flow related to seismic activity and slope stability. Upcoming seafloor science missions in 2010 include monitoring benthic biological communities and associated biogeochemistry as indicators of climate change in both the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean. EuroSITES also promotes the development of innovative sensors and samplers in order to progress capability to measure climate-relevant properties of the ocean. These include further developing current technologies for autonomous long-term monitoring of oxygen consumption in the mesopelagic, pH and mesozooplankton abundance. Many of these science missions are directly related to complementary activities in other European projects such as EPOCA, HYPOX and ESONET. In 2010 a direct collaboration including in situ field work will take place between ESONET and EuroSITES. The demonstration mission MODOO (funded by ESONET) will be implemented in 2010 at the EuroSITES PAP observatory. Field work will include deployment of a seafloor lander system with various sensors which will send data to shore in real

  13. Early age sealing of buffer-rock gap by artificial wetting to induce bentonite swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, Erika; Marjavaara, Pieti

    2012-01-01

    to quantify the variation of water content, SHORE hardness and density across the buffer and gap filling. The results showed that the bentonite buffer exposed to rapid artificial wetting is able to uniformly swelling to fill the gap within the first day with 25 mm gap. When only a water-filled gap was used, a radial pressure of about 200 kPa was achieved within the first few days with gas-tight steel lid in use. The pressure reached a maximum after about 2 weeks and then gradually declined due to moisture distribution from the gap towards the centre of the buffer block. Radial cracks appeared within the blocks within the test duration, which extended the full depth and across blocks. These could tighten and seal with prolonged testing or water addition. When gap filling materials were used, such as Cebogel pellets or Ibeco Seal granules, the radial pressure had maximum values up to 600 kPa. The pressure developed at a much faster rate and was better maintained over time, without the same type of pressure drop experienced with only an air-water filled gap. It was demonstrated that water could percolate through the pellet filling to be evenly distributed within a few minutes. This was also achieved in longer tube-filling tests simulating actual deposition holes, showing that when the pellets were placed by free-falling there was enough void space to allow full water filtration. The swollen material was well confined in the gap when an axial confining pressure was used from the start of testing. In some cases, the vertical, or axial, uplift pressure due to swelling was as much as double the radial pressure. Yet this could theoretically be counter-balanced by applying a confining load or lid to prevent buffer uplift into the tunnel backfill area. These post-test assessments showed that moisture equilibrium between the gap and buffer was not reached within the short test duration as expected. The outer gap filled material could have water contents on the order of 100 to

  14. Early concepts and charts of ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R. G.; Stramma, L.; Kortum, G.

    Charts of ocean currents from the late nineteenth century show that already by then the patterns of surface circulation in regions away from polar latitudes were well understood. This fundamental knowledge accumulated gradually through centuries of sea travel and had reached a state of near correctness by the time dedicated research cruises, full-depth measurements and the practical application of the dynamical method were being instituted. Perhaps because of the foregoing, many of the pioneering works, critical to establishing what the upper-level circulation is like, the majority of the charts accompanying them, and several of the groundbreaking theoretical treatments on the physics of currents, are only poorly known to present-day oceanographers. In this paper we trace Western developments in knowledge and understanding of ocean circulation from the earliest times to the late-1800s transition into the modern era. We also discuss certain peripheral advances that proved critical to the subject. The earliest known ideas, dating from the Bronze Age and described by Homer, necessarily reflect severe limitations to geographical knowledge, as well as basic human predilections toward conjecture and exaggeration in the face of inadequate information. People considered the earth to be flat and circular, with the ocean flowing like a river around it. They also believed in horrific whirlpools, a concept that persisted into the Renaissance and which would later provide subject material for modern literature. From the Greek Classical Age, we find hydrologic theories of Earth's interior being laced with subterranean channels (Socrates) and all motion deriving from a divine force forever propelling the heavens toward the west, the primum mobile (Aristotle). These ideas, particularly the latter, dominated opinions about ocean circulation into the late Renaissance. By late Antiquity mariners had very likely acquired intimate knowledge of coastal currents in the Mediterranean, but