WorldWideScience

Sample records for ezrin radixin moesin

  1. Caspase Cleavages of the Lymphocyte-oriented Kinase Prevent Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin Phosphorylation during Apoptosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Catherine; Belkina, Natalya V.; Long, Thavy; Deruy, Emeric; Dissous, Colette; Shaw, Stephen; Tulasne, David

    2016-01-01

    The lymphocyte-oriented kinase (LOK), also called serine threonine kinase 10 (STK10), is synthesized mainly in lymphocytes. It is involved in lymphocyte migration and polarization and can phosphorylate ezrin, radixin, and moesin (the ERM proteins). In a T lymphocyte cell line and in purified human lymphocytes, we found LOK to be cleaved by caspases during apoptosis. The first cleavage occurs at aspartic residue 332, located between the kinase domain and the coiled-coil regulation domain. This cleavage generates an N-terminal fragment, p50 N-LOK, containing the kinase domain and a C-terminal fragment, which is further cleaved during apoptosis. Although these cleavages preserve the entire kinase domain, p50 N-LOK displays no kinase activity. In apoptotic lymphocytes, caspase cleavages of LOK are concomitant with a decrease in ERM phosphorylation. When non-apoptotic lymphocytes from mice with homozygous and heterozygous LOK knockout were compared, the latter showed a higher level of ERM phosphorylation, but when apoptosis was induced, LOK−/− and LOK+/− lymphocytes showed the same low level, confirming in vivo that LOK-induced ERM phosphorylation is prevented during lymphocyte apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that cleavage of LOK during apoptosis abolishes its kinase activity, causing a decrease in ERM phosphorylation, crucial to the role of the ERM proteins in linking the plasma membrane to actin filaments. PMID:26945071

  2. Caspase Cleavages of the Lymphocyte-oriented Kinase Prevent Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin Phosphorylation during Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Catherine; Belkina, Natalya V; Long, Thavy; Deruy, Emeric; Dissous, Colette; Shaw, Stephen; Tulasne, David

    2016-05-06

    The lymphocyte-oriented kinase (LOK), also called serine threonine kinase 10 (STK10), is synthesized mainly in lymphocytes. It is involved in lymphocyte migration and polarization and can phosphorylate ezrin, radixin, and moesin (the ERM proteins). In a T lymphocyte cell line and in purified human lymphocytes, we found LOK to be cleaved by caspases during apoptosis. The first cleavage occurs at aspartic residue 332, located between the kinase domain and the coiled-coil regulation domain. This cleavage generates an N-terminal fragment, p50 N-LOK, containing the kinase domain and a C-terminal fragment, which is further cleaved during apoptosis. Although these cleavages preserve the entire kinase domain, p50 N-LOK displays no kinase activity. In apoptotic lymphocytes, caspase cleavages of LOK are concomitant with a decrease in ERM phosphorylation. When non-apoptotic lymphocytes from mice with homozygous and heterozygous LOK knockout were compared, the latter showed a higher level of ERM phosphorylation, but when apoptosis was induced, LOK(-/-) and LOK(+/-) lymphocytes showed the same low level, confirming in vivo that LOK-induced ERM phosphorylation is prevented during lymphocyte apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that cleavage of LOK during apoptosis abolishes its kinase activity, causing a decrease in ERM phosphorylation, crucial to the role of the ERM proteins in linking the plasma membrane to actin filaments. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Different regulation of P-glycoprotein function between Caco-2 and Caki-1 cells by ezrin, radixin and moesin proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Kentaro; Otsuka, Kyoma; Kato, Yuko; Kawabata, Hideaki; Ohmori, Shinya; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-03-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediates efflux of many xenobiotics, including therapeutic drugs, from normal and tumour tissues, and its functional localization on the plasma membrane of cells is regulated by scaffold proteins, such as ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM proteins). We previously reported that radixin is involved in post-translational regulation of P-gp in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells and mouse small intestine, but not in mouse kidney. Here, we investigated whether the role of ERM proteins in regulation of P-gp transport activity in cancers is the same as that in the corresponding normal tissues, using human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and renal carcinoma (Caki-1) cells. In Caco-2 cells, radixin silencing alone reduced the P-gp-mediated intracellular accumulation of rhodamine123 (Rho123), while the mRNA level of P-gp was unchanged. Thus, it appears that only radixin among the ERMs regulates P-gp activity in Caco-2 cells. On the other hand, none of the ERM proteins influenced P-gp activity in Caki-1 cells. The regulation of P-gp by ERM proteins is different between Caco-2 and Caki-1 cells. Moreover, these regulatory properties are the same as those of the corresponding normal tissues, and suggest that tissue-specific differences in the regulation of P-gp by ERM proteins are retained in cancerous tissues. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society, Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology.

  4. Ezrin and moesin expression in canine and feline osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavaty, Juraj; Wolfesberger, Birgitt; Hauck, Marlene; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, Andrea; Miller, Ingrid; Walter, Ingrid

    2017-08-01

    Biological features of canine osteosarcomas (OS) differ markedly from those found in feline and resemble more human osteosarcomas, in particular for their high rate of metastasis and poor prognosis. Ezrin, radixin and moesin are members of the ERM protein family and link the actin cytoskeleton with the cell membrane. Ezrin and moesin have been shown to be of prognostic significance in tumor progression due to their role in the metastatic process. The objective of this study was to analyze ezrin and moesin protein expression in a series of dog (n = 16) and cat (n = 8) osteosarcoma samples using immunohistochemistry and western blot techniques. We found that cat OS have a higher moesin expression compared to dog OS, however, the active phosphorylated forms of moesin and ezrin Tyr353 were more abundant in the dog samples. A statistically significant difference was found for the low and high immunohistochemical scores of ezrin and pan-phospho-ERM proteins between cat and dog. Although phospho-ezrin Thr567 was higher in feline OS, the membranous localization in dog OS samples indicates the presence of the biologically active form. Therefore, the observed differences in phosphorylated forms of ezrin and moesin status should be further studied to demonstrate if they are relevant for different biological behavior between dog and cat OS.

  5. Layilin, a cell surface hyaluronan receptor, interacts with merlin and radixin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bono, Petri; Cordero, Etchell; Johnson, Kristen; Borowsky, Mark; Ramesh, Vijaya; Jacks, Tyler; Hynes, Richard O.

    2005-01-01

    Layilin is a widely expressed integral membrane hyaluronan receptor, originally identified as a binding partner of talin located in membrane ruffles. We have identified merlin, the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein and radixin, as other interactors with the carboxy-terminal domain of layilin. We show that the carboxy-terminal domain of layilin is capable of binding to the amino-terminal domain of radixin. An interdomain interaction between the amino- and the carboxy-terminal domains of radixin inhibits its ability to bind to layilin. In the presence of acidic phospholipids, the interdomain interaction of radixin is inhibited and layilin can bind to full-length radixin. In contrast, layilin binds both full-length and amino-terminal merlin-GST fusion proteins without a requirement for phospholipids. Furthermore, layilin antibody can immunoprecipitate merlin, confirming association in vivo between these two proteins, which also display similar subcellular localizations in ruffling membranes. No interaction was observed between layilin and ezrin or layilin and moesin. These findings expand the known binding partners of layilin to include other members of the talin/band 4.1/ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) family of cytoskeletal-membrane linker molecules. This in turn suggests that layilin may mediate signals from extracellular matrix to the cell cytoskeleton via interaction with different intracellular binding partners and thereby be involved in the modulation of cortical structures in the cell

  6. Effects of advanced glycation end products on ezrin-dependent functions in LLC-PK1 proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A; Gallicchio, Marisa A; McRobert, E Anne; Tikoo, Anjali; Cooper, Mark E

    2005-06-01

    We have recently shown that advanced glycation products (AGEs) bind to the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of proteins. ERM proteins act as cross-linkers between cell membrane proteins and the actin cytoskeleton. They are also involved in signal transduction pathways. They therefore have a critical role in normal cell processes, including modulation of cell shape, adhesion, and motility. We postulate that AGEs may contribute to diabetic complications by disrupting ERM function. In support of this hypothesis, AGEs inhibit ezrin-dependent tubulogenesis of proximal tubule cells. Phosphorylation is an important activating mechanism for ERM proteins, and AGEs inhibit ezrin phosphorylation mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor.

  7. The Janus-faced role of ezrin in "linking" cells to either normal or metastatic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Daria; Fais, Stefano

    2009-11-15

    In the majority of eukaryotic cells, the ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM) proteins are involved in many physiologic functions including regulation of actin cytoskeleton, control of cell shape, adhesion, motility and modulation of signal transduction pathways. In a previous study, we used a dominant negative ezrin-mutant to address ezrin involvement in remodeling of actin cytoskeleton and subsequently we depicted ezrin key role in melanoma cell migration and progression. Herein, we highlight recent advances on ezrin involvement in the metastatic phenomenon, including also some more neglected ezrin-related functions. Novel molecular processes driven by ezrin activation include: phagocytosis, acquisition of resistance to chemotherapeutics and triggering of programmed cell death signals. Recent data support an integrated role of ezrin also in development of tumor malignancy. On one hand, ezrin may be responsible of deranged execution of specific known functions such as adhesion and motility and on the other, it may also participate to unique metastatic determinants, through the establishment of aberrant linkages with tumor-related proteins. For instance, ezrin misslocalization, absence or deranged activity has started to be correlated with tumor progression in many tumors of different species, including humans. Concomitantly, ezrin may act simultaneously as a regulatory or deregulatory chaperon in both normal and tumor cells. It is still to be established whether this Janus-faced feature of ezrin is due to some unknown transforming Zelig-like property or to the fact that a tumor-associated molecule preferentially links to ezrin thus distracting it from its normal connections. However, the contribution of ezrin functional deregulation to the acquisition of the metastatic phenotype appears clear and ezrin or ezrin aberrant associations may represent good candidates for future anti-tumor therapies.

  8. X-linked primary immunodeficiency associated with hemizygous mutations in the moesin (MSN) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Luce, Sonia; Ouchani, Farid; Soheili, Tayebeh Shabi; Sadek, Hanem; Chouteau, Myriam; Durand, Amandine; Pic, Isabelle; Majewski, Jacek; Brouzes, Chantal; Lambert, Nathalie; Bohineust, Armelle; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Gandemer, Virginie; Monnier, Delphine; Heijmans, Catherine; van Gijn, Marielle; Dalm, Virgil A; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Picard, Capucine; Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven; Hivroz, Claire; Jabado, Nada; de Saint Basile, Geneviève; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana, Marina; André-Schmutz, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    We investigated 7 male patients (from 5 different families) presenting with profound lymphopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, fluctuating monocytopenia and neutropenia, a poor immune response to vaccine antigens, and increased susceptibility to bacterial and varicella zoster virus infections. We sought to characterize the genetic defect involved in a new form of X-linked immunodeficiency. We performed genetic analyses and an exhaustive phenotypic and functional characterization of the lymphocyte compartment. We observed hemizygous mutations in the moesin (MSN) gene (located on the X chromosome and coding for MSN) in all 7 patients. Six of the latter had the same missense mutation, which led to an amino acid substitution (R171W) in the MSN four-point-one, ezrin, radixin, moesin domain. The seventh patient had a nonsense mutation leading to a premature stop codon mutation (R533X). The naive T-cell counts were particularly low for age, and most CD8 + T cells expressed the senescence marker CD57. This phenotype was associated with impaired T-cell proliferation, which was rescued by expression of wild-type MSN. MSN-deficient T cells also displayed poor chemokine receptor expression, increased adhesion molecule expression, and altered migration and adhesion capacities. Our observations establish a causal link between an ezrin-radixin-moesin protein mutation and a primary immunodeficiency that could be referred to as X-linked moesin-associated immunodeficiency. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Akt2-Dependent Phosphorylation of Radixin in Regulation of Mrp-2 Trafficking in WIF-B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Jo; Rockey, Don C; Karvar, Serhan

    2016-02-01

    The dominant ezrin/radixin/moesin protein in hepatocytes is radixin, which plays an important role in mediating the binding of F-actin to the plasma membrane after a conformational activation by phosphorylation at Thr564. Here we have investigated the importance of Akt-mediated radixin Thr564 phosphorylation on Mrp-2 distribution and function in WIF-B cells. Mrp-2 is an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter that plays an important role in detoxification and chemoprotection by transporting a wide range of compounds, especially conjugates of lipophilic substances with glutathione, organic anions, and drug metabolites such as glucuronides. Akt1 and Akt2 expression were manipulated using dominant active and negative constructs as well as Akt1 and Akt2 siRNA. Cellular distribution of radixin and Mrp-2 was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. A 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate, which is a substrate of the Mrp-2 and is actively transported in canalicular lumina, was used to measure Mrp-2 function. Radixin phosphorylation was significantly increased in wild-type and dominant active Akt2 transfected cells. Furthermore, radixin and Mrp-2 were localized at the canalicular membrane, similar to control cells. In contrast, overexpression of dominant negative Akt2, siRNA knockdown of Akt2 and a specific Akt inhibitor prevented radixin phosphorylation and led to alteration of normal radixin and Mrp-2 localization; inhibition of Akt2, but not Akt1 function led to radixin localization to the cytoplasmic space. In addition, dominant negative and Akt2 knockdown led to a dramatically impaired hepatocyte secretory response, while wild-type and dominant active Akt2 transfected cells exhibited increased 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate excretion. In contrast to Akt2, Akt1 was not associated with radixin phosphorylation. These studies, therefore, identify Akt2 as a critical kinase that regulates radixin phosphorylation and leads to Mrp-2 translocation and

  10. The actin binding cytoskeletal protein Moesin is involved in nuclear mRNA export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristó, Ildikó; Bajusz, Csaba; Borsos, Barbara N; Pankotai, Tibor; Dopie, Joseph; Jankovics, Ferenc; Vartiainen, Maria K; Erdélyi, Miklós; Vilmos, Péter

    2017-10-01

    Current models imply that the evolutionarily conserved, actin-binding Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) proteins perform their activities at the plasma membrane by anchoring membrane proteins to the cortical actin network. Here we show that beside its cytoplasmic functions, the single ERM protein of Drosophila, Moesin, has a novel role in the nucleus. The activation of transcription by heat shock or hormonal treatment increases the amount of nuclear Moesin, indicating biological function for the protein in the nucleus. The distribution of Moesin in the nucleus suggests a function in transcription and the depletion of mRNA export factors Nup98 or its interacting partner, Rae1, leads to the nuclear accumulation of Moesin, suggesting that the nuclear function of the protein is linked to mRNA export. Moesin localizes to mRNP particles through the interaction with the mRNA export factor PCID2 and knock down of Moesin leads to the accumulation of mRNA in the nucleus. Based on our results we propose that, beyond its well-known, manifold functions in the cytoplasm, the ERM protein of Drosophila is a new, functional component of the nucleus where it participates in mRNA export. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Tailor-made ezrin actin binding domain to probe its interaction with actin in-vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Shrivastava

    Full Text Available Ezrin, a member of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin protein family, is an Actin-plasma membrane linker protein mediating cellular integrity and function. In-vivo study of such interactions is a complex task due to the presence of a large number of endogenous binding partners for both Ezrin and Actin. Further, C-terminal actin binding capacity of the full length Ezrin is naturally shielded by its N-terminal, and only rendered active in the presence of Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 or phosphorylation at the C-terminal threonine. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the design, expression and purification of constructs, combining the Ezrin C-terminal actin binding domain, with functional elements such as fusion tags and fluorescence tags to facilitate purification and fluorescence microscopy based studies. For the first time, internal His tag was employed for purification of Ezrin actin binding domain based on in-silico modeling. The functionality (Ezrin-actin interaction of these constructs was successfully demonstrated by using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy. This design can be extended to other members of the ERM family as well.

  12. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  13. Death Receptor-Induced Apoptosis Signalling Regulation by Ezrin Is Cell Type Dependent and Occurs in a DISC-Independent Manner in Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iessi, Elisabetta; Zischler, Luciana; Etringer, Aurélie; Bergeret, Marion; Morlé, Aymeric; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Morizot, Alexandre; Shirley, Sarah; Lalaoui, Najoua; Elifio-Esposito, Selene L.; Fais, Stefano; Garrido, Carmen; Solary, Eric; Micheau, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin belongs to the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) protein family and has been demonstrated to regulate early steps of Fas receptor signalling in lymphoid cells, but its contribution to TRAIL-induced cell death regulation in adherent cancer cells remains unknown. In this study we report that regulation of FasL and TRAIL-induced cell death by ezrin is cell type dependant. Ezrin is a positive regulator of apoptosis in T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat, but a negative regulator in colon cancer cells. Using ezrin phosphorylation or actin-binding mutants, we provide evidence that negative regulation of death receptor-induced apoptosis by ezrin occurs in a cytoskeleton- and DISC-independent manner, in colon cancer cells. Remarkably, inhibition of apoptosis induced by these ligands was found to be tightly associated with regulation of ezrin phosphorylation on serine 66, the tumor suppressor gene WWOX and activation of PKA. Deficiency in WWOX expression in the liver cancer SK-HEP1 or the pancreatic Mia PaCa-2 cell lines as well as WWOX silencing or modulation of PKA activation by pharmacological regulators, in the colon cancer cell line SW480, abrogated regulation of TRAIL signalling by ezrin. Altogether our results show that death receptor pro-apoptotic signalling regulation by ezrin can occur downstream of the DISC in colon cancer cells. PMID:26010871

  14. Death Receptor-Induced Apoptosis Signalling Regulation by Ezrin Is Cell Type Dependent and Occurs in a DISC-Independent Manner in Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Iessi

    Full Text Available Ezrin belongs to the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin protein family and has been demonstrated to regulate early steps of Fas receptor signalling in lymphoid cells, but its contribution to TRAIL-induced cell death regulation in adherent cancer cells remains unknown. In this study we report that regulation of FasL and TRAIL-induced cell death by ezrin is cell type dependant. Ezrin is a positive regulator of apoptosis in T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat, but a negative regulator in colon cancer cells. Using ezrin phosphorylation or actin-binding mutants, we provide evidence that negative regulation of death receptor-induced apoptosis by ezrin occurs in a cytoskeleton- and DISC-independent manner, in colon cancer cells. Remarkably, inhibition of apoptosis induced by these ligands was found to be tightly associated with regulation of ezrin phosphorylation on serine 66, the tumor suppressor gene WWOX and activation of PKA. Deficiency in WWOX expression in the liver cancer SK-HEP1 or the pancreatic Mia PaCa-2 cell lines as well as WWOX silencing or modulation of PKA activation by pharmacological regulators, in the colon cancer cell line SW480, abrogated regulation of TRAIL signalling by ezrin. Altogether our results show that death receptor pro-apoptotic signalling regulation by ezrin can occur downstream of the DISC in colon cancer cells.

  15. Engagement of CD81 induces ezrin tyrosine phosphorylation and its cellular redistribution with filamentous actin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, Greg P.; Rajapaksa, Ranjani; Liu, Raymond; Sharpe, Orr; Kuo, Chiung-Chi; Wald Krauss, Sharon; Sagi, Yael; Davis, R. Eric; Staudt, Louis M.; Sharman, Jeff P.; Robinson, William H.; Levy, Shoshana

    2009-06-09

    CD81 is a tetraspanin family member involved in diverse cellular interactions in the immune and nervous systems and in cell fusion events. However, the mechanism of action of CD81 and of other tetraspanins has not been defined. We reasoned that identifying signaling molecules downstream of CD81 would provide mechanistic clues. We engaged CD81 on the surface of Blymphocytes and identified the induced tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins by mass spectrometry. This analysis showed that the most prominent tyrosine phosphorylated protein was ezrin, an actin binding protein and a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family. We also found that CD81 engagement induces spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that Syk was involved in tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin. Ezrin colocalized with CD81 and F-actin upon stimulation and this association was disrupted when Syk activation was blocked. Taken together, these studies suggest a model in which CD81 interfaces between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton by activating Syk, mobilizing ezrin, and recruiting F-actin to facilitate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell signaling. This may be a mechanism explaining the pleiotropic effects induced in response to stimulating cells by anti-CD81 antibodies or by the hepatitis C virus, which uses this molecule as its key receptor.

  16. Lipid Raft Association Restricts CD44-Ezrin Interaction and Promotion of Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatello, Simona; Babina, Irina S.; Hazelwood, Lee D.; Hill, Arnold D.K.; Nabi, Ivan R.; Hopkins, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration. PMID:23031255

  17. Rational redesign of neutral endopeptidase binding to merlin and moesin proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, Masha Y; Iida, Katsuyuki; Zheng, Rong; Horiguchi, Akio; Shen, Ruoqian; Nanus, David M

    2009-01-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (NEP) is a 90- to 110-kDa cell-surface peptidase that is normally expressed by numerous tissues but whose expression is lost or reduced in a variety of malignancies. The anti-tumorigenic function of NEP is mediated not only by its catalytic activity but also through direct protein–protein interactions of its cytosolic region with several binding partners, including Lyn kinase, PTEN, and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins. We have previously shown that mutation of the K19K20K21 basic cluster in NEPs' cytosolic region to residues QNI disrupts binding to the ERM proteins. Here we show that the ERM-related protein merlin (NF2) does not bind NEP or its cytosolic region. Using experimental data, threading, and sequence analysis, we predicted the involvement of moesin residues E159Q160 in binding to the NEP cytosolic domain. Mutation of these residues to NL (to mimic the corresponding N159L160 residues in the nonbinder merlin) disrupted moesin binding to NEP. Mutation of residues N159L160Y161K162M163 in merlin to the corresponding moesin residues resulted in NEP binding to merlin. This engineered NEP peptide–merlin interaction was diminished by the QNI mutation in NEP, supporting the role of the NEP basic cluster in binding. We thus identified the region of interaction between NEP and moesin, and engineered merlin into a NEP-binding protein. These data form the basis for further exploration of the details of NEP-ERM binding and function. PMID:19388049

  18. P-glycoprotein binds to ezrin at amino acid residues 149-242 in the FERM domain and plays a key role in the multidrug resistance of human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Daria; Zamboni, Silvia; Federici, Cristina; Lugini, Luana; Lozupone, Francesco; De Milito, Angelo; Cecchetti, Serena; Cianfriglia, Maurizio; Fais, Stefano

    2012-06-15

    Overexpression of the mdr1 gene encoding P-glycoprotein (Pgp) exerts a major role in reducing the effectiveness of cytotoxic therapy in osteosarcoma. The interaction between actin and Pgp has been shown to be instrumental in the establishment of multidrug resistance (MDR) in human tumor cells. The cytoskeleton linker ezrin exerts a pivotal role in maintaining the functional connection between actin and Pgp. We investigated the role of ezrin in a human multidrug-resistant osteosarcoma cell line overexpressing Pgp and compared it to its counterpart that overexpresses an ezrin deletion mutant. The results showed that Pgp binds at amino acid residues 149-242 of the N-terminal domain of ezrin. The interaction between ezrin and Pgp occurs in the plasma membrane of MDR cells, where they also co-localize with the ganglioside G(M1) located in lipid rafts. The overexpression of the ezrin deletion mutant entirely restored drug susceptibility of osteosarcoma cells, consistent with Pgp dislocation to cytoplasmic compartments and abrogation of G(M1) /Pgp co-localization at the plasma membrane. Our study provides evidence that ezrin exerts a key role in MDR of human osteosarcoma cells through a Pgp-ezrin-actin connection that is instrumental for the permanence of Pgp into plasma membrane lipid rafts. We also show for the first time that Pgp-binding site is localized to amino acid residues 149-242 of the ezrin Band 4.1, Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (FERM) domain, thus proposing a specific target for future molecular therapy aimed at counteracting MDR in osteosarcoma patients. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  19. CLIC5 stabilizes membrane-actin filament linkages at the base of hair cell stereocilia in a molecular complex with radixin, taperin, and myosin VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Felipe T; Andrade, Leonardo R; Tanda, Soichi; Grati, M'hamed; Plona, Kathleen L; Gagnon, Leona H; Johnson, Kenneth R; Kachar, Bechara; Berryman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 5 protein (CLIC5) was originally isolated from microvilli in complex with actin binding proteins including ezrin, a member of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of membrane-cytoskeletal linkers. CLIC5 concentrates at the base of hair cell stereocilia and is required for normal hearing and balance in mice, but its functional significance is poorly understood. This study investigated the role of CLIC5 in postnatal development and maintenance of hair bundles. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy of CLIC5-deficient jitterbug (jbg) mice revealed progressive fusion of stereocilia as early as postnatal day 10. Radixin (RDX), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Q (PTPRQ), and taperin (TPRN), deafness-associated proteins that also concentrate at the base of stereocilia, were mislocalized in fused stereocilia of jbg mice. TPRQ and RDX were dispersed even prior to stereocilia fusion. Biochemical assays showed interaction of CLIC5 with ERM proteins, TPRN, and possibly myosin VI (MYO6). In addition, CLIC5 and RDX failed to localize normally in fused stereocilia of MYO6 mutant mice. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which these proteins work together as a complex to stabilize linkages between the plasma membrane and subjacent actin cytoskeleton at the base of stereocilia. © Published 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  20. Activation of moesin, a protein that links actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, occurs by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding sequentially to two sites and releasing an autoinhibitory linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Aissa, Khadija; Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Belkina, Natalya V; Maniti, Ofelia; Rosales, Tilman; Hao, Jian-Jiang; Kruhlak, Michael J; Knutson, Jay R; Picart, Catherine; Shaw, Stephen

    2012-05-11

    Many cellular processes depend on ERM (ezrin, moesin, and radixin) proteins mediating regulated linkage between plasma membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Although conformational activation of the ERM protein is mediated by the membrane PIP2, the known properties of the two described PIP2-binding sites do not explain activation. To elucidate the structural basis of possible mechanisms, we generated informative moesin mutations and tested three attributes: membrane localization of the expressed moesin, moesin binding to PIP2, and PIP2-induced release of moesin autoinhibition. The results demonstrate for the first time that the POCKET containing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate on crystal structure (the "POCKET" Lys-63, Lys-278 residues) mediates all three functions. Furthermore the second described PIP2-binding site (the "PATCH," Lys-253/Lys-254, Lys-262/Lys-263) is also essential for all three functions. In native autoinhibited ERM proteins, the POCKET is a cavity masked by an acidic linker, which we designate the "FLAP." Analysis of three mutant moesin constructs predicted to influence FLAP function demonstrated that the FLAP is a functional autoinhibitory region. Moreover, analysis of the cooperativity and stoichiometry demonstrate that the PATCH and POCKET do not bind PIP2 simultaneously. Based on our data and supporting published data, we propose a model of progressive activation of autoinhibited moesin by a single PIP2 molecule in the membrane. Initial transient binding of PIP2 to the PATCH initiates release of the FLAP, which enables transition of the same PIP2 molecule into the newly exposed POCKET where it binds stably and completes the conformational activation.

  1. Constitutively active ezrin increases membrane tension, slows migration, and impedes endothelial transmigration of lymphocytes in vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Belkina, Natalya V; Park, Chung; Nambiar, Raj; Loughhead, Scott M; Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Ben-Aissa, Khadija; Hao, Jian-Jiang; Kruhlak, Michael J; Qi, Hai; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Kehrl, John H; Tyska, Matthew J; Shaw, Stephen

    2012-01-12

    ERM (ezrin, radixin moesin) proteins in lymphocytes link cortical actin to plasma membrane, which is regulated in part by ERM protein phosphorylation. To assess whether phosphorylation of ERM proteins regulates lymphocyte migration and membrane tension, we generated transgenic mice whose T-lymphocytes express low levels of ezrin phosphomimetic protein (T567E). In these mice, T-cell number in lymph nodes was reduced by 27%. Lymphocyte migration rate in vitro and in vivo in lymph nodes decreased by 18% to 47%. Lymphocyte membrane tension increased by 71%. Investigations of other possible underlying mechanisms revealed impaired chemokine-induced shape change/lamellipod extension and increased integrin-mediated adhesion. Notably, lymphocyte homing to lymph nodes was decreased by 30%. Unlike most described homing defects, there was not impaired rolling or sticking to lymph node vascular endothelium but rather decreased migration across that endothelium. Moreover, decreased numbers of transgenic T cells in efferent lymph suggested defective egress. These studies confirm the critical role of ERM dephosphorylation in regulating lymphocyte migration and transmigration. Of particular note, they identify phospho-ERM as the first described regulator of lymphocyte membrane tension, whose increase probably contributes to the multiple defects observed in the ezrin T567E transgenic mice.

  2. Sorafenib blocks tumour growth, angiogenesis and metastatic potential in preclinical models of osteosarcoma through a mechanism potentially involving the inhibition of ERK1/2, MCL-1 and ezrin pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Stefano

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma (OS is the most common primary bone tumour in children and young adults. Despite improved prognosis, metastatic or relapsed OS remains largely incurable and no significant improvement has been observed in the last 20 years. Therefore, the search for alternative agents in OS is mandatory. Results We investigated phospho-ERK 1/2, MCL-1, and phospho-Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (P-ERM as potential therapeutic targets in OS. Activation of these pathways was shown by immunohistochemistry in about 70% of cases and in all OS cell lines analyzed. Mutational analysis revealed no activating mutations in KRAS whereas BRAF gene was found to be mutated in 4/30 OS samples from patients. Based on these results we tested the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib (BAY 43-9006 in preclinical models of OS. Sorafenib inhibited OS cell line proliferation, induced apoptosis and downregulated P-ERK1/2, MCL-1, and P-ERM in a dose-dependent manner. The dephosphorylation of ERM was not due to ERK inhibition. The downregulation of MCL-1 led to an increase in apoptosis in OS cell lines. In chick embryo chorioallantoic membranes, OS supernatants induced angiogenesis, which was blocked by sorafenib and it was also shown that sorafenib reduced VEGF and MMP2 production. In addition, sorafenib treatment dramatically reduced tumour volume of OS xenografts and lung metastasis in SCID mice. Conclusion In conclusion, ERK1/2, MCL-1 and ERM pathways are shown to be active in OS. Sorafenib is able to inhibit their signal transduction, both in vitro and in vivo, displaying anti-tumoural activity, anti-angiogenic effects, and reducing metastatic colony formation in lungs. These data support the testing of sorafenib as a potential therapeutic option in metastatic or relapsed OS patients unresponsive to standard treatments.

  3. Pleiotropic function of ezrin in human metastatic melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Cristina; Brambilla, Daria; Lozupone, Francesco; Matarrese, Paola; de Milito, Angelo; Lugini, Luana; Iessi, Elisabetta; Cecchetti, Serena; Marino, Marialucia; Perdicchio, Maurizio; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Spada, Massimo; Malorni, Walter; Fais, Stefano

    2009-06-15

    The membrane cytoskeleton cross-linker, ezrin, has recently been depicted as a key regulator in the progression and metastasis of several pediatric tumors. Less defined appears the role of ezrin in human adult tumors, especially melanoma. We therefore addressed ezrin involvement in the metastatic phenotype of human adult metastatic melanoma cells. Our results show that cells resected from melanoma metastatic lesions of patients, display marked metastatic spreading capacity in SCID mice organs. Stable transfection of human melanoma cells with an ezrin deletion mutant comprising only 146 N-terminal aminoacids led to the abolishment of metastatic dissemination. In vitro experiments revealed ezrin direct molecular interactions with molecules related to metastatic functions such as CD44, merlin and Lamp-1, consistent with its participation to the formation of phagocitic vacuoles, vesicular sorting and migration capacities of melanoma cells. Moreover, the ezrin fragment capable of binding to CD44 was shorter than that previously reported, and transfection with the ezrin deletion mutant abrogated plasma membrane Lamp-1 recruitment. This study highlights key involvement of ezrin in a complex machinery, which allows metastatic cancer cells to migrate, invade and survive in very unfavorable conditions. Our in vivo and in vitro data reveal that ezrin is the hub of the metastatic behavior also in human adult tumors. Copyright 2008 UICC.

  4. Molecular networks linked by Moesin drive remodeling of the cell cortex during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, Chantal; Decelle, Barbara; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Dorn, Jonas F.; Payrastre, Bernard; Payre, François; Carreno, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    The cortical mechanisms that drive the series of mitotic cell shape transformations remain elusive. In this paper, we identify two novel networks that collectively control the dynamic reorganization of the mitotic cortex. We demonstrate that Moesin, an actin/membrane linker, integrates these two networks to synergize the cortical forces that drive mitotic cell shape transformations. We find that the Pp1-87B phosphatase restricts high Moesin activity to early mitosis and down-regulates Moesin at the polar cortex, after anaphase onset. Overactivation of Moesin at the polar cortex impairs cell elongation and thus cytokinesis, whereas a transient recruitment of Moesin is required to retract polar blebs that allow cortical relaxation and dissipation of intracellular pressure. This fine balance of Moesin activity is further adjusted by Skittles and Pten, two enzymes that locally produce phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and thereby, regulate Moesin cortical association. These complementary pathways provide a spatiotemporal framework to explain how the cell cortex is remodeled throughout cell division. PMID:21969469

  5. Moesin Is a Biomarker for the Assessment of Genotoxic Carcinogens in Mouse Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoen Jung; Choi, In-Kwon; Sheen, Yhun Yhong; Park, Sue Nie; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2012-01-01

    1,2-Dibromoethane and glycidol are well known genotoxic carcinogens, which have been widely used in industry. To identify a specific biomarker for these carcinogens in cells, the cellular proteome of L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells treated with these compounds was analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Of 50 protein spots showing a greater than 1.5-fold increase or decrease in intensity compared to control cells on a 2-D gel, we focused on the candidate biomarker moesin. Western analysis using monoclonal rabbit anti-moesin confirmed the identity of the protein and its increased level of expression upon exposure to the carcinogenic compounds. Moesin expression also increased in cells treated with six additional genotoxic carcinogens, verifying that moesin could serve as a biomarker to monitor phenotypic change upon exposure to genotoxic carcinogens in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. PMID:22358511

  6. The ERM protein Moesin is essential for neuronal morphogenesis and long-term memory in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymuth, Patrick S; Fitzsimons, Helen L

    2017-08-29

    Moesin is a cytoskeletal adaptor protein that plays an important role in modification of the actin cytoskeleton. Rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton drives both neuronal morphogenesis and the structural changes in neurons that are required for long-term memory formation. Moesin has been identified as a candidate memory gene in Drosophila, however, whether it is required for memory formation has not been evaluated. Here, we investigate the role of Moesin in neuronal morphogenesis and in short- and long-term memory formation in the courtship suppression assay, a model of associative memory. We found that both knockdown and overexpression of Moesin led to defects in axon growth and guidance as well as dendritic arborization. Moreover, reduction of Moesin expression or expression of a constitutively active phosphomimetic in the adult Drosophila brain had no effect on short term memory, but prevented long-term memory formation, an effect that was independent of its role in development. These results indicate a critical role for Moesin in both neuronal morphogenesis and long-term memory formation.

  7. The Ezrin Metastatic Phenotype Is Associated with the Initiation of Protein Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W. Briggs

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously associated the cytoskeleton linker protein, Ezrin, with the metastatic phenotype of pediatric sarcomas, including osteosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. These studies have suggested that Ezrin contributes to the survival of cancer cells after their arrival at secondary metastatic locations. To better understand this role in metastasis, we undertook two noncandidate analyses of Ezrin function including a microarray subtraction of high-and low-Ezrin-expressing cells and a proteomic approach to identify proteins that bound the N-terminus of Ezrin in tumor lysates. Functional analyses of these data led to a novel and unifying hypothesis that Ezrin contributes to the efficiency of metastasis through regulation of protein translation. In support of this hypothesis, we found Ezrin to be part of the ribonucleoprotein complex to facilitate the expression of complex messenger RNA in cells and to bind with poly A binding protein 1 (PABP1; PABPC1. The relevance of these findings was supported by our identification of Ezrin and components of the translational machinery in pseudopodia of highly metastatic cells during the process of cell invasion. Finally, two small molecule inhibitors recently shown to inhibit the Ezrin metastatic phenotype disrupted the Ezrin/PABP1 association. Taken together, these results provide a novel mechanistic basis by which Ezrin may contribute to metastasis.

  8. Baicalein mediates inhibition of migration and invasiveness of skin carcinoma through Ezrin in A431 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bin; Li, Ji; Huang, Damao; Wang, Weiwei; Chen, Yu; Liao, Youxiang; Tang, Xiaowei; Xie, Hongfu; Tang, Faqing

    2011-01-01

    Ezrin is highly expressed in skin cancer and promotes tumor metastasis. Ezrin serves as a promising target for anti-metastasis therapy. The aim of this study is to determine if the flavonoid bacailein inhibits the metastasis of skin cancer cells through Ezrin. Cells from a cutaneous squamous carcinoma cell line, A431, were treated with baicalein at 0-60 μM to establish the non-cytotoxic concentration (NCC) range for baicalein. Following treatment with baicalein within this range, total Ezrin protein (both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms) and phosphorylated-Ezrin (phos-Ezrin) were detected by western blotting, and Ezrin RNA was detected in A431 cells using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Thereafter, the motility and invasiveness of A431 cells following baicalein treatment were determined using wound-healing and Boyden chamber invasion assays. Short-interfering RNA (si-RNA) specifically targeting Ezrin was transfected into A431 cells, and a si-RNA Ezrin-A431 cell line was established by G418 selection. This stable cell line was transiently transfected with Ezrin and mutant Ezrin plasmids, and its motilityand invasiveness was subsequently determined to clarify whether bacailein inhibits these processes through Ezrin. We determined the range of NCCs for baicalein to be 2.5-40 μM in A431 cells. Baicalein displayed a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of expressions of total Ezrin and phos-Ezrin within this range NCCs. In addition, it exerted this inhibitory effect through the reduction of Ezrin RNA transcript. Baicalein also inhibited the motility and invasiveness of A431 skin carcinoma cells within the range of NCCs, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. A431 cell motility and invasiveness were inhibited by 73% and 80% respectively when cells were treated with 20 μM baicalein. However, the motility and invasiveness of A431 cells containing the Ezrin mutant were not effectively inhibited by baicalein. Baicalein reduces the

  9. Ezrin dephosphorylation/downregulation contributes to ursolic acid-mediated cell death in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Liu, L; Chen, J; Zhao, Z; Peng, Y; Li, P; Gao, N

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin links the actin filaments with the cell membrane and has a functional role in the apoptotic process. It appears clear that ezrin is directly associated with Fas, leading to activation of caspase cascade and cell death. However, the exact role of ezrin in ursolic acid (UA)-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In this study, we show for the first time that UA induces apoptosis in both transformed and primary leukemia cells through dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin, association and polarized colocalization of Fas and ezrin, as well as formation of death-inducing signaling complex. These events are dependent on Rho-ROCK1 signaling pathway. Knockdown of ezrin enhanced cell death mediated by UA, whereas overexpression of ezrin attenuated UA-induced apoptosis. Our in vivo study also showed that UA-mediated inhibition of tumor growth of mouse leukemia xenograft model is in association with the dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin. Such findings suggest that the cytoskeletal protein ezrin may represent an attractive target for UA-mediated lethality in human leukemia cells

  10. Are podoplanin and ezrin involved in the invasion process of the ameloblastomas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.F. Costa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The association between podoplanin and ezrin in the process of odontogenic tumors invasion has been suggested, but was not studied yet. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between podoplanin and ezrin expressions in the odontogenic epithelium of ameloblastomas. Forty-seven ameloblastomas were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using anti-podoplanin and anti-ezrin antibodies. The expressions of both proteins were evaluated using a score method and the comparison and association between these proteins were verified, respectively, by Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test and by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, using a statistical significance level of 0.05. The majority of tumors (87.2% exhibited strong membranous expression of podoplanin in the peripheral cells. Cytoplasmic expression of ezrin in the peripheral cells of ameloblastomas was stronger than its membranous expression. No statistically significant correlation was observed between podoplanin and ezrin. However, there was statistically significant difference between membranous podoplanin and membranous ezrin expressions, between cytoplasmic podoplanin and membranous ezrin expressions, and between cytoplasmic podoplanin and cytoplasmic ezrin expressions. There was no statistical difference between membranous podoplanin and cytoplasmic ezrin expressions. These results suggest a synergistic role of both proteins in the process of invasion of ameloblastomas.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of ezrin in oral potentially malignant disorders-A descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghini Mohanraj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ezrin, also known as cytovillin, is a member of the ERM family of protein. Ezrin cross-links actin filament with the plasma membrane. They are involved in the formation of microvilli, cell–cell adhesion, maintenance of cell shape, cell motility, and membrane trafficking. Recent analysis reveals their involvement in signaling pathways. Ezrin is highly expressed in several types of human cancers, and correlation between its immunoreactivity and histopathological data as well as the patient outcome has previously been studied. Objective: The objective of the study was to analyze the immunohistochemical expression pattern of ezrin in oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs, namely, oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF with different grades and clinically leucoplakia (hyperkeratosis with various degree of dysplasia and its use as a predictive marker for malignant transformation. Subjects and Methods: Sample size n = 43, histopathologically confirmed cases of OPMDs (13 cases of OSMF with different grades and 30 cases of clinically leukoplakia were retrieved from the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. Immunohistochemistry was done using anti-ezrin antibody, and the expression was graded in terms of proportion and intensity. Results: There was a significant expression of ezrin in OPMDs, and its cytoplasmic shift can be used as a predictive marker for malignant transformation. Conclusion: The findings of the current study revealed that the expression of ezrin in OPMDs may be related to the progression of the disease.

  12. Fetal growth retardation and lack of hypotaurine in ezrin knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Nishimura

    Full Text Available Ezrin is a membrane-associated cytoplasmic protein that serves to link cell-membrane proteins with the actin-based cytoskeleton, and also plays a role in regulation of the functional activities of some transmembrane proteins. It is expressed in placental trophoblasts. We hypothesized that placental ezrin is involved in the supply of nutrients from mother to fetus, thereby influencing fetal growth. The aim of this study was firstly to clarify the effect of ezrin on fetal growth and secondly to determine whether knockout of ezrin is associated with decreased concentrations of serum and placental nutrients. Ezrin knockout mice (Ez(-/- were confirmed to exhibit fetal growth retardation. Metabolome analysis of fetal serum and placental extract of ezrin knockout mice by means of capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed a markedly decreased concentration of hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine. However, placental levels of cysteine and cysteine sulfinic acid (precursors of hypotaurine and taurine were not affected. Lack of hypotaurine in Ez(-/- mice was confirmed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Administration of hypotaurine to heterogenous dams significantly decreased the placenta-to-maternal plasma ratio of hypotaurine in wild-type fetuses but only slightly decreased it in ezrin knockout fetuses, indicating that the uptake of hypotaurine from mother to placenta is saturable and that disruption of ezrin impairs the uptake of hypotaurine by placental trophoblasts. These results indicate that ezrin is required for uptake of hypotaurine from maternal serum by placental trophoblasts, and plays an important role in fetal growth.

  13. [Effects of ezrin silencing on pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yun-xiao; Yu, Shuang-ni; Lu, Zhao-hui; Chen, Jie

    2012-12-01

    To explore the effects of ezrin silencing on pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1. Pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1 was transfected with ezrin silencing plasmid. The proliferation and the cell cycle status were determined by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. Cellular membrane protrusions/microvilli formation were visualized by scanning election microscopy. Colony formation assay was used to determine the cell anchor-independent growth ability in vitro. Trans-filter migration and invasion assays were performed with 8 µm pore inserts in a 24-well BioCoat chamber with/without Matrigel. Ezrin silencing decreased cellular protrusions/microvilli formation, anchorage-independent growth, cell migration and invasion, but had no effects on cell proliferation in vitro and cell cycle, in pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1. Ezrin expression affects the cellular protrusions/microvilli formation, anchorage-independent growth, cell migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1.

  14. Overexpression of ezrin and galectin-3 as predictors of poor prognosis of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Li

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the correlation of ezrin and galectin-3 expressions with prognosis in cervical cancer. The immunohistochemical method was applied to detect ezrin and galectin-3 expressions in normal cervix tissues (n=30, cervicitis tissues (n=28, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN tissues (classified as I-III, n=89, and cervical carcinoma tissues (n=84. Follow-up was conducted for 5 to 78 months to analyze the correlation of protein expressions with prognosis. Ezrin and galectin-3 expressions in cervical cancer were significantly higher than in normal cervix, cervicitis and CIN (all P<0.05, and expressions in CIN were significantly higher than in normal cervix and cervicitis (both P<0.05. The expressions of ezrin and galectin-3 were both related with histological grade, deep myometrial invasion and lymph node metastasis (all P<0.05. Spearman analysis showed that ezrin expression was positively correlated with galectin-3 expression in cervical cancer (r=0.355, P<0.05. The survival rate of patients with high expressions of ezrin and galectin-3 was significantly lower than those with low expressions of proteins (both P<0.05. The expressions of ezrin and galectin-3, histological grade, depth of stromal invasion, and lymph node metastasis are risk factors affecting the survival rate of patients with cervical cancer. The expressions of ezrin and galectin-3 were correlated with the development of cervical cancer, and overexpressions of those proteins were indicative of poor prognosis in patients with cervical cancer.

  15. Ezrin expression combined with MSI status in prognostication of stage II colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Slik

    Full Text Available Currently used factors predicting disease recurrence in stage II colorectal cancer patients are not optimal for risk stratification. Thus, new biomarkers are needed. In this study the applicability of ezrin protein expression together with MSI status and BRAF mutation status were tested in predicting disease outcome in stage II colorectal cancer. The study population consisted of 173 stage II colorectal cancer patients. Paraffin-embedded cancer tissue material from surgical specimens was used to construct tissue microarrays (TMAs with next-generation technique. The TMA-slides were subjected to following immunohistochemical stainings: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, ezrin and anti-BRAF V600E antibody. The staining results were correlated with clinicopathological variables and survival. In categorical analysis, high ezrin protein expression correlated with poor disease-specific survival (p = 0.038. In univariate analysis patients having microsatellite instabile / low ezrin expression tumors had a significantly longer disease-specific survival than patients having microsatellite stable / high ezrin expression tumors (p = 0.007. In multivariate survival analysis, the presence of BRAF mutation was associated to poor overall survival (p = 0.028, HR 3.29, 95% CI1.14-9.54. High ezrin protein expression in patients with microsatellite stable tumors was linked to poor disease-specific survival (p = 0.01, HR 5.68, 95% CI 1.53-21.12. Ezrin protein expression is a promising biomarker in estimating the outcome of stage II colorectal cancer patients. When combined with microsatellite status its ability in predicting disease outcome is further improved.

  16. Nuclear Import of β-Dystroglycan Is Facilitated by Ezrin-Mediated Cytoskeleton Reorganization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Limeta, Alejandra; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Ortega, Arturo; Crouch, Dorothy H.; Jans, David A.; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2014-01-01

    The β-dystroglycan (β-DG) protein has the ability to target to multiple sites in eukaryotic cells, being a member of diverse protein assemblies including the transmembranal dystrophin-associated complex, and a nuclear envelope-localised complex that contains emerin and lamins A/C and B1. We noted that the importin α2/β1-recognised nuclear localization signal (NLS) of β-DG is also a binding site for the cytoskeletal-interacting protein ezrin, and set out to determine whether ezrin binding might modulate β-DG nuclear translocation for the first time. Unexpectedly, we found that ezrin enhances rather than inhibits β-DG nuclear translocation in C2C12 myoblasts. Both overexpression of a phosphomimetic activated ezrin variant (Ez-T567D) and activation of endogenous ezrin through stimulation of the Rho pathway resulted in both formation of actin-rich surface protrusions and significantly increased nuclear translocation of β-DG as shown by quantitative microscopy and subcellular fractionation/Western analysis. In contrast, overexpression of a nonphosphorylatable inactive ezrin variant (Ez-T567A) or inhibition of Rho signaling, decreased nuclear translocation of β-DG concomitant with a lack of cell surface protrusions. Further, a role for the actin cytoskeleton in ezrin enhancement of β-DG nuclear translocation was implicated by the observation that an ezrin variant lacking its actin-binding domain failed to enhance nuclear translocation of β-DG, while disruption of the actin cytoskeleton led to a reduction in β-DG nuclear localization. Finally, we show that ezrin-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization enhances nuclear translocation of the cytoplasmic but not the transmembranal fraction of β-DG. This is the first study showing that cytoskeleton reorganization can modulate nuclear translocation of β-DG, with the implication that β-DG can respond to cytoskeleton-driven changes in cell morphology by translocating from the cytoplasm to the nucleus to orchestrate

  17. Ezrin/NF-kB activation regulates epithelial- mesenchymal transition induced by EGF and promotes metastasis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingru; Lin, Zhaoyu; Chen, Bin; Chen, Shuang; Jiang, Zhipeng; Zhou, Taicheng; Hou, Zehui; Wang, Youyuan

    2017-08-01

    There is growing evidence that epithelial mesenchymal-transition (EMT) plays significant roles in terms of tumor metastasis. There are a lot of cytokines inducing EMT of tumor cells, EGF is one of the important cytokines.Ezrin is a connexin between the cytoskeleton and the cell membrane, which is closely related to the morphological movement and metastasis of tumor cells.EGF can activate Ezrin and affects cell motility. In recent years, many studies have shown that NF-kB acts as an important transcription factor, involving in the process of EMT. However, does Ezrin participate in the regulation of EGF-induced EMT through the NF-kB pathway? This question needs us to discuss.In the present study, we found that EGF could induce colorectal cancer cells to develop EMT,enhance their ability to invade and migrate and promotes phosphorylation of Ezrin Tyr353.On the other hand, inhibition of Ezrin could reverse EGF-induced EMT and inhibit NF-kB P65 translocating into the nucleus. Finally, knockout of Ezrin inhibited EGF-induced lung metastasis of colorectal cancer xenografts and abnormal activation of Ezrin and NF-kB were related with colorectal cancer metastasis and poor prognosis. Our present results suggest that Ezrin/NF-kB pathway may provide experimental evidence for new targeted drugs for colorectal cancer metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Ezrin enhances line tension along transcellular tunnel edges via NMIIa driven actomyosin cable formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Caroline; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Senju, Yosuke; Doye, Anne; Efimova, Nadia; Janel, Sébastien; Lipuma, Justine; Tsai, Meng Chen; Hamaoui, Daniel; Maddugoda, Madhavi P.; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Prévost, Coline; Lafont, Frank; Svitkina, Tatyana; Lappalainen, Pekka; Bassereau, Patricia; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    Transendothelial cell macroaperture (TEM) tunnels control endothelium barrier function and are triggered by several toxins from pathogenic bacteria that provoke vascular leakage. Cellular dewetting theory predicted that a line tension of uncharacterized origin works at TEM boundaries to limit their widening. Here, by conducting high-resolution microscopy approaches we unveil the presence of an actomyosin cable encircling TEMs. We develop a theoretical cellular dewetting framework to interpret TEM physical parameters that are quantitatively determined by laser ablation experiments. This establishes the critical role of ezrin and non-muscle myosin II (NMII) in the progressive implementation of line tension. Mechanistically, fluorescence-recovery-after-photobleaching experiments point for the upstream role of ezrin in stabilizing actin filaments at the edges of TEMs, thereby favouring their crosslinking by NMIIa. Collectively, our findings ascribe to ezrin and NMIIa a critical function of enhancing line tension at the cell boundary surrounding the TEMs by promoting the formation of an actomyosin ring.

  19. Ezrin and E-cadherin expression profile in cervical cytology: a prognostic marker for tumor progression in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana E; Navarro-Tito, Napoleón; Alarcón-Romero, Luz Del C; Ortuño-Pineda, Carlos; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Castañeda-Saucedo, Eduardo; Ortiz-Ortiz, Julio; Garibay-Cerdenares, Olga L; Jiménez-López, Marco A; Mendoza-Catalán, Miguel A

    2018-03-27

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the fourth cause of mortality by neoplasia in women worldwide. The use of immunomarkers is an alternative tool to complement currently used algorithms for detection of cancer, and to improve selection of therapeutic schemes. Aberrant expression of Ezrin and E-cadherin play an important role in tumor invasion. In this study we analyzed Ezrin and E-cadherin expression in liquid-based cervical cytology samples, and evaluated their potential use as prognostic immunomarkers. Immunocytochemical staining of Ezrin and E-cadherin was performed in cervical samples of 125 patients. The cytological or histological diagnostic was performed by Papanicolaou staining or H&E staining, respectively. HPV genotyping was determined using INNO-LIPA Genotyping Extra kit and the HPV physical status by in situ hybridization. Ezrin expression in HaCaT, HeLa and SiHa cell lines was determined by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and Western blot. High Ezrin expression was observed in cervical cancer samples (70%), samples with multiple infection by HR-HPV (43%), and samples with integrated viral genome (47%). High Ezrin expression was associated with degree of SIL, viral genotype and physical status. In contrast, low E-cadherin expression was found in cervical cancer samples (95%), samples with multiple infection by HR-HPV/LR-HPV (87%) and integrated viral genome (72%). Low E-cadherin expression was associated with degree of SIL and viral genotype. Interestingly, Ezrin nuclear staining was associated with degree of SIL and viral genotype. High Ezrin expression, high percent of nuclear Ezrin and low E-cadherin expression behaved as risk factors for progression to HSIL and cervical cancer. Ezrin and E-cadherin expression profile in cervical cytology samples could be a potential prognostic marker, useful for identifying cervical lesions with a high-risk of progression to cervical cancer.

  20. Clinicopathologic significance of fascin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, and ezrin expressions in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Joo Jung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The over expression of fascin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, and ezrin proteins has been associated with poor prognosis in various carcinomas and sarcomas. However, very few studies have reported the relationship between the expression of fascin, EMMPRIN, and ezrin proteins and the clinico-pathologic parameters of colorectal carcinomas. Aims: The aim was to investigate the relationship between fascin, EMMPRIN, and ezrin proteins in colorectal adenocarcinomas and their correlation with clinico-pathologic parameters. Settings and Design: The expression of fascin, EMMPRIN, and ezrin proteins was studied in 210 colorectal adenocarcinoma patients through immunohistochemical staining. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining by the avidin-biotin peroxidase method was done. The scoring of each protein expression was done and divided into three groups (negative, low-, and high-expression groups. Statistical Analysis: A chi-square test, and Kendall′s tau-b correlation test were used for comparing. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank tests and the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: The percentages of the high-expression group of fascin, EMMPRIN, and ezrin proteins in colorectal adenocarcinomas were 24%, 73%, and 62%, respectively. Weak positive correlations were observed among these protein expressions. An increased expression of the fascin protein was significantly associated with advanced tumor depth and shorter survival times, and a high expression of fascin protein was an independent prognostic factor in univariate and multivariate survival analyses. EMMPRIN and ezrin protein expressions were not associated with the clinico-pathologic parameters. Conclusions: The high expression of fascin protein may be an unfavorable prognostic marker for individual colorectal cancer patients.

  1. Ezrin interacts with the SARS coronavirus Spike protein and restrains infection at the entry stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Kaoru Millet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Entry of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV and its envelope fusion with host cell membrane are controlled by a series of complex molecular mechanisms, largely dependent on the viral envelope glycoprotein Spike (S. There are still many unknowns on the implication of cellular factors that regulate the entry process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using as bait the carboxy-terminal endodomain of S, which faces the cytosol during and after opening of the fusion pore at early stages of the virus life cycle. Here we show that the ezrin membrane-actin linker interacts with S endodomain through the F1 lobe of its FERM domain and that both the eight carboxy-terminal amino-acids and a membrane-proximal cysteine cluster of S endodomain are important for this interaction in vitro. Interestingly, we found that ezrin is present at the site of entry of S-pseudotyped lentiviral particles in Vero E6 cells. Targeting ezrin function by small interfering RNA increased S-mediated entry of pseudotyped particles in epithelial cells. Furthermore, deletion of the eight carboxy-terminal amino acids of S enhanced S-pseudotyped particles infection. Expression of the ezrin dominant negative FERM domain enhanced cell susceptibility to infection by SARS-CoV and S-pseudotyped particles and potentiated S-dependent membrane fusion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ezrin interacts with SARS-CoV S endodomain and limits virus entry and fusion. Our data present a novel mechanism involving a cellular factor in the regulation of S-dependent early events of infection.

  2. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca 2+ signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate

  3. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine [Pôle de Recherche Cardiovasculaire, IREC, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Morel, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.morel@uclouvain.be [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  4. Crystallographic characterization of the radixin FERM domain bound to the cytoplasmic tail of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Kitano, Ken; Aoyama, Miki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    The radixin FERM domain was shown to bind the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic peptide and crystals of the complex were obtained. ERM proteins play a role in the cross-linking found between plasma membranes and actin filaments. The N-terminal FERM domains of ERM proteins are responsible for membrane association through direct interaction with the cytoplasmic tails of integral membrane proteins. During cell migration and movement, membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) on plasma membranes sheds adhesion molecule CD44 in addition to degrading the extracellular matrix. Here, the interaction between the radixin FERM domain and the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic tail is reported and preliminary crystallographic characterization of crystals of the radixin FERM domain bound to the cytoplasmic tail of MT1-MMP is presented. The crystals belong to space group P6 1 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.7, c = 128.3 Å, and contain one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. The diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å

  5. An ezrin-rich, rigid uropod-like structure directs movement of amoeboid blebbing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, Anna; Bamber, Jeffrey; Sadok, Amine; Elson-Schwab, Ilan; Marshall, Christopher J

    2011-04-15

    Melanoma cells can switch between an elongated mesenchymal-type and a rounded amoeboid-type migration mode. The rounded 'amoeboid' form of cell movement is driven by actomyosin contractility resulting in membrane blebbing. Unlike elongated A375 melanoma cells, rounded A375 cells do not display any obvious morphological front-back polarisation, although polarisation is thought to be a prerequisite for cell movement. We show that blebbing A375 cells are polarised, with ezrin (a linker between the plasma membrane and actin cytoskeleton), F-actin, myosin light chain, plasma membrane, phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate and β1-integrin accumulating at the cell rear in a uropod-like structure. This structure does not have the typical protruding shape of classical leukocyte uropods, but, as for those structures, it is regulated by protein kinase C. We show that the ezrin-rich uropod-like structure (ERULS) is an inherent feature of polarised A375 cells and not a consequence of cell migration, and is necessary for cell invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that membrane blebbing is reduced at this site, leading to a model in which the rigid ezrin-containing structure determines the direction of a moving cell through localised inhibition of membrane blebbing.

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor C promotes cervical cancer metastasis via up-regulation and activation of RhoA/ROCK-2/moesin cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Mian; Cheng, Yang; Li, Wen; Liu, Qiongshan; Liu, Junxiu; Huang, Jinghe; Fu, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    The elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) is correlated with clinical cervical cancer metastasis and patient survival, which is interpreted by VEGF-C functions to stimulate angiogenesis and lymphatic genesis. However, the direct impact of VEGF-C on cervical cancer cell motility remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of VEGF-C on actin cytoskeleton remodeling and on cervical cancer cell migration and invasion and how the actin-regulatory protein, moesin regulated these effects through RhoA/ROCK-2 signaling pathway. On cervical carcinoma cell line SiHa cells, exposure of VEGF-C triggered remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of membrane ruffles, which was required for cell movement. VEGF-C significantly enhanced SiHa cells horizontal migration and three-dimensional invasion into matrices. These actions were dependent on increased expression and phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory protein moesin and specific moesin siRNA severely impaired VEGF-C stimulated-cell migration. The extracellular small GTPase RhoA/ROCK-2 cascade mediated the increased moesin expression and phosphorylation, which was discovered by the use of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of Rho kinase and by transfected constitutively active, dominant-negative RhoA as well as ROCK-2 SiRNA. Furthermore, in the surgical cervical specimen from the patients with FIGO stage at cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and I-II cervical squamous cell carcinoma, the expression levels of moesin were found to be significantly correlated with tumor malignancy and metastasis. These results implied that VEGF-C promoted cervical cancer metastasis by upregulation and activation of moesin protein through RhoA/ROCK-2 pathway. Our findings offer new insight into the role of VEGF-C on cervical cancer progression and may provide potential targets for cervical cancer therapy

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor C promotes cervical cancer metastasis via up-regulation and activation of RhoA/ROCK-2/moesin cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jinghe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C is correlated with clinical cervical cancer metastasis and patient survival, which is interpreted by VEGF-C functions to stimulate angiogenesis and lymphatic genesis. However, the direct impact of VEGF-C on cervical cancer cell motility remains largely unknown. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of VEGF-C on actin cytoskeleton remodeling and on cervical cancer cell migration and invasion and how the actin-regulatory protein, moesin regulated these effects through RhoA/ROCK-2 signaling pathway. Results On cervical carcinoma cell line SiHa cells, exposure of VEGF-C triggered remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of membrane ruffles, which was required for cell movement. VEGF-C significantly enhanced SiHa cells horizontal migration and three-dimensional invasion into matrices. These actions were dependent on increased expression and phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory protein moesin and specific moesin siRNA severely impaired VEGF-C stimulated-cell migration. The extracellular small GTPase RhoA/ROCK-2 cascade mediated the increased moesin expression and phosphorylation, which was discovered by the use of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of Rho kinase and by transfected constitutively active, dominant-negative RhoA as well as ROCK-2 SiRNA. Furthermore, in the surgical cervical specimen from the patients with FIGO stage at cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and I-II cervical squamous cell carcinoma, the expression levels of moesin were found to be significantly correlated with tumor malignancy and metastasis. Conclusions These results implied that VEGF-C promoted cervical cancer metastasis by upregulation and activation of moesin protein through RhoA/ROCK-2 pathway. Our findings offer new insight into the role of VEGF-C on cervical cancer progression and may provide potential targets for cervical cancer therapy.

  8. ANDROGENS REGULATE T47D CELLS MOTILITY AND INVASION THROUGH ACTIN CYTOSKELETON REMODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena Montt-Guevara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between androgens and breast cancer is controversial. Androgens have complex effects on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Moreover, androgens receptor (AR is expressed in approximately 70% to 90% of invasive breast carcinomas, which has prognostic relevance in basal-like cancers and in triple negative breast cancers. Recent studies have associated the actin-binding proteins of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM family with metastasis in endocrine-sensitive cancers. We studied on T47D breast cancer cells whether androgens with different characteristics, such as testosterone (T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA may regulate breast cancer cell motility and invasion through the control of actin remodelling. We demonstrate that androgens promote migration and invasion in T47D via Moesin activation. We show that T and DHEA exert their actions via the AR and estrogen receptor (ER, while the non aromatizable androgen – DHT only recruits AR. We further report that androgen induced significant changes in actin organization with pseudopodia along with membrane ruffles formation, and this process is mediated by Moesin. Our work identifies novel mechanisms of action of androgens on breast cancer cells. Through the modulation of Moesin, androgens alter the architecture of cytoskeleton in T47D breast cancer cell and promote cell migration and invasion. These results could help to understand the biological actions of androgens on breast cancer, and eventually to develop new strategies for treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Podoplanin, ezrin, and Rho-A proteins may have joint participation in tumor invasion of lip cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assao, Agnes; Nonogaki, Suely; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Carvalho, André Lopes; Pinto, Clóvis Antônio Lopes; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Oliveira, Denise Tostes

    2017-06-01

    Podoplanin and ezrin connection through Rho-A phosphorylation have been suggested as part of the activation pathway, in the process of tumor invasion and cell movement in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation among podoplanin, ezrin, and Rho-A immunoexpressions in 91 squamous cells carcinomas of the lower lip and their influence in patient's prognosis. The immunoexpressions of podoplanin, ezrin, and Rho-A were evaluated through a semi-quantitative score method, based on the capture of 10 microscopic fields at the front of tumor invasion. The association and correlation of these proteins with the clinicopathological features were verified by Fischer's exact test and Spearman's test. The prognostic values were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. A statistically significant association between strong cytoplasmic podoplanin expression and alcohol (p = 0.024), loco-regional recurrences (p = 0.028), and lymph node metastasis (pN+) (p = 0.010) was found. The membranous (p = 0.000 and r = 0.384) and cytoplasmic (p = 0.000 and r = 0.344) podoplanin expression was statistically correlated with ezrin expression. Also, membranous podoplanin was significantly correlated with Rho-A expression (p = 0.006 and r = 0.282). The expressions of podoplanin, ezrin, and Rho-A were not significant prognostic factors for patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the lower lip. Therefore, our results confirm a correlation among podoplanin, ezrin, and Rho-A expressions in squamous cell carcinoma of the lip suggesting a cooperative participation of these proteins in cell movement and invasion. Furthermore, strong cytoplasmic podoplanin expression could be helpful to identify patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lip and lower risk of loco-regional recurrences.

  10. A decision tree-based combination of ezrin-interacting proteins to estimate the prognostic risk of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian-Zhong; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Shao-Hong; Ji, Xia; Yang, Cui-Xia; Xu, Xiu-E; Liao, Lian-Di; Wu, Jian-Yi; Li, En-Min; Zhang, Kai; Xu, Li-Yan

    2017-08-01

    Our previous studies have highlighted the importance of ezrin in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Here our objective was to explore the clinical significance of ezrin-interacting proteins, which would provide a theoretical basis for understanding the function of ezrin and potential therapeutic targets for ESCC. We used affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify PDIA3, CNPY2, and STMN1 as potential ezrin-interacting proteins. Confocal microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation analysis further confirmed the colocalization and interaction of ezrin with PDIA3, CNPY2, and STMN1. Tissue microarray data of ESCC samples (n=263) showed that the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were significantly lower for the CNPY2 (OS, P=.003; DFS, P=.011) and STMN1 (OS, P=.010; DFS, P=.002) high-expression groups compared with the low-expression groups. By contrast, overexpression of PDIA3 was significantly correlated with favorable survival (OS, P<.001; DFS, P=.001). Cox regression demonstrated the prognostic value of PDIA3, CNPY2, and STMN1 in ESCC. Furthermore, decision tree analysis revealed that the resulting classifier of both ezrin and its interacting proteins could be used to better predict OS and DFS of patients with ESCC. In conclusion, a signature of ezrin-interacting proteins accurately predicts ESCC patient survival or tumor recurrence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Vitamin D Receptor, Retinoid X Receptor, Ki-67, Survivin, and Ezrin Expression in Canine Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Davies

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine osteosarcoma (OS is an aggressive malignant bone tumor. Prognosis is primarily determined by clinical parameters. Vitamin D has been postulated as a novel therapeutic option for many malignancies. Upon activation, vitamin D receptors (VDRs combine with retinoid receptor (RXR forming a heterodimer initiating a cascade of events. Vitamin D's antineoplastic activity and its mechanism of action in OS remain to be clearly established. Expression of VDR, RXR, Ki-67, survivin, and ezrin was studied in 33 archived, canine OS specimens. VDR, RXR, survivin, and ezrin were expressed in the majority of cases. There was no statistically significant difference in VDR expression in relationship with tumor grade, type, or locations or animal breed, age, and/or sex. No significant association (p=0.316 between tumor grade and Ki-67 expression was found; in particular, no difference in Ki-67 expression between grades 2 and 3 OSs was found, while a negative correlation was noted between Ki-67 and VDR expression (ρ=−0.466, a positive correlation between survivin and RXR expression was found (p=0.374. A significant relationship exists between VDR and RXR expression in OSs and proliferative/apoptosis markers. These results establish a foundation for elucidating mechanisms by which vitamin D induces antineoplastic activity in OS.

  12. Rictor positively regulates B cell receptor signaling by modulating actin reorganization via ezrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Huang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As the central hub of the metabolism machinery, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2 has been well studied in lymphocytes. As an obligatory component of mTORC2, the role of Rictor in T cells is well established. However, the role of Rictor in B cells still remains elusive. Rictor is involved in B cell development, especially the peripheral development. However, the role of Rictor on B cell receptor (BCR signaling as well as the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism is still unknown. This study used B cell-specfic Rictor knockout (KO mice to investigate how Rictor regulates BCR signaling. We found that the key positive and negative BCR signaling molecules, phosphorylated Brutons tyrosine kinase (pBtk and phosphorylated SH2-containing inositol phosphatase (pSHIP, are reduced and enhanced, respectively, in Rictor KO B cells. This suggests that Rictor positively regulates the early events of BCR signaling. We found that the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin is drastically increased in Rictor KO B cells after BCR stimulation through dysregulating the dephosphorylation of ezrin. The high actin-ezrin intensity area restricts the lateral movement of BCRs upon stimulation, consequently reducing BCR clustering and BCR signaling. The reduction in the initiation of BCR signaling caused by actin alteration is associated with a decreased humoral immune response in Rictor KO mice. The inhibition of actin polymerization with latrunculin in Rictor KO B cells rescues the defects of BCR signaling and B cell differentiation. Overall, our study provides a new pathway linking cell metablism to BCR activation, in which Rictor regulates BCR signaling via actin reorganization.

  13. Ezrin is down-regulated in diabetic kidney glomeruli and regulates actin reorganization and glucose uptake via GLUT1 in cultured podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Anita A; Koskelainen, Susanna; Hyvönen, Mervi E; Musante, Luca; Lehtonen, Eero; Koskenniemi, Kerttu; Tienari, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Szalay, Csaba; Révész, Csaba; Varmanen, Pekka; Nyman, Tuula A; Hamar, Peter; Holthöfer, Harry; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2014-06-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a complication of diabetes and a major cause of end-stage renal disease. To characterize the early pathophysiological mechanisms leading to glomerular podocyte injury in diabetic nephropathy, we performed quantitative proteomic profiling of glomeruli isolated from rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and controls. Fluorescence-based two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, coupled with mass spectrometry, identified 29 differentially expressed spots, including actin-binding protein ezrin and its interaction partner, NHERF2, which were down-regulated in the streptozotocin group. Knockdown of ezrin by siRNA in cultured podocytes increased glucose uptake compared with control siRNA-transfected cells, apparently by increasing translocation of glucose transporter GLUT1 to the plasma membrane. Knockdown of ezrin also induced actin remodeling under basal conditions, but reduced insulin-stimulated actin reorganization. Ezrin-dependent actin remodeling involved cofilin-1 that is essential for the turnover and reorganization of actin filaments. Phosphorylated, inactive cofilin-1 was up-regulated in diabetic glomeruli, suggesting altered actin dynamics. Furthermore, IHC analysis revealed reduced expression of ezrin in the podocytes of patients with diabetes. Our findings suggest that ezrin may play a role in the development of the renal complication in diabetes by regulating transport of glucose and organization of the actin cytoskeleton in podocytes. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Myosin-1E interacts with FAK proline-rich region 1 to induce fibronectin-type matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heim, Joel B; Squirewell, Edwin J; Neu, Ancilla

    2017-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase involved in development and human disease, including cancer. It is currently thought that the four-point one, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM)-kinase domain linker, which contains autophosphorylation site tyrosine (Y) 397, is not required...... for in vivo FAK function until late midgestation. Here, we directly tested this hypothesis by generating mice with FAK Y397-to-phenylalanine (F) mutations in the germline. We found that Y397F embryos exhibited reduced mesodermal fibronectin (FN) and osteopontin expression and died during mesoderm development...... and other FN-type matrix in both mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human melanoma. Our data support a model in which FAK Y397 autophosphorylation is required for FAK function in vivo and is positively regulated by MYO1E....

  15. LOK is a major ERM kinase in resting lymphocytes and regulates cytoskeletal rearrangement through ERM phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Natalya V; Liu, Yin; Hao, Jian-Jiang; Karasuyama, Hajime; Shaw, Stephen

    2009-03-24

    ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) proteins mediate linkage of actin cytoskeleton to plasma membrane in many cells. ERM activity is regulated in part by phosphorylation at a C-terminal threonine, but the identity of ERM kinases is unknown in lymphocytes and incompletely defined in other mammalian cells. Our studies show that lymphocyte-oriented kinase (LOK) is an ERM kinase in vitro and in vivo. Mass spectrometric analysis indicates LOK is abundant at the lymphocyte plasma membrane and immunofluorescence studies show LOK enrichment at the plasma membrane near ERM. In vitro peptide specificity analyses characterize LOK as a basophilic kinase whose optimal substrate sequence resembles the ERM site, including unusual preference for tyrosine at P-2. LOK's activity on moesin peptide and protein was comparable to reported ERM kinases ROCK and PKC but unlike them LOK displayed preferential specificity for moesin compared to traditional basophilic kinase substrates. Two genetic approaches demonstrate a role for LOK in ERM phosphorylation: cell transfection with LOK kinase domain augments ERM phosphorylation and lymphocytes from LOK knockout mice have >50% reduction in ERM phosphorylation. The findings on localization and specificity argue that LOK is a direct ERM kinase. The knockout mice have normal hematopoietic cell development but notably lymphocyte migration and polarization in response to chemokine are enhanced. These functional alterations fit the current understanding of the role of ERM phosphorylation in regulating cortical reorganization. Thus, these studies identify a new ERM kinase of importance in lymphocytes and confirm the role of ERM phosphorylation in regulating cell shape and motility.

  16. Distinct Ezrin Truncations Differentiate Metastases in Sentinel Lymph Nodes from Unaffected Lymph Node Tissues, from Primary Breast Tumors, and from Healthy Glandular Breast Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Röwer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lymph node metastasis status is a prognostic factor for further lymph node involvement and for patient survival in breast cancer patients. Frozen section analysis of lymph nodes is a reliable method for detection of macro-metastases. However, this method is far less effective in detecting micro-metastases, requesting improved diagnostic procedures. METHODS: We investigated expression and truncation of ezrin in (i sentinel lymph node metastases, (ii unaffected axillary lymph nodes, (iii primary breast tumors, and (iv healthy glandular breast tissues using 2D gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry in addition to Western blotting. RESULTS: Full-length ezrin (E1; amino acids 1–586 is present in all four investigated tissues. Two truncated ezrin forms, one missing about the first hundred amino acids (E2a and the other lacking about 150 C-terminal amino acids (E2b were detectable in primary tumor tissues and in sentinel lymph node metastases but not in glandular tissues. Strikingly, an ezrin truncation (E3 which consists approximately of amino acids 238–586 was found strongly expressed in all sentinel lymph node metastases. Moreover, an N-terminal ezrin fragment (E4 that consists approximately of amino acids 1–273 was identified in sentinel lymph node metastases as well. CONCLUSIONS: We show for the first time the existence of tissue-dependent specific ezrin truncations. The distinguished strong Western blot staining of ezrin E3 in sentinel lymph node metastases underlines its capability to substantiate the occurrence of lymph node (micrometastases in breast cancer patients.

  17. Bushen Huoxue Attenuates Diabetes-Induced Cognitive Impairment by Improvement of Cerebral Microcirculation: Involvement of RhoA/ROCK/moesin and Src Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM is closely correlated with cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative disease. Bushen Huoxue (BSHX is a compound Chinese medicine used clinically to treat diabetes-induced cognitive impairment. However, its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, KKAy mice, a genetic model of type 2 diabetes with obesity and insulin resistant hyperglycemia, received a daily administration of BSHX for 12 weeks. Blood glucose was measured every 4 weeks. After 12 weeks, BSHX treatment significantly ameliorated the T2DM related insults, including the increased blood glucose, the impaired spatial memory, decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF, occurrence of albumin leakage, leukocyte adhesion and opening capillary rarefaction. Meanwhile, the downregulation of the tight junction proteins (TJ claudin-5, occludin, zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1 and JAM-1 between endothelial cells, amyloid-β (Aβ accumulation in hippocampus, increased AGEs and RAGE, and expression of RhoA/ROCK/moesin signaling pathway and phosphorylation of Src kinase in KKAy mice were significantly protected by BSHX treatment. These results indicate that the protective effect of BSHX on T2DM-induced cognitive impairment involves regulation of RhoA/ROCK1/moesin signaling pathway and phosphorylation of Src kinase.

  18. Distribution dynamics and functional importance of NHERF1 in regulation of Mrp-2 trafficking in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvar, Serhan; Suda, Jo; Zhu, Lixin; Rockey, Don C

    2014-10-15

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) is a multifunctional scaffolding protein that interacts with receptors and ion transporters in its PDZ domains and with the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of proteins in its COOH terminus. The role of NHERF1 in hepatocyte function remains largely unknown. We examine the distribution and physiological significance of NHERF1 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp-2) in hepatocytes. A WT radixin binding site mutant (F355R) and NHERF1 PDZ1 and PDZ2 domain adenoviral mutant constructs were tagged with yellow fluorescent protein and expressed in polarized hepatocytes to study localization and function of NHERF1. Cellular distribution of NHERF1 and radixin was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. A 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) assay was used to characterize Mrp-2 function. Similar to Mrp-2, WT NHERF1 and the NHERF1 PDZ2 deletion mutant were localized to the canalicular membrane. In contrast, the radixin binding site mutant (F355R) and the NHERF1 PDZ1 deletion mutant, which interacts poorly with Mrp-2, were rarely associated with the canalicular membrane. Knockdown of NHERF1 led to dramatically impaired CMFDA secretory response. Use of CMFDA showed that the NHERF1 PDZ1 and F355R mutants were devoid of a secretory response, while WT NHERF1-infected cells exhibited increased secretion of glutathione-methylfluorescein. The data indicate that NHERF1 interacts with Mrp-2 via the PDZ1 domain of NHERF1 and, furthermore, that NHERF1 is essential for maintaining the localization and function of Mrp-2. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Dystroglycan versatility in cell adhesion: a tale of multiple motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winder Steve J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dystroglycan is a ubiquitously expressed heterodimeric adhesion receptor. The extracellular α-subunit makes connections with a number of laminin G domain ligands including laminins, agrin and perlecan in the extracellular matrix and the transmembrane β-subunit makes connections to the actin filament network via cytoskeletal linkers including dystrophin, utrophin, ezrin and plectin, depending on context. Originally discovered as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex of skeletal muscle, dystroglycan is an important adhesion molecule and signalling scaffold in a multitude of cell types and tissues and is involved in several diseases. Dystroglycan has emerged as a multifunctional adhesion platform with many interacting partners associating with its short unstructured cytoplasmic domain. Two particular hotspots are the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region and at the very carboxy terminus of dystroglycan. Regions which between them have several overlapping functions: in the juxtamembrane region; a nuclear localisation signal, ezrin/radixin/moesin protein, rapsyn and ERK MAP Kinase binding function, and at the C terminus a regulatory tyrosine governing WW, SH2 and SH3 domain interactions. We will discuss the binding partners for these motifs and how their interactions and regulation can modulate the involvement of dystroglycan in a range of different adhesion structures and functions depending on context. Thus dystroglycan presents as a multifunctional scaffold involved in adhesion and adhesion-mediated signalling with its functions under exquisite spatio-temporal regulation.

  20. Inactivation of Src-to-Ezrin Pathway: A Possible Mechanism in the Ouabain-Mediated Inhibition of A549 Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Kyoung Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ouabain, a cardiac glycoside found in plants, is primarily used in the treatment of congestive heart failure and arrhythmia because of its ability to inhibit Na+/K+-ATPase pump. Recently ouabain has been shown to exert anticancer effects but the underlying mechanism is not clear. Here, we explored the molecular mechanism by which ouabain exerts anticancer effects in human lung adenocarcinoma. Employing proteomic techniques, we found 7 proteins downregulated by ouabain in A549 including p-ezrin, a protein associated with pulmonary cancer metastasis in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, when the relative phosphorylation levels of 39 intracellular proteins were compared between control and ouabain-treated A549 cells, p-Src (Y416 was also found to be downregulated by ouabain. Furthermore, western blot revealed the ouabain-mediated downregulation of p-FAK (Y925, p-paxillin (Y118, p130CAS, and Na+/K+-ATPase subunits that have been shown to be involved in the migration of cancer cells. The inhibitory effect of ouabain and Src inhibitor PP2 on the migration of A549 cells was confirmed by Boyden chamber assay. Anticancer effects of ouabain in A549 cells appear to be related to its ability to regulate and inactivate Src-to-ezrin signaling, and proteins involved in focal adhesion such as Src, FAK, and p130CAS axis are proposed here.

  1. A previously unidentified deletion in G protein-coupled receptor 143 causing X-linked congenital nystagmus in a Chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital nystagmus (CN is characterized by conjugated, spontaneous, and involuntary ocular oscillations. It is an inherited disease and the most common inheritance pattern is X-linked CN. In this study, our aim is to identify the disease-causing mutation in a large sixth-generation Chinese family with X-linked CN. Methods: It has been reported that mutations in four-point-one, ezrin, radixin, moesin domain-containing 7 gene (FRMD7 and G protein-coupled receptor 143 gene (GPR143 account for the majority patients of X-linked nystagmus. We collected 8 ml blood samples from members of a large sixth-generation pedigree with X-linked CN and 100 normal controls. FRMD7 and GPR143 were scanned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based DNA sequencing assays, and multiplex PCR assays were applied to detect deletions. Results: We identified a previously unreported deletion covering 7 exons in GPR143 in a Chinese family. The heterozygous deletion from exon 3 to exon 9 of GPR143 was detected in all affected males in the family, while it was not detected in other unaffected relatives or 100 normal controls. Conclusions: This is the first report of molecular characterization in GPR143 gene in the CN family. Our results expand the spectrum of GPR143 mutations causing CN and further confirm the role of GPR143 in the pathogenesis of CN.

  2. A novel nonsense mutation of the GPR143 gene identified in a Chinese pedigree with ocular albinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naihong Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular basis of ocular albinism type I in a Chinese pedigree. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Complete ophthalmologic examinations were performed on 4 patients, 7 carriers and 17 unaffected individuals in this five-generation family. All coding exons of four-point-one (4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM domain-containing 7 (FRMD7 and G protein-coupled receptor 143 (GPR143 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, sequenced and compared with a reference database. Ocular albinism and nystagmus were found in all patients of this family. Macular hypoplasia was present in the patients including the proband. A novel nonsense hemizygous mutation c.807T>A in the GPR143 gene was identified in four patients and the heterozygous mutation was found in seven asymptomatic individuals. This mutation is a substitution of tyrosine for adenine which leads to a premature stop codon at position 269 (p.Y269X of GPR143. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report that p.Y269X mutation of GPR143 gene is responsible for the pathogenesis of familial ocular albinism. These results expand the mutation spectrum of GPR143, and demonstrate the clinical characteristics of ocular albinism type I in Chinese population.

  3. TREM-like transcript-1 protects against inflammation-associated hemorrhage by facilitating platelet aggregation in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, A. Valance; Gibot, Sébastien; Acevedo, Ismael; Gattis, James; Quigley, Laura; Feltz, Robert; De La Mota, Alina; Schubert, Rebecca L.; Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cheng, Jun; Dutra, Amalia; Pak, Evgenia; Chertov, Oleg; Rivera, Linette; Morales, Jessica; Lubkowski, Jacek; Hunter, Robert; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; McVicar, Daniel W.

    2009-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells–like (TREM-like) transcript-1 (TLT-1), a type 1 single Ig domain orphan receptor specific to platelet and megakaryocyte α-granules, relocates to the platelet surface upon platelet stimulation. We found here that patients diagnosed with sepsis, in contrast to healthy individuals, had substantial levels of soluble TLT-1 (sTLT-1) in their plasma that correlated with the presence of disseminated intravascular coagulation. sTLT-1 bound to fibrinogen and augmented platelet aggregation in vitro. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domain of TLT-1 could also bind ezrin/radixin/moesin family proteins, suggesting its ability to link fibrinogen to the platelet cytoskeleton. Accordingly, platelets of Treml1–/– mice failed to aggregate efficiently, extending tail-bleeding times. Lipopolysaccharide-treated Treml1–/– mice developed higher plasma levels of TNF and D-dimers than wild-type mice and were more likely to succumb during challenge. Finally, Treml1–/– mice were predisposed to hemorrhage associated with localized inflammatory lesions. Taken together, our findings suggest that TLT-1 plays a protective role during inflammation by dampening the inflammatory response and facilitating platelet aggregation at sites of vascular injury. Therefore, therapeutic modulation of TLT-1–mediated effects may provide clinical benefit to patients with hypercoagulatory conditions, including those associated with inflammation. PMID:19436112

  4. Proteome analysis of multidrug-resistant, breast cancer–derived microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deep Pokharel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer multidrug resistance (MDR occurs when cancer cells evade the cytotoxic actions of chemotherapeutics through the active efflux of drugs from within the cells. Our group have previously demonstrated that multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells spontaneously shed microparticles (MPs and that these MPs can transfer resistance to drug-responsive cells and confer MDR on those cells in as little as 4 h. Furthermore, we also showed that, unlike MPs derived from leukaemia cells, breast cancer–derived MPs display a tissue selectivity in the transfer of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, transferring the resistance protein only to malignant breast cells. This study aims to define the proteome of breast cancer–derived MPs in order to understand the differences in protein profiles between those shed from drug-resistant versus drug-sensitive breast cancer cells. In doing so, we detail the protein cargo required for the intercellular transfer of MDR to drug-sensitive recipient cells and the factors governing the transfer selectivity to malignant breast cells. We describe the first proteomic analysis of MPs derived from human breast cancer cells using SDS PAGE and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS, in which we identify 120 unique proteins found only in drug-resistant, breast cancer–derived MPs. Our results demonstrate that the MP-mediated transfer of P-gp to recipient cells occurs alongside CD44; the Ezrin, Radixin and Moesin protein family (ERM; and cytoskeleton motor proteins within the MP cargo.

  5. A proteomic and cellular analysis of uropods in the pathogen Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Marquay Markiewicz

    Full Text Available Exposure of Entamoeba histolytica to specific ligands induces cell polarization via the activation of signalling pathways and cytoskeletal elements. The process leads to formation of a protruding pseudopod at the front of the cell and a retracting uropod at the rear. In the present study, we show that the uropod forms during the exposure of trophozoites to serum isolated from humans suffering of amoebiasis. To investigate uropod assembly, we used LC-MS/MS technology to identify protein components in isolated uropod fractions. The galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine lectin, the immunodominant antigen M17 (which is specifically recognized by serum from amoeba-infected persons and a few other cells adhesion-related molecules were primarily involved. Actin-rich cytoskeleton components, GTPases from the Rac and Rab families, filamin, α-actinin and a newly identified ezrin-moesin-radixin protein were the main factors found to potentially interact with capped receptors. A set of specific cysteine proteases and a serine protease were enriched in isolated uropod fractions. However, biological assays indicated that cysteine proteases are not involved in uropod formation in E. histolytica, a fact in contrast to the situation in human motile immune cells. The surface proteins identified here are testable biomarkers which may be either recognized by the immune system and/or released into the circulation during amoebiasis.

  6. Anterior-posterior regionalized gene expression in the Ciona notochord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Wendy; Thayer, Rachel; Veeman, Michael

    2014-04-01

    In the simple ascidian chordate Ciona, the signaling pathways and gene regulatory networks giving rise to initial notochord induction are largely understood and the mechanisms of notochord morphogenesis are being systematically elucidated. The notochord has generally been thought of as a non-compartmentalized or regionalized organ that is not finely patterned at the level of gene expression. Quantitative imaging methods have recently shown, however, that notochord cell size, shape, and behavior vary consistently along the anterior-posterior (AP) axis. Here we screen candidate genes by whole mount in situ hybridization for potential AP asymmetry. We identify 4 genes that show non-uniform expression in the notochord. Ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) is expressed more strongly in the secondary notochord lineage than the primary. CTGF is expressed stochastically in a subset of notochord cells. A novel calmodulin-like gene (BCamL) is expressed more strongly at both the anterior and posterior tips of the notochord. A TGF-β ortholog is expressed in a gradient from posterior to anterior. The asymmetries in ERM, BCamL, and TGF-β expression are evident even before the notochord cells have intercalated into a single-file column. We conclude that the Ciona notochord is not a homogeneous tissue but instead shows distinct patterns of regionalized gene expression. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. HIV infection of T cells: actin-in and actin-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Belkina, Natalya V; Shaw, Stephen

    2009-04-14

    Three studies shed light on the decade-old observation that the actin cytoskeleton is hijacked to facilitate entry of HIV into its target cells. Polymerization of actin is required to assemble high concentrations of CD4 and CXCR4 at the plasma membrane, which promote viral binding and entry in both the simple model of infection by free virus and the more physiologically relevant route of infection through the virological synapse. Three types of actin-interacting proteins-filamin, ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM), and cofilin-are now shown to play critical roles in this process. Filamin binds to both CD4 and CXCR4 in a manner promoted by signaling of the HIV gp120 glycoprotein. ERM proteins attach actin filaments to the membrane and may promote polymerization of actin. Early in the process of viral entry, cofilin is inactivated, which is proposed to facilitate the early assembly of actin filaments, but cofilin is reported to be activated soon thereafter to facilitate postentry events. This complex role of cofilin may help to reconcile the paradox that actin polymerization promotes initial binding and fusion steps but inhibits some subsequent early postentry events.

  8. Outside-in HLA class I signaling regulates ICAM-1 clustering and endothelial cell-monocyte interactions via mTOR in transplant antibody-mediated rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Sahar; Sosa, Rebecca A; Jin, Yi-Ping; Kageyama, Shoichi; Fishbein, Michael C; Rozengurt, Enrique; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Reed, Elaine F

    2018-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) resulting in transplant allograft vasculopathy (TAV) is the major obstacle for long-term survival of solid organ transplants. AMR is caused by donor-specific antibodies to HLA, which contribute to TAV by initiating outside-in signaling transduction pathways that elicit monocyte recruitment to activated endothelium. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors can attenuate TAV; therefore, we sought to understand the mechanistic underpinnings of mTOR signaling in HLA class I Ab-mediated endothelial cell activation and monocyte recruitment. We used an in vitro model to assess monocyte binding to HLA I Ab-activated endothelial cells and found mTOR inhibition reduced ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) phosphorylation, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) clustering, and monocyte firm adhesion to HLA I Ab-activated endothelium. Further, in a mouse model of AMR, in which C57BL/6. RAG1 -/- recipients of BALB/c cardiac allografts were passively transferred with donor-specific MHC I antibodies, mTOR inhibition significantly reduced vascular injury, ERM phosphorylation, and macrophage infiltration of the allograft. Taken together, these studies indicate mTOR inhibition suppresses ERM phosphorylation in endothelial cells, which impedes ICAM-1 clustering in response to HLA class I Ab and prevents macrophage infiltration into cardiac allografts. These findings indicate a novel therapeutic application for mTOR inhibitors to disrupt endothelial cell-monocyte interactions during AMR. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. A Role for CD81 and Hepatitis C Virus in Hepatoma Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L. Brimacombe

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tetraspanins are a family of small proteins that interact with themselves, host transmembrane and cytosolic proteins to form tetraspanin enriched microdomains (TEMs that regulate important cellular functions. Several tetraspanin family members are linked to tumorigenesis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is an increasing global health burden, in part due to the increasing prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV associated HCC. The tetraspanin CD81 is an essential receptor for HCV, however, its role in hepatoma biology is uncertain. We demonstrate that antibody engagement of CD81 promotes hepatoma spread, which is limited by HCV infection, in an actin-dependent manner and identify an essential role for the C-terminal interaction with Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM proteins in this process. We show enhanced hepatoma migration and invasion following expression of CD81 and a reduction in invasive potential upon CD81 silencing. In addition, we reveal poorly differentiated HCC express significantly higher levels of CD81 compared to adjacent non-tumor tissue. In summary, these data support a role for CD81 in regulating hepatoma mobility and propose CD81 as a tumour promoter.

  10. Structure and function of ABCG2-rich extracellular vesicles mediating multidrug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Goler-Baron

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major impediment to curative cancer chemotherapy. The ATP-Binding Cassette transporters ABCG2, ABCB1 and ABCC2 form a unique defense network against multiple structurally and functionally distinct chemotherapeutics, thereby resulting in MDR. Thus, deciphering novel mechanisms of MDR and their overcoming is a major goal of cancer research. Recently we have shown that overexpression of ABCG2 in the membrane of novel extracellular vesicles (EVs in breast cancer cells results in mitoxantrone resistance due to its dramatic sequestration in EVs. However, nothing is known about EVs structure, biogenesis and their ability to concentrate multiple antitumor agents. To this end, we here found that EVs are structural and functional homologues of bile canaliculi, are apically localized, sealed structures reinforced by an actin-based cytoskeleton and secluded from the extracellular milieu by the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. Apart from ABCG2, ABCB1 and ABCC2 were also selectively targeted to the membrane of EVs. Moreover, Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin protein complex selectively localized to the border of the EVs membrane, suggesting a key role for the tethering of MDR pumps to the actin cytoskeleton. The ability of EVs to concentrate and sequester different antitumor drugs was also explored. Taking advantage of the endogenous fluorescence of anticancer drugs, we found that EVs-forming breast cancer cells display high level resistance to topotecan, imidazoacridinones and methotrexate via efficient intravesicular drug concentration hence sequestering them away from their cellular targets. Thus, we identified a new modality of anticancer drug compartmentalization and resistance in which multiple chemotherapeutics are actively pumped from the cytoplasm and highly concentrated within the lumen of EVs via a network of MDR transporters differentially targeted to the EVs membrane. We propose a composite model for the structure and

  11. The combination of sorafenib and everolimus shows antitumor activity in preclinical models of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignochino, Ymera; Dell’Aglio, Carmine; Inghilleri, Simona; Zorzetto, Michele; Basiricò, Marco; Capozzi, Federica; Canta, Marta; Piloni, Davide; Cemmi, Francesca; Sangiolo, Dario; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Soster, Marco; Marchiò, Serena; Pozzi, Ernesto; Morbini, Patrizia; Luisetti, Maurizio; Aglietta, Massimo; Grignani, Giovanni; Stella, Giulia M

    2015-01-01

    Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive tumor arising from mesothelial cells lining the pleural cavities characterized by resistance to standard therapies. Most of the molecular steps responsible for pleural transformation remain unclear; however, several growth factor signaling cascades are known to be altered during MPM onset and progression. Transducers of these pathways, such as PIK3CA-mTOR-AKT, MAPK, and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) could therefore be exploited as possible targets for pharmacological intervention. This study aimed to identify ‘druggable’ pathways in MPM and to formulate a targeted approach based on the use of commercially available molecules, such as the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. We planned a triple approach based on: i) analysis of immunophenotypes and mutational profiles in a cohort of thoracoscopic MPM samples, ii) in vitro pharmacological assays, ii) in vivo therapeutic approaches on MPM xenografts. No mutations were found in ‘hot spot’ regions of the mTOR upstream genes (e.g. EGFR, KRAS and PIK3CA). Phosphorylated mTOR and ERM were specifically overexpressed in the analyzed MPM samples. Sorafenib and everolimus combination was effective in mTOR and ERM blockade; exerted synergistic effects on the inhibition of MPM cell proliferation; triggered ROS production and consequent AMPK-p38 mediated-apoptosis. The antitumor activity was displayed when orally administered to MPM-bearing NOD/SCID mice. ERM and mTOR pathways are activated in MPM and ‘druggable’ by a combination of sorafenib and everolimus. Combination therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy against MPM. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1363-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  12. Distinct cytoskeleton populations and extensive crosstalk control Ciona notochord tubulogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bo; Deng, Wei; Jiang, Di

    2011-04-01

    Cell elongation is a fundamental process that allows cells and tissues to adopt new shapes and functions. During notochord tubulogenesis in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, a dramatic elongation of individual cells takes place that lengthens the notochord and, consequently, the entire embryo. We find a novel dynamic actin- and non-muscle myosin II-containing constriction midway along the anteroposterior aspect of each notochord cell during this process. Both actin polymerization and myosin II activity are required for the constriction and cell elongation. Discontinuous localization of myosin II in the constriction indicates that the actomyosin network produces local contractions along the circumference. This reveals basal constriction by the actomyosin network as a novel mechanism for cell elongation. Following elongation, the notochord cells undergo a mesenchymal-epithelial transition and form two apical domains at opposite ends. Extracellular lumens then form at the apical surfaces. We show that cortical actin and Ciona ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) are essential for lumen formation and that a polarized network of microtubules, which contributes to lumen development, forms in an actin-dependent manner at the apical cortex. Later in notochord tubulogenesis, when notochord cells initiate a bi-directional crawling movement on the notochordal sheath, the microtubule network rotates 90° and becomes organized as parallel bundles extending towards the leading edges of tractive lamellipodia. This process is required for the correct organization of actin-based protrusions and subsequent lumen coalescence. In summary, we establish the contribution of the actomyosin and microtubule networks to notochord tubulogenesis and reveal extensive crosstalk and regulation between these two cytoskeleton components.

  13. Crystal Structure of the FERM Domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccarelli, D.; Song, H.; Poy, F.; Schaller, M.; Eck, M.

    2006-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that localizes to focal adhesions in adherent cells. Through phosphorylation of proteins assembled at the cytoplasmic tails of integrins, FAK promotes signaling events that modulate cellular growth, survival, and migration. The amino-terminal region of FAK contains a region of sequence homology with band 4.1 and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins termed a FERM domain. FERM domains are found in a variety of signaling and cytoskeletal proteins and are thought to mediate intermolecular interactions with partner proteins and phospholipids at the plasma membrane and intramolecular regulatory interactions. Here we report two crystal structures of an NH2-terminal fragment of avian FAK containing the FERM domain and a portion of the regulatory linker that connects the FERM and kinase domains. The tertiary folds of the three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3) are similar to those of known FERM structures despite low sequence conservation. Differences in the sequence and relative orientation of the F3 subdomain alters the nature of the interdomain interface, and the phosphoinositide binding site found in ERM family FERM domains is not present in FAK. A putative protein interaction site on the F3 lobe is masked by the proximal region of the linker. Additionally, in one structure the adjacent Src SH3 and SH2 binding sites in the linker associate with the surfaces of the F3 and F1 lobes, respectively. These structural features suggest the possibility that protein interactions of the FAK FERM domain can be regulated by binding of Src kinases to the linker segment

  14. Analysis of close associations of uropod-associated proteins in human T-cells using the proximity ligation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Baumann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have shown previously that the raft-associated proteins flotillin-1 and -2 are rapidly recruited to the uropods of chemoattractant-stimulated human neutrophils and T-cells and are involved in cell polarization. Other proteins such as the adhesion receptor PSGL-1, the actin-membrane linker proteins ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM and the signaling enzyme phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ90 (PIPKIγ90 also accumulate in the T-cell uropod. Using the in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA we now have investigated putative close associations of these proteins in human freshly isolated T-cells before and after chemokine addition. The PLA allows in situ subcellular localization of close proximity of endogenous proteins at single-molecule resolution in fixed cells. It allows detection also of weaker and transient complexes that would not be revealed with co-immunoprecipitation approaches. We previously provided evidence for heterodimer formation of tagged flotillin-1 and -2 in T-cells before and after chemokine addition using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET. We now confirm these findings using PLA for the endogenous flotillins in fixed human T-cells. Moreover, in agreement with the literature, our PLA findings confirm a close association of endogenous PSGL-1 and ERM proteins both in resting and chemokine-activated human T-cells. In addition, we provide novel evidence using the PLA for close associations of endogenous activated ERM proteins with PIPKIγ90 and of endogenous flotillins with PSGL-1 in human T-cells, before and after chemokine addition. Our findings suggest that preformed clusters of these proteins coalesce in the uropod upon cell stimulation.

  15. Evolution and origin of merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 tumor-suppressor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelyanchuk Leonid V

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 tumor suppressor gene, belongs to the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM subgroup of the protein 4.1 superfamily, which links cell surface glycoproteins to the actin cytoskeleton. While merlin's functional activity has been examined in mammalian and Drosophila models, little is understood about its evolution, diversity, and overall distribution among different taxa. Results By combining bioinformatic and phylogenetic approaches, we demonstrate that merlin homologs are present across a wide range of metazoan lineages. While the phylogenetic tree shows a monophyletic origin of the ERM family, the origin of the merlin proteins is robustly separated from that of the ERM proteins. The derivation of merlin is thought to be in early metazoa. We have also observed the expansion of the ERM-like proteins within the vertebrate clade, which occurred after its separation from Urochordata (Ciona intestinalis. Amino acid sequence alignment reveals the absence of an actin-binding site in the C-terminal region of all merlin proteins from various species but the presence of a conserved internal binding site in the N-terminal domain of the merlin and ERM proteins. In addition, a more conserved pattern of amino acid residues is found in the region containing the so-called "Blue Box," although some amino acid substitutions in this region exist in the merlin sequences of worms, fish, and Ciona. Examination of sequence variability at functionally significant sites, including the serine-518 residue, the phosphorylation of which modulates merlin's intra-molecular association and function as a tumor suppressor, identifies several potentially important sites that are conserved among all merlin proteins but divergent in the ERM proteins. Secondary structure prediction reveals the presence of a conserved α-helical domain in the central to C-terminal region of the merlin proteins of various species. The

  16. Akt1 binds focal adhesion kinase via the Akt1 kinase domain independently of the pleckstrin homology domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, M D; Zeng, B; Wang, S

    2015-10-01

    Akt1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) are protein kinases that play key roles in normal cell signaling. Individually, aberrant expression of these kinases has been linked to a variety of cancers. Together, Akt1/FAK interactions facilitate cancer metastasis by increasing cell adhesion under conditions of increased extracellular pressure. Pathological and iatrogenic sources of pressure arise from tumor growth against constraining stroma or direct perioperative manipulation. We previously reported that 15 mmHg increased extracellular pressure causes Akt1 to both directly interact with FAK and to phosphorylate and activate it. We investigated the nature of the Akt1/FAK binding by creating truncations of recombinant FAK, conjugated to glutathione S-transferase (GST), to pull down full-length Akt1. Western blots probing for Akt1 showed that FAK/Akt1 binding persisted in FAK truncations consisting of only amino acids 1-126, FAK(NT1), which contains the F1 subdomain of its band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, and moesin (FERM) domain. Using FAK(NT1) as bait, we then pulled down truncated versions of recombinant Akt1 conjugated to HA (human influenza hemagglutinin). Probes for GST-FAK(NT1) showed Akt1-FAK binding to occur in the absence of the both the Akt1 (N)-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and its adjacent hinge region. The Akt1 (C)-terminal regulatory domain was equally unnecessary for Akt1/FAK co-immunoprecipitation. Truncations involving the Akt1 catalytic domain showed that the domain by itself was enough to pull down FAK. Additionally, a fragment spanning from the PH domain to half way through the catalytic domain demonstrated increased FAK binding compared to full length Akt1. These results begin to delineate the Akt1/FAK interaction and can be used to manipulate their force-activated signal interactions. Furthermore, the finding that the N-terminal half of the Akt1 catalytic domain binds so strongly to FAK when cleaved from the rest of the protein may suggest a means

  17. Precise Somatotopic Thalamocortical Axon Guidance Depends on LPA-Mediated PRG-2/Radixin Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jin; Sahani, Sadhna; Hausrat, Torben Johann

    2016-01-01

    Precise connection of thalamic barreloids with their corresponding cortical barrels is critical for processing of vibrissal sensory information. Here, we show that PRG-2, a phospholipid-interacting molecule, is important for thalamocortical axon guidance. Developing thalamocortical fibers both...

  18. X-linked primary immunodeficiency associated with hemizygous mutations in the moesin (MSN) gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Luce, Sonia; Ouchani, Farid; Soheili, Tayebeh Shabi; Sadek, Hanem; Chouteau, Myriam; Durand, Amandine; Pic, Isabelle; Majewski, Jacek; Brouzes, Chantal; Lambert, Nathalie; Bohineust, Armelle; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Gandemer, Virginie; Monnier, Delphine; Heijmans, Catherine; van Gijn, Marielle; Dalm, Virgil A; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Picard, Capucine; Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven; Hivroz, Claire; Jabado, Nada; de Saint Basile, Geneviève; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana, Marina; André-Schmutz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated 7 male patients (from 5 different families) presenting with profound lymphopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, fluctuating monocytopenia and neutropenia, a poor immune response to vaccine antigens, and increased susceptibility to bacterial and varicella zoster virus infections.

  19. Vesicular transport of progeny parvovirus particles through ER and Golgi regulates maturation and cytolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Séverine; Rommelaere, Jean; Nüesch, Jürg P F

    2013-09-01

    Progeny particles of non-enveloped lytic parvoviruses were previously shown to be actively transported to the cell periphery through vesicles in a gelsolin-dependent manner. This process involves rearrangement and destruction of actin filaments, while microtubules become protected throughout the infection. Here the focus is on the intracellular egress pathway, as well as its impact on the properties and release of progeny virions. By colocalization with cellular marker proteins and specific modulation of the pathways through over-expression of variant effector genes transduced by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors, we show that progeny PV particles become engulfed into COPII-vesicles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are transported through the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Besides known factors like sar1, sec24, rab1, the ERM family proteins, radixin and moesin play (an) essential role(s) in the formation/loading and targeting of virus-containing COPII-vesicles. These proteins also contribute to the transport through ER and Golgi of the well described analogue of cellular proteins, the secreted Gaussia luciferase in absence of virus infection. It is therefore likely that radixin and moesin also serve for a more general function in cellular exocytosis. Finally, parvovirus egress via ER and Golgi appears to be necessary for virions to gain full infectivity through post-assembly modifications (e.g. phosphorylation). While not being absolutely required for cytolysis and progeny virus release, vesicular transport of parvoviruses through ER and Golgi significantly accelerates these processes pointing to a regulatory role of this transport pathway.

  20. Ezrin mediates c-Myc actions in prostate cancer cell invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuan, Yin Choy; Iglesias Gato, Diego; Fernandez-Perez, L

    2010-01-01

    The forced overexpression of c-Myc in mouse prostate and in normal human prostate epithelial cells results in tumor transformation with an invasive phenotype. How c-Myc regulates cell invasion is poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the interplay of c-Myc and androgens in the re...

  1. Differential expression of p-ERM, a marker of cell polarity, in benign and neoplastic oviductal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Gang; Bijron, Jonathan G; Yuan, Ju; Hirsch, Michelle S; McKeon, Frank D; Nucci, Marisa R; Crum, Christopher P; Xian, Wa

    2013-07-01

    Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) is a noninvasive phase of pelvic serous cancer at risk for metastasizing. Because of its biologic significance, its accurate distinction from nonmalignant mimics is important. Loss of cell orientation is an important feature of STIC. We sought to determine whether the immunohistochemical localization of cytoskeletal-organizing proteins phospho-ezrin-radaxin-moesin (p-ERM) would be useful in making this distinction. The benign oviductal entities (normal and p53 signatures), premalignant atypias (tubal intraepithelial lesions in transition), serous intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs), and carcinomas were analyzed for 5 staining patterns and compared. Linear or uniform luminal p-ERM staining was strongly associated with benign mucosa in contrast to STICs, in which it was lost and often replaced by nonlinear or nonuniform patterns highlighting individually cell groups or single cells. Premalignant atypias were similar to benign mucosa by p-ERM staining and retained the linear luminal pattern. This study shows, for the first time, that patterns of staining for an immunohistochemical correlate of cell polarity (p-ERM) differ between STICs, their benign counterparts and premalignant atypias that do not fulfill the criteria for STICs. If confirmed, these findings warrant further analysis of indices of cell polarity as objective markers for the diagnosis and mapping of the evolution of pelvic serous precursors.

  2. Enhanced Effector Function of CD8+ T Cells From Healthy Controls and HIV-Infected Patients Occurs Through Thrombin Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Amanda; Smith, Mindy; Karpova, Tatiana; Hasley, Rebecca B.; Belkina, Natalya; Shaw, Stephen; Balenga, Nariman; Druey, Kirk M.; Nickel, Erin; Packard, Beverly; Imamichi, Hiromi; Hu, Zonghui; Follmann, Dean; McNally, James; Higgins, Jeanette; Sneller, Michael; Lane, H. Clifford; Catalfamo, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of vascular integrity by trauma and other tissue insults leads to inflammation and activation of the coagulation cascade. The serine protease thrombin links these 2 processes. The proinflammatory function of thrombin is mediated by activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). We found that peripheral blood effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes expressed PAR-1 and that expression was increased in CD8+ T cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients. Thrombin enhanced cytokine secretion in CD8+ T cells from healthy controls and HIV-infected patients. In addition, thrombin induced chemokinesis, but not chemotaxis, of CD8+ T cells, which led to structural changes, including cell polarization and formation of a structure rich in F-actin and phosphorylated ezrin-radexin-moesin proteins. These findings suggest that thrombin mediates cross-talk between the coagulation system and the adaptive immune system at sites of vascular injury through increased T-cell motility and production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:23204166

  3. Enhanced effector function of CD8(+) T cells from healthy controls and HIV-infected patients occurs through thrombin activation of protease-activated receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Amanda; Smith, Mindy; Karpova, Tatiana; Hasley, Rebecca B; Belkina, Natalya; Shaw, Stephen; Balenga, Nariman; Druey, Kirk M; Nickel, Erin; Packard, Beverly; Imamichi, Hiromi; Hu, Zonghui; Follmann, Dean; McNally, James; Higgins, Jeanette; Sneller, Michael; Lane, H Clifford; Catalfamo, Marta

    2013-02-15

    Disruption of vascular integrity by trauma and other tissue insults leads to inflammation and activation of the coagulation cascade. The serine protease thrombin links these 2 processes. The proinflammatory function of thrombin is mediated by activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). We found that peripheral blood effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes expressed PAR-1 and that expression was increased in CD8(+) T cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thrombin enhanced cytokine secretion in CD8(+) T cells from healthy controls and HIV-infected patients. In addition, thrombin induced chemokinesis, but not chemotaxis, of CD8(+) T cells, which led to structural changes, including cell polarization and formation of a structure rich in F-actin and phosphorylated ezrin-radexin-moesin proteins. These findings suggest that thrombin mediates cross-talk between the coagulation system and the adaptive immune system at sites of vascular injury through increased T-cell motility and production of proinflammatory cytokines.

  4. [Inhibitory effect of baicalein on the proliferation and invasion of osteosarcoma cells and mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhibin; Li, Chun; Chen, Zhiwei

    2015-03-01

    To explore the effect of baicalein on the proliferation and invasion of osteosarcoma cells and its related mechanism. Osteosarcoma MG-63 cells that were cultured in vitro were respectively treated with 20 μL culture medium (control group), dehydrated alcohol (0 μmol/L baicalein group), 100 and 200 μmol/L baicalein solution for 48 hours. Cell proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay. The cell invasion ability was detected using Transwell(TM) invasion assay. The expression of ezrin mRNA was examined by real-time quantitative PCR. The expressions of ezrin protein and p-ezrin protein were measured using Western blotting. Apoptosis index (AI) was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). The inhibitory rates of cell proliferation significantly increased in 100 and 200 μmol/L baicalein groups as compared with 0 μmol/L baicalein group. Moreover, that was higher in 200 μmol/L baicalein group than in 100 μmol/L baicalein group. In comparison with control and 0 μmol/L baicalein groups, the mean cell numbers of permeated membrane and levels of ezrin mRNA, ezrin protein and p-ezrin protein gradually decreased, but AI was gradually elevated with the increase of baicalein concentrations, whereas there was no significant difference in these indicators between 0 μmol/L baicalein group and control group. Baicalein can inhibit the proliferation and invasion of osteosarcoma MG-63 cells. The mechanism may be associated with the inhibited expression and activity of ezrin protein and the promoted tumor cell apoptosis.

  5. Dinitrosopiperazine-Mediated Phosphorylated-Proteins Are Involved in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongjun Tan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available N,N'-dinitrosopiperazine (DNP with organ specificity for nasopharyngeal epithelium, is involved in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC metastasis, though its mechanism is unclear. To reveal the pathogenesis of DNP-induced metastasis, immunoprecipitation was used to identify DNP-mediated phosphoproteins. DNP-mediated NPC cell line (6-10B motility and invasion was confirmed. Twenty-six phosphoproteins were increased at least 1.5-fold following DNP exposure. Changes in the expression levels of selected phosphoproteins were verified by Western-blotting analysis. DNP treatment altered the phosphorylation of ezrin (threonine 567, vimentin (serine 55, stathmin (serine 25 and STAT3 (serine 727. Furthermore, it was shown that DNP-dependent metastasis is mediated in part through ezrin at threonine 567, as DNP-mediated metastasis was decreased when threonine 567 of ezrin was mutated. Strikingly, NPC metastatic tumors exhibited a higher expression of phosphorylated-ezrin at threonine 567 than the primary tumors. These findings provide novel insight into DNP-induced NPC metastasis and may contribute to a better understanding of the metastatic mechanisms of NPC tumors.

  6. EGF-induced expansion of migratory cells in the rostral migratory stream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle R Lindberg

    Full Text Available The presence of neural stem cells in the adult brain is currently widely accepted and efforts are made to harness the regenerative potential of these cells. The dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation, and the subventricular zone (SVZ of the anterior lateral ventricles, are considered the main loci of adult neurogenesis. The rostral migratory stream (RMS is the structure funneling SVZ progenitor cells through the forebrain to their final destination in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, extensive proliferation occurs in the RMS. Some evidence suggest the presence of stem cells in the RMS, but these cells are few and possibly of limited differentiation potential. We have recently demonstrated the specific expression of the cytoskeleton linker protein radixin in neuroblasts in the RMS and in oligodendrocyte progenitors throughout the brain. These cell populations are greatly altered after intracerebroventricular infusion of epidermal growth factor (EGF. In the current study we investigate the effect of EGF infusion on the rat RMS. We describe a specific increase of radixin(+/Olig2(+ cells in the RMS. Negative for NG2 and CNPase, these radixin(+/Olig2(+ cells are distinct from typical oligodendrocyte progenitors. The expanded Olig2(+ population responds rapidly to EGF and proliferates after only 24 hours along the entire RMS, suggesting local activation by EGF throughout the RMS rather than migration from the SVZ. In addition, the radixin(+/Olig2(+ progenitors assemble in chains in vivo and migrate in chains in explant cultures, suggesting that they possess migratory properties within the RMS. In summary, these results provide insight into the adaptive capacity of the RMS and point to an additional stem cell source for future brain repair strategies.

  7. MST4 kinase phosphorylates ACAP4 protein to orchestrate apical membrane remodeling during gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao; Yao, Phil Y; Jiang, Jiying; Zhang, Yin; Su, Zeqi; Yao, Wendy; Wang, Xueying; Gui, Ping; Mullen, McKay; Henry, Calmour; Ward, Tarsha; Wang, Wenwen; Brako, Larry; Tian, Ruijun; Zhao, Xuannv; Wang, Fengsong; Cao, Xinwang; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Xing; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2017-09-29

    Digestion in the stomach depends on acidification of the lumen. Histamine-elicited acid secretion is triggered by activation of the PKA cascade, which ultimately results in the insertion of gastric H,K-ATPases into the apical plasma membranes of parietal cells. Our recent study revealed the functional role of PKA-MST4-ezrin signaling axis in histamine-elicited acid secretion. However, it remains uncharacterized how the PKA-MST4-ezrin signaling axis operates the insertion of H,K-ATPases into the apical plasma membranes of gastric parietal cells. Here we show that MST4 phosphorylates ACAP4, an ARF6 GTPase-activating protein, at Thr 545 Histamine stimulation activates MST4 and promotes MST4 interaction with ACAP4. ACAP4 physically interacts with MST4 and is a cognate substrate of MST4 during parietal cell activation. The phosphorylation site of ACAP4 by MST4 was mapped to Thr 545 by mass spectrometric analyses. Importantly, phosphorylation of Thr 545 is essential for acid secretion in parietal cells because either suppression of ACAP4 or overexpression of non-phosphorylatable ACAP4 prevents the apical membrane reorganization and proton pump translocation elicited by histamine stimulation. In addition, persistent overexpression of MST4 phosphorylation-deficient ACAP4 results in inhibition of gastric acid secretion and blockage of tubulovesicle fusion to the apical membranes. Significantly, phosphorylation of Thr 545 enables ACAP4 to interact with ezrin. Given the location of Thr 545 between the GTPase-activating protein domain and the first ankyrin repeat, we reason that MST4 phosphorylation elicits a conformational change that enables ezrin-ACAP4 interaction. Taken together, these results define a novel molecular mechanism linking the PKA-MST4-ACAP4 signaling cascade to polarized acid secretion in gastric parietal cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Anchored PKA as a gatekeeper for gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidoux, Guillaume; Taskén, Kjetil

    2015-01-01

    Anchored protein kinase A (PKA) bound to A Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) mediates effects of localized increases in cAMP in defined subcellular microdomains and retains the specificity in cAMP-PKA signaling to distinct extracellular stimuli. Gap junctions are pores between adjacent cells constituted by connexin proteins that provide means of communication and transfer of small molecules. While the PKA signaling is known to promote human trophoblast cell fusion, the gap junction communication through connexin 43 (Cx43) is a prerequisite for this process. We recently demonstrated that trophoblast fusion is regulated by ezrin, a known AKAP, which binds to Cx43 and delivers PKA in the vicinity gap junctions. We found that disruption of the ezrin-Cx43 interaction abolished PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Cx43 as well as gap junction communication and subsequently cell fusion. We propose that the PKA-ezrin-Cx43 macromolecular complex regulating gap junction communication constitutes a general mechanism to control opening of Cx43 gap junctions by phosphorylation in response to cAMP signaling in various cell types.

  9. 2-D Difference in gel electrophoresis combined with Pro-Q Diamond staining: a successful approach for the identification of kinase/phosphatase targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsatti, Laura; Forte, Eleonora; Tomei, Licia; Caterino, Marianna; Pessi, Antonello; Talamo, Fabio

    2009-07-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL-3 is an appealing therapeutic cancer target for its well described involvement in the metastasis progression. Nevertheless, very little is known about PRL-3 role in tumorigenesis. In the attempt to identify the protein target of this phosphatase we have devised a model system based on the use of highly invasive HCT116 colon cancer cells over-expressing PRL-3. We used 2-D difference gel electrophoresis combined with the fluorescence staining Pro-Q Diamond selective for phosphorylated proteins to monitor changes in the phosphorylation status of possible substrates. Proteins whose phosphorylation level was negatively affected by PRL-3 over-expression were identified by MS. Two proteins were found to be significantly dephosphorylated in this condition, the cytoskeletal protein ezrin and elongation factor 2. Ezrin has already been described as having a proactive role in cancer metastasis through control of its phosphorylation status, and the PRL-3-induced modulation of ezrin phosphorylation in HCT116 and human umblical vascular endothelial cells is the subject of a separate paper by Forte et al. [Biochim. Biophys. Acta 2008, 1783, 334-344]. The combination of 2-D difference in gel electrophoresis and Pro-Q Diamond was hence confirmed successful in analyzing changes of protein phosphorylation which enable the identification of kinase/phosphatase targets.

  10. [Implant placement in the aesthetic zone: the socket-shield-technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagas, L J; Pepplinkhuizen, J J F A A; Bergé, S J; Meijer, G J

    2015-01-01

    Following the extraction of an incisor in the maxilla, resorption of the -alveolar bone always occurs, especially on the buccal side. This often indicates that in the buccocervical area, insufficient bone is present to cover the dental implant. One treatment option is to carry out a bone transplant on the buccal side prior to or during the placement of the implant. An alternative way of supporting the buccocervical gingival is to leave the buccal part of the radixin situ, the so-called socket-shield technique. The results of this treatment for 16 consecutive patients were evaluated and revealed that the socket-shield technique produces good treatment results.

  11. Assessment of response to beta-blockers by expression of βArr2 and RhoA/ROCK2 in antrum mucosa in cirrhotic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebicka, Jonel; von Heydebrand, Matthias; Lehmann, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Non-selective beta-blockers (NSBB) are first choice for prevention of variceal bleeding. But possible deleterious effects in refractory ascites and frequent non-response are clinical drawbacks. Since levels of vasoactive proteins in antrum mucosa reflect vascular dysfunction...... and protein expression of Ras homolog family member A (RhoA), Rho-kinase (ROCK)2, beta-arrestin2 (βArr2), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the phosphorylation of downstream effectors VASP and moesin were analyzed using PCR and Western blot. Further 21 patients on NSBB were evaluated...

  12. Value of preoperative enhanced multi-slice spiral CT scan for judging TNM staging of gastric cancer as well as its relationship with tumor marker and proliferation molecule expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Jun Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the value of preoperative enhanced multi-slice spiral CT scan for judging TNM staging of gastric cancer as well as its relationship with tumor marker and proliferation molecule expression. Methods: A total of 135 patients with gastric cancer who received surgical resection in our hospital between May 2012 and October 2015 were selected as the research subjects, preoperative enhanced multi-slice spiral CT scan was conducted to judge TNM staging, and serum was collected to determine the content of tumor markers; tumor tissue was collected after operation to determine the content of cytokines and pro-proliferation molecules. Results: CEA, CA199, CA153, CA125 and CA724 content in serum as well as TGFβ1, TGFβ2, VEGF, FGF2, PTP1B, PIK3CD, Survivin, Ezrin and YAP content in gastric cancer tissue of patients with TNM II, III and IV stage gastric cancer were significantly higher than those of patients with TNM I stage; CEA, CA199, CA153, CA125 and CA724 content in serum as well as TGFβ1, TGFβ2, VEGF, FGF2, PTP1B, PIK3CD, Survivin, Ezrin and YAP content in gastric cancer tissue of patients with TNM III and IV stage gastric cancer were significantly higher than those of patients with TNM II stage; CEA, CA199, CA153, CA125 and CA724 content in serum as well as TGFβ1, TGFβ2, VEGF, FGF2, PTP1B, PIK3CD, Survivin, Ezrin and YAP content in gastric cancer tissue of patients with TNM IV stage gastric cancer were significantly higher than those of patients with TNM III stage. Conclusions: TNM staging of gastric cancer decided by preoperative enhanced multi-slice spiral CT scan has good consistency with the content of tumor markers in serum and proliferation molecules in tumor lesion.

  13. FERM proteins in animal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepass, Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    Proteins containing a FERM domain are ubiquitous components of the cytocortex of animal cells where they are engaged in structural, transport, and signaling functions. Recent years have seen a wealth of genetic studies in model organisms that explore FERM protein function in development and tissue organization. In addition, mutations in several FERM protein-encoding genes have been associated with human diseases. This review will provide a brief overview of the FERM domain structure and the FERM protein superfamily and then discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism of function and developmental requirement of several FERM proteins including Moesin, Myosin-VIIA, Myosin-XV, Coracle/Band4.1 as well as Yurt and its vertebrate homologs Mosaic Eyes and EPB41L5/YMO1/Limulus.

  14. Morphofunctional Changes After Sleeve Gastrectomy and Very Low Calorie Diet in an Animal Model of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera-Urquijo, Eider; Rodríguez-Navarro, Sarai; Beisani, Marc; Salcedo-Allende, Maria Teresa; Chakkur, Aisha; Arús-Avilés, Marc; Cremades, Manel; Augustin, Salvador; Martell, María; Balibrea, José M

    2018-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent chronic liver disease and is found in 70% of obese people. The evidence available to date suggests that bariatric surgery could be an effective treatment by reducing weight and also by improving metabolic complications in the long term. This work aimed to compare, in a diet-induced NAFLD animal model, the effect of both sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and very-low calorie diet (VLCD). Thirty-five Wistar rats were divided into control rats (n = 7) and obese rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). After 10 weeks, the obese rats were subdivided into four groups: HFD (n = 7), VLCD (n = 7), and rats submitted to either a sham operation (n = 7) or SG (n = 7). Both liver tissue and blood samples were processed to evaluate steatosis and NASH changes in histology (Oil Red, Sirius Red and H&E); presence of endothelial damage (CD31, Moesin/p-Moesin, Akt/p-Akt, eNOS/p-eNOS), oxidative stress (iNOS) and fibrosis (αSMA, Col1, PDGF, VEGF) proteins in liver tissue; and inflammatory (IL6, IL10, MCP-1, IL17α, TNFα), liver biochemical function, and hormonal (leptin, ghrelin, visfatin and insulin) alterations in plasma. Both VLCD and SG improved histology, but only SG induced a significant weight loss, improved endothelial damage, and a decreased cardiovascular risk by reducing insulin resistance (IR), leptin, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. There were no relevant variations in the inflammatory and fibrosis markers. Our study suggests a slight superiority of SG over VLCD by improving not only the histology but also the IR and cardiovascular risk markers related to NAFLD.

  15. Presence in the pre-surgical fine-needle aspiration of potential thyroid biomarkers previously identified in the post-surgical one.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Ciregia

    Full Text Available Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNA is usually applied to distinguish benign from malignant thyroid nodules. However, cytological analysis cannot always allow a proper diagnosis. We believe that the improvement of the diagnostic capability of pre-surgical FNA could avoid unnecessary thyroidectomy. In a previous study, we performed a proteome analysis to examine FNA collected after thyroidectomy. With the present study, we examined the applicability of these results on pre-surgical FNA. We collected pre-surgical FNA from 411 consecutive patients, and to obtain a correct comparison with our previous results, we processed only benign (n=114, papillary classical variant (cPTC (n=34 and papillary tall cell variant (TcPTC (n=14 FNA. We evaluated levels of five proteins previously found up-regulated in thyroid cancer with respect to benign nodules. ELISA and western blot (WB analysis were used to assay levels of L-lactate dehydrogenase B chain (LDHB, Ferritin heavy chain, Ferritin light chain, Annexin A1 (ANXA1, and Moesin in FNA. ELISA assays and WB analysis confirmed the increase of LDHB, Moesin, and ANXA1 in pre-surgical FNA of thyroid papillary cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of ANXA1 were respectively 87 and 94% for cPTC, 85 and 100% for TcPTC. In conclusion, a proteomic analysis of FNA from patients with thyroid nodules may help to distinguish benign versus malignant thyroid nodules. Moreover, ANXA1 appears to be an ideal candidate given the high sensitivity and specificity obtained from ROC curve analysis.

  16. A novel mechanism of regulating breast cancer cell migration via palmitoylation-dependent alterations in the lipid raft affiliation of CD44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babina, Irina S; McSherry, Elaine A; Donatello, Simona; Hill, Arnold D K; Hopkins, Ann M

    2014-02-10

    Most breast cancer-related deaths result from metastasis, a process involving dynamic regulation of tumour cell adhesion and migration. The adhesion protein CD44, a key regulator of cell migration, is enriched in cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts. We recently reported that raft affiliation of CD44 negatively regulates interactions with its migratory binding partner ezrin. Since raft affiliation is regulated by post-translational modifications including palmitoylation, we sought to establish the contribution of CD44 palmitoylation and lipid raft affiliation to cell migration. Recovery of CD44 and its binding partners from raft versus non-raft membrane microdomains was profiled in non-migrating and migrating breast cancer cell lines. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce single or double point mutations into both CD44 palmitoylation sites (Cys286 and Cys295), whereupon the implications for lipid raft recovery, phenotype, ezrin co-precipitation and migratory behaviour was assessed. Finally CD44 palmitoylation status and lipid raft affiliation was assessed in primary cultures from a small panel of breast cancer patients. CD44 raft affiliation was increased during migration of non-invasive breast cell lines, but decreased during migration of highly-invasive breast cells. The latter was paralleled by increased CD44 recovery in non-raft fractions, and exclusive non-raft recovery of its binding partners. Point mutation of CD44 palmitoylation sites reduced CD44 raft affiliation in invasive MDA-MB-231 cells, increased CD44-ezrin co-precipitation and accordingly enhanced cell migration. Expression of palmitoylation-impaired (raft-excluded) CD44 mutants in non-invasive MCF-10a cells was sufficient to reversibly induce the phenotypic appearance of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and to increase cell motility. Interestingly, cell migration was associated with temporal reductions in CD44 palmitoylation in wild-type breast cells. Finally

  17. Role of TGF-beta1-independent changes in protein neosynthesis, p38alphaMAPK, and cdc42 in hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence-like morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrétien, Aline; Dierick, Jean-François; Delaive, Edouard

    2008-01-01

    for p38(MAPK) activation, in turn triggering phosphorylation of L-caldesmon and HSP27. Cdc42 was also shown to be mainly responsible for the increase in TGF-beta1 mRNA level observed at 24 h after treatment with H(2)O(2) and onward. This study further clarified the mechanisms of senescence......The role of TGF-beta1 in hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence-like morphogenesis has been described. The aim of this work was to investigate whether TGF-beta1-independent changes in protein synthesis are involved in this morphogenesis and to study possible mechanisms occurring earlier than TGF-beta......1 overexpression. Among the multiple TGF-beta1-independent changes in protein neosynthesis, followed or not by posttranslational modifications, identified by proteomic analysis herein, those of ezrin, L-caldesmon, and HSP27 were particularly studied. Rho-GTPase cdc42 was shown to be responsible...

  18. The PDZ domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor PDZGEF directs binding to phosphatidic acid during brush border formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah V Consonni

    Full Text Available PDZGEF is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small G protein Rap. It was recently found that PDZGEF contributes to establishment of intestinal epithelial polarity downstream of the kinase Lkb1. By binding to phosphatidic acid enriched at the apical membrane, PDZGEF locally activates Rap2a resulting in induction of brush border formation via a pathway that includes the polarity players TNIK, Mst4 and Ezrin. Here we show that the PDZ domain of PDZGEF is essential and sufficient for targeting PDZGEF to the apical membrane of polarized intestinal epithelial cells. Inhibition of PLD and consequently production of phosphatidic acid inhibitis targeting of PDZGEF to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, localization requires specific positively charged residues within the PDZ domain. We conclude that local accumulation of PDZGEF at the apical membrane during establishment of epithelial polarity is mediated by electrostatic interactions between positively charged side chains in the PDZ domain and negatively charged phosphatidic acid.

  19. Vitamin D Proliferates Vaginal Epithelium through RhoA Expression in Postmenopausal Atrophic Vagina tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Arum; Lee, Man Ryul; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Kim, Yeon-Suk; Kim, Jun-Mo; Enkhbold, Temuulee; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2017-09-30

    Postmenopausal atrophic vagina (PAV) is the thinning of the walls of the vagina and decreased lugae of the vagina. PAV is caused by decreased estrogen levels in postmenopausal women. However, the harmful effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have resulted in considerable caution in its use. Various estrogen agonist treatment options are available. Vitamin D is influences the regulation of differentiation and proliferation of various cells, especially tissues lining stratified squamous epithelium, such as the vaginal epithelium. In this study, we hypothesized that vitamin D could provide an alternative and a safe treatment option for PAV by promoting the proliferation and differentiation of the vaginal epithelium. Thirty six patients were enrolled in this case-control study. Vitamin D associated proteins in a vitamin D and sex hormone treated vaginal epithelial cell line as well as normal and PAV tissues were measured. To confirm of cell-to-cell junction protein expression, cell line and tissue studies included RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry staining, and immunoblot analyses. The expression of cell-to-cell junction proteins was higher in women with symptoms of atrophic vagina tissue compared to women without the symptoms. Vitamin D stimulated the proliferation of the vaginal epithelium by activating p-RhoA and Erzin through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). The results suggest that vitamin D positively regulates cell-to-cell junction by increasing the VDR/p-RhoA/p-Ezrin pathway. This is the first study to verify the relationship of the expression of RhoA and Ezrin proteins in vaginal tissue of PAV.

  20. The brain-tumor related protein podoplanin regulates synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicvaric, Ana; Yang, Jiaye; Krieger, Sigurd; Khan, Deeba; Kim, Eun-Jung; Dominguez-Rodriguez, Manuel; Cabatic, Maureen; Molz, Barbara; Acevedo Aguilar, Juan Pablo; Milicevic, Radoslav; Smani, Tarik; Breuss, Johannes M; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Pollak, Daniela D; Uhrin, Pavel; Monje, Francisco J

    2016-12-01

    Podoplanin is a cell-surface glycoprotein constitutively expressed in the brain and implicated in human brain tumorigenesis. The intrinsic function of podoplanin in brain neurons remains however uncharacterized. Using an established podoplanin-knockout mouse model and electrophysiological, biochemical, and behavioral approaches, we investigated the brain neuronal role of podoplanin. Ex-vivo electrophysiology showed that podoplanin deletion impairs dentate gyrus synaptic strengthening. In vivo, podoplanin deletion selectively impaired hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory without affecting amygdala-dependent cued fear conditioning. In vitro, neuronal overexpression of podoplanin promoted synaptic activity and neuritic outgrowth whereas podoplanin-deficient neurons exhibited stunted outgrowth and lower levels of p-Ezrin, TrkA, and CREB in response to nerve growth factor (NGF). Surface Plasmon Resonance data further indicated a physical interaction between podoplanin and NGF. This work proposes podoplanin as a novel component of the neuronal machinery underlying neuritogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and hippocampus-dependent memory functions. The existence of a relevant cross-talk between podoplanin and the NGF/TrkA signaling pathway is also for the first time proposed here, thus providing a novel molecular complex as a target for future multidisciplinary studies of the brain function in the physiology and the pathology. Key messages Podoplanin, a protein linked to the promotion of human brain tumors, is required in vivo for proper hippocampus-dependent learning and memory functions. Deletion of podoplanin selectively impairs activity-dependent synaptic strengthening at the neurogenic dentate-gyrus and hampers neuritogenesis and phospho Ezrin, TrkA and CREB protein levels upon NGF stimulation. Surface plasmon resonance data indicates a physical interaction between podoplanin and NGF. On these grounds, a relevant cross-talk between podoplanin and NGF as well

  1. Protein phosphatase 2A inhibition and subsequent cytoskeleton reorganization contributes to cell migration caused by microcystin-LR in human laryngeal epithelial cells (Hep-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beilei; Liu, Jinghui; Huang, Pu; Xu, Kailun; Wang, Hanying; Wang, Xiaofeng; Guo, Zonglou; Xu, Lihong

    2017-03-01

    The major toxic mechanism of Microcystin-LR is inhibition of the activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), resulting in a series of cytotoxic effects. Our previous studies have demonstrated that microcystin-LR (MCLR) induced very different molecular effects in normal cells and the tumor cell line SMMC7721. To further explore the MCLR toxicity mechanism in tumor cells, human laryngeal epithelial cells (Hep-2) was examined in this study. Western blot, immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and transwell migration assay were used to detect the effects of MCLR on PP2A activity, PP2A substrates, cytoskeleton, and cell migration. The results showed that the protein level of PP2A subunits and the posttranslational modification of the catalytic subunit were altered and that the binding of the AC core enzyme as well as the binding of PP2A/C and α4, was also affected. As PP2A substrates, the phosphorylation of MAPK pathway members, p38, ERK1/2, and the cytoskeleton-associated proteins, Hsp27, VASP, Tau, and Ezrin were increased. Furthermore, MCLR induced reorganization of the cytoskeleton and promoted cell migration. Taken together, direct covalent binding to PP2A/C, alteration of the protein levels and posttranslational modification, as well as the binding of subunits, are the main pattern for the effects of MCLR on PP2A in Hep-2. A dose-dependent change in p-Tau and p-Ezrin due to PP2A inhibition may contribute to the changes in the cytoskeleton and be related to the cell migration in Hep-2. Our data provide a comprehensive exposition of the MCLR mechanism on tumor cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 890-903, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Peroxiredoxin I protein, a potential biomarker of hydronephrosis in fetal mice exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxue; Liu, Jing; Liu, Xing; Wei, Guanghui

    2014-06-01

    In previous studies, we established an animal model of human congenital hydronephrosis with exposure of developing mice to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), but the etiopathogenesis is not entirely clear. The present study was to identify the changes that may be involved in the etiology at the protein level. C57BL/6J mice fetuses were treated with TCDD. Comparative proteomic analysis was adopted to identify the proteins associated with hydronephrosis induced by TCDD. Two-dimensional electrophoresis display revealed that 19 protein spots were differentially expressed in the upper urinary tract tissues in fetal mice after exposure to TCDD. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) identified 12 up-regulated proteins: peroxiredoxin I (Prx I), cadherin 6, gamma-actin, radixin, desmin, type II transforming growth factor-beta receptor, chromogranin B, serum albumin precursor, transferrin, hypothetical protein LOC70984, lipk protein, and zinc finger protein 336. Histochemical staining indicated that Prx I protein was positively expressed in the ureteric epithelium in the treated group, and not in the control group, which is consistent with MALDI-TOF-MS. Prx I protein may be a potential biomarker or responsive protein of hydronephrosis in fetal mice induced by TCDD. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct functions of Crumbs regulating slit diaphragms and endocytosis in Drosophila nephrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochapfel, Florian; Denk, Lucia; Mendl, Gudrun; Schulze, Ulf; Maaßen, Christine; Zaytseva, Yulia; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Weide, Thomas; Rachel, Reinhard; Witzgall, Ralph; Krahn, Michael P

    2017-12-01

    Mammalian podocytes, the key determinants of the kidney's filtration barrier, differentiate from columnar epithelial cells and several key determinants of apical-basal polarity in the conventional epithelia have been shown to regulate podocyte morphogenesis and function. However, little is known about the role of Crumbs, a conserved polarity regulator in many epithelia, for slit-diaphragm formation and podocyte function. In this study, we used Drosophila nephrocytes as model system for mammalian podocytes and identified a conserved function of Crumbs proteins for cellular morphogenesis, nephrocyte diaphragm assembly/maintenance, and endocytosis. Nephrocyte-specific knock-down of Crumbs results in disturbed nephrocyte diaphragm assembly/maintenance and decreased endocytosis, which can be rescued by Drosophila Crumbs as well as human Crumbs2 and Crumbs3, which were both expressed in human podocytes. In contrast to the extracellular domain, which facilitates nephrocyte diaphragm assembly/maintenance, the intracellular FERM-interaction motif of Crumbs is essential for regulating endocytosis. Moreover, Moesin, which binds to the FERM-binding domain of Crumbs, is essential for efficient endocytosis. Thus, we describe here a new mechanism of nephrocyte development and function, which is likely to be conserved in mammalian podocytes.

  4. Proteomic analysis of proton beam irradiated human melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Kedracka-Krok

    Full Text Available Proton beam irradiation is a form of advanced radiotherapy providing superior distributions of a low LET radiation dose relative to that of photon therapy for the treatment of cancer. Even though this clinical treatment has been developing for several decades, the proton radiobiology critical to the optimization of proton radiotherapy is far from being understood. Proteomic changes were analyzed in human melanoma cells treated with a sublethal dose (3 Gy of proton beam irradiation. The results were compared with untreated cells. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed with mass spectrometry to identify the proteins. At the dose of 3 Gy a minimal slowdown in proliferation rate was seen, as well as some DNA damage. After allowing time for damage repair, the proteomic analysis was performed. In total 17 protein levels were found to significantly (more than 1.5 times change: 4 downregulated and 13 upregulated. Functionally, they represent four categories: (i DNA repair and RNA regulation (VCP, MVP, STRAP, FAB-2, Lamine A/C, GAPDH, (ii cell survival and stress response (STRAP, MCM7, Annexin 7, MVP, Caprin-1, PDCD6, VCP, HSP70, (iii cell metabolism (TIM, GAPDH, VCP, and (iv cytoskeleton and motility (Moesin, Actinin 4, FAB-2, Vimentin, Annexin 7, Lamine A/C, Lamine B. A substantial decrease (2.3 x was seen in the level of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the metastatic properties of melanoma.

  5. Advances in basic and clinical immunology in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Javier; Badran, Yousef R; Geha, Raif S; Chou, Janet S; Fried, Ari J

    2017-10-01

    Advances in basic immunology in 2016 included studies that further characterized the role of different proteins in the differentiation of effector T and B cells, including cytokines and proteins involved in the actin cytoskeleton. Regulation of granule formation and secretion in cytotoxic cells was also further described by examining patients with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. The role of prenylation in patients with mevalonate kinase deficiency leading to inflammation has been established. We reviewed advances in clinical immunology, as well as new approaches of whole-genome sequencing and genes newly reported to be associated with immunodeficiency, such as linker of activation of T cells (LAT); B-cell CLL/lymphoma 11B (BCL11B); RGD, leucine-rich repeat, tropomodulin domain, and proline-rich domain-containing protein (RLTPR); moesin; and Janus kinase 1 (JAK1). Trials of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and gene therapy for primary immunodeficiency have had relative success; the use of autologous virus-specific cytotoxic T cells has proved effective as well. New medications are being explored, such as pioglitazone, which is under study for its role in enhancing the oxidative burst in patients with chronic granulomatous disease. Development of vaccines for HIV infection continues to provide insight into the immune response against a virus with an extraordinary mutation rate. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Disruption of the Cdc42/Par6/aPKC or Dlg/Scrib/Lgl Polarity Complex Promotes Epithelial Proliferation via Overlapping Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimizzi, Gregory V; Maher, Meghan T; Loza, Andrew J; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of apical-basal polarity is a defining characteristic and essential feature of functioning epithelia. Apical-basal polarity (ABP) proteins are also tumor suppressors that are targeted for disruption by oncogenic viruses and are commonly mutated in human carcinomas. Disruption of these ABP proteins is an early event in cancer development that results in increased proliferation and epithelial disorganization through means not fully characterized. Using the proliferating Drosophila melanogaster wing disc epithelium, we demonstrate that disruption of the junctional vs. basal polarity complexes results in increased epithelial proliferation via distinct downstream signaling pathways. Disruption of the basal polarity complex results in JNK-dependent proliferation, while disruption of the junctional complex primarily results in p38-dependent proliferation. Surprisingly, the Rho-Rok-Myosin contractility apparatus appears to play opposite roles in the regulation of the proliferative phenotype based on which polarity complex is disrupted. In contrast, non-autonomous Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) signaling appears to suppress the proliferation that results from apical-basal polarity disruption, regardless of which complex is disrupted. Finally we demonstrate that disruption of the junctional polarity complex activates JNK via the Rho-Rok-Myosin contractility apparatus independent of the cortical actin regulator, Moesin.

  7. Prolactin promotes breast cancer cell migration through actin cytoskeleton remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Ludovico da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of prolactin on breast cancer development and progression is debated. Breast cancer progression largely depends on cell movement and on the ability to remodel the actin cytoskeleton. In this process, actin-binding proteins are requested to achieve fibrillar actin de-polymerization and relocation at the cell membrane. Kinases such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK are later required to form actin/vinculin-enriched structures called focal adhesion complexes, which mediate firm adhesion to the extracellular matrix. These controllers are regulated by c-Src, which forms multiprotein signaling complexes with membrane receptors and is regulated by a number of hormones, including prolactin. We here show that breast cancer cells exposed to prolactin display an elevated c-Src expression and phosphorylation. In parallel, increased moesin and FAK expression and phosphorylation are found. These molecular changes are associated to relocation to the plasma membrane of cytoskeletal actin fibers and to increased horizontal cell movement. In conclusion, prolactin regulates actin remodeling and enhances breast cancer cell movement. This finding broadens the understanding of prolactin actions on breast cancer cells, highlighting new pathways that may be relevant to on breast cancer progression.

  8. Manipulation of the Host Cell Membrane during Plasmodium Liver Stage Egress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul-Christian Burda

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A crucial step in the life cycle of Plasmodium parasites is the transition from the liver stage to the blood stage. Hepatocyte-derived merozoites reach the blood vessels of the liver inside host cell-derived vesicles called merosomes. The molecular basis of merosome formation is only partially understood. Here we show that Plasmodium berghei liver stage merozoites, upon rupture of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, destabilize the host cell membrane (HCM and induce separation of the host cell actin cytoskeleton from the HCM. At the same time, the phospholipid and protein composition of the HCM appears to be substantially altered. This includes the loss of a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 reporter and the PIP2-dependent actin-plasma membrane linker ezrin from the HCM. Furthermore, transmembrane domain-containing proteins and palmitoylated and myristoylated proteins, as well as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, lose their HCM localization. Collectively, these findings provide an explanation of HCM destabilization during Plasmodium liver stage egress and thereby contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that lead to merosome formation.

  9. Morphological and Immunohistochemical Characterization of Canine Osteosarcoma Spheroid Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, C; Gabriel, C; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Spheroid cell culture emerges as powerful in vitro tool for experimental tumour research. In this study, we established a scaffold-free three-dimensional spheroid system built from canine osteosarcoma (OS) cells (D17). Spheroids (7, 14 and 19 days of cultivation) and monolayer cultures (2 and 7 days of cultivation) were evaluated and compared on light and electron microscopy. Monolayer and spheroid cultures were tested for vimentin, cytokeratin, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen I by means of immunohistochemistry. The spheroid cell culture exhibited a distinct network of collagen I in particular after 19-day cultivation, whereas in monolayer cultures, collagen I was arranged as a lamellar basal structure. Necrotic centres of large spheroids, as observed in 14- and 19-day cultures, were characterized by significant amounts of osteocalcin. Proliferative activity as determined by Ki-67 immunoreactivity showed an even distribution in two-dimensional cultures. In spheroids, proliferation was predominating in the peripheral areas. Metastasis-associated markers ezrin and S100A4 were shown to be continuously expressed in monolayer and spheroid cultures. We conclude that the scaffold-free spheroid system from canine OS cells has the ability to mimic the architecture of the in vivo tumour, in particular cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. © 2015 The Authors. Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Mouse Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cell Lines retain their phenotypic characteristics after transfection with Human Papilloma Virus: A new tool to further the study of RPE biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanuto, Paola; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Sanchez, Patricia; Salas, Pedro; Hernandez, Eleut; Cousins, Scott W.; Elliot, Sharon J.

    2009-01-01

    Development of immortalized mouse retinal pigmented epithelial cell (RPE) lines that retain many of their in vivo phenotypic characteristics, would aid in studies of ocular diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD). RPE cells were isolated from 16 month old (estrogen receptor knockout) ERKOα and ERKOβ mice and their C57Bl/6 wild type littermates. RPE65 and cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) expression, in vivo markers of RPE cells, were detected by real-time RT-PCR and western analysis. We confirmed the presence of epithelial cell markers, ZO1, cytokeratin 8 and 18 by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, we confirmed the distribution of actin filaments and the expression of ezrin. To develop cell lines, RPE cells were isolated, propagated and immortalized using human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 (E6/E7). RPE-specific markers and morphology were assessed before and after immortalization. In wildtype littermate controls, there was no evidence of any alterations in the parameters that we examined including MMP-2, TIMP-2, collagen type IV, and estrogen receptor (ER) α and ERβ protein expression and ER copy number ratio. Therefore, immortalized mouse RPE cell lines that retain their in vivo phenotype can be isolated from either pharmacologically or genetically manipulated mice, and may be used to study RPE cell biology. PMID:19013153

  11. Tributyltin induces disruption of microfilament in HL7702 cells via MAPK-mediated hyperphosphorylation of VASP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wei-Wei; Ji, Lin-Dan; Qian, Hai-Xia; Zhou, Mi; Zhao, Jin-Shun; Xu, Jin

    2016-11-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) has been widely used for various industrial purposes, and it has toxic effects on multiple organs and tissues. Previous studies have found that TBT could induce cytoskeletal disruption, especially of the actin filaments. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TBT could induce microfilament disruption using HL7702 cells and then to assess for the total levels of various microfilament-associated proteins; finally, the involvement of the MAPK pathway was investigated. The results showed that after TBT treatment, F-actin began to depolymerize and lost its characteristic filamentous structure. The protein levels of Ezrin and Cofilin remained unchanged, the actin-related protein (ARP) 2/3 levels decreased slightly, and the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) decreased dramatically. However, the phosphorylation levels of VASP increased 2.5-fold, and the ratio of phosphorylated-VASP/unphosphorylated-VASP increased 31-fold. The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK and JNK were discovered to be activated. Inhibition of ERK and JNK not only largely diminished the TBT-induced hyperphosphorylation of VASP but also recovered the cellular morphology and rescued the cells from death. In summary, this study demonstrates that TBT-induced disruption of actin filaments is caused by the hyperphosphorylation of VASP through MAPK pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1530-1538, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Trehalose improves cell proliferation and dehydration tolerance of human HaCaT cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kyung Eun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a disaccharide molecule that serves as a natural osmotic regulator in halophilic microorganisms and plants but not in mammals. We observed that human HaCaT cells supplied with trehalose improved cell proliferation and extended viability under dehydration. In HaCaT cells, in response to increasing concentrations of exogenous trehalose, the levels of heat shock protein (HSP 70 increased and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP 1 decreased. Proteome analysis of trehalose-treated HaCaT cells revealed remarkable increases in the levels of proteins involved in cell signaling and the cell cycle, including p21 activated kinase I, Sec I family domain protein and elongation factor G. Moreover, the proteins for cell stress resistance, tryptophan hydroxylase, serine/cysteine proteinase inhibitors and vitamin D receptors were also increased. In addition, the proteins responsible for the maintenance of the cytoskeleton and cellular structures including procollagen-lysine dioxygenase, vinculin and ezrin were increased. Proteomic data revealed that trehalose affected HaCaT cells by inducing the proteins involved in cell proliferation. These results suggest that trehalose improves the proliferation and dehydration tolerance of HaCaT cells by inducing proteins involved in cell growth and dehydration protection.

  13. Cannibalism: a way to feed on metastatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, Stefano

    2007-12-18

    Cannibalism of tumors is an old story for pathologists, but it remained a mystery for at least one century. Recent data highlighted tumor cannibalism as a key advantage in tumor malignancy, possibly involved in resistance of tumors to the specific immune reaction. However, new data suggests also that metastatic tumor cells may use this peculiar function to feed in conditions of low nutrient supply. This makes malignant cancer cells more similar to microorganisms, rather than to normal cells undergoing malignant transformation. In cytological or histological samples of human tumors it is common to detect cells with one or many vacuoles, possibly containing cells under degradation, that push the nucleus to the periphery giving it the shape of a crescent moon. The cannibal cells may feed on sibling tumor cells, but also of the lymphocytes that should kill them. Cannibal cells eat everything without distinguishing between the feeding materials, with a mechanism that mostly differ from typical phagocytosis. Despite such phenomenon is considered mainly non-selective, a molecular framework of factors that contribute to cannibalism has been described. This machinery includes the presence of an acidic environment that allows a continuous activation of specific lytic enzymes, such as cathepsin B. Cannibalism occurs in apparently well defined structures whose main actors are big caveolar-like vacuoles and a connection between caveolin-1 and the actin cytoskeleton through the actin-linker molecule ezrin. Each of the components of the cannibal framework may represent specific tumor targets for future new strategies against cancer.

  14. Lumen Formation Is an Intrinsic Property of Isolated Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Taniguchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that dissociated human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs are intrinsically programmed to form lumens. PSCs form two-cell cysts with a shared apical domain within 20 hr of plating; these cysts collapse to form monolayers after 5 days. Expression of pluripotency markers is maintained throughout this time. In two-cell cysts, an apical domain, marked by EZRIN and atypical PKCζ, is surrounded by apically targeted organelles (early endosomes and Golgi. Molecularly, actin polymerization, regulated by ARP2/3 and mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 (MDIA, promotes lumen formation, whereas actin contraction, mediated by MYOSIN-II, inhibits this process. Finally, we show that lumenal shape can be manipulated in bioengineered micro-wells. Since lumen formation is an indispensable step in early mammalian development, this system can provide a powerful model for investigation of this process in a controlled environment. Overall, our data establish that lumenogenesis is a fundamental cell biological property of human PSCs.

  15. Purification of infectious human herpesvirus 6A virions and association of host cell proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garoff Henrik

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses that are incorporating host cell proteins might trigger autoimmune diseases. It is therefore of interest to identify possible host proteins associated with viruses, especially for enveloped viruses that have been suggested to play a role in autoimmune diseases, like human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A in multiple sclerosis (MS. Results We have established a method for rapid and morphology preserving purification of HHV-6A virions, which in combination with parallel analyses with background control material released from mock-infected cells facilitates qualitative and quantitative investigations of the protein content of HHV-6A virions. In our iodixanol gradient purified preparation, we detected high levels of viral DNA by real-time PCR and viral proteins by metabolic labelling, silver staining and western blots. In contrast, the background level of cellular contamination was low in the purified samples as demonstrated by the silver staining and metabolic labelling analyses. Western blot analyses showed that the cellular complement protein CD46, the receptor for HHV-6A, is associated with the purified and infectious virions. Also, the cellular proteins clathrin, ezrin and Tsg101 are associated with intact HHV-6A virions. Conclusion Cellular proteins are associated with HHV-6A virions. The relevance of the association in disease and especially in autoimmunity will be further investigated.

  16. NHERF1 Between Promises and Hopes: Overview on Cancer and Prospective Openings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Centonze

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1 is a scaffold protein, with two tandem PDZ domains and a carboxyl-terminal ezrin-binding (EB region. This particular sticky structure is responsible for its interaction with different molecules to form multi-complexes that have a pivotal role in a lot of diseases. In particular, its involvement during carcinogenesis and cancer progression has been deeply analyzed in different tumors. The role of NHERF1 is not unique in cancer; its activity is connected to its subcellular localization. The literature data suggest that NHERF1 could be a new prognostic/predictive biomarker from breast cancer to hematological cancers. Furthermore, the high potential of this molecule as therapeutical target in different carcinomas is a new challenge for precision medicine. These evidences are part of a future view to improving patient clinical management, which should allow different tumor phenotypes to be treated with tailored therapies. This article reviews the biology of NHERF1, its engagement in different signal pathways and its involvement in different cancers, with a specific focus on breast cancer. It also considers NHERF1 potential role during inflammation related to most human cancers, designating new perspectives in the study of this “Janus-like” protein.

  17. New trends in the study of podoplanin as a cell morphological regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Sawa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Podoplanin is a mucin-type glycoprotein firstly identified in podocytes, which is homologous to the type I alveolar cell specific T1α-2 antigen and to the oncofetal antigen M2A recognized by the D2-40 antibody. Podoplanin possesses a platelet aggregation-stimulating domain causes the platelet aggregation on cancer cells by the binding activity to CLEC-2. Podoplanin also contributes to the formation of membrane-actin structures. The increased podoplanin expression is found in squamous cell carcinomas at the invasive edge. It has been reported that the podoplanin induces an actin cytoskeleton rearrangement dependent on the RhoA GTPase activation to phosphorylate ezrin and facilitates an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which induces the single cell migration of cancer cells. However, the podoplanin-expressing cancer cells often express E-cadherin and migrate in a collective manner, suggesting that there are podoplanin-induced alternative pathways for the actin cytoskeleton rearrangement independent of the RhoA activation and EMT. The strong expression of podoplanin is present in salivary gland myoepithelial cells, and in enamel epithelia and odontoblasts of the tooth germ for a bell stage. Podoplanin may act as a cell morphological regulator in normal and cancer cells.

  18. Phospholipids as an alternative to direct covalent coupling: surface functionalization of nanoporous alumina for protein recognition and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzara, Thomas D; Behn, Daniela; Kliesch, Torben-Tobias; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2012-01-15

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with aligned, cylindrical, non-intersecting pores with diameters of 75 nm and depths of 3.5 or 10 μm were functionalized with lipid monolayers harboring different receptor lipids. AAO was first functionalized with dodecyl-trichlorosilane, followed by fusion of small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) forming a lipid monolayer. The SUVs' lipid composition was transferred onto the AAO surface, allowing us to control the surface receptor density. Owing to the optical transparency of the AAO, the overall vesicle spreading process and subsequent protein binding to the receptor-doped lipid monolayers could be investigated in situ by optical waveguide spectroscopy (OWS). SUV spreading occurred at the pore-rim interface, followed by lateral diffusion of lipids within the pore-interior surface until homogeneous coverage was achieved with a lipid monolayer. The functionality of the system was demonstrated through streptavidin binding onto a biotin-DOPE containing POPC membrane, showing maximum protein coverage at 10 mol% of biotin-DOPE. The system enabled us to monitor in real-time the selective extraction of two histidine-tagged proteins, PIGEA14 (14 kDa) and ezrin (70 kDa), directly from cell lysate solutions using a DOGS-NTA(Ni)/DOPC (1:9) membrane. The purification process including protein binding and elution was monitored by OWS and confirmed by SDS-PAGE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ZO-1 and ZO-2 are required for extra-embryonic endoderm integrity, primitive ectoderm survival and normal cavitation in embryoid bodies derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic C Y Phua

    Full Text Available The Zonula Occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 are cell-cell junction-associated adaptor proteins that are essential for the structural and regulatory functions of tight junctions in epithelial cells and their absence leads to early embryonic lethality in mouse models. Here, we use the embryoid body, an in vitro peri-implantation mouse embryogenesis model, to elucidate and dissect the roles ZO-1 and ZO-2 play in epithelial morphogenesis and de novo tight junction assembly. Through the generation of individual or combined ZO-1 and ZO-2 null embryoid bodies, we show that their dual deletion prevents tight junction formation, resulting in the disorganization and compromised barrier function of embryoid body epithelial layers. The disorganization is associated with poor microvilli development, fragmented basement membrane deposition and impaired cavity formation, all of which are key epithelial tissue morphogenetic processes. Expression of Podocalyxin, which positively regulates the formation of microvilli and the apical membrane, is repressed in embryoid bodies lacking both ZO-1 and ZO-2 and this correlates with an aberrant submembranous localization of Ezrin. The null embryoid bodies thus give an insight into how the two ZO proteins influence early mouse embryogenesis and possible mechanisms underlying the embryonic lethal phenotype.

  20. Cardiac Autoantibodies from Patients Affected by a New Variant of Endemic Pemphigus Foliaceus in Colombia, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Michael S.; Jiao, Zhe; Gao, Weiqing; Yi, Hong; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Duque-Ramírez, Mauricio; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Several patients affected by a new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus in El Bagre, Colombia (El Bagre-EPF) have experienced a sudden death syndrome, including persons below the age of 50. El Bagre-EPF patients share several autoantigens with paraneoplastic pemphigus patients, such as reactivity to plakins. Further, paraneoplastic pemphigus patients have autoantibodies to the heart. Therefore, we tested 15 El Bagre-EPF patients and 15 controls from the endemic area for autoreactivity to heart tissue using direct and indirect immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and immunoelectron microscopy utilizing heart extracts as antigens. We found that 7 of 15 El Bagre patients exhibited a polyclonal immune response to several cell junctions of the heart, often colocalizing with known markers. These colocalizing markers included those for the area composita of the heart, such as anti-desmoplakins I and II; markers for gap junctions, such as connexin 43; markers for tight junctions, such as ezrin and junctional adhesion molecule A; and adherens junctions, such pan-cadherin. We also detected colocalization of the patient antibodies within blood vessels, Purkinje fibers, and cardiac sarcomeres. We conclude that El Bagre-EPF patients display autoreactivity to multiple cardiac epitopes, that this disease may resemble what is found in patients with rheumatic carditis, and further, that the cardiac pathophysiology of this disorder warrants further evaluation. PMID:21796504

  1. New insights into potential functions for the protein 4.1superfamily of proteins in kidney epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calinisan, Venice; Gravem, Dana; Chen, Ray Ping-Hsu; Brittin,Sachi; Mohandas, Narla; Lecomte, Marie-Christine; Gascard, Philippe

    2005-06-17

    Members of the protein 4.1 family of adapter proteins are expressed in a broad panel of tissues including various epithelia where they likely play an important role in maintenance of cell architecture and polarity and in control of cell proliferation. We have recently characterized the structure and distribution of three members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1B, 4.1R and 4.1N, in mouse kidney. We describe here binding partners for renal 4.1 proteins, identified through the screening of a rat kidney yeast two-hybrid system cDNA library. The identification of putative protein 4.1-based complexes enables us to envision potential functions for 4.1 proteins in kidney: organization of signaling complexes, response to osmotic stress, protein trafficking, and control of cell proliferation. We discuss the relevance of these protein 4.1-based interactions in kidney physio-pathology in the context of their previously identified functions in other cells and tissues. Specifically, we will focus on renal 4.1 protein interactions with beta amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP), 14-3-3 proteins, and the cell swelling-activated chloride channel pICln. We also discuss the functional relevance of another member of the protein 4.1 superfamily, ezrin, in kidney physiopathology.

  2. [Multiplexing mapping of human cDNAs]. Final report, September 1, 1991--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    Using PCR with automated product analysis, 329 human brain cDNA sequences have been assigned to individual human chromosomes. Primers were designed from single-pass cDNA sequences expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Primers were used in PCR reactions with DNA from somatic cell hybrid mapping panels as templates, often with multiplexing. Many ESTs mapped match sequence database records. To evaluate of these matches, the position of the primers relative to the matching region (In), the BLAST scores and the Poisson probability values of the EST/sequence record match were determined. In cases where the gene product was stringently identified by the sequence match had already been mapped, the gene locus determined by EST was consistent with the previous position which strongly supports the validity of assigning unknown genes to human chromosomes based on the EST sequence matches. In the present cases mapping the ESTs to a chromosome can also be considered to have mapped the known gene product: rolipram-sensitive cAMP phosphodiesterase, chromosome 1; protein phosphatase 2A{beta}, chromosome 4; alpha-catenin, chromosome 5; the ELE1 oncogene, chromosome 10q11.2 or q2.1-q23; MXII protein, chromosome l0q24-qter; ribosomal protein L18a homologue, chromosome 14; ribosomal protein L3, chromosome 17; and moesin, Xp11-cen. There were also ESTs mapped that were closely related to non-human sequence records. These matches therefore can be considered to identify human counterparts of known gene products, or members of known gene families. Examples of these include membrane proteins, translation-associated proteins, structural proteins, and enzymes. These data then demonstrate that single pass sequence information is sufficient to design PCR primers useful for assigning cDNA sequences to human chromosomes. When the EST sequence matches previous sequence database records, the chromosome assignments of the EST can be used to make preliminary assignments of the human gene to a chromosome.

  3. Dynamics and molecular determinants of cytoplasmic lipid droplet clustering and dispersion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Orlicky

    Full Text Available Perilipin-1 (Plin1, a prominent cytoplasmic lipid droplet (CLD binding phosphoprotein and key physiological regulator of triglyceride storage and lipolysis in adipocytes, is thought to regulate the fragmentation and dispersion of CLD that occurs in response to β-adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase. Here we investigate the dynamics and molecular determinants of these processes using cell lines stably expressing recombinant forms of Plin1 and/or other members of the perilipin family. Plin1 and a C-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1 (Plin1CT induced formation of single dense CLD clusters near the microtubule organizing center, whereas neither an N-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1, nor Plin2 or Plin3 induced clustering. Clustered CLD coated by Plin1, or Plin1CT, dispersed in response to isoproterenol, or other agents that activate adenylate cyclase, in a process inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, and blocked by microtubule disruption. Isoproterenol-stimulated phosphorylation of CLD-associated Plin1 on serine 492 preceded their dispersion, and live cell imaging showed that cluster dispersion involved initial fragmentation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, which then fragmented into well-dispersed individual CLD. siRNA knockdown of the cortical actin binding protein, moesin, induced disaggregation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, and inhibited the reaggregation of dispersed CLD into tight clusters. Together these data suggest that the clustering and dispersion processes involve a complex orchestration of phosphorylation-dependent, microtubule-dependent and independent, and microfilament dependent steps.

  4. Dynamics and molecular determinants of cytoplasmic lipid droplet clustering and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlicky, David J; Monks, Jenifer; Stefanski, Adrianne L; McManaman, James L

    2013-01-01

    Perilipin-1 (Plin1), a prominent cytoplasmic lipid droplet (CLD) binding phosphoprotein and key physiological regulator of triglyceride storage and lipolysis in adipocytes, is thought to regulate the fragmentation and dispersion of CLD that occurs in response to β-adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase. Here we investigate the dynamics and molecular determinants of these processes using cell lines stably expressing recombinant forms of Plin1 and/or other members of the perilipin family. Plin1 and a C-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1 (Plin1CT) induced formation of single dense CLD clusters near the microtubule organizing center, whereas neither an N-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1, nor Plin2 or Plin3 induced clustering. Clustered CLD coated by Plin1, or Plin1CT, dispersed in response to isoproterenol, or other agents that activate adenylate cyclase, in a process inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, and blocked by microtubule disruption. Isoproterenol-stimulated phosphorylation of CLD-associated Plin1 on serine 492 preceded their dispersion, and live cell imaging showed that cluster dispersion involved initial fragmentation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, which then fragmented into well-dispersed individual CLD. siRNA knockdown of the cortical actin binding protein, moesin, induced disaggregation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, and inhibited the reaggregation of dispersed CLD into tight clusters. Together these data suggest that the clustering and dispersion processes involve a complex orchestration of phosphorylation-dependent, microtubule-dependent and independent, and microfilament dependent steps.

  5. Reconstruction and signal propagation analysis of the Syk signaling network in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Naldi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to build in-depth cell signaling networks from vast experimental data is a key objective of computational biology. The spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk protein, a well-characterized key player in immune cell signaling, was surprisingly first shown by our group to exhibit an onco-suppressive function in mammary epithelial cells and corroborated by many other studies, but the molecular mechanisms of this function remain largely unsolved. Based on existing proteomic data, we report here the generation of an interaction-based network of signaling pathways controlled by Syk in breast cancer cells. Pathway enrichment of the Syk targets previously identified by quantitative phospho-proteomics indicated that Syk is engaged in cell adhesion, motility, growth and death. Using the components and interactions of these pathways, we bootstrapped the reconstruction of a comprehensive network covering Syk signaling in breast cancer cells. To generate in silico hypotheses on Syk signaling propagation, we developed a method allowing to rank paths between Syk and its targets. We first annotated the network according to experimental datasets. We then combined shortest path computation with random walk processes to estimate the importance of individual interactions and selected biologically relevant pathways in the network. Molecular and cell biology experiments allowed to distinguish candidate mechanisms that underlie the impact of Syk on the regulation of cortactin and ezrin, both involved in actin-mediated cell adhesion and motility. The Syk network was further completed with the results of our biological validation experiments. The resulting Syk signaling sub-networks can be explored via an online visualization platform.

  6. Several adaptor proteins promote intracellular localisation of the transporter MRP4/ABCC4 in platelets and haematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaletzki, Yvonne; Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Bröderdorf, Susanne; Hammer, Elke; Grube, Markus; Hagen, Paul; Sucic, Sonja; Freissmuth, Michael; Völker, Uwe; Greinacher, Andreas; Rauch, Bernhard H; Kroemer, Heyo K; Jedlitschky, Gabriele

    2017-01-05

    The multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) has been identified as an important transporter for signalling molecules including cyclic nucleotides and several lipid mediators in platelets and may thus represent a novel target to interfere with platelet function. Besides its localisation in the plasma membrane, MRP4 has been also detected in the membrane of dense granules in resting platelets. In polarised cells it is localised at the basolateral or apical plasma membrane. To date, the mechanism of MRP4 trafficking has not been elucidated; protein interactions may regulate both the localisation and function of this transporter. We approached this issue by searching for interacting proteins by in vitro binding assays, followed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry, and by visualising their co-localisation in platelets and haematopoietic cells. We identified the PDZ domain containing scaffold proteins ezrin-binding protein 50 (EBP50/NHERF1), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), and sorting nexin 27 (SNX27), but also the adaptor protein complex 3 subunit β3A (AP3B1) and the heat shock protein HSP90 as putative interaction partners of MRP4. The knock-down of SNX27, PSD95, and AP3B1 by siRNA in megakaryoblastic leukaemia cells led to a redistribution of MRP4 from intracellular structures to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of HSP90 led to a diminished expression and retention of MRP4 in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that MRP4 localisation and function are regulated by multiple protein interactions. Changes in the adaptor proteins can hence lead to altered localisation and function of the transporter.

  7. Alterations of proteins in MDCK cells during acute potassium deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerapen, Paleerath; Ausakunpipat, Nardtaya; Chanchaem, Prangwalai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Chronic K(+) deficiency can cause hypokalemic nephropathy associated with metabolic alkalosis, polyuria, tubular dilatation, and tubulointerstitial injury. However, effects of acute K(+) deficiency on the kidney remained unclear. This study aimed to explore such effects by evaluating changes in levels of proteins in renal tubular cells during acute K(+) deficiency. MDCK cells were cultivated in normal K(+) (NK) (K(+)=5.3 mM), low K(+) (LK) (K(+)=2.5 mM), or K(+) depleted (KD) (K(+)=0 mM) medium for 24 h and then harvested. Cellular proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby staining (5 gels per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed a total 48 protein spots that had significantly differential levels among the three groups. Among these, 46 and 30 protein spots had differential levels in KD group compared to NK and LK groups, respectively. Comparison between LK and NK groups revealed only 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed. All of these differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), ezrin, lamin A/C, tubulin, chaperonin-containing TCP1 (CCT1), and calpain 1 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Global protein network analysis showed three main functional networks, including 1) cell growth and proliferation, 2) cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization, and 3) protein folding in which the altered proteins were involved. Further investigations on these networks may lead to better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of low K(+)-induced renal injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Ameliorates Intrahepatic Cholestasis Independent of Biliary Bicarbonate Secretion in Vil2kd/kd Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Ryo; Kawaguchi, Kotoku; Togashi, Fumitaka; Sugata, Masato; Masuda, Shizuka; Asano, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is a hydrophilic bile acid that possesses many pharmacological effects, including increasing bile flow, changing the hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool, and modulation of the immune response. UDCA has been approved for treating cholestatic liver disease, such as primary biliary cholangitis. However, several unanticipated severe side effects of UDCA are observed in cholestatic patients, and its pharmacological benefits remain controversial. We reported that ezrin-knockdown (Vil2 kd/kd ) mice exhibited severe hepatic injury because of a functional disorder in bile duct fluidity and alkalinity regulation, resembling human intrahepatic cholestatic disease. Here we used Vil2 kd/kd mice as a cholestatic model to investigate the pharmacological effects of UDCA. We investigated the effects of oral and parenteral administration of UDCA on Vil2 kd/kd mice. In Vil2 kd/kd mice, fed a 0.5% (w/w) UDCA diet for 3 weeks, hepatic injury was exacerbated, although oral administration of a lower dose of UDCA slightly improved hepatic function in Vil2 kd/kd mice. On the other hand, intraperitoneal administration of UDCA (50 mg/kg/d) ameliorated hepatic function and markedly reduced periductal fibrosis and cholangiocyte proliferation in Vil2 kd/kd mice although biliary pH and HCO 3 - concentration were not improved. The expression levels of inflammatory and profibrotic genes were also significantly decreased in these mice. Furthermore, UDCA prevented cholangiocytes from hydrophobic bile acid-induced cytotoxicity independent of extracellular pH in in vitro experiments. These results suggest that an appropriate dosage of UDCA can ameliorate the intrahepatic cholestasis in Vil2 kd/kd mice without changing the biliary bicarbonate secretion.

  9. Protein kinase C zeta suppresses low- or high-grade colorectal cancer (CRC) phenotypes by interphase centrosome anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Ravi Kiran; Javadi, Arman; McClements, Jane; Vohhodina, Jekaterina; Savage, Kienan; Loughrey, Maurice Bernard; Evergren, Emma; Campbell, Frederick Charles

    2018-04-01

    Histological grading provides prognostic stratification of colorectal cancer (CRC) by scoring heterogeneous phenotypes. Features of aggressiveness include aberrant mitotic spindle configurations, chromosomal breakage, and bizarre multicellular morphology, but pathobiology is poorly understood. Protein kinase C zeta (PKCz) controls mitotic spindle dynamics, chromosome segregation, and multicellular patterns, but its role in CRC phenotype evolution remains unclear. Here, we show that PKCz couples genome segregation to multicellular morphology through control of interphase centrosome anchoring. PKCz regulates interdependent processes that control centrosome positioning. Among these, interaction between the cytoskeletal linker protein ezrin and its binding partner NHERF1 promotes the formation of a localized cue for anchoring interphase centrosomes to the cell cortex. Perturbation of these phenomena induced different outcomes in cells with single or extra centrosomes. Defective anchoring of a single centrosome promoted bipolar spindle misorientation, multi-lumen formation, and aberrant epithelial stratification. Collectively, these disturbances induce cribriform multicellular morphology that is typical of some categories of low-grade CRC. By contrast, defective anchoring of extra centrosomes promoted multipolar spindle formation, chromosomal instability (CIN), disruption of glandular morphology, and cell outgrowth across the extracellular matrix interface characteristic of aggressive, high-grade CRC. Because PKCz enhances apical NHERF1 intensity in 3D epithelial cultures, we used an immunohistochemical (IHC) assay of apical NHERF1 intensity as an indirect readout of PKCz activity in translational studies. We show that apical NHERF1 IHC intensity is inversely associated with multipolar spindle frequency and high-grade morphology in formalin-fixed human CRC samples. To conclude, defective PKCz control of interphase centrosome anchoring may underlie distinct categories of

  10. Crizotinib-Resistant ROS1 Mutations Reveal a Predictive Kinase Inhibitor Sensitivity Model for ROS1- and ALK-Rearranged Lung Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, Francesco; Loriot, Yohann; Kuo, Mei-Shiue; Mahjoubi, Linda; Lacroix, Ludovic; Planchard, David; Besse, Benjamin; Farace, Françoise; Auger, Nathalie; Remon, Jordi; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; André, Fabrice; Soria, Jean-Charles; Friboulet, Luc

    2016-12-15

    The identification of molecular mechanisms conferring resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is a key step to improve therapeutic results for patients with oncogene addiction. Several alterations leading to EGFR and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) resistance to TKI therapy have been described in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Only two mutations in the ROS1 kinase domain responsible for crizotinib resistance have been described in patients thus far. A patient suffering from a metastatic NSCLC harboring an ezrin (EZR)-ROS1 fusion gene developed acquired resistance to the ALK/ROS1 inhibitor crizotinib. Molecular analysis (whole-exome sequencing, CGH) and functional studies were undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of resistance. Based on this case, we took advantage of the structural homology of ROS1 and ALK to build a predictive model for drug sensitivity regarding future ROS1 mutations. Sequencing revealed a dual mutation, S1986Y and S1986F, in the ROS1 kinase domain. Functional in vitro studies demonstrated that ROS1 harboring either the S1986Y or the S1986F mutation, while conferring resistance to crizotinib and ceritinib, was inhibited by lorlatinib (PF-06463922). The patient's clinical response confirmed the potency of lorlatinib against S1986Y/F mutations. The ROS1 S1986Y/F and ALK C1156Y mutations are homologous and displayed similar sensitivity patterns to ALK/ROS1 TKIs. We extended this analogy to build a model predicting TKI efficacy against potential ROS1 mutations. Clinical evidence, in vitro validation, and homology-based prediction provide guidance for treatment decision making for patients with ROS1-rearranged NSCLC who progressed on crizotinib. Clin Cancer Res; 22(24); 5983-91. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Canine osteosarcoma: a naturally occurring disease to inform pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenger, Joelle M; London, Cheryl A; Kisseberth, William C

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common form of malignant bone cancer in children and dogs, although the disease occurs in dogs approximately 10 times more frequently than in people. Multidrug chemotherapy and aggressive surgical techniques have improved survival; however, new therapies for OSA are critical, as little improvement in survival times has been achieved in either dogs or people over the past 15 years, even with significant efforts directed at the incorporation of novel therapeutic approaches. Both clinical and molecular evidence suggests that human and canine OSA share many key features, including tumor location, presence of microscopic metastatic disease at diagnosis, development of chemotherapy-resistant metastases, and altered expression/activation of several proteins (e.g. Met, ezrin, phosphatase and tensin homolog, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3), and p53 mutations, among others. Additionally, canine and pediatric OSA exhibit overlapping transcriptional profiles and shared DNA copy number aberrations, supporting the notion that these diseases are similar at the molecular level. This review will discuss the similarities between pediatric and canine OSA with regard to histology, biologic behavior, and molecular genetic alterations that indicate canine OSA is a relevant, spontaneous, large animal model of the pediatric disease and outline how the study of naturally occurring OSA in dogs will offer additional insights into the biology and future treatment of this disease in both children and dogs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Cooperativity of CD44 and CD49d in leukemia cell homing, migration, and survival offers a means for therapeutic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vibuthi; Erb, Ulrike; Zöller, Margot

    2013-11-15

    A CD44 blockade drives leukemic cells into differentiation and apoptosis by dislodging from the osteogenic niche. Because anti-CD49d also supports hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, we sought to determine the therapeutic efficacy of a joint CD49d/CD44 blockade. To unravel the underlying mechanism, the CD49d(-) EL4 lymphoma was transfected with CD49d or point-mutated CD49d, prohibiting phosphorylation and FAK binding; additionally, a CD44(-) Jurkat subline was transfected with murine CD44, CD44 with a point mutation in the ezrin binding site, or with cytoplasmic tail-truncated CD44. Parental and transfected EL4 and Jurkat cells were evaluated for adhesion, migration, and apoptosis susceptibility in vitro and in vivo. Ligand-binding and Ab-blocking studies revealed CD44-CD49d cooperation in vitro and in vivo in adhesion, migration, and apoptosis resistance. The cooperation depends on ligand-induced proximity such that both CD44 and CD49d get access to src, FAK, and paxillin and via lck to the MAPK pathway, with the latter also supporting antiapoptotic molecule liberation. Accordingly, synergisms were only seen in leukemia cells expressing wild-type CD44 and CD49d. Anti-CD44 together with anti-CD49d efficiently dislodged EL4-CD49d/Jurkat-CD44 in bone marrow and spleen. Dislodging was accompanied by increased apoptosis susceptibility that strengthened low-dose chemotherapy, the combined treatment most strongly interfering with metastatic settlement and being partly curative. Ab treatment also promoted NK and Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activation, which affected leukemia cells independent of CD44/CD49d tail mutations. Thus, mostly owing to a blockade of joint signaling, anti-CD44 and anti-CD49d hamper leukemic cell settlement and break apoptosis resistance, which strongly supports low-dose chemotherapy.

  13. Antibody-validated proteins in inflamed islets of fulminant type 1 diabetes profiled by laser-capture microdissection followed by mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoriko Nishida

    Full Text Available There are no reports of proteomic analyses of inflamed islets in type 1 diabetes.Proteins expressed in the islets of enterovirus-associated fulminant type 1 diabetes (FT1DM with extensive insulitis were identified by laser-capture microdissection mass spectrometry using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded pancreatic tissues.Thirty-eight proteins were identified solely in FT1DM islets, most of which have not been previously linked to type 1 diabetes. Five protein-protein interacting clusters were identified, and the cellular localization of selected proteins was validated immunohistochemically. Migratory activity-related proteins, including plastin-2 (LCP1, moesin (MSN, lamin-B1 (LMNB1, Ras GTPase-activating-like protein (IQGAP1 and others, were identified in CD8+ T cells and CD68+ macrophages infiltrated to inflamed FT1DM islets. Proteins involved in successive signaling in innate/adaptive immunity were identified, including SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1, Ras GTPase-activating-like protein (IQGAP1, proteasome activator complex subunit 1 (PSME1, HLA class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA-C, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-alpha/beta (STAT1. Angiogenic (thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP and anti-angiogenic (tryptophan-tRNA ligase (WARS factors were identified in migrating CD8+ T cells and CD68+ macrophages. Proteins related to virus replication and cell proliferation, including probable ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box helicase 5 (DDX5 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H (HNRNPH1, were identified. The anti-apoptotic protein T-complex protein 1 subunit epsilon (CCT5, the anti-oxidative enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PDG, and the anti-viral and anti-apoptotic proteins serpin B6 (SERPINB6 and heat shock 70 kDa protein1-like (HSPA1L, were identified in FT1DM-affected islet cells.The identified FT1DM-characterizing proteins include those involved in aggressive beta cell destruction through

  14. Evolutionary conservation of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 primary structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schapira Marc

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 plays a critical role in recruiting leukocytes in inflammatory lesions by mediating leukocyte rolling on selectins. Core-2 O-glycosylation of a N-terminal threonine and sulfation of at least one tyrosine residue of PSGL-1 are required for L- and P-selectin binding. Little information is available on the intra- and inter-species evolution of PSGL-1 primary structure. In addition, the evolutionary conservation of selectin binding site on PSGL-1 has not been previously examined in detail. Therefore, we performed multiple sequence alignment of PSGL-1 amino acid sequences of 14 mammals (human, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, bovine, pig, rat, tree-shrew, bushbaby, mouse, bat, horse, cat, sheep and dog and examined mammalian PSGL-1 interactions with human selectins. Results A signal peptide was predicted in each sequence and a propeptide cleavage site was found in 9/14 species. PSGL-1 N-terminus is poorly conserved. However, each species exhibits at least one tyrosine sulfation site and, except in horse and dog, a T [D/E]PP [D/E] motif associated to the core-2 O-glycosylation of a N-terminal threonine. A mucin-like domain of 250–280 amino acids long was disclosed in all studied species. It lies between the conserved N-terminal O-glycosylated threonine (Thr-57 in human and the transmembrane domain, and contains a central region exhibiting a variable number of decameric repeats (DR. Interspecies and intraspecies polymorphisms were observed. Transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences are well conserved. The moesin binding residues that serve as adaptor between PSGL-1 and Syk, and are involved in regulating PSGL-1-dependent rolling on P-selectin are perfectly conserved in all analyzed mammalian sequences. Despite a poor conservation of PSGL-1 N-terminal sequence, CHO cells co-expressing human glycosyltransferases and human, bovine, pig or rat PSGL-1 efficiently rolled on human L- or P

  15. Protein Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) in Calpain-dependent Feedback Regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor (VEGFR2) in Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixuan; Li, Qiang; Youn, Ji Youn; Cai, Hua

    2017-01-01

    The VEGF/VEGFR2/Akt/eNOS/NO pathway is essential to VEGF-induced angiogenesis. We have previously discovered a novel role of calpain in mediating VEGF-induced PI3K/AMPK/Akt/eNOS activation through Ezrin. Here, we sought to identify possible feedback regulation of VEGFR2 by calpain via its substrate protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and the relevance of this pathway to VEGF-induced angiogenesis, especially in diabetic wound healing. Overexpression of PTP1B inhibited VEGF-induced VEGFR2 and Akt phosphorylation in bovine aortic endothelial cells, while PTP1B siRNA increased both, implicating negative regulation of VEGFR2 by PTP1B. Calpain inhibitor ALLN induced VEGFR2 activation, which can be completely blocked by PTP1B overexpression. Calpain activation induced by overexpression or Ca/A23187 resulted in PTP1B cleavage, which can be blocked by ALLN. Moreover, calpain activation inhibited VEGF-induced VEGFR2 phosphorylation, which can be restored by PTP1B siRNA. These data implicate calpain/PTP1B negative feedback regulation of VEGFR2, in addition to the primary signaling pathway of VEGF/VEGFR2/calpain/PI3K/AMPK/Akt/eNOS. We next examined a potential role of PTP1B in VEGF-induced angiogenesis. Endothelial cells transfected with PTP1B siRNA showed faster wound closure in response to VEGF. Aortic discs isolated from PTP1B siRNA-transfected mice also had augmented endothelial outgrowth. Importantly, PTP1B inhibition and/or calpain overexpression significantly accelerated wound healing in STZ-induced diabetic mice. In conclusion, our data for the first time demonstrate a calpain/PTP1B/VEGFR2 negative feedback loop in the regulation of VEGF-induced angiogenesis. Modulation of local PTP1B and/or calpain activities may prove beneficial in the treatment of impaired wound healing in diabetes. PMID:27872190

  16. Protein Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) in Calpain-dependent Feedback Regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor (VEGFR2) in Endothelial Cells: IMPLICATIONS IN VEGF-DEPENDENT ANGIOGENESIS AND DIABETIC WOUND HEALING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixuan; Li, Qiang; Youn, Ji Youn; Cai, Hua

    2017-01-13

    The VEGF/VEGFR2/Akt/eNOS/NO pathway is essential to VEGF-induced angiogenesis. We have previously discovered a novel role of calpain in mediating VEGF-induced PI3K/AMPK/Akt/eNOS activation through Ezrin. Here, we sought to identify possible feedback regulation of VEGFR2 by calpain via its substrate protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and the relevance of this pathway to VEGF-induced angiogenesis, especially in diabetic wound healing. Overexpression of PTP1B inhibited VEGF-induced VEGFR2 and Akt phosphorylation in bovine aortic endothelial cells, while PTP1B siRNA increased both, implicating negative regulation of VEGFR2 by PTP1B. Calpain inhibitor ALLN induced VEGFR2 activation, which can be completely blocked by PTP1B overexpression. Calpain activation induced by overexpression or Ca/A23187 resulted in PTP1B cleavage, which can be blocked by ALLN. Moreover, calpain activation inhibited VEGF-induced VEGFR2 phosphorylation, which can be restored by PTP1B siRNA. These data implicate calpain/PTP1B negative feedback regulation of VEGFR2, in addition to the primary signaling pathway of VEGF/VEGFR2/calpain/PI3K/AMPK/Akt/eNOS. We next examined a potential role of PTP1B in VEGF-induced angiogenesis. Endothelial cells transfected with PTP1B siRNA showed faster wound closure in response to VEGF. Aortic discs isolated from PTP1B siRNA-transfected mice also had augmented endothelial outgrowth. Importantly, PTP1B inhibition and/or calpain overexpression significantly accelerated wound healing in STZ-induced diabetic mice. In conclusion, our data for the first time demonstrate a calpain/PTP1B/VEGFR2 negative feedback loop in the regulation of VEGF-induced angiogenesis. Modulation of local PTP1B and/or calpain activities may prove beneficial in the treatment of impaired wound healing in diabetes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. The clinicopathological factors that determine a local recurrence of rectal cancers that have been treated with surgery and chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chul Won; Kim, Mi Sook; Kim, Min Suk

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the pathological prognostic factors related to local recurrence after radical surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy in advanced rectal cancer. Fifty-four patients with advanced rectal cancer who were treated with radiation surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy between February 1993 and December 2001 were enrolled in this study. Among these patients, 14 patients experienced local recurrence. Tissue specimens of the patient were obtained to determine pathologic parameters such as histological grade, depth of invasion, venous invasion, lymphatic invasion, neural invasion and immuno histopathological analysis for expression of p53, Ki-67 c-erb, ezrin, c-met, phosphorylated S6 kinase, S100A4, and HIF-1 alpha. The correlation of these parameters with the tumor response to radiotherapy was statistically analyzed using the chi-square test, multivariate analysis, and the hierarchical clustering method. In univariate analysis, the histological tumor grade, venous invasion, invasion depth of the tumor and the over expression of c-met and HIF-1 alpha were accompanied with radioresistance that was found to be statistically significant. In multivariate analysis, venous invasion, invasion depth of tumor and over expression of c-met were also accompanied with radioresistance that was found to be statistically significant. By analysis with hierarchical clustering, the invasion depth of the tumor, and the over expression of c-met and HIF-1 alpha were factors found to be related to local recurrence. Whereas 71.4% of patients with local recurrence had 2 or more these factors, only 27.5% of patients without local recurrence had 2 or more of these factors. In advanced rectal cancer patients treated by radical surgery and adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy, the poor prognostic factors found to be related to local recurrence were HIF-1 alpha positive, c-met positive, and an invasion depth more than 5.5 mm. A prospective study is necessary to confirm whether

  18. Changes in cortical cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix gene expression in prostate cancer are related to oncogenic ERG deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Wolfgang A; Ingenwerth, Marc; Djuidje, Carolle E; Hader, Christiane; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Engers, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The cortical cytoskeleton network connects the actin cytoskeleton to various membrane proteins, influencing cell adhesion, polarity, migration and response to extracellular signals. Previous studies have suggested changes in the expression of specific components in prostate cancer, especially of 4.1 proteins (encoded by EPB41 genes) which form nodes in this network. Expression of EPB41L1, EPB41L2, EPB41L3 (protein: 4.1B), EPB41L4B (EHM2), EPB41L5, EPB49 (dematin), VIL2 (ezrin), and DLG1 (summarized as „cortical cytoskeleton' genes) as well as ERG was measured by quantitative RT-PCR in a well-characterized set of 45 M0 prostate adenocarcinoma and 13 benign tissues. Hypermethylation of EPB41L3 and GSTP1 was compared in 93 cancer tissues by methylation-specific PCR. Expression of 4.1B was further studied by immunohistochemistry. EPB41L1 and EPB41L3 were significantly downregulated and EPB41L4B was upregulated in cancer tissues. Low EPB41L1 or high EPB41L4B expression were associated with earlier biochemical recurrence. None of the other cortical cytoskeleton genes displayed expression changes, in particular EPB49 and VIL2, despite hints from previous studies. EPB41L3 downregulation was significantly associated with hypermethylation of its promoter and strongly correlated with GSTP1 hypermethylation. Protein 4.1B was detected most strongly in the basal cells of normal prostate epithelia. Its expression in carcinoma cells was similar to the weaker one in normal luminal cells. EPB41L3 downregulation and EPB41L4B upregulation were essentially restricted to the 22 cases with ERG overexpression. Expression changes in EPB41L3 and EPB41L4B closely paralleled those previously observed for the extracellular matrix genes FBLN1 and SPOCK1, respectively. Specific changes in the cortical cytoskeleton were observed during prostate cancer progression. They parallel changes in the expression of extracellular matrix components and all together appear to be associated with

  19. Podocyte changes upon induction of albuminuria in Thy-1.1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Bart; Dijkman, Henry B P M; te Loeke, Nathalie A J M; van Son, Jacco P H F; Steenbergen, Eric J; Assmann, Karel J M; Wetzels, Jack F M; Groenen, Patricia J T A

    2003-12-01

    Thy-1.1 transgenic mice, characterized by ectopic expression of the Thy-1.1 protein on podocytes, spontaneously develop proteinuria and focal glomerulosclerosis (FGS). Injection of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against the Thy-1.1 protein in young transgenic mice induces a massive albuminuria that is followed by an accelerated FGS within 3 weeks. This albuminuria is complement and leukocyte independent. The time course of proteinuria, the pathogenesis of the acute proteinuria and the dose dependency of FGS are unknown. Albuminuria was measured in Thy-1.1 transgenic mice after injection of different doses of anti-Thy-1.1 mAb and at different time points within the first 24 h after injection. Podocytic foot processes and slit pore diameter were quantitated by electron microscopy. Changes in expression of slit pore constituents (podocin, CD2AP, nephrin and ZO-1), cytoskeleton-associated proteins (actin, alpha-actinin, ezrin and synaptopodin), the GDH-podocyte adhesion molecules alpha(3)-integrin, and heparan sulfate were studied by immunofluorescence. FGS was scored by light microscopy at 3 weeks after induction of albuminuria. Albuminuria in Thy-1.1 transgenic mice was observed within 10 min after anti-Thy-1.1 mAb injection. This rapid development of albuminuria was accompanied by a reduction in number of podocytic foot processes from 20.0 +/- 0.7/10 microm glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in saline-treated transgenic mice to 8.0 +/- 0.5 and 2.2 +/- 0.2 in anti-Thy-1.1-treated mice, at 10 min and 8 h after treatment, respectively. In addition, we observed a significant decrease in width of remaining slit pores, from 32.7 +/- 1.1 to 26.8 +/- 1.4 nm at 10 min after mAb injection. By immunofluorescence, we did not observe major changes in the expression pattern of any of the proteins studied. There was no correlation between the injected dose of the anti-Thy-1.1 mAb and the acute albuminuria. In contrast, the percentage of FGS at 3 weeks correlated with the