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Sample records for extractable soil phosphorus

  1. Assessment of bioavailable organic phosphorus in tropical forest soils by organic acid extraction and phosphatase hydrolysis.

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    Darch, Tegan; Blackwell, Martin S A; Chadwick, David; Haygarth, Philip M; Hawkins, Jane M B; Turner, Benjamin L

    2016-12-15

    Soil organic phosphorus contributes to the nutrition of tropical trees, but is not accounted for in standard soil phosphorus tests. Plants and microbes can release organic anions to solubilize organic phosphorus from soil surfaces, and synthesize phosphatases to release inorganic phosphate from the solubilized compounds. We developed a procedure to estimate bioavailable organic phosphorus in tropical forest soils by simulating the secretion processes of organic acids and phosphatases. Five lowland tropical forest soils with contrasting properties (pH 4.4-6.1, total P 86-429 mg P kg(- 1)) were extracted with 2 mM citric acid (i.e., 10 μmol g(- 1), approximating rhizosphere concentrations) adjusted to soil pH in a 4:1 solution to soil ratio for 1 h. Three phosphatase enzymes were then added to the soil extract to determine the forms of hydrolysable organic phosphorus. Total phosphorus extracted by the procedure ranged between 3.22 and 8.06 mg P kg(- 1) (mean 5.55 ± 0.42 mg P kg(- 1)), of which on average three quarters was unreactive phosphorus (i.e., organic phosphorus plus inorganic polyphosphate). Of the enzyme-hydrolysable unreactive phosphorus, 28% was simple phosphomonoesters hydrolyzed by phosphomonoesterase from bovine intestinal mucosa, a further 18% was phosphodiesters hydrolyzed by a combination of nuclease from Penicillium citrinum and phosphomonoesterase, and the remaining 51% was hydrolyzed by a broad-spectrum phytase from wheat. We conclude that soil organic phosphorus can be solubilized and hydrolyzed by a combination of organic acids and phosphatase enzymes in lowland tropical forest soils, indicating that this pathway could make a significant contribution to biological phosphorus acquisition in tropical forests. Furthermore, we have developed a method that can be used to assess the bioavailability of this soil organic phosphorus.

  2. Overestimation of organic phosphorus in wetland soils by alkaline extraction and molybdate colorimetry.

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    Turner, Benjamin L; Newman, Susan; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2006-05-15

    Accurate information on the chemical nature of soil phosphorus is essential for understanding its bioavailability and fate in wetland ecosystems. Solution phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy was used to assess the conventional colorimetric procedure for phosphorus speciation in alkaline extracts of organic soils from the Florida Everglades. Molybdate colorimetry markedly overestimated organic phosphorus by between 30 and 54% compared to NMR spectroscopy. This was due in large part to the association of inorganic phosphate with organic matter, although the error was exacerbated in some samples by the presence of pyrophosphate, an inorganic polyphosphate that is not detected by colorimetry. The results have important implications for our understanding of phosphorus biogeochemistry in wetlands and suggest that alkaline extraction and solution 31p NMR spectroscopy is the only accurate method for quantifying organic phosphorus in wetland soils.

  3. Disturbance of water-extractable phosphorus determination by colloidal particles in a heavy clay soil from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, G.F.; Chardon, W.J.; Salm, van der C.

    2005-01-01

    Received for publication January 25, 2005. Water extraction methods are widely used to extract phosphorus (P) from soils for both agronomic and environmental purposes. Both the presence of soil colloids in soil water filtrates, and the contribution of colloidal P to the molybdate-reactive phosphorus

  4. Soil-extractable phosphorus and phosphorus saturation threshold in beef cattle pastures as affected by grazing management and forage type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigua, Gilbert C; Chase, Chad C; Albano, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Grazing can accelerate and alter the timing of nutrient transfer, and could increase the amount of extractable phosphorus (P) cycle from soils to plants. The effects of grazing management and/or forage type that control P cycling and distribution in pasture's resources have not been sufficiently evaluated. Our ability to estimate the levels and changes of soil-extractable P and other crop nutrients in subtropical beef cattle pastures has the potential to improve our understanding of P dynamics and nutrient cycling at the landscape level. To date, very little attention has been paid to evaluating transfers of extractable P in pasture with varying grazing management and different forage type. Whether or not P losses from grazed pastures are significantly greater than background losses and how these losses are affected by soil, forage management, or stocking density are not well understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of grazing management (rotational versus "zero" grazing) and forage types (FT; bahiagrass, Paspalum notatum, Flugge versus rhizoma peanuts, Arachis glabrata, Benth) on the levels of extractable soil P and degree of P saturation in beef cattle pastures. This study (2004-2007) was conducted at the Subtropical Agricultural Research Station, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service located 7 miles north of Brooksville, FL. Soil (Candler fine sand) at this location was described as well-drained hyperthermic uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments. A split plot arrangement in a completely randomized block design was used and each treatment was replicated four times. The main plot was represented by grazing management (grazing vs. no grazing) while forage types (bahiagrass vs. perennial peanut) as the sub-plot treatment. Eight steel exclosures (10 × 10 m) were used in the study. Four exclosures were placed and established in four pastures with bahiagrass and four exclosures were established in four pastures with rhizoma

  5. Dissolved reactive phosphorus in runoff assessed by soil extraction with an acetate buffer

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    R. UUSITALO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Agronomic soil test phosphorus (STP data is, in addition to fertility studies, increasingly utilised in environmental risk assessment. We compared relationships between soil P extracted by acid ammonium acetate (AAAc-P and water-soluble P (Pw in laboratory, and AAAc-P and dissolved molybdatereactive P (DRP in field runoff. The laboratory study suggested a close relationship (R2 = 0.87, n = 64 between AAAc-P and soluble P concentration in 1:100 (w/v soil-to-water extracts, described by a linear equation:Pw (mg l–1 =0.021 × AAAc-P (mg l–1 soil– 0.015 (mg l–1. In Lake Rehtijärvi cathcment, dominated by clayey soils, the AAAc-P content of field Ap horizon in a similar manner influenced the flow-weighted DRP concentration in surface runoff and drainflow:a 1 mg l–1 increase in soil AAAc-P corresponded to 0.015 and 0.018 mg l–1 increase in surface runoff and drainflow DRP, respectively. When the AAAc-P vs.Pw relationship obtained in the laboratory test was used to predict the average DRP concentration in edge-of-field runoff, the precision of the DRP estimates inferred from STP data was in 95% of the cases ± 0.10 mg l–1. In the L. Rehtijärvi catchment, 50% of the diffuse DRP loading risk was assigned to an area that corresponded to less than 20% of the fields and the situation may be similar in the national scale.;

  6. The status of phosphorus in Thai soils and P evaluation using EDTA-NaF extraction method

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    Toru Matoh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the available P extracted by Bray II method in tropical soil is low, most of tropical plants can grow well. The objective of this study was to study P status and to evaluate the available P extracted by EDTA-NaF method. Top soil and sub soil of 10 dominant soil series in Thailand were analyzed for some chemical properties and characterization of the forms of phosphorus using EDTA-NaF extraction and successive phosphorus extraction by the modified Sekiya method. The soil total P concentration was 38-1137 mg P2O5 kg-1. The available Bray II-P was very low to high (1-76 mg P2O5 kg-1, and it approximated 0.17-12% of the total P. Iron and aluminum phosphates were the main fraction of inorganic P in acid soil, whereas Ca phosphates were in calcareous soils. Organic P content accounted for 33-67% and most of them were bound with Fe and Al in acid soils and Ca in calcareous soils. P extracted by EDTA-NaF reagent was obviously larger than that of Bray II reagent. The EDTA-NaF extracted P [high molecular weight organic P (HMWP+ inorganic P (EDTA ext Pi] was 7-46% and 1-6% of total P in acid soils and calcareous soils respectively. The EDTA ext Pi tended to be larger than HMWP except in Tk soil. The total amount of extracted P correlated well with Al-Pi and Fe-Pi which were the main fraction of inorganic P. It also correlated with HMWP, but HMWP did not correlate with organic P determine by ignition method and Ca-Po, Fe-Po and Al-Po. The EDTA-NaF method may be suitable for P evaluation in the soils which have high amounts of Fe-Pi, Al -Pi and organic P widely distributed in Thailand.

  7. Comparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and colorimetric determination of total and extractable phosphorus in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Krasimir, E-mail: kivanov1@abv.bg [Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Plovdiv (Bulgaria); Zaprjanova, Penka [Tobacco and Tobacco Products Institute, Plovdiv (Bulgaria); Petkova, Milena [Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Plovdiv (Bulgaria); Stefanova, Violeta; Kmetov, Veselin; Georgieva, Deyana [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Plovdiv University ' Paisii Hilendarski,' Plovdiv (Bulgaria); Angelova, Violina [Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Plovdiv (Bulgaria)

    2012-05-15

    The most widely used method for determination of total phosphorus in soils is perchloric acid digestion, followed by a colorimetric assay to measure the concentration of P in solution. The first part of this study compares an alternative digestion method, using aqua regia (ISO 11466 and EPA Method 3052), with perchloric acid digestion procedure, and also compares inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) with colorimetry for the measurement of P on the basis of five internationally certified standard soils and 20 real-life soils with widely different extractability of phosphorus. The phosphorus concentration was determined by means of the reduced phosphomolybdenum blue and ICP-MS. The relationship between methods has been examined statistically. Good agreement of the results from colorimetry and ICP-MS was established for all certified soils. The microwave-assisted digestion with aqua regia was comparable, both in precision and accuracy, with the hot plate aqua regia method. The phosphorus concentration found with the HF + HClO{sub 4} digestion method was in good agreement with the certified mean values, while the superiority in extracting phosphorus, when compared to other methods, was obvious. Soil testing for plant-available phosphorus in Bulgaria and many European countries is most commonly conducted using acid Ca-lactate extraction (Egner-Riehm test) and alkaline sodium bicarbonate extraction (BDS ISO 11263:2002), based on Olsen test, followed by a colorimetric assay to measure the concentration of P in solution. The second part of this study reports the differences between Egner-Riehm test and BDS ISO 11263:2002 measured colorimetrically and by ICP-MS. Fifty soils were selected from South Bulgaria to represent a wide range of soil properties. It was established that ICP-MS consistently yielded significantly higher P concentrations than the colorimetric method in both extraction tests, and the relative differences were greatest in soils with lower

  8. Releasing Pattern of Applied Phosphorus and Distribution Change of Phosphorus Fractions in the Acid Upland Soils with Successive Resin Extraction

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    Arief Hartono

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The releasing pattern of applied P in the acid upland soils and the soil properties influencing the pattern were studied. Surface horizons of six acid upland soils from Sumatra, Java and Kalimantan were used in this study. The releasing pattern of applied P (300 mg P kg-1 of these soils were studied by successive resin extraction. P fractionation was conducted to evaluate which fractions released P to the soil solution after successive resin extraction. The cumulative of resin-Pinorganic (Pi release of soils was fitted to the first order kinetic. Regression analyses using factor scores obtained from the previous principal components analyses was applied to determine soil properties influencing P releasing pattern. The results suggested that the maximum P release was significantly (P < 0.05 increased by acidity plus 1.4 nm mineral-related factor (PC2 i.e. exchangeable Al and 1.4 nm minerals (smectite and vermiculite and decreased by oxide related factor (PC1 i.e. aluminum (Al plus 1/2 iron (Fe (by ammonium oxalate, crystalline Al and Fe oxides, cation exchange capacity, and clay content. P fractionation analysis after successive resin extraction showed that both labile and less labile in the form of NaHCO3-Pi and NaOH-Pi fractions, respectively, can be transformed into resin-Pi when in the most labile resin-Pi is depleted. Most of P released in high oxides soils were from NaOH-Pi fraction while in low oxides soils were from NaHCO3-Pi. P release from the former fraction resulted in the maximum P release lower than that of the latter one. When NaHCO3-Pi was high, NaOH-Pi was relatively more stable than NaHCO3-Pi despite resin-Pi removal. NaHCO3-Pi and NaOH-Pi are very important P fractions in replenishing resin-Pi in these acid upland soils.

  9. Extractability of slurry and fertilizer phosphorus in soil after repeated freezing

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    H. SOINNE

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential effects of freezing on phosphorus (P chemistry in Finnish soils are not well known. We studied the effects of multiple freeze-thaw cycles on soil P chemistry in a laboratory incubation experiment with one organic and one mineral surface soil. The soils were incubated at +5°C or at alternating +5/–20°C temperatures for 24 weeks, either without amendment or amended with pig slurry or with commercial compound fertilizer (NPK 20–3–9. After incubation, the soils were analyzed for water-soluble reactive and unreactive P, and acid ammonium acetate soluble P (PAAA. Freezing and thawing of soils during the incubation had no significant effect on any of the water-soluble P fractions or PAAA. The outcome was most likely a consequence of the good P status of the soils, which masked the gentle effects of freezing. According to these results, the time of soil sampling (fall vs. spring has no effect on P test results on soils with a good P status. Concentrations of soluble P after incubation were roughly twice as high in the slurry treatments than in the fertilizer treatments, demonstrating potentially better long-term availability of slurry P.;

  10. Phosphorus extracted by ion exchange resins and mehlich-1 from oxisols (latosols treated with different phosphorus rates and sources for varied soil-source contact periods

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    Irio Fernando de Freitas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large number of studies addressing the quantification of phosphorus (P availability by different extraction methods, many questions remain unanswered. The aim of this paper was to compare the effectiveness of the extractors Mehlich-1, Anionic Resin (AR and Mixed Resin (MR, to determine the availability of P under different experimental conditions. The laboratory study was arranged in randomized blocks in a [(3 x 3 x 2 + 3] x 4 factorial design, with four replications, testing the response of three soils with different texture: a very clayey Red Latosol (LV, a sandy clay loam Red Yellow Latosol (LVA, and a sandy loam Yellow Latosol (LA, to three sources (triple superphosphate, reactive phosphate rock from Gafsa-Tunisia; and natural phosphate from Araxá-Minas Gerais at two P rates (75 and 150 mg dm-3, plus three control treatments (each soil without P application after four contact periods (15, 30, 60, and 120 days of the P sources with soil. The soil acidity of LV and LVA was adjusted by raising base saturation to 60 % with the application of CaCO3 and MgCO3 at a 4:1 molar ratio (LA required no correction. These samples were maintained at field moisture capacity for 30 days. After the contact periods, the samples were collected to quantify the available P concentrations by the three extractants. In general, all three indicated that the available P-content in soils was reduced after longer contact periods with the P sources. Of the three sources, this reduction was most pronounced for triple superphosphate, intermediate for reactive phosphate, while Araxá phosphate was least sensitive to the effect of time. It was observed that AR extracted lower P levels from all three soils when the sources were phosphate rocks, while MR extracted values close to Mehlich-1 in LV (clay and LVA (medium texture for reactive phosphate. For Araxá phosphate, much higher P values were determined by Mehlich-1 than by the resins, because of the acidity of

  11. Determination of soil organic phosphorus exchange sensitivity

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    Shand, Charles; Wendler, Renate; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Pat; George, Timothy; Brown, Lawrie; Giles, Courtney; Stutter, Marc; Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Wearing, Catherine; Haygarth, Philip; Blackwell, Martin; Darch, Tegan

    2015-04-01

    Soils contain both organic and inorganic phosphorus (P) species in varying proportions. Studies have shown that many soils contain substantial amounts of inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) and there is much interest worldwide in developing strategies to make some use of this recalcitrant resource for plant growth to reduce P fertilizer inputs. Little is known about the preference of ion exchange processes in the solubilisation of organic vs inorganic P forms in soils, an important first step in making P forms bioavailable. Although they do not possess biotic functions, resins provides a simple means to deplete P forms in soil allowing investigation of exchange selectivity between inorganic and organic P forms. The aim of our work was to determine new understanding of exchange selectivity in soils and provide insight into potential depletion and plant uptake of soil phosphorus, with emphasis on organic forms such as IHP. For our study we used a Cambisol sampled from an agricultural area (Tayport) near Dundee in Scotland. The soil had a high Olsen (0.5 M sodium bicarbonate at pH 8.5) extractable P status (84 mg P/kg) and P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of its NaOH/EDTA extract showed it contained a substantial proportion of IHP (21 % of total extractable P). For resin extraction we used anion exchange resin sheets (4.17 cm each side) in bicarbonate form to minimise pH related solubilisation effects. We used 3.5 g of soil in 75 ml of water and added 1, 2 or 3 resin squares. After equilibration the resin squares were removed and replaced with fresh resin squares a further 3 times. Phosphorus was recovered from the resin sheets by elution with 0.25 M sulphuric acid and analysed by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy to determine total P, and colorimetrically with malachite green to determine inorganic P with the remainder assigned to organic P. The data showed that the resin preferentially removed inorganic P and even after four sequential extractions little or

  12. Phytoextraction of excess soil phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Nilesh C. [Department of Biology, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Boulevard 11080, Bowling Green, KY 42101-1080 (United States); Starnes, Daniel L. [Department of Biology, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Boulevard 11080, Bowling Green, KY 42101-1080 (United States); Sahi, Shivendra V. [Department of Biology, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Boulevard 11080, Bowling Green, KY 42101-1080 (United States)]. E-mail: shiv.sahi@wku.edu

    2007-03-15

    In the search for a suitable plant to be used in P phytoremediation, several species belonging to legume, vegetable and herb crops were grown in P-enriched soils, and screened for P accumulation potentials. A large variation in P concentrations of different plant species was observed. Some vegetable species such as cucumber (Cucumis sativus) and yellow squash (Cucurbita pepo var. melopepo) were identified as potential P accumulators with >1% (dry weight) P in their shoots. These plants also displayed a satisfactory biomass accumulation while growing on a high concentration of soil P. The elevated activities of phosphomonoesterase and phytase were observed when plants were grown in P-enriched soils, this possibly contributing to high P acquisition in these species. Sunflower plants also demonstrated an increased shoot P accumulation. This study shows that the phytoextraction of phosphorus can be effective using appropriate plant species. - Crop plants such as cucumber, squash and sunflower accumulate phosphorus and thus can be used in the phytoextraction of excess phosphorus from soils.

  13. Complex Forms of Soil Organic Phosphorus-A Major Component of Soil Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Timothy I; Smernik, Ronald J; McLaughlin, Mike J; McBeath, Therese M; Kirby, Jason K; Simpson, Richard J; Guppy, Christopher N; Doolette, Ashlea L; Richardson, Alan E

    2015-11-17

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element for life, an innate constituent of soil organic matter, and a major anthropogenic input to terrestrial ecosystems. The supply of P to living organisms is strongly dependent on the dynamics of soil organic P. However, fluxes of P through soil organic matter remain unclear because only a minority (typically soil organic P has been identified as recognizable biomolecules of low molecular weight (e.g., inositol hexakisphosphates). Here, we use (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the speciation of organic P in soil extracts fractionated into two molecular weight ranges. Speciation of organic P in the high molecular weight fraction (>10 kDa) was markedly different to that of the low molecular weight fraction (soil organic P across the five diverse soils. These soil phosphomonoesters will need to be integrated within current models of the inorganic-organic P cycle of soil-plant terrestrial ecosystems.

  14. Ruzigrass affecting soil-phosphorus availability

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    Alexandre Merlin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of ruzigrass (Urochloaruziziensis in enhancing soil-P availability in areas fertilized with soluble or reactive rock phosphates. The area had been cropped for five years under no-till, in a system involving soybean, triticale/black-oat, and pearl millet. Previously to the five-year cultivation period, corrective phosphorus fertilization was applied once on soil surface, at 0.0 and 80 kg ha-1 P2O5, as triple superphosphate or Arad rock phosphate. After this five-year period, plots received the same corrective P fertilization as before and ruzigrass was introduced to the cropping system in the stead of the other cover crops. Soil samples were taken (0-10 cm after ruzigrass cultivation and subjected to soil-P fractionation. Soybean was grown thereafter without P application to seed furrow. Phosphorus availability in plots with ruzigrass was compared to the ones with spontaneous vegetation for two years. Ruzigrass cultivation increased inorganic (resin-extracted and organic (NaHCO3 soil P, as well as P concentration in soybean leaves, regardless of the P source. However, soybean yield did not increase significantly due to ruzigrass introduction to the cropping system. Soil-P availability did not differ between soluble and reactive P sources. Ruzigrass increases soil-P availability, especially where corrective P fertilization is performed.

  15. Sensitivity of soil phosphorus tests in predicting the potential risk of phosphorus loss from pasture soil

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    H. SOINNE

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the effects of urine and dung additions on the phosphorus (P chemistry of pasture land and to compare the sensitivity of two soil extraction methods in assessing the P-loading risk. In a field experiment, urine and dung were added to soil in amounts corresponding to single excrement portions and the soil samples, taken at certain intervals, were analysed for pHH2O, acid ammonium acetate extractable P (PAc and water extractable total P (TPw, and molybdate reactive P (MRPw. Urine additions immediately increased soil pH and MRPw, but no such response was observed in PAc extraction due to the low pH (4.65 of the extractant enhancing the resorption of P. The PAc responded to the dunginduced increase in soil total P similarly as did Pw, which suggests that both tests can serve to detect areas of high P concentration. However, water extraction was a more sensitive method for estimating short-term changes in P solubility. In pasture soils, the risk of P loss increases as a result of the interaction of urination and high P concentration in the topsoil resulting from continuous dung excretion.;

  16. Potential Phosphorus Mobilisation in Peat Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    for each location. This mobilisation was measured using intact soil cores (d: 6 cm; h: 15 cm) from the 10 locations set up in an anaerobic closed-flow system. Finally, the hydro- physical parameters like soil-water retention curves, break-through curves, air-filled porosity and bulk density were measured......Re-establishment of wetlands on peat soils containing phosphorus bound to iron(III)-oxides can lead to an undesirable phosphorus loss to the aquatic environment due to the reductive dissolution of iron(III)-oxides. Thus it is important to be able to assess the potential phosphorus mobilisation from...... peat soils before a re-establishment takes place. The potential phosphorus mobilisation from a peat soil depends not only on the geochemical characteristics but also on the redox conditions, the hydrological regime in the area as well as the hydro-physical properties of the soil. The hypothesis...

  17. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

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    Prata, Fabio [BIOAGRI Labs., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Div. de Quimica. Lab. de Radioquimica; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Ciencias Exatas; Lavorenti, Arquimedes [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Secao de Toxicologia

    2003-03-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha{sup -1} of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L{sup -1}), with a {sup 14}C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL{sup -1}. Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl{sub 2} 0.01 mol L{sup -1} and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L{sup -1}). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm{sup -3}. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  18. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

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    Prata Fábio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with KH2PO4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha-1 of P2O5, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L-1, with a 14C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL-1. Four steps of the desorption procedure with CaCl2 0.01 mol L-1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L-1. Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm-3. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%, and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content.

  19. Soil phosphorus landscape models for precision soil conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jinseok; Grunwald, Sabine; Vasques, Gustavo M

    2015-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) enrichment in soils has been documented in the Santa Fe River watershed (SFRW, 3585 km) in north-central Florida. Yet the environmental factors that control P distribution in soils across the landscape, with potential contribution to water quality impairment, are not well understood. The main goal of this study was to develop soil-landscape P models to support a "precision soil conservation" approach combining fine-scale (i.e., site-specific) and coarse-scale (i.e., watershed-extent) assessment of soil P. The specific objectives were to: (i) identify those environmental properties that impart the most control on the spatial distribution of soil Mehlich-1 extracted P (MP) in the SFRW; (ii) model the spatial patterns of soil MP using geostatistical methods; and (iii) assess model quality using independent validation samples. Soil MP data at 137 sites were fused with spatially explicit environmental covariates to develop soil MP prediction models using univariate (lognormal kriging, LNK) and multivariate methods (regression kriging, RK, and cokriging, CK). Incorporation of exhaustive environmental data into multivariate models (RK and CK) improved the prediction of soil MP in the SFRW compared with the univariate model (LNK), which relies solely on soil measurements. Among all tested environmental covariates, land use and vegetation related properties (topsoil) and geologic data (subsoil) showed the largest predictive power to build inferential models for soil MP. Findings from this study contribute to a better understanding of spatially explicit interactions between soil P and other environmental variables, facilitating improved land resource management while minimizing adverse risks to the environment.

  20. Phosphorus cycling in agricultural soils. Pt.1: Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The excess of phosphorus brought into the soil system is subject to transformation processes and displacement. In general, the mobility of phosphorus in soil solution will remain low due to the very effective retention possibilities of soil

  1. Disponibilidade de fósforo em solos avaliada por diferentes extratores Phosphorus availability in soils, determined by different extracting procedures

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    Fábio Cesar da Silva

    1999-02-01

    , Bray 1 e Olsen; (d não superestima, como os extratores ácidos, a disponibilidade de P em solos tratados com fosfatos naturais; (e é o que apresenta o melhor embasamento teórico para a determinação do chamado "fator quantidade" de P em solos, que é o mais importante índice da disponibilidade do nutriente.The objective of this paper was the comparative study of the most important extractors of soil phosphorus. It presents a literature review of papers that deal with methods of extraction for the evaluation of phosphorus availability in soils. The methods considered were: anion exchange resin, Olsen, Bray 1, Bray 2, Mehlich 1, Troug, Égner, water, 0,01M CaCl2, iron hydroxide impregnated filter paper (Pi and the determinations of the E and L values. The comparison between results of soil analysis by different methods of phosphorus extraction in soils and phosphorus uptake by plants was initially made considering the coefficient of determination (r² for several extractants. The following average values and corresponding numbers of articles in which the method was considered were obtained: resin, 70% (34; E value, 68% (16; L value, 65% (8; Olsen, 54% (48; Bray 1, 50% (42; Mehlich 1, 46% (25; Égner, 44% (9; Bray 2, 42% (19; Water, 42% (15; Truog, 38% (13; CaCl2, 36% (13, and Morgan, 32% (13. The comparison of several methods, considering the pairs of results (r² obtained for the extractants, that were tested together through linear correlation and average contrasts (t student test, indicated that the resin method was statistically superior to the other methods. The resin method presents the following favorable features: (a highest values for the determinations coefficients for the correlations between P uptake by plants and soil P by the different methods, as reviewed in 72 papers; (b it can be used in both acid and alkaline soils, which is not the case for the other most commonly used methods; (c it reveals adequately the effect of liming on the increase of P

  2. Soil phosphorus constrains biodiversity across European grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceulemans, Tobias; Stevens, Carly J; Duchateau, Luc; Jacquemyn, Hans; Gowing, David J G; Merckx, Roel; Wallace, Hilary; van Rooijen, Nils; Goethem, Thomas; Bobbink, Roland; Dorland, Edu; Gaudnik, Cassandre; Alard, Didier; Corcket, Emmanuel; Muller, Serge; Dise, Nancy B; Dupré, Cecilia; Diekmann, Martin; Honnay, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Nutrient pollution presents a serious threat to biodiversity conservation. In terrestrial ecosystems, the deleterious effects of nitrogen pollution are increasingly understood and several mitigating environmental policies have been developed. Compared to nitrogen, the effects of increased phosphorus have received far less attention, although some studies have indicated that phosphorus pollution may be detrimental for biodiversity as well. On the basis of a dataset covering 501 grassland plots throughout Europe, we demonstrate that, independent of the level of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and soil acidity, plant species richness was consistently negatively related to soil phosphorus. We also identified thresholds in soil phosphorus above which biodiversity appears to remain at a constant low level. Our results indicate that nutrient management policies biased toward reducing nitrogen pollution will fail to preserve biodiversity. As soil phosphorus is known to be extremely persistent and we found no evidence for a critical threshold below which no environmental harm is expected, we suggest that agro-environmental schemes should include grasslands that are permanently free from phosphorus fertilization.

  3. Phosphorus fractions in sandy soils of vineyards in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djalma Eugênio Schmitt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P applications to vineyards can cause P accumulation in the soil and maximize pollution risks. This study was carried out to quantify the accumulation of P fractions in sandy soils of vineyards in southern Brazil. Soil samples (layers 0-5, 6-10 and 11-20 cm were collected from a native grassland area and two vineyards, after 14 years (vineyard 1 and 30 years (vineyard 2 of cultivation, in Santana do Livramento, southern Brazil, and subjected to chemical fractionation of P. Phosphorus application, especially to the 30-year-old vineyard 2, increased the inorganic P content down to a depth of 20 cm, mainly in the labile fractions extracted by anion-exchange resin and NaHCO3, in the moderately labile fraction extracted by 0.1 and 0.5 mol L-1 NaOH, and in the non-labile fraction extracted by 1 mol L-1 HCl, indicating the possibility of water eutrophication. Phosphorus application and grapevine cultivation time increased the P content in the organic fraction extracted by NaHCO3 from the 0-5 cm layer, and especially in the moderately labile fraction extracted by 0.1 mol L-1 NaOH, down to a depth of 20 cm.

  4. Soil phosphorus availability and soybean response to phosphorus starter fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Antonio Rosolem

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus fixation in tropical soils may decrease under no-till. In this case, P fertilizer could be surface-spread, which would improve farm operations by decreasing the time spend in reloading the planter with fertilizers. In the long term, less soluble P sources could be viable. In this experiment, the effect of surface-broadcast P fertilization with both soluble and reactive phosphates on soil P forms and availability to soybean was studied with or without fertilization with soluble P in the planting furrow in a long-term experiment in which soybean was grown in rotation with Ruzigrass (Brachiaria ruziziensis. No P or 80 kg ha-1 of P2O5 in the form of triple superphosphate or Arad reactive rock phosphate was applied on the surface of a soil with variable P fertilization history. Soil samples were taken to a depth of 60 cm and soil P was fractionated. Soybean was grown with 0, 30, and 60 kg ha-1 of P2O5 in the form of triple phosphate applied in the seed furrow. Both fertilizers applied increased available P in the uppermost soil layers and the moderately labile organic and inorganic forms of P in the soil profile, probably as result of root decay. Soybean responded to phosphates applied on the soil surface or in the seed furrow; however, application of soluble P in the seed furrow should not be discarded. In tropical soils with a history of P fertilization, soluble P sources may be substituted for natural reactive phosphates broadcast on the surface. The planting operation may be facilitated through reduction in the rate of P applied in the planting furrow in relation to the rates currently applied.

  5. Soil phosphorus dynamics as affected by Congo grass and P fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Antonio Rosolem

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Some plant species can change soil phosphorus (P availability and this may be an important tool in managing tropical high fixing phosphorus soils. An experiment was conducted to evaluate phosphorus transformations in the soil and phosphatase activity during periods of Congo grass (Brachiaria ruziziensis, Germain et Evrard growth in two tropical soils receiving 20, 40, 80, 160 mg dm-3 of inorganic P. Plants were grown for 84 days in 8-L pots. Acid phosphatase activity, P in the microbial mass, soil organic and inorganic P and P accumulation by Congo grass were evaluated. Phosphorus fertilization increased soil P availability, Congo grass yields and P accumulation in the plant. On average, less labile P forms in the soil were not changed by Congo grass; however, the P in the soil extracted with HCl (P-Ca - non labil form decreased. This decrease may have resulted from the combination of the presence of grass and phosphatase capacity to dissolve less available P in the soil. Thus, soil exploration by Congo grass roots and the subsequent extraction of calcium phosphate may have increased the P concentration in the plant tissue. Despite the decrease in the P extracted from the soil with HCl resulting in increased labile P forms in the soil, the effect of Congo grass on the availability of P depends on the soil type.

  6. Predicting Phosphorus Release from Anaerobic, Alkaline, Flooded Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarawansha, Geethani; Kumaragamage, Darshani; Flaten, Don; Zvomuya, Francis; Tenuta, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Anaerobic conditions induced by prolonged flooding often lead to an enhanced release of phosphorus (P) to floodwater; however, this effect is not consistent across soils. This study aimed to develop an index to predict P release potential from alkaline soils under simulated flooded conditions. Twelve unamended or manure-amended surface soils from Manitoba were analyzed for basic soil properties, Olsen P (Ols-P), Mehlich-3 extractable total P (M3P), Mehlich-3 extractable molybdate-reactive P (M3P), water extractable P (WEP), soil P fractions, single-point P sorption capacity (P), and Mehlich-3 extractable Ca (M3Ca), and Mg (M3Mg). Degree of P saturation (DPS) was calculated using Ols-P, M3P or M3P as the intensity factor, and an estimated adsorption maximum based on either P or M3Ca + M3Mg as the capacity factor. To develop the model, we used the previously reported floodwater dissolved reactive P (DRP) concentration changes during 8 wk of flooding for the same unamended and manured soils. Relative changes in floodwater DRP concentration (DRP), calculated as the ratio of maximum to initial DRP concentration, ranged from 2 to 15 across ten of the soils, but were ≤1.5 in the two soils with the greatest clay content. Partial least squares analysis indicated that DPS3 calculated using M3P as the intensity factor and (2 × P) + M3P as the capacity factor with clay percentage can effectively predict DRP ( = 0.74). Results suggest that P release from a soil to floodwater may be predicted using simple and easily measurable soil properties measured before flooding, but validation with more soils is needed.

  7. Soil organic phosphorus characterisation on a glacial chronosequence (Damma, Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, Klaus A.; Requejo, María I.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic phosphorus (P) may play a significant role in ecosystem P dynamics, yet, little is known about the development of different organic P classes over time. According to the commonly accepted model, relative proportions of organic P are expected to increase quickly after the commencement of soil development, subsequently remaining relatively stable over time. We tested this hypothesis on a young soil chronosequence in the Damma glacier forefield (Switzerland), where we examined the development of different organic P classes over time. In detail, we hypothesized that organic P compounds resistant against broadly active phosphatase-enzymes would increase with soil age. Soil samples (0-5 cm) were taken on 21 sites with 6 to 136 years of soil development. Using enzyme addition assays to soil extracts (0.25 M NaOH / 0.05 M EDTA), four organic P classes were detected: a) Monoester-like P (organic P hydrolysed by an acid phosphatase), b) DNA-like P (organic P hydrolysed by a nuclease in combination with an acid phosphatase, minus monoester-like P), c) Inositol Phosphate-like P (organic P hydrolysed by a phytase, minus monoester like P) and d) Enzyme stable P (difference between total extracted organic P and the three enzyme labile P classes a, b and c). NaOH-EDTA extractable inorganic and organic P increased with soil age from 4.2 and 5.2 mg kg-1 at the youngest sites to 23.9 and 64.5 mg kg-1 at the oldest sites, respectively. On all sites, more organic than inorganic P was extracted. We observed a strong linear relationship between organic and inorganic P along the chronosequence. Between 60 and 100% of extractable organic P was hydrolysed by the added enzymes, without a clear trend with respect to soil age. On most sites, Inositol phosphate-like P was the most prominent organic P class (1.8-24.3 mg kg-1). However, on some sites higher amounts of monoester-like P were detected (0.4-23.4 mg kg-1). DNA-like P ranged from nil to 12.9 mg kg-1. Thus, we observed a

  8. Characteristics of Phosphorus in Some Eastern Australian Acid Sulfate Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Forty-five acid sulfate topsoil samples (depth < 0.5 m) from 15 soil cores were collected from 11 locations along the New South Wales coast, Australia. There was an overall trend for the concentration of the HC1extractable P to increase along with increasing amounts of organic C and the HCl-extractable trivalent metals in the topsoils of some less-disturbed acid sulfate soils (pH <4.5). This suggests that inorganic P in these soils probably accumulated via biological cycling and was retained by complexation with trivalent metals or their oxides and hydroxides. While there was no clear correlation between pH and the water-extractable P, the concentration of the water-extractable P tended to increase with increasing amounts of the HCl-extractable P. This disagrees with some established models which suggest that the concentration of solution P in acid soils is independent of total P and decreases with increasing acidity. The high concentration of sulfate present in acid sulfate soils appeared to affect the chemical behavior of P in these soil systems. Comparison was made between a less disturbed wetland acid sulfate soil and a more intensively disturbed sugarcane acid sulfate soil.The results show that reclamation of wetland acid sulfate soils for sugarcane production caused a significant decrease in the HCl-extractable P in the topsoil layer as a result of the reduced bio-cycling of phosphorus following sugarcane farming. Simulation experiment shows that addition of hydrated lime had no effects on the immobilization of retained P in an acid sulfate soil sample within a pH range 3.5~4.6. When the pH was raised to above 4.6, soluble P in the soil extracts had a tendency to increase with increasing pH until the 15th extraction (pH 5.13). This, in combination with the poor pH-soluble P relationship observed from the less-disturbed acid sulfate soils, suggests that soluble P was not clearly pH-dependent in acid sulfate soils with pH < 4.5.

  9. Do soils loose phosphorus with dissolved organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, K.; Brödlin, D.; Hagedorn, F.

    2014-12-01

    During ecosystem development and soil formation, primary mineral sources of phosphorus are becoming increasingly depleted. Inorganic phosphorus forms tend to be bound strongly to or within secondary minerals, thus, are hardly available to plants and are not leached from soil. What about organic forms of phosphorus? Since rarely studied, little is known on the composition, mobility, and bioavailability of dissolved organic phosphorus. There is some evidence that plant-derived compounds, such as phytate, bind strongly to minerals as well, while microbial compounds, such as nucleotides and nucleic acids, may represent more mobile fractions of soil phosphorus. In some weakly developed, shallow soils, leaching losses of phosphorus seem to be governed by mobile organic forms. Consequently, much of the phosphorus losses observed during initial stages of ecosystem development may be due to the leaching of dissolved organic matter. However, the potentially mobile microbial compounds are enzymatically hydrolysable. Forest ecosystems on developed soils already depleted in easily available inorganic phosphorus are characterized by rapid recycling of organic phosphors. That can reduce the production of soluble forms of organic phosphorus as well as increase the enzymatic hydrolysis and subsequent plant uptake of phosphorus bound within dissolved organic matter. This work aims at giving an outlook to the potential role of dissolved organic matter in the cycling of phosphorus within developing forest ecosystems, based on literature evidence and first results of ongoing research.

  10. Impacts of anthropic pressures on soil phosphorus availability, concentration, and phosphorus forms in sediments in a Southern Brazilian watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, Joao Batista Rossetto; Rheinheimer dos Santos, Danilo; Goncalves, Celso Santos; Copetti, Andre Carlos Cruz [Dept. de Solos, Univ. Federal de Santa Maria, Centro de Ciencias Rurais, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bortoluzzi, Edson Campanhola [Faculdade de Agronomia e Medicina Veterinaria da Univ. de Passo Fundo, RS (Brazil); Tessier, Daniel [Inst. National de la Recherche Agronomique, Versailles (France)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The transfer of soil sediments and phosphorus from terrestrial to aquatic systems is a common process in agricultural lands. The aims of this paper are to quantify the soil phosphorus availability and to characterize phosphorus forms in soil sediments as contaminant agents of waters as a function of anthropic pressures. Materials and methods On three subwatersheds with different anthropic pressure, water and sediment samples were collected automatically in upstream and downstream discharge points in six rainfall events during the tobacco growing season. Phosphorus desorption capacity from soil sediments was estimated by successive extractions with anion exchange resins. First-order kinetic models were adjusted to desorption curves for estimating potentially bioavailable particulate phosphorus, desorption rate constant, and bioavailable particulate phosphorus. Results and discussion The amount of bioavailable particulate phosphorus was directly correlated with the iron oxide content. The value of desorption rate constant was directly related with the total organic carbon and inversely with the iron oxide contents. Phosphate ions were released to solution, on average, twice as rapidly from sediments collected in subwatersheds with low anthropic activity than from those ones of highly anthropic subwatersheds. Anthropic pressure on watershed can engender high sediment discharge, but these solid particles seem to present low phosphorus-releasing capacity to water during transport due to the evidenced high affinity between phosphorus and iron oxide from sediments. Conclusions Anthropic pressure was related with sediment concentration and phosphorus release to aquatic systems. While natural vegetation along streams plays a role on soil and water depuration, it is unable to eliminate the phosphorus inputs intrinsic to the agricultural-intensive systems. Recommendations and perspectives The contamination of water in watershed by phosphates is facilitated by the

  11. Phosphorus in soil treatment systems: accumulation and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveborn, David; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Elmefors, Elin; Yu, Lin; Eriksson, Ann-Kristin; Ljung, Emelie; Renman, Gunno

    2014-11-01

    Septic tanks with subsequent soil treatment systems (STS) are a common treatment technique for domestic wastewater in rural areas. Phosphorus (P) leakage from such systems may pose a risk to water quality (especially if they are located relatively close to surface waters). In this study, six STS in Sweden (11-28 years old) were examined. Samples taken from the unsaturated subsoil beneath the distribution pipes were investigated by means of batch and column experiments, and accumulated phosphorus were characterized through X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis. At all sites the wastewater had clearly influenced the soil. This was observed through decreased pH, increased amounts of oxalate extractable metals and at some sites altered P sorption properties. The amount of accumulated P in the STS were found to be between 0.32 and 0.87 kg m(-3), which in most cases was just a fraction of the estimated P load (<30%). Column studies revealed that high P concentrations (up to 6 mg L(-1)) were leached from the material when deionized water was applied. However, the response to deionized water varied between the sites. As evidenced by XANES analysis, aluminium phosphates or P adsorbed to aluminium (hydr)oxides, as well as organically bound P, were important sinks for P. Generally soils with a high content of oxalate-extractable Al were also less vulnerable to P leakage.

  12. Phosphorus forms in biosolids-amended soils and losses in runoff: effects of wastewater treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Chad J; Sims, J Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Continuous addition of municipal biosolids to soils based on plant nitrogen (N) requirements can cause buildup of soil phosphorus (P) in excess of crop requirements; runoff from these soils can potentially contribute to nonpoint P pollution of surface waters. However, because biosolids are often produced using lime and/or metal salts, the potential for biosolids P to cause runoff P losses can vary with wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) process. This study was conducted to determine the effect of wastewater treatment process on the forms and amounts of P in biosolids, biosolids-amended soils, and in runoff from biosolids-amended soils. We amended two soil types with eight biosolids and a poultry litter (PL) at equal rates of total P (200 kg ha(-1); unamended soils were used as controls. All biosolids and amended soils were analyzed for various types of extractable P, inorganic P fractions, and the degree of P saturation (acid ammonium oxalate method). Amended soils were placed under a simulated rainfall and all runoff was collected and analyzed for dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP), iron-oxide-coated filter paper strip-extractable phosphorus (FeO-P), and total phosphorus (EPA3050 P). Results showed that biosolids produced with a biological nutrient removal (BNR) process caused the highest increases in extractable soil P and runoff DRP. Alternatively, biosolids produced with iron only consistently had the lowest extractable P and caused the lowest increases in extractable soil P and runoff DRP when added to soils. Differences in soil and biosolids extractable P levels as well as P runoff losses were related to the inorganic P forms of the biosolids.

  13. Phosphorus losses in simulated rainfall runoff from manured soils of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volf, Callie A; Ontkean, Gerald R; Bennett, D Rodney; Chanasyk, David S; Miller, Jim J

    2007-01-01

    Manure applied to agricultural land at rates that exceed annual crop nutrient requirements can be a source of phosphorus in runoff. Manure incorporation is often recommended to reduce phosphorus losses in runoff. A small plot rainfall simulation study was conducted at three sites in Alberta to evaluate the effects of manure rate and incorporation on phosphorus losses. Treatments consisted of three solid beef cattle manure application rates (50, 100, and 200 kg ha(-1) total phosphorus), an unmanured control, and two incorporation methods (nonincorporated and incorporated with one pass of a double disk). Simulated rain was applied to soils with freshly applied and residual (1 yr after application) manure at 70 mm h(-1) to produce 30 min of runoff. Soil test phosphorus (STP), total phosphorus (TP), and dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) concentrations in runoff increased with manure rate for fresh and residual manure. Initial abstraction and runoff volumes did not change with manure rate. Initial abstraction, runoff volumes, and phosphorus concentrations did not change with manure incorporation at Lacombe and Wilson, but initial abstraction volumes increased and runoff volumes and phosphorus concentrations decreased with incorporation of fresh manure at Beaverlodge. Phosphorus losses in runoff were directly related to phosphorus additions. Extraction coefficients (slopes of the regression lines) for the linear relationships between residual manure STP and phosphorus in runoff were 0.007 to 0.015 for runoff TP and 0.006 to 0.013 for runoff DRP. While incorporation of manure with a double disk had no significant effect on phosphorus losses in runoff from manure-amended soils 1 yr after application, incorporation of manure is still recommended to control nitrogen losses, improve crop nutrient uptake, and potentially reduce odor concerns.

  14. Comportamento de extratores em solo tratado com fontes diversas de fósforo Performance of extracting procedures in soil treated with several sources of phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Stefanutti

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available Em condições de casa-de-vegetação foram feitos sete cultivos sucessivos para avaliar o efeito direto e residual do superfosfato simples granulado e do termofosfato magnesiano (Yoorin fornecidos em quatro doses (O, 50,100 e 200 ppm. O fósforo disponível foi determinado depois do terceiro, quarto e último cultivos usando-se os extratores de Mehlich 1, Bray 1, resina e a técnica de diluição isotópica (valor E. De um modo geral, os coeficientes de correlação mais altos entre P disponível e matéria seca ou fósforo total absorvido, foram encontrados com os dados obtidos com resina e Mehlich 1, seguindo-se os obtidos com Bray 1 e, em último lugar, os com o valor E.In order to evaluate the direct and residual effects of ordinary granulated superphosphate as compared to magnesium thermophosphate (Yoorin, supplied at four rates (0,50,100 and 200 ppm, seven successive croppings were carried out in the glasshouse. Available phosphorus was assessed after the third, fourth and seventh harvest by using Mehlich 1, Bray 1, anión exchange resin and isotopic dilution (E value. The highest correlation coefficients between available P and either total dry matter or total P content was found to occur with data provided by Mehlich 1 and resin. Phosphorus extracted by Bray 1 as well as that estimated by the E value showed lower "r" coefficients.

  15. Bacteria as transporters of phosphorus through soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, N.; Bælum, Jacob; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The transport of phosphorus (P) from agricultural land has led to the eutrophication of surface waters worldwide, especially in areas with intensive animal production. In this research, we investigated the role of bacteria in the leaching of P through three agricultural soils with different......RNA genes cell−1. Leaching of bacteria was in the range of 2.5–4.5 × 105 cells ml−1 prior to application of slurry to the three soil textures. After slurry application, leaching increased to 1.1 × 106 cells ml−1 in the loamy sand, 4.9 × 106 cells ml−1 in the sandy loam and 5.0 × 106 cells ml−1 in the loam....... Based on the reported P content of soil bacteria, 0.3–1.8% of the total P leached was present in the bacterial biomass when no slurry was applied, whereas slurry application increased the leaching of P from the bacterial biomass to 3−7.9% of total P leached. Bacterial leaching was related...

  16. Phosphorus Availability in Soils Amended with Wheat Residue Char

    OpenAIRE

    Parvage, Md. Masud; Ulén, Barbro; Eriksson, Jan; Strock, Jeffery; Kirchmann, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Plant availability and risk for leaching and/or runoff losses of phosphorus (P) from soils depends among others on P concentration in the soil solution. Water soluble P in soil measures soil solution P concentration. The aim of this study was to understand the effect of wheat residue char (biochar) addition on water soluble P concentration in a wide range of biochar amended soils. Eleven agricultural fields representing dominant soil texture classes of Swedish agricultural lands were chosen. ...

  17. Soil phosphorus mobilization in the rhizosphere of cover crops has little effect on phosphorus cycling in California agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    External phosphorus (P) inputs to agricultural soils are needed to replace soil P removed by harvest and maintain soil fertility. Alternative fertilization approaches that maintain soil fertility while reducing P inputs could improve current practices that often result in excessive P application and...

  18. Soil phosphorus and the ecology of lowland tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ben

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation I will explore the extent to which phosphorus influences the productivity, diversity, and distribution of plant species in tropical forests. I will highlight the range of soils that occur in tropical forests and will argue that pedogenesis and associated phosphorus depletion is a primary driver of forest diversity over long timescales. I will draw on data from a regional-scale network of forest dynamics plots in Panama to show that tree species distributions are determined predominantly as a function of dry season intensity and soil phosphorus availability, and will suggest potential mechanistic explanations for this pattern in relation to phosphorus acquisition. Finally, I will present observational and experimental evidence from Panama to show how phosphorus, nitrogen, and potassium, limit plant productivity and microbial communities on strongly-weathered soils in the lowland tropics.

  19. Effects of different treatments of cattle slurry manure on water-extractable phosphorus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapuis-Lardy, L.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Goede, de R.G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cattle slurry manure applied to land increases the risk of phosphorus (P) movement to surface waters, which may lead to eutrophication. The water-extractable fraction of P in slurry manure is correlated with P concentration in runoff from soils amended with slurry smanure, and thus is an effective i

  20. Effects of Soil properties on phosphorus subsurface migration in sandy soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming-Kui

    2008-01-01

    The soil factors influencing the potential migration of dissolved and particulate phosphorus (P) from structurallyweak sandy subsoils were evaluated by means of soil column leaching experiments.Soil colloids were extracted from two types of soils to make the colloid-bound forms of P solution.Eight sandy soils with diverse properties were collected for packing soil columns.The effects of influent solutions varying in concentrations of colloids,P,and electrolyte,on the transport of P and quality of leachates were characterized.P migration in the soils was soil property-dependent.High soil electrical conductivity values retarded the mobility of colloids and transportability of colloid-associated P (particulate P).Soil electrical conductivity was negatively correlated with colloids and reactive particulate P (RPP) concentrations in the leachates,whereas,the total reactive P (TRP) and dissolved reactive P (DRP) concentrations in the leachates were mainly controlled by the P adsorption capacity and the P levels in the subsoil.The reactive particulate P in the leachates was positively correlated with the colloidal concentration.Increased colloidal concentration in the influent could significantly increase the colloidal concentration in the leachates.Elevated P concentration in the influent had little effect on P recovery in the leachates,but it resulted in significant increases in the absolute P concentration in the leachates.

  1. Diversity enhances agricultural productivity via rhizosphere phosphorus facilitation on phosphorus-deficient soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Li, Shu-Min; Sun, Jian-Hao; Zhou, Li-Li; Bao, Xing-Guo; Zhang, Hong-Gang; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2007-07-01

    Intercropping, which grows at least two crop species on the same pieces of land at the same time, can increase grain yields greatly. Legume-grass intercrops are known to overyield because of legume nitrogen fixation. However, many agricultural soils are deficient in phosphorus. Here we show that a new mechanism of overyielding, in which phosphorus mobilized by one crop species increases the growth of a second crop species grown in alternate rows, led to large yield increases on phosphorus-deficient soils. In 4 years of field experiments, maize (Zea mays L.) overyielded by 43% and faba bean (Vicia faba L.) overyielded by 26% when intercropped on a low-phosphorus but high-nitrogen soil. We found that overyielding of maize was attributable to below-ground interactions between faba bean and maize in another field experiment. Intercropping with faba bean improved maize grain yield significantly and above-ground biomass marginally significantly, compared with maize grown with wheat, at lower rates of P fertilizer application (112.5 kg of P(2)O(5) per hectare). By using permeable and impermeable root barriers, we found that maize overyielding resulted from its uptake of phosphorus mobilized by the acidification of the rhizosphere via faba bean root release of organic acids and protons. Faba bean overyielded because its growth season and rooting depth differed from maize. The large increase in yields from intercropping on low-phosphorus soils is likely to be especially important on heavily weathered soils.

  2. Effects of long-term phosphorus fertilization and straw incorporation on phosphorus fractions in subtropical paddy soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-yuan; YANG Rui; GAO Ru; WEI Hong-an; CHEN An-lei; LI Yong

    2015-01-01

    Study on soil phosphorus (P) fraction is an important aspect in probing the mechanisms of soil P accumulation in farm-land and mitigating its losing risk to the environment. We used a sequential extraction method to evaluate the impacts of long-term fertilization and straw incorporation on inorganic, organic, and residual P (Pi, Po, and Pre) fractions in the plow layer (0–20 cm) of acidic paddy soil in southern China. The experiment comprised of six treatments:(i) no fertilizer control (CK); (i ) straw incorporation and green manure (SG); (i i) nitrogen and P fertilizer (NP); (iv) NP+SG; (v) NP+K fertilizer (NPK);and (vi) NPK+SG. The results showed that, compared to the initial total soil P content (TSP, 600 mg kg–1 in 1990), long-term (20 years) combined continuous P fertilizer and SG signiifcantly increased P accumulation (by 13–20%) while single fertilization (39.3 kg P ha–1 yr–1) could maintain soil P status at the most. The average soil P fractions comprised of extractable Pi, Po, and Pre by 51.7, 33.4, and 14.9%in total soil P, respectively. With comparison of no fertilizer addition (CK), long-term single fertilization signiifcantly (P0.05), our data indicate that SG may partial y substitute for fertilizer P input and minimizing soil P accumulation and subsequent environmental risk in the subtropical paddy soil.

  3. Organic compounds from plant extracts and their effect on soil phosphorus availability Compostos orgânicos de extratos de plantas e seus efeitos na disponibilidade de fósforo no solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sergio Pavinato

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of organic compounds from plant extracts of six species and phosphate fertilization on soil phosphorus availability. Pots of 30 cm height and 5 cm diameter were filled with Typic Hapludox. Each pot constituted a plot of a completely randomized design, in a 7x2 factorial arrangement, with four replicates. Aqueous extracts of black oat (Avena strigosa, radish (Raphanus sativus, corn (Zea mays, millet (Pennisetum glaucum, soybean (Glycine max, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor, and water, as control, were added in each plot, with or without soluble phosphate fertilization. After seven days of incubation, soil samples were taken from soil layers at various depths, and labile, moderately labile and nonlabile P fractions in the soil were analysed. Plant extracts led to an accumulation of inorganic phosphorus in labile and moderately labile fractions, mainly in the soil surface layer (0-5 cm. Radish, with a higher amount of malic acid and higher P content than other species, was the most efficient in increasing soil P availability.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de compostos orgânicos de extratos de plantas de seis espécies e da fertilização fosfatada na disponibilidade de fósforo no solo. Tubos de 30 cm de altura e 5 cm de diâmetro foram preenchidos com Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo. Cada tubo constituiu uma parcela, em delineamento completamente casualizado, em arranjo fatorial 7x2, com quatro repetições. Extratos líquidos de aveia-preta (Avena strigosa, nabo forrageiro (Raphanus sativus, milho (Zea mays, milheto (Pennisetum glaucum, soja (Glycine max, sorgo forrageiro (Sorghum bicolor e água (testemunha foram aplicados em cada parcela, com ou sem fertilização com fosfato solúvel. Após sete dias de incubação, amostras de solo foram coletadas em várias profundidades, e foram analisadas as formas lábil, moderadamente lábil e não lábil de fósforo no solo. Houve acúmulo de f

  4. Profile Distributions of Dissolved and Colloidal Phosphorus as Affected by Degree of Phosphorus Saturation in Paddy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZANG Ling; TIAN Guang-Ming; LIANG Xin-Qing; HE Miao-Miao; BAO Qi-Bei; YAO Jin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Soil dissolved phosphorus (P) and colloidal P mobilization could be closely related to the degree of phosphorus saturation (DPS).Effects of a wide range of DPS on the distributions of dissolved P and colloidal P in a paddy soil profile were investigated in this study.Dissolved P and colloidal P in water-dispersible soil colloid suspension increased obviously with increasing DPS.The change point of DPS was at 0.12 by using a split-line model.Above the value,dissolved P (3.1 mg P kg-1) in soil profile would increase sharply and then transfer downward.Compared with dissolved P,colloidal P was the dominant fraction (78%-91%) of P in soil colloid suspension,and positively related to DPS without a significant change point.The high release of colloids in subsoils with low DPS was attributed to the low ionic strength and high pH value in subsoils.The DPS also had a significant and positive correlation with electrical conductivity (EC),but it showed a negative correlation with pH value.However,the concentration of colloidal P was not greatly correlated to the pH value,EC and optical density of the soil colloid suspension.The results indicated that DPS was an important factor that may affect the accumulation and mobilization of water-extractable colloidal P and dissolved P.

  5. Manure and nitrogen application enhances soil phosphorus mobility in calcareous soil in greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhengjuan; Chen, Shuo; Li, Junliang; Alva, Ashok; Chen, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Over many years, high phosphorus (P) loading for intensive vegetable cropping in greenhouses of North China has contributed to excessive P accumulation, resulting in environmental risk. In this study, the influences of manure and nitrogen (N) application on the transformation and transport of soil P were investigated after nine years in a greenhouse tomato double cropping system (winter-spring and autumn-winter seasons). High loading of manure significantly increased the soil inorganic P (Pi), inositol hexakisphosphate (IHP), mobile P and P saturation ratio (PSR, >0.7 in 0-30 cm depth soil; PSR was estimated from P/(Fe + Al) in an oxalate extract of the soil). The high rate of N fertilizer application to the studied calcareous soil with heavy loading of manure increased the following: (i) mobile organic P (Po) and Pi fractions, as evidenced by the decrease in the ratio of monoesters to diesters and the proportion of stable Pi (i.e., HCl-Pi) in total P (Pt) in 0-30 cm depth soil; (ii) relative distribution of Po in the subsoil layer; and (iii) P leaching to soil depths below 90 cm and the proportion of Po in Pt in the leachate. More acidic soil due to excessive N application increased P mobility and leaching. The increase in Ox-Al (oxalate-extractable Al) and the proportion of microbe-associated Po related to N application at soil depths of 0-30 cm suggested decrease in the net Po mineralization, which may contribute to downward transport of Po in the soil profile.

  6. The distribution of soil phosphorus for global biogeochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is a major element required for biological activity in terrestrial ecosystems. Although the total P content in most soils can be large, only a small fraction is available or in an organic form for biological utilization because it is bound either in incompletely weathered mineral particles, adsorbed on mineral surfaces, or, over the time of soil formation, made unavailable by secondary mineral formation (occluded. In order to adequately represent phosphorus availability in global biogeochemistry-climate models, a representation of the amount and form of P in soils globally is required. We develop an approach that builds on existing knowledge of soil P processes and databases of parent material and soil P measurements to provide spatially explicit estimates of different forms of soil P on the global scale. We assembled data on the various forms of phosphorus in soils globally, chronosequence information, and several global spatial databases to develop a map of total soil P and the distribution among mineral bound, labile, organic, occluded, and secondary P forms in soils globally. The amount of P, to 50 cm soil depth, in soil labile, organic, occluded, and secondary pools is 3.5 ± 3, 8.7 ± 6, 13.2 ± 9, and 3.3 ± 2 Pg P respectively. The amount in soil mineral particles to the same depth is estimated at 12.5 ± 9 Pg P for a global soil total of 41.2 ± 20 Pg P. The large uncertainty in our estimates reflects our limited understanding of the processes controlling soil P transformations during pedogenesis and lack of measurements of soil P. In spite of the large uncertainty, the estimated global spatial variation and distribution of different soil P forms presented in this study will be useful for global biogeochemistry models that include P as a limiting element in biological production by providing initial estimates of the available soil P for plant uptake and microbial utilization.

  7. Microbiological transformations of phosphorus and sulphur compounds in acid soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenov Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of phosphorus and sulphur in soil is closely related to the dynamics of the biological cycle in which microorganisms play a central role. There is not much microbiological activity in acid soils because aerobes are scarce, rhizosphere is restricted to the shallow surface layer, and the biomass of microorganisms decreases with higher acidity. The aim of the research was to investigate the number of microorganisms, which decompose organic and inorganic phosphorus compounds and organic sulphur compounds in calcocambisol, luvisol, and pseudogley. The following parameters were determined in the soil samples: pH in H2O and in 1MKCl; the content of CaCO3 (%; humus content (%, nitrogen content (%; the content of physiologically active phosphorus and potassium (mg P2O5/100g of soil; mg K2O/100g of soil. The number of microorganisms was determined by the method of agar plates on appropriate nutrient media: the number of microorganisms solubilizing phosphates on a medium by Muramcov; the number of microorganisms that decompose organic phosphorus compounds on a medium with lecithin; and the number of microorganisms that transform organic sulphur compounds on a medium by Baar. All three types of soil are acid non-carbonate soils with a low level of available phosphorus and a more favorable amount of potassium, nitrogen, and humus. The largest number of bacteria, which transform organic phosphorus compounds, was found in calcocambisol. The largest number of phosphate solubilizing bacteria was recorded in pseudogley, whereas the largest number of phosphate solubilizing fungi was recorded in calcocambisol. The largest number of bacteria, which transform organic sulphur compounds, was recorded in pseudogley.

  8. Effect Of Wood-Based Biochar And Sewage Sludge Amendments For Soil Phosphorus Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frišták Vladimír

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of two biochars (pyrolysed wood chips and garden clippings on phosphorus (P availability in a heavy-metal contaminated soil poor in phosphorus. Short-term 14-days incubation experiments were conducted to study how applications of biochars at different rates (1 and 5 % in combination with (1:1 and without dried sewage sludge from a municipal waste water treatment plant (WWTP affected the content of soil extractable P. For P-availability analyses deionized water, calcium acetate lactate (CAL, Mehlich 3 and Olsen extraction protocols were applied. In addition, the content of total and mobile forms of potentially toxic heavy metals (PTHM was studied. Application of both biochars caused a significant decrease of PTHM available forms in sewage sludge amended soil samples. The concentration of total and available P increased with higher biochar and sewage sludge application rates.

  9. The chemical characteristics of soil which determine phosphorus partitioning in highly calcareous soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA TOPALOVIC

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus fractions from three highly calcareous soils (average, 24.9 ± 4.8 %CO32- from sampling sites with aMediterranean climate were isolated by sequential extraction. In order to provide a more reliable basis for the definition of the obtained P-fractions, principal component analysis was applied and from the chemical characteristics of the 14 investigated soils, those characteristics which define the content and association features of the P-fractions were assessed. The soils are characterized by a relatively high pH (8.0 – 8.2 and by significantly differing contents of organic mater, acid-soluble Mg and total P. These differences affected the various association features of the P-fraction with the soil constituents. The NH4F–P fraction (isolated with 0.5 M NH4F, pH 8.2 is defined by the contents of the main metals of the oxide–hydroxide–clay associations (Al, Fe,Mn or by the the redox potential (Eh of Mn. The accumulation of NaOH–phosphorus (extractable with 0.1M NaOH depended on the constituents of the oxide–hydroxide–clay association, the humic substances and Eh-related factors. In those soils in whichNaOH–Pis defined by the oxide–hydroxide–clay assoiation, the participation of Fe as a bridge-forming metal is proposed. The main part of total P, i.e., DP = TP – (NH4F–P + NaOH–P is defined by the status of Mn– and Fe–humic complexes or by the concentration of hydroxyl-ions.

  10. Landslide-induced changes in soil phosphorus speciation and availability in Xitou, Central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsin; Hsiao, Sheng-Che; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Chiu-Ping; Menyailo, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus is an important nutrient in forest ecosystem. In tropical/subtropical areas, phosphorus is generally limited because of strong soil weathering but its speciation and availability can be changed by disturbances, such as the geological landslide events. In this study, we evaluated the changes in soil P speciation and availability after landslide in a mountainous forest ecosystem in Xitou, central Taiwan. Five soil pedons along a landslide/nonlanslide affected sequence from deep landslide deposit to nonlandslide were collected. The Hedley's sequential extraction procedure and synchrotron-based phosphorus x-ray adsorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy were applied for the surface 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm soils to provide information concerning chemical and structural composition of phosphorus. The results indicated that plant available P (Resin-P + NaHCO3 extract P) and total P were reduced after landslide, from 150 and 500 mg kg-1, respectively, at nonlandsliding sites to 50 and 350 mg kg-1 at landsliding sites. However, the apatite-type P was significantly increased after landslide, from about 70 mg kg-1 at nonlandsliding sites to around 200 mg kg-1 at landsliding sites. Similar trend of enhanced apatite-type P after landslide was also observed in the XANES spectra. The ryegrass pot experiment confirmed that the landsliding soils were less fertile and had less growth rate. However, both nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients were limited at landsliding sites. The results demonstrated that soil P speciation and availability were significantly altered after landslide; these resultant changes are expected to influence functions in forest ecosystems.

  11. Isotopic assessment of soil phosphorus fertility and evaluation of rock phosphates as phosphorus sources for plants in subtropical China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, L.M.; Zhou, Z.G.; Feng, G.L.; Lu, R.K. [Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China); Fardeau, J.C. [Departement Environnement et Agronomie, INRA, Versailles (France)

    2002-05-15

    Soil phosphorus (P) deficiency is a major factor limiting crop productivity in many tropical and subtropical soils. Due to the acidic nature of these soils, rock phosphate (RP)-based P fertilizers that are cheaper than manufactured water-soluble P fertilizers can be an attractive alternative under certain conditions. Assessment of the efficacy of these alternative P fertilizers and a rational management of local P resources for sustainable agricultural production require an understanding of the dynamics of P in the soil-plant system and the interactions of various P sources in soils and monitoring of soil available P levels. The present work was conducted to test the applicability of the {sup 32}P isotopic kinetic method to assess the soil P fertility status and evaluate the agronomic effectiveness of local rock phosphates in subtropical China. A series of experiments was carried out in the laboratory, greenhouse and field conditions with the following specific objectives: (a) to evaluate the suitability of this isotopic kinetic method in evaluating soil P fertility in 32 soil samples collected across southern China, (b) to test and further develop chemical extraction methods for routine soil P testing, (c) to monitor the dissolution kinetics of local low to medium grade rock phosphate sources and their effect on soil properties and (d) to evaluate their agronomic effectiveness in greenhouse and field experiments. Since most of the studied soils had very low concentrations of soluble P and high P-fixing capacities, the isotopic kinetic method was found unsuitable for evaluating soil P fertility and to predict plant P uptake. In contrast, the proposed chemical extraction method (NaHCO{sub 3}-NH{sub 4}F) predicted very well plant P uptake, suggesting that this extraction method can be routinely used to evaluate soil bioavailable P in similar soils in subtropical China. From the incubation study, it was found that although the local low to medium grade RPs were

  12. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from undisturbed soil cores sampled along a natural clay gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2011-01-01

    was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...... and the so-called degree of P saturation (oxalate-extractable P on iron and aluminum minerals). Because higher colloidal P concentration was countered by a lower colloidal leaching, the total amount of leached P stayed remarkably constant along the natural clay gradient....

  13. Improving Phosphorus Availability in an Acid Soil Using Organic Amendments Produced from Agroindustrial Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huck Ywih Ch’ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In acid soils, soluble inorganic phosphorus is fixed by aluminium and iron. To overcome this problem, acid soils are limed to fix aluminium and iron but this practice is not economical. The practice is also not environmentally friendly. This study was conducted to improve phosphorus availability using organic amendments (biochar and compost produced from chicken litter and pineapple leaves, resp. to fix aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus. Amending soil with biochar or compost or a mixture of biochar and compost increased total phosphorus, available phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus fractions (soluble inorganic phosphorus, aluminium bound inorganic phosphorus, iron bound inorganic phosphorus, redundant soluble inorganic phosphorus, and calcium bound phosphorus, and organic phosphorus. This was possible because the organic amendments increased soil pH and reduced exchangeable acidity, exchangeable aluminium, and exchangeable iron. The findings suggest that the organic amendments altered soil chemical properties in a way that enhanced the availability of phosphorus in this study. The amendments effectively fixed aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus, thus rendering phosphorus available by keeping the inorganic phosphorus in a bioavailable labile phosphorus pool for a longer period compared with application of Triple Superphosphate without organic amendments.

  14. Improving phosphorus availability in an acid soil using organic amendments produced from agroindustrial wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Huck Ywih; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Majid, Nik Muhamad Ab

    2014-01-01

    In acid soils, soluble inorganic phosphorus is fixed by aluminium and iron. To overcome this problem, acid soils are limed to fix aluminium and iron but this practice is not economical. The practice is also not environmentally friendly. This study was conducted to improve phosphorus availability using organic amendments (biochar and compost produced from chicken litter and pineapple leaves, resp.) to fix aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus. Amending soil with biochar or compost or a mixture of biochar and compost increased total phosphorus, available phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus fractions (soluble inorganic phosphorus, aluminium bound inorganic phosphorus, iron bound inorganic phosphorus, redundant soluble inorganic phosphorus, and calcium bound phosphorus), and organic phosphorus. This was possible because the organic amendments increased soil pH and reduced exchangeable acidity, exchangeable aluminium, and exchangeable iron. The findings suggest that the organic amendments altered soil chemical properties in a way that enhanced the availability of phosphorus in this study. The amendments effectively fixed aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus, thus rendering phosphorus available by keeping the inorganic phosphorus in a bioavailable labile phosphorus pool for a longer period compared with application of Triple Superphosphate without organic amendments.

  15. [Topsoil phosphorus forms and availability of different soil and water conservation plantations in typical black soil region, northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Fan, Rui-Ying; Wang, En-Heng; Xia, Xiang-You; Chen, Xiang-Wei

    2014-06-01

    Aiming to understand soil phosphorus status of plantations in typical black soil region of Northeast China, the topsoil (0-10 cm) phosphorus fractionations and its availability were examined in four soil and water conservation plantations dominantly composed of Larix gmelini, Fraxinus mandshurica, Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica and Populus nigra var. italica x P. cathayan, respectively. The results showed that total P, Olsen-P and the concentration of different P fractionations in F. mandshurica and P. nigra var. italica x P. cathayan plantations were significantly higher than that of the other two coniferous plantations. Organic P was the major fractionation in the four plantations' topsoil, and sodium hydroxide extractable organic P (NaOH-Po ) representing moderately labile organic phosphorus was predominant, which accounted for 58.9% of total P. The contents of H2O-Pi and NaHCO3-P which were more labile to plant were lower, only accounting for 1.2% and 6.6% of total P, respectively. Except for NaHCO3-Po, all the other P fractions of four plantations correlated with each other, and they also had significant correlations with soil organic matter, total P, Olsen-P. Compared with the coniferous plantations, the broadleaf plantations presented higher availability of phosphorus.

  16. Phosphorus accumulation and spatial distribution in agricultural soils in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Gitte Holton; Kristensen, Kristian; Olesen, S E;

    2013-01-01

    Over the past century, phosphorus (P) has accumulated in Danish agricultural soils. We examined the soil P content and the degree of P saturation in acid oxalate (DPS) in 337 agricultural soil profiles and 32 soil profiles from deciduous forests sampled at 0–0.25, 0.25–0.50, 0.50–0.75 and 0.75–1....... discusses the potential importance of leaching, deep tillage, erosion and bioturbation for the observed accumulation of P in the subsoil....

  17. Agronomic and environmental soil test phosphorus method comparisons and diet modification impacts on poultry litter phosphorus composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene, Branly

    Phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields to freshwater ecosystems is of increasing concern due to elevated soil P levels brought on by long term and excessive application rates of manure and commercial fertilizers. Both Bray P1 and Mehlich-3 P (PM3) soil tests are used in Indiana to make fertilizer recommendations and to limit manure application rates. The Mehlich-3 P Saturation Ratio (PSRM3) has been proposed as an alternative to PM3 and the ammonium oxalate degree of P saturation (DPSOX) for assessing the risk of soluble P loss from soils. We assessed the correlations among agronomic soil test methods (PM3 and Bray P1), environmental soil test methods (soluble P: deionized water, DW; artificial rainwater, ARW; dilute salt extractable P, DSEP), ammonium oxalate P (POX), total P (TP), and P saturation methods from 565 Indiana surface soil samples. Significant correlations were found among the various STP methods evaluated, and Bray P1 and PM3 displayed the strongest coefficient of correlation (r = 0.93, p phytate P were significantly (pPhytate P, on the other hand, was reduced by 38, 37, and 47% for day 0, 7, and 14 of storage, respectively. Overall, DDGS influenced the forms of P in poultry litter with phytate P being the most impacted. The inclusion of DDGS in poultry diets seems promising as it can potentially decrease the levels of phytate P in poultry litters, which is of may be of environmental significance as phytate P can desorb inorganic P in soils.

  18. Effect of phosphorus and organic matter on soil-plant phosphorus relationships in spinach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zahedifar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effect of application of phosphorus (P and organic matter on soil-plant P relationship at different growth stages of spinach, an experiment was conducted at greenhouse conditions. Treatments consisted of two levels of organic matter (0 and 2% of sheep manure and three levels of P as Ca(H2PO42 (0, 20 and 60 mg P kg-1soil. Soil and plant samples were collected at five growth stages (the first sampling was in the fourth week after emergence, and the other samplings were each one week after the first sampling. The results showed that crop yield increased with the increase of soil P at all growth stages, whereas it had no significant effect on plant P content. In the 4th week of growth, plant P increased with an increase of soil P, and it remained relatively unchanged in the 5th week. But it decreased significantly in the 6th to 8th week. Concentration of plant nutrients depends not only on soil nutrients concentration but also on plant age and availability of other nutrients. In some stages of the plant growth, the growth rate might be too fast such that total uptake of the nutrients is not enough to maintain the necessary concentration. Plants required adequate P at early growth stages for optimum growth. Phosphorus uptake was increased with plant growth in all samples. Soil P content was higher in all organic matter treatments (especially in the 6th week after emergence. Phosphorus uptake in samples with organic matter, and no addition of P, was more than the samples which received P. This might be due to mineralization of organic P added to the soil.

  19. The distribution of soil phosphorus for global biogeochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is a major element required for biological activity in terrestrial ecosystems. Although the total P content in most soils can be large, only a small fraction is available or in an organic form for biological utilization because it is bound either in incompletely weathered mineral particles, adsorbed on mineral surfaces, or, over the time of soil formation, made unavailable by secondary mineral formation (occluded. In order to adequately represent phosphorus availability in global biogeochemistry–climate models, a representation of the amount and form of P in soils globally is required. We develop an approach that builds on existing knowledge of soil P processes and databases of parent material and soil P measurements to provide spatially explicit estimates of different forms of naturally occurring soil P on the global scale. We assembled data on the various forms of phosphorus in soils globally, chronosequence information, and several global spatial databases to develop a map of total soil P and the distribution among mineral bound, labile, organic, occluded, and secondary P forms in soils globally. The amount of P, to 50cm soil depth, in soil labile, organic, occluded, and secondary pools is 3.6 ± 3, 8.6 ± 6, 12.2 ± 8, and 3.2 ± 2 Pg P (Petagrams of P, 1 Pg = 1 × 1015g respectively. The amount in soil mineral particles to the same depth is estimated at 13.0 ± 8 Pg P for a global soil total of 40.6 ± 18 Pg P. The large uncertainty in our estimates reflects our limited understanding of the processes controlling soil P transformations during pedogenesis and a deficiency in the number of soil P measurements. In spite of the large uncertainty, the estimated global spatial variation and distribution of different soil P forms presented in this study will be useful for global biogeochemistry models that include P as a limiting element in biological production by providing initial estimates of the available soil P for plant uptake

  20. Phosphorus leaching in a soil textural gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2009-01-01

    Texture is a major factor influencing mobilization and transport of P in soil owing partly to differences in adsorptive properties, and partly to differences in pore-size distribution and pore organization. Slurry application strategies may be important mitigation measures for reducing agricultural...... P leaching. We propose diverse interactions between dominant flow pathways and cattle slurry: - Injection of slurry reduces P leaching compared to surface application in soils with preferential flow behaviour - Injection of slurry has less impact on P leaching compared to surface application...... in soils with matrix dominated flow behaviour We tested these hypotheses on three textural soil classes (Olsen-P 1.6 mg P 100 g-1) on intact soil columns (20*20 cm) and compared them to in situ P leaching before slurry application. In a loamy sand P leaching with both slurry application techniques slightly...

  1. Phosphorus depletion in forest soils shapes bacterial communities towards phosphorus recycling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergkemper, Fabian; Schöler, Anne; Engel, Marion; Lang, Friederike; Krüger, Jaane; Schloter, Michael; Schulz, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an important macronutrient for all biota on earth but similarly a finite resource. Microorganisms play on both sides of the fence as they effectively mineralize organic and solubilize precipitated forms of soil phosphorus but conversely also take up and immobilize P. Therefore, we analysed the role of microbes in two beech forest soils with high and low P content by direct sequencing of metagenomic deoxyribonucleic acid. For inorganic P solubilization, a significantly higher microbial potential was detected in the P-rich soil. This trait especially referred to Candidatus Solibacter usiatus, likewise one of the dominating species in the data sets. A higher microbial potential for efficient phosphate uptake systems (pstSCAB) was detected in the P-depleted soil. Genes involved in P starvation response regulation (phoB, phoR) were prevalent in both soils. This underlines the importance of effective phosphate (Pho) regulon control for microorganisms to use alternative P sources during phosphate limitation. Predicted genes were primarily harboured by Rhizobiales, Actinomycetales and Acidobacteriales.

  2. Utilization of phosphorus loaded alkaline residue to immobilize lead in a shooting range soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yubo; Qi, Fangjie; Seshadri, Balaji; Xu, Yilu; Hou, Jiexi; Ok, Yong Sik; Dong, Xiaoli; Li, Qiao; Sun, Xiuyun; Wang, Lianjun; Bolan, Nanthi

    2016-11-01

    The alkaline residue generated from the production of soda ash using the ammonia-soda method has been successfully used in removing phosphorus (P) from aqueous solution. But the accumulation of P-containing solid after P removal is an undesirable menace to the environment. To achieve the goal of recycling, this study explored the feasibility of reusing the P loaded alkaline residue as an amendment for immobilization of lead (Pb) in a shooting range soil. The main crystalline phase and micromorphology of amendments were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersion spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) methods. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), sequential extraction procedure, and physiologically based extraction test (PBET) were employed to evaluate the effectiveness of Pb immobilization in soil after 45 d incubation. Treatment with P loaded alkaline residue was significantly effective in reducing the TCLP and PBET extractable Pb concentrations in contrast to the untreated soil. Moreover, a positive change in the distribution of Pb fractions was observed in the treated soil, i.e., more than 60% of soil-Pb was transformed to the residual fraction compared to the original soil. On the other hand, P loaded amendments also resulted in a drastic reduction in phytoavailable Pb to the winter wheat and a mild release of P as a nutrient in treated soil, which also confirmed the improvement of soil quality.

  3. Relationships between foliar phosphorus fractions of Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica and soil available phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiong ZHAO; Xingyu LIU; Dehui ZENG; Jinhuan LIU; Yalin HU

    2009-01-01

    In order to find out the best foliar diagnostic index of phosphorus (P) nutrition in Mongolian pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) in the southeastern Keerqin Sandy Lands, the concentrations of total nitrogen (N), inorganic P, organic P and total P in needles of different ages and soil available P were examined. The results show that in the study area, soil available P was rather low (0.12-0.63mg/kg) and was significantly correlated with inorganic P (cPi) and total P (cPt) concentrations in current year needles of Mongolian pine. The significant correlation between soil available P and needle cPt derived from the significant correlation between cPi and cPt. Compared with cPt, cPi did reflect the level of soil P supply more accurately and more directly.

  4. Phosphorus Speciation and Sorption Processes in Preferential flow paths and Soil Matrix in Forested Podzolic Till Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saastamoinen, S.; Laine-Kaulio, H.; Klöve, B.

    2009-04-01

    The importance of preferential flow paths in nutrient leaching and subsurface transport has been identified in several studies mainly on agricultural soils. In forest soils research, decayed root channels, stone surfaces and other secondary soil structures have shown to affect unsaturated flow in glacial till soil. Until recently, the focus has been on nitrogen and carbon dynamics in the preferential flow paths. Preferential flow may also have a fundamental role in phosphorus (P) sorption processes and transport from forested till soils to surface waters. The main objectives of this study were to determine how preferential flow paths affect to P speciation, sorption and leaching in forested podzolic till soil. Field experiments were conducted in mixed coniferous forest, with soil type of glacial sandy till classified as Haplic Podzol. The first experiment was conducted in Ranua, Northern Finland. The preferential flow paths were identified by introducing Acid Blue 9 dye tracer to a 1 m2 study plot. The soil profile was vertically sliced and samples were collected from the stained preferential flow paths and unstained soil matrix. Ammonium-oxalate extracted trace elements and P, total and inorganic P, inorganic P fractions and organic P forms (31P-NMR spectroscopy) were analyzed from the samples. In the second experiment in Sotkamo, Eastern Finland, three 1 m2 study plots were selected from a forested hillslope: top, middle and bottom slope. The detection of preferential flow paths and the sampling procedure was identical to the first plot experiment. Samples were analyzed for ammonium-oxalate extracted trace elements and P. Also, the effect of reaction time, P concentration and temperature on the sorption process in preferential flow paths and soil matrix was studied by kinetic batch-type sorption experiments. Stone surfaces were the most dominant preferential flow paths and contained lower oxalate-extracted and total P concentrations than the soil matrix in all

  5. Rapid transport and transformation of phosphorus species during the leaching of poultry manure amended soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Courtney; Cade-Menun, Barbara; Liu, Corey; Hill, Jane

    2015-04-01

    The loss of phosphorus (P) from soils due to leaching is a major concern in heavily fertilized agricultural regions. The mobility and transformation of P species will depend on the source of manure fertilizer, leaching regime, and the extent of soil P saturation within the soil profile. We investigate spatial and temporal changes in the distribution of P species within a poultry manure-amended soil at two depths (0-5, 10-15 cm) as well as leachate P fractions during 10 weeks of leaching. Leachate P was primarily composed of dissolved fractions (soluble reactive P; dissolved unreactive P) and reached a maximum in the fourth week of leaching. In soils, the degree of P saturation (80%) and water extractable P (9 mg kg-1) were also greatest in week 4. 31P NMR spectra of the 0-5 cm depth indicate that surface soils were most similar to the poultry manure in week 4. During peak leaching, the proportion of orthophosphate (OrthoP) at the soil surface (0-5 cm; 80%) was greater than that from the lowest depth (10-15 cm; 72%), which contained relatively larger proportions of monoester-(17%) and diester-P classes (10%). Poultry manure likely contributed to the mobile pool of P species, including OrthoP, myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (myo-IHP), and nucleic acids. The appearance of neo- and D-chiro-IHP, as well as phospholipid signals during the leaching period indicate possible short-term (Phytate, organic phosphorus, degree of phosphorus saturation, soil, leachate, poultry manure

  6. Phosphorus leaching in a soil textural gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton

    2009-01-01

    Texture is a major factor influencing mobilization and transport of P in soil owing partly to differences in adsorptive properties, and partly to differences in pore-size distribution and pore organization. Slurry application strategies may be important mitigation measures for reducing agricultur...

  7. Organic Phosphorus Characterisation in Agricultural Soils by Enzyme Addition Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, Klaus; Frossard, Emmanuel; Bünemann, Else K.

    2013-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a non-renewable resource and it is a building block of many molecules indispensable for life. Up to 80 per cent of total soil P can be in organic form. Hydrolysability and thereby availability to plants and microorganisms differ strongly among the multitude of chemical forms of soil organic P. A recent approach to characterise organic P classes is the addition of specific enzymes which hydrolyse organic P to inorganic orthophosphate, making it detectable by colorimetry. Based on the substrate specificity of the added enzymes, conclusions about the hydrolysed forms of organic P can then be made. The aim of this study was to determine the applicability of enzyme addition assays for the characterisation of organic P species in soil:water suspensions of soils with differing properties. To this end, ten different soil samples originating from four continents, with variable pH (in water) values (4.2-8.0), land management (grassland or cropped land) and P fertilization intensity were analysed. Three different enzymes were used (acid phosphatase, nuclease and phytase). Acid phosphatase alone or in combination with nuclease was applied to determine the content of P in simple monoesters (monoester-like P) and P in DNA (DNA-like P), while P hydrolysed from myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (Ins6P-like P) was calculated from P release after incubation with phytase minus P release by acid phosphatase. To reduce sorption of inorganic P on soil particles of the suspension, especially in highly weathered soils, soil specific EDTA additions were determined in extensive pre-tests. The results of these pre-tests showed that recoveries of at least 30 per cent could be achieved in all soils. Thus, detection of even small organic P pools, such as DNA-like P, was possible in all soils if a suitable EDTA concentration was chosen. The enzyme addition assays provided information about the hydrolysable quantities of the different classes of soil organic P compounds as affected

  8. Phosphorus fertilization of 'Fuyutoyo' cabbages in phosphorus-rich Eutrustox soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Bernardes Cecílio Filho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Crop fertilization with P is a practice that constantly needs to be improved because of its high cost, natural reserve constraints, and environmental impact caused by the excessive use of nutrients. Phosphorus rates (0, 120, 240, 360, 480, 600, and 720 kg P2O5 ha-1 in the cultivation of 'Fuyutoyo' cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata in a P-rich Eutrustox soil (93 mg P dm-3 in Jaboticabal (21°15'22'' S, 48°15'58" W; 575 m a.s.l., São Paulo, Brazil, were evaluated in an experiment with a randomized complete block design with three replicates. Phosphorus rates influenced plant characteristics and soil P content. Maximum leaf and soil P content was obtained with 720 kg P2O5 ha-1, but maximum values of leaf area, leaf dry mass, cabbage head mass, and productivity were obtained with 420, 310, 430, and 437.5 kg ha-1 P2O5, respectively. Results indicate that even crops grown in a P-rich soil benefit from applying P fertilizer, which has a positive effect on the growth and productivity of the 'Fuyutoyo' cabbage.

  9. Substantial dust loss of bioavailable phosphorus from agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katra, Itzhak; Gross, Avner; Swet, Nitzan; Tanner, Smadar; Krasnov, Helena; Angert, Alon

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element in terrestrial ecosystems. Knowledge on the role of dust in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus is very limited with no quantitative information on aeolian (by wind) P fluxes from soils. The aim of this study is to focus on P cycling via dust emissions under common land-use practices in an arid environment by integration of sample analyses and aeolian experiments. The experiments indicate significant P fluxes by PM10 dust due to agricultural land use. Even in a single wind-dust event at moderate velocity (7.0 m s‑1), P flux in conventional agricultural fields can reach 1.83 kg km‑2, that accumulates to a considerable amount per year at a regional scale. The results highlight a negative yearly balance in P content (up to hundreds kg km‑2) in all agricultural soils, and thus more P nutrition is required to maintain efficient yield production. In grazing areas where no P nutrition is applied, the soil degradation process can lead to desertification. Emission of P from soil dust sources has significant implications for soil nutrient resources and management strategies in agricultural regions as well as for loading to the atmosphere and global biogeochemical cycles.

  10. Movement of Phosphorus in a Calcareous Soil as Affected by Humic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Zhen-Yu; WANG Qing-Hua; LIU Fang-Chun; MA Hai-Lin; MA Bing-Yao; S.S.MALHI

    2013-01-01

    When humic acid (HA) and phosphorus (P) fertilizer are simultaneously applied to soil,HA may affect the movement of P.A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of a commercial HA product co-applied with monocalcium phosphate (MCP) on the distance of P movement and the concentration of P in various forms at different distances from the P fertilizer application site in a calcareous soil from northern China.Fertilizer MCP (at a rate equivalent to 26.6 kg P ha-1) was applied alone or in combination with HA (at 254.8 kg HA ha-1) to the surface of soil packed in cylinders (150 mm high and 50 mm internal diameter),and then incubated at 320 g kg-1 moisture content for 7 and 28 d periods.Extraction and analysis of each 2 mm soil layer in columns showed that the addition of HA to MCP increased the distance of P movement and the concentrations of water-extractable P,acid-extractable P and Olsen P in soil.The addition of HA to MCP could enhance P availability by increasing the distance of P movement and the concentration of extractable P in soil surrounding the P fertilizer.

  11. Periphyton: an important regulator in optimizing soil phosphorus bioavailability in paddy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yonghong; Liu, Junzhuo; Lu, Haiying; Wu, Chenxi; Kerr, Philip

    2016-11-01

    Periphyton is ubiquitous in paddy field, but its importance in influencing the bioavailability of phosphorus (P) in paddy soil has been rarely recognized. A paddy field was simulated in a greenhouse to investigate how periphyton influences P bioavailability in paddy soil. Results showed that periphyton colonizing on paddy soil greatly reduced P content in paddy floodwater but increased P bioavailability of paddy soil. Specifically, all the contents of water-soluble P (WSP), readily desorbable P (RDP), algal-available P (AAP), and NaHCO3-extractable P (Olsen-P) in paddy soil increased to an extent compared to the control (without periphyton) after fertilization. In particular, Olsen-P was the most increased P species, up to 216 mg kg(-1) after fertilization, accounting for nearly 60 % of total phosphorus (TP) in soil. The paddy periphyton captured P up to 1.4 mg g(-1) with Ca-P as the dominant P fraction and can be a potential crop fertilizer. These findings indicated that the presence of periphyton in paddy field benefited in improving P bioavailability for crops. This study provides valuable insights into the roles of periphyton in P bioavailability and migration in a paddy ecosystem and technical support for P regulation.

  12. Modifications of the phosphorus cycle with development of lignite mine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trasar Cepeda, M.C.; Deblas, E.; Garcia Rodeja, I.; Leiros, M.C.; Gil Sotres, F. (Universidad de Santiago, Santiago (Spain). Departamento de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola)

    1993-10-01

    Various aspects of the P cycle in four and seven year old soils from the Meirama lignite mine (northwest Spain) were studied. With increasing soil age, the organic P (P(o)) content increased in parallel with the organic matter content. The observed increase in secondary inorganic P is related to the increase in the retention capacity for P with soil age. The observed increase in the HCl-P fraction can be attributed to a gradual dissolution of the non-extractable forms of P produced from fertilizers added in the course of spoil management. Both the C:P(o) ratio and phosphatase activity also increased with soil age, suggesting that biochemical mineralization processes are taking place and indicating a need for the hydrolysis of phosphate esters to ensure an adequate phosphorus supply to plants. All these findings suggest that in the long term plants may suffer a pronounced P deficiency.

  13. The Role of Organic Acids on the Release of Phosphorus and Zinc in a Calcareous Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Nezami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phosphorus (P and zinc (Zn fixation by soil minerals and their precipitation is one of the major constraints for crop production in calcareous soils. Recent Studies show that root exudates are effective for the extraction of the large amounts of nutrients in calcareous soils. A part of the root exudations are Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids (LMWOAs. LMWOAs are involved in the nutrients availability and uptake by plants, nutrients detoxification, minerals weathering and microbial proliferation in the soil. At nutrients deficiency conditions citric and oxalic acids are released by plants root in large quantities and increase nutrient solubility like P, Zn, Fe, Mn and Cu in the rhizosphere. These components are the large portion of the carbon source in the soil after exudations are mineralized by microorganisms, quickly. In addition, soil surface sorption can affect their half-life and other behaviors in the soil. In order to study the effect of oxalic and citric organic acids on the extraction of phosphorus and zinc from a calcareous soil, an experiment was conducted. Materials and Methods: Studied soil was calcareous and had P and Zn deficiency. Soil sample was collected from A horizon (0-30 cm of Damavand region. 3 g of dried soil sample was extracted with 30 ml of oxalic and citric acids extraction solutions at different concentrations (0.1, 1 and 10 mM and different time periods (10, 60, 180 and 360 minutes on an orbital shaker at 200 rev min-1.The soil extracts then centrifuged for 10 minutes (16000g. After filtering, the pH of the extractions was recorded and then phosphorus, calcium and zinc amounts were determined. Soil extraction with distilled water was used as control. Each treatment was performed in 3 replications. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA test followed by the Bonferroni method significant level adjustments due to multiple comparisons. Results and Discussion: The results of variance analysis showed

  14. Relationship of soil qualities to maize growth under increasing phosphorus supply in acid soils of southern Cameroon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TCHIENKOUA; M.JEMO; R.NJOMGANG; C.NOLTE; N.SANGINGA; J.TAKOW

    2008-01-01

    A large array of soil properties influences plant growth response to phosphorus (P) fertilizer input in acid soils.We carried out a pot experiment using three contrasted acid soils from southern Cameroon with the following main objectives:i) to assess the main soil causal factors of different maize (Zea mays L.) growth response to applied P and ii) to statistically model soil quality variation across soil types as well as their relationships to dry matter production.The soils used are classified as Typic Kandiudox (TKO),Rhodic Kandiudult (RKU),and Typic Kandiudult (TKU).Analysis of variance,regression,and principal component analyses were used for data analysis and interpretation.Shoot dry matter yield (DMY) was significantly affected by soil type and P rate with no significant interaction.Predicted maximum attainable DMY was lowest in the TKO (26.2 g pot-1) as compared to 35.6 and 36.7 g pot-1 for the RKU and TKU,respectively.Properties that positively influenced DMY were the levels of inorganic NaHCO3-extractable P,individual basic cations (Ca,Mg,and K),and pH.Their effects contrasted with those of exchangeable A1 and C/N ratio,which significantly depressed DMY.Principal component analysis yielded similar results,identifying 4 orthogonal components,which accounted for 84.7% of the total system variance (TSV).Principal component 1 was identified as soil nutrient deficiency explaining 35.9% of TSV.This soil quality varied significantly among the studied soils,emerging as the only soil quality which significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with maize growth.The 2nd,3rd,and 4th components were identified as soil organic matter contents,texture,and HCl-extractable P,respectively.

  15. Phosphorus Speciation of Sequential Extracts of Organic Amendments using NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinremi, O.

    2009-04-01

    O.O. 1Akinremi Babasola Ajiboye and Donald N. Flaten 1Department of Soil Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2NT, Canada We carried out this study in order to determine the forms of phosphorus in various organic amendments using state-of-the art spectroscopic technique. Anaerobically digested biosolids (BIO), hog (HOG), dairy (DAIRY), beef (BEEF) and poultry (POULTRY) manures were subjected to sequential extraction. The extracts were analyzed by solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of the total P analysed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) in the sequential extracts of organic amendments were orthophosphate, except POULTRY, which was dominated by organic P. The labile P fraction in all the organic amendments, excluding POULTRY, was mainly orthophosphate P from readily soluble calcium and some aluminum phosphates. In the poultry litter, however, Ca phytate was the main P species controlling P solubility. Such knowledge of the differences in the chemical forms of phosphorus in organic amendments are essential for proper management of these amendments for agro-environmental purposes Key words: organic amendments, solution NMR, sequential fractionation, labile phosphorus

  16. Determining phosphorus release rates to runoff from selected Alberta soils using laboratory rainfall simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Charles R; Amrani, Mohamed; Akbar, Muhammad A; Heaney, Danial J; Vanderwel, Douwe S

    2006-01-01

    Phosphorus losses from agricultural land can cause accelerated eutrophication of surface water bodies. This study evaluated the use of soil test phosphorus (STP) levels to predict dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations in runoff water from agricultural soils using laboratory rainfall simulation. The objectives of this study were to determine (i) to what extent STP concentrations can be used as a basis to predict P losses from Alberta soils and (ii) how extended rainfall simulation run times affected DIP losses. Soil samples collected from a total of 38 field sites, widely scattered throughout the southern half of Alberta, were subjected to rainfall simulation in the laboratory. The STP concentrations were determined using Miller-Axley, Norwest, Kelowna, Modified Kelowna Mehlich-III, and distilled water extraction methods. Each rainfall simulation event lasted for at least 90 min. Runoff samples were collected in time series for the duration of each simulation, during two distinct runoff intervals: (i) for the first 30 min of continuous runoff (T30) and (ii) for 40 min during runoff equilibrium (Teq). For all the STP extractants and both runoff intervals, the relationship with DIP-flow-weighted mean concentration (FWMC) was linear and highly significant with r2 values ranging from 0.74 to 0.96. However, the slopes of the resulting regression lines were, on average, 1.85 times greater for the T30 runoff interval over those computed for the Teq interval. Thus experimental methodology greatly influenced regression parameters, suggesting that more work was needed to verify these relationships under natural conditions. In addition, with many of the r2 values greater than 0.90 there would be little, if any, benefit derived by including soil properties in regression analysis.

  17. Changes in soil nitrogen and phosphorus under different broiler production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Sylvia; Rogasik, Jutta; Schnug, Ewald

    2004-01-01

    In a field study, soils of four conventional free-range and organic broiler runs were analyzed for N and P concentrations in the years 2000 and 2001. Zones of different use intensity by broilers were identified on the free runs and mean zonal nutrient contents were compared with each other. Intensity of use by birds and spatial distribution of soil nutrient concentrations were found to be related to each other. Fecal N input by broilers resulted in accumulation of soil mineral nitrogen (N(min)) contents down to a 90-cm sampling depth. In highly frequented "hot spots," plant requirement as defined by the German "N-Basis-Sollwert" (110 kg/ha N(min)) for grassland was exceeded in all four cases. This implies an increased environmental risk of ammonia volatilization and nitrate leaching. Fecal P input by broilers resulted in accumulation of plant-available and thus mobile soil P (phosphorus extracted with calcium-acetate-lactate [P(CAL)] and phosphorus extracted with water [P(w)]) in the most intensely used zones. In these areas, soil P contents exceeded 90 mg/kg P(CAL) (upper limit of soil test P defined in Germany for optimum plant yield) by as much as 217 mg/kg, which indicates an enhanced risk of P loss from the soil via runoff or leaching. The conclusion might be drawn that, with regard to nutrient loss from free-run soils, intensive indoor production in a closed system may be more environmentally neutral than conventional free-range or organic production. However, to put this into perspective, the scope of the environmental risk connected with spatially limited point accumulation of nutrients should be considered. Furthermore, an environmental evaluation must also account for the fate and environmental effects of the broiler litter produced inside the broiler house.

  18. Evaluation of Soil Labile Phosphorus Using a Double—Labeling (32P and 33P) Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGGUANG-HUO

    1992-01-01

    Isotopic exchangeability of phosphorus in four Chinese soils with and without P application was studied by 32P and 33P double-labeling technique in relation to routine chemical extractions.The results showed that Bray-I and Bray-Ⅱ reagents could extract most of the fast exchangeable P.Not all of the Olsen-P belonged to fast exchangeable P,but it was about the same quantity of fast exchangeable P in a calcareous soil and a neutral soil without P application.Sequential fractionation of the soil phosphorus showed that most of the added radioisotopes in high P fixation red soils were tightly held by iron and aluminium oxides,which could be totally extracted only by 0.1M NaOH solution.In the neutral and calcareous soils most of the radioisotopes added were loosely held on the surface of soil particles and could be extracted by anion exchange resin.Phosphate application increased the resin-P fraction significantly for all the soils studied.

  19. Effects of aluminium water treatment residuals, used as a soil amendment to control phosphorus mobility in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulén, Barbro; Etana, Ararso; Lindström, Bodil

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) leaching from agricultural soils is a serious environmental concern. Application of aluminium water treatment residuals (Al-WTRs) at a rate of 20 Mg ha(-1) to clay soils from central Sweden significantly increased mean topsoil P sorption index (PSI) from 4.6 to 5.5 μmol kg(-1) soil. Mean degree of P saturation in ammonium lactate extract (DPS-AL) significantly decreased from 17 to 13%, as did plant-available P (P-AL). Concentrations of dissolved reactive P (DRP) decreased by 10-85% in leaching water with Al-WTR treatments after exposure of topsoil lysimeters to simulated rain. Soil aggregate stability (AgS) for 15 test soils rarely improved. Three soils (clay loam, silty loam and loam sand) were tested in greenhouse pot experiments. Aluminium-WTR application of 15 or 30 ton ha(-1) to loam sand and a clay loam with P-AL values of 80-100 mg kg(-1) soil significantly increased growth of Italian ryegrass when fertilised with P but did not significantly affect growth of spring barley on any soil. Al-WTR should only be applied to soils with high P fertility where improved crop production is not required.

  20. Phosphorus, Agriculture & The Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Mullins, Gregory Lee

    2009-01-01

    Discusses potential environmental impacts of phosphorus, the functions of phosphorus in plants and animals, and the soil phosphorus cycle. Notes methods for controlling phosphorus losses to surface waters

  1. Hydrogeomorphology influences soil nitrogen and phosphorus mineralization in floodplain wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Gregory B.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Rybicki, Nancy B.

    2013-01-01

    Conceptual models of river–floodplain systems and biogeochemical theory predict that floodplain soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) mineralization should increase with hydrologic connectivity to the river and thus increase with distance downstream (longitudinal dimension) and in lower geomorphic units within the floodplain (lateral dimension). We measured rates of in situ soil net ammonification, nitrification, N, and P mineralization using monthly incubations of modified resin cores for a year in the forested floodplain wetlands of Difficult Run, a fifth order urban Piedmont river in Virginia, USA. Mineralization rates were then related to potentially controlling ecosystem attributes associated with hydrologic connectivity, soil characteristics, and vegetative inputs. Ammonification and P mineralization were greatest in the wet backswamps, nitrification was greatest in the dry levees, and net N mineralization was greatest in the intermediately wet toe-slopes. Nitrification also was greater in the headwater sites than downstream sites, whereas ammonification was greater in downstream sites. Annual net N mineralization increased with spatial gradients of greater ammonium loading to the soil surface associated with flooding, soil organic and nutrient content, and herbaceous nutrient inputs. Annual net P mineralization was associated negatively with soil pH and coarser soil texture, and positively with ammonium and phosphate loading to the soil surface associated with flooding. Within an intensively sampled low elevation flowpath at one site, sediment deposition during individual incubations stimulated mineralization of N and P. However, the amount of N and P mineralized in soil was substantially less than the amount deposited with sedimentation. In summary, greater inputs of nutrients and water and storage of soil nutrients along gradients of river–floodplain hydrologic connectivity increased floodplain soil nutrient mineralization rates.

  2. Phosphorus levels in soil and lettuce production due to phosphorus fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Mantovani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The leafy vegetables are considered nutrient-demanding, but are scarce in the literature works about phosphorus fertilization. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of phosphate on the production of lettuce, content and amount of P accumulated in leaf plants, and to relate levels of P in the clayey soil with plant production. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse in pots in a randomized block design with ten treatments and four replications. The treatments were made up of P, corresponding to 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 mg dm-3, as triple superphosphate powder. Portions of 6 dm3 of the clay soil (420 g kg-1 clay received lime, aimed at raising the V % soil to 70 %, equivalent to 20 t ha-1 of cattle manure, and the phosphate fertilizer according to the treatments, remaining incubated for about 30 days. At the end of incubation, each pot received a change of lettuce cultivar Verônica. The plant harvesting was performed 39 days after transplanting the seedlings. O P gave large increases in growth and production of lettuce, and culture responded positively to the application of high doses of the nutrient. A dose of 350 mg dm-3, equivalent to 800 kg ha-1 P2O5, was the most suitable for growing lettuce in the clay soil. In this work conditions, the phosphorus fertilizations it was necessary when the P-Mehlich contents in the clay soil were less than 75 mg dm-3.

  3. Changes in Soil Phosphorus Fractions Following Woody Plant Invasion of Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutton, T. W.; Kantola, I. B.; Filley, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    Many grass-dominated ecosystems around the world have experienced woody plant encroachment over the last century due to livestock grazing, fire suppression, and/or changes in climate and atmospheric chemistry. In the Rio Grande Plains of Texas, subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by N-fixing tree legumes have largely replaced grasslands and altered the biogeochemistry of this region. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of this grassland-to-woodland transition on the size, distribution, and availability of soil P pools. A modified Hedley method was employed to fractionate soil P into pools based on organic and inorganic forms and relative plant-availability. Soil samples (0-10 cm) were collected in remnant grasslands and near the centers of woody plant clusters ranging in age from 14 to 86 yrs in a subtropical savanna parkland in southern Texas. Soil P was fractionated into resin-extractable inorganic P, bicarbonate-extractable organic and inorganic P, hydroxide-extractable organic and inorganic P, acid-extractable inorganic P, and residual inorganic P forms. P concentrations in these fractions were determined by colorimetry, and soil total P was determined by lithium fusion. Organic P was calculated from the difference between total and inorganic P. Total P in whole soils increased dramatically from 98 mg P kg-1 soil in remnant grasslands to 168 mg P kg-1 soil in the oldest woody plant stands (70-85 yrs). P concentrations in all pools increased linearly with increasing woody plant stand age except acid-extractable phosphorus. The most dramatic increases were observed in the resin-extractable fraction (plant-available P), which increased from 3 to 13 mg P kg-1 soil, and in hydroxide-extractable P (the majority of the organic P in the system), which increased from 15 mg P kg-1 soil in grasslands to 26 mg P kg-1 soil in the wooded clusters. Although the exact mechanisms by which soil P increases following woody invasion remain unknown, we suggest that

  4. Effect of water treatment residuals on soil phosphorus, copper and aluminium availability and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombi, E., E-mail: enzo.lombi@unisa.edu.a [CSIRO Land and Water, Centre for Environmental Contaminant Research, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia); Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Building X, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); CRC CARE, PO Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia); Stevens, D.P. [CSIRO Land and Water, Centre for Environmental Contaminant Research, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia); Arris Pty Ltd, PO Box 5143, Burnley, Victoria 3121 (Australia); McLaughlin, M.J. [CSIRO Land and Water, Centre for Environmental Contaminant Research, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia); Soil and Land Systems, University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia)

    2010-06-15

    Water treatment residuals (WTRs) are produced by the treatment of potable water with coagulating agents. Beneficial recycling in agriculture is hampered by the fact that WTRs contain potentially toxic contaminants (e.g. copper and aluminium) and they bind phosphorus strongly. These issues were investigated using a plant bioassay (Lactuca sativa), chemical extractions and an isotopic dilution technique. Two WTRs were applied to an acidic and a neutral pH soil at six rates. Reductions in plant growth in amended soils were due to WTR-induced P deficiency, rather than Al or Cu toxicity. The release of potentially toxic Al from WTRs was found to be mitigated by their alkaline nature and pH buffering capacity. However, acidification of WTRs was shown to release more soluble Al than soil naturally high in Al. Copper availability was relatively low in all treatments. However, the lability of WTR-Cu increased when the WTR was applied to the soil. - The effect of water treatment residue application to soil was investigated in relation to phosphorus availability, and copper and aluminium phytotoxicity.

  5. Phosphorus leaching from a sandy soil in the presence of modified and un-modified adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharami, Somayeh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2014-10-01

    Phosphorus (P) leaching from a sandy soil was investigated in the presence of modified and unmodified clay minerals and nanoparticles (NPs). Compared with control soil, amended soil with NPs had the highest percentage of P retention than amended soil with clay minerals. Among the adsorbents used, the highest percentage of P retention was produced by Al₂O₃-chitosan while the lowest percentage of P retention was by zeolite. Data measured for P leaching after using adsorbents were used to predict P leaching using transport model. PHREEQC model was able to model P leaching from control and amended soil. After leaching, P values in control and amended soil were fractionated by a sequential extraction procedure. Concentration of P in Ca-bound fraction (HCl-P) after application of modified and unmodified clay minerals and NPs (except TiO₂ and Al₂O₃) increased and decreased, respectively. Saturation indices (SIs) and P speciation were assessed using the Visual MINTEQ version 2.3 program. According to the SIs, leaching P from control and amended soil with different adsorbent was controlled by dissolution of hydroxyapatite. The results indicated that used adsorbents can reduce P leaching from the sandy soil. Thus, retention of P by amended soil reduced a risk in terms of groundwater contamination with P.

  6. Effect of fertilization on soil phosphorus in a long-term field experiment in southern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. JAAKKOLA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was established in 1978 on a loam soil (pH in CaCl 2 7.1 to monitor gradual changes in the soil P status as response to different P fertilization regimes. For 18 years, cereals or grass were cultivated without P fertilization (P 0 or with annual P application of 35 kg ha -1 (P 1 or 70- 79 kg P ha -1 and 71-83 kg K ha -1 (P 2 K. The effects of the treatments on the crop yield varied yearly. The Chang and Jackson fractionation analysis revealed that fertilizer P not taken up by the plant crops was mostly in the NH 4 F extract and to a lesser extent in the NaOH extract. The NH 4 F-extractable P proved also to be the main P source for plants. However, the changes in the reserves of inorganic and organic P did not agree very well with the calculated P balance in soil (applied P minus plant P uptake. This disproportion was partly explained by the soil movement from plots to the neighbouring ones during the experiment. Phosphorus extractable in acid ammonium acetate or water decreased gradually when no P was applied and increased with increasing P accumulation. The changes in the inorganic P reserves due to different P fertilization history were reflected a little more sensitively in the water extraction test than in the acid acetate test.;

  7. Agronomic threshold of soil available phosphorus in grey desert soils in Xinjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Liu, H.; Hao, X. Y.; Wang, X. H.; Sun, J. S.; Li, J. M.; Ma, Y. B.

    2016-08-01

    Based on 23 years of data, yields of maize, wheat and cotton were modelled under different fertilizer management practices and at different levels of available phosphorus (Olsen-P) in soil. Three types of threshold models were used, namely linear-linear (LL), linear- plateau (LP), and Mitscherlich type exponential (Exp). The agronomic thresholds of available phosphorus were 25.4 mgkg-1 for cotton, 14.8 mgkg-1 for wheat, 13.1 mgkg-1 for maize and 25.4 mgkg-1 for the grey desert soil regions of Xinjiang in China as a whole.

  8. Nitrogen and phosphorus resorption in a neotropical rain forest of a nutrient-rich soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    In tropical forests with nutrient-rich soil tree's nutrient resorption from senesced leaves has not always been observed to be low. Perhaps this lack of consistence is partly owing to the nutrient resorption methods used. The aim of the study was to analyse N and P resorption proficiency from tropical rain forest trees in a nutrient-rich soil. It was hypothesised that trees would exhibit low nutrient resorption in a nutrient-rich soil. The soil concentrations of total N and extractable P, among other physical and chemical characteristics, were analysed in 30 samples in the soil surface (10 cm) of three undisturbed forest plots at 'Estaci6n de Biologia Los Tuxtlas' on the east coast of Mexico (18 degrees 34' - 18 degrees 36' N, 95 degrees 04' - 95 degrees 09' W). N and P resorption proficiency were determined from senescing leaves in 11 dominant tree species. Nitrogen was analysed by microkjeldahl digestion with sulphuric acid and distilled with boric acid, and phosphorus was analysed by digestion with nitric acid and perchloric acid. Soil was rich in total N (0.50%, n = 30) and extractable P (4.11 microg g(-1) n = 30). As expected, trees showed incomplete N (1.13%, n = 11) and P (0.11%, n = 1) resorption. With a more accurate method of nutrient resorption assessment, it is possible to prove that a forest community with a nutrient-rich soil can have low levels of N and P resorption.

  9. Extração do fósforo do solo pelo método de Neubauer e por métodos químicos Extraction of phosphorus from the soil by the neubauer and chemical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Catani

    1954-01-01

    Full Text Available Nêste trabalho são apresentados dados sôbre a extração do fósforo de alguns solos do Estado de São Paulo, obtidos pelo método biológico de Neubauer e por diversos métodos químicos. Foram empregados três tipos de solo : massapé-salmourão, terra roxa misturada e arenito Bauru. As amostras de solo foram submetidas à extração do fósforo por arroz (Oryza sativa L., usando a técnica de Neubauer, com pequenas modificações. Ao mesmo tempo o fósforo foi extraído das referidas amostras com os seguintes extratores : água distilada; solução de ácido acético 0,25 normal; solução de ácido sulfúrico 0,05 normal; solução 0,025 ncrmal de fluoreto de amônio e 0,05 normal de ácido sulfúrico ; solução 0,25 normal de ácido oxálico e 0,75 normal de oxalato de potássio.The present work is an attempt to correlate the results obtained in the extraction of soil phosphorus by various chemical methods with those obtained by the biological seedling method of Neubauer. The soil samples investigated represent three of the main soil types of the State of São Paulo, Brazil. Physico-chemical properties of these soils are given in the Portuguese text. Two samples of each soil type were prepared. To one of the samples superphosphate was added at the rate of 115 kg of P2O5 per hectare before being tested. Aliquots of the two samples were then extracted with the following extractors : distilled water ; 0.25 normal acetic acid ; 0.05 normal sulfuric acid ; 0.025 normai ammonium fluoride and 0.05 normal sulfuric acid ; 0.25 normal oxalic acid and 0.75 normal potassium oxalate. Rice plants (Oryza sativa L. were used for the Neubauer test instead of rye (Secale cereale L. because they had been found to be more satisfactory in previous tests. The results, representing the average of three replications, are summarized in table 1. Figures in column 4 represent the differences between the phosphorus absorbed from 100 g of soil and from the blank

  10. Solid-Phase Speciation and Solubility of Phosphorus in an Acid Sulfate Paddy Soil during Soil Reduction and Reoxidation as Affected by Oil Palm Ash and Biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisawapipat, Worachart; Charoensri, Kamolchanok; Runglerttrakoolchai, Jirawat

    2017-02-01

    Understanding phosphorus (P) speciation and how redox conditions control P solubility in acid sulfate paddy soils with limited P availability is crucial for improving soil P availability. We examined P speciation and extractability in an acid sulfate paddy soil incorporated with oil palm ash (OPA) and biochar (OPB) during soil reduction and subsequent oxidation. Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the soil samples revealed that P in the soil mainly occurred as P adsorbed to ferrihydrite and P adsorbed to gibbsite. During soil reduction, gibbsite-bound P was transformed into variscite, which was back-transformed to gibbsite-bound P during soil reoxidation. Sequential extraction results confirmed the dominance of Fe/Al (hydr)oxides-bound P (average 72%) in the soils. The OPA incorporation increased the exchangeable P pool concurring with the decrease in gibbsite-bound P. The OPB incorporation enhanced the dissolved P from the residual pool presumably due to electron shuttling of biochar with Fe(III) minerals during soil reduction. Our results highlight P dynamics in paddy soils, which are of immense importance for effective P-management strategies in rice cultivation.

  11. A structural equation model analysis of phosphorus transformations in global unfertilized and uncultivated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Enqing; Chen, Chengrong; Kuang, Yuanwen; Zhang, Yuguang; Heenan, Marijke; Wen, Dazhi

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the soil phosphorus (P) cycle is a prerequisite for predicting how environmental changes may influence the dynamics and availability of P in soil. We compiled a database of P fractions sequentially extracted by the Hedley procedure and its modification in 626 unfertilized and uncultivated soils worldwide. With this database, we applied structural equation modeling to test hypothetical soil P transformation models and to quantify the importance of different soil P pools and P transformation pathways in shaping soil P availability at a global scale. Our models revealed that soluble inorganic P (Pi, a readily available P pool) was positively and directly influenced by labile Pi, labile organic P (Po), and primary mineral P and negatively and directly influenced by secondary mineral P; soluble Pi was not directly influenced by moderately labile Po or occluded P. The overall effect on soluble Pi was greatest for labile Pi followed by the organic P pools, occluded P, and then primary mineral P; the overall influence from secondary mineral P was small. Labile Pi was directly linked to all other soil P pools and was more strongly linked than soluble Pi to labile Po and primary mineral P. Our study highlights the important roles of labile Pi in mediating P transformations and in determining overall P availability in soils throughout the world.

  12. Contribution of Iron Phosphate in Calcareous Paddy Soils to Phosphorus Nutrition of Rice Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUOZHI-FEN; TUSHU-XIN; 等

    1995-01-01

    A study was carried out on contribution of iron phosphate to phosphorus nutrition of rice plant under waterlogged and moist conditions,respectively,by use of synthetic Fe32 PO4.nH2O,tagging directly the iron phophate in calcareous paddy soils.Results showed that under waterlogged condition,similar to iron phosphate in acidic paddy soils.that in clacareous paddy soils was an important source of phosphorus to rice plant ,and the amount of phosphorus originated from it generally constituted 30-65% of the total phosphorus absorbed by rice plant.

  13. Succession of Soil Acidity Quality and its Influence on Soil Phosphorus Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUANWenbiao; CHENLixin

    2004-01-01

    Succession rules of soil acidity quality of larch plantations in first rotation at different development stages, succession rules of soil acidity quality of young stand of larch plantations in second rotation and the relationship between soil acidity and various forms of organic phosphorus and inorganic phosphorus were studied in mountainous area of eastern part of Northeastern China. The results showed that active acidity (pH value) inrhizosphere soil decreased continually with stand age increasing from young stand, half-mature stand, near mature stand to mature stand, but active acidity (pH value) in non-rhizosphere soil, exchange acidity, exchangeable aluminium, total hydrolytic acidity, and the ratio of exchange acidity and total hydrolytic acidity in rhizosphere soil and in non-rhizosphere soil increased apparently; total organic P, moderately resistant organic P, and highly resistant organic P in soil decreased at all age stages in larch plantations when soil acidity added. For rhizosphere soil of all stands of larch plantations at different development stages,there was positive correlation between Ca-P (except in young stand), Al-P(except in half-mature stand), Fe-P (except in near mature stand and mature stand), O-P (except in young stand), and soil active acidity,respectively; For rhizosphere soil, there was negative correlation between Ca-P (except in half-mature stand), Al-P(except in young stand), O-P, and exchange acidity, exchangeable aluminium, there was also negative correlation between Ca-P, Al-P(except in young stand and half-mature stand), Fe-P, O-P, and total hydrolytic acidity respectively. For rhizosphere soil, the correlation coefficient between Ca-P, O-P and total hydrolytic aciditydecreased, respectively, as stand ages up and that between Fe-P and exchange acidity,exchangeable aluminium increased, respectively, as stand ages grew. For non-rhizosphere soil, there was not significant correlation between soil acidity and various forms of

  14. Evaluation of potential effects of soil available phosphorus on soil arsenic availability and paddy rice inorganic arsenic content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Hou, Qingye; Yang, Zhongfang; Zhong, Cong; Zheng, Guodong; Yang, Zhiqiang; Li, Jie

    2014-05-01

    The transfer of arsenic from paddy field to rice is a major exposure route of the highly toxic element to humans. The aim of our study is to explore the effects of soil available phosphorus on As uptake by rice, and identify the effects of soil properties on arsenic transfer from soil to rice under actual field conditions. 56 pairs of topsoil and rice samples were collected. The relevant parameters in soil and the inorganic arsenic in rice grains were analyzed, and then all the results were treated by statistical methods. Results show that the main factors influencing the uptake by rice grain include soil pH and available phosphorus. The eventual impact of phosphorus is identified as the suppression of As uptake by rice grains. The competition for transporters from soil to roots between arsenic and phosphorus in rhizosphere soil has been a dominant feature.

  15. Penguins significantly increased phosphine formation and phosphorus contribution in maritime Antarctic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Renbin; Wang, Qing; Ding, Wei; Wang, Can; Hou, Lijun; Ma, Dawei

    2014-11-14

    Most studies on phosphorus cycle in the natural environment focused on phosphates, with limited data available for the reduced phosphine (PH3). In this paper, matrix-bound phosphine (MBP), gaseous phosphine fluxes and phosphorus fractions in the soils were investigated from a penguin colony, a seal colony and the adjacent animal-lacking tundra and background sites. The MBP levels (mean 200.3 ng kg(-1)) in penguin colony soils were much higher than those in seal colony soils, animal-lacking tundra soils and the background soils. Field PH3 flux observation and laboratory incubation experiments confirmed that penguin colony soils produced much higher PH3 emissions than seal colony soils and animal-lacking tundra soils. Overall high MBP levels and PH3 emissions were modulated by soil biogeochemical processes associated with penguin activities: sufficient supply of the nutrients phosphorus, nitrogen, and organic carbon from penguin guano, high soil bacterial abundance and phosphatase activity. It was proposed that organic or inorganic phosphorus compounds from penguin guano or seal excreta could be reduced to PH3 in the Antarctic soils through the bacterial activity. Our results indicated that penguin activity significantly increased soil phosphine formation and phosphorus contribution, thus played an important role in phosphorus cycle in terrestrial ecosystems of maritime Antarctica.

  16. Penguins significantly increased phosphine formation and phosphorus contribution in maritime Antarctic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Renbin; Wang, Qing; Ding, Wei; Wang, Can; Hou, Lijun; Ma, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    Most studies on phosphorus cycle in the natural environment focused on phosphates, with limited data available for the reduced phosphine (PH3). In this paper, matrix-bound phosphine (MBP), gaseous phosphine fluxes and phosphorus fractions in the soils were investigated from a penguin colony, a seal colony and the adjacent animal-lacking tundra and background sites. The MBP levels (mean 200.3 ng kg−1) in penguin colony soils were much higher than those in seal colony soils, animal-lacking tundra soils and the background soils. Field PH3 flux observation and laboratory incubation experiments confirmed that penguin colony soils produced much higher PH3 emissions than seal colony soils and animal-lacking tundra soils. Overall high MBP levels and PH3 emissions were modulated by soil biogeochemical processes associated with penguin activities: sufficient supply of the nutrients phosphorus, nitrogen, and organic carbon from penguin guano, high soil bacterial abundance and phosphatase activity. It was proposed that organic or inorganic phosphorus compounds from penguin guano or seal excreta could be reduced to PH3 in the Antarctic soils through the bacterial activity. Our results indicated that penguin activity significantly increased soil phosphine formation and phosphorus contribution, thus played an important role in phosphorus cycle in terrestrial ecosystems of maritime Antarctica. PMID:25394572

  17. Relevance of a perchloric acid extraction scheme to determine mineral and organic phosphorus in swine slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumer, Marie-Line; Béline, Fabrice; Spérandio, Mathieu; Morel, Christian

    2008-03-01

    To increase the phosphorus recycling potential from swine slurry, mineral phosphorus products which could be used as fertilizers should be obtained and new processes need to be investigated. A routine method is needed to better evaluate the dissolved and solid mineral phosphorus in swine slurry. Cold perchloric acid extraction method previously developed for wastewater or sludge analysis was adapted. Ionic chromatography was used to measure orthophosphate in extracts. Only one extraction step was needed to distinguish between mineral and organic phosphorus in slurry. Reproducibility of the method was high (less than 5% of variation on the measured fractions). Selectivity was assessed by adding several organic and mineral phosphorus sources in the slurry. Cold perchloric extraction followed by ionic chromatography was very selective in quantifying both the mineral and organic forms of phosphorus in swine slurry.

  18. Soil phosphorus dynamics and availability and irrigated coffee yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Henrique Pereira Reis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Research data have demonstrated that the P demand of coffee (Coffea arabica L. is similar to that of short-cycle crops. In this context, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of annual P fertilization on the soil P status by the quantification of labile, moderately labile, low-labile, and total P fractions, associating them to coffee yield. The experiment was installed in a typical dystrophic Red Latosol (Oxisol cultivated with irrigated coffee annually fertilized with triple superphosphate at rates of 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 kg ha-1 P2O5. Phosphorus fractions were determined in two soil layers: 0-10 and 10-20 cm. The P leaf contents and coffee yield in 2008 were also evaluated. The irrigated coffee responded to phosphate fertilization in the production phase with gains of up to 138 % in coffee yield by the application of 400 kg ha-1 P2O5. Coffee leaf P contents increased with P applications and stabilized around 1.98 g kg-1, at rates of 270 kg ha-1 P2O5 and higher. Soil P application caused, in general, an increase in bioavailable P fractions, which constitute the main soil P reservoir.

  19. Net transformation of phosphorus forms applied as inorganic and organic amendments to a calcareous soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audette, Yuki; O'Halloran, Ivan; Voroney, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The forms of phosphorus (P) in animal manure composts are different from that of synthetic P fertilizers, and this could affect how soil P chemistry will be altered when they are used as P amendments. The objective of this study was to analyze the net changes in the nature and dynamics of plant available P forms applied either as inorganic P (KH2PO4) or turkey litter compost (TLC) in calcareous soil with and without plant growth. Forms of TLC-P were characterized by x-ray diffraction and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy techniques. The amounts of various P forms in soils were measured by a sequential fractionation method after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks incubation. Brushite (Ca-P) and newberyite (Mg-P) were the major forms of inorganic P, and phosphate monoester was the major form of organic P present in TLC. The addition of inorganic P fertilizer increased the labile/moderately labile P, whereas the compost increased the moderately labile P extractable with weak acid (pH 4.2). Even though the amount of the labile P fraction in the compost-treated soil was smaller than that in the fertilizer-treated soils, ryegrass growth and plant P uptake were greater. The net transformation of the labile/moderately labile P was slower in the compost-treated soil without plant growth, however it was faster with plant growth. This study showed that P applied either as an inorganic or an organic amendment was recovered in different P fractions in a calcareous soil, and therefore it is expected that the P source would affect soil P chemistry. A weak acid extractable inorganic P fraction should be considered as plant available P especially in the compost-treated soil, that is converted into plant available P through direct and/or indirect root-induced acidification in the rhizosphere.

  20. Chemical Criteria to Assess Risk of Phosphorus Leaching from Urban Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gan-Lin; W. BURGHARDT; YANG Jin-Ling

    2005-01-01

    Soils from urban and suburban areas are normally enriched with phosphorus (P). Sixteen urban soils with a wide range of total P concentrations under typical urban land uses were sampled and analyzed for extractable P concentrations using water, sodium bicarbonate and citric acid. Meanwhile the soils were artificially leached in columns and P concentrations in the leachates were determined. With linear regression a two-stage linear relationship was found to exist between concentrations of P in the leachates and soil P contents obtained by various chemical measurements, i.e., there was a "change-point" denoting the critical threshold value for extractable P between the regression lines, above which concentrations of P in leachates increased substantially. These threshold "change-point" values were 1.5 mg kg-1 for water-soluble P and CaC12-P, 25 mg kg-1 for Olsen-P, and 250-350 mg kg-1 for citric acid-P with the sharpest change and the best predictor [r2 (upper) = 0.928, r2 (lower)= 0.807] appearing for Olsen-P. These "change-points" were considered important criteria in assessing the risk of P leaching from urban soils and could be used as standards to delineate and target hazardous areas in urban and suburban areas.

  1. Land-use intensification impact on phosphorus fractions in highly weathered tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranguit, Deejay; Guillaume, Thomas; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Deforestation and land-use intensification in tropics have increased over the past decades, driven by the demand for agricultural products. Despite the fact that phosphorus (P) is one of the main limiting nutrients for agricultural productivity in the tropics, the effect of land-use intensification on P availability remains unclear. The objective was to assess the impacts of land-use intensification on soil inorganic and organic P fractions of different availability (Hedley sequential fractionation) and P stocks in highly weathered tropical soils. We compared the P availability under extensive land-use (rubber agroforest) and intensive land-use with moderate fertilization (rubber monoculture plantations) or high fertilization (oil palm monoculture plantations) in Indonesia. The phosphorus stock was dominated by inorganic forms (60 to 85%) in all land-use types. Fertilizer application increased easily-available inorganic P (i.e., H2O-Pi, NaHCO3-Pi) in intensive rubber and oil palm plantations compared to agroforest. However, the easily-available organic P (NaHCO3-extractable Po) was reduced by half under oil palm and rubber. The decrease of moderately available and non-available P by land-use intensification means that fertilization maintains only short-term soil fertility that is not sustainable in the long run due to the depletion of P reserves. The mechanisms of this P reserve depletion are: soil erosion (here assessed by C/P ratio), mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) and export of P with yield products. Easily-available P fractions (i.e., H2O-Pi, NaHCO3-Pi and Po) and total organic P were strongly positively correlated with carbon content suggesting that SOM plays a critical role in maintaining P availability. Therefore, the ecologically based management is necessary in mitigating SOM losses to increase the sustainability of agricultural production in P limited highly weathered tropical soils.

  2. Applicability and limitations of enzyme addition assays for the characterisation of soil organic phosphorus across a range of soil types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, Klaus; Doolette, Ashlea; Smernik, Ronald; Frossard, Emmanuel; Bünemann, Else K.

    2014-05-01

    -like P (10 - 47%) and DNA-like P (0 - 15%). The four soil organic P classes detected by either 31P NMR spectroscopy or enzyme addition assays were well correlated with each other (R2 0.93 - 0.99). In soil:water filtrates, 0.1 - 4.1 mg enzyme-labile P kg-1 soil were detected, which consisted mainly of inositol phosphate-like P. In some soils, a low absolute amount of water-soluble organic P hindered a more detailed characterisation. In soil:water suspensions, enzyme-labile organic P ranged from 4.3 - 12.6 mg P kg-1 soil. However, the enzyme addition assay was only applicable on three soils, since in the other soils i) added enzymes were partly inhibited in soil:water suspensions and ii) the hydrolysis of organic P classes by soil intrinsic enzymes could not be accounted for. In conclusion, enzyme addition assays appear to be a promising approach for a rapid determination of four main soil organic P classes in NaOH-EDTA extracts. Especially the small amount of required sample size (< 1ml) and the relatively simple instrumentation facilitate a rapid and cheap analysis on these extracts. Application of this method is also possible on soil:water filtrates, but low amounts of organic P may hinder detailed analysis. Key words: soil organic phosphorus characterisation, enzyme addition assays, 31P NMR spectroscopy, soil suspensions, soil filtrate

  3. Dairy heifer manure management, dietary phosphorus, and soil test P effects on runoff phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, William E; Coblentz, Wayne K; Hoffman, Patrick C

    2012-01-01

    Manure application to cropland can contribute to runoff losses of P and eutrophication of surface waters. We conducted a series of three rainfall simulation experiments to assess the effects of dairy heifer dietary P, manure application method, application rate, and soil test P on runoff P losses from two successive simulated rainfall events. Bedded manure (18-21% solids) from dairy heifers fed diets with or without supplemental P was applied on a silt loam soil packed into 1- by 0.2-m sheet metal pans. Manure was either surface-applied or incorporated (Experiment 1) or surface-applied at two rates (Experiment 2) to supply 26 to 63 kg P ha. Experiment 3 evaluated runoff P from four similar nonmanured soils with average Bray P1-extractable P levels of 11, 29, 51, and 75 mg kg. We measured runoff quantity, total P (TP), dissolved reactive P (DRP), and total and volatile solids in runoff collected for 30 min after runoff initiation from two simulated rain events (70 mm h) 3 or 4 d apart. Manure incorporation reduced TP and DRP concentrations and load by 85 to 90% compared with surface application. Doubling the manure rate increased runoff DRP and TP concentrations an average of 36%. In the same experiment, P diet supplementation increased water-extractable P in manure by 100% and increased runoff DRP concentration threefold. Concentrations of solids, TP, and DRP in runoff from Rain 2 were 25 to 75% lower than from Rain 1 in Experiments 1 and 2. Runoff DRP from nonmanured soils increased quadratically with increasing soil test P. These results show that large reductions in P runoff losses can be achieved by incorporation of manure, avoiding unnecessary diet P supplementation, limiting manure application rate, and managing soils to prevent excessive soil test P levels.

  4. Assessment on Phosphorus Efficiency Characteristics of Soybean Genotypes in Phosphorus-Deficient Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A glasshouse study compared the growth and phosphorus (P) efficiency of 96 genotypes of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] in a P-deficient soil. The soybean genotypes differed greatly in growth, nodulation and P uptake after growing in the soil for 45 days, with shoot biomass ranging from 0.91 to 1.75 g per plant. The application of P improved biomass production, nodulation and P uptake and decreased root to shoot ratio, root length and surface area and P utilization efficiency. The 96 soybean genotypes were divided into 3 categories in P efficiency using the principal component analysis and cluster analysis, and 4 categories according to F values in combination with growth potentials. The P-efficient genotypes were associated with high biomass production, root to shoot ratio, root length and surface area and P uptake but low shoot to root P concentration ratio under P deficiency. The results indicate that there is a substantial genotypic variation in P efficiency in existing germplasm, and that P efficiency was correlated positively with dry weights of shoots and roots, ratio of root to shoot dry weight, root length and surface area, root P content and total P uptake. The shoot dry weight under P deficiency and relative shoot dry weight (deficient P/adequate P supply) are effective and simple indicators for screening P-efficient genotypes at the seedling stage.

  5. Interlaboratory validation of the Mehlich 3 method for extraction of plant-available phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hailin; Kaiuki, Solomon; Schroder, Jackie L; Payton, Mark E; Focht, Charlie

    2009-01-01

    The Mehlich 3 (M3) method is widely used for extraction of plant-available phosphorus (P) from soil over a wide range of pH values. The method is also used by many laboratories to determine multiple plant-available nutrients simultaneously. However, this method has not been statistically validated within and among laboratories. The objective of this study was to determine the repeatability (within-laboratory performance) and reproducibility (among-laboratories performance) of the M3 method by using a wide variety of soils. An in-house homogeneity test was conducted for 10 soils. Three replicates of each of the 10 soils were sent to 26 domestic and international laboratories primarily for P analysis. Samples were scooped, weighed, or both scooped and weighed for extraction. The P in extracts was quantified by the participating laboratories by using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) or colorimetrically. For the scooped samples analyzed colorimetrically, the repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) ranged from 2.07 to 12.1%; the RSDr ranged from 2.2 to 21.4% for the scooped samples analyzed by ICP-AES. For the weighed samples analyzed colormetrically, the RSDr values were 1.09-9.34%, and for the weighed samples analyzed by ICP-AES, they were 1.70-5.76%. For the reproducibility data, the RSDR values ranged from 6.85 to 50.8% for the scooped-colorimetry category, from 6.95 to 73.9% for the scooped-ICP-AES category, from 7.19 to 42.6% for the weighed-colorimetry category, and from 5.29 to 35.9% for the weighed-ICP-AES category. The greatest RSD values were associated with the Susitna soil, which had the smallest concentration of extractable P. Because of the relatively small concentration of P in this soil, the laboratories were attempting to measure solution concentrations that were close to the detection limits. The Horwitz ratios (HorRat) were also used to evaluate the repeatability, HorRat(r), and reproducibility, Hor

  6. [Soil Phosphorus Forms and Leaching Risk in a Typically Agricultural Catchment of Hefei Suburban].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hui-hui; Li, Ru-zhong; Pei, Ting-ting; Zhang, Rui-gang

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the soil phosphorus forms and leaching risk in a typically agricultural catchment of Ershibu River in Hefei Suburban, Chaohu Lake basin, 132 surface soil samples were collected from the catchment area. The spatial distribution of total phosphorus (TP) and bio-available phosphorus (Bio-P), and the spatial variability of soil available phosphorus (Olsen-P) and easy desorption phosphorus (CaCl2-P) were analyzed using the Kriging technology of AreGIS after speciation analysis of soil phosphorus. Moreover, the enrichment level of soil phosphorus was studied, and the phosphorus leaching risk was evaluated through determining the leaching threshold value of soil phosphorus. The results showed that the samples with high contents of TP and Bio-P mainly located in the upstream of the left tributary and on the right side of local area where two tributaries converged. The enrichment rates of soil phosphorus forms were arranged as follows: Ca-P (15.01) > OP (4.16) > TP (3. 42) > IP (2.94) > Ex-P (2.76) > Fe/Al-P (2.43) > Olsen-P (2.34). The critical value of Olsen-P leaching was 18.388 mg x kg(-1), and the leaching samples with values higher than the threshold value accounted for 16.6% of total samples. Generally, the high-risk areas mainly occurred in the upstream of the left tributary, the middle of the right tributary and the local area of the downstream of the area where two tributaries converged.

  7. Changes in Soil Minerology Reduce Phosphorus Mobility During Anoxic Soil Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, S. K.; Geohring, L. D.; Richards, B. K.; Walter, M.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) transfer from the landscape to receiving waters is an important environmental concern because these diffuse losses may cause widespread water quality impairments which can accelerate freshwater eutrophication. Phosphorus (P) mobilization from soil to surface and subsurface flow paths is controlled by numerous factors, and thus it can vary greatly with time and landscape scale. To determine whether P mobilization during soil saturation in the landscape was caused or controlled by complexation, iron reduction or ligand exchange, experiments were carried out to better characterize the interrelationships of varying P sources with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and soil anoxic conditions. The soil incubation experiments consisted of treatments with distilled water, 5 mM acetic acid (HAc), 0.05% humic acid (HA) and glucose (40 mM) at 26 o C under anaerobic conditions to isolate effects of the various P exchange processes. The experimental results suggest that during soil saturation, the loosely bound P, which is primarily associated with iron oxyhydroxides, was mobilized by both reduction and complexation processes. Good correlations were observed between ferrous iron (Fe+2) and DOC, and between total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) and DOC, facilitating P desorption to the soil water. The anaerobic soil conditions with different P sources also indicated that mineralization facilitated P mobility, mainly due to chelation (humics and metabolites) and as a result of the bio-reduction of iron when fresh litter and grass were present. The organic P sources which are rich in carbohydrate and cellulose and that undergo fermentation due to the action of lactate forming organisms also caused a release of P. The easily metabolizable DOC sources lead to intensive bio-reduction of soil with the release of Fe, however this did not necessarily appear to cause more TDP in the soil solution. The varying P additions in soils with water, HAc and glucose (40mm) before and after

  8. [Effects of soil phosphorus level on morphological and photosynthetic characteristics of Ageratina adenophora and chromolaena odorata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Manlia; Feng, Yulong; Li, Xin

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, a comparative study was made on the growth, morphology, biomass allocation, and photosynthesis of two invasive plant species Ageratina adenophora and Chromolaena odorata under five soil phosphorus levels, aimed to know how the test plant species acclimate to the changes of soil phosphorus level, evaluate which plant traits were associated with the invasiveness of the two species, and know whether the increased level of soil phosphorus could facilitate their invasion. The results showed that the two species had considerable phenotypic plasticity and ? phosphorus acclimation ability. At low phosphorus levels, their root mass ratio increased, which could enhance the nutrient capture ability, while at high phosphorus levels, their specific leaf area, maximum net photosynthetic rate, light saturation point, and chlorophyll and carotenoid contents per unit area were high, and the assimilative capacity and area increased, which could facilitate their carbon gain. A. adenophora had higher phosphorus acclimation ability than C. odorata. With the increase of phosphorous level, the relative growth rate, total biomass, branch number, leaf area index, and maximum net photosynthetic rate of the two species increased significantly, and most of the parameters were not decreased significantly under over-optimal phosphorus level. The two species could grow better under high phosphorus levels which were usually excessive and/or harmful for most native species, and enhanced soil phosphorus level might promote their invasion. At high phosphorus levels, the two invasive plant species might shade out native species through increasing their plant height, branch number, and leaf area index. The two species could maintain relatively high growth rate under high phosphorus levels in dry season when native plant species almost stopped growing. The ability that the invasive plant species could temporally use natural resources which native plant species could not use was also

  9. Phosphorus sorption-desorption and effects of temperature, pH and salinity on phosphorus sorption in marsh soils from coastal wetlands with different flooding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Ye, Xiaofei; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhao, Qingqing; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2017-12-01

    Wetland soils act as a sink or source of phosphorus (P) to the overlaying water due to phosphorus sorption-desorption processes. Litter information is available on sorption and desorption behaviors of phosphorus in coastal wetlands with different flooding conditions. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate phosphorus sorption-desorption processes, fractions of adsorbed phosphorus, and the effects of salinity, pH and temperature on phosphorus sorption on soils in tidal-flooding wetlands (TW), freshwater-flooding wetlands (FW) and seasonal-flooding wetlands (SW) in the Yellow River Delta. Our results showed that the freshly adsorbed phosphorus dominantly exists in Occluded-P and Fe/AlP and their percentages increased with increasing phosphorus adsorbed. Phosphorus sorption isotherms could be better described by the modified Langmuir model than by the modified Freundlich model. A binomial equation could be properly used to describe the effects of salinity, pH, and temperature on phosphorus sorption. Phosphorus sorption generally increased with increasing salinity, pH, and temperature at lower ranges, while decreased in excess of some threshold values. The maximum phosphorus sorption capacity (Qmax) was larger for FW soils (256 mg/kg) compared with TW (218 mg/kg) and SW soils (235 mg/kg) (p < 0.05). The percentage of phosphorus desorption (Pdes) in the FW soils (7.5-63.5%) was much lower than those in TW (27.7-124.9%) and SW soils (19.2-108.5%). The initial soil organic matter, pH and the exchangeable Al, Fe and Cd contents were important factors influencing P sorption and desorption. The findings of this study indicate that freshwater restoration can contribute to controlling the eutrophication status of water bodies through increasing P sorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the Langmuir model in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool for high soil phosphorus condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorus adsorption by a water treatment residual was tested through Langmuir and linear sorption isotherms and applied in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The objective of this study was to use laboratory and greenhouse experimental phosphorus data to evaluate the performance of a modi...

  11. Some plant extracts retarde nitrification in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul–Mehdi S. AL-ANSARI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An incubation experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of aqueous extracts of 17 plant materials on nitrification inhibition of urea- N in soil as compared with chemical inhibitor Dicyandiamide (DCD. Plant materials used in study were collected from different areas of Basrah province, south of Iraq. Aqueous extracts were prepared at ratio of 1:10 (plant material: water and added at conc. of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 ml g– 1 soil to loamy sand soil. DCD was added to soil at rate of 50 µg g-1 soil . Soil received urea at rate of 1000 µg N g-1 soil. Treated soils were incubated at 30 OC for 40 days. Results showed that application of all plant extracts, except those of casuarina, date palm and eucalyptus to soil retarded nitrification in soil. Caper, Sowthistle ,bladygrass and pomegranate extracts showed highest inhibition percentage (51, 42, 40 and 40 %, respectively and were found to be more effective than DCD (33 %. Highest inhibition was achieved by using those extracts at conc. of 0.1 ml g-1 soil after 10 days of incubation . Data also revealed that treated soil with these plant extracts significantly increased amount of NH4+–N and decreased amount of NO3-–N accumulation in soil compared with DCD and control treatments. Results of the study suggested a possibility of using aqueous extracts of some studied plants as potent nitrification inhibitor in soil.

  12. Relationships Between Agronomic and Environmental Soil Test Phosphorus in Three Typical Cultivated Soils in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Min; JIE Xiao-Lei; ZHU Yong-Guan; HOU Yan-Lin; ZHANG Tie-Quan

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the relationships between agronomic soil test P and environmental soil test P in three soils predominately distributing in three typical agricultural production areas of China. Soil P was analyzed using Bray-1 (BP), Oisen (OP), and Mehlich-3 (MP) methods as agronomic tests, and using Fe-oxide impregnated filter paper (FeP), anion-exchange resin membrane (RP), and water (WP) as environmental tests. There were linear relationships between soil P extractable with all the tests evaluated. The regression coefficients, R2, ranged from 0.8164 to 0.9409 between each two of thc agronomic soil test P, and ranged from 0.4702 to 0.8990 between each two of the environmental soil test P, when the three soils were considered separately. When soil test P was analyzed across all the three soils, the highest regression R2 was found between OP and MP (0.7940) amongst agronomic soil test P, and between FeP and RP amongst environmental soil test P (0.8842). While all of the three agronomic soil test P was linearly related to each of the environmental soil test P across the three soils, strongest relationships were found between OP and environmental soil test P. Agronomic OP may be adopted as an analytical tool for environmental prediction of soil P.

  13. External costs of cadmium emissions to soil: a drawback of phosphorus fertilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzol, Massimo; C.R. Smart, James; Thomsen, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: In this study the Impact-Pathway Approach methodology was applied for monetary valuation of health impacts due to cadmium emitted to soil as a micro-pollutant present in phosphorus fertilizers. Due to the high persistency of cadmium in soil, and high soil-to-plant transfer rates, humans...

  14. Phytoremediation of high phosphorus soil by annual ryegrass and common bermudagrass harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Removal of soil phosphorus (P) in crop harvest is a remediation option for soils high in P. This four-year field-plot study determined P uptake by annual ryegrass (ARG, Lolium multiflorum Lam.) and common bermudagrass (CB, Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) from Ruston soil (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic...

  15. Effect of reactive substrates used for the removal of phosphorus from wastewater on the fertility of acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucarella, Victor; Zaleski, Tomasz; Mazurek, Ryszard; Renman, Gunno

    2008-07-01

    Reactive substrates used in filter systems can reduce phosphorus (P) pollution and, once saturated with P, may be recycled in agriculture. These substrates are usually calcium carbonate derivates with high pH values, which may be particularly beneficial for acid soils. Three reactive substrates (Filtra P, Polonite and wollastonite) saturated with P were used as amendments to an acid soil in a pot experiment. Substrate amendments tended to improve ryegrass yield and P uptake compared with control and potassium phosphate treatments. Polonite produced the highest yield/amendment ratio, while Polonite and Filtra P significantly increased the concentrations of P and Ca in the ryegrass. Addition of all three substrates increased the pH, AL-extractable P and cation exchange capacity of soils during the experiment. These substrates can therefore be applied to acid soils in order to recycle P and improve soil properties.

  16. Soil phosphorus retention potential in the United States Pacific Northwest summarized for NHDPlus v2 catchments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the area of soils with different levels of phosphorus retention potential in the...

  17. Extent of soil with low phosphorus retention potential in the United States Pacific Northwest

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the extent of soils with low phosphorus retention potential in the Pacific...

  18. Extent of soil with high phosphorus retention potential in the United States Pacific Northwest

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the extent of soils with high phosphorus retention potential in the Pacific...

  19. Extent of soil with moderate phosphorus retention potential in the United States Pacific Northwest

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the extent of soils with moderate phosphorus retention potential in the Pacific...

  20. Access to organic and insoluble sources of phosphorus varies among soil Chytridiomycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, David J; Letcher, Peter M; McGee, Peter A

    2006-09-01

    The sources of minerals accessed by fungi in the Chytridiomycota (chytrid) in soil are largely unknown. The ability of ten species of soil chytrids to use various sources of phosphorus was examined in vitro. While all grew on orthophosphate, fifty per cent of isolates grew on phytic acid, and one isolate grew on DNA as the sole source of phosphorus. All isolates solubilised and utilised CaHPO(4). Most isolates utilised hydroxyapatite when NH (4) (+) was the nitrogen source. When ammonium was omitted, 50% of isolates solubilised hydroxyapatite. Many soil chytrids may utilise phosphomonoesters as the sole source of phosphorus, and access to DNA appears limited. We suggest that the capacity to use different sources of phosphorus may influence the diversity of chytrids found in Australian soils.

  1. Extent of soil with very high phosphorus retention potential in the United States Pacific Northwest

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the extent of soils with very high levels of phosphorus retention potential in...

  2. Soil vapor extraction with dewatering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, N.R. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-08-01

    The physical treatment technology of soil vapor extraction (SVE) is reliable, safe, robust, and able to remove significant amounts of mass at a relatively low cost. SVE combined with a pump-and-treat system to create a dewatered zone has the opportunity to remove more mass with the added cost of treating the extracted groundwater. Various limiting processes result in a significant reduction in the overall mass removal rates from a SVE system in porous media. Only pilot scale, limited duration SVE tests conducted in low permeability media have been reported in the literature. It is expected that the presence of a fracture network in low permeability media will add another complexity to the limiting conditions surrounding the SVE technology. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Phosphorus forms and chemistry in the soil profile under long-term conservation tillage: a phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade-Menun, Barbara J; Carter, Martin R; James, Dean C; Liu, Corey W

    2010-01-01

    In many regions, conservation tillage has replaced conventional tilling practices to reduce soil erosion, improve water conservation, and increase soil organic matter. However, tillage can have marked effects on soil properties, specifically nutrient redistribution or stratification in the soil profile. The objective of this research was to examine soil phosphorus (P) forms and concentrations in a long-term study comparing conservation tillage (direct drilling, "No Till") and conventional tillage (moldboard plowing to 20 cm depth, "Till") established on a fine sandy loam (Orthic Humo-Ferric Podzol) in Prince Edward Island, Canada. No significant differences in total carbon (C), total nitrogen (N), total P, or total organic P concentrations were detected between the tillage systems at any depth in the 0- to 60-cm depth range analyzed. However, analysis with phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed differences in P forms in the plow layer. In particular, the concentration of orthophosphate was significantly higher under No Till than Till at 5 to 10 cm, but the reverse was true at 10 to 20 cm. Mehlich 3-extractable P was also significantly higher in No Till at 5 to 10 cm and significantly higher in Till at 20 to 30 cm. This P stratification appears to be caused by a lack of mixing of applied fertilizer in No Till because the same trends were observed for pH and Mehlich 3-extractable Ca (significantly higher in the Till treatment at 20 to 30 cm), reflecting mixing of applied lime. The P saturation ratio was significantly higher under No Till at 0 to 5 cm and exceeded the recommended limits, suggesting that P stratification under No Till had increased the potential for P loss in runoff from these sites.

  4. Colloid and Phosphorus Leaching From Undisturbed Soil Cores Sampled Along a Natural Clay Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann;

    2011-01-01

    The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...

  5. Phosphorus in agroecosystems on gray forest soils in the opolie regions of Central Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitishen, V. I.; Lichko, V. I.; Kurganova, E. V.

    2008-08-01

    Long-term stationary field experiments revealed a poor supply of gray forest soils with available phosphorus, which provides no more than half the amount necessary for optimum nutrition of plants. It was found that agricultural crops with different capacities to assimilate phosphates from the soil and fertilizers have strong requirements for phosphorus fertilizers and abruptly increase their utilization in the production process with increasing level of nitrogen nutrition. Crops with the optimum level of nitrogen nutrition uptake a double amount of phosphorus compared to crops depleted in nitrogen. Clover and barley have an increased capacity to mobilize soil phosphates from the lower horizons at an extremely low content of available forms of them in the plow layer. Winter wheat and corn are characterized by an active uptake of phosphorus applied with fertilizer and its efficient utilization in the production process if the nitrogen supply is not a limiting factor. The level of phosphorus nutrition of subsequent rotation crops increases due to the enrichment of the root-inhabited soil layer with phosphorus from clover root and harvest residues. Based on the data about the unacceptably abrupt decrease in the application of mineral fertilizers in Russian agriculture (90% of fertilizers are exported now), it is shown that the export of fertilizers should be limited at the state level, because chemicals, and primarily phosphorus fertilizers, should be considered strategic resources for internal use only.

  6. Amending soils with sediment material from constructed wetlands increases phosphorus sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Johanna; Uusitalo, Risto; Leppänen, Janette; Yli-Halla, Markku

    2017-04-01

    Sediment of agricultural constructed wetlands (CWs) is comprised of matter eroded from surrounding fields. This material is rich in aluminium (Al) and iron (Fe) (hydr)oxides that have a high affinity for phosphorus (P). Sediment material returned to fields could therefore affect soil P retention characteristics. We incubated a clay soil with a high soil test P (STP, 24 mg PAc l-1; extracted with pH 4.65 ammonium acetate buffer) and a sandy loam with excessive STP (210 mg PAc l-1) for three weeks with increasing amounts of CW sediment: 0, 2, 5, 10 and 50% of the sample volume. After incubation, the soil-sediment mixtures were studied with the quantity/intensity (Q/I) technique, using chemical extractions and by exposing the mixtures to simulated rainfall. Sorption affinity for P regularly increased with increasing the sediment share of the mixtures, the 0% sediment content having the lowest and 50% sediment content the highest P sorption. With 0% sediment application, the value of equilibrium P concentration (EPC0) determined by Q/I technique, was 0.69 and 44.3 mg l-1 for clay soil and sandy loam, respectively. With 2-5% sediment amendment, the EPC0 decreased 13-36% for clay soil and 13-54% for sandy loam. The 50% sediment mixtures had EPC0 of 0.05 mg l-1 for both soils. At a practically feasible sediment addition rate of 5%, dissolved reactive P (DRP) in percolating water from simulated rainfall decreased by 55% in the clay soil and 54% in sandy loam (p<0.001 in both cases). Particulate-P (PP) also showed a decreasing trend with increasing sediment addition rate. Upon prolonged simulated rainfall, the decreasing effect of sediment on DRP and PP declined somewhat. The effects of sediment addition can be attributed partly to increased salt concentrations in the sediment, which have a short-term effect on P mobilisation, but mostly to increased concentrations of Al and Fe (hydr)oxides, increasing long-term P sorption capacity. Amending the soils with sediment material

  7. Soil phosphorus - new insights into a critical cycle across many soil functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Peter; Zimmer, Dana

    2017-04-01

    The fate of phosphorus (P-) compounds in the soil - plant - water - system is linked with most soil functions such as productivity for agricultural crops, reactor for nutrient cycling, filter and buffer for water, and biodiversity. The P-compounds, mostly phosphates in a multitude of chemical bonds, may have contradicting influences on soil functions. For instance, P-concentrations may be suboptimal for crop yields but at the same time exceeding the soil filter/buffer capacity for water resources. Modern agriculture has increased this misbalance. Therefore, a better soil P management that balances all soil functions requires a deeper understanding of the P-cycling in the environment. The collaborative project "InnoSoilPhos" in the frame of the BonaRes-program of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) aims at disclosing the chemical composition, biogeochemical transformations and microbiological fundamentals of P-cycling and P-transport processes across all relevant scales from atomic to catchment and landscapes. The contribution will give an overview on the project and some examples for the latest findings on P-reactions at mineral surfaces (experimental and theoretical), microorganism diversity involved in soil P-transformations, crop yield responses to P-fertilizer regimes (including new P-recycling products) and, finally, hot spots and hot moments of P-release from soils into adjoining freshwater systems. These findings allow some preliminary demands and frame conditions for an improved soil P management to better balance the soil functions and safe the global mineable P resources.

  8. Soil phosphorus forms as quality indicators of soils under different vegetation covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrión, María-Belén; López, Olga; Lafuente, Francisco; Mulas, Rafael; Ruipérez, César; Puyo, Alberto

    2007-05-25

    The type of vegetation cover determines the physicochemical and biological properties of the soil over which they are developing. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different vegetation covers on the forms of soil phosphorus, in order to know which of these forms can be used as a soil quality indicator. The experimental area was located on the acidic plateau at the North of Palencia (North Spain), where an area was selected vegetation covers very close to each other: pine (Pinus sylvestris), oak (Quercus pyrenaica), and three different shrub species (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Erica australis and Halimium alyssoides). The Ah horizon was sampled and pH, total organic C (C(org)), total N (N), cationic exchange capacity (CEC), sum of bases (S) and P forms by a sequential fractionation were analysed. Results showed that oak and A. uva-ursi improve the considered soil parameters (pH, C(org)/N ratio, CEC, and S) and provide soils of better quality. Inorganic soil P forms were influenced in greater extent by the vegetation cover than were P organic forms. Labile inorganic P forms could be used as indicators of soil quality. The organic P forms were less sensitive than inorganic ones to the indicated improvements.

  9. The Comparison of Olsen, DMT-HFO and DGT Methods for Assessment of Plant Available Phosphorus in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Heidari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is one of the most important limiting nutrients for crop production in the world soils. Excessive and deficiencies of P in calcareous soils has been reported. Several methods can be used to recognize soil bioavailable phosphorus. Soil P tests involve chemical extraction and ion-sink extractants. The diffusive gradient in thin-films (DGT is a new technique for measuring available soil phosphorus. This technique attempts to simulate physico-chemical processes influencing the uptake of solutes by plant roots. Also, the dialysis membrane tubes filled with hydrous ferric oxide solution (DMT-HFO has recently been used to assess P desorption over long-term laboratory studies. The DMT-HFO method acts like the DGT method. Both systems are based on Fick’s law and try to imitate physicochemical uptake of P by plant roots in soils. The aim of this research was to use Fick’s law in the interpretation of DMT measurements and compare it with the Olsen and DGT methods for assessment of corn available phosphorus in some calcareous soils. For this purpose, the diffusion coefficients of P in the DMT membrane and DGT gel were calculated. The DMT-HFOs were located in soil suspensions at 24, 72, 240, and 500 hours and the concentration of DMT-HFO (CDMT-HFO for P in the mentioned times were compared with those of Olsen and DGT methods on assessing of corn P uptake. Corn (SC 704 were grown in a greenhouse on ten different calcareous soils. Based on the results, the diffusion coefficient of P (H2PO4- in DMT (5.54*10-8 cm2.s-1was lower than that of DGT gel (5.8*10-6 cm2.s-1. The linear correlation coefficient(r between CDMT-HFO and corn P content was increased by the time (24- 500 hours. Based on the r2 values, the lowest and highest correlations were related to CDMT-HFO in 24 hours (r2=0.22, p<0.05 and 500 hours (r2=0.9, p<0.05, respectively. The DMT-HFO provides a more precise correlation with P uptake by corn (r2=0.9 in 500 hours than Olsen P (r2

  10. Rainfall intensity and phosphorus source effects on phosphorus transport in surface runoff from soil trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Francirose; Sharpley, Andrew; Prochnow, Luis Ignacio

    2007-02-01

    Phosphorus runoff from agricultural fields amended with mineral fertilizers and manures has been linked to freshwater eutrophication. A rainfall simulation study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different rainfall intensities and P sources differing in water soluble P (WSP) concentration on P transport in runoff from soil trays packed with a Berks loam and grassed with annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.). Triple superphosphate (TSP; 79% WSP), low-grade super single phosphate (LGSSP; 50% WSP), North Carolina rock phosphate (NCRP; 0.5% WSP) and swine manure (SM; 70% WSP), were broadcast (100 kg total P ha-1) and rainfall applied at 25, 50 and 75 mm h-1 1, 7, 21, and 56 days after P source application. The concentration of dissolved reactive (DRP), particulate (PP), and total P (TP) was significantly (Prunoff with a rainfall intensity of 75 than 25 mm h-1 for all P sources. Further, runoff DRP increased as P source WSP increased, with runoff from a 50 mm h-1 rain 1 day after source application having a DRP concentration of 0.25 mg L-1 for NCRP and 28.21 mg L-1 for TSP. In contrast, the proportion of runoff TP as PP was greater with low (39% PP for NCRP) than high WSP sources (4% PP for TSP) averaged for all rainfall intensities. The increased PP transport is attributed to the detachment and transport of undissolved P source particles during runoff. These results show that P source water solubility and rainfall intensity can influence P transport in runoff, which is important in evaluating the long-term risks of P source application on P transport in surface runoff.

  11. Organic phosphorus mineralisation in a temperate grassland soil under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, Klaus A.; Andresen, Louise; Gorenflo, André D.; Müller, Christoph; Frossard, Emmanuel; Bünemann, Else K.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for all biota and significant proportions of P in soil are present in organic form. Increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide ([CO2]) have been shown to influence plant P uptake traits, resulting in plant-mediated changes in soil P pools. However, little is known on the effect of elevated [CO2] on organic P mineralisation rates in soil. Study design & hypotheses: A 33P isotopic dilution experiment was performed with soils of the 17-year-old Giessen free air carbon dioxide enrichment (GiFACE) - trial. At the GiFACE, three plots are treated with 20 % elevated [CO2] while three control plots receive ambient air. We hypothesised that i) the observed positive effect of elevated [CO2] on plant growth translates into differences in soil organic P mineralisation rates between treated and untreated plots, resulting in ii) differences in soil organic P pools. Methods: Fresh soil (0-8 cm) was sampled from each plot, labelled with a carrier free 33P solution and incubated for 36 days at 19° C in the dark. On six time points, inorganic P and 33P in soil filtrates, soil microorganisms (by liquid fumigation) and resin extractable P were quantified. The baseline of 33P isotopic dilution was assessed from a short term batch experiment and extrapolated for 36 days. Gross organic P mineralisation rates were determined as the difference between isotopic dilution in the incubated soils (physicochemical + biological processes) minus extrapolated values (physicochemical processes only). Additionally, enzyme addition assays on alkaline soil extracts were performed to quantify different soil organic P classes, using enzymes with a known substrate specificity. Results & Discussion: Gross organic P mineralisation rates were high during the first three days (5.5 - 34.3 mg P kg-1 d-1), possibly due to the soil disturbance at labelling soils with 33P. However, gross organic P mineralisation decreased rapidly to rates between 0

  12. Phosphorus Changes and Sorption Characteristics in a Calcareous Soil Under Long-Term Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Sheng-Li; DANG Ting-Hui; HAO Ming-De

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of phosphorus (P) behavior in long-term fertilized soils is essential for programming fertilization practices and for sustaining environmental quality.The long-term (1984-1997) effects of various fertilization treatments on P changes and sorption isotherms as well as the relationship of soil properties to P sorption and P forms were evaluated in an Ustic Isohumisol,a calcareous soil,on the Loess Plateau,China.Compared to 1984,after 13 years of crop production,total soil P in the no-P treatments (control and N treatment) decreased by 5%-7%,but in the phosphorus fertilizer alone (P),nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers in combination (NP),manure alone (M),and nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers and manure in combination (NPM) treatments,it increased by 22%,19%,28%,and 58%,respectively.Residual fertilizer P was found mainly in NH4Ac-soluble P (Cas-P),followed by NaHCO3-sohible P (NaHCO3-P),and NH4F-soluble P (Al-P).Phosphorus sorption in the soils with different fertilization practices fit the Langmuir equations.Phosphorus sorption capacity in the no-P treatments increased,whereas it decreased in the P-included treatments (P,NP,and NPM treatments).Phosphorus sorption maximum (Qm) was significantly and negatively correlated to inorganic P including Na4CO3-P,Cas-P,NaOH-Na2CO3-soluble P (Fe-P),and AI-P (P ≤ 0.01).Moreover,long-term fertilization increased soil organic carbon in the NP,M,and NPM treatments and decreased pH in the NP and NPM treatments.Thus,the ability of the soil to release sorbed P to the environment increased under long-term P fertilization.

  13. A neural network model for estimating soil phosphorus using terrain analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Keshavarzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural network (ANN model was developed and tested for estimating soil phosphorus (P in Kouhin watershed area (1000 ha, Qazvin province, Iran using terrain analysis. Based on the soil distribution correlation, vegetation growth pattern across the topographically heterogeneous landscape, the topographic and vegetation attributes were used in addition to pedologic information for the development of ANN model in area for estimating of soil phosphorus. Totally, 85 samples were collected and tested for phosphorus contents and corresponding attributes were estimated by the digital elevation model (DEM. In order to develop the pedo-transfer functions, data linearity was checked, correlated and 80% was used for modeling and ANN was tested using 20% of collected data. Results indicate that 68% of the variation in soil phosphorus could be explained by elevation and Band 1 data and significant correlation was observed between input variables and phosphorus contents. There was a significant correlation between soil P and terrain attributes which can be used to derive the pedo-transfer function for soil P estimation to manage nutrient deficiency. Results showed that P values can be calculated more accurately with the ANN-based pedo-transfer function with the input topographic variables along with the Band 1.

  14. Effects of Air-Drying on the Inorganic Phosphorus Forms in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ke; TANG Yan; WANG Xiao-li; LU Hai-ming; ZHAO Hai-tao

    2005-01-01

    After 90 day's cultivation of five different plants (rye grass, lupin, buckwheat, rape and amaranth) in three soils (Yellow brown soil, Paddy soil and Red soil), fresh soil samples were collected and inorganic phosphorus (Pi) fractions were measured before and after air-drying. The results clearly indicated that the total Pi and their composition differed significantly among soil types. The air-drying process increased the total Pi in yellow brown soil and in paddy soil, while decreased that in red soil. The total Pi could vary to 70% of that before air-drying. The Pi forms in different soils changed to different extent after air-drying. As to yellow brown soil, Al-P decreased, while O-P and Ca-P increased; as to paddy soil, Al-P and Ca-P increased, while Fe-P and O-P remained; as to red soil, Al-P and Fe-P increased, Ca-P remained and O-P reduced obviously. Growth of different plants in soils had effects on Pi forms during the process of air-drying. Therefore, for chemical study of soil phosphorus, application of fresh soil samples can provide more reliable results.

  15. Succession Rules of Various Types of Soil Phosphorus in Larch Plantations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENLixin; JIANGLixue; YANGChengdong

    2004-01-01

    By the method of comparison and analysis, the succession pattern of total P, available phosphorus, organic P types and inorganic P types in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil at different development stages in Larch (Larix olgensis) plantations was revealed. The result showed: when stand age increased, the content of available phosphorus, O-P, total P and organic P in rhizosphere soil decreased greatly or significantly,the content of inorganic P, Ca-P and Fe-P in rhizosphere soil in rhizosphere soil increased greatly or significantly. The content of Ca-P in non-rhizosphere soil increased with stand growing. The content of Fe-P in half-mature stand, available P and Fe-P in near mature stand, available P and Ca-P in mature stand in nonrhizosphere soil was more than that in rhizosphere soil.

  16. Fertilization with phosphorus increases soil nitrogen absorption in young plants of Eucalyptus grandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina Graciano; Juan F. Goya; Jorge L. Frangi; Juan J. Guiamet

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are the nutrients that most commonly limit tree growth. Interactions between fertilization and soil type are well known, and in soils with moderate or low N availability, N-fertilization is frequently recommended to improve tree nutrition. The aim of this paper was to analyze how different doses of P and N applied in three different...

  17. Speciation And Distribution Of Phosphorus In A Fertilized Soil: A Synchrotron-Based Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorus availability is often a limiting factor for crop production around the world. The efficiency of P fertilizers in calcareous soils is limited by reactions that decrease P availability; however, fluid fertilizers have recently been shown, in highly calcareous soils of s...

  18. Speciation And Distribution Of Phosphorus In A Fertilized Soil: A Synchrotron-Based Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorus availability is often a limiting factor for crop production around the world. The efficiency of P fertilizers in calcareous soils is limited by reactions that decrease P availability; however, fluid fertilizers have recently been shown, in highly calcareous soils of s...

  19. Phosphorus concentrations in sequentially fractionated soil samples as affected by digestion methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequential fractionation has been used for several decades for improving our understanding on the effects of agricultural practices and management on the lability and bioavailability of phosphorus in soil, manure, and other soil amendments. Nevertheless, there have been no reports on how manipulatio...

  20. Description of the phosphorus sorption and desorption processes in lowland peaty clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoumans, O.F.

    2013-01-01

    To determine phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land to surface water, information is needed about the behavior of P in soils. In this study, the sorption and desorption characteristics of lowland peaty clay soils are described based on experimental laboratory studies. The maximum P sorption ca

  1. [Study on estimation of deserts soil total phosphorus content from thermal-infrared emissivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yan-jun; Tiyip, Tashpolat; Zhang, Fei; Sawut, Mamat; Nurmemet, Ilyas

    2015-02-01

    Soil phosphorus provides nutrient elements for plants, is one of important parameters for evaluating soil quality. The traditional method for soil total phosphorus content (STPC) measurement is not effective and time-consuming. However, remote sensing (RS) enables us to determine STPC in a fast and efficient way. Studies on the estimation of STPC in near-infrared spectroscopy have been developed by scholars, but model accuracy is still poor due to the low absorption coefficient and unclear absorption peak of soil phosphorus in near-infrared. In order to solve the deficiency which thermal-infrared emissivity estimate desert soil total phosphorus content, and could improve precision of estimation deserts soil total phosphorus. In this paper, characteristics of soil thermal-infrared emissivity are analyzed on the basis of laboratory processing and spectral measurement of deserts soil samples from the eastern Junggar Basin. Furthermore, thermal-infrared emissivity based RS models for STPC estimation are established and accuracy assessed. Results show that: when STPC is higher than 0.200 g x kg(-1), the thermal-infrared emissivity increases with the increase of STPC on the wavelength between 8.00 microm and 13 microm, and the emissivity is more sensitive to STPC on the wavelength between 9.00 and 9.6 microm; the estimate mode based on multiple stepwise regression was could not to estimate deserts soil total phosphorus content from thermal-infrared emissivity because the estimation effects of them were poor. The estimation accuracy of model based on partial least squares regression is higher than the model based on multiple stepwise regression. However, the accuracy of second-order differential estimation model based on partial least square regression is higher than based on multiple stepwise regression; The first differential of continuous remove estimation model based on partial least squares regression is the best model with R2 of correction and verification are up to

  2. The application of soil amendments benefits to the reduction of phosphorus depletion and the growth of cabbage and corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Ji, Hongli; Kerr, Philip; Wu, Yonghong; Fang, Yanming

    2015-11-01

    The loss of phosphorus from agricultural intensive areas can cause ecological problems such as eutrophication in downstream surface waters. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to control the phosphorus loss using environmentally benign soil amendments, viz, ferrous sulfate (FES), aluminum sulfate (ALS), and polyacrylamide (PAM). The phosphorus concentration changes in soil and leaching solution, the morphological index of plant (including stem and root), and root activity and quality (represented by chlorophyll and soluble sugar) at different growth stages of cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.) were monitored in a pilot experiment. Phosphorus contents in soil and runoff were also investigated in field experiments cultivated with corn (Zea mays L.). The results show that the application of these amendments improved the phosphorus uptake by cabbage and corn, resulting in the enhanced morphologies of root and stem as well as the root activity at the early and middle stages of cabbage growth. The soil total phosphorus and available phosphorus in soils treated with FES, ALS, and PAM declined, resulting in lower concentrations of phosphorus in the leachate and the soil runoff. During the use of the soil amendments, the cabbage quality measures, determined as chlorophyll and soluble sugar in leaves, were not significantly different from those in the control. It is suggested that the application of these soil amendments is safe for cabbage production under single season cropping conditions, and the use of these three amendments is a promising measure to reduce phosphorus loss in intensive agricultural areas.

  3. Hair from different ethnic groups vary in elemental composition and nitrogen and phosphorus mineralisation in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malepfane, N M; Muchaonyerwa, P

    2017-02-01

    Disposal of hair wastes at landfills causes nitrate leaching to ground water, and use of the waste as fertiliser could be a viable option. This study was to determine elemental composition of major hair types in South Africa and their nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) release in soil. Wastes of African, White and Indian hair were obtained from local salons and analysed for carbon (C), N and sulphur (S) with the Leco CNS analyzer, and P, bases, aluminium (Al) and micronutrients, with the ICP. We also conducted an incubation study to determine changes in mineral N and P in soil. Hair wastes were added to soil at increasing rates based on N, incubated at 25 °C with destructive sampling after 0, 28, 56 and 84 days and pH, ammonium-N, nitrate-N and extractable P measured. All data were subjected to analysis of variance. Indian and White hair had higher N than African. White hair had higher C and lower potassium (K) than those of other types. The Fe levels in hair were in the order White > African > Indian, whilst those of Al were African > Indian > White. African hair had higher calcium (Ca), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn) and cobalt (Co) than the other types. Ammonium-N and nitrate-N releases were in the order: Indian > African > White, especially at higher rates. Ammonium-N increased in the first 28 days and declined thereafter, when nitrate-N increased and pH decreased. The findings implied that hair types differ in elemental composition and nitrogen release in soil, with implications on pollution and soil fertility.

  4. Phosphorus release behaviors of poultry litter biochar as a soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yue [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Lin, Yingxin [Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Delaware State University, Dover, DE 19901 (United States); Chiu, Pei C.; Imhoff, Paul T. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Guo, Mingxin, E-mail: mguo@desu.edu [Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Delaware State University, Dover, DE 19901 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Phosphorus (P) may be immobilized and consequently the runoff loss risks be reduced if poultry litter (PL) is converted into biochar prior to land application. Laboratory studies were conducted to examine the water extractability of P in PL biochar and its release kinetics in amended soils. Raw PL and its biochar produced through 400 °C pyrolysis were extracted with deionized water under various programs and measured for water extractable P species and contents. The materials were further incubated with a sandy loam at 20 g kg{sup −1} soil and intermittently leached with water for 30 days. The P release kinetics were determined from the P recovery patterns in the water phase. Pyrolysis elevated the total P content from 13.7 g kg{sup −1} in raw PL to 27.1 g kg{sup −1} in PL biochar while reduced the water-soluble P level from 2.95 g kg{sup −1} in the former to 0.17 g kg{sup −1} in the latter. The thermal treatment transformed labile P in raw PL to putatively Mg/Ca phosphate minerals in biochar that were water-unextractable yet proton-releasable. Orthophosphate was the predominant form of water-soluble P in PL biochar, with condensed phosphate (e.g., pyrophosphate) as a minor form and organic phosphate in null. Release of P from PL biochar in both water and neutral soils was at a slower and steadier rate over a longer time period than from raw PL. Nevertheless, release of P from biochar was acid-driven and could be greatly promoted by the media acidity. Land application of PL biochar at soil pH-incorporated rates and frequency will potentially reduce P losses to runoffs and minimize the adverse impact of waste application on aquatic environments. - Highlights: • The predominant portion of P in poultry litter biochar is water insoluble. • Poultry litter P was immobilized by forming Ca/Mg (pyro)phosphates in biochar. • Release of P from biochar was slower and steadier than from raw poultry litter. • Soil pH greatly influenced the P release patterns

  5. total nitrogen and available phosphorus dynamics in soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2012-02-15

    Feb 15, 2012 ... Should this trend of decline in the concentration of phosphorus continue .... from topsoil during the productive life of the rubber .... Nutrient cycles and successional .... products, treated with poultry droppings and planted with ...

  6. Phosphorus status of soils from contrasting forested ecosystems in southwestern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achat, D. L.; Bakker, M. R.; Zeller, B.; Derrien, D.; Barsukov, P.; Nikitich, P.

    2011-12-01

    Phosphorus is one of the most limiting nutrients in many ecosystems and mineral reserves available for fertilizer production are forecasted to last for no more than 100 yrs. Crop requirements for P are often lower in forests than in agriculture and P fertilization to forest ecosystems is not very common on a global scale. In southern Siberia, expected climate change would lead to higher overall precipitation, higher temperatures and subsequently to changes in land use (i.e. agricultural land could increase on detriment of forests). In the present work we evaluated P status in four forested ecosystems in southwestern Siberia including 1 site with lowland Populus tremula, and 3 upland sites in the Salair mountains with Populus tremula, Abies siberica or with small forest openings. The upland sites feature twice higher productivity than the lowland sites and it was suggested that thick snow cover on those sites would enable winter activity of microbial communities leading to faster soil degradation processes and higher nutrient availability. We thus wanted to test whether biological processes in the upland sites were of larger impact on P status than in the lowland sites. We combined 32P isotopic dilution techniques (for diffusive P), chemical extractions (for total P, organic P) and fumigation/incubation/respiration methods (for microbial P) to test this hypothesis. Additional soil analyses (C, N and othes) were performed. Results will be interpreted in the light of the exising knowledge on botany, climate, pedology and expected implications for future land use, would this occur to change.

  7. Phosphorus transformations as a function of pedogenesis: A synthesis of soil phosphorus data using Hedley fractionation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the importance of phosphorus (P as a limiting nutrient in terrestrial ecosystems, our understanding of terrestrial P dynamics and our ability to model P cycling are hampered by the lack of consistent measurements of soil P. The Hedley fractionation method provides a comprehensive assessment of soil P and has been widely used in recent decades. Here we expand an earlier study that summarized Hedley P data from the literature to create a larger Hedley P database and further investigate the relationships between distributions of different forms of P and the stages of soil development. Our expanded Hedley P database generally supports what the Walker and Syers (1976 conceptual model predicts: the gradual decrease and eventual depletion of primary mineral P (mainly apatite P; the continual increase and eventual dominance of occluded P; and the overall decrease of total P during soil development. However the analysis disagrees with Walker and Syers (1976 in that we found labile inorganic P(Pi and secondary mineral Pi (non-occluded P in Walker and Syers' model to be a significant fraction of total P throughout all soil orders with different weathering stages. By analyzing the Hedley-labile P and vegetation P demand, we found that the amount of labile P is much greater than vegetation demand, even in highly weathered soils commonly considered P limited. We conclude that labile P measured by Hedley fractionation method should not be defined as plant available P since most of this labile P likely ends up as immobilized by microbes. Our analysis of the database also shows that carbon (C and nitrogen (N in soil organic matter are closely linked in all soil orders, but P is decoupled from C and N in highly weathered soils with larger variations of nitrogen:organic P (N:Po ratio and higher mean values of N:Po ratio, compared to slightly and intermediately weathered soils.

  8. Phosphorus transformations as a function of pedogenesis: a synthesis of soil phosphorus data using Hedley fractionation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the importance of phosphorus (P as a limiting nutrient in terrestrial ecosystems, our understanding of terrestrial P dynamics and our ability to model P cycling are hampered by the lack of consistent measurements of soil P. The Hedley fractionation method provides a comprehensive assessment of soil P and has been widely used in recent decades. Here we expand an earlier study that summarized Hedley P data from the literature to create a larger Hedley P database and further investigate the relationships between distributions of different forms of P and the stages of soil development. Our expanded Hedley P database generally supports what the Walker and Syers (1976 conceptual model predicts: the gradual decrease and eventual depletion of primary mineral P (mainly apatite P; the continual increase and eventual dominance of occluded P; and the overall decrease of total P during soil development. However the analysis disagrees with Walker and Syers (1976 in that we found labile inorganic P(Pi and secondary Pi (non-occluded P in Walker and Syers' model to be a significant fraction of total P throughout all soil orders with different weathering stages. By analyzing the Hedley-labile P and vegetation P demand, we found that the amount of labile P is much greater than vegetation demand, even in highly weathered soils commonly considered P limited. We conclude that measured Hedley-labile P should not be defined as plant available P since most of this labile P likely ends up as immobilized by microbes. Our analysis of the database also shows that carbon (C and nitrogen (N in soil organic matter are closely linked in all soil orders, but P is decoupled from C and N in highly weathered soils with larger variations of nitrogen:organic P (N:Po ratio and higher mean values of N:Po ratio, compared to slightly and intermediately weathered soils.

  9. Phosphorus transformations as a function of pedogenesis: A synthesis of soil phosphorus data using Hedley fractionation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Post, W. M.

    2011-10-01

    In spite of the importance of phosphorus (P) as a limiting nutrient in terrestrial ecosystems, our understanding of terrestrial P dynamics and our ability to model P cycling are hampered by the lack of consistent measurements of soil P. The Hedley fractionation method provides a comprehensive assessment of soil P and has been widely used in recent decades. Here we expand an earlier study that summarized Hedley P data from the literature to create a larger Hedley P database and further investigate the relationships between distributions of different forms of P and the stages of soil development. Our expanded Hedley P database generally supports what the Walker and Syers (1976) conceptual model predicts: the gradual decrease and eventual depletion of primary mineral P (mainly apatite P); the continual increase and eventual dominance of occluded P; and the overall decrease of total P during soil development. However the analysis disagrees with Walker and Syers (1976) in that we found labile inorganic P(Pi) and secondary mineral Pi (non-occluded P in Walker and Syers' model) to be a significant fraction of total P throughout all soil orders with different weathering stages. By analyzing the Hedley-labile P and vegetation P demand, we found that the amount of labile P is much greater than vegetation demand, even in highly weathered soils commonly considered P limited. We conclude that labile P measured by Hedley fractionation method should not be defined as plant available P since most of this labile P likely ends up as immobilized by microbes. Our analysis of the database also shows that carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil organic matter are closely linked in all soil orders, but P is decoupled from C and N in highly weathered soils with larger variations of nitrogen:organic P (N:Po) ratio and higher mean values of N:Po ratio, compared to slightly and intermediately weathered soils.

  10. Using 31P-NMR to investigate dynamics of soil phosphorus compounds in the Rothamsted Long Term Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Martin; Turner, Ben; Granger, Steve; Hooper, Tony; Darch, Tegan; Hawkins, Jane; Yuan, Huimin; McGrath, Steve

    2015-04-01

    The technique of 31P-NMR spectroscopy has done more to advance the knowledge of phosphorus forms (especially organic phosphorus) in environmental samples than any other method. The technique has advanced such that specific compounds can be identified where previously only broad categories such as orthophosphate monoesters and diesters were distinguishable. The Soil Archive and Long Term Experiments at Rothamsted Research, UK, potentially provides an unequalled opportunity to use this technique to observe changes in soil phosphorus compounds with time and under different treatments, thereby enhancing our understanding of phosphorus cycling and use by plants. Some of the earliest work using this technique on soils was carried out by Hawkes et al. in 1984 and this used soils from two of the oldest Rothamsted Long Term Experiments, namely Highfield and Park Grass. Here we revisit the samples studied in this early work and reanalyse them using current methodology to demonstrate how the 31P-NMR technique has advanced. We also present results from a study on the phosphorus chemistry in soils along the Hoosfield acid strip (Rothamsted, UK), where a pH gradient from 3.7 to 7.8 occurs in a single soil with little variation in total phosphorus (mean ± standard deviation 399 ± 27 mg P kg-1). Soil pH was found to be an important factor in determining the proportion of phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in the soil organic phosphorus, although total organic phosphorus concentrations were a relatively consistent proportion of the total soil phosphorus (36 ± 2%) irrespective of soil pH. Key words. 31P-NMR, soil organic phosphorus, long term experiments, Hoosfield acid strip

  11. Liming and phosphorus fertilization in soils under cerrado. 1. Dry matter accumulation and phosphorus uptake by sorghum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, L.F.S. (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Bahia. Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Mandioca e Fruticultura); Fernandes, M.S.; Velloso, A.C.X. (Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Solos); Castro, A.F. de (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Rio de Janeiro. Servico Nacional de Levantamento e Conservacao de Solos)

    1983-07-01

    The effects of liming and phosphorus fertilizer (300 Kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha) application on dry matter accumulation and P-uptake by sorghum plants were studied under greenhouse conditions. Plants were grown in four Oxisols originally under cerrado vegetation. There was a positive correlation between P-fertilization and liming on dry matter accumulation and P-uptake by plants. The results showed that the main effect of liming in these soils was on the elimination of phytotoxicity, mainly due to exchangeable aluminum.

  12. Phosphorus Dynamics in Long-Term Flooded, Drained, and Reflooded Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Tian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In flooded areas, soils are often exposed to standing water and subsequent drainage, thus over fertilization can release excess phosphorus (P into surface water and groundwater. To investigate P release and transformation processes in flooded alkaline soils, wheat-growing soil and vegetable-growing soil were selected. We flooded-drained-reflooded two soils for 35 d, then drained the soils, and 10 d later reflooded the soils for 17 d. Dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP, soil inorganic P fractions, Olsen P, pH, and Eh in floodwater and pore water were analyzed. The wheat-growing soil had significantly higher floodwater DRP concentrations than vegetable-growing soil, and floodwater DRP in both soils decreased with the number of flooding days. During the reflooding period, DRP in overlying floodwater from both soils was less than 0.87 mg/L, which was 3–25 times less than that during the flooding period. Regardless of flooding or reflooding, pore water DRP decreased with flooding days. The highest concentration of pore water DRP observed at a 5-cm depth. Under the effect of fertilizing and flooding, the risk of vertical P movement in 10–50 cm was enhanced. P diffusion occurred from the top to the bottom of the soils. After flooding, Al-P increased in both soils, and Fe-P, O-P, Ca2-P decreased, while Fe-P, Al-P, and O-P increased after reflooding, When Olsen P in the vegetable-growing soil exceeded 180.7 mg/kg and Olsen P in the wheat-growing soil exceeded 40.8 mg/kg, the concentration of DRP in pore water increased significantly. Our results showed that changes in floodwater and pore water DRP concentrations, soil inorganic P fractions, and Olsen P are significantly affected by fertilizing and flooding; therefore, careful fertilizer management should be employed on flooded soils to avoid excess P loss.

  13. Influence of climate warming and nitrogen deposition on soil phosphorus composition and phosphorus availability in a temperate grassland, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuangNa ZHANG; ZhenHua CHEN; AiMing ZHANG; LiJun CHEN; ZhiJie WU

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming and nitrogen (N) deposition change ecosystem processes, structure, and functioning whereas the phosphorus (P) composition and availability directly influence the ecosystem structure under condi-tions of N deposition. In our study, four treatments were designed, including a control, diurnal warming (DW), N deposition (ND), and combined warming and N deposition (WN). The effects of DW, ND, and WN on P composition were studied by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy in a temperate grassland region of China. The results showed that the N deposition decreased the soil pH and total N (TN) concentration but increased the soil Olsen-P concentration. The solution-state 31P NMR analysis showed that the DW, ND and WN treatments slightly decreased the proportion of orthophosphate and increased that of the monoesters. An absence of myo-inositol phosphate in the DW, ND and WN treatments was observed compared with the control. Furthermore, the DW, ND and WN treatments significantly decreased the recovery of soil P in the NaOH-EDTA solution by 17%-20%. The principal component analysis found that the soil pH was positively correlated with the P recovery in the NaOH-EDTA solution. Therefore, the decreased soil P recovery in the DW and ND treatments might be caused by an indirect influence on the soil pH. Additionally, the soil moisture content was the key factor limiting the available P. The positive correlation of total carbon (TC) and TN with the soil P composition indicated the influence of climate warming and N deposition on the biological processes in the soil P cycling.

  14. The role of the organic layer for phosphorus nutrition of young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) at two sites differing in soil Phosphorus availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauenstein, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Simon Hauenstein1, Thomas Pütz2, and Yvonne Oelmann1, 1 Geoecology, Department of Geosciences, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany 2 Agrosphere (IBG-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, Germany The accumulation of an organic layer in forests is linked to the ratio between litterfall rates and decomposition rates with decomposition rates being decelerated due to acidification and associated nutrient depletion with proceeding ecosystem development. Nevertheless, the nutrient pool in the organic layer might still represent an important source for Phosphorus (P) nutrition of forests on nutrient-poor soils. Our objective was to assess the importance of the organic layer to P nutrition of young beech trees at two sites differing in soil P availability. We established a mesocosm experiment including plants and soil from a Phosphorus depleted forest site on a Haplic Podzol in Lüss and a Phosphorus rich forest site on a Eutric Cambisol in Bad Brückenau either with or without the organic layer. After 1 year under outdoor conditions, we applied 33P to the pots. After 0h, 24h, 48h, 96h, 192h, 528h we destructively harvested the young beech trees (separated into leaves, branches, stems) and sampled the organic layer and mineral soil of the pots. In each soil horizon we measured concentrations of resin-extractable P, plant available P fractions and total P. We extracted the xylem sap of the whole 2-year-old trees by means of scholander pressure bomb. 33P activity was measured for every compartment in soil and plant. The applied 33P was recovered mainly in the organic layer in Lüss, whereas it was evenly distributed among organic and mineral horizons in pots of Bad Brückenau soil. Comparing pots with and without an organic layer, the specific 33P activity differed by 323% between pots with and without an organic layer present in the Lüss soil. For both sites, the presence of the organic layer increased 33P activity in xylem sap compared to the treatment without

  15. Duplicate and conquer: multiple homologs of PHOSPHORUS-STARVATION TOLERANCE1 enhance phosphorus acquisition and sorghum performance on low-phosphorus soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, Barbara; de Sousa, Sylvia M; Assis, Lidianne; Guimaraes, Claudia T; Leiser, Willmar; Azevedo, Gabriel C; Negri, Barbara; Larson, Brandon G; Shaff, Jon E; Pastina, Maria Marta; Barros, Beatriz A; Weltzien, Eva; Rattunde, Henry Frederick W; Viana, Joao H; Clark, Randy T; Falcão, Alexandre; Gazaffi, Rodrigo; Garcia, Antonio Augusto F; Schaffert, Robert E; Kochian, Leon V; Magalhaes, Jurandir V

    2014-10-01

    Low soil phosphorus (P) availability is a major constraint for crop production in tropical regions. The rice (Oryza sativa) protein kinase, PHOSPHORUS-STARVATION TOLERANCE1 (OsPSTOL1), was previously shown to enhance P acquisition and grain yield in rice under P deficiency. We investigated the role of homologs of OsPSTOL1 in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) performance under low P. Association mapping was undertaken in two sorghum association panels phenotyped for P uptake, root system morphology and architecture in hydroponics and grain yield and biomass accumulation under low-P conditions, in Brazil and/or in Mali. Root length and root surface area were positively correlated with grain yield under low P in the soil, emphasizing the importance of P acquisition efficiency in sorghum adaptation to low-P availability. SbPSTOL1 alleles reducing root diameter were associated with enhanced P uptake under low P in hydroponics, whereas Sb03g006765 and Sb03g0031680 alleles increasing root surface area also increased grain yield in a low-P soil. SbPSTOL1 genes colocalized with quantitative trait loci for traits underlying root morphology and dry weight accumulation under low P via linkage mapping. Consistent allelic effects for enhanced sorghum performance under low P between association panels, including enhanced grain yield under low P in the soil in Brazil, point toward a relatively stable role for Sb03g006765 across genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions. This study indicates that multiple SbPSTOL1 genes have a more general role in the root system, not only enhancing root morphology traits but also changing root system architecture, which leads to grain yield gain under low-P availability in the soil.

  16. [Effects of combined application of biochar and inorganic fertilizers on the available phosphorus content of upland red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yan; Chen, Xiao-min; Liu, Zu-xiang; Huang, Qian-ru; LiI, Qiu-xia; Chen, Chen; Lu, Shao-shan

    2013-04-01

    Aiming at the low content of available phosphorus in upland red soil of Southern China, this paper studied the effects of combined application of biochar and inorganic fertilizers on the available phosphorus and organic carbon contents and the pH of this soil. With the combined application of biochar and inorganic fertilizers, the soil physical and chemical properties improved to different degrees. As compared with the control, the soil pH and the soil organic carbon and available phosphorus contents at different growth stages of oil rape after the combined application of biochar and inorganic fertilizers all had an improvement, with the increments at bolting stage, flowering stage, and ripening stage being 16%, 24% and 26%, 23%, 34% and 38%, and 100%, 191% and 317% , respectively. The soil pH and the soil organic carbon and available phosphorus contents were increased with the increasing amount of applied biochar. Under-the application of biochar, the soil available phosphorus had a significant correlation with the soil pH and soil organic carbon content. This study could provide scientific basis to improve the phosphorus deficiency and the physical and chemical properties of upland red soil.

  17. Phosphorus leaching in soils amended with piggery effluent or lime residues from effluent treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, D M; Ritchie, G S

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in wastes from piggeries may contribute to the eutrophication of waterways if not disposed of appropriately. Phosphorus leaching, from three soils with different P sorption characteristics (two with low P retention and one with moderate P retention) when treated with piggery effluent (with or without struvite), was investigated using batch and leaching experiments. The leaching of P retained in soil from the application of struvite effluent was determined. In addition, P leaching from lime residues (resulting from the treatment of piggery effluent with lime to remove P) was determined in comparison to superphosphate when applied to the same three soils. Most P was leached from sandy soils with low P retention when effluent with or without struvite was applied. More than 100% of the filterable P applied in struvite effluent was leached in sandy soils with low P retention. Solid, inorganic forms of P (struvite) became soluble and potentially leachable at pHdissolution if there were sufficient sorption sites. In sandy soils with low P retention, more than 39% of the total filterable P applied in recycled effluent (without struvite) was leached. Soil P increased mainly in surface layers after treatment with effluent. Sandy soils pre-treated with struvite effluent leached 40% of the P retained in the previous application. Phosphorus decreased in surface layers and increased at depth in the soil with moderate P retention after leaching the struvite effluent pre-treated soil with water. The soils capacity to adsorb P and the soil pH were the major soil properties that affected the rate and amount of P leaching, whereas the important characteristics of the effluent were pH, P concentration and the forms of P in the effluent. Phosphorus losses from soils amended with hydrated lime and lime kiln dust residues were much lower than losses from soils amended with superphosphate. Up to 92% of the P applied as superphosphate was leached from sandy soils with low P

  18. Phosphorus distribution in a soil fertilized with recovered manure phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorus (P) can be recovered in a concentrated form from livestock manure and poultry litter. A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the short-term leaching potential and plant availability of P from recovered P materials from liquid pig manure (SRP) and broiler litter (LRP) in a characteri...

  19. Effect of Animal Manure on Phosphorus Sorption to Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    In most phosphorus (P) sorption studies P is added as an inorganic salt to a pre-defined background solution such as CaCl2 or KCl; however, in many regions the application of P to agricultural fields is in the form of animal manure. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to compare the sorption b...

  20. Phosphorus Mobilization from Manure-Amended and Unamended Alkaline Soils to Overlying Water during Simulated Flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarawansha, E A G S; Kumaragamage, D; Flaten, D; Zvomuya, F; Tenuta, M

    2015-07-01

    Anaerobic soil conditions resulting from flooding often enhance release of phosphorus (P) to overlying water. Enhanced P release is well documented for flooded acidic soils; however, there is little information for flooded alkaline soils. We examined the effect of flooding and anaerobic conditions on P mobilization using 12 alkaline soils from Manitoba that were either unamended or amended with solid cattle manure. Pore water and floodwater were analyzed over 8 wk of simulated flooding for dissolved reactive P (DRP), Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn. As expected, manured soils had significantly greater pore and floodwater DRP concentrations than unamended. Flooding increased pore water DRP concentrations significantly in all soils and treatments except one manured clay in which concentrations increased initially and then decreased. Floodwater DRP concentrations increased significantly by two- to 15-fold in 10 soils regardless of amendment treatment but remained relatively stable in the two soils with greatest clay content. Phosphorus release at the onset of flooding was associated with the release of Ca, Mg, and Mn, suggesting that P release may be controlled by the dissolution of Mg and Ca phosphates and reductive dissolution of Mn phosphates. Thereafter, P release was associated with release of Fe, suggesting the reductive dissolution of Fe phosphates. Differences in pore water and floodwater DRP concentrations among soils and amendment treatments and the high variability in P mobilization from pore water to floodwater among soils indicate the need to further investigate chemical reactions responsible for P release and mobility under anaerobic conditions.

  1. Sustainable long-term intensive application of manure to sandy soils without phosphorus leaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asomaning, Samuel K.; Abekoe, Mark K.; Dowuona, G.N.N.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term application of manure to sandy soils to ensure high crop productivity may lead to phosphorus (P) leaching, which, in turn, may deteriorate the quality of recipient waters because of eutrophication. The risk of P leaching depends on contents of aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) oxides...... soils, whereas in the deepest soil layers the P contents in the cultivated and uncultivated soils were almost the same indicating very limited downward P transport despite long-term manure application. This was supported by comparable P concentrations in groundwater taken under cultivated...

  2. Bioavailability of zinc and phosphorus in calcareous soils as affected by citrate exudation

    OpenAIRE

    Duffner, A.; Hoffland, E.; Temminghoff, E. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Zinc (Zn) and phosphorus (P) deficiency often occurs at the same time and limits crop production in many soils. It has been suggested that citrate root exudation is a response of plants to both deficiencies. We used white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) as a model plant to clarify if citrate exuded by roots could increase the bioavailability of Zn and P in calcareous soils. Methods White lupin was grown in nutrient solution and in two calcareous soils in a rhizobox. Rhizosphere soil solution wa...

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi contribute to phosphorus uptake by wheat grown in a phosphorus-fixing soil even in the absence of positive growth responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiying; Smith, Sally E; Holloway, Robert E; Zhu, Yongguan; Smith, F Andrew

    2006-01-01

    We used 32P to quantify the contribution of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus intraradices) to phosphorus (P) uptake by wheat (Triticum aestivum), grown in compartmented pots. The soil was from a major cereal-growing area, the Eyre Peninsula, South Australia; it was highly calcareous and P-fixing. Fertilizer P was added to soil at 20 mg kg(-1), as solid or liquid. Two extraction methods were used to estimate plant-available P. Fungal colonization was well established at harvest (36 d). Application of P decreased both colonization and hyphal length density in soil, with small differences between different P fertilizers. Plants showed large positive responses in terms of growth or total P uptake to all P additions, and showed no positive (or even negative) responses to AM colonization, regardless of P application. 32P was detected only in AM plants, and we calculated that over 50% of P uptake by plants was absorbed via AM fungi, even when P was added. The results add to the growing body of knowledge that 'nonresponsive' AM plants have a functional AM pathway for P transfer to the plant; it should not be ignored in breeding plants for root traits designed to improve P uptake.

  4. Wet chemical and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of phosphorus speciation in a sandy soil receiving long-term fertilizer or animal manure applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, G.F.; Chardon, W.J.; Dolfing, J.; Oenema, O.; Meer, van der P.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2003-01-01

    In areas under intensive livestock farming and with high application rates of animal manure, inorganic and organic phosphorus (P) may be leached from soils. Since the contribution of these P compounds to P leaching may differ, it is important to determine the speciation of P in these soils. We

  5. Phosphorus Speciation of Forest-soil Organic Surface Layers using P K-edge XANES Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Prietzel; J Thieme; D Paterson

    2011-12-31

    The phosphorus (P) speciation of organic surface layers from two adjacent German forest soils with different degree of water-logging (Stagnosol, Rheic Histosol) was analyzed by P K-edge XANES and subsequent Linear Combination Fitting. In both soils, {approx}70% of the P was inorganic phosphate and {approx}30% organic phosphate; reduced P forms such as phosphonate were absent. The increased degree of water-logging in the Histosol compared to the Stagnosol did not affect P speciation.

  6. Bioavailability of zinc and phosphorus in calcareous soils as affected by citrate exudation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffner, A.; Hoffland, E.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Zinc (Zn) and phosphorus (P) deficiency often occurs at the same time and limits crop production in many soils. It has been suggested that citrate root exudation is a response of plants to both deficiencies. We used white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) as a model plant to clarify if citrate exuded by

  7. Effect of Rhizobium inoculation and phosphorus application on native Texas legumes grown in local soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osman, E.; Muir, J.P.; Elgersma, A.

    2002-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments were conducted to determine the effects of Rhizobium inoculation and addition of phosphorus to soil on the productivity and quality of the Texas range legumes Desmanthus illinoiensis (Michx.) MacMill. ex B.L. Rob. & Fernald, Desmanthus velutinus Scheele, Desmanthus

  8. Nitrous oxide emissions from soil amended with low-phosphorus broiler litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regions of the United States with a high concentration of poultry farms have soils with excess nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) far beyond the agronomic requirement of crops because of recurrent land application of broiler litter. A new waste treatment technology developed by USDA-ARS, called “Quick ...

  9. Spatial estimation of foliar phosphorus in different species of the genus Coffea based on soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel de Assis Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Information underlying analyses of coffee fertilization systems should consider both the soil and the nutritional status of plants. This study investigated the spatial relationship between phosphorus (P levels in coffee plant tissues and soil chemical and physical properties. The study was performed using two arabica and one canephora coffee variety. Sampling grids were established in the areas, and the points georeferenced. The assessed properties of the soil were levels of available phosphorus (P-Mehlich, remaining phosphorus (P-rem and particle size, and of the plant tissue, phosphorus levels (foliar P. The data were subjected to descriptive statistical analysis, correlation analysis, cluster analysis, and probability tests. Geostatistical and trend analyses were only performed for pairs of variables with significant linear correlation. The spatial variability for foliar P content was high for the variety Catuai and medium for the other evaluated plants. Unlike P-Mehlich, the variability in P-rem of the soil indicated the nutritional status of this nutrient in the plant.

  10. Effect of Rhizobium inoculation and phosphorus application on native Texas legumes grown in local soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osman, E.; Muir, J.P.; Elgersma, A.

    2002-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments were conducted to determine the effects of Rhizobium inoculation and addition of phosphorus to soil on the productivity and quality of the Texas range legumes Desmanthus illinoiensis (Michx.) MacMill. ex B.L. Rob. & Fernald, Desmanthus velutinus Scheele, Desmanthus virgatus (L

  11. Leaf and soil nitrogen and phosphorus availability in a neotropical rain forest of nutrient-rich soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Martínez-Sánchez

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen and phosphorus supply in a lowland rain forest with a nutrient-rich soil was investigated by means of the leaf N/P quotient. It was hypothesised a high N and P supply to the forest ecosystem with a N and P rich soil. Total N and extractable P were determined in the surface (10 cm soil of three plots of the forest. Total N was analysed by the Kjeldahl method, and P was extracted with HCl and NH4F. The leaf N/P quotient was evaluated from the senesced leaves of 11 dominant tree species from the mature forest. Samples of 5 g of freshly fallen leaves were collected from three trees of each species. Nitrogen was analysed by microkjeldahl digestion with sulphuric acid and distilled with boric acid, and phosphorus was analysed by digestion with nitric acid and perchloric acid, and determined by photometry. Concentrations of total N (0.50%, n = 30 and extractable P (4.11 μg g-1, n = 30 in the soil were high. As expected, P supply was sufficient, but contrary to expected, N supply was low (N/P = 11.8, n = 11. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(2: 357-361. Epub 2006 Jun 01.A través del cociente foliar N/P, se investigó la disponibilidad de nitrógeno y fósforo en una selva húmeda tropical con suelo fértil. Como hipótesis se esperaba encontrar una alta disponibilidad de N y P en el ecosistema debido a un suelo rico en N y P. Se determinó el N total y el P extraible en el suelo superficial (10 cm en tres sitios de la selva. El N total se analizó por el método Kjeldahl y el P por extracción con HCl y NH4F. El cociente foliar N/P se evaluó a partir de hojas seniles de 11 especies arbóreas dominantes de la selva madura. Se recolectaron muestras de 5 g de hojas recién caídas de tres árboles de cada especie. El nitrógeno se analizó por digestión microkjeldahl con ácido sulfúrico y destilación con ácido bórico, y el fósforo por digestión con ácido nítrico y ácido perclórico, y determinación con fotometría. Las concetraciones de N

  12. Extraction Techniques for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Lau

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide a review of the analytical extraction techniques for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in soils. The extraction technologies described here include Soxhlet extraction, ultrasonic and mechanical agitation, accelerated solvent extraction, supercritical and subcritical fluid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, solid phase extraction and microextraction, thermal desorption and flash pyrolysis, as well as fluidised-bed extraction. The influencing factors in the extraction of PAHs from soil such as temperature, type of solvent, soil moisture, and other soil characteristics are also discussed. The paper concludes with a review of the models used to describe the kinetics of PAH desorption from soils during solvent extraction.

  13. Phosphorus utilization and microbial community in response to lead/iron addition to a waterlogged soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Shunqing; WU Yuping; XU Jianming

    2009-01-01

    Constructed wetlands have emerged as a viable option for helping to solve a wide range of water quality problems. However, heavy metals adsorbed by substrates would decrease the growth of plants, impair the functions of wetlands and eventually result in failure of contaminant removal. Typha latifolia L., tolerant to heavy metals, has been widely used for phytoremediation of Pb/Zn mine tailings under waterlogged conditions. This study examined effects of iron as ferrous sulfate (100 and 500 mg/kg) and lead as lead nitrate (0, 100, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) on phosphorus utilization and microbial community structure in a constructed wetland. Wetland plants (T. latifolia) were grown for 8 weeks in rhizobags filled with a paddy soil under waterlogged conditions. The results showed that both the amount of iron plaque on the roots and phosphorus adsorbed on the plaque decreased with the amount of lead addition. When the ratio of added iron to lead was 1:1, phosphorus utilized by plants was the maximum. Total amount of phospholipids fatty acids (PLFAs) was 23%-59% higher in the rhizosphere soil than in bulk soil. The relative abundance of Gram-negative bacteria, aerobic bacteria, and methane oxidizing bacteria was also higher in the rhizosphere soil than in bulk soil, but opposite was observed for other bacteria and fungi. Based on cluster analysis, microbial communities were mostly controlled by the addition of ferrous sulfate and lead nitrate in rhizosphere and bulk soil, respectively.

  14. Phosphorus fertilization by active dust deposition in a super-humid, temperate environment—Soil phosphorus fractionation and accession processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, Andre; Almond, Peter C.; Condron, Leo M.

    2013-01-01

    The inventory of soil phosphorus (P) is subject to significant changes over time. The main primary form, bedrock-derived apatite P, becomes progressively lost through leaching, or transformed into more immobile and less plant-accessible, secondary organic and mineral forms. Here we studied the rejuvenating effect of dust deposition on soil P along an active dust flux gradient downwind of a braided river. Along the gradient, we measured soil P fractions to 50 cm depth of six Spodosols and one Inceptisol, supplemented by tree foliage P concentrations. While an increasing dust flux correlates with a twofold increase of foliar P and soil organic P along the gradient, apatite P declines from ~50 to 3 g m-2 and total P shows no response. Compared to dust-unaffected Spodosols, depth distribution of total P becomes increasingly uniform and organic P propagates deeper into the soil under dust flux. Further, the effect of topsoil P eluviation attenuates due to higher organic P content and the zone of high apatite P concentrations associated with un-weathered subsoil becomes progressively removed from the upper 50 cm. We interpret these patterns as being consistent with upbuilding pedogenesi and conclude that dust-derived mineral P is assimilated in the organic surface horizon and does not reach the mineral soil. Dust-derived mineral P is temporarily stored in the living biomass and returns to the soil with plant and microbial detritus as organic P, which is subsequently buried by further dust increments. We further conclude that (1) the efficiency of P fertilization of the ecosystem by dust accession is higher than through P advection in dust-unaffected Spodosols and (2) organic P may serve as an important source of labile P in a high-leaching environment.

  15. Effects of soil nitrogen:phosphorus ratio on growth rate of Artemisia ordosica seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To address how the ratios of nitrogen and phosphorus (N:P ratios) in soil affect plant growth, we performed a two-factor (soil available N:P ratios and plant density) randomized block pot experiment to examine the relationships between soil N:P ratios, and the N:P ratios and growth rate of Artemisia ordosica seedlings. Under moderate water stress and adequate nutrient status, both soil N:P and plant density influenced the N:P ratios and growth rates of A. ordosica. With the increase of soil N:P ratios, the growth rates of A. ordosica seedlings decreased significantly. With the increase of soil N:P ratios, N:P ratios in A. ordosica seedlings increased significantly. While the nitrogen concentrations in the plant increased slightly, the phosphorus concentrations significantly decreased. With the increase of plant density, the shoot N:P ratios and growth rates significantly decreased, which resulted from soil N:P ratios. Thus, soil N:P ratios influenced the N:P ratios in A. ordosica seedlings, and hence, influenced its growth. Our results suggest that, under adequate nutrient environment, soil N:P ratios can be a limiting factor for plant growth.

  16. Organic Acids Regulation of Chemical-Microbial Phosphorus Transformations in Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Paredes, Cecilia; Zhang, Hao; Giles, Courtney D; Darch, Tegan; Stutter, Marc; George, Timothy S; Shand, Charles; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Blackwell, Martin; Wearing, Catherine; Haygarth, Philip M

    2016-11-01

    We have used an integrated approach to study the mobility of inorganic phosphorus (P) from soil solid phase as well as the microbial biomass P and respiration at increasing doses of citric and oxalic acid in two different soils with contrasting agronomic P status. Citric or oxalic acids significantly increased soil solution P concentrations for doses over 2 mmol kg(-1). However, low organic acid doses (soils, treatment with the tribasic citric acid led to a greater increase in soil solution P than the dibasic oxalic acid, likely due to the rapid degrading of oxalic acids in soils. After equilibration of soils with citric or oxalic acids, the adsorbed-to-solution distribution coefficient (Kd) and desorption rate constants (k-1) decreased whereas an increase in the response time of solution P equilibration (Tc) was observed. The extent of this effect was shown to be both soil and organic acid specific. Our results illustrate the critical thresholds of organic acid concentration necessary to mobilize sorbed and precipitated P, bringing new insight on how the exudation of organic acids regulate chemical-microbial soil phosphorus transformations.

  17. Long-term grassland management effects on soil Phosphorus status on rewetted Histosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Sebastian; Müller, Jürgen; Kayser, Manfred

    2017-04-01

    Since the Neolithic Period, the cultivation of wetlands has played a significant role for the settlement of Humans northwest Germany. A continuing drainage of the wetlands over the centuries and an intensified soil cultivation during the last decades has caused irreversible peat degradation and led to fundamental changes in the landscape. Nowadays, almost 70 % of the 4345 km2 peatland of Lower Saxony is altered by agriculture. For the revitalization of wetland ecosystems, permanent rewetting is an integral component to preserve the functions of organic soils and achieve resilient, speciesrich wetlands. However, permanent rewetting measures are not always feasible. In our study area at the Osterfeiner Moor, a fen located in the Dümmer lowlands near Osnabrück, intensive forage cropping areas were converted into extensive permanent grasslands accompanied by temporary rewetting during winter. This management practice combined with zero fertilization and a low mowing and grazing intensity aims at mitigating mineralisation of peat layers and creating a habitat for endangered meadow bird species. In this semi-natural ecosystem soil phosphorus (P) dynamics play a crucial role. However, longterm research results on P availability of degraded and rewetted fens are still lacking. Thus, we investigated the interaction of different grassland uses and P dynamics in the soil. We described P depletion of the topsoil over a time scale of 17 years after the implementation of restoration measures. Our study site comprises of 180 ha protected grassland divided into 52 management plots. According to the management system, we divided the plots into meadows, pastures and combinations of cutting and grazing. The soils in our study area can be characterised as drained organic soils, WRB: Rheic Sapric Histosols (Drainic), with drastic degradation properties through moorsh forming processes. Plant-available P (double lactate extraction method: PDL) was analysed from representative topsoil

  18. Phosphorus sorption, desorption and resorption by soils of the Brazilian Cerrado supporting eucalypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Nairam F. Filho [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Dept. de Ciencia Florestal, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Comerford, N.B. [Florida Univ., Soil and Water Science Dept., Gainesville, FL (United States); Barros, Nairam F. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Dept. do Solos, Vicosa, MG (Brazil)

    2005-02-01

    Oxisols of the Brazilian Cerrado are highly weathered phosphorus deficient soils, on which eucalypt is increasingly being grown as a source of carbon and energy for steel manufacturing. Phosphorus (P) fertilization is a necessary practice to assure adequate eucalypt production; therefore, an understanding of cycling by inorganic soil P should lead to efficient P management and more accurate modeling of P bioavailability. Since sorption and desorption reactions control inorganic P bioavailability, the purpose of this study was to contrast P sorption, desorption and subsequent resorption for a range of Cerrado soils. Its specific objectives were to determine (i) if desorption and resorption show the same hysteresis shown by sorption and desorption, (ii) if K{sub d} values of resorption and desorption for Cerrado soils are dependent on the soil's clay content and (iii) if resorption and desorption K{sub d} values are a function of the amount of labile P on the soil surface. Three levels of P were sorbed onto four Cerrado soils with clay contents between 13% and 81%. Phosphorus desorption was measured using anion-exchange membranes. Sorption was a function of soil clay content, and a pedotransfer function for the soil partition coefficient was calculated with an r{sup 2} = 0.99. Desorption and resorption were dependent on both the clay content of the soil (r{sup 2} = 0.59-0.99) and the amount of sorbed labile P. Pedotransfer functions for each of these processes depend on accurate measurement of the inorganic P that responds to disequilibria exchange. Desorption and resorption were not hysteretic; yet desorption was hysteretic with the original sorption isotherm. This suggests the question: how useful are commonly produced sorption isotherms? (Author)

  19. [Effects of tobacco garlic crop rotation and intercropping on tobacco yield and rhizosphere soil phosphorus fractions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Biao; Zhang, Xi-zhou; Yang, Xian-bin

    2015-07-01

    A field plot experiment was conducted to investigate the tobacco yield and different forms of soil phosphorus under tobacco garlic crop rotation and intercropping patterns. The results showed that compared with tobacco monoculture, the tobacco yield and proportion of middle/high class of tobacco leaves to total leaves were significantly increased in tobacco garlic crop rotation and intercropping, and the rhizosphere soil available phosphorus contents were 1.3 and 1.7 times as high as that of tobacco monoculture at mature stage of lower leaf. For the inorganic phosphorus in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil in different treatments, the contents of O-P and Fe-P were the highest, followed by Ca2-P and Al-P, and Ca8-P and Ca10-P were the lowest. Compared with tobacco monoculture and tobacco garlic crop intercropping, the Ca2-P concentration in rhizosphere soil under tobacco garlic crop rotation at mature stage of upper leaf, the Ca8-P concentration at mature stage of lower leaf, and the Ca10-P concentration at mature stage of middle leaf were lowest. The Al-P concentrations under tobacco garlic crop rotation and intercropping were 1.6 and 1.9 times, and 1.2 and 1.9 times as much as that under tobacco monoculture in rhizosphere soil at mature stages of lower leaf and middle leaf, respectively. The O-P concentrations in rhizosphere soil under tobacco garlic crop rotation and intercropping were significantly lower than that under tobacco monoculture. Compared with tobacco garlic crop intercropping, the tobacco garlic crop rotation could better improve tobacco yield and the proportion of high and middle class leaf by activating O-P, Ca10-P and resistant organic phosphorus in soil.

  20. Effects of phosphate fertilizer and manure on Chinese cabbage yield and soil phosphorus accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhua LIAO; Jianling LIU; Xinjun Wang; Ke JIA; Na MENG

    2008-01-01

    The yield response of Chinese cabbage to phosphate fertilizer and manure was studied.The effect of over-application of phosphate fertilizer and manure on plant total phosphorus content and phosphorus accumulation in soil was also investigated.The experiment was arranged in a plastic barrel in the field for two years.Application of phosphate fertilizer at the rates of 150-Chinese cabbage.Application of manure at the rates of 33.3-133.2 g.kg-1 gave a yield increase of 18.2%-25.9% of the crop.There was no significant difference of yield resfertilizer,and no significant yield response to the application of phosphate fertilizer after applying manure.The total P content in Chinese cabbage was increased gradually with the rate increase of phosphate fertilizer and manure.Phosphorus was absorbed luxuriously by the plant with over-application phosphate fertilizer and manure.The content of total-P,Olsen-P,water-soluble P,biological available P in the soil was increased with the rate of phosphate fertilizer and manure.Organic phosphorus in the soil was increased by the application of manure.Olsen-P had high correlations with water-soluble-P and biological available-P,but there was a poor relationship between Olsen-P and organic-P.

  1. Phosphorus Characteristics with Controlled Nitrogen in Fertile Soils in Protected Vegetable Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Heng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an unreasonable phenomenon of fertilization in vegetable facility cultivation, with the serious imbalance of soil nutrient. In purpose of understanding the absorption characteristics of phosphorus from nitrogen-rich soil, a long-term nitrogen-controlled experiment was carried from the year 2004 to 2007, and a split plot experiment of leaching was carried in winter-spring season of 2007. The results showed that the content of phosphorus varied with different nitrogen control. The TP was decreased with nitrogen supply of none(NN 、organic manure(MN 、organic manure and straw(MN+S, and the decreased range was NN>MN>MN+S, meanwhile the increase range of TP was traditional-nitrogen(CN >traditional-nitrogen+straw(CN+S >optimized-nitrogen+straw(SN+S >optimized-nitrogen(SN. The available P with CN and CN+S reached to 213.7 mg· kg -1 、225.4 mg·kg -1, which increased by 17.1 percent and 23.5 percent, which declared the phosphorus was accumulated; The available P with other nitrogen controlled decreased with the range of NN>MN>MN+S>SN+S>SN跃CN>CN+S, which showed that the supply reduction of nitrogen could slowdown the phosphorus accumulated and promote the utilization ratio of phosphorus. The organophosphorus was increased except NN, with obvious increase with CN、CN+S(308.4 mg·kg -1 、331.4 mg·kg -1 by 28.5 percent and 38.2 percent. The absorption coefficient of phosphorus with SN+S(P 2 O 5,mg· 100 g -1 reached to 1 571, increased by 143.6 percent; Otherwise the absorption coefficient of phosphorus with CN、CN+S showed negative growth, the CN dipped to 416(P 2 O 5,mg·100 g -1 by 35.5 percent. Adding wheat straw could greatly improved the capacity of absorption of phosphorus and slow down the accumulation of available phosphorus to some extent. The concentrations of total phosphorus in the filtrate with SN+S were less than SN, contrary to the concentration of organophosphorus, thus the straw returning had a certain effect on

  2. Aplicação de fósforo para imobilização química do cádmio em solo contaminado Phosphorus application for the chemical immobilization of cadmium in contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Ricardo Trevizam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of phosphorus on the Cd availability to plants of a contaminated soil using 109Cd isotope and chemical extractants. The experiment was set in a randomized block design and the soil was labeled with 222 KBq of 109Cd per pot and received 5 rates of P as triple superphosphate, growing lettuce plants as test crop. The use of phosphorus reduced pH of soil which altered the Cd availability in DTPA and Mehlich extractants. The lettuce Cd content decreased but its accumulation and L value increased in all treatments compared to the control, demonstrating the inefficiency of phosphorus in reducing the Cd availability.

  3. Phosphorus release from anaerobic peat soil during convective discharge – effect of soil Fe:P molar ratio and preferential flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    was controlled by reductive Fe(III) dissolution, and was well predicted from the soil FeBD:PBD molar ratio. Continuous convective column discharge with oxygen-free deionised water at 1 mm h− 1 for 10 effluent pore volumes resulted in highly variable in situ redox potential (Eh from − 200 to 300 mV), effluent Fe...... influence of soil geochemistry and local scale active flow volume. Combining batch incubation experiments and continuous column discharge experiments, we investigated iron (Fe) reduction and P release from 10 anoxic Fe-dominated (oxalate extractable Fe (Feox) from ~ 5500 to 50,000 mg kg− 1) lowland peat......(II) concentrations (23 to 2000 μM) and effluent dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) concentrations (discharge (3...

  4. Mineralization of organic phosphorus in soil size fractions under different vegetation covers in the north of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joice Cleide de Oliveira Rita

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In unfertilized, highly weathered tropical soils, phosphorus (P availability to plants is dependent on the mineralization of organic P (Po compounds. The objective of this study was to estimate the mineralization of total and labile Po in soil size fractions of > 2.0, 2.0-0.25 and 2.0 and 2.0-0.25 mm fractions, respectively. In contrast, there was an average increase of 90 % of total Po in microaggregates of 2.0 (-50 % and < 0.25 mm (-76 % fractions, but labile Po increased by 35 % in the 2.0-0.25 mm fraction. The Po fraction relative to total extracted P and total labile P within the soil size fractions varied with the vegetation cover and incubation time. Therefore, the distribution of P fractions (Pi and Po in the soil size fraction revealed the distinctive ability of the cover species to recycle soil P. Consequently, the potential of Po mineralization varied with the size fraction and vegetation cover. Because Po accounted for most of the total labile P, the P availability to plants was closely related to the mineralization of this P fraction.

  5. Spectroscopic quantification of soil phosphorus forms by {sup 31}P-NMR after nine years of organic or mineral fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatiboni, Luciano Colpo, E-mail: gatiboni@cav.udesc.br [Universidade Estadual de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Lages, SC (Brazil); Brunetto, Gustavo; Rheinheimer, Danilo dos Santos; Kaminski, Joao; Flores, Alex Fabiani Claro; Lima, Maria Angelica Silveira; Girotto, Eduardo; Copetti, Andre Carlos Cruz, E-mail: danilo.rheinheimer@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: joao.kaminski@gmail.com, E-mail: acflores@quimica.ufsm.br, E-mail: masl32003@gmail.com, E-mail: girottosolos@gmail.com, E-mail: andrecopetti@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil); Pandolfo, Carla Maria; Veiga, Milton, E-mail: pandolfo@epagri.sc.gov.br, E-mail: milveiga@epagri.sc.gov.br [Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuaria e Extensao Rural de Santa Catarina (EPAGRI), Campos Novos, SC (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    Long-standing applications of mineral fertilizers or types of organic wastes such as manure can cause phosphorus (P) accumulation and changes in the accumulated P forms in the soil. The objective of this research was to evaluate the forms of P accumulated in soils treated with mineral fertilizer or different types of manure in a long-term experiment. Soil was sampled from the 0-5 cm layer of plots fertilized with five different nutrient sources for nine years: 1) control without fertilizer; 2) mineral fertilizer at recommended rates for local conditions; 3) 5 t ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} of moist poultry litter; 4) 60 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} of liquid cattle manure and 5) 40 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} of liquid swine manure. The {sup 31}P-NMR spectra of soil extracts detected the following P compounds: orthophosphate, pyrophosphate, inositol phosphate, glycerophosphate, and DNA. The use of organic or mineral fertilizer over nine years did not change the soil P forms but influenced their concentration. Fertilization with mineral or organic fertilizers stimulated P accumulation in inorganic forms. Highest inositol phosphate levels were observed after fertilization with any kind of manure and highest organic P concentration in glycerophosphate form in after mineral or no fertilization. (author)

  6. Spectroscopic quantification of soil phosphorus forms by 31p-nmr after nine years of organic or mineral fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Colpo Gatiboni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-standing applications of mineral fertilizers or types of organic wastes such as manure can cause phosphorus (P accumulation and changes in the accumulated P forms in the soil. The objective of this research was to evaluate the forms of P accumulated in soils treated with mineral fertilizer or different types of manure in a long-term experiment. Soil was sampled from the 0-5 cm layer of plots fertilized with five different nutrient sources for nine years: 1 control without fertilizer; 2 mineral fertilizer at recommended rates for local conditions; 3 5 t ha-1 year-1 of moist poultry litter; 4 60 m³ ha-1 year-1 of liquid cattle manure and 5 40 m³ ha-1 year-1 of liquid swine manure. The 31P-NMR spectra of soil extracts detected the following P compounds: orthophosphate, pyrophosphate, inositol phosphate, glycerophosphate, and DNA. The use of organic or mineral fertilizer over nine years did not change the soil P forms but influenced their concentration. Fertilization with mineral or organic fertilizers stimulated P accumulation in inorganic forms. Highest inositol phosphate levels were observed after fertilization with any kind of manure and highest organic P concentration in glycerophosphate form in after mineral or no fertilization.

  7. Fine Root Patterning and Balanced Inorganic Phosphorus Distribution in the Soil Indicate Distinctive Adaptation of Maize Plants to Phosphorus Deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu; YU Peng; PENG Yun-Feng; LI Xue-Xian; CHEN Fan-Jun; LI Chun-Jian

    2012-01-01

    Plants have diverse strategies to cope with phosphorus (P) deficiency.To better understand how maize responds to P deficiency,a field experiment with two P levels,0 and 100 kg P2O5 ha-1 (P0 and P100,respectively),was carried out as a part of a long-term Pfertilizer field trial.Plant and soil analyses showed that P-deficient maize reduced its growth rate,increased P use efficiency,and formed more thin roots with the diameter less than 0.6 mm at jointing and silking stages,compared to the plants treated with P100.Further,there were no differences in major inorganic P fractions (Ca2-P,Ca8-P,A1-P,Fe-P,occluded P and Ca10-P) between the rhizospheric and bulk soils at each harvest,even when soil Olsen-P was only 1.38 mg kg-1.These results suggested that maize responded to P deficiency by reducing the internal P demand for growth and increasing P acquisition ability by favorable root morphological alteration at low carbon cost.

  8. Electrokinetic extraction of chromate from unsaturated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, E.D. [SAT-UNSAT, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lindgren, E.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Heavy-metal contamination of soil and groundwater is a widespread problem in industrial nations. Remediation by excavation of such sites may not be cost effective or politically acceptable. Electrokinetic remediation is one possible remediation technique for in situ removal of such contaminants from unsaturated soils. Previous papers discussing the work performed by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Sat-Unsat, Inc. (SUI) (Lindgren et al., 1991, 1992, 1993) focused on the transport of contaminants and dyes by electrokinetics in unsaturated soils. These experiments were conducted with graphite electrodes with no extraction system. As the contaminants migrated through the soil, they increased in concentration at the electrode creating a diffusion flux in the opposite direction. This paper discusses a technique to remove the contaminants from unsaturated soils once they have reached an electrode.

  9. Characterization of Colloidal Phosphorus Species in Drainage Waters from a Clay Soil Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regelink, I.C.; Koopmans, G.F.; Salm, van der C.; Weng, L.P.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus transport from agricultural land contributes to eutrophication of surface waters. Pipe drain and trench waters from a grassland field on a heavy clay soil in the Netherlands were sampled before and after manure application. Phosphorus speciation was analyzed by physicochemical P

  10. Growth, yield and yield components of dry bean as influenced by phosphorus in a tropical acid soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorus deficiency is one of the most yield limiting factors for dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production in tropical acid soils. Dry beans are invariably grown as mono crops or as inter crops under the perennial tropical crops. Information is limited regarding the influence of phosphorus fertili...

  11. Nitrogen and phosphorus resorption in a neotropical rain forest of a nutrient-rich soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Martínez-Sánchez

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In tropical forests with nutrient-rich soil tree’s nutrient resorption from senesced leaves has not always been observed to be low. Perhaps this lack of consistence is partly owing to the nutrient resorption methods used. The aim of the study was to analyse N and P resorption proficiency from tropical rain forest trees in a nutrient-rich soil. It was hypothesised that trees would exhibit low nutrient resorption in a nutrient-rich soil. The soil concentrations of total N and extractable P, among other physical and chemical characteristics, were analysed in 30 samples in the soil surface (10 cm of three undisturbed forest plots at ‘Estación de Biología Los Tuxtlas’ on the east coast of Mexico (18°34’ - 18°36’ N, 95°04’ - 95°09’ W. N and P resorption proficiency were determined from senescing leaves in 11 dominant tree species. Nitrogen was analysed by microkjeldahl digestion with sulphuric acid and distilled with boric acid, and phosphorus was analysed by digestion with nitric acid and perchloric acid. Soil was rich in total N (0.50%, n = 30 and extractable P (4.11 µg g-1, n = 30. As expected, trees showed incomplete N (1.13%, n = 11 and P (0.11%, n = 11 resorption. With a more accurate method of nutrient resorption assessment, it is possible to prove that a forest community with a nutrient-rich soil can have low levels of N and P resorption. Rev. Biol. Trop. 53(3-4: 353-359. Epub 2005 Oct 3.En las selvas tropicales con suelos fértiles se ha observado que la reabsorción de nutrientes de los arboles de las hojas seniles no siempre es baja. Esta falta de consistencia en el resultado es talvez debida en parte a la metodología de reabsorción de nutrientes utilizada. El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar la reabsorción final de N y P de arboles de la selva húmeda tropical en un suelo rico en nutrientes. La hipótesis planteada fue que en un suelo rico en nutrientes los arboles presentarían una baja reabsorción final de

  12. Negative effects of excessive soil phosphorus on floristic quality in Ohio wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Schumacher, William; Gara, Brian; Monteith, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Excessive soil nutrients, often from agricultural runoff, have been shown to negatively impact some aspects of wetland plant communities. We measured plant-available phosphorus (Mehlich-3: MeP) in soil samples, and assessed the vascular plant community and habitat degradation at 27 emergent and 13 forested wetlands in Ohio, USA. We tested two hypotheses: (1) that an index of vegetation biological integrity based on floristic quality was lower in wetlands with higher concentrations of MeP in the soil, and (2) that higher concentrations of MeP occurred in wetlands with more habitat degradation (i.e., lower quality), as estimated by a rapid assessment method. Hypothesis (1) was supported for emergent, but not for forested wetlands. Hypothesis (2) was marginally supported (P = 0.09) for emergent, but not supported for forested wetlands. The results indicate that the effect of concentration of phosphorus in wetland soils and the quality of plant species assemblages in wetlands is more complex than shown in site-specific studies and may depend in part on degree of disturbance in the surrounding watershed and dominant wetland vegetation type. Woody plants in forested wetlands are typically longer lived than herbaceous species in the understory and emergent wetlands, and may persist despite high inputs of phosphorus. Further, the forested wetlands were typically surrounded by a wide band of forest vegetation, which may provide a barrier against sedimentation and the associated phosphorus inputs to the wetland interior. Our results indicate that inferences about soil nutrient conditions made from rapid assessment methods for assessing wetland habitat condition may not be reliable.

  13. Negative effects of excessive soil phosphorus on floristic quality in Ohio wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A; Schumacher, William; Gara, Brian; Monteith, Steven E

    2016-05-01

    Excessive soil nutrients, often from agricultural runoff, have been shown to negatively impact some aspects of wetland plant communities. We measured plant-available phosphorus (Mehlich-3: MeP) in soil samples, and assessed the vascular plant community and habitat degradation at 27 emergent and 13 forested wetlands in Ohio, USA. We tested two hypotheses: (1) that an index of vegetation biological integrity based on floristic quality was lower in wetlands with higher concentrations of MeP in the soil, and (2) that higher concentrations of MeP occurred in wetlands with more habitat degradation (i.e., lower quality), as estimated by a rapid assessment method. Hypothesis (1) was supported for emergent, but not for forested wetlands. Hypothesis (2) was marginally supported (P=0.09) for emergent, but not supported for forested wetlands. The results indicate that the effect of concentration of phosphorus in wetland soils and the quality of plant species assemblages in wetlands is more complex than shown in site-specific studies and may depend in part on degree of disturbance in the surrounding watershed and dominant wetland vegetation type. Woody plants in forested wetlands are typically longer lived than herbaceous species in the understory and emergent wetlands, and may persist despite high inputs of phosphorus. Further, the forested wetlands were typically surrounded by a wide band of forest vegetation, which may provide a barrier against sedimentation and the associated phosphorus inputs to the wetland interior. Our results indicate that inferences about soil nutrient conditions made from rapid assessment methods for assessing wetland habitat condition may not be reliable.

  14. On-site assessment of extractable soil nutrients after long-term biosolids applications to perennial forage

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate soil nutrient loading and depth distributions of extractable nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) after long-term, continuous annual surface-applications of anaerobically-digested Class B biosolids at a municipal recycling facility in central Te...

  15. Phosphorus collectors from filter paper and synthetic cloth coated with iron or aluminium oxide to provide phosphorus by diffusion in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bernardi Luchese

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus collectors made from filter paper and synthetic cloth, were tested to evaluate their feasibility of determining the need for phosphate application. The collectors were coated with two types of oxides, iron oxide and aluminium oxide. The capacity of the collectors was tested by placing them in a 2 mL of solution containing phosphorus (PO4(3- in the concentration of 0.0, 1.00, 3.00, 5.00, 7.00, 9.00 and 11.00 µ g.mL-1, respectively, after which they were placed in contact with four types of soil (LBa, LRd, LEd and Ca and incubed for 0.0 and 24 h. In this test the soils were kept at a humidity equivalent to 150 mmHg suction. The amount of phosphorus extracted from the solutions was tested at intervals between 0,0 and 11.0 µ g of phosphorus/mL. Results indicated that collectors were most efficient in Dystrophic Dark-Red Latosol (LEd and less efficient in "Bruno álico" Latosol (LBa and Cambisol (Ca. Synthetic cloth was the support yielding the best performance, whereas iron oxide lining was the most adequate lining material. Phosphorus collection increased with time of incubation.Coletores de fósforo feitos de papel filtro e pano sintético (perfex foram usados no estudo da determinação da necessidade de adubação fosfatada. Foram preparados coletores impregnados com óxido de ferro e outros com óxido de alumínio. A capacidade foi testada colocando-os em 2 mL de uma solução padrão de fósforo (na forma de fosfato com 0,0; 1,00; 3,00; 5,00; 7,00; 9,00 e 11;00 µg.mL-1 , depois foram colocados em contato com 4 tipos de solos (Lba, LRd, Led e Ca e incubados por 0,0 e 24 horas. No teste, os solos foram mantidos com uma umidade equivalente a 150 mmHg de sucção. Os resultados mostraram que os coletores foram mais eficientes, na extração de fósforo, no solo LED e menos eficiente no LBa e Ca (Cambissolo. O pano sintético foi a matriz (material suporte que proporcionou melhores resultados. O óxido de ferro foi o substrato foi o

  16. Effects of Application of Biogas Slurry on the Form and Mobility of Soil Phosphorus in Vegetable Greenhouse Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Min-feng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A packed soil column experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of biogas slurry on phosphorus(P form and mobility in a vegetable greenhouse soil with different P fertility levels. The results showed that application of biogas slurry all significantly reduced leachate volume and total phosphorus leaching in the experimental soil with different fertility levels. Compared with control treatments, the application of biogas slurry decreased total phosphorus content in leachate by 722.3 μg·column-1 through reducing leachate volume. Total inorganic phosphorus(TIP decreased by 507.2 μg·column-1 and 1 319 μg·column-1 in the moderate-P-fertility and high-P-fertility soil, respectively. Dissolved inorganic phosphorus(DIP was decreased by 158.1 μg·column-1 and 474.3 μg·column-1 in the low-P-fertility and moderate-P-fertility soil, respectively. In low-P-fertility soil, biogas slurry application significantly increased soil total P, Olsen-P and organic P in 0~7 cm soil depth by a proportion of 34.8%, 37.7% and 148%, respectively. It also reduced soil pH by 0.39 units. In 7~14 cm soil depth, biogas slurry application significantly increased soil total P, Olsen-P and organic P by a proportion of 18.5%, 29.3% and 32.9%, respectively. SoipH was also decreased by 0.28 units. In moderate-P-fertility soil, application of biogas slurry had no significantly influence on soil total P, but increased soil Olsen-P by 20.1% in 0~7 cm soil depth compared with control treatment. In 7~14 cm soil depth, application of biogas slurry reduced soil pH by 0.33 units. In high-P-fertility soil, application of biogas slurry had no significantly influence on soil total P, Olsen-P and organic P in 0~7 cm soil depth compared with control treatment. In 7~14 cm soil depth, application of biogas slurry reduced soil pH by 0.34 units. In conclusion, application of biogas slurry significantly increased different forms of phosphorus contents in low-P-fertility soil, however

  17. Soil Phosphorus Dynamics as Influenced by Land Use Changes in Humid Tropical, Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing-Cheng; HUANG Jian-Hui; PAN Qing-Min; TANG Jian-Wei; HAN Xing-Guo

    2005-01-01

    Land use changes can greatly influence soil phosphorus (P) dynamics, especially when converting native forests to agricultural land. Soils in Xishuangbanna, which is one of southwest China's tropical areas that maintain fragments of primary forests, were studied to a) evaluate the effect of two common land use changes, conversion of forests to agricultural land or rubber tree plantation, on the dynamics of available P and total P in bulk soils as well as total P in particle size fractions; b) assess the relationship between soil P dynamics and soil organic carbon (SOC); and c)elucidate the relationship between soil P content and soil properties such as pH and texture. Clearing secondary forests with subsequent shifting cultivation and establishment of rubber tree plantation caused significant decreases (P < 0.05)in available P at 0-20 cm soil depths, whereas for total P there was a significant decrease (P < 0.05) when converting to shifting cultivation, rubber tree plantation, or fallow field at both 0-20 and 20-40 cm depths. Abandonment of fields used for shifting cultivation led to significant increases (P < 0.05) in available P at 20-40 cm depth. In addition, there was a significant positive relationship between soil organic carbon and soil P content. Compared to secondary forests, the ratio of organic carbon to total P in surface soils (0-20 cm) of shifting cultivation and rubber tree plantation was significantly lower (P < 0.05).

  18. Impact of pH on Microbial Biomass Carbon and Microbial Biomass Phosphorus in Red Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guo-Chao; HE Zhen-Li; WANG Yi-Jun

    2004-01-01

    The impact of pH changes on microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and microbial biomass phosphorus (Pmic)were examined for 3 red soils under citrus production with different lengths of cultivation. Soil pH significantly affected Cmic and Pmic. The Cmic and Pmic changes, as a function of soil pH, appeared to follow a normal distribution with the original soil pH value at the apex and as pH increased or decreased compared to the original soil pH, Cmic and Pmic declined. Moreover, there were critical pH values at both extremes (3.0 on the acidic side and 8.0 to 8.5 on the alkaline side), beyond which most of microorganisms could never survive.The effect of pH on Cmic and Pmic was also related to the original soil pH. The higher the original soil pH was, the less Cmic or Pmic were affected by pH change. It is suggested that soil microorganisms that grow in a soil environment with a more neutral soil pH range (I.e. pH 5.5-7.5) may have a greater tolerance to pH changes than those growing in more acidic or more alkaline soil pH conditions.

  19. Soil nitrogen affects phosphorus recycling: foliar resorption and plant-soil feedbacks in a northern hardwood forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Craig R; Yanai, Ruth D; Fisk, Melany C; Vadeboncoeur, Matthew A; Quintero, Brauuo A; Fahey, Timothy J

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have attempted to link foliar resorption of nitrogen and phosphorus to their. respective availabilities in soil, with mixed results. Based on resource optimization theory, we hypothesized that the foliar resorption of one element could be driven by the availability of another element. We tested various measures of soil N and P as predictors of N and P resorption in six tree species in 18 plots across six stands at the Bartlett Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA. Phosphorus resorption efficiency (P resorption also increased with soil P content, which is difficult to explain basdd on single-element limitation, butfollows from the correlation between soil N and soil P. The expected single-element relationships were evident only in the 0 horizon: P resorption was high where resin-available P was low in the Oe (P resorption was high where potential N mineralization in the Oa was low (P resorption. The striking effect of soil N content on foliar P resorption is the first evidence of multiple-element control on nutrient resorption to be reported from an unmanipulated ecosystem.

  20. Fertilization strategies affect phosphorus forms and release from soils and suspended solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borda, Teresa; Celi, Luisella; Bünemann, Else K; Oberson, Astrid; Frossard, Emmanuel; Barberis, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    The release of phosphorus from soils in surface runoff is strongly influenced by fertilizer inputs and contributes significantly to agriculturally driven eutrophication. This work evaluated the forms and availability of P in bulk soils and suspended solids (SS) produced by a water dispersion test that mimics the action of rain events and/or irrigation. This test was applied on soils cultivated with maize and fertilized with mineral N, P, and K (NPK); mineral P and K (PK); bovine slurry and P (S); or manure and P (M) for 15 yr. The P surplus in the treated soils was in the order NPK fertilizer-derived P salts in the suspended solids control P forms and exchangeability for mineral fertilizer treatments, whereas in M soil carbon content assumed a key role.

  1. Extractability and bioavailability of Pb and As in historically contaminated orchard soil: effects of compost amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Margaret; Tai, Yiping; Zhuang, Ping; McBride, Murray B

    2013-06-01

    The availability of Pb and As in an historically contaminated orchard soil, after amendment with compost and aging in the field, was determined by single-step chemical extraction with 1.0 M ammonium acetate at pH 4.8, sequential extraction using the modified BCR test, and a redworm bioassay in the laboratory. The efficiency of soil Pb extraction by ammonium acetate was greater at higher total soil Pb but was reduced by compost amendment. Conversely, the extraction efficiency of total soil As increased with compost amendment, but was not sensitive to total soil As. The redworm bioassay indicated Pb (but not As) bioavailability to be reduced by soil amendment with compost, a result consistent with the ammonium acetate extraction test but not reflected in modified BCR test. Electron microprobe studies of the orchard soil revealed Pb and As to be spatially associated in discrete particles along with phosphorus and iron. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Variability in the mobilization of sediment and phosphorus across 13 European soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nicola; Quinton, John N; Barberis, Elisabetta; Presta, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the variability in mobilization and transport of primary particles and associated total phosphorus (TP) in sediments eroded by overland flow from 13 European arable soils and to consider the empirical support for more process-based alternatives to modeling phosphorus (P) transfers. The 13 soils were subjected to simulated rainfall in laboratory experiments. Rainfall was applied to a soil flume (0.5 x 0.25 m) for 30 min at intensity of 60 mm h(-1), and all overland flow generated during this period was collected. Two simulations were performed 5 d apart. The soils generated a wide range of overland flow (13.3-26.9 mm) and sediment (1.1-16.9 g). The sediments from the experiments were enriched with medium silt particles (6-20 mum). Except for one soil in the second simulation, all of the study soils produced overland flow sediments (OFS) that were enriched with P (TP 976-3884 mg kg(-1), P enrichment ratio 0.92-4.42). Sediment TP was positively correlated (P modeling of P transport in overland flow is to be successful at small scales.

  3. Influence of Organic Manure on Organic Phosphorus Fraction in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYONG-SONG; NIWU-ZHONG; 等

    1993-01-01

    The transformation of organic P(Po) from organic manures in two types of soils (ultisol and entisol) and the influences of external addition of organic substance or inorganic P(Pi) on Po under the condition of the 60% maximum water capacity were investigated.The results obtained from Po fractionation experiments indicated that all the Po fractions except for the highly resistant Po fraction decreased during incubation.Application of pig feces and cow feces could largely increase each fraction of Po in the soils.Immediately after application of organic manure into the soils a large part of labile and moderately labile Po from organic manure was transferred into moderately resistant Po,which might be due to the fact that Ca-or Mg-inositol P was precipitated into Fe-inositol P.However,the availability of Po from organic manure in the soils would increase again after incubation because of the transformation of moderately labile and resistant Po fractions into labile Po fractions.Addition of cellulose or Pi into the soils showed a good effect on increasing all the Po fractions except for the highly resistant Po,and this effect was much more pronounced when cellulose was applied in combination with Pi.Therefore,in view of the effect of organic manure on improving P nutrition to plant,attention should be paid to both the Po and the organic substances from organic manure,It is suggested that application of Pi fertilizer combined with organic manure may be referred to as an effective means of protecting Pi from chemical fixation in soil.

  4. Phosphorus Amendment Efficacy for In Situ Remediation of Soil Lead Depends on the Bioaccessible Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    A validated method is needed to measure reductions of in vitro bioaccessible (IVBA) Pb in urban soil remediated with amendments. This study evaluated the effect of in vitro extraction solution pH and glycine buffer on bioaccesible Pb in P-treated soils. Two Pb-contaminated soils...

  5. Unexprected Changes in Soil Phosphorus Dynamics Following Tropical Deforestation to Cattle Pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Lefer, Margaret E.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    2001-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is widely believed to limit plant growth and organic matter storage in a large fraction of the world's lowland tropical rainforests. We investigated how the most common land use change in such forests, conversion to cattle pasture, affects soil P fractions along forest to pasture chronosequences in the central Brazilian Amazon and in southwestern Costa Rica. Our sites represent a broad range in rainfall, soil type, management strategies, and total soil P (45.2 - 1228.0 microng P / g soil), yet we found some unexpected and at times strikingly similar changes in soil P in all sites. In the Brazilian sites, where rainfall is relatively low and pasture management is more intense than in the Costa Rican sites, significant losses in total soil P and soil organic carbon (SOC) were seen with pasture age on both fine-textured oxisol and highly sandy entisol soils. However, P losses were largely from occluded, inorganic soil P fractions, while organic forms of soil P remained constant or increased with pasture age, despite the declines in SOC. In Costa Rica, SOC remained constant across the oxisol sites and increased from forest to pasture on the mollisols, while total soil P increased with pasture age in both sequences. The increases in total soil P were largely due to changes in organic P; occluded soil P increased only slightly in the mollisols, and remained unchanged in the older oxisols. We suggest that changes in the composition and/or the primary limiting resources of the soil microbial community may drive the changes in organic P. We also present a new conceptual model for changes in soil P following deforestation to cattle pasture.

  6. The potential of legume tree prunings as organic matters for improving phosphorus availability in an acid soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wahyudi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A study that was aimed to elucidate roles of Gliricidia sepium and Tithonia diversifolia prunings and their extracted humic and fulvic acids on improving phosphorus availability and decreasing aluminum concentration in an Ultisol was conducted in a glasshouse. Thirteen treatments consisting of two prunings, six rates of pruning application (5, 7.5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 t/ha and one control (no added prunings were arranged in a randomized block design with four replicates. Each mixture of prunings and soil was placed in a pot containing 8 kg of soil and maize of Srikandi cultivar was grown on it for 45 days. At harvest, soil pH, P content and aluminium concentration were measured. Results of the glasshouse experiment showed that application of Gliricidia and Tithonia prunings significantly increased soil pH, reduced Alo concentration, increased Alp content, increased P availability, and increased P taken up by maize grown for 45 days. The optimum rate of both Gliricidia and Tithonia pruning should be 40 t/ha. However, at the same rate, optimum production gained by Tithonia would be higher than that of Gliricidia.

  7. Phosphorus leaching from cow manure patches on soil columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chardon, W.J.; Aalderink, G.H.; Salm, van der C.

    2007-01-01

    The loss of P in overland flow or leachate from manure patches can impair surface water quality. We studied leaching of P from 10-cmhigh lysimeters filled with intact grassland soil or with acid-washed sand. A manure patch was created on two grassland and two sandfilled lysimeters, and an additional

  8. [Effects of soil covering on solar greenhouse pepper water use efficiency and soil nitrate N and available phosphorus contents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mao-juan; Liang, Yin-li; Chen, Jia-rui; Xiong, Ya-mei; Wei, Ze-xiu

    2007-06-01

    A greenhouse study on the effects of soil covering on pepper (Capsicum anmuum L.) water use efficiency and soil nitrate and available phosphorus contents showed that straw mulch + plastic film mulch could get the highest pepper yield water use efficiency (33.04 kg . m(-3)) and economic water use efficiency (50.22 yuan . m(-3)), followed by plastic film mulch, with the two parameters being 18.81 kg . m(-3) and 28.57 yuan . m(-3), respectively. Significant differences of nitrate N content in 0-20 cm soil layer were observed among different treatments. The control had the highest nitrate N content (50.33 mg . kg(-1)), followed by straw mulch (31.98 mg . kg(-1)) and straw + plastic film mulch (31.96 mg . kg(-1)), and plastic film mulch and applying water preserving agent. Compared with the control, soil covering could increase the nitrate N use efficiency of pepper, and decrease the accumulation of nitrate N in plough layer. In 0-20 cm soil layer, treatment plastic film mulch had the lowest available phosphorus content (0.72 mg . kg(-3)), and the second (0. 92 mg . kg(-1)) was the treatment straw + plastic film mulch. Treatments straw + plastic film mulch and plastic film mulch could increase pepper fruit yield and fertilizer use efficiency, and decrease fertilizer loss.

  9. Interactive effects of nitrogen and phosphorus on soil microbial communities in a tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Tao; Gilliam, Frank S; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2013-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition in humid tropical regions may exacerbate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests on highly weathered soils. However, it is not clear how P availability affects soil microbes and soil carbon (C), or how P processes interact with N deposition in tropical forests. We examined the effects of N and P additions on soil microbes and soil C pools in a N-saturated old-growth tropical forest in southern China to test the hypotheses that (1) N and P addition will have opposing effects on soil microbial biomass and activity, (2) N and P addition will alter the composition of the microbial community, (3) the addition of N and P will have interactive effects on soil microbes and (4) addition-mediated changes in microbial communities would feed back on soil C pools. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was used to quantify the soil microbial community following four treatments: Control, N addition (15 g N m(-2) yr(-1)), P addition (15 g P m(-2) yr(-1)), and N&P addition (15 g N m(-2) yr(-1) plus 15 g P m(-2) yr(-1)). These were applied from 2007 to 2011. Whereas additions of P increased soil microbial biomass, additions of N reduced soil microbial biomass. These effects, however, were transient, disappearing over longer periods. Moreover, N additions significantly increased relative abundance of fungal PLFAs and P additions significantly increased relative abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi PLFAs. Nitrogen addition had a negative effect on light fraction C, but no effect on heavy fraction C and total soil C. In contrast, P addition significantly decreased both light fraction C and total soil C. However, there were no interactions between N addition and P addition on soil microbes. Our results suggest that these nutrients are not co-limiting, and that P rather than N is limiting in this tropical forest.

  10. Interactive effects of nitrogen and phosphorus on soil microbial communities in a tropical forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    Full Text Available Elevated nitrogen (N deposition in humid tropical regions may exacerbate phosphorus (P deficiency in forests on highly weathered soils. However, it is not clear how P availability affects soil microbes and soil carbon (C, or how P processes interact with N deposition in tropical forests. We examined the effects of N and P additions on soil microbes and soil C pools in a N-saturated old-growth tropical forest in southern China to test the hypotheses that (1 N and P addition will have opposing effects on soil microbial biomass and activity, (2 N and P addition will alter the composition of the microbial community, (3 the addition of N and P will have interactive effects on soil microbes and (4 addition-mediated changes in microbial communities would feed back on soil C pools. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA analysis was used to quantify the soil microbial community following four treatments: Control, N addition (15 g N m(-2 yr(-1, P addition (15 g P m(-2 yr(-1, and N&P addition (15 g N m(-2 yr(-1 plus 15 g P m(-2 yr(-1. These were applied from 2007 to 2011. Whereas additions of P increased soil microbial biomass, additions of N reduced soil microbial biomass. These effects, however, were transient, disappearing over longer periods. Moreover, N additions significantly increased relative abundance of fungal PLFAs and P additions significantly increased relative abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi PLFAs. Nitrogen addition had a negative effect on light fraction C, but no effect on heavy fraction C and total soil C. In contrast, P addition significantly decreased both light fraction C and total soil C. However, there were no interactions between N addition and P addition on soil microbes. Our results suggest that these nutrients are not co-limiting, and that P rather than N is limiting in this tropical forest.

  11. Phosphorus transport with runoff of simulated rainfall from purple-soil cropland of different surface conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yang; ZHANG Jin-zhong; ZHU Bo; ZHOU Pei; MIAO Chi-yuan; WANG Tao

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the patterns of phosphorus transport from purple-soil cropland of 5° and 10° slopes with bare and vegetated surfaces, respectively. Each type of land was tested under a simulated moderate rainfall of 0.33 mm/min, a downfall of 0.90 mm/min, and a rainstorm of 1.86 mm/min. Runoff dynamics and changes in the export amount of phosphorus are influenced by the rainfall intensity, the slope and surface conditions of cropland. The vegetation diverts rain water from the surface into soil and helps the formation of a subsurface runoff, but has little influence on runoff process at the same sloping degree. Vegetated soil has a smaller phosphorous loss, particularly much less in the particulate form. A heavier rainfall flushes away more phosphorous. Rainwater percolating soil carries more dissolved phosphorous than particulate phosphorous. Understanding the patterns of phosphorous transport under various conditions from purple soil in the middle of Sichuan basin is helpful for developing countermeasures against non-point-source pollution resulting in the eutrophication of water bodies in this region that could, if not controlled properly, deteriorate the water quality of the Three Gorges Reservoir.

  12. Use of dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) fertilizers to reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G C; He, Z L; Stoffella, P J; Yang, X E; Yu, S; Calvert, D

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing concern over P leaching from sandy soils applied with water-soluble P fertilizers. Laboratory column leaching experiments were conducted to evaluate P leaching from a typical acidic sandy soil in Florida amended with DPR fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) and N-Viro soil. Ten leaching events were carried out at an interval of 7 days, with a total leaching volume of 1,183 mm equivalent to the mean annual rainfall of this region during the period of 2001-2003. Leachates were collected and analyzed for total P and inorganic P. Phosphorus in the leachate was dominantly reactive, accounting for 67.7-99.9% of total P leached. Phosphorus leaching loss mainly occurred in the first three leaching events, accounting for 62.0-98.8% of the total P leached over the whole period. The percentage of P leached (in the total P added) from the soil amended with water-soluble P fertilizer was higher than those receiving the DPR fertilizers. The former was up to 96.6%, whereas the latter ranged from 0.3% to 3.8%. These results indicate that the use of N-Viro-based DPR fertilizers can reduce P leaching from sandy soils.

  13. 200 years of soil carbon nitrogen and phosphorus change across the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipping, Ed; Quinton, John; Davies, Jessica; Bell, Vicky; Carnell, Ed; Dragosits, Ulli; Muhammed, Shibu; Naden, Pam; Stuart, Marianne; Tomlinson, Sam; Whitmore, Andy; Wu, Lianhai

    2015-04-01

    Human intervention over the last 200 years has resulted in vast changes to the fluxes of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) entering the United Kingdom's landscape. Industrialisation has resulted in N deposition, agricultural intensification has seen widespread use of N and P fertilizers and societal actions have resulted in extensive land use change. To understand the consequences of these anthropogenic inputs for our soils, freshwaters and ecosystems it is necessary to take an integrated long term large scale approach. Integration across the compartments of the critical zone - from atmosphere, plants to soil and stream - is necessary in order to trace the effects of deposition, fertilization, cultivation and land use change. Coherent integration of C, N and P dynamics is also crucial, as biological processes tightly couple these cycles, so that in unison C N and P control the generation of biomass and consequent production of soil organic matter, having knock on effects for dissolved and particulate fluxes and ecosystem function. The Long-Term Large-Scale (LTLS) project is developing an integrated model that simulates the pools and fluxes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (C, N, and P) between atmospheric, vegetation, soil and aquatic systems for the whole of the United Kingdom for a period spanning from the onset of the industrial revolution up until the present day. In this paper we will present results demonstrating the changes in the soil macronutrient cycles in response to agrarian and social change in the United Kingdom over the last 200 years

  14. Congo grass grown in rotation with soybean affects phosphorus bound to soil carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Merlin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The phosphorus supply to crops in tropical soils is deficient due to its somewhat insoluble nature in soil, and addition of P fertilizers has been necessary to achieve high yields. The objective of this study was to examine the mechanisms through which a cover crop (Congo grass - Brachiaria ruziziensis in rotation with soybean can enhance soil and fertilizer P availability using long-term field trials and laboratory chemical fractionation approaches. The experimental field had been cropped to soybean in rotation with several species under no-till for six years. An application rate of no P or 240 kg ha-1 of P2O5 had been applied as triple superphosphate or as Arad rock phosphate. In April 2009, once more 0.0 or 80.0 kg ha-1 of P2O5 was applied to the same plots when Congo grass was planted. In November 2009, after Congo grass desiccation, soil samples were taken from the 0-5 and 5-10 cm depth layer and soil P was fractionated. Soil-available P increased to the depth of 10 cm through growing Congo grass when P fertilizers were applied. The C:P ratio was also increased by the cover crop. Congo grass cultivation increased P content in the soil humic fraction to the depth of 10 cm. Congo grass increases soil P availability by preventing fertilizer from being adsorbed and by increasing soil organic P.

  15. A leaf phosphorus assay for seedlings of Acacia mangium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J S; Simpson, R J; Sands, R

    1992-10-01

    Concentrations of extractable and total phosphorus in leaves, stem, root and nodules of 12-week-old seedlings of two provenances of Acacia mangium Willd. were analyzed to identify the fraction of phosphorus and the plant part most suitable for predicting the phosphorus nutritional status of the seedlings.For both provenances, concentrations of extractable phosphorus were more sensitive to changes in soil phosphorus status and varied less among different plant parts than concentrations of total phosphorus. Concentrations of extractable phosphorus in the youngest fully expanded leaf (Leaf 3 from the apex) and the next two older leaves correlated closely with seedling dry mass and may be used to assess the phosphorus nutritional status of Acacia mangium seedlings.

  16. Fractionation of Moderately and Highly Stable Organic Phosphorus in Acid Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANYEKUAN; LISHIJUN

    1998-01-01

    The fractionation of moderately and highly organic phosphorus(Po) in acid soil was studied by two methods .By the first method,after incubation for 40 d; the mineralization rates of eight constituents of stable Po in the soil were determined.By the second method ,five constituents of peecipitates of stable Po in the soil were separated,then the five precipiates were put back into the original soils and incubated for 40 d and 60 d .Then,mineralization rates of the five precipitates were determined.The same results were obtained by the two methods.When the pH of the alkali solution containing stable Po was adjusted from 3.00 to 3.10,the mineralization rate of moderately stable Po Was rapidly raised.Therefore,the pH 3.00 is the critical point between moderately and highly stable Po.

  17. Phosphorus saturation and mobilization in two typical Chinese greenhouse vegetable soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalkhajeh, Yusef Kianpoor; Huang, Biao; Hu, Wenyou;

    2017-01-01

    and sandy and alkaline Tongshan Ustic Cambosols. A total of 20 intact soil columns were collected based on differences in total P content varying between 1360 and 11,220 mg kg(-1). Overall, six leaching experiments were carried out with collection of leachates over 24 h. Very high P concentrations.......44% led to DRP leaching exceeding 0.1 mg L(-1). Accordingly, more than 80% of Tongshan soils resulted in DRP leaching exceeding the environmental P threshold. In conclusion P rich alkaline sandy soils used for greenhouse vegetable production are at high risk of P mobilization across China.......Chinese greenhouse vegetable production can cause eutrophication of fresh waters due to heavy use of fertilizers. To address this, phosphorus (P) leaching was compared between two major greenhouse vegetable soils from Jiangsu Province, Southeast China: clayey and acid-neutral Guli Orthic Anthrosols...

  18. Interrill erosion of carbon and phosphorus from conventionally and organically farmed Devon silt soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J; Armstrong, Elizabeth K; Ling, Amy C;

    2012-01-01

    Globally, between 0.57 and 1.33 Pg of soil organic carbon (SOC) may be affected by interrill processes. Also, a significant amount of phosphorus (P) is contained in the surface soil layer transformed by raindrop impact, runoff and crust formation. In the EU, the P content of a crusted (2 mm......) surface layer corresponds to 4 to 40 kg ha− 1 of P on arable land (1.094 mil km2). Therefore, the role of interrill processes for nutrient cycling and the global carbon cycle requires close attention. Interrill erosion is a complex phenomenon involving the detachment, transport and deposition of soil...... and particle size. As a consequence, erosion on interrill areas is selective, moving the most easily detached small and/or light soil particles. This leads to the enrichment of clay, phosphorous (P) and carbon (C). Such enrichment in interrill sediment is well documented, however, the role of interrill erosion...

  19. A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

  20. Hourly Fluctuations in Labile Soil Phosphorus in Response to Climate Variability in a Wet Tropical Forest, La Selva, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecar, K. L.; Lawrence, D. C.; Das, R.; Clark, D. A.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Schwendenmann, L.

    2007-05-01

    Tropical rain forests are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world and play a significant role in the global carbon budget. Changes in phosphorus cycling dynamics as a result of on-going climate change have the potential to limit productivity in this ecosystem. Our objective was to determine hourly patterns in labile soil phosphorus throughout the day and explore possible mechanisms driving these patterns. We conducted an in situ experiment on soils from a wet tropical forest at La Selva Biological Station located in N.E. Costa Rica. A variety of climatic and biotic variables including temperature, precipitation, PAR, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration were measured in order to determine their effect on labile phosphorus. Our results indicate that labile phosphorus does vary significantly throughout the day in response to a combination of climatic variables. An understanding of the mechanisms driving phosphorus availability at fine temporal scales can provide a valuable indicator of long term trends in phosphorus cycling dynamics.

  1. Phosphate solubilizing microbes: sustainable approach for managing phosphorus deficiency in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Seema B; Sayyed, Riyaz Z; Trivedi, Mrugesh H; Gobi, Thivakaran A

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus is the second important key element after nitrogen as a mineral nutrient in terms of quantitative plant requirement. Although abundant in soils, in both organic and inorganic forms, its availability is restricted as it occurs mostly in insoluble forms. The P content in average soil is about 0.05% (w/w) but only 0.1% of the total P is available to plant because of poor solubility and its fixation in soil (Illmer and Schinner, Soil Biol Biochem 27:257-263, 1995). An adequate supply of phosphorus during early phases of plant development is important for laying down the primordia of plant reproductive parts. It plays significant role in increasing root ramification and strength thereby imparting vitality and disease resistance capacity to plant. It also helps in seed formation and in early maturation of crops like cereals and legumes. Poor availability or deficiency of phosphorus (P) markedly reduces plant size and growth. Phosphorus accounts about 0.2 - 0.8% of the plant dry weight. To satisfy crop nutritional requirements, P is usually added to soil as chemical P fertilizer, however synthesis of chemical P fertilizer is highly energy intensive processes, and has long term impacts on the environment in terms of eutrophication, soil fertilility depletion, carbon footprint. Moreover, plants can use only a small amount of this P since 75-90% of added P is precipitated by metal-cation complexes, and rapidly becomes fixed in soils. Such environmental concerns have led to the search for sustainable way of P nutrition of crops. In this regards phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms (PSM) have been seen as best eco-friendly means for P nutrition of crop. Although, several bacterial (pseudomonads and bacilli) and fungal strains (Aspergilli and Penicillium) have been identified as PSM their performance under in situ conditions is not reliable and therefore needs to be improved by using either genetically modified strains or co-inoculation techniques. This review

  2. Phosphorus addition can trigger strong priming of soil organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Na; Schaefer, Doug; Zou, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric dust and nitrogen deposition may alter phosphorus (P) availability in soils. Understanding how P affects decomposition of soil organic matter (OM) is important to unravel relationships between P and carbon (C) cycles. To examine P priming effect on decomposition of OM, we added P at three levels on a basis of organic C content (0.0156%, 0.0625% and 0.25% of organic-C contents) to four types of OM (leaf litter, wood litter, organic and mineral soils collected from a subtropical forest) in a microcosm experiment over a 3-day period. We detected P priming effect on decomposition of all four types of OM and the magnitude of this priming effect varied with both OM types and P addition levels. Efflux of CO2 from decomposing leaf litter was decreased by 18.4% with the low-level P addition but increased by 11.9% in the intermediate-level P addition treatments. High-level P addition did not change CO2 efflux from decomposing leaf-litter. For the wood OM, the low-level P addition reduced CO2 efflux by 10.2%, intermediate-level P addition had no effect, but high-level P addition increased CO2 efflux by 17.0%. Positive P priming effect on CO2 efflux occurred in both organic and mineral soils at all three-level P additions and the magnitude of this priming effect increased with P addition levels. The high-level P addition treatment increased CO2 effluxes by 66.3% in the organic soil and by 25.4% in the mineral soil. We conclude that increase in P availability may trigger strong priming effect on CO2 efflux in forest soils, consequently produce C-climate feedbacks. Keywords: Priming effect, available phosphorus, plant litter, soil organic matter

  3. Linking stoichiometric homeostasis of microorganisms with soil phosphorus dynamics in wetlands subjected to microcosm warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Li, Hongyi; Zhang, Zhijian; Muehlbauer, Jeffrey D; He, Qiang; Xu, Xinhua; Yue, Chunlei; Jiang, Daqian

    2014-01-01

    Soil biogeochemical processes and the ecological stability of wetland ecosystems under global warming scenarios have gained increasing attention worldwide. Changes in the capacity of microorganisms to maintain stoichiometric homeostasis, or relatively stable internal concentrations of elements, may serve as an indicator of alterations to soil biogeochemical processes and their associated ecological feedbacks. In this study, an outdoor computerized microcosm was set up to simulate a warmed (+5°C) climate scenario, using novel, minute-scale temperature manipulation technology. The principle of stoichiometric homeostasis was adopted to illustrate phosphorus (P) biogeochemical cycling coupled with carbon (C) dynamics within the soil-microorganism complex. We hypothesized that enhancing the flux of P from soil to water under warming scenarios is tightly coupled with a decrease in homeostatic regulation ability in wetland ecosystems. Results indicate that experimental warming impaired the ability of stoichiometric homeostasis (H) to regulate biogeochemical processes, enhancing the ecological role of wetland soil as an ecological source for both P and C. The potential P flux from soil to water ranged from 0.11 to 34.51 mg m(-2) d(-1) in the control and 0.07 to 61.26 mg m(-2) d(-1) in the warmed treatment. The synergistic function of C-P acquisition is an important mechanism underlying C∶P stoichiometric balance for soil microorganisms under warming. For both treatment groups, strongly significant (psoil highly labile organic carbon to dissolved reactive phosphorus in porewater) and potential P flux. Although many factors may affect soil P dynamics, the n-HC∶P term fundamentally reflects the stoichiometric balance or interactions between the energy landscape (i.e., C) and flow of resources (e.g., N and P), and can be a useful ecological tool for assessing potential P flux in ecosystems.

  4. Phosphorus and soil development: does the Walker and Syers model apply to semiarid ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmants, Paul C; Hart, Stephen C

    2010-02-01

    The Walker and Syers model of phosphorus (P) transformations during pedogenesis is widely accepted for the development of humid ecosystems, but long-term P dynamics of more arid ecosystems remain poorly understood. We tested the Walker and Syers model in semiarid piñon-juniper woodlands by measuring soil P fractions under tree canopies and in intercanopy spaces along a well-constrained, approximately 3000 ka (1 ka = 1000 years) volcanic substrate age gradient in northern Arizona, USA. The various pools of soil P behaved largely as predicted; total soil P and primary mineral P declined consistently with substrate age, labile inorganic P increased early in soil development and then declined at later stages, and organic phosphorus increased consistently across the chronosequence. Within each site, soils under tree canopies tended to have higher concentrations of labile and intermediately available P fractions compared to intercanopy soils. However, the degree of spatial heterogeneity conferred by tree islands was moderated by the stage of soil development. In contrast, tree islands had no influence on within-site distribution of more recalcitrant soil P pools, which appear to be controlled solely by the stage of pedogenesis. Coincident with declines in total P, primary mineral P, and labile inorganic P, we found that phosphatase enzyme activity increased with substrate age; a result consistent with greater ecosystem-level P demand on older, more highly weathered substrates. Our results suggest that, compared to humid climates, reduced inputs of water, energy, and acidity to semiarid ecosystems slow the rate of change in P fractions during pedogenesis, but the overall pattern remains consistent with the Walker and Syers model. Furthermore, our data imply that pedogenic change may be an important factor controlling the spatial distribution of labile P pools in semiarid ecosystems. Taken together, these data should both broaden and unify terrestrial ecosystem

  5. Do microorganism stoichiometric alterations affect carbon sequestration in paddy soil subjected to phosphorus input?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, ZhiJian; Li, HongYi; Hu, Jiao; Li, Xia; He, Qiang; Tian, GuangMing; Wang, Hang; Wang, ShunYao; Wang, Bei

    2015-04-01

    Ecological stoichiometry provides a powerful tool for integrating microbial biomass stoichiometry with ecosystem processes, opening far-reaching possibilities for linking microbial dynamics to soil carbon (C) metabolism in response to agricultural nutrient management. Despite its importance to crop yield, the role of phosphorus (P) with respect to ecological stoichiometry and soil C sequestration in paddy fields remains poorly understood, which limits our ability to predict nutrient-related soil C cycling. Here, we collected soil samples from a paddy field experiment after seven years of superphosphate application along a gradient of 0, 30, 60, and 90 (P-0 through P-90, respectively) kg.ha-1.yr-1 in order to evaluate the role of exogenous P on soil C sequestration through regulating microbial stoichiometry. P fertilization increased soil total organic C and labile organic C by 1-14% and 4-96%, respectively, while rice yield is a function of the activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase (BG), acid phosphatase (AP), and the level of available soil P through a stepwise linear regression model. P input induced C limitation, as reflected by decreases in the ratios of C:P in soil and microbial biomass. An eco-enzymatic ratio indicating microbial investment in C vs. P acquisition, i.e., ln(BG): ln(AP), changed the ecological function of microbial C acquisition, and was stoichiometrically related to P input. This mechanism drove a shift in soil resource availability by increasing bacterial community richness and diversity, and stimulated soil C sequestration in the paddy field by enhancing C-degradation-related bacteria for the breakdown of plant-derived carbon sources. Therefore, the decline in the C:P stoichiometric ratio of soil microorganism biomass under P input was beneficial for soil C sequestration, which offered a "win-win" relationship for the maximum balance point between C sequestration and P availability for rice production in the face of climate change.

  6. Mobilization and Mobility of Colloidal Phosphorus in Sandy Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Ilg, Katrin

    2007-01-01

    erschienen in: Journal of Environmental Quality. - 2005(34)3, S. 926-935; Soil Science Society of America Journal. - 2007(71)2, S. 298-305 Die Auswaschung von Phosphor (P) trägt zur Verlagerung von P aus terrestrischen in aquatische Ökosysteme bei. Neben der gelösten Form kann P im Sickerwasser auch an Kolloide gebunden auftreten. Die Sorption von P an potentiell dispergierbare Bestandteile der Bodenmatrix, z.B. Eisen- und Aluminiumoxide und -hydroxide, beeinflusst deren Oberflächenladung ...

  7. Soil Phosphorus status in Chinese greenhouse vegetable production system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kianpoor Kalkhajeh, Yusef

    Rapid expansion of greenhouse vegetable production (GVP) in China within the last three decades has been accompanied with intensive application of chemical and manure fertilizers, frequent irrigation, and year-round crop rotation. As a consequence, excessive P accumulation and availability have...... to the surrounding below threshold values Overall, very high P contents were measured in 75 representative Chinese GVP top soils (0-20 cm) with total P and Olsen P varying from 260 to 11,200 mg kg-1, and 5 to 740 mg kg-1, respectively. These large variations reflect the significant differences in vegetation history...

  8. Winter effect on soil microorganisms under different tillage and phosphorus management practices in eastern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yichao; Lalande, Roger; Hamel, Chantal; Ziadi, Noura

    2015-05-01

    Determining how soil microorganisms respond to crop management systems during winter could further our understanding of soil phosphorus (P) transformations. This study assessed the effects of tillage (moldboard plowing or no-till) and P fertilization (0, 17.5, or 35 kg P·ha(-1)) on soil microbial biomass, enzymatic activity, and microbial community structure in winter, in a long-term (18 years) corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) rotation established in 1992 in the province of Quebec, Canada. Soil samples were collected at 2 depths (0-10 and 10-20 cm) in February 2010 and 2011 after the soybean and the corn growing seasons, respectively. Winter conditions increased the amounts of soil microbial biomasses but reduced the overall enzymatic activity of the soil, as compared with fall levels after corn. P fertilization had a quadratic effect on the amounts of total, bacterial, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi phospholipid fatty acid markers after corn but not after soybean. The soil microbial community following the soybean and the corn crops in winter had a different structure. These findings suggest that winter conditions and crop-year could be important factors affecting the characteristics of the soil microbial community under different tillage and mineral P fertilization.

  9. Phosphorus Sorption Characteristics of Red Soils from Lampung, West- and Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamsul Arifin Siradz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus Sorption Characteristics of Red Soils from Lampung, West- and Central Java (S.A. Siradz : Red soilis a common name used to identify any soil showing yellowish to reddish colour, these soils mainly occur in tropicaland subtropical regions. The term is frequently used to convey an image of red, infertile, acid soils in the tropics andis associated with tropical and subtropical climates which are characterized by high temperature and humidity. Majorsoil constraints to crop production may include low pH, low available P and high P fixation capacity, toxicity due toAl and sometimes Mn and Fe, deficiencies of N, Ca, Mg, K, and micronutrients e.g. Mo, Zn and Cu, low CEC and lowbase saturation, and very low content of weatherable minerals. The aim of this study was to determine the phosphorussorption characteristics of red soils from Lampung, West Java and Central Java. Soils were sampled at depth of 0-20cm from minimally disturbed sites after discarding the uppermost few cm consisting of an accumulation of litter. Thesamples were air-dried, crushed using a ceramic mortar and pestle and then passed through a 0.5 mm stainless steelsieve. Measurements of P sorption were conducted by equilibrating 200 mg of air dry soil ( West Java and Central Java. Values of pH(NaF, Ald, and exchangeable Ca were most predictive of Psorption in these soils.

  10. Integrating Phosphorus Movement with Soil and Water Loss in the Daily Erosion Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklenar, Tim; Perez-Bidegain, Mario; Cruse, Richard; Gelder, Brian; Herzmann, Daryl

    2016-04-01

    The Daily Erosion Project (DEP) is an ongoing modelling effort which is now in its second generation. DEP provides comprehensive and dynamic estimates of sediment delivery, soil erosion, and hill slope runoff for agricultural land areas across the Midwestern United States every day for Hydrologic Unit Code 12 (HUC 12) size watersheds. Results are posted every morning on the Internet at dailyerosion.org. Currently DEP covers all of Iowa and portions of Kansas and Minnesota, but expansion of coverage is ongoing. The integration of highly resolute spatial and temporal climate data, soil properties, crop rotation and residue management data affords the opportunity to test the effects of using multiple conservation practices on the transport and fate of water borne nutrients, especially phosphorus, on the Midwestern United States agricultural landscapes. Understanding the interaction of different environmental and land management practices on phosphorus movement will allow data from the DEP to guide conservation efforts as expansion continues into surrounding Midwestern states. The presentation will provide an overview of the DEP technology, including how input data are derived and used to make daily erosion estimates on over 200,000 flowpaths in the modelling area, as well as a discussion of the ongoing phosphorus transport modelling efforts and plans for future expansion (both land area and model functionality).

  11. Influence of Lime and Phosphorus Application Rates on Growth of Maize in an Acid Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Asbon Opala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactive effects of lime and phosphorus on maize growth in an acid soil were investigated in a greenhouse experiment. A completely randomized design with 12 treatments consisting of four lime levels, 0, 2, 10, and 20 t ha−1, in a factorial combination with three phosphorus rates, 0, 30, and 100 kg ha−1, was used. Maize was grown in pots for six weeks and its heights and dry matter yield were determined and soils were analyzed for available P and exchangeable acidity. Liming significantly reduced the exchangeable acidity in the soils. The effect of lime on available P was not significant but available P increased with increasing P rates. There was a significant effect of lime, P, and P by lime interactions on plant heights and dry matter. Without lime application, dry matter increased with increasing P rates but, with lime, dry mattes increased from 0 to 30 kg P ha−1 but declined from 30 to 100 kg P ha−1. The highest dry matter yield (13.8 g pot−1 was obtained with a combined 2 t ha−1 of lime with 30 kg P ha−1 suggesting that lime application at low rates combined with moderate amounts of P would be appropriate in this soil.

  12. Effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on availability of soil phosphorus and growth of maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Mau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A glasshouse experiment was conducted to study the interactive effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF inoculation on phosphorus uptake by maize (Zea mayze L. grown on a calcareous soil of Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara. The biochar was made of cow dung. Twelve treatment combinations (three biochars levels of 0, 5 and 7.5 g/kg of soil, and four AMF inoculation levels of 0, 5, 10 and 15 spores / kg of soil were arranged in a completely randomized block design with three replicates. Results of the study showed that at 8 weeks after transplanting, the biochar and mycorrhizal treatments increased the availability soil phosphorus and phosphorus uptake by maize. Application 4.5 and 7.5 g biochar/kg of soil combined with inoculation of 10-15 AMF spores / kg of soil provided to high value of phosphorus uptake by maize. Application of biochar alone, however, did not significantly improve maize growth and phosphorus uptake by maize

  13. Effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on availability of soil phosphorus and growth of maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Mau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A glasshouse experiment was conducted to study the interactive effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF inoculation on phosphorus uptake by maize (Zea mayze L. grown on a calcareous soil of Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara. The biochar was made of cow dung. Twelve treatment combinations (three biochars levels of 0, 5 and 7.5 g/kg of soil, and four AMF inoculation levels of 0, 5, 10 and 15 spores / kg of soil were arranged in a completely randomized block design with three replicates. Results of the study showed that at 8 weeks after transplanting, the biochar and mycorrhizal treatments increased the availability soil phosphorus and phosphorus uptake by maize. Application 4.5 and 7.5 g biochar/kg of soil combined with inoculation of 10-15 AMF spores / kg of soil provided to high value of phosphorus uptake by maize. Application of biochar alone, however, did not significantly improve maize growth and phosphorus uptake by maize.

  14. Phosphorus in Finnish soils in the 1900s with particular reference to the acid ammonium acetate soil test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. SAARELA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive research into phosphorus (P in soils and crops began in Finland in the early 1900s. The average amount of total P in the ploughed topsoil layer of mineral soils was about two tonnes per hectare in the 1930s, before the abundant use of fertilisers. The main chemical fractions of P in mineral soils were organic matter, primary apatite and secondary complexes of the hydrous oxides of Al and Fe. Of the smaller amounts of P in light peat soils, as much as 80% was present in stable organic compounds. Field experiments showed that the native P reserves of Finnish soils are poorly available to plants, and that P fertilisers are inefficiently utilised because of the strong fixation of applied phosphate in soils. In evaluations before the late 1950s, all simple chemical tests appeared to be rather unreliable indicators of the supply of P from soils to plants, but later research has shown that the results were impaired by errors implicit in the research materials. Some soil test P values (STPobtained from old samples stored for more than ten years evidently were too high, particularly for organic soils, and many of the soils studied were strongly acidic and therefore biologically less fertile than the chemical P tests indicated. The acid ammonium acetate method (pH 4.65 was introduced in the early 1950s and has since been used in routine soil testing in Finland, not only for P but for all macronutrients except N. In later evaluations of different methods used for estimating the requirement of P fertilisation, the acid ammonium acetate method has proven equal or superior to any other simple chemical method.;

  15. Total phosphorus, zinc, copper, and manganese concentrations in cecil soil through ten years of poultry litter application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poultry litter (PL) is an inexpensive and effective source of plant nutrients. However, over application could result in phosphorus and heavy metal accumulation in soils. A field experiment evaluating PL application to a Cecil soil used for cotton and corn production has been maintained for 10 years...

  16. Determination of phosphate in soil extracts in the field: A green chemistry enzymatic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen R. Campbell

    2015-01-01

    First, the soil sample is extracted with deionized water and filtered. Next, an aliquot of the soil extract (0.5 mL is transferred to a disposable cuvette, containing 0.5 mL of reaction mixture [200 mM HEPES, pH 7.6, 20 mM MgCl2, with 80 nmol 2-amino-6-mercapto-7-methylpurine ribonucleoside (MESG and 1 unit of recombinant purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP; EC 2.4.2.1], mixed, and incubated for 10 min at field temperature. Absorbance of the completed reaction is measured at 360 nm in open-source, portable photometer linked by bluetooth to a smartphone. The phosphate and phosphorus content of the soil is determined by comparison of its absorbance at 360 nm to a previously prepared standard phosphate curve, which is stored in the smartphone app.

  17. Effect of Land Cover Change on Soil Phosphorus Fractions in Southeastern Horqin Sandy Land, Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qiong; ZENG De-Hui; FAN Zhi-Ping; D.K.LEE

    2008-01-01

    In the past 50 years, large areas of the Horqin sandy land were afforested to prevent desertification. Although the afforestation policy appears successful, many people now doubt whether it is suitable to plant trees with high density on the poor soils in semiarid regions. Little is known about the impacts of afforestation on the sandy soil properties, although the evaluation of these impacts is fundamental to judge the rationality of afforestation policy. Soil phosphorus (P) fractions, acid phosphomonoesterase activities, and other soil chemical properties were compared among five adjoining typical ecosystems on poor sandy soils in southeastern Horqin sandy land. The ecosystems studied are natural elm savanna, degraded grassland, Mongolian pine (Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica) plantation, Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) plantation, and mixed plantation of Mongolian pine and poplar (Populus simonii). The results showed that organic P dominated soil P (47%-65%) was the principal source of available P. The degradation of elm savanna to grassland significantly reduced soil pH and resulted in an overall reduction in soil fertility, although slightly increased labile inorganic P. Grassland afforestation had no significant influence on soil pH, organic carbon, and total N but significantly reduced total P. Impacts of grassland afforestation on soil P fractions depended on tree species. Natural elm savanna had higher soil P conserving ability than artificial plantations. Therefore, with the aim of developing a sustainable ecosystem, we suggested that vegetations with low nutrient demand (particularly P) and efficient nutrient cycling would be more suitable for ecosystem restoration in the semiarid region.

  18. Extraction of nerve agent VX from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montauban, Cécile; Bégos, Arlette; Bellier, Bruno

    2004-05-15

    The development and optimization of a method allowing the extraction of intact organophosphorus chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate (VX) from several types of soils are presented here. This involved the selection of an appropriate buffer to bring the sample to a pH close to the pK(a) of VX but sufficiently low to avoid its basic hydrolysis. Buffering with Tris (pH 9) and subsequent extraction of the aqueous layer by a 85:15 (v/v) hexane/dichloromethane mixture allows rapid and sensitive flame photometric detection of VX at spiking levels lower than 10 microg x g(-1), even after 3 months of aging. Extraction yields were close to 60% in complex matrixes. This method also allows recovery and identification of a characteristic degradation product of VX, bis(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) disulfide, which appears to be formed during the aging process. The performance of this method is far better than that of OPCW reference operating procedure, which does not allow extraction of detectable amounts of VX (spiked at 10 microg x g(-1)) in one of the soils used for this study.

  19. Rhizosphere Environment and Labile Phosphorus Release from Organic Waste-Amended Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Thanh H.

    2015-04-01

    Crop residues and biofertilizers are primary sources of nutrients for organic crop production. However, soils treated with large amounts of nutrient-enriched manure have elevated phosphorus (P) levels in regions of intensive animal agriculture. Surpluses occurred in these amended soils, resulting in large pools of exchangeable inorganic P (Pi) and enzyme-labile organic P (Po) that averaging 30.9 and 68.2 mg kg-1, respectively. Organic acids produced during crop residue decomposition can promote the complexation of counter-ions and decouple and release unbound Pi from metal and alkali metal phosphates. Animal manure and cover crop residues also contain large amounts of soluble organic matter, and likely generate similar ligands. However, a high degree of heterogeneity in P spatial distribution in such amended fields, arising from variances in substrate physical forms ranging from slurries to dried solids, composition, and diverse application methods and equipment. Distinct clusters of Pi and Po were observed, where accumulation of the latter forms was associated with high soil microbial biomass C and reduced phosphomonoesterases' activity. Accurate estimates of plant requirements and lability of soil P pools, and real-time plant and soil P sensing systems are critical considerations to optimally manage manure-derived nutrients in crop production systems. An in situ X-ray fluorescence-based approach to sensing canopy and soil XRFS-P was developed to improve the yield-soil P relationship for optimal nutrient recommendations in addition to allowing in-the-field verification of foliar P status.

  20. Is the inherent potential of maize roots efficient for soil phosphorus acquisition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Deng

    Full Text Available Sustainable agriculture requires improved phosphorus (P management to reduce the overreliance on P fertilization. Despite intensive research of root adaptive mechanisms for improving P acquisition, the inherent potential of roots for efficient P acquisition remains unfulfilled, especially in intensive agriculture, while current P management generally focuses on agronomic and environmental concerns. Here, we investigated how levels of soil P affect the inherent potential of maize (Zea mays L. roots to obtain P from soil. Responses of root morphology, arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, and phosphate transporters were characterized and related to agronomic traits in pot and field experiments with soil P supply from deficiency to excess. Critical soil Olsen-P level for maize growth approximated 3.2 mg kg(-1, and the threshold indicating a significant environmental risk was about 15 mg kg(-1, which represented the lower and upper levels of soil P recommended in current P management. However, most root adaptations involved with P acquisition were triggered when soil Olsen-P was below 10 mg kg(-1, indicating a threshold for maximum root inherent potential. Therefore, to maintain efficient inherent potential of roots for P acquisition, we suggest that the target upper level of soil P in intensive agriculture should be reduced from the environmental risk threshold to the point maximizing the inherent potential of roots.

  1. Four decades of post-agricultural forest development have caused major redistributions of soil phosphorus fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrijver, An De; Vesterdal, Lars; Hansen, Karin Irene

    2012-01-01

    Fertilisation of agricultural land causes an accumulation of nutrients in the top soil layer, among which phosphorus (P) is particularly persistent. Changing land use from farmland to forest affects soil properties, but changes in P pools have rarely been studied despite their importance to forest...... ecosystem development. Here, we describe the redistributions of the P pools in a four-decadal chronosequence of post-agricultural common oak (Quercus robur L.) forests in Belgium and Denmark. The aim was to assess whether forest age causes a repartitioning of P throughout the various soil P pools (labile P...... inorganic P fractions significantly decreased with forest age, the organic fractions significantly increased. The labile P pool (inorganic ? organic), which is considered to be the pool of P most likely to contribute to plant-available P, significantly decreased with forest age (from[20 to\\10% of total P...

  2. Soil metaproteomics – Comparative evaluation of protein extraction protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Keiblinger, Katharina M.; Wilhartitz, Inés C.; Schneider, Thomas; Roschitzki, Bernd; Schmid, Emanuel; Eberl, Leo; Riedel, Kathrin; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Metaproteomics and its potential applications are very promising to study microbial activity in environmental samples and to obtain a deeper understanding of microbial interactions. However, due to the complexity of soil samples the exhaustive extraction of proteins is a major challenge. We compared soil protein extraction protocols in terms of their protein extraction efficiency for two different soil types. Four different protein extraction procedures were applied based on (a) SDS extractio...

  3. Phosphorus Distribution in Soils from Australian Dairy and Beef Rearing Pastoral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel B. Adeloju

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of soil type and management practices on P distribution in soils from Australian dairy and beef rearing pastoral systems has been investigated by chemical measurements and phosphorus-31 (31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The amount and forms of P within the soil profile varied with soil type, with the acidic red Ferrosols containing relatively high orthophosphate concentrations, averaging 72.2% compared with 66.8% for Dermosols, under similar management conditions. Soil from Sodosol sites which received less fertiliser P addition had the lowest orthophosphate concentration with only 57.6%. In contrast, relatively high proportions of organic P were found in soil samples from unfertilised Sodosol sites. On average, soil from Sodosol sites contained 37.5% organic P (combined monoester P and diester P, while those from Dermosol and Ferrosol sites contained 31.7% and 25.8%, respectively. Of these, the highest monoester phosphate proportions of 44.6% (site M3 and 46.4% (site M4 were found in Sodosol sites with no recent P inputs, but the highest proportion of diester phosphate (5.7% was found in an unclassified grey sandy loam Dermosol. The higher organic P concentrations in soil from Sodosol sites may be associated with more regular moisture input from both rainfall and boarder-check (flood irrigation. The highest level of pyrophosphate (8.5% was also found in a grey/yellow Sodosol. Overall, the results indicate that P speciation in the Australian soils is strongly influenced by soil type, fertiliser P application rate and timing, and moisture variations.

  4. Fit-for-purpose phosphorus management: do riparian buffers qualify in catchments with sandy soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, David; Summers, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Hillslope runoff and leaching studies, catchment-scale water quality measurements and P retention and release characteristics of stream bank and catchment soils were used to better understand reasons behind the reported ineffectiveness of riparian buffers for phosphorus (P) management in catchments with sandy soils from south-west Western Australia (WA). Catchment-scale water quality measurements of 60 % particulate P (PP) suggest that riparian buffers should improve water quality; however, runoff and leaching studies show 20 times more water and 2 to 3 orders of magnitude more P are transported through leaching than runoff processes. The ratio of filterable reactive P (FRP) to total P (TP) in surface runoff from the plots was 60 %, and when combined with leachate, 96 to 99 % of P lost from hillslopes was FRP, in contrast with 40 % measured as FRP at the large catchment scale. Measurements of the P retention and release characteristics of catchment soils (bank soil (bank soils suggest that catchment soils contain more P, are more P saturated and are significantly more likely to deliver FRP and TP in excess of water quality targets than stream bank soils. Stream bank soils are much more likely to retain P than contribute P to streams, and the in-stream mixing of FRP from the landscape with particulates from stream banks or stream beds is a potential mechanism to explain the change in P form from hillslopes (96 to 99 % FRP) to large catchments (40 % FRP). When considered in the context of previous work reporting that riparian buffers were ineffective for P management in this environment, these studies reinforce the notion that (1) riparian buffers are unlikely to provide fit-for-purpose P management in catchments with sandy soils, (2) most P delivered to streams in sandy soil catchments is FRP and travels via subsurface and leaching pathways and (3) large catchment-scale water quality measurements are not good indicators of hillslope P mobilisation and transport

  5. Removal and attenuation of sewage effluent combined tracer signals of phosphorus, caffeine and saccharin in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Samia; Withers, Paul J A; Paterson, Eric; McRoberts, Colin W; Stutter, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Contaminants in septic tank effluent (STE) are expected to be removed by the soil system before discharging to the environment. However, potential contaminants such as phosphorus (P), caffeine and artificial sweeteners do find their way to watercourses impacting aquatic eco systems. In this study, the attenuation of STE P, caffeine and saccharin were investigated in untreated soil and in soil with reduced microbial activity, in aqueous solutions and in the complex matrix of STE. Time series sorption and desorption experiments using batch equilibrium and a column experiment of STE P attenuation were conducted. The results revealed that the soil distribution coefficients (Kd) were: P 81.57 > caffeine 22.16 > saccharin 5.98 cm(3)/g, suggesting greater soil affinity to P adsorption. The data revealed that 80% of saccharin and 33% of caffeine attenuation was associated with microbial activities rather than adsorption processes. However, a complete removal of saccharin and caffeine did not occur during the equilibration period, suggesting their leaching potential. The dominant mechanism of P attenuation was adsorption (chemical and physical), yielding P retention of >73% and 35% for P in aqueous solution and in STE matrix, respectively, for batch equilibrium. The soil in the column acted as effluent P sink retaining 125 μg P/g soil of effluent P. The attenuation of P, caffeine and saccharin in the aqueous solution was greater than in STE, suggesting that the complex composition of STE reduced soil adsorption ability, and that other substances present in STE may be competing for soil binding sites. The data revealed that caffeine and P had similarities in the interaction with soils and thus caffeine may be considered as a STE tracer of anthropogenic source of P in receiving waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Pig Slurry Application and Crops on Phosphorus Content in Soil and the Chemical Species in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessandro De Conti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of pig slurry rates and plant cultivation can modify the soil phosphorus (P content and distribution of chemical species in solution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the total P, available P and P in solution, and the distribution of chemical P species in solution, in a soil under longstanding pig slurry applications and crop cultivation. The study was carried out in soil columns with undisturbed structure, collected in an experiment conducted for eight years in the experimental unit of the Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM, Santa Maria (RS. The soil was an Argissolo Vermelho distrófico arênico (Typic Hapludalf, subjected to applications of 0, 20, 40, and 80 m3 ha-1 pig slurry. Soil samples were collected from the layers 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40, and 40-60 cm, before and after black oat and maize grown in a greenhouse, for the determination of available P, total P and P in the soil solution. In the solution, the concentration of the major cations, anions, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, and pH were determined. The distribution of chemical P species was determined by software Visual Minteq. The 21 pig slurry applications increased the total P content in the soil to a depth of 40 cm, and the P extracted by Mehlich-1 and from the solution to a depth of 30 cm. Successive applications of pig slurry changed the balance between the solid and liquid phases in the surface soil layers, increasing the proportion of the total amount of P present in the soil solution, aside from changing the chemical species in the solution, reducing the percentage complexed with Al and increasing the one complexed with Ca and Mg in the layers 0-5 and 5-10 cm. Black oat and maize cultivation increased pH in the solution, thereby increasing the proportion of HPO42- and reducing H2PO4- species.

  7. Improving phosphorus uptake and wheat productivity by phosphoric acid application in alkaline calcareous soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad; Yaqub, Muhammad; Naeem, Asif; Ashraf, Muhammad; Hernandez, Vicente Espinosa

    2016-08-01

    Low phosphorus (P) efficiency from existing granular fertilisers necessitates searching for efficient alternatives to improve wheat productivity in calcareous soil. Multi-location trials have shown that phosphoric acid (PA) produced 16% higher wheat grain over commercial P fertilisers, i.e. diammonium phosphate (DAP) and triple superphosphate (TSP). Methods of P application significantly influenced grain yield and the efficiency of methods was observed in the order: PA placement below seed > PA, DAP or TSP fertigation > DAP or TSP broadcast. The sub-surface application of PA produced highest grain yields (mean of all rates), i.e. 4669, 4158 and 3910 kg ha(-1) in Bagh, Bhalwal and Shahpur soil series, respectively. Phosphoric acid at 66 kg P2 O5 ha(-1) was found more effective in increasing gain yield over that of control. Trend in grain P uptake was found similar to that observed for grain yield. Maximum P uptake by grain was recorded at the highest P rate and the lowest at zero P. The significant increase in P uptake with P rates was generally related to the increase in yield rather than its concentration in grain. Phosphorus agronomic efficiency (PAE) and phosphorus recovery efficiency (PRE) were found higher at lower P rate (44 kg P2 O5 ha(-1) ) and decreased with P application. However, PA applied by the either method resulted in higher PAE and PRE compared to DAP and TSP. Phosphoric acid is suggested as an efficient alternative to commercial granular P fertilisers for wheat production in alkaline calcareous soils. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Application of Mycorrhiza and Soil from a Permaculture System Improved Phosphorus Acquisition in Naranjilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symanczik, Sarah; Gisler, Michelle; Thonar, Cécile; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Van der Heijden, Marcel; Kahmen, Ansgar; Boller, Thomas; Mäder, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Naranjilla (Solanum quitoense) is a perennial shrub plant mainly cultivated in Ecuador, Colombia, and Central America where it represents an important cash crop. Current cultivation practices not only cause deforestation and large-scale soil degradation but also make plants highly susceptible to pests and diseases. The use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can offer a possibility to overcome these problems. AMF can act beneficially in various ways, for example by improving plant nutrition and growth, water relations, soil structure and stability and protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, the impact of AMF inoculation on growth and nutrition parameters of naranjilla has been assessed. For inoculation three European reference AMF strains (Rhizoglomus irregulare, Claroideoglomus claroideum, and Cetraspora helvetica) and soils originating from three differently managed naranjilla plantations in Ecuador (conventional, organic, and permaculture) have been used. This allowed for a comparison of the performance of exotic AMF strains (reference strains) versus native consortia contained in the three soils used as inocula. To study fungal communities present in the three soils, trap cultures have been established using naranjilla as host plant. The community structures of AMF and other fungi inhabiting the roots of trap cultured naranjilla were assessed using next generation sequencing (NGS) methods. The growth response experiment has shown that two of the three reference AMF strains, a mixture of the three and soil from a permaculture site led to significantly better acquisition of phosphorus (up to 104%) compared to uninoculated controls. These results suggest that the use of AMF strains and local soils as inoculants represent a valid approach to improve nutrient uptake efficiency of naranjilla and consequently to reduce inputs of mineral fertilizers in the cultivation process. Improved phosphorus acquisition after inoculation with permaculture

  9. Application of Mycorrhiza and Soil from a Permaculture System Improved Phosphorus Acquisition in Naranjilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Symanczik

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Naranjilla (Solanum quitoense is a perennial shrub plant mainly cultivated in Ecuador, Colombia, and Central America where it represents an important cash crop. Current cultivation practices not only cause deforestation and large-scale soil degradation but also make plants highly susceptible to pests and diseases. The use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF can offer a possibility to overcome these problems. AMF can act beneficially in various ways, for example by improving plant nutrition and growth, water relations, soil structure and stability and protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, the impact of AMF inoculation on growth and nutrition parameters of naranjilla has been assessed. For inoculation three European reference AMF strains (Rhizoglomus irregulare, Claroideoglomus claroideum, and Cetraspora helvetica and soils originating from three differently managed naranjilla plantations in Ecuador (conventional, organic, and permaculture have been used. This allowed for a comparison of the performance of exotic AMF strains (reference strains versus native consortia contained in the three soils used as inocula. To study fungal communities present in the three soils, trap cultures have been established using naranjilla as host plant. The community structures of AMF and other fungi inhabiting the roots of trap cultured naranjilla were assessed using next generation sequencing (NGS methods. The growth response experiment has shown that two of the three reference AMF strains, a mixture of the three and soil from a permaculture site led to significantly better acquisition of phosphorus (up to 104% compared to uninoculated controls. These results suggest that the use of AMF strains and local soils as inoculants represent a valid approach to improve nutrient uptake efficiency of naranjilla and consequently to reduce inputs of mineral fertilizers in the cultivation process. Improved phosphorus acquisition after inoculation with

  10. Soil Test Phosphorus Recovery from Livestock Manures Compared with Inorganic Fertilizer in Soil Incubations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Craig Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compared dairy and hen manure P recovery relative to fertilizer P recovery for two Nova Scotia soils with different antecedent soil test P (STP, incubated for 5, 15, 30, 60, and 110 days. Fertilizer equivalence of manure P was expressed as P recovery ratio in percentage points (%PRR. Repeated measures analysis with soil pH covariate revealed: (1 manure %PRR averaged 72% (low-STP soil and 80% (medium-STP soil, (2 there were no significant differences in %PRR between dairy and hen manure, and (3 manure %PRR decreased with incubation time for the low-STP soil but not for the medium-STP soil. The soil pH covariate was significant for both low- and medium-STP soils, and the relationship with %PRR was positive for low- but not for the medium-STP soil.

  11. Impact of Long-Term Fertilization on Phosphorus Status in Black Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xiao-Zeng; SONG Chun-Yu; WANG Shou-Yu; C. TANG

    2005-01-01

    A twelve-year field trial was carried out to determine the impact of long-term fertilization on phosphorus (P) distribution in the soil profile, P balance, and the transformation and availability of soil P in a black soil (Phaeozem, FAO). Under a wheat-soybean-corn rotation, during twelve years where no fertilizer was applied, crops removed 60 and 81 mg P kg-1 soil in the control and NK treatment, respectively. About one third of the P absorbed by crops was originated from organic P. Ca2-P, Ca8-P, Al-P and Fe-P were the main forms of inorganic P absorbed by crops. The surplus P from fertilization remained in the 0-20 cm soil layer and increased with the application rate of P. The combined application of NP or NPK increased available P to a lesser extent than the combined application of PK. Fertilizer P had mainly transformed to the Al-P, Fe-P, Ca2-P, and Ca8-P forms. By using the P budget (X), changes in total P (Y1) and available P (Y2) in soils under the current cropping system could be predicted by the equations: Y1 = 0.02 + 1.01X and Y2 = 2.08 + 0.15X.

  12. Dynamics of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in soil amended with irradiated, pasteurized and limed biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Hernández, Olivia; Mckelligan-Gonzalez, Alba Natalia; Lopez-Olguin, Ana Maria; Espinosa-Ceron, Fabiola; Escamilla-Silva, Eleazar; Dendooven, Luc

    2003-03-01

    Sewage biosolids contain high concentrations of pathogens, which limits their use as soil amendment. This study investigated how application of lime (Ca(OH)2), irradiation, or pasteurization reduced pathogens in biosolids and how its application affected soil characteristics. A soil sampled outside the canopy of Mesquite trees (Prosopis laevigata) and from a pasture at Lerma (Mexico) was amended with treated or untreated biosolids, characterized and incubated aerobically while dynamics of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) were monitored. Heavy metals concentrations in the biosolids were low, so it was of excellent quality (USEPA). The amount of pathogens in the biosolids made it a class "B" (USEPA) which can be used in forests. Only irradiation sufficiently reduced faecal coliforms to make it a class "A" biosolids without restrictions in application. C mineralization increased significantly when biosolids were added, but not concentrations of available P (P < 0.05). Ammonium (NH4+) concentrations in soil amended with biosolids were higher compared to unamended soil, but not the concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) except when biosolids treated with Ca(OH)2 was added to the Lerma soil.

  13. Seedling Growth and Phosphorus Cycling in Northern Forest Soils Amended With Biochar and Wood Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyce, G. L.; Jones, T.; Fulthorpe, R.; Basiliko, N.

    2015-12-01

    Biochar may be a powerful soil amendment to reduce nutrient depletion in North American forests where long-term nitrogen deposition has led to phosphorus (P) limitation, but many effects of biochar in these ecosystems are still unknown. We performed a 12-week growth chamber experiment in which red pine (Pinus resinosa) and sugar maple (Acer saccharum) seedlings were grown in pots with soil from three Ontario forests and varying amounts of sugar maple biochar. Additionally, biochar effects were compared with the effects of wood ash, a forest biomass bioenergy by-product that may also be a beneficial soil amendment in these ecosystems. We assessed plant biomass, soil microbial biomass and phosphatase activity; additional chemical analyses of plant tissue and soils are ongoing. Biochar effects on seedling growth were not consistent across tree species, soil type, and addition rate. For sugar maple seedlings grown in sand and sandy-loam textured soils, biochar additions of 20 t ha-1 significantly (p = 0.03) decreased root biomass by 25 %, and the root-to-shoot ratio correspondingly declined, but this effect was not observed in a silty soil. For red pine seedlings, the same biochar addition rate slightly increased root biomass. Wood ash effects on biomass were similarly variable. For example, in the sandy soil, sugar maple root biomass was significantly lower after application of 16 t ash ha-1, but unchanged by rates of 4 or 40 t ash ha-1. Microbial biomass and soil phosphatase activity also varied by soil type. Phosphatase activity was significantly lower (p = 0.02) in soils with sugar maple compared to red pine, but there were no consistent biochar or ash effects across all soils and species. However, for red pine seedlings grown in silt, biochar significantly (p = 0.04) reduced the phosphatase activity compared to the control and ash soils. Overall, biochar may lessen P-limitation in forested ecosystems, but the suitability of biochar, and wood ash, for increasing P

  14. Black Phosphorus Quantum Dots for Hole Extraction of Typical Planar Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Kaiwen; Wang, Yao; Feng, Xiyuan; Liao, Zhenwu; Su, Qicong; Lin, Xinnan; He, Zhubing

    2017-02-02

    Black phosphorus, famous as two-dimensional (2D) materials, shows such excellent properties for optoelectronic devices such as tunable direct band gap, extremely high hole mobility (300-1000 cm(2)/(V s)), and so forth. In this Letter, facile processed black phosphorus quantum dots (BPQDs) were successfully applied to enhance hole extraction at the anode side of the typical p-i-n planar hybrid perovskite solar cells, which remarkably improved the performance of devices with photon conversion efficiency ramping up from 14.10 to 16.69%. Moreover, more detailed investigations by c-AFM, SKPM, SEM, hole-only devices, and photon physics measurements discover further the hole extraction effect and work mechanism of the BPQDs, such as nucleation assistance for the growth of large grain size perovskite crystals, fast hole extraction, more efficient hole transfer, and suppression of energy-loss recombination at the anode interface. This work definitely paves the way for discovering more and more 2D materials with high electronic properties to be used in photovoltaics and optoelectronics.

  15. Thermodynamic features and an experimental study of the extraction of phosphorus from ferrophosphorus in the presence of iron silicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevko, V. M.; Serzhanov, G. M.; Karataeva, G. E.; Lavrov, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The displacement of phosphorus from ferrophosphorus (24.89% P, 67.82% Fe) by FeSi2 is studied by thermodynamic simulation. The melting of electrothermic ferrophosphorus with FS65 ferrosilicium with the extraction of gaseous phosphorus and the formation of a complex ferroalloy containing 42.8-44.3% Si, 50-52.4% Fe, 1.8-2.0% Mn, and 1.4-1.6% P is experimentally investigated.

  16. Rhizosheaths on wheat grown in acid soils: phosphorus acquisition efficiency and genetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Richard A; Weligama, Chandrakumara; Verbyla, Klara; Ryan, Peter R; Rebetzke, Gregory J; Rattey, Allan; Richardson, Alan E; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Rhizosheaths comprise soil bound to roots, and in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rhizosheath size correlates with root hair length. The aims of this study were to determine the effect that a large rhizosheath has on the phosphorus (P) acquisition by wheat and to investigate the genetic control of rhizosheath size in wheat grown on acid soil.Near-isogenic wheat lines differing in rhizosheath size were evaluated on two acid soils. The soils were fertilized with mineral nutrients and included treatments with either low or high P. The same soils were treated with CaCO3 to raise the pH and detoxify Al(3+) Genotypic differences in rhizosheath size were apparent only when soil pH was low and Al(3+) was present. On acid soils, a large rhizosheath increased shoot biomass compared with a small rhizosheath regardless of P supply. At low P supply, increased shoot biomass could be attributed to a greater uptake of soil P, but at high P supply the increased biomass was due to some other factor. Generation means analysis indicated that rhizosheath size on acid soil was controlled by multiple, additive loci. Subsequently, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of an F6 population of recombinant inbred lines identified five major loci contributing to the phenotype together accounting for over 60% of the total genetic variance. One locus on chromosome 1D accounted for 34% of the genotypic variation. Genetic control of rhizosheath size appears to be relatively simple and markers based on the QTL provide valuable tools for marker assisted breeding.

  17. Linking stoichiometric homeostasis of microorganisms with soil phosphorus dynamics in wetlands subjected to microcosm warming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Wang

    Full Text Available Soil biogeochemical processes and the ecological stability of wetland ecosystems under global warming scenarios have gained increasing attention worldwide. Changes in the capacity of microorganisms to maintain stoichiometric homeostasis, or relatively stable internal concentrations of elements, may serve as an indicator of alterations to soil biogeochemical processes and their associated ecological feedbacks. In this study, an outdoor computerized microcosm was set up to simulate a warmed (+5°C climate scenario, using novel, minute-scale temperature manipulation technology. The principle of stoichiometric homeostasis was adopted to illustrate phosphorus (P biogeochemical cycling coupled with carbon (C dynamics within the soil-microorganism complex. We hypothesized that enhancing the flux of P from soil to water under warming scenarios is tightly coupled with a decrease in homeostatic regulation ability in wetland ecosystems. Results indicate that experimental warming impaired the ability of stoichiometric homeostasis (H to regulate biogeochemical processes, enhancing the ecological role of wetland soil as an ecological source for both P and C. The potential P flux from soil to water ranged from 0.11 to 34.51 mg m(-2 d(-1 in the control and 0.07 to 61.26 mg m(-2 d(-1 in the warmed treatment. The synergistic function of C-P acquisition is an important mechanism underlying C∶P stoichiometric balance for soil microorganisms under warming. For both treatment groups, strongly significant (p<0.001 relationships fitting a negative allometric power model with a fractional exponent were found between n-HC∶P (the specialized homeostatic regulation ability as a ratio of soil highly labile organic carbon to dissolved reactive phosphorus in porewater and potential P flux. Although many factors may affect soil P dynamics, the n-HC∶P term fundamentally reflects the stoichiometric balance or interactions between the energy landscape (i.e., C and flow of

  18. Comparision of results of diferent instrumental methodics (MP-AES, UV-Vis spectrometry) for determination of available forms of soil phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonutare, Tonu

    2016-04-01

    The content of easily extractable forms of phosphorus (P) in soils is important as on the environmental viewpoint and also from agronomical side. For determination of plant available P there is several extraction methods developed. Due to big variations in soil properties, it is very complicated to find the best method for P extractions from soil. For determination of P content in extracts during the years Vis-spectroscopy was used as simple and economic method. During the last decade the role of atomic emission spectroscopic (AES) methods started to grow rapidly. The advantage of this method is accuracy and shorter time of analysis. For the plant growth it is important that the content of P is in phosphate form. This can be determined by phosphate-molybdate method Vis spectrometrically. AES method measured total content of P, including P in organic compound and therefore give a overestimated results of plant available P. The aim of our work was to investigate the possibility of the use of MP-AES spectrometry for determination of plant avalable P in soil. In work more than 100 soil samples with very diferent properties were used. For extraction Mehlich 3, acetate-lactate (AL), double lactate (DL) and calcium lactate (CAL) extragents were used. The content of extracted P was determined by molybdatemethod using Vis spectrometer and microplate reader and also the MP-AES (microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer). The detection limits and limits of quantification for P is calculated. Comparision of analysed by Vis spectroscopy and MP AES P content is provided. Also the influence of soil pH and organic matter content to the results of analysis was reported.

  19. [Responses of rhizosphere nitrogen and phosphorus transformations to different acid rain intensities in a hilly red soil tea plantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Chen, Fu-sheng; Ye, Su-qiong; Yu, Su-qin; Fang, Xiang-min; Hu, Xiao-fei

    2015-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) plantation in hilly red soil region has been long impacted by acid deposition, however its effects on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) transformations in rhizosphere soils remain unclear. A 25-year old tea plantation in a typical hilly red soil region was selected for an in situ simulation experiment treated by pH 4.5, pH 3.5, pH 2.5 and control. Rhizosihere and bulk soils were collected in the third year from the simulated acid deposition experiment. Soil mineral N, available P contents and major enzyme activities were analyzed using the chemical extraction and biochemical methods, and N and P mineralization rates were estimated using the indoor aerobic incubation methods. Our results showed that compared to the control, the treatments of pH 4.5, pH 3.5 and pH 2.5, respectively decreased 7.1%, 42.1% and 49.9% NO3(-)-N, 6.4%, 35.9% and 40.3% mineral N, 10.5%, 41.1% and 46.9% available P, 18.7%, 30.1% and 44.7% ammonification rate, 3.6%, 12.7% and 38.8% net N-mineralization rate, and 31.5%, 41.8% and 63.0% P mineralization rate in rhizosphere soils; however, among the 4 treatments, rhizosphere soil nitrification rate was not significantly different, the rhizosphere soil urease and acid phosphatase activities generally increased with the increasing intensity of acid rain (Pacid intensity, the rhizosphere effects of NH4+-N, NO3(-)-N, mineral N, ammonification and net N-mineralization rates were altered from positive to negative effects, those of urease and acid phosphatease showed the opposite trends, those of available P and P mineralization were negative and that of nitrification was positive. In sum, prolonged elevated acid rain could reduce N and P transformation rates, decrease their availability, alter their rhizosphere effects, and have impact on nutrient cycling in tea plantation.

  20. Soil metaproteomics - Comparative evaluation of protein extraction protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiblinger, Katharina M; Wilhartitz, Inés C; Schneider, Thomas; Roschitzki, Bernd; Schmid, Emanuel; Eberl, Leo; Riedel, Kathrin; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Metaproteomics and its potential applications are very promising to study microbial activity in environmental samples and to obtain a deeper understanding of microbial interactions. However, due to the complexity of soil samples the exhaustive extraction of proteins is a major challenge. We compared soil protein extraction protocols in terms of their protein extraction efficiency for two different soil types. Four different protein extraction procedures were applied based on (a) SDS extraction without phenol, (b) NaOH and subsequent phenol extraction, (c) SDS-phenol extraction and (d) SDS-phenol extraction with prior washing steps. To assess the suitability of these methods for the functional analysis of the soil metaproteome, they were applied to a potting soil high in organic matter and a forest soil. Proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) and the number of unique spectra as well as the number of assigned proteins for each of the respective protocols was compared. In both soil types, extraction with SDS-phenol (c) resulted in "high" numbers of proteins. Moreover, a spiking experiment was conducted to evaluate protein recovery. To this end sterilized forest soil was amended with proteins from pure cultures of Pectobacterium carotovorum and Aspergillus nidulans. The protein recovery in the spiking experiment was almost 50%. Our study demonstrates that a critical evaluation of the extraction protocol is crucial for the quality of the metaproteomics data, especially in highly complex samples like natural soils.

  1. Successive DNA extractions improve characterization of soil microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio R. Dimitrov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, characterization of soil microbial communities relies heavily on the use of molecular approaches. Independently of the approach used, soil DNA extraction is a crucial step, and success of downstream procedures will depend on how well DNA extraction was performed. Often, studies describing and comparing soil microbial communities are based on a single DNA extraction, which may not lead to a representative recovery of DNA from all organisms present in the soil. The use of successive DNA extractions might improve soil microbial characterization, but the benefit of this approach has only been limitedly studied. To determine whether successive DNA extractions of the same soil sample would lead to different observations in terms of microbial abundance and community composition, we performed three successive extractions, with two widely used commercial kits, on a range of clay and sandy soils. Successive extractions increased DNA yield considerably (1–374%, as well as total bacterial and fungal abundances in most of the soil samples. Analysis of the 16S and 18S ribosomal RNA genes using 454-pyrosequencing, revealed that microbial community composition (taxonomic groups observed in the successive DNA extractions were similar. However, successive DNA extractions did reveal several additional microbial groups. For some soil samples, shifts in microbial community composition were observed, mainly due to shifts in relative abundance of a number of microbial groups. Our results highlight that performing successive DNA extractions optimize DNA yield, and can lead to a better picture of overall community composition.

  2. Increasing temperature reduces the coupling between available nitrogen and phosphorus in soils of Chinese grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yan; Baumann, Frank; Song, Chao; Zhang, Mi; Shi, Yue; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas; He, Jin-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Changes in climatic conditions along geographical gradients greatly affect soil nutrient cycling processes. Yet how climate regimes such as changes in temperature influence soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and their stoichiometry is not well understood. This study investigated the spatial pattern and variability of soil N and P availability as well as their coupling relationships at two soil layers (0–10 and 10–20 cm) along a 4000-km climate transect in two grassland biomes of China, the Inner Mongolian temperate grasslands and the Tibetan alpine grasslands. Our results found that in both grasslands, from cold to warm sites the amounts of soil total N, total P and available P all decreased. By contrast, the amount of available N was positively related to mean annual temperature in the Tibetan grasslands. Meanwhile, with increasing temperature ratio of available N to P significantly increased but the linear relationship between them was considerably reduced. Thus, increasing temperature may not only induce a stoichiometric shift but also loose the coupling between available N and P. This N-P decoupling under warmer conditions was more evident in the Tibetan alpine grasslands where P limitation might become more widespread relative to N as temperatures continue to rise.

  3. Citramalic acid and salicylic acid in sugar beet root exudates solubilize soil phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlovsky Petr

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In soils with a low phosphorus (P supply, sugar beet is known to intake more P than other species such as maize, wheat, or groundnut. We hypothesized that organic compounds exuded by sugar beet roots solubilize soil P and that this exudation is stimulated by P starvation. Results Root exudates were collected from plants grown in hydroponics under low- and high-P availability. Exudate components were separated by HPLC, ionized by electrospray, and detected by mass spectrometry in the range of mass-to-charge ratio (m/z from 100 to 1000. Eight mass spectrometric signals were enhanced at least 5-fold by low P availability at all harvest times. Among these signals, negative ions with an m/z of 137 and 147 were shown to originate from salicylic acid and citramalic acid. The ability of both compounds to mobilize soil P was demonstrated by incubation of pure substances with Oxisol soil fertilized with calcium phosphate. Conclusions Root exudates of sugar beet contain salicylic acid and citramalic acid, the latter of which has rarely been detected in plants so far. Both metabolites solubilize soil P and their exudation by roots is stimulated by P deficiency. These results provide the first assignment of a biological function to citramalic acid of plant origin.

  4. A global analysis of fine root production as affected by soil nitrogen and phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Z Y; Chen, Han Y H

    2012-09-22

    Fine root production is the largest component of belowground production and plays substantial roles in the biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial ecosystems. The increasing availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) due to human activities is expected to increase aboveground net primary production (ANNP), but the response of fine root production to N and P remains unclear. If roots respond to nutrients as ANNP, fine root production is anticipated to increase with increasing soil N and P. Here, by synthesizing data along the nutrient gradient from 410 natural habitats and from 469 N and/or P addition experiments, we showed that fine root production increased in terrestrial ecosystems with an average increase along the natural N gradient of up to 0.5 per cent with increasing soil N. Fine root production also increased with soil P in natural conditions, particularly at P soil types. The global average increases in fine root production are lower than those of ANNP, indicating that above- and belowground counterparts are coupled, but production allocation shifts more to aboveground with higher soil nutrients. Our results suggest that the increasing fertilizer use and combined N deposition at present and in the future will stimulate fine root production, together with ANPP, probably providing a significant influence on atmospheric CO(2) emissions.

  5. Phosphorus-arsenic interactions in variable-charge soils in relation to arsenic mobility and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolan, Nanthi; Mahimairaja, Santiago; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Choppala, Girish

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorus (P) influences arsenic (As) mobility and bioavailability which depends on the charge components of soil. The objective of this study was to examine P-As interaction in variable-charge allophanic soils in relation to P-induced As mobilization and bioavailability. In this work, the effect of P on arsenate [As(V)] adsorption and desorption was examined using a number of allophanic and non-allophanic soils which vary in their anion adsorption capacity. The effect of P on As uptake by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) plants was examined using a solution culture, and a soil plant growth experiment involving two As-spiked allophanic and non-allophanic soils which vary in their anion adsorption capacity, and a field As-contaminated sheep dip soil. Arsenate adsorption increased with an increase in the anion adsorption capacity of soils. The addition of P resulted in an increase in As desorption, and the effect was more pronounced in the case of allophanic soil. In the case of both As-spiked soils and field contaminated sheep-dip soil, application of P increased the desorption of As, thereby increasing its bioavailability. The effect of P on As uptake was more pronounced in the high anion adsorbing allophanic than low adsorbing non-allophanic soil. In the case of solution culture, As phytoavailability decreased with increasing concentration of P which is attributed to the competition of P for As uptake by roots. While increasing P concentration in solution decreased the uptake of As, it facilitated the translocation of As from root to shoot. The net effect of P on As phytoavailability in soils depends on the extent of P-induced As mobilization in soils and P-induced competition for As uptake by roots. The P-induced mobilization of As could be employed in the phytoremediation of As-contaminated sites. However, care must be taken to minimize the leaching of As mobilized through the P-induced desorption, thereby resulting in groundwater and off site contamination

  6. Phosphorus critical levels and availability in lowland soils cultivated with flooded rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Isabela Orlando dos Santos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Lowland soils present a great potential for the flooded rice crop. This work aimed to estimate critical levels of P in waterlogged soils cultivated with rice using Mehlich 1 and anion exchange resin as soil-P extractors, compare the performance of these extractors as for the evaluation of the P availability, and study the soil-P fractions involved in the P nutrition of the rice crop. Studied soils consisted of four Histosols: Low Humic Gley (GP, Aluvial (A, Humic Gley (GH and Bog Soil (O which were previously cultivated with beans. The experimental design was completely randomized, in a factorial scheme, using four soils, five P rates (75, 150, 300, 500 and 800 mg dm-3 and two liming treatments (with and without liming, with three replicates. After 60 days of flooding, soil samples were submitted to P extraction by Mehlich 1 and resin, and phosphorous fractionation. Two rice plants were cultivated in pots containing 3 dm³ of waterlogged soils. The labile P and the moderately labile P of the soils contributed for rice nutrition. The two tested extractors presented efficiency in the evaluation of P availability for the rice cultivated in lowland waterlogged soils.

  7. Ethylene: a regulator of root architectural responses to soil phosphorus availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borch, K.; Bouma, T.J.; Lynch, J.P.; Brown, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The involvement of ethylene in root architectural responses to phosphorus availability was investigated in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L,) plants grown with sufficient and deficient phosphorus. Although phosphorus deficiency reduced root mass and lateral root number, main root length was

  8. Methods for microbial DNA extraction from soil for PCR amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Yeates C; Gillings, MR; Davison AD; Altavilla N; Veal DA

    1998-01-01

    Amplification of DNA from soil is often inhibited by co-purified contaminants. A rapid, inexpensive, large-scale DNA extraction method involving minimal purification has been developed that is applicable to various soil types (1). DNA is also suitable for PCR amplification using various DNA targets. DNA was extracted from 100g of soil using direct lysis with glass beads and SDS followed by potassium acetate precipitation, polyethylene glycol precipitation, phenol extraction and isopropanol pr...

  9. Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

    2010-03-15

    Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE

  10. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizers on Movement and Transformation of Phosphorus in an Acid Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Zhen-Yu; ZHOU Jian-Min; WANG Huo-Yan; DU Chang-Wen; CHEN Xiao-Qin

    2005-01-01

    The effects of two different nitrogen fertilizers (urea and NH4Cl) with monocalcium phosphate (MCP) on the movement and transformation of fertilizer P in soil microsites along with soil pH changes at different distances from the fertilizer application site were studied in an incubation experiment. A highly acidic red soil (Ultisol, pH 4.57) from south China with MCP fertilizer alone or in combination with NH4Cl or urea was added to the surface of soil cylinders and packed in wax blocks. After 7 and 28 days, the extraction and analysis of each 2 mm layer from the interface of the soil and fertilizer showed that added NH4Cl or urea did not change the movement distance of fertilizer P. However, P transformation was significantly affected (P < 0.05). After 7 days, at 0-8 mm distance from the fertilizer site the addition of urea significantly decreased the water-extractable P concentration; however, after 28 days the effect of N addition had disappeared. Also,at limited distances close to the fertilizer site NH4Cl application with MCP significantly increased acid-extractable P and available P, while with the addition of urea they significantly decreased. Compared with application of MCP alone,addition of urea significantly increased soil pH in fertilizer microsites, whereas the addition of NH4Cl significantly decreased soil pH.

  11. Chemical and biological properties of phosphorus-fertilized soil under legume and grass cover (Cerrado region, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Fernando Pereira Souza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of cover crops has been suggested as an effective method to maintain and/or increase the organic matter content, while maintaining and/or enhancing the soil physical, chemical and biological properties. The fertility of Cerrado soils is low and, consequently, phosphorus levels as well. Phosphorus is required at every metabolic stage of the plant, as it plays a role in the processes of protein and energy synthesis and influences the photosynthetic process. This study evaluated the influence of cover crops and phosphorus rates on soil chemical and biological properties after two consecutive years of common bean. The study analyzed an Oxisol in Selvíria (Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, in a randomized block, split plot design, in a total of 24 treatments with three replications. The plot treatments consisted of cover crops (millet, pigeon pea, crotalaria, velvet bean, millet + pigeon pea, millet + crotalaria, and millet + velvet bean and one plot was left fallow. The subplots were represented by phosphorus rates applied as monoammonium phosphate (0, 60 and 90 kg ha-1 P2O5. In August 2011, the soil chemical properties were evaluated (pH, organic matter, phosphorus, potential acidity, cation exchange capacity, and base saturation as well as biological variables (carbon of released CO2, microbial carbon, metabolic quotient and microbial quotient. After two years of cover crops in rotation with common bean, the cover crop biomass had not altered the soil chemical properties and barely influenced the microbial activity. The biomass production of millet and crotalaria (monoculture or intercropped was highest. The biological variables were sensitive and responded to increasing phosphorus rates with increases in microbial carbon and reduction of the metabolic quotient.

  12. Phosphorus status of diverse soils in Finland as influenced by long-term P fertilisation I.Native and previously applied P at 24 experimental sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. SAARELA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The native reserves of phosphorus (P in Finnish soils are sizeable but poorly available to plants. The P status has been generally poor, but large rates of P applied since the 1940s have substantially enhanced the supply of P from the soil. As a means of optimising P fertilisation of crops grown in the improved soils and promoting agro-environmental sustainability of agriculture, long-term field experiments were established in 1977-1981 on various soil types around Finland, between the latitudes of 60 and 65 N. The experimental sites (8 Cambisols, 9 Regosols, 6 Histosols, 1 Podsol were moderately acidic (pH w 5.6, range 4.6-6.6 and contained 1.6-31.2% organic C, and (mineral soils 3-74% clay. The concentration of total P was 1.22 (0.66-1.87 g kg -1 , and the inorganic fraction separated with fluoride and hydroxide extractions (Al,Fe-P was 8.2% (4.5-12.4% of oxalate extractable Al+Fe (P saturation index. In mineral topsoil the pool of Al,Fe-P was 850 kg ha -1 , which is 300 kg ha -1 larger than was obtained in the early 1960s and 600 kg ha -1 larger than found in virgin soils. The soil test P value was 13.1 (3.7-60 mg dm -3 by the acid ammonium acetate method, 11.5 (1.6-42 mg dm -3 by a water extraction method (1:60 v/v and 61 (23-131 mg kg -1 with a modified Olsen method. The intensity factor of soil P status has remained at a relatively low level in a major part of the cultivated area.;

  13. Legacy Phosphorus Effect and Need to Re-calibrate Soil Test P Methods for Organic Crop Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Thanh H.; Schomberg, Harry H.; Cavigelli, Michel A.

    2015-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a required nutrient for the normal development and growth of plants and supplemental P is needed in most cultivated soils. Large inputs of cover crop residues and nutrient-rich animal manure are added to supply needed nutrients to promote the optimal production of organic grain crops and forages. The effects of crop rotations and tillage management of the near-surface zone on labile phosphorus (P) forms were studied in soil under conventional and organic crop management systems in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. after 18 years due to the increased interest in these alternative systems. Soil nutrient surpluses likely caused by low grain yields resulted in large pools of exchangeable phosphate-P and equally large pools of enzyme-labile organic P (Po) in soils under organic management. In addition, the difference in the P loading rates between the conventional and organic treatments as guided by routine soil test recommendations suggested that overestimating plant P requirements contributed to soil P surpluses because routine soil testing procedures did not account for the presence and size of the soil enzyme-labile Po pool. The effect of large P additions is long-lasting as they continued to contribute to elevated soil total bioactive P concentrations 12 or more years later. Consequently, accurate estimates of crop P requirements, P turnover in soil, and real-time plant and soil sensing systems are critical considerations to optimally manage manure-derived nutrients in organic crop production.

  14. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Aflatoxin B 1 from Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research describes the development of a Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) method to recover aflatoxin B1 from fortified soil. The effects of temperature, pressure, modifier (identity and percentage), and extraction type were assessed. Using the optimized SFE conditions, ...

  15. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Aflatoxin B 1 from Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research describes the development of a Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) method to recover aflatoxin B1 from fortified soil. The effects of temperature, pressure, modifier (identity and percentage), and extraction type were assessed. Using the optimized SFE conditions, ...

  16. Studies on the extraction of sulfonamides from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich-Montiu, J; Beltrán, J L; Prat, M D; Granados, M

    2010-05-01

    The extraction of six sulfonamides (sulfadiazine, sulfadimidine, sulfathiazole, sulfachloropiridazine, sulfadimethoxine, and sulfaquinoxaline) from soils with different physicochemical characteristics and at several aging times was investigated. Conventional mechanical shaking, microwave-assisted extraction, ultrasound probe-assisted extraction and pressurized liquid extraction techniques were evaluated. The four techniques provided similar results when applied to freshly contaminated soils. However, microwave-assisted extraction was the most suitable to extract sulfonamide aged residues from soils. Microwave-assisted extraction was applied to eight soils aged for 3 months, using acetonitrile:buffer pH 9 (20:80) as the extraction solvent, and recoveries ranged from 15-25% for STZ to 42-64% for SDM.

  17. Determination of phosphate in soil extracts in the field: A green chemistry enzymatic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ellen R; Warsko, Kayla; Davidson, Anna-Marie; Bill Campbell, Wilbur H

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of ortho-phosphate in soil extracts usually involves sending dried samples of soil to a laboratory for analysis and waiting several weeks for the results. Phosphate determination methods often involve use of strong acids, heavy metals, and organic dyes. To overcome limitations of this approach, we have developed a phosphate determination method which can be carried out in the field to obtain results on the spot. This new method uses: •Small volumes.•An enzymatic reaction.•Green chemistry. First, the soil sample is extracted with deionized water and filtered. Next, an aliquot of the soil extract (0.5 mL) is transferred to a disposable cuvette, containing 0.5 mL of reaction mixture [200 mM HEPES, pH 7.6, 20 mM MgCl2, with 80 nmol 2-amino-6-mercapto-7-methylpurine ribonucleoside (MESG) and 1 unit of recombinant purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP; EC 2.4.2.1)], mixed, and incubated for 10 min at field temperature. Absorbance of the completed reaction is measured at 360 nm in open-source, portable photometer linked by bluetooth to a smartphone. The phosphate and phosphorus content of the soil is determined by comparison of its absorbance at 360 nm to a previously prepared standard phosphate curve, which is stored in the smartphone app.

  18. Determination of phosphate in soil extracts in the field: A green chemistry enzymatic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ellen R.; Warsko, Kayla; Davidson, Anna-Marie; (Bill) Campbell, Wilbur H.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of ortho-phosphate in soil extracts usually involves sending dried samples of soil to a laboratory for analysis and waiting several weeks for the results. Phosphate determination methods often involve use of strong acids, heavy metals, and organic dyes. To overcome limitations of this approach, we have developed a phosphate determination method which can be carried out in the field to obtain results on the spot. This new method uses: • Small volumes. • An enzymatic reaction. • Green chemistry. First, the soil sample is extracted with deionized water and filtered. Next, an aliquot of the soil extract (0.5 mL) is transferred to a disposable cuvette, containing 0.5 mL of reaction mixture [200 mM HEPES, pH 7.6, 20 mM MgCl2, with 80 nmol 2-amino-6-mercapto-7-methylpurine ribonucleoside (MESG) and 1 unit of recombinant purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP; EC 2.4.2.1)], mixed, and incubated for 10 min at field temperature. Absorbance of the completed reaction is measured at 360 nm in open-source, portable photometer linked by bluetooth to a smartphone. The phosphate and phosphorus content of the soil is determined by comparison of its absorbance at 360 nm to a previously prepared standard phosphate curve, which is stored in the smartphone app. PMID:26150991

  19. Phosphorus retention in calcareous soils and the effect of organic matter on its mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Wandruszka Ray

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A survey of the interactions between phosphorus (P species and the components of calcareous soils shows that both surface reactions and precipitation take place, especially in the presence of calcite and limestone. The principal products of these reactions are dicalcium phosphate and octacalcium phosphate, which may interconvert after formation. The role of calcium carbonate in P retention by calcareous soils is, however, significant only at relatively high P concentrations – non-carbonate clays play a more important part at lower concentrations. In the presence of iron oxide particles, occlusion of P frequently occurs in these bodies, especially with forms of the element that are pedogenic in origin. Progressive mineralization and immobilization, often biological in nature, are generally observed when P is added as a fertilizer. Manure serves both as a source of subsurface P and an effective mobilizing agent. Blockage of P sorption sites by organic acids, as well as complexation of exchangeable Al and Fe in the soil, are potential causes of this mobilization. Swine and chicken manure are especially rich P sources, largely due the practice of adding the element to the feed of nonruminants. Humic materials, both native and added, appear to increase recovery of Olsen P. In the presence of metal cations, strong complexes between inorganic P and humates are formed. The influence of humic soil amendments on P mobility warrants further investigation.

  20. A method for analyzing the δ18O of resin-extractable soil inorganic phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Tal; Mazeh, Shunit; Tamburini, Federica; Frossard, Emmanuel; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Chiti, Tommaso; Angert, Alon

    2011-03-15

    Improved tools for tracing phosphate transformations in soils are much needed, and can lead to a better understanding of the terrestrial phosphorus cycle. The oxygen stable isotopes in soil phosphate are still not exploited in this regard. Here we present a method for measuring the oxygen stable isotopes in a fraction of the soil phosphate which is rapidly available to plants, the resin-extractable P. This method is based on extracting available phosphate from the soil with anion-exchange membranes, soil organic matter removal by a resin, purification by precipitation as cerium phosphate, and finally precipitation as silver phosphate. The purified silver phosphate samples are then measured by a high-temperature elemental analyzer (HT-EA) coupled in continuous flow mode to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Testing the method with Mediterranean and semi-arid soils showed no artifacts, as well as good reproducibility in the same order as that of the HT-EA analytical uncertainty (0.3‰). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Quantifying phosphorus levels in soils, plants, surface water, and shallow groundwater associated with bahiagrass-based pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigua, Gilbert C; Hubbard, Robert K; Coleman, Samuel W

    2010-01-01

    Recent assessments of water quality status have identified eutrophication as one of the major causes of water quality 'impairment' not only in the USA but also around the world. In most cases, eutrophication has accelerated by increased inputs of phosphorus due to intensification of crop and animal production systems since the early 1990 s. Despite substantial measurements using both laboratory and field techniques, little is known about the spatial and temporal variability of phosphorus dynamics across landscapes, especially in agricultural landscapes with cow-calf operations. Critical to determining environmental balance and accountability is an understanding of phosphorus excreted by animals, phosphorus removal by plants, acceptable losses of phosphorus within the manure management and crop production systems into soil and waters, and export of phosphorus off-farm. Further research effort on optimizing forage-based cow-calf operations to improve pasture sustainability and protect water quality is therefore warranted. We hypothesized that properly managed cow-calf operations in subtropical agroecosystem would not be major contributors to excess loads of phosphorus in surface and ground water. To verify our hypothesis, we examined the comparative concentrations of total phosphorus among soils, forage, surface water, and groundwater beneath bahiagrass-based pastures with cow-calf operations in central Florida, USA. Soil samples were collected at 0-20; 20-40, 40-60, and 60-100 cm across the landscape (top slope, middle slope, and bottom slope) of 8 ha pasture in the fall and spring of 2004 to 2006. Forage availability and phosphorus uptake of bahiagrass were also measured from the top slope, middle slope, and bottom slope. Bi-weekly (2004-2006) groundwater and surface water samples were taken from wells located at top slope, middle slope, and bottom slope, and from the runoff/seepage area. Concentrations of phosphorus in soils, forage, surface water, and shallow

  2. Ion Chromatography as an Alternative to Standard Methods for Analysis of Macro-nutrients in Mehlich 1 Extracts of Unfertilized Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph B. Fischer; James H. Miller

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluates ion chromatography (IC) as an alternative to atomic absorption (AA) and inductively-coupled plasma spectromctry (ICP) for analysis of potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), and calcium (Ca), and and as an alternative to antimonylmolybdate colorimetry and ICP for analysis of phosphorus (P) macro-nutrients in Mehlich 1 extracts. Soils typical of pine forests...

  3. Reducing soil phosphorus fertility brings potential long-term environmental gains: A UK analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Paul J. A.; Hodgkinson, Robin A.; Rollett, Alison; Dyer, Chris; Dils, Rachael; Collins, Adrian L.; Bilsborrow, Paul E.; Bailey, Geoff; Sylvester-Bradley, Roger

    2017-05-01

    Soil phosphorus (P) fertility arising from historic P inputs is a major driver of P mobilisation in agricultural runoff and increases the risk of aquatic eutrophication. To determine the environmental benefit of lowering soil P fertility, a meta-analysis of the relationship between soil test P (measured as Olsen-P) and P concentrations in agricultural drainflow and surface runoff in mostly UK soils was undertaken in relation to current eutrophication control targets (30-35 µg P L-1). At agronomic-optimum Olsen P (16-25 mg kg-1), concentrations of soluble reactive P (SRP), total dissolved P (TDP), total P (TP) and sediment-P (SS-P) in runoff were predicted by linear regression analysis to vary between 24 and 183 µg L-1, 38 and 315 µg L-1, 0.2 and 9.6 mg L-1, and 0.31 and 3.2 g kg-1, respectively. Concentrations of SRP and TDP in runoff were much more sensitive to changes in Olsen-P than were TP and SS-P concentrations, which confirms that separate strategies are required for mitigating the mobilisation of dissolved and particulate P forms. As the main driver of eutrophication, SRP concentrations in runoff were reduced on average by 60 µg L-1 (71%) by lowering soil Olsen-P from optimum (25 mg kg-1) to 10 mg kg-1. At Olsen-P concentrations below 12 mg kg-1, dissolved hydrolysable P (largely organic) became the dominant form of soluble P transported. We concluded that maintaining agronomic-optimum Olsen-P could still pose a eutrophication risk, and that a greater research focus on reducing critical soil test P through innovative agro-engineering of soils, crops and fertilisers would give long-term benefits in reducing the endemic eutrophication risk arising from legacy soil P. Soil P testing should become compulsory in priority catchments suffering, or sensitive to, eutrophication to ensure soil P reserves are fully accounted for as part of good fertiliser and manure management.

  4. Phosphorus status of soils from contrasting forested ecosystems in southwestern Siberia: effects of microbiological and physicochemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Siberian forest is a tremendous repository of terrestrial organic carbon (C), which may increase owing to climate change, potential increases in ecosystem productivity and hence C sequestration. Phosphorus (P) availability could limit the C sequestration potential, but tree roots may mine the soil deep to increase access to mineral P. Improved understanding and quantification of the processes controlling P availability in surface and deep soil layers of Siberian forest ecosystems are thus...

  5. [Dynamic characteristics of phosphorus in purple paddy soil and its environmental Impact].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-ping; Shi, Xiao-jun

    2008-02-01

    The dynamic characteristics of phosphorus (P) in the surface water and runoff of paddy field with different P fertilizing treatments were investigated using the field experiment under the independent irrigation system as well as its environmental impact. The results showed that the concentration of total phosphorus (TP) in the surface water increased as the fertilizing amounts enhanced and reached the peak values after 24 h for all treatments in range of 0.928-3.824 mg/L. And the fluctuation of TP concentration in surface water was drastic during the first 30 days with the average contents of 0.259-1.433 mg/L which exceeded the critic values of eutrophication. Therefore, the field managements such as inter-tillage and drainage should be avoided during the time. After 40 days, the TP concentration declined slowly and then came to stabilization with low values after 60 days. The contents of different P forms in the runoff water increased with the improved amounts of precipitation and fertilizing and above 50% was dissolved phosphorus (DP). The DP was the dominant one in the P loss of the purple paddy soil and the loss load changed between 0.358 and 2.579 kg/hm2. Additionally, the P loss more easily occurred for the treatment of utilizing the cattle manure than that of straw, approximately 40% of loss load higher. Both the loss load and apparent P loss ratio evidently declined with the treatment of fertilizer combined with straw, suggesting that it was the better measure for reducing the P loss in the paddy field.

  6. Successive DNA extractions improve characterization of soil microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitrov, M.R.; Veraart, A.J.; De Hollander, M.; Smidt, H.; van Veen, J.A.; Kuramae, E.E.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, characterization of soil microbial communities relies heavily on the use of molecular approaches. Independently of the approach used, soil DNA extraction is a crucial step, and success of downstream procedures will depend on how well DNA extraction was performed. Often, studies describing

  7. Successive DNA extractions improve characterization of soil microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocha Dimitrov, Mauricio; Veraart, Annelies J.; Hollander, de Mattias; Smidt, Hauke; Veen, van Johannes A.; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, characterization of soil microbial communities relies heavily on the use of molecular approaches. Independently of the approach used, soil DNA extraction is a crucial step, and success of downstream procedures will depend on how well DNA extraction was performed. Often, studies

  8. Rare earth elements in soil extracts by ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobler, L.; Furrer, V.; Wyttenbach, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Burger, M.; Jakob, A. [AC-Laboratorium Spiez (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Three different horizons of a soil profile were extracted with water and with a complexing solution. 14 REEs were determined in the extracts. The distribution patterns obtained from the different horizons were rather similar and did not show the large fractionations observed between different plant species growing on this soil. (author) 2 figs., 1 ref.

  9. Oxygen extraction from lunar soil by fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seboldt, W.; Lingner, S.; Hoernes, S.; Grimmeisen, W.

    1991-01-01

    Mining and processing of lunar material could possibly lead to more cost-efficient scenarios for permanent presence of man in space and on the Moon. Production of oxygen for use as propellant seems especially important. Different candidate processes for oxygen-extraction from lunar soil were proposed, of which the reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen was studied most. This process, however, needs the concentration of ilmenite from lunar regolith to a large extent and releases oxygen only with low efficiency. Another possibility - the fluorination method - which works with lunar bulk material as feedstock is discussed. Liberation of oxygen from silicate or oxide materials by fluorination methods has been applied in geoscience since the early sixties. The fact that even at moderate temperatures 98 to 100 percent yields can be attained, suggests that fluorination of lunar regolith could be an effective way of propellant production. Lunar soil contains about 50 percent oxygen by weight which is gained nearly completely through this process as O2 gas. The second-most element Si is liberated as gaseous SiF4. It could be used for production of Si-metal and fluorine-recycling. All other main elements of lunar soil will be converted into solid fluorides which also can be used for metal-production and fluorine-recycling. Preliminary results of small scale experiments with different materials are discussed, giving information on specific oxygen-yields and amounts of by-products as functions of temperature. These experiments were performed with an already existing fluorine extraction and collection device at the University of Bonn, normally used for determination of oxygen-isotopic abundances. Optimum conditions, especially concerning energy consumption, are investigated. Extrapolation of the experimental results to large industrial-type plants on the Moon is tried and seems to be promising at first sight. The recycling of the fluorine is, however, crucial for the process. It

  10. Comparação de quatro extratores de fósforo de solos Comparison of four extractors of soil phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Van Raij

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available É apresentado um estudo comparativo de quatro métodos de extração de fósforo de solos: a IAC, baseado na extração de 5cm³ de terra com 50ml de H2SO4 0,05N; b Bray I modificado, baseado na extração de 2,5cm³ de terra com 50ml de solução 0,03N em NH4F e 0,025N em HCl; c Olsen, baseado na extração de 2,5cm³ de terra com 50ml de NaHCO3 0,5N a pH 8,5 e d resina, baseado na extração de 5cm³ de terra com 2,5cm³ de resina trocadora de aníons, com agitação por duas horas em suspensão aquosa. Para comparar os métodos determinou-se, para cada um deles, a correlação entre os teores de fósforo nos solos e os resultados de respostas à adubação fosfatada em ensaios de campo, de 16 ensaios de milho e 16 de algodão. Para as duas culturas em conjunto, os valores absolutos dos coeficientes de correlação, para os quatro métodos, foram: a 0,683; b 0,650; c 0,391 e d 0,802, indicando a superioridade do método da resina.A comparative study of four methods used for the extraction of soil phosphorus, is presented. The methods were: a IAC method, based on the extraction of, 5cm³ of soil with 50ml of 0.05N H2SO4; b a modified Bray I method, based on the extraction of 2.5cm³ of soil with 50m1 of a solution 0.03N in NH4F and 0.025N in HCl; c Olsen's method, based on the extraction of 2.5cm³ of soil with 50ml of 0.5N NaHCO3 solution at pH 8.5; d an anion exchange resin method based on the extraction of 5cm³ of soil with 2.5cm³ of an anion exchange resin contained in a polyester netting bag, by shaking in 50ml water. For each method, the correlation coefficients between soil phosphorus and the response to phosphorus fertilization of 16 field experiments of cotton and 16 field experiments of corn were, respectively, 0.683, 0.650, 0.391 and 0.802, indicating the superiority of the anion-exchange resin method for the assessment of soil phosphorus availability.

  11. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration: Synthetic effects of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization on Chinese Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Sun, Qiqi; Wang, Ying; Liu, Qingfang; Du, Lanlan; Zhao, Man; Gao, Xin; Hu, Yaxian; Guo, Shengli

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization has the potential to alter soil respiration temperature sensitivity (Q10) by changing soil biochemical and crop physiological process. A four-year field experiment was conducted to determine how Q10 responded to these biochemical and physiological changes in rain-fed agro-ecosystems on the semi-arid Loess Plateau. Soil respiration, as well as biotic and abiotic factors were measured in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), with three fertilization treatments: (no fertilization (CK), 160kgNhm(-1) (N), and 160kgNha(-1) with 39kgPha(-1) (N+P). Mean annual soil respiration rate (calculated by averaging the four years) in the N treatment and N+P treatment was 18% and 48% higher than that in the CK treatment, respectively; and it was increased by 26% (14%-48%) in the N+P treatment as compared with that in the N treatment. The decrease of Q10 in the N and N+P treatments against the CK treatment was not stable for each year, ranging from 0.01 to 0.28. The maximum decrease of Q10 in the N and N+P treatments was 10% and 15% in 2014-2015, while in other years the decrease of Q10 was numerical but not significant. Soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) was increased by 10% and 50%, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was increased by 6% and 21%, and photosynthesis rate was increased ranging from 6% to 33% with N and N+P fertilization. The relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi were significantly higher by 32.9%-54.1% in N addition soils (N and N+P) compared to CK treatment, whereas additional P application into soils increased the relative abundance of the family Micrococcaceae, Nocardioidaceae and Chitinophagaceae. Soil respiration was positively related to SMBC, DOC and photosynthesis rate (paffect soil respiration and temperature sensitivity differently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rhizosphere effect on phosphorus availability in forest soils at different altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feudis, Mauro; Cardelli, Valeria; Massaccesi, Luisa; Bol, Roland; Willbold, Sabine; Cocco, Stefania; Corti, Giuseppe; Agnelli, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for plants but it is one of the least available mineral nutrients, and can substantially limit plant growth. Although plants are able to respond to the P shortage, the global warming might modify the soil-plant-microorganisms system and reduce P availability. We evaluated the rhizosphere effect of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in forest soils of the Apennines mountains (central Italy) at two altitudes (800 and 1000 m) and along 1° of latitudinal gradient, using latitude and altitude as proxies for temperature change. Specifically, we tested if 1) soil organic C, total N, and organic and available P decrease with increasing latitude and altitude, and 2) the rhizosphere effect on P availability becomes more pronounced when potential nutrient limitations are more severe, as it happens with increasing latitude and altitude. The results suggested that the small latitudinal gradient has no effect on soil properties. Conversely, significant changes occurred between 800 and 1000 m a.s.l., as the soils at higher altitude showed greater TOC, organic and available P contents, and alkaline mono-phosphatases activity than the soils at 800 m a.s.l. Compared to the soils at lower altitude, a marked rhizosphere effect was found at 1000 m a.s.l., and it was mainly attributed to the release of labile organics through rhizodeposition processes. These labile organic compounds were considered able to induce a "priming effect" that fostered the mineralization of the soil organic matter. The enhanced organic carbon cycling, in turn, likely promoted the mineralization of the organic P forms. This was supported by the smaller proportion of orthophosphate monoesters found in the P pool of the rhizosphere than in that of the soil far from the roots, with a consequent increase of the amount of available P. Hence, we speculate that at high altitude the energy supplied by the plants through rhizodeposition to the rhizosphere heterotrophic microbial

  13. Effects of co-application of biosolids and water treatment residuals on corn growth and bioavailable phosphorus and aluminum in alkaline soils in egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, A M; Elkhatib, E A; Fathi, N O; Lin, Z-Q

    2009-01-01

    The co-application of biosolids and water treatment residuals (WTRs) has been previously trialed to reduce excessive bioavailable P in the soil treated with biosolids. However, uncertainty still exists regarding the environmental consequences of the co-application of biosolids and WTRs, especially in alkaline soils in Egypt or the Middle East region. A greenhouse pot study was conducted with Egyptian alkaline soils to (i) quantify the effects of co-application of biosolids and drinking WTRs on biomass production of corn (Zea mays L. cultivar single hybrid 10), (ii) determine the co-application effects on Olsen-P and KCl-extractable Al in relation to their accumulation in plant tissues, and (iii) optimize the co-application ratio of biosolids to WTRs for the best yield and effective reduction of soil bioavailable P. The results show that, among the studied soils treated with 1% biosolids along with various rates of WTRs, the corn yield increased significantly (P soil water holding capacity that increased with the addition of WTRs. Phosphorus uptake by plants significantly (P soils that were treated with 1, 2, or 3% WTRs. The application of 4% WTRs in the biosolid-amended soils resulted in a significant reduction in soil Olsen-P values, but without having observable phytotoxicity of metals (such as Al) to corn during the growth period. The effective co-application ratio of biosolids to WTRs, for increasing corn yield and minimizing the potential for bioavailable P in runoff, was approximately 1:1 at the application rate of 3% biosolids and 4% WTRs in the alkaline soils.

  14. Direct Cellular Lysis/Protein Extraction Protocol for Soil Metaproteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Jansson, Janet [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Chavarria, Krystle L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Tom, Lauren M [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Brodie, Eoin L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel direct protocol for deep proteome characterization of microorganisms in soil. The method employs thermally assisted detergent-based cellular lysis (SDS) of soil samples, followed by TCA precipitation for proteome extraction/cleanup prior to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric characterization. This approach was developed and optimized using different soils inoculated with genome-sequenced bacteria (Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida or Gram-positive Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus). Direct soil protein extraction was compared to protein extraction from cells isolated from the soil matrix prior to lysis (indirect method). Each approach resulted in identification of greater than 500 unique proteins, with a wide range in molecular mass and functional categories. To our knowledge, this SDS-TCA approach enables the deepest proteome characterizations of microbes in soil to date, without significant biases in protein size, localization, or functional category compared to pure cultures. This protocol should provide a powerful tool for ecological studies of soil microbial communities.

  15. Direct cellular lysis/protein extraction protocol for soil metaproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourey, Karuna; Jansson, Janet; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Shah, Manesh; Chavarria, Krystle L; Tom, Lauren M; Brodie, Eoin L; Hettich, Robert L

    2010-12-03

    We present a novel direct protocol for deep proteome characterization of microorganisms in soil. The method employs thermally assisted detergent-based cellular lysis (SDS) of soil samples, followed by TCA precipitation for proteome extraction/cleanup prior to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric characterization. This approach was developed and optimized using different soils inoculated with genome-sequenced bacteria (Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida or Gram-positive Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus). Direct soil protein extraction was compared to protein extraction from cells isolated from the soil matrix prior to lysis (indirect method). Each approach resulted in identification of greater than 500 unique proteins, with a wide range in molecular mass and functional categories. To our knowledge, this SDS-TCA approach enables the deepest proteome characterizations of microbes in soil to date, without significant biases in protein size, localization, or functional category compared to pure cultures. This protocol should provide a powerful tool for ecological studies of soil microbial communities.

  16. Spatiotemporal dynamics of soil phosphorus and crop uptake in global cropland during the 20th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Beusen, Arthur H. W.; Van Apeldoorn, Dirk F.; Mogollón, José M.; Yu, Chaoqing; Bouwman, Alexander F.

    2017-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) plays a vital role in global crop production and food security. In this study, we investigate the changes in soil P pool inventories calibrated from historical countrywide crop P uptake, using a 0.5-by-0.5° spatially explicit model for the period 1900-2010. Globally, the total P pool per hectare increased rapidly between 1900 and 2010 in soils of Europe (+31 %), South America (+2 %), North America (+15 %), Asia (+17 %), and Oceania (+17 %), while it has been stable in Africa. Simulated crop P uptake is influenced by both soil properties (available P and the P retention potential) and crop characteristics (maximum uptake). Until 1950, P fertilizer application had a negligible influence on crop uptake, but recently it has become a driving factor for food production in industrialized countries and a number of transition countries like Brazil, Korea, and China. This comprehensive and spatially explicit model can be used to assess how long surplus P fertilization is needed or how long depletions of built-up surplus P can continue without affecting crop yield.

  17. Standard Protocol and Quality Assessment of Soil Phosphorus Speciation by P K-Edge XANES Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Florian; Prietzel, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Phosphorus (P) in soils is most often bound as phosphate to one or more of the following four elements or compounds: calcium, aluminum, iron, and soil organic matter. A promising method for direct P speciation in soils is synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the K-edge of P. However, the quality of this method is debated controversially, partly because a standard protocol for reproducible spectrum deconvolution is lacking and minor modifications of the applied deconvolution procedure can lead to considerable changes in the P speciation results. On the basis of the observation that appropriate baseline correction and edge-step normalization are crucial for correct linear combination (LC) fitting results, we established a standard protocol for the deconvolution and LC fitting of P K-edge XANES spectra. We evaluated the quality of LC fits obtained according to this standard protocol with 16 defined dilute (2 mg P g(-1)) ternary mixtures of aluminum phosphate, iron phosphate, hydroxyapatite, and phytic acid in a quartz matrix. The LC fitting results were compared with the contribution of the different P compounds to total P in the various mixtures. Compared to using a traditional LC fitting procedure, our standard protocol reduced the fitting error by 6% (absolute). However, P portions smaller than 5% should be confirmed with other methods or excluded from the P speciation results. A publicly available database of P K-edge XANES reference spectra was initiated.

  18. [Effects of applying different kind fertilizers on enzyme activities related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in reddish paddy soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Li; Wang, Qiu-Bing; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Sun, Xiao-Min; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Yang, Feng-Ting; Bu, Jin-Feng; Wang, Hui-min

    2013-04-01

    Based on the long-term fixed position experimental data from Qianyanzhou Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1998, this paper analyzed the effects of applying different kind fertilizers (straw, ST; pig manure, OM; and chemical fertilizer, NPK) on the nutrients (C, N, and P) status and the activities of related enzymes ( beta-1,4-glucosidase, betaG; beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, NAG; L-leucine aminopeptidase, LAP; and acid phosphatase, AP) in reddish paddy soil. With the application of OM, the activities of soil betaG, NAG, and LAP increased significantly, as compared with other treatments, and were 1.4, 2. 6, and 1.9 times higher than the control (CK) , respectively. Applying OM also improved the ratio of soil organic carbon to total nitrogen (C/N), but decreased the soil betaG/(NAG+LAP) ratio, suggesting that pig manure could benefit the degradation of soil cellulose and the accumulation of soil organic carbon. Applying NPK increased the activities of soil betaG, NAG, and LAP, but decreased the AP activity, with a decrement of 34% as compared with CK. Under the application of NPK, the soilbetaG/AP and (NAG+ LAP)/AP ratios increased, but the ratios of soil organic carbon to total phosphorus (C/P) and of soil total nitrogen to total phosphorus (N/P) decreased, indicating that chemical fertilizers could induce the accumulation of soil inorganic phosphorus, and inhibit the microbial functions of degrading polysaccharides and phosphate phospholipids.

  19. Phosphorus availability in oxidic soils treated with lime and silicate applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline da Silva Sandim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the assumption that silicate application can raise soil P availability for crops, the aim of this research was to compare the effect of silicate application on soil P desorption with that of liming, in evaluations based on two extractors and plant growth. The experiment was carried out in randomized blocks with four replications, in a 3 × 3 × 5 factorial design, in which three soil types, three P rates, and four soil acidity correctives were evaluated in 180 experimental plots. Trials were performed in a greenhouse using corn plants in 20-dm³ pots. Three P rates (0, 50 and 150 mg dm-3 were applied in the form of powder triple superphosphate and the soil was incubated for 90 days. After this period, soil samples were collected for routine chemical analysis and P content determination by the extraction methods resin, Mehlich-1 and remaining P. Based on the results, acidity correctives were applied at rates calculated for base saturation increased to 70 %, with subsequent incubation for 60 more days, when P content was determined again. The acidity correctives consisted of: dolomitic lime, steelmaking slag, ladle furnace slag, and wollastonite. Therefore, our results showed that slags raised the soil P content more than lime, suggesting a positive correlation between P and Si in soil. Silicon did not affect the extractor choice since both Mehlich-1 and resin had the same behavior regarding extracted P when silicon was applied to the soil. For all evaluated plant parameters, there was significant interaction between P rates and correctives; highest values were obtained with silicate.

  20. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil methane uptake in disturbed forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mianhai; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Xiankai; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is generally thought to suppress soil methane (CH4) uptake in natural forests, and phosphorus (P) input may alleviate this negative effect. However, it remains unclear how N and P inputs control soil CH4 uptake in disturbed forests. In this study, soil CH4 uptake rates were measured in two disturbed forests, including a secondary forest (with previous, but not recent, disturbance) and a plantation forest (with recent continuous disturbance), in southern China for 34 months of N and/or P additions: control, N addition (150 kg N ha-1 yr-1), P addition (150 kg P ha-1 yr-1), and NP addition (150 kg N ha-1 yr-1 plus 150 kg P ha-1 yr-1). Mean CH4 uptake rate in control plots was significantly higher in the secondary forest (24.40 ± 0.81 µg CH4-C m-2 h-1) than in the plantation forest (17.07 ± 0.70 µg CH4-C m-2 h-1). CH4 uptake rate had negative relationships with soil water-filled pore space in both forests. In the secondary forest, N, P, and NP additions significantly decreased CH4 uptake by 39.7%, 27.8%, and 37.6%, respectively, but had no significant effects in the plantation forest, indicating that P input does not alleviate the suppression of CH4 uptake by N deposition. Taken together, our findings suggest that reducing anthropogenic disturbance, including harvesting of forest floor, and anthropogenic N and P inputs will increase soil CH4 uptake in disturbed forests, which is important in view of the increased trends in global warming during recent decades.

  1. Predicting the Soil Phosphorus Dynamics of the Ploughed Layer Under Continuous Cultivation and P Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, C.; Augusto, L.; Gallet-Budynek, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    One major component of the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus (P) in soils is the plant-available soil P. Its sound management, to minimize the loss of soil P to surface waters while ensuring enough P to sustain soil fertility, requires being able to predict the long term dynamics of plant-available soil P with the P budget. We examined the ability of a simple model to predict the change in plant-available soil P of the ploughed layer for almost 3 decades of continuous cultivation and P fertilization. We used a process-based assessment of plant-availability that considers both the concentration (Cp) of phosphate ions (Pi) in solution and the time-dependent amount (Pr) of Pi bound to the soil solid phase that can diffuse towards solution that equilibrates with time Pi in solution under the effect of a gradient of concentration. Soil analyses were performed in batch experiment on soil suspensions using a 32Pi-dilution method at steady-state. The modeling considered the difference between P inputs minus P outputs. This annual P budget was partitioned between Cp and Pr for one year. Every year the P budget was calculated as the added P to soil minus the P removed in grain yields and the P that leaves the plough layer by leaching estimated as the simulated Cp value multiplied by the annual volume of drainage water. Other fluxes that can play a role in P cycling such as atmospheric deposit, preferential, subsurface and surface flows were neglected. We analyzed archived soil samples, taken up every 3-4 years from a long-term field experiment (1972-2000) on a sandy soil under temperate climate. It comprised 4 replicates and 3 annual rates of P application as commercial superphosphate: 0, 44 and 96 kg Pha-1 yr-1. The crop was a monoculture of irrigated-maize. Grain yields and their P content were determined every year for all plots. The overall corn grain yield over almost 3 decades was: 11.6 t ha-1 yr-1 (mean P content of grain = 3.0 g P kg¬-1). The starting Cp value in

  2. Contrasted response of colloidal, organic and inorganic dissolved phosphorus forms during rewetting of dried riparian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Sen; Gruau, Gérard; Malique, François; Dupas, Rémi; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Petitjean, Patrice; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Riparian vegetated buffer strip (RVBS) are currently used to protect surface waters from phosphorus (P) emissions because of their ability to retain P-enriched soil particles. However, this protection role may be counterbalanced by the development in these zones of conditions able to trigger the release of highly mobile dissolved or colloidal P forms. Rewetting after drying is one of these conditions. So far, the potential sources of P mobilized during rewetting after drying are not clearly identified, nor are clearly identified the chemical nature of the released dissolved P species, or the role of the soil P speciation on these forms. In this study, two riparian soils (G and K) showing contrasting soil P speciation (65% of inorganic P species in soil G, as against 70% of organic P) were submitted to three successive dry/wet cycles in the laboratory. Conventional colorimetric determination of P concentrations combined with ultrafiltration, and measurements of iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents using ICP-MS and TOC analyzers, respectively, were used to study the response of the different P forms to rewetting after drying and also their release kinetics during soil leaching. For both soils, marked P release peaks were observed at the beginning of each wet cycles, with the organic-rich K soils giving, however, larger peaks than the inorganic one (G soil). For both soils also, concentrations in molybdate reactive P (MRP) remained quite constant throughout each leaching episode, contrary to the molybdate unreactive P (MUP) concentrations which were high immediately after rewetting and then decreased rapidly during leaching. A speciation change was observed from the beginning to the end of all leaching cycles. Colloidal P was found to be a major fraction of the total P immediately after rewetting (up to 50-70%) and then decreased to the end of each wet cycle where most of the eluted P was true dissolved inorganic P. Colloidal

  3. Methods for microbial DNA extraction from soil for PCR amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeates C

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Amplification of DNA from soil is often inhibited by co-purified contaminants. A rapid, inexpensive, large-scale DNA extraction method involving minimal purification has been developed that is applicable to various soil types (1. DNA is also suitable for PCR amplification using various DNA targets. DNA was extracted from 100g of soil using direct lysis with glass beads and SDS followed by potassium acetate precipitation, polyethylene glycol precipitation, phenol extraction and isopropanol precipitation. This method was compared to other DNA extraction methods with regard to DNA purity and size.

  4. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, R.V.; Mincher, B.J.

    2002-05-23

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65 C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% {+-} 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% {+-} 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95 C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

  5. [Characteristics of soil phosphorus runoff under different rainfall intensities in the typical vegetable plot of Taihu Basin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Xia; Yang, Gui-Shan; Yuan, Shao-Feng; Wu, Ye

    2007-08-01

    Experiments of field runoff plots, which were conducted at vegetable plots in Hongsheng town of Wuxi city--the typical region of Taihu Basin, were designed to assess the effects of different rainfall intensities on soil phosphorus runoff loss from vegetable plots by artificial rainfall simulations. Results showed that there was a relationship of power function between initial runoff-generation time and rainfall intensity. Runoff amount slowly increased under small rainfall intensity, but rapidly increased with rainfall intensity increase. The concentrations of total phosphorus (TP) and particulate phosphorus (PP) were higher at the early stage, then gradually decreased with time and finally reached a comparative steady stage under 0.83, 1.17 and 1.67 mm x min(-1). However they indicated no obvious trend except wavy undulation under 2.50 mm x min(-1). In the course of rainfall-runoff, dissolved phosphorus (DP) gently varied and accounted for 20% - 32% of TP. PP was 68% - 80% of TP and its change trend was consistent with TP. Therefore, PP was main loss form of soil phosphorus runoff. Comparison of different phosphorous loss rate under different rainfall intensities suggested that loss rate of TP and DP under 2.50 mm x min(-1) was 20 times and 33 times higher than that under 0.83 mm x min(-1), which showed that loss rate of PP and DP increased with the increase of rainfall intensities. Results indicated that lots of inorganic dissolved phosphorus (DIP) of phosphorous fertilizer was discharged into water environment by using fertilizer in soil surface before rainfall, which increased loss of DP and greatly aggravated degree of water eutrophication.

  6. Soil phosphorus and water effects on growth, nutrient and carbohydrate concentrations, d13C, and nodulation of mimosa (Albizia julibrissin Durz.) on a highly weathered soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growth and physiological performance of multipurpose tree species can be severely constrained by nutrient shortages such as of phosphorus (P) in highly-weathered soils. Limitations to plant growth are accentuated by seasonal dry periods. We examined P fertilization and irrigation effects on growth...

  7. Microbial protein in soil: influence of extraction method and C amendment on extraction and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erin B; Williams, Mark A

    2010-02-01

    The capacity to study the content and resolve the dynamics of the proteome of diverse microbial communities would help to revolutionize the way microbiologists study the function and activity of microorganisms in soil. To better understand the limitations of a proteomic approach to studying soil microbial communities, we characterized extractable soil microbial proteins using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Two methods were utilized to extract proteins from microorganisms residing in a Quitman and Benfield soil: (1) direct extraction of bulk protein from soil and (2) separation of the microorganisms from soil using density gradient centrifugation and subsequent extraction (DGC-EXT) of microbial protein. In addition, glucose and toluene amendments to soil were used to stimulate the growth of a subset of the microbial community. A bacterial culture and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were added to the soil to qualitatively assess their recovery following extraction. Direct extraction and resolution of microbial proteins using SDS-PAGE generally resulted in smeared and unresolved banding patterns on gels. DGC-EXT of microbial protein from soil followed by separation using SDS-PAGE, however, did resolve six to 10 bands in the Benfield but not the Quitman soil. DGC-EXT of microbial protein, but not direct extraction following the addition of glucose and toluene, markedly increased the number of bands (approximately 40) on the gels in both Benfield and Quitman soils. Low recoveries of added culture and BSA proteins using the direct extraction method suggest that proteins either bind to soil organic matter and mineral particles or that partial degradation takes place during extraction. Interestingly, DGC may have been preferentially selected for actively growing cells, as gauged by the 10-100x lower cy19:0/18:1omega7 ratio of the fatty acid methyl esters in the isolated community compared to that for the whole soil. DGC can be used to

  8. Effect of low-molecular-weight organic acids on kinetics release and fractionation of phosphorus in some calcareous soils of western Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, M; Jalali, M

    2013-07-01

    Organic acid has been related to nutrient mobilization, mainly in phosphorus (P) insoluble utilization, and therefore enhances P bioavailability. In this study, we examined the effect of low-molecular-weight organic acids (malic, citric, and oxalic acids) on P release of some calcareous soils from western Iran. Fractionation and speciation of P in the soil solution were studied at the initial and final P release. Significantly different quantities of P were extracted by the organic acids. On average the maximum (1,554.9 mg kg(-1)) and the minimum (1,260.5 mg kg(-1)) P were extracted by 10 mM oxalic and malic acid, respectively. Power equation described well P release. In the initial stage of P release, the solution samples in soils were supersaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite and β-TCP. At the end of P release, all solutions were undersaturated with phosphate minerals. The percentage of Fe-Al oxide fraction generally increased after P release, while carbonate and residual P fractions were decreased in all organic acids. Compared with the native soils, adding malic and citric acids had no effect on Fe-Al oxide fraction, but oxalic acid significantly reduced this fraction.

  9. Effect of different nickel soil contents on cock’s-foot yield and nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuziemska Beata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the influence of liming and waste organic materials on the yield and nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium contents in cock’s-foot (Dactylis glomerata L. grown on nickel-contaminated soil in the third year of a pot culture experiment. In the experiment, the following factors were taken into consideration: (1 nickel soil contamination (0, 75, 150 and 225 mg Ni·kg−1 of soil; (2 liming (0 Ca and Ca according to 1 Hh of soil and (3 organic materials (no waste organic materials added, brown coal from a coal mine in Turów and rye straw. Introducing nickel into the soil, regardless of its amount, caused a significant decrease in the total yield of cock’s-foot and increased the nitrogen and potassium contents. Liming caused a significant increase in the yield of cock’s-foot and decrease its potassium content, but it did not clearly differentiate the nitrogen and phosphorus content. The used organic materials (straw and brown coal caused a decrease in the phosphorus content in the grass biomass.

  10. Vertical distribution and retention mechanism of nitrogen and phosphorus in soils with different macrophytes of a natural river mouth wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Qiuwen; Ren, Kuixiao; Chen, Kaining

    2015-03-01

    Wetland vegetation can improve water quality through several processes including direct assimilation and the indirect effects of sedimentation and mineralization. This research takes the Zhucao River mouth of Daxi reservoir as a study case to investigate the vertical distribution of nitrogen and phosphorus in the soil of a natural wetland covered by different plants prior to any restoration action. There are four native emergent macrophytes (Typha latifolia L., Polygonum hydropiper L., Juncus effuses L., Phragmites communis L.) in the wetland. The total nitrogen (TN) and nitrate contents decreased with the soil depth for all vegetation types, and the mean TN and nitrate concentrations were higher in vegetative soil than in bare ground. The maximum TN concentration was found in the surface soil (0-2 cm) covered by P. communis. Ammonium decreased with the soil depth in vegetative areas, while it increased with soil depth in bare ground. The rank order of P fractions was organic P (OP) > P associated with Ca (Ca-P) > P associated with Fe/Al (Fe/Al-P). Total phosphorus (TP) and OP showed vertical profiles similar to that of TN. The mean concentrations of TP, Ca-P and Fe/Al-P were higher in vegetative soil than in bare ground. The maximum mean TP was also found in soil covered by P. communis. Loss on ignition (LOI) was significantly correlated with TN and TP (P reservoir.

  11. Profile Characteristics and Potential Environmental Effect of Accumulated Phosphorus in Soils ofVegetable Fields in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Profile characteristics of accumulated P in 10 representative soils of vegetable fields in suburban districts of Beijing were investigated. Bioavailability of the accumulated P and its potential effect on the environment were studied in a greenhouse pot experiment and a soil column experiment. The results showed that the concentration of Olsen-P in the 0~20 cm soil samples of the vegetable fields ranged from 22.1 to 358.0 mg kg-1, which was 2 to 10 times higher than that of the crop fields in the suburbs of Beijing. Most of the excessive phosphorus was accumulated in the topsoils. The longer the soils cultivated with vegetables, the higher the soil total P, Olsen-P and organic matter concentration. Accumulated P in the soils from vegetable fields had higher bioavailability. Application of phosphorus fertilizer could not increase the dry weights of cucumbers, Chinese cabbage, and rape seedlings continuously planted. The soil column study showed high P concentration (> 0.6 mg L-1) in the leachates from the columns of the vegetable field soils with high accumulated P, which has a potential effect on the groundwater and natural water quality.

  12. Effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on availability of soil phosphorus and growth of maize

    OpenAIRE

    A.E. Mau; S R Utami

    2014-01-01

    A glasshouse experiment was conducted to study the interactive effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) inoculation on phosphorus uptake by maize (Zea mayze L.) grown on a calcareous soil of Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara. The biochar was made of cow dung. Twelve treatment combinations (three biochars levels of 0, 5 and 7.5 g/kg of soil, and four AMF inoculation levels of 0, 5, 10 and 15 spores / kg of soil) were arranged in a completely randomized block design with thr...

  13. Biodegradability of soil water soluble organic carbon extracted from seven different soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SCAGLIA Barbara; ADANI Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is considered the most mobile and reactive soil carbon source and its characterization is an important issue for soil ecology study. A biodegradability test was set up to study WSOC extracted from 7 soils differently managed. WSOC was extracted from soil with water (soil/water ratio of 1:2, W/V) for 30 min, and then tested for biodegradability by a liquid state respirometric test. Result obtained confirmed the finding that WSOC biodegradability depended on both land use and management practice. These results suggested the biodegradability test as suitable method to characterize WSOC, adding useful information to soil fertility.

  14. Extraction Efficiency of Belonolaimus longicaudatus from Sandy Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, R; Frederick, J J

    1991-10-01

    Numbers of Belonolaimus longicaudatus extracted from sandy soils (91-92% sand) by sieving and centrifugation were only 40-55% of those extracted by sieving and incubation on a Baermann tray. Residues normally discarded at each step of the sieving plus Baermann tray extraction procedure were examined for nematodes to obtain estimates of extraction efficiencies. For third-stage and fourth-stage juveniles, males, and females, estimates of extraction efficiency ranged from 60 to 65% in one experiment and 73 to 82% in another. Estimated extraction efficiencies for second-stage juveniles were lower (33% in one experiment, 67% in another) due to losses during sieving. When sterilized soil was seeded with known numbers of B. longicaudatus, 60% of second-stage juveniles and 68-76% of other stages were recovered. Most stages of B. longicaudatus could be extracted from these soils by sieving plus Baermann incubation with an efficiency of 60-70%.

  15. Avaliação da disponibilidade de fósforo no solo para a cultura do milho Assessment of soil phosphorus availability to corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Roberto Miola

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se um experimento, em 1994, em casa de vegetação com seis solos do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, com o objetivo de avaliar a disponibilidade de fósforo no solo extraído pelos métodos duplo ácido (Mehlich-1, resinas em esferas (RE, em cápsulas (RC e em membrana (RM e papéis de filtro impregnados com óxido de ferro em solo umedecido a 75% da capacidade de campo (D1 e solo saturado (D2. Os solos foram previamente incubados com quatro doses de fósforo, e cultivados com milho durante 28 dias. Os coeficientes de determinação obtidos entre o fósforo absorvido pelas plantas de milho e o fósforo extraído foram: 0,85 para o Mehlich-1; 0,82 para o RE; 0,84 para o RC; 0,89 para o RM; 0,75 para o D1 e 0,70 para o D2. As quantidades de fósforo extraídas pelos métodos das resinas foram altamente correlacionadas entre si (r=0,98 e com as extraídas pelo método D1 (r=0,89. Os resultados permitiram concluir que os métodos testados foram igualmente eficientes na extração do fósforo do solo e para avaliar a disponibilidade deste elemento para a cultura do milho.In order to evaluate soil phosphorus availability to plants, the extraction methods: Mehlich-1, exchange resins in beads (RE, encapsulated (RC and as membrane (RM and iron oxide impregnated filter papers with 75% field capacity (D1 and waterlogged conditions (D2 were studied in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, in 1994, in a greenhouse experiment with six soils fertilized with four phosphate rates and cultivated with corn (Zea mays L. for 28 days. Determination coefficients between plant absorbed phosphorus and the amounts determined by the extraction methods were: 0.85 (Mehlich-1, 0.82 (RE, 0.84 (RC, 0.89 (RM, 0.75 (D1 and 0.70 (D2. Soil phosphorus contents extracted by the exchange resin methods were highly correlated (r=0.98, as well as with the amounts extracted by the D-1 method (r = 0.89. The results indicated that the studied methods are equally effective for predicting P

  16. Aluminium and iron estimated by Mehlich-3 extractant in mine soils in Galicia, northwest Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, M.L.F.; Alvarez, E.; Monterroso, C. [University of Santiago, Lugo (Spain). Dept. of Edaphology

    1998-07-01

    The efficiency of Mehlich-3 reagent as an extractant for aluminium (Al) and iron (Fe) was studied in Galician coal mine soils, in the process of reclamation. Mehlich-3 Al and oxalate Al values (r+0.77) although the regression line tended to be curvilinear. Mehlich-3 and Fe values were compared to those from other Al and Fe tests and with phosphorus (P) sorption. The soils are very heterogeneous, consisting mainly of carbonaceous and non-carbonacoues clays and shales, which are often rich in pyrite. Some of them have been amended with topsoil or fly ash. A close relationship was observed between Mehlich-3 Al was better correlated than oxalate Al to pyrophosphate Al (r=0.66 vs. r=0.59) and also to pH-NaF (r=0.89 vs. r=0.74). The Mehlich-3 Al was almost as good as oxalate Al in estimating non-crystalline A.

  17. Soil pH controls the environmental availability of phosphorus: Experimental and mechanistic modelling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devau, Nicolas [INRA, UMR 1222 Eco and Sols - Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Biogeochimie des Sols (INRA-IRD-SupAgro), Place Viala, F-34060 Montpellier (France); Cadre, Edith Le [Supagro, UMR 1222 Eco and Sols - Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Biogeochimie des Sols (INRA-IRD-SupAgro), Place Viala, F-34060 Montpellier (France); Hinsinger, Philippe; Jaillard, Benoit [INRA, UMR 1222 Eco and Sols - Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Biogeochimie des Sols (INRA-IRD-SupAgro), Place Viala, F-34060 Montpellier (France); Gerard, Frederic, E-mail: gerard@supagro.inra.fr [INRA, UMR 1222 Eco and Sols - Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Biogeochimie des Sols (INRA-IRD-SupAgro), Place Viala, F-34060 Montpellier (France)

    2009-11-15

    Inorganic P is the least mobile major nutrient in most soils and is frequently the prime limiting factor for plant growth in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, the extraction of soil inorganic P with CaCl{sub 2} (P-CaCl{sub 2}) and geochemical modelling were combined in order to unravel the processes controlling the environmentally available P (EAP) of a soil over a range of pH values (pH {approx} 4-10). Mechanistic descriptions of the adsorption of cations and anions by the soil constituents were used (1-pK Triple Plane, ion-exchange and NICA-Donnan models). These models are implemented into the geochemical code Visual MINTEQ. An additive approach was used for their application to the surface horizon of a Cambisol. The geochemical code accurately reproduced the concentration of extracted P at the different soil pH values (R{sup 2} = 0.9, RMSE = 0.03 mg kg{sup -1}). Model parameters were either directly found in the literature or estimated by fitting published experimental results in single mineral systems. The strong agreement between measurements and modelling results demonstrated that adsorption processes exerted a major control on the EAP of the soil over a large range of pH values. An influence of the precipitation of P-containing mineral is discounted based on thermodynamic calculations. Modelling results indicated that the variations in P-CaCl{sub 2} with soil pH were controlled by the deprotonation/protonation of the surface hydroxyl groups, the distribution of P surface complexes, and the adsorption of Ca and Cl from the electrolyte background. Iron-oxides and gibbsite were found to be the major P-adsorbing soil constituents at acidic and alkaline pHs, whereas P was mainly adsorbed by clay minerals at intermediate pH values. This study demonstrates the efficacy of geochemical modelling to understand soil processes, and the applicability of mechanistic adsorption models to a 'real' soil, with its mineralogical complexity and the additional

  18. Kinetics of phosphorus sorption in soils in the state of Paraíba¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmannuella Costa Santos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The soil P sorption capacity has been studied for many years, but little attention has been paid to the rate of this process, which is relevant in the planning of phosphate fertilization. The purpose of this experiment was to assess kinetics of P sorption in 12 representative soil profiles of the State of Paraíba (Brazil, select the best data fitting among four equations and relate these coefficients to the soil properties. Samples of 12 soils with wide diversity of physical, chemical and mineralogical properties were agitated in a horizontal shaker, with 10 mmo L-1 CaCl2 solution containing 6 and 60 mg L-1 P, for periods of 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 420, 720, 1,020, and 1,440 min. After each shaking period, the P concentration in the equilibrium solution was measured and three equations were fitted based on the Freundlich equation and one based on the Elovich equation, to determine which soil had the highest sorption rate (kinetics and which soil properties correlated to this rate. The kinetics of P sorption in soils with high maximum P adsorption capacity (MPAC was fast for 30 min at the lower initial P concentration (6 mg L-1. No difference was observed between soils at the higher initial P concentration (60 mg L-1. The P adsorption kinetics were positively correlated with clay content, MPAC and the amount of Al extracted with dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate. The data fitted well to Freundlich-based equations equation, whose coefficients can be used to predict P adsorption rates in soils.

  19. Effect of phosphorus application on growth of bitter Chinese lettuce and soil phosphorus leaching%施磷对苦麦菜生长及土壤磷素淋失的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁建凤; 罗文贱; 杨少海; 邹献中; 陈勇; 孙丽丽; 魏岚; 巫金龙

    2011-01-01

    利用网室土柱模拟试验,研究了不同磷用量[0、0.05 g·kg-1(土)、0.10 g·kg-1(土)、0.20 g·kg-1(土)]对苦麦菜产量、磷素吸收和利用及土壤磷淋失的影响.结果表明,施磷显著增加苦麦菜产量、促进植株对磷的吸收.苦麦菜产量在低磷水平[0.05 g·kg-1(土)]时最高,为每个土柱186.29 g.随磷用量增加,苦麦菜产量和磷肥利用率明显降低,植株吸磷量无明显变化.施磷显著增加土壤磷淋失量,且随磷用量增加,不同形态磷淋失量均显著增加.同一磷处理颗粒磷淋失量高于溶解态磷.不同磷用量条件下土壤各形态磷的淋失率均低于0.1%.低量施磷条件下溶解态磷在施磷后第10 d出现第1次淋失高峰:中量和高量施磷条件下溶解态磷在施磷后第10 d和第40 d分别出现2次淋失高峰.土壤总磷和颗粒磷淋失高峰期在施磷后第40~50 d出现.施肥后第60d,土壤总磷、溶解态磷和颗粒磷淋失浓度均明显降低.综合考虑苦麦菜产量、磷素吸收和利用及土壤磷淋失量等因素,苦麦菜以0.05 g·kg-1(土)的施磷量为佳.%A soil column experiment was conducted in net room to study the effects of different phosphorus levels [0, 0.05 g·kg-1(soil), 0.10 g·kg-1(soil) and 0.20 g·kg-1(soil)] on phosphorus uptake, utilization and yield of bitter Chinese lettuce and on soil phosphorus leaching. The results showed that phosphorus application significantly increased yield of bitter Chinese lettuce and also promoted phosphorus absorption by the plant. The highest yield (186.29 g per column) was observed under low phosphorus level [0.05 g·kg-1(soil)]. With increasing phosphorus level, yield and phosphorus use efficiency decreased significantly. There was no significant change in phosphorus uptake under different phosphorus levels. It was also noted that leaching of total phosphorus increased significantly with increasing phosphorus level. Under the same treatment, particulate phosphorus

  20. Hydrologic connectivity to streams increases nitrogen and phosphorus inputs and cycling in soils of created and natural floodplain wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kristin L; Noe, Gregory B; Ahn, Changwoo

    2013-07-01

    Greater connectivity to stream surface water may result in greater inputs of allochthonous nutrients that could stimulate internal nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling in natural, restored, and created riparian wetlands. This study investigated the effects of hydrologic connectivity to stream water on soil nutrient fluxes in plots ( = 20) located among four created and two natural freshwater wetlands of varying hydrology in the Piedmont physiographic province of Virginia. Surface water was slightly deeper; hydrologic inputs of sediment, sediment-N, and ammonium were greater; and soil net ammonification, N mineralization, and N turnover were greater in plots with stream water classified as their primary water source compared with plots with precipitation or groundwater as their primary water source. Soil water-filled pore space, inputs of nitrate, and soil net nitrification, P mineralization, and denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) were similar among plots. Soil ammonification, N mineralization, and N turnover rates increased with the loading rate of ammonium to the soil surface. Phosphorus mineralization and ammonification also increased with sedimentation and sediment-N loading rate. Nitrification flux and DEA were positively associated in these wetlands. In conclusion, hydrologic connectivity to stream water increased allochthonous inputs that stimulated soil N and P cycling and that likely led to greater retention of sediment and nutrients in created and natural wetlands. Our findings suggest that wetland creation and restoration projects should be designed to allow connectivity with stream water if the goal is to optimize the function of water quality improvement in a watershed.

  1. Strategies to mitigate diffuse phosphorus pollution during rewetting of fen peat soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, R; Rupp, H; Seeger, J; Leinweber, P

    2010-01-01

    The cultivation of fen peat soils (Eutric Histosols) for agricultural purposes, started in Europe about 250 years ago, resulting in decreased soil fertility, increased oxidation of peat and corresponding greenhouse gas fluxes to the atmosphere, nutrient transfer to aquatic ecosystems and losses in total area of the former native wetlands. To prevent these negative environmental effects set-aside programs and rewetting measures were promoted in recent years. Literature results and practical experiences showed that large scale rewetting of intensively used agricultural Histosols may result in mobilisation of phosphorus (P), its transport to adjacent surface waters and an accelerated eutrophication. The paper summarises results from an international European Community sponsored research project and demonstrates how results obtained at different scales and from different scientific disciplines were compiled to derive a strategy to carry out rewetting measures. Based on this findings a simple decision support system (DSS) for a hydrologically sensitive area in the Droemling catchment in north-eastern Germany was developed and since 2005 practically used to prevent freshwater resources from non point P pollution.

  2. Ethylene: a regulator of root architectural responses to soil phosphorus availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borch, K.; Bouma, T.J.; Lynch, J.P.; Brown, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The involvement of ethylene in root architectural responses to phosphorus availability was investigated in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L,) plants grown with sufficient and deficient phosphorus. Although phosphorus deficiency reduced root mass and lateral root number, main root length was unchang

  3. Ethylene: a regulator of root architectural responses to soil phosphorus availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borch, K.; Bouma, T.J.; Lynch, J.P.; Brown, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The involvement of ethylene in root architectural responses to phosphorus availability was investigated in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L,) plants grown with sufficient and deficient phosphorus. Although phosphorus deficiency reduced root mass and lateral root number, main root length was unchang

  4. The Effects of Fire on Soil Molybdenum and Phosphorus and Their Potential Role in Nitrogen Fixation in the Southeastern Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M.; Howarth, R. W.; Marino, R. M.; Neill, C.; Brando, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Deforestation and increasing drought intensity will increase the susceptibility of forests to fire over large areas of the Amazon. During burning, mineral and organic nitrogen (N) are lost, but the N cycle typically recovers after decades of forest regrowth. Tropical forests are assumed to be N-rich, sustained by high rates of N-fixation, but there are few empirical measurements of N-fixation from the Amazon Basin. In addition, we do not know how micronutrient requirements of N-fixation, such as phosphorus (P) and molybdenum (Mo) respond to fire. While P is a well-documented control on N-fixation in tropical forests, experimental Mo additions have shown that low concentrations of Mo can also limit N-fixation. At Tanguro Ranch in the southeastern Amazon, a large-scale, long-term experiment compares a control forest with forest that was burned twice three years apart in 2004 and 2007. The experimental area consists of adjacent 50-ha plots. We measured surface soil Mo, P, and extractable inorganic N (NH4+ and NO3-) to test the hypotheses that: (1) based on previous modeling of aerosol deposition, Mo and P concentrations in soils are low may constrain N-fixation, and (2) fire increases Mo, P, and inorganic N concentrations. Mo and P concentrations in the control plots were low (0.15 ± 0.02 mg Mo/kg and 156 ± 13 mg P/kg) and up to ten-fold lower for Mo and three-fold lower for P than previously reported for some tropical forests outside of the Amazon. Mo and NO3- (0.26 ± 0.10 mg NO3-/kg dry soil) in the control plot were significantly different (p < 0.05) than in the burned plot (0.23 ± 0.02 mg Mo/kg and 1.79 ± 0.29 mg NO3/kg dry soil). P and NH4 were not significantly different in the burned plots (p < 0.05). Mo released from burning may be potentially more important than P from burning to support N-fixation and N cycling in recovering forests.

  5. Native and Alien Plant Species Richness Response to Soil Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Temperate Floodplain and Swamp Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hrivnák

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil nitrogen and phosphorus are commonly limiting elements affecting plant species richness in temperate zones. Our species richness-ecological study was performed in alder-dominated forests representing temperate floodplains (streamside alder forests of Alnion incanae alliance and swamp forests (alder carrs of Alnion glutinosae alliance in the Western Carpathians. Species richness (i.e., the number of vascular plants in a vegetation plot was analyzed separately for native and alien vascular plants in 240 vegetation plots across the study area covering Slovakia, northern Hungary and southern Poland. The relationship between the species richness of each plant group and total soil nitrogen content, plant-available phosphorus and carbon to nitrogen (C/N ratio was analyzed by generalized linear mixed models (GLMM with Poisson error distribution and log-link function. The number of recorded native and alien species was 17–84 (average 45.4 and 0–9 (average 1.5 species per plot, respectively. The GLMMs were statistically significant (p ˂ 0.001 for both plant groups, but the total explained variation was higher for native (14% than alien plants (9%. The richness of native species was negatively affected by the total soil nitrogen content and plant-available phosphorus, whereas the C/N ratio showed a positive impact. The alien richness was predicted only by the total soil nitrogen content showing a negative effect.

  6. Effects of plant diversity on microbial nitrogen and phosphorus dynamics in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommer, Judith; Braun, Judith; Daly, Amanda; Gorka, Stefan; Hu, Yuntao; Kaiser, Christina; Martin, Victoria; Meyerhofer, Werner; Walker, Tom W. N.; Wanek, Wolfgang; Wasner, Daniel; Wiesenbauer, Julia; Zezula, David; Zheng, Qing; Richter, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    There is a general consensus that plant diversity affects many ecosystem functions. One example of such an effect is the enhanced aboveground and belowground plant biomass production with increasing species richness, with implications for carbon and nutrient distribution in soil. The Jena Experiment (http://www.the-jena-experiment.de/), a grassland biodiversity experiment established in 2002 in Germany, comprises different levels of plant species richness and different numbers of plant functional groups. It provides the opportunity to examine how changes in biodiversity impact on microbially-mediated nutrient cycling processes. We here report on plant diversity and plant functional composition effects on growth and nitrogen and phosphorus transformation rates, including nitrogen use efficiency, of microbial communities. Microbial growth rates and microbial biomass were positively affected by increasing plant species richness. Amino acid and ammonium concentrations in soil were also positively affected by plant species richness, while phosphate concentrations in contrast were negatively affected. The cycling of organic N in soils (estimated as gross protein depolymerization rates) increased about threefold with plant diversity, while gross N and P mineralization were not significantly affected by either species or functional richness. Microbial nitrogen use efficiency did not respond to different levels of plant diversity but was very high (0.96 and 0.98) across all levels of plant species richness, demonstrating a low N availability for microbes. Taken together this indicates that soil microbial communities were able to meet the well-documented increase in plant N content with species richness, and also the higher N demand of the microbial community by increasing the recycling of organic N such as proteins. In fact, the microbial community even overcompensated the increased plant and microbial N demand, as evidenced by increased levels of free amino acids and

  7. Temperature Effects on Phosphorus Release from a Biosolids-Amended Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L. Silveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effects of temperature on the potential leachable P pool and distribution of chemical P forms in a biosolids-amended soil. A P-deficient Spodosol was incubated with seven biosolids and inorganic P fertilizer at 20 and 32°C for 90 days. Amendments were applied to provide a total P concentration of 112 mg kg−1 soil, which correspond to a field application of ~224 kg P ha−1. Cumulative P mass leached during the 90 d study for any P source was <2% of the applied P, but greater cumulative P mass was released from the biological P removal and composted biosolids than from the heat-dried materials. Increasing temperature (20 to 32°C generally decreased cumulative P mass leached, suggesting greater soil affinity to retain P at 32°C than at 20°C. In a static incubation experiment (no leaching, soil water-extractable P concentrations were reduced over time, but no temperature effect was observed. Similarly, P distribution among the various fractions was not affected by temperature. The relatively great ability of the soil to sorb P masked differences in biosolids properties and the potential impacts of temperature on P lability. Additional work using low P-sorbing soils is warranted.

  8. [Vertical distribution patterns of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in Chinese pine forest soils developed from different parent materials in Songshan Mountain Nature Reserve, Beijing of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Li-hui; Sun, Zhao-di; Nie, Li-shui; Luo, Pan-pan; Wu, Ji-Gui; Xu, Wu-de

    2013-04-01

    Taking the soils developed from two kinds of parent materials (granite and limestone) under Pinus tabulaeformis forest at the same altitude in Songshan Mountain Nature Reserve of Beijing as test objects, this paper studied the vertical distribution patterns of soil total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium. The soil developed from granite had the total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium contents being 1.61-2. 35 g kg-1, 5. 84-10.74 mg kg- 1, and 39.33-93.66 mg kg-1, while that developed from limestone had the total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium contents being 1. 69 -2. 36 g kg-1, 4.45-8.57 mg . kg-1, and 60.66-124.00 mg kg-1, respectively. The total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium contents in the two soils were the highest in 0-10 cm layer, decreased with increasing depth, and had significant differences between different layers, showing that the soil total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium had a strong tendency to accumulate in surface layer. Such a tendency was more obvious for the soil developed from limestone. The paired t-test for the two soils indicated that the total nitrogen content in different layers had no significant difference, whereas the available phosphorus content in 0-10 cm layer and the available potassium content in 10-20 cm layer differed significantly.

  9. Influence of different fertilization on the dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus accumulation in acid and limed soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva Jokubauskaite

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil quality has become an important issue in soil science. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC is believed to play an important role in soil processes and in the C, N and P balances, their supplies to plants in all types of soils. It is much more sensitive to soil management than is soil organic matter as a whole, and can be used as a key indicator of soil natural functions. This study aimed to assess the influence of different organic fertilizers on DOC and N, P accumulation. The study was carried out on a moraine loam soil at the Vezaiciai Branch of Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry in 2012. Farmyard manure (FYM (60 t ha -1 and alternative organic fertilizers (wheat straw, rape residues, roots, stubble, perennial grasses were applied on two soil backgrounds - acid and limed. DOC was analysed using an ion chromatograph SKALAR. Application of organic amendments resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon (SOC content, which demonstrates a positive role of organic fertilizers in SOC conservation. The combination of different organic fertilizers and liming had a significant positive effect on DOC concentration in the soil. The highest DOC content (0.241 g kg-1 was established in the limed soil fertilized with farmyard manure. The most unfavourable status of DOC was determined in the unlimed, unfertilized soil. The limed and FYM-applied soil had the highest nitrogen (1.47 g kg-1 and phosphorus (0.84 g kg-1 content compared to the other treatments. Organic fertilizers gave a significant positive effect on SOC and DOC content increase in the topsoil. This immediate increase is generally attributed to the presence of soluble materials in the amendments. Application of organic fertilizers in acid and limed soil increased the nutrient stocks and ensured soil chemical indicators at the optimal level for plant growth and thus may provide a mechanism as well as prediction opportunities for soil fertility, conservation

  10. Dynamics of phosphorus fractions in the rhizosphere of fababean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) grown in calcareous and acid soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, G.; Li, Haigang; Leffelaar, P.A.; Shen, J.; Zhang, F.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of soil phosphorus (P) fractions were investigated, in the rhizosphere of fababean (Vicia faba L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) grown in calcareous and acid soils. Plants were grown in a mini-rhizotron with a thin (3 mm) soil layer, which was in contact with the root-mat, and considered as r

  11. Organophosphorus Pesticide Extraction and Cleanup from Soils and Measurement Using GC-NPD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-Gang; JIANG Xin; MAO Ying-Ming; ZHAO Zhen-Hua; BIAN Yong-Rong

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to optimize instrumental parameters and conditions for analysis of selected organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) by gas chromatography (GC) with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (NPD) (GC-NPD); to select an appropriate solvent system; to conduct a comparison of sonication and shaking extractions; and to select an appropriate procedure for extracting organophosphorus pesticides from soils. Procedure Ⅰ consisted of n-hexane or petroleum ether together with acetone used as solvents, while Procedure Ⅱ contained several solvents including acetone,methanol, dichloromethane, and n-hexane or petroleum ether. Experimental results indicated that a mixture of petroleum ether/acetone (2:1, v/v) could be used in place of n-hexane/acetone (2:1, v/v) as it was a less expensive solvent system.In addition, shaking under a water bath at 20 ℃ was more effective than sonication. Also, Procedure Ⅰ was more effective,safer, and more timesaving than Procedure Ⅱ. Procedure I was applied to three soil types of different organic matter content, with recoveries of the OPPs from the yellow-brown soils, which had a higher organic matter content, being lower than those from the yellow and red soils.

  12. [Effects of phosphorus fertilization on yield of winter wheat and utilization of soil nitrogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Dan; Li, Shu-wen; Xia, Bo; Wen, Hong-da

    2015-02-01

    In order to evaluate the threshold of phosphorus (P) application rate and improve the utilization efficiency of fertilizers in Baoding region of Hebei Province, a field experiment was conducted to examine the impacts of P fertilization on wheat yield, soil NO(3-)-N and nitrogen use efficiency. Results showed that, compared with the CK (P0), all treatments with P application (P1, 120 kg · hm(-2); P2, 240 kg · hm(-2) and P3, 480 kg · hm(-2)) increased the plant height, flag leaf areas and total leaf areas per plant of winter wheat, which was conducive to the accumulation of photosynthetic products. In addition, P application increased the spike number, kernels per spike and yield of winter wheat but slightly decreased the grain mass per 1000 seeds. Of the P-fertilized treatments, P2 had the highest wheat yield of 6102 kg · hm(-2), which was similar to P1 but significantly greater than those of P0 and P3. Furthermore, P fertilization reduced the NO(3-)-N content in top soil layer although the total accumulation of NO3- was still rather high. The N grain production efficiencies (GPE(N)) and N uptake efficiencies (UE(N)) of P1 and P2 were similar but greater than the other treatments. The use efficiency (UR(P)) , agronomic efficiency (AE(P)) and partial productivity of P fertilizer (PFP(P)) in P1 were significantly greater than P2 and P3. In conclusion, the P application rate of 120 kg · hm(-2) (P1) in this study could be an appropriate threshold in Baoding, Hebei, from the aspects of wheat yield, nitrogen and phosphate use efficiencies and accumulation of soil NO3-.

  13. Phosphorus status and microbial community of paddy soil with the growth of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) under different phosphorus fertilizer treatments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haichao GUO; Guang-huo WANG

    2009-01-01

    Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) was grown in paddy soil in pots under different phosphorus (P) fertilizer treatments to investigate changes of P fractions and microbial community of the soil. The treatments included Kunyang phosphate rock (KPR) applications at 50 mg P/kg (KPR50) and 250 mg P/kg (KPR250), mono-calcium phosphate (MCP) application at 50 mg P/kg (MCP50), and the control without P application. The results showed that KPR50, KPR250, and MCP50 applications significantly increased the dry weight of the ryegrass by 13%, 38%, and 55%, and increased P uptake by 19%, 135%, and 324%, respectively. Compared with MCP50, the relative effectiveness of KPR50 and KPR250 treatments in ryegrass production was about 23% and 68%, respectively. After one season ofryegrass growth, the KPR50, KPR250, and MCP50 applications increased soil-available P by 13.4%, 26.8%, and 55.2%, respectively. More than 80% of the applied KPR-P remained as HCI-P fraction in the soil. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis showed that the total and bacterial PLFAs were significantly higher in the soils with KPR250 and MCP50 treatments compared with KPR50 and control. The latter had no significant difference in the total or bacterial PLFAs. The KPR50, KPR250, and MCP50 treatments increased fungal PLFA by 69%, 103%, and 69%, respectively. Both the principal component analysis and the cluster analysis of the PLFA data suggest that P treatments altered the microbial community composition of the soils, and that P availability might be an important contributor to the changes in the microbial community structure during the ryegrass growth in the paddy soils.

  14. Characterization of phosphorus species in sediments from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: Combining sequential extractions and X-ray spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraal, Peter; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Behrends, Thilo; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2015-01-01

    The bulk phosphorus (P) distribution in sediment samples from the oxygen minimum zone of the northern Arabian Sea was determined using two methods: sequential chemical extraction (the ‘SEDEX’ procedure) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of the phosphorus K-edge. Our

  15. Extraction agents for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil in soil washing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ee Von; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Poh, Phaik Eong

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil have been recognised as a serious health and environmental issue due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic properties. One of the commonly employed soil remediation techniques to clean up such contamination is soil washing or solvent extraction. The main factor which governs the efficiency of this process is the solubility of PAHs in the extraction agent. Past field-scale soil washing treatments for PAH-contaminated soil have mainly employed organic solvents or water which is either toxic and costly or inefficient in removing higher molecular weight PAHs. Thus, the present article aims to provide a review and discussion of the alternative extraction agents that have been studied, including surfactants, biosurfactants, microemulsions, natural surfactants, cyclodextrins, vegetable oil and solution with solid phase particles. These extraction agents have been found to remove PAHs from soil at percentages ranging from 47 to 100% for various PAHs.

  16. Organic compounds of different extractability in total solvent extracts from soils of contrasting water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassova, Irena; Doerr, Stefan H.

    2010-05-01

    Previous studies examining organic compounds that may cause water-repellent behaviour of soils have typically focussed on analysing only the lipophilic fraction of extracted material. This study aimed to provide a more comprehensive examination by applying single- and sequential-accelerated solvent extraction (ASE), separation and analysis by GC/MS of the total solvent extracts of three soils taken from under eucalypt vegetation with different levels of water repellency. Water repellency increased in all the soils after extraction with DCM:MeOH (95:5), but was eliminated with iso-propanol/ammonia (95:5). Quantities of major lipid compound classes varied between solvents and soils. Iso-propanol/ammonia (95:5) solvent released saccharides, glycerol, aromatic acids and other polar organic compounds, which were more abundant in fractionated extracts from the single extraction and the third step sequential ASE extraction, than in the extracts from the DCM:MeOH ASE solvent. Dominant compounds extracted from all soils were long-chain alkanols (>C22), palmitic acid, C29 alkane, β-sitosterol, terpenes, terpenoids and other polar compounds. The soil with smallest repellency lacked >C18 fatty acids and had smallest concentrations of alkanols (C26, C28 and C30) and alkanes (C29, C31), but a greater abundance of more complex polar compounds than the more repellent soils. We therefore speculate that the above compounds play an important role in determining the water repellency of the soils tested. The results suggest that one-stage and sequential ASE extractions with iso-propanol:ammonia and subsequent fractionation of extracts are a useful approach in providing a comprehensive assessment of the potential compounds involved in causing soil water repellency.

  17. Soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus changes under sugarcane expansion in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, André L.C., E-mail: andrefranco@usp.br [Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Cherubin, Maurício R. [Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Pavinato, Paulo S.; Cerri, Carlos E.P. [Department of Soil Science, “Luiz de Queiroz” College of Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Pádua Dias 11, 13418-900 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Six, Johan [Department of Environmental Systems Science, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 1, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Davies, Christian A. [Shell Technology Centre Houston, 3333 Highway 6 South, Houston, TX 77082 (United States); Cerri, Carlos C. [Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    Historical data of land use change (LUC) indicated that the sugarcane expansion has mainly displaced pasture areas in Central–Southern Brazil, globally the largest producer, and that those pastures were prior established over native forests in the Cerrado biome. We sampled 3 chronosequences of land use comprising native vegetation (NV), pasture (PA), and sugarcane crop (SC) in the sugarcane expansion region to assess the effects of LUC on soil carbon, nitrogen, and labile phosphorus pools. Thirty years after conversion of NV to PA, we found significant losses of original soil organic matter (SOM) from NV, while insufficient new organic matter was introduced from tropical grasses into soil to offset the losses, reflecting in a net C emission of 0.4 Mg ha{sup −1} yr{sup −1}. These findings added to decreases in {sup 15}N signal indicated that labile portions of SOM are preserved under PA. Afterwards, in the firsts five years after LUC from PA to SC, sparse variations were found in SOM levels. After more than 20 years of sugarcane crop, however, there were losses of 40 and 35% of C and N stocks, respectively, resulting in a rate of C emission of 1.3 Mg ha{sup −1} yr{sup −1} totally caused by the respiration of SOM from C4-cycle plants. In addition, conversion of pastures to sugarcane mostly increased {sup 15}N signal, indicating an accumulation of more recalcitrant SOM under sugarcane. The microbe- and plant-available P showed site-specific responses to LUC as a function of different P-input managements, with the biological pool mostly accounting for more than 50% of the labile P in both anthropic land uses. With the projections of 6.4 Mha of land required by 2021 for sugarcane expansion in Brazil to achieve ethanol's demand, this explanatory approach to the responses of SOM to LUC will contribute for an accurate assessment of the CO{sub 2} balance of sugarcane ethanol. - Highlights: • An explanatory approach to the responses of soil C, N and P to

  18. Long-term manure application effects on phosphorus speciation, kinetics and distribution in highly weathered agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Dalton Belchior; da Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Vergütz, Leonardus; Sparks, Donald Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) K-edge XANES and Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopies along with sequential P chemical fractionation and desorption kinetics experiments, were employed to provide micro- and macro-scale information on the long-term fate of manure application on the solid-state speciation, kinetics and distribution of P in highly weathered agricultural soils of southern Brazil. Soil test P values ranged from 7.3 up to 16.5 times as much higher than the reference soil. A sharp increase in amorphous Fe and Al amounts were observed as an effect of the consecutive application of manures. Whereas our results showed that the P sorption capacity of some manured soils was not significantly affected, P risk assessment indices indicated that P losses should be expected, likely due to the excessive manure rates applied to the soils. The much higher contents of amorphous Fe and Al (hydr)oxides (55% and 80% increase with respect to the reference soil, respectively) in manured soils seem to have counterbalanced the inhibiting effect of soil organic matter on P sorption by creating additional P sorption sites. Accordingly, the newly created P sorbing surfaces were important to prevent an even larger P loss potential. Phosphorus K-edge XANES lent complimentary hints on the loss of crystallinity and transformation of originally present Fe-P minerals into poorly crystalline ones as an effect of manuring, whereas Fe K-edge EXAFS provided insights into the structural changes underwent in the soils upon manure application and soil management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Model analysis of mechanisms controlling pneumatic soil vapor extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Camilla Kruse; Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Jensen, Karsten Høgh;

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of traditional soil venting or soil vapor extraction (SVE) highly depends on the architecture of the subsurface because imposed advective air flow tends to bypass low-permeable contaminated areas. Pneumatic SVE is a technique developed to enhance remediation efficiency of heterogen...... level the pneumatic venting technology is superior to the traditional technique, and that the method is particularly efficient in cases where large permeability contrasts exist between soil units in the subsurface.......The efficiency of traditional soil venting or soil vapor extraction (SVE) highly depends on the architecture of the subsurface because imposed advective air flow tends to bypass low-permeable contaminated areas. Pneumatic SVE is a technique developed to enhance remediation efficiency...... of heterogeneous soils by enforcing large fluctuating pressure fronts through the contaminated area. Laboratory experiments have suggested that pneumatic SVE considerably improves the recovery rate from low-permeable units. We have analyzed the experimental results using a numerical code and quantified...

  20. NMR and mass spectrometry of phosphorus in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rifai, H.; Heerboth, M.; Gedris, T.E.; Newman, S.; Orem, W.; Cooper, W.T.

    2008-01-01

    There is at present little information on the long-term stability of phosphorus sequestered in wetlands. Phosphorus sequestered during high loading periods may be relatively unstable and easily remobilized following changes in nutrient status or hydrological regime, but the chemical forms of sequestered phosphorus that do remobilize are largely unknown at this time. A lack of suitable analytical techniques has contributed to this dearth of knowledge regarding the stability of soil organic phosphorus. We analysed phosphorus in soils from the 'head' of Rescue Strand tree island and an adjacent marsh in the Florida Everglades by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Tree islands are important areas of biodiversity within the Everglades and offer a unique opportunity to study phosphorus sequestration because they are exposed to large phosphorus loads and appear to be natural nutrient sinks. The 31P NMR profiling of extracts from surface and sediment samples in the tree island indicates that phosphorus input to Rescue Strand tree island soils is mostly in the form of inorganic ortho-phosphate and is either refractory when deposited or rapidly recycled by the native vegetation into a stable phosphorus pool largely resistant to re-utilization by plants or microbes. Mass spectrometry revealed the presence of inositol hexakisphosphate, a common organic monophosphate ester not previously observed in Everglades' soils. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  1. Investigations on phosphorus recovery and reuse as soil amendment from electric arc furnace slag filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Simon C; Drizo, Aleksandra

    2009-11-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag has been identified as an effective filter material for the removal of phosphorus (P) from both point and non-point sources. To determine the feasibility of land-applying P saturated EAF steel slag this study was undertaken to investigate (i) saturated EAF steel slag material's potential as a P fertilizer or soil amendment and (ii) P desorption and metals leachate from saturated EAF steel slag material to surface runoff. Medicago sativa (alfalfa) was planted in a nutrient depleted washed sand media. Phosphorus was added either as saturated EAF steel slag or as a standard commercial phosphate fertilizer in order to assess the plant availability of the P from saturated EAF steel slag. Four different P application levels were tested: a low (20 lbs acre furrow slice(-1) (5.5 g P m(-3))) two medium (40 and 60 lbs. acre f.s.(-1) (11 and 16.5 g P m(-3))) and a high (120 lbs. acre f.s.(-1) (33 g P m(-3))). The above-ground biomass of half of the plants was harvested after 5 weeks and the second half at 10 weeks. All treatments regardless of the P source used showed high rates of germination. At the first harvest period (5 weeks) significantly higher above-ground biomass (p < 0.01) was seen at the 3 highest P amendment rates in treatments with triple super phosphate fertilizer (TSP) than with EAF steel slag. However, by the second harvest (10 weeks) only the highest amendment rate of TSP showed a significantly higher amount of biomass (p < 0.01), suggesting that EAF steel slag might be an effective slow release P source. In a second experiment, a rain simulator was used to assess desorption of DRP, TP and metals from a saturated and semi-saturated EAF steel slag. The results revealed that the total amounts of DRP and TP released to surface runoff from EAF steel slag were negligible when compared to the total quantities of P retained by this material. Overall the results from this study demonstrated that once the EAF steel slag filter

  2. Phosphorus status of soils from contrasting forested ecosystems in Southwestern Siberia: combined effects of plant species and climate

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The Russian boreal forest, which mainly consists of extensive forests in Siberia, is the largest continuous forest region on Earth and represents 70 % of the world's boreal forest. Siberian forest is a tremendous repository of terrestrial organic carbon (C), which may increase owing to climate change, potential increases in ecosystem productivity and hence C sequestration. Phosphorus (P) availability could limit the C sequestration potential, but tree roots may mine the soil deeper to ...

  3. Optimizing Available Phosphorus in Calcareous Soils Fertilized with Diammonium Phosphate and Phosphoric Acid Using Freundlich Adsorption Isotherm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Naeem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In calcareous soils, phosphorus (P retention and immobilization take place due to precipitation and adsorption. Since soil pH is considered a major soil variable affecting the P sorption, an acidic P fertilizer could result in low P adsorption compared to alkaline one. Therefore, P adsorption from DAP and phosphoric acid (PA required to produce desired soil solution P concentration was estimated using Freundlich sorption isotherms. Two soils from Faisalabad and T. T. Singh districts were spiked with 0, 10, and 20 % for 15 days. Freundlich adsorption isotherms ( were constructed, and theoretical doses of PA and DAP to develop a desired soil solution P level (i.e., 0.20 mg L−1 were calculated. It was observed that P adsorption in soil increased with . Moreover, at all the levels of , P adsorption from PA was lower compared to that from DAP in both the soils. Consequently, lesser quantity of PA was required to produce desired solution P, 0.2 mg L−1, compared to DAP. However, extrapolating the developed relationship between soil contents and quantity of fertilizer to other similar textured soils needs confirmation.

  4. Optimizing available phosphorus in calcareous soils fertilized with diammonium phosphate and phosphoric acid using Freundlich adsorption isotherm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Asif; Akhtar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Waqar

    2013-01-01

    In calcareous soils, phosphorus (P) retention and immobilization take place due to precipitation and adsorption. Since soil pH is considered a major soil variable affecting the P sorption, an acidic P fertilizer could result in low P adsorption compared to alkaline one. Therefore, P adsorption from DAP and phosphoric acid (PA) required to produce desired soil solution P concentration was estimated using Freundlich sorption isotherms. Two soils from Faisalabad and T. T. Singh districts were spiked with 0, 10, and 20 % CaCO3 for 15 days. Freundlich adsorption isotherms (P = aC(b/a)) were constructed, and theoretical doses of PA and DAP to develop a desired soil solution P level (i.e., 0.20 mg L(-1)) were calculated. It was observed that P adsorption in soil increased with CaCO3. Moreover, at all the levels of CaCO3, P adsorption from PA was lower compared to that from DAP in both the soils. Consequently, lesser quantity of PA was required to produce desired solution P, 0.2 mg L(-1), compared to DAP. However, extrapolating the developed relationship between soil CaCO3 contents and quantity of fertilizer to other similar textured soils needs confirmation.

  5. [Impact of rice agriculture on nitrogen and phosphorus exports in streams in hilly red soil earth region of central subtropics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li-Fang; Wang, Yi; Wu, Jin-Shui; Li, Yong; Li, Yu-Yuan; Meng, Cen; Li, Hang; Zhang, Man-Yi

    2014-01-01

    The research selected the Tuojia catchment and Jianshan catchment in Changsha County, Hunan Province, to comparatively study the effects of rice agriculture on the nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations and exports in streams in the typical agricultural catchments of the hilly red soil earth region. The monitoring of 16 months suggested that, there was a moderate stream nutrient pollution in both Tuojia and Jianshan catchments, especially for nitrogen pollution. Comparing the two catchments, the nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were higher and the water quality was worse in the Tuojia catchment than that in the Jianshan catchment. From the nutrient composition of view, ammonia nitrogen was the main species of total nitrogen in the Tuojia catchment (accounting for 58.5% of total nitrogen), while it was nitrate nitrogen in the Jianshan catchment (accounting for 76. 1% of total nitrogen). The proportion of dissolved phosphorus in total phosphorus was 47. 1% in the Tuojia catchment, higher than the proportion of 37.5% in the Jianshan catchment. From temporal variations of nutrient dynamics of view, concentrations of all forms of nitrogen were higher during January to February and in July, respectively, and total phosphorus and dissolved phosphorus were higher during May to June and during October to December. Since the stream discharge in the catchments concentrated during the rice growing period from April to October, the higher nutrient concentrations during the period suggested potential risks of nitrogen and phosphorus losses. The total nitrogen mass flux was 1.67 kg x (hm2 x month)(-1) and TP was 0.06 kg x (hm2 x month)(-1) in the Tuojia catchment, which were greater than the 0.44 kg x (hm2 x month)(-1) and 0.02 kg x (hm2 x month)(-1) in the Jianshan catchment. Given the similar climate, geomorphology, soil type and cultivation patterns but the different area proportion of rice agriculture between two catchments, results suggested that, under the traditional

  6. Prediction of reducible soil iron content from iron extraction data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Reeven, van J.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Soils contain various iron compounds that differ in solubility, reducibility and extractability. Moreover, the contribution of the various iron compounds to total iron (Fe) and total Fe concentrations differs highly among soils. As a result, the total reducible Fe content can also differ among

  7. System of extraction of volatiles from soil using microwave processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethridge, Edwin C. (Inventor); Kaukler, William F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A device for the extraction and collection of volatiles from soil or planetary regolith. The device utilizes core drilled holes to gain access to underlying volatiles below the surface. Microwave energy beamed into the holes penetrates through the soil or regolith to heat it, and thereby produces vapor by sublimation. The device confines and transports volatiles to a cold trap for collection.

  8. Selenium speciation and extractability in Dutch agricultural soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Supriatin, Supriatin; Weng, Liping; Comans, Rob N.J.

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to understand selenium (Se) speciation and extractability in Dutch agricultural soils. Top soil samples were taken from 42 grassland fields and 41 arable land fields in the Netherlands. Total Se contents measured in aqua regia were between 0.12 and 1.97mgkg-1(on average

  9. Mild extractability and bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Alexander, M.

    1999-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine the relationship between bioavailability of unaged and aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and the amounts detected by mild solvent extraction. More aged than unaged anthracene remained in Lima loam following introduction of earthworms (Eisenia foetida), a mixed culture containing anthracene-degrading microorganisms, or earthworms or wheat after bacterial biodegradation of the compound. Aging decreased the percentage of anthracene recovered by mild extraction with n-butanol from soil following introduction of earthworms, growth of wheat, biodegradation by bacteria, or when maintained sterile. Biodegradation resulted in a marked decrease in the percentage of aged and unaged anthracene recovered from soil by mild extraction with n-butanol or ethyl acetate. Aging of fluoranthene and pyrene decreased the amount removed by mild extraction with n-butanol, ethyl acetate, and propanol. The uptake of aged and unaged anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene by earthworms was correlated with the amounts recovered from soil by mild extraction with n-butanol, propanol, and ethyl acetate. The retention of aged and unaged anthracene by wheat and barley was correlated with the amounts recovered from soil by the same procedure. The authors suggest that mild extraction with organic solvents can be used to predict the bioavailability of PAHs in soil.

  10. Elemental stoichiometry indicates predominant influence of potassium and phosphorus limitation on arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in acidic soil at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Haneef; Meghvansi, Mukesh K; Gupta, Rajeev; Veer, Vijay

    2015-09-15

    The functioning of high-altitude agro-ecosystems is constrained by the harsh environmental conditions, such as low temperatures, acidic soil, and low nutrient supply. It is therefore imperative to investigate the site-specific ecological stoichiometry with respect to AM symbiosis in order to maximize the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) benefits for the plants in such ecosystems. Here, we assess the elemental stoichiometry of four Capsicum genotypes grown on acidic soil at high altitude in Arunachal Pradesh, India. Further, we try to identify the predominant resource limitations influencing the symbioses of different Capsicum genotypes with the AM fungi. Foliar and soil elemental stoichiometric relations of Capsicum genotypes were evaluated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization and occurrence under field conditions. AM fungal diversity in rhizosphere, was estimated through PCR-DGGE profiling. Results demonstrated that the symbiotic interaction of various Capsicum genotypes with the AM fungi in acidic soil was not prominent in the study site as evident from the low range of root colonization (21-43.67%). In addition, despite the rich availability of carbon in plant leaves as well as in soil, the carbon-for-phosphorus trade between AMF and plants appeared to be limited. Our results provide strong evidences of predominant influence of the potassium-limitation, in addition to phosphorus-limitation, on AM symbiosis with Capsicum in acidic soil at high altitude. We also conclude that the potassium should be considered in addition to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in further studies investigating the stoichiometric relationships with the AMF symbioses in high altitude agro-ecosystems.

  11. Difficultly Extractable Fixed Ammonium in Some Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENBIYUN; CHENGLILI; 等

    1999-01-01

    Ninety-three soil samples and 19 sedimentary rock samples collected from 21 provinces of China were analyzed for their contents of fixed ammonium and total N by Kjeldahl-HF method.Results showed that amount of difficultly extractable fixed ammonium(the fixed ammonium that is not determinable by Kjeldahl procedures commonly used for soils) in soils ranged from 0 to 202 mg kg-1,It was generally more than 50 mg kg-1 in soils in Changji and Turpan districts,Xinjiang,accounting for 3.2%-36.8% with an average of 13.9% of the total N.For some Orthents derived from purple shale and purple sandstone in Sichuan and Hunan provinces and Chao soils derived from secondary loess in Henan Province and Ningxia Autonomous Region it was generally around 30 mg kg-1,accounting for 4%-7% of the total soil N,and for most of the rest of soils studied,with the exception of some subsoils,no or trace difficultly extractable fixed ammonium could be detected.It was sugested that the difficultly extractable fixed ammonium was originated from parent rock,and for slightly weathered soils derived from parent materials rich in this form of N the Kjeldahl method might give underestimation of total soil N.

  12. Fósforo microbiano do solo sob sistema plantio direto em resposta à adição de fosfato solúvel Microbial phosphorus in a soil under no-tillage as affected by soluble phosphorus addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Martinazzo

    2007-06-01

    summer at Glicine max sowing. Microbial phosphorus and available phosphorus by anion exchange resin were evaluated in the 0-10 cm soil layer 91, 133, 147, 203, and 267 days after Lolium multiflorum sowing. Phosphate application increased microbial phosphorus, more intensely when applied at soybean sowing over the Lolium multiflorum residues. P immobilization in the microbial biomass was temporary and decreased over the course of the crop cycle; these variations were not correlated with variations in P extracted by anion-exchange resin.

  13. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Robert Vincent; Mincher, Bruce Jay

    2002-08-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65°C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% ± 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% ± 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95°C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

  14. Assessment of Non-Point Source Total Phosphorus Pollution from Different Land Use and Soil Types in a Mid-High Latitude Region of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The transport characteristics of phosphorus in soil and the assessment of its environmental risk have become hot topics in the environmental and agricultural fields. The Sanjiang Plain is an important grain production base in China, and it is characterised by serious land use change caused by large-scale agricultural exploitation. Agricultural inputs and tillage management have destroyed the soil nutrient balance formed over long-term conditions. There are few studies on non-point source phosphorus pollution in the Sanjiang Plain, which is the largest swampy low plain in a mid-high-latitude region in China. Most studies have focused on the water quality of rivers in marsh areas, or the export mechanism of phosphorus from specific land uses. They were conducted using experimental methods or empirical models, and need further development towards mechanism models and the macro-scale. The question is how to find a way to couple processes in phosphorus cycling and a distributed hydrological model considering local hydrological features. In this study, we report an attempt to use a distributed phosphorus transport model to analyse non-point source total phosphorus pollution from different land uses and soil types on the Sanjiang Plain. The total phosphorus concentration generally shows an annually increasing trend in the study area. The total phosphorus load intensity is heterogeneous in different land use types and different soil types. The average total phosphorus load intensity of different land use types can be ranked in descending order from paddy field, dry land, wetlands, grassland, and forestland. The average total phosphorus load intensity of different soil types can be ranked in descending order: paddy soil, bog soil, planosol, meadow soil, black soil, and dark brown earth. The dry land and paddy fields account for the majority of total phosphorus load in the study area. This is mainly caused by extensive use of phosphate fertilizer on the

  15. SEQUENTIAL EXTRACTION OF PHOSPHORUS BY MEHLICH-1 AND ION EXCHANGE RESIN FROM B HORIZONS OF FERRIC AND PERFERRIC LATOSOLS (OXISOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo de Lima Camêlo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In general, Latosols have low levels of available P, however, the influence of the parent material seems to be decisive in defining the pool and predominant form of P in these soils. This study evaluated P availability by extraction with Mehlich-1 (M-1 and Ion Exchange Resin (IER, from samples of B horizons of Ferric and Perferric Latosols developed from different parent materials. To this end, in addition to the physical and chemical characterization of soils, 10 sequential extractions were performed with M-1 and IER from samples of B horizons (depth between 0.8 and 1.0 m. Total contents of Ca, P, Fe, Al, and Ti were determined after digestion with nitric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids. The effects of sequential P extractions on Fe oxides were also evaluated from the analyses of dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate and ammonium acid oxalate. The high similarity between contents of P accumulated after sequential extractions with M-1 and IER in soils developed on tuffite indicated a predominance of P-Ca. Higher contents of P after a single IER extraction show greater efficiency in P removal from highly weathered soils, as from the Latosols studied here. The P contents also show the high sensitivity of extractant M-1 in highly buffered soils. Furthermore, a single extraction with extractant M-1 or IER is not sufficient to estimate the amount of labile P in these soils.

  16. Selenium speciation and extractability in Dutch agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriatin, Supriatin; Weng, Liping; Comans, Rob N J

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed to understand selenium (Se) speciation and extractability in Dutch agricultural soils. Top soil samples were taken from 42 grassland fields and 41 arable land fields in the Netherlands. Total Se contents measured in aqua regia were between 0.12 and 1.97 mg kg(-1) (on average 0.58 mg kg(-1)). Organic Se after NaOCl oxidation-extraction accounted for on average 82% of total Se, whereas inorganic selenite (selenate was not measurable) measured in ammonium oxalate extraction using HPLC-ICP-MS accounted for on average 5% of total Se. The predominance of organic Se in the soils is supported by the positive correlations between total Se (aqua regia) and total soil organic matter content, and Se and organic C content in all the other extractions performed in this study. The amount of Se extracted followed the order of aqua regia > 1 M NaOCl (pH8) > 0.1 M NaOH>ammonium oxalate (pH3) > hot water>0.43 M HNO3 > 0.01 M CaCl2. None of these extractions selectively extracts only inorganic Se, and relative to other extractions 0.43 M HNO3 extraction contains the lowest fraction of organic Se, followed by ammonium oxalate extraction. In the 0.1M NaOH extraction, the hydrophobic neutral (HON) fraction of soil organic matter is richer in Se than in the hydrophilic (Hy) and humic acid (HA) fractions. The organic matter extracted in 0.01 M CaCl2 and hot water is in general richer in Se compared to the organic matter extracted in 0.1M NaOH, and other extractions (HNO3, ammonium oxalate, NaOCl, and aqua regia). Although the extractability of Se follows to a large extent the extractability of soil organic carbon, there is several time variations in the Se to organic C ratios, reflecting the changes in composition of organic matter extracted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Spatial variability of soil total and DTPA-extractable cadmium caused by long-term application of phosphate fertilizers, crop rotation, and soil characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarnejadi, A R; Sayyad, Gh; Homaee, M; Davamei, A H

    2013-05-01

    Increasing cadmium (Cd) accumulation in agricultural soils is undesirable due to its hazardous influences on human health. Thus, having more information on spatial variability of Cd and factors effective to increase its content on the cultivated soils is very important. Phosphate fertilizers are main contamination source of cadmium (Cd) in cultivated soils. Also, crop rotation is a critical management practice which can alter soil Cd content. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of long-term consumption of the phosphate fertilizers, crop rotations, and soil characteristics on spatial variability of two soil Cd species (i.e., total and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) extractable) in agricultural soils. The study was conducted in wheat farms of Khuzestan Province, Iran. Long-term (27-year period (1980 to 2006)) data including the rate and the type of phosphate fertilizers application, the respective area, and the rotation type of different regions were used. Afterwards, soil Cd content (total or DTPA extractable) and its spatial variability in study area (400,000 ha) were determined by sampling from soils of 255 fields. The results showed that the consumption rate of di-ammonium phosphate fertilizer have been varied enormously in the period study. The application rate of phosphorus fertilizers was very high in some subregions with have extensive agricultural activities (more than 95 kg/ha). The average and maximum contents of total Cd in the study region were obtained as 1.47 and 2.19 mg/kg and DTPA-extractable Cd as 0.084 and 0.35 mg/kg, respectively. The spatial variability of Cd indicated that total and DTPA-extractable Cd contents were over 0.8 and 0.1 mg/kg in 95 and 25 % of samples, respectively. The spherical model enjoys the best fitting and lowest error rate to appraise the Cd content. Comparing the phosphate fertilizer consumption rate with spatial variability of the soil cadmium (both total and DTPA extractable) revealed the high

  18. Reproductive response to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization along the Hawaiian archipelago's natural soil fertility gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiManno, Nicole M; Ostertag, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are the most important nutrients involved in plant reproduction and typically the most limiting in terrestrial ecosystems. The natural soil fertility gradient of the Hawaiian archipelago, in which younger islands are N limited and older islands are P limited, provides a model system to examine questions regarding allocation of nutrients. Using fertilized plots (+N or +P) at the extreme sites of the Hawaiian archipelago, vegetative productivity (e.g., net primary productivity, growth, and litterfall) and foliar nutrient responses have previously been studied for the dominant canopy tree, Metrosideros polymorpha. Here, we investigated whether the reproductive response of M. polymorpha mirrors the previously found vegetative productivity and foliar nutrient responses, by quantifying: (1) inflorescence and seed productivity, and (2) nutrient concentration of reproductive structures. Fertilization with N and P did not significantly affect the productivity of inflorescences or seeds, or seed viability at either site. However, nutrient concentrations increased after fertilization; %P increased in inflorescences in the +P treatment at the P-limited site. Seeds and inflorescences generally contained higher nutrient concentrations than leaves at both sites. Unlike foliar data, reproductive strategies of M. polymorpha differed depending on soil nutrient limitation with emphasis on quality (higher seed viability/greater nutrient concentrations) at the P-limited site. We suggest that in response to P additions M. polymorpha employs a nutrient conservation strategy for its inflorescences and an investment strategy for its seeds. Examining N and P simultaneously challenges a basic assumption that reproductive allocation follows a similar pattern to the often measured aboveground productivity.

  19. Physiological responses of needles of Pinus massoniana elite families to phosphorus stress in acid soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE You-lan; LIU Ai-qin; Mulualem Tigabu; WUPeng-fei; MA Xiang-qing; WANG Chen; Per Christer Oden

    2013-01-01

    Pinus massoniana Lamb.is a major timber species widely planted in the South China,where the soil is acidic and deficient in phosphorus (P) due to fixation by aluminum and iron.Understanding the physiological responses to rhizospheric insoluble P is essential for enhancing plantation productivity.Thus,a sand culture experiment was conducted with four levels of P treatment (0,5,20 g insoluble P and 10 g soluble P),and 11 P.massoniana elite families.Physiological responses were measured after two months of stress.Compared to the normal soluble P treatment,the insoluble P treatment significantly reduced the proline content and the APase activity in the needles,while it significantly increased the catalase activity by 1.3-fold and malondialdehyde content by 1.2-fold.Soluble protein content was unaffected by the treatments,but chlorophyll content was significantly lower in P-deprived treatment compared with soluble and insoluble P treatments.These physiological responses also exhibited highly significant variation among families (p < 0.01).The findings suggest that increased catalase activities in the presence of insoluble P might be involved in the activation of an anti-oxidation defense mechanism that scavenges the reactive oxygen species elicited by the stress.And this response has a strong genetic control that can be exploited to identify desirable genotypes.

  20. Nutrient acquisition, soil phosphorus partitioning and competition among trees in a lowland tropical rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasto, Megan K; Osborne, Brooke B; Lekberg, Ylva; Asner, Gregory P; Balzotti, Christopher S; Porder, Stephen; Taylor, Philip G; Townsend, Alan R; Cleveland, Cory C

    2017-03-06

    We hypothesized that dinitrogen (N2 )- and non-N2 -fixing tropical trees would have distinct phosphorus (P) acquisition strategies allowing them to exploit different P sources, reducing competition. We measured root phosphatase activity and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization among two N2 - and two non-N2 -fixing seedlings, and grew them alone and in competition with different inorganic and organic P forms to assess potential P partitioning. We found an inverse relationship between root phosphatase activity and AM colonization in field-collected seedlings, indicative of a trade-off in P acquisition strategies. This correlated with the predominantly exploited P sources in the seedling experiment: the N2 fixer with high N2 fixation and root phosphatase activity grew best on organic P, whereas the poor N2 fixer and the two non-N2 fixers with high AM colonization grew best on inorganic P. When grown in competition, however, AM colonization, root phosphatase activity and N2 fixation increased in the N2 fixers, allowing them to outcompete the non-N2 fixers regardless of P source. Our results indicate that some tropical trees have the capacity to partition soil P, but this does not eliminate interspecific competition. Rather, enhanced P and N acquisition strategies may increase the competitive ability of N2 fixers relative to non-N2 fixers.

  1. Extraction of heavy metals from soils using biodegradable chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandy, Susan; Bossart, Karin; Mueller, Roland; Ritschel, Jens; Hauser, Lukas; Schulin, Rainer; Nowack, Bernd

    2004-02-01

    Metal pollution of soils is widespread across the globe, and the clean up of these soils is a difficulttask. One possible remediation technique is ex-situ soil washing using chelating agents. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a very effective chelating agent for this purpose but has the disadvantage that it is quite persistent in the environment due to its low biodegradability. The aim of our work was to investigate the biodegradable chelating agents [S,S]-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS), iminodisuccinic acid (IDSA), methylglycine diacetic acid (MGDA), and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as potential alternatives and compare them with EDTA for effectiveness. Kinetic experiments showed for all metals and soils that 24 h was the optimum extraction time. Longer times only gave minor additional benefits for heavy metal extraction but an unwanted increase in iron mobilization. For Cu at pH 7, the order of the extraction efficiency for equimolar ratios of chelating agent to metal was EDDS > NTA> IDSA > MGDA > EDTA and for Zn it was NTA > EDDS > EDTA >MGDA > IDSA. The comparatively low efficiency of EDTA resulted from competition between the heavy metals and co-extracted Ca. For Pb the order of extraction was EDTA > NTA >EDDS due to the much stronger complexation of Pb by EDTA compared to EDDS. At higher concentration of complexing agent, less difference between the agents was found and less pH dependence. There was an increase in heavy metal extraction with decreasing pH, but this was offset by an increase in Ca and Fe extraction. In sequential extractions EDDS extracted metals almost exclusively from the exchangeable, mobile, and Mn-oxide fractions. We conclude that the extraction with EDDS at pH 7 showed the best compromise between extraction efficiency for Cu, Zn, and Pb and loss of Ca and Fe from the soil.

  2. Phragmites australis + Typha latifolia Community Enhanced the Enrichment of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in the Soil of Qin Lake Wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Ge

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic plants play an essential role and are effective in mitigating lake eutrophication by forming complex plant-soil system and retaining total nitrogen (TN and phosphorus (TP in soils to ultimately reduce their quantities in aquatic systems. Two main vegetation types (Phragmites australis community and P. australis + Typha latifolia community of Qin Lake wetland were sampled in this study for the analysis of TN and TP contents and reserves in the wetland soils. The results showed that (1 the consumption effect of Qin Lake wetland on soluble N was much more significant than on soluble P. (2 The efficiency of TN enrichment in wetland soil was enhanced by vegetation covering of P. australis and T. latifolia. (3 Wetland soil P was consumed by P. australis community and this pattern was relieved with the introduction of T. latifolia. (4 According to the grey relativity analysis, the most intensive interaction between plants and soil occurred in summer. In addition, the exchange of N in soil-vegetation system primarily occurred in the 0–15 cm soil layer. Our results indicated that vegetation covering was essential to the enrichment of TN and TP, referring to the biology-related fixation in the wetland soil.

  3. Phragmites australis + Typha latifolia Community Enhanced the Enrichment of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in the Soil of Qin Lake Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhiwei; An, Ran; Fang, Shuiyuan; Lin, Pengpeng; Li, Chuan; Xue, Jianhui; Yu, Shuiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Aquatic plants play an essential role and are effective in mitigating lake eutrophication by forming complex plant-soil system and retaining total nitrogen (TN) and phosphorus (TP) in soils to ultimately reduce their quantities in aquatic systems. Two main vegetation types (Phragmites australis community and P. australis + Typha latifolia community) of Qin Lake wetland were sampled in this study for the analysis of TN and TP contents and reserves in the wetland soils. The results showed that (1) the consumption effect of Qin Lake wetland on soluble N was much more significant than on soluble P. (2) The efficiency of TN enrichment in wetland soil was enhanced by vegetation covering of P. australis and T. latifolia. (3) Wetland soil P was consumed by P. australis community and this pattern was relieved with the introduction of T. latifolia. (4) According to the grey relativity analysis, the most intensive interaction between plants and soil occurred in summer. In addition, the exchange of N in soil-vegetation system primarily occurred in the 0-15 cm soil layer. Our results indicated that vegetation covering was essential to the enrichment of TN and TP, referring to the biology-related fixation in the wetland soil.

  4. Phragmites australis + Typha latifolia Community Enhanced the Enrichment of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in the Soil of Qin Lake Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Fang, Shuiyuan; Lin, Pengpeng; Xue, Jianhui; Yu, Shuiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Aquatic plants play an essential role and are effective in mitigating lake eutrophication by forming complex plant-soil system and retaining total nitrogen (TN) and phosphorus (TP) in soils to ultimately reduce their quantities in aquatic systems. Two main vegetation types (Phragmites australis community and P. australis + Typha latifolia community) of Qin Lake wetland were sampled in this study for the analysis of TN and TP contents and reserves in the wetland soils. The results showed that (1) the consumption effect of Qin Lake wetland on soluble N was much more significant than on soluble P. (2) The efficiency of TN enrichment in wetland soil was enhanced by vegetation covering of P. australis and T. latifolia. (3) Wetland soil P was consumed by P. australis community and this pattern was relieved with the introduction of T. latifolia. (4) According to the grey relativity analysis, the most intensive interaction between plants and soil occurred in summer. In addition, the exchange of N in soil-vegetation system primarily occurred in the 0–15 cm soil layer. Our results indicated that vegetation covering was essential to the enrichment of TN and TP, referring to the biology-related fixation in the wetland soil.

  5. Extracting Quantitative Data from Lunar Soil Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.; Hiroi, T.

    2005-01-01

    Using the modified Gaussian model (MGM) developed by Sunshine et al. [1] we compared the spectral properties of the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) suite of lunar soils [2,3] with their petrologic and chemical compositions to obtain quantitative data. Our initial work on Apollo 17 soils [4] suggested that useful compositional data could be elicited from high quality soil spectra. We are now able to expand upon those results with the full suite of LSCC soils that allows us to explore a much wider range of compositions and maturity states. The model is shown to be sensitive to pyroxene abundance and can evaluate the relative portion of high-Ca and low-Ca pyroxenes in the soils. In addition, the dataset has provided unexpected insights into the nature and causes of absorption bands in lunar soils. For example, it was found that two distinct absorption bands are required in the 1.2 m region of the spectrum. Neither of these bands can be attributed to plagioclase or agglutinates, but both appear to be largely due to pyroxene.

  6. Soil phosphorus fractionation as a tool for monitoring dust phosphorus signature underneath a Blue Pine (Pinus wallichiana canopy in a Temperate Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa-Nawaz Shafqat

    2016-12-01

    the cycling of P in temperate forest in Himalaya region. Keywords: soil phosphorus fractions; atmospheric dust; stemflow, throughfall; temperate forest.

  7. Spatiotemporal dynamics of phosphorus release, oxygen consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after localised soil amendment with organic fertilisers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christel, Wibke; Zhu, Kun; Hoefer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Organic fertilisation inevitably leads to heterogeneous distribution of organic matter and nutrients in soil, i.e. due to uneven surface spreading or inhomogeneous incorporation. The resulting localised hotspots of nutrient application will induce various biotic and abiotic nutrient turnover...... processes and fixation in the residue sphere, giving rise to distinct differences in nutrient availability, soil oxygen content and greenhouse gas (GHG) production. In this study we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of the reaction of manure solids and manure solids char with soil, focusing...... on their phosphorus (P) availability, as current emphasis on improving societal P efficiency through recycling waste or bio-based fertilisers necessitates a sound understanding of their behaviour. Soil layers amended at a constant P application rate with either pig manure solids or char made from pig manure solids...

  8. Fósforo extraído pela solução de Mehlich-1 determinado por colorimetria e ICP em solos do Sul do Brasil Phosphorus extracted with Mehlich-1 determined by colorimetric and ICP methods in South Brazilian soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Bortolon

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A adoção do ICP para análise de fósforo tem apresentado controvérsias, pois o valor determinado por essa técnica, muitas vezes, não é comparável com o obtido por colorimetria. Nos EUA, alguns laboratórios apresentam restrições à adoção dessa técnica, pelas seguintes razões: as recomendações de adubação em uso foram desenvolvidas empregando-se o método colorimétrico para a determinação do P; e as diferenças significativas têm sido obtidas entre os teores determinados por colorimetria e por ICP, pois, devido à alta temperatura do plasma, o ICP mede outras formas de P além do ortofosfato, atribuída ao P orgânico na solução. Este estudo teve por objetivo comparar os teores de P extraído do solo pela solução de Mehlich-1, determinado por colorimetria (COL e por ICP, em 595 amostras de solos do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, com amplas variações nas características físicas, químicas e mineralógicas. Os teores de P extraído, determinado por ICP e por COL, não diferiram estatisticamente (r = 0,94; p The adoption of ICP technique to determine P in soil testing has been questioned, due the values determined with this technique is not comparable that those determined with colorimetric method. In the USA, some laboratories are restricted to adopt the ICP technique due the follow reasons: the nutrient recommendations to plants were developed for colorimetric method for P determination; significantly differences have been obtained between P determined with colorimetric and ICP techniques, because the high plasma temperature can measure other P forms besides orthophosphate, attributed to organic P in solution. This study compared the P amounts extracted by Mehlich-1 solution and determined by COL and ICP techniques, in 595 soil samples from the state of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil with s wide range of soil physic, chemistry and mineralogic properties. The P amounts determined by ICP and COL did not differ statistically

  9. Residual soil DNA extraction increases the discriminatory power between samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jennifer M; Weyrich, Laura S; Clarke, Laurence J; Cooper, Alan

    2015-06-01

    Forensic soil analysis relies on capturing an accurate and reproducible representation of the diversity from limited quantities of soil; however, inefficient DNA extraction can markedly alter the taxonomic abundance. The performance of a standard commercial DNA extraction kit (MOBIO PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit) and three modified protocols of this kit: soil pellet re-extraction (RE); an additional 24-h lysis incubation step at room temperature (RT); and 24-h lysis incubation step at 55°C (55) were compared using high-throughput sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer I ribosomal DNA. DNA yield was not correlated with fungal diversity and the four DNA extraction methods displayed distinct fungal community profiles for individual samples, with some phyla detected exclusively using the modified methods. Application of a 24 h lysis step will provide a more complete inventory of fungal biodiversity, and re-extraction of the residual soil pellet offers a novel tool for increasing discriminatory power between forensic soil samples.

  10. Selective dissolution followed by EDDS washing of an e-waste contaminated soil: Extraction efficiency, fate of residual metals, and impact on soil environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiyuan, Jingzi; Tsang, Daniel C W; Valix, Marjorie; Zhang, Weihua; Yang, Xin; Ok, Yong Sik; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-01-01

    To enhance extraction of strongly bound metals from oxide minerals and organic matter, this study examined the sequential use of reductants, oxidants, alkaline solvents and organic acids followed by a biodegradable chelating agent (EDDS, [S,S]-ethylene-diamine-disuccinic-acid) in a two-stage soil washing. The soil was contaminated by Cu, Zn, and Pb at an e-waste recycling site in Qingyuan city, China. In addition to extraction efficiency, this study also examined the fate of residual metals (e.g., leachability, bioaccessibility, and distribution) and the soil quality parameters (i.e., cytotoxicity, enzyme activities, and available nutrients). The reductants (dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate and hydroxylamine hydrochloride) effectively extracted metals by mineral dissolution, but elevated the leachability and bioaccessibility of metals due to the transformation from Fe/Mn oxides to labile fractions. Subsequent EDDS washing was found necessary to mitigate the residual risks. In comparison, prior washing by oxidants (persulphate, hypochlorite, and hydrogen peroxide) was marginally useful because of limited amount of soil organic matter. Prior washing by alkaline solvents (sodium hydroxide and sodium bicarbonate) was also ineffective due to metal precipitation. In contrast, prior washing by low-molecular-weight organic acids (citrate and oxalate) improved the extraction efficiency. Compared to hydroxylamine hydrochloride, citrate and oxalate induced lower cytotoxicity (Microtox) and allowed higher enzyme activities (dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, and urease) and soil nutrients (available nitrogen and phosphorus), which would facilitate reuse of the treated soil. Therefore, while sequential washing proved to enhance extraction efficacy, the selection of chemical agents besides EDDS should also include the consideration of effects on metal leachability/bioaccessibility and soil quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Runoff, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses from purple slope cropland soil under rating fertilization in Three Gorges Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouraima, Abdel-Kabirou; He, Binghui; Tian, Taiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Soil erosion along with soil particles and nutrients losses is detrimental to crop production. We carried out a 5-year (2010 to 2014) study to characterize the soil erosion and nitrogen and phosphorus losses caused by rainfall under different fertilizer application levels in order to provide a theoretical evidence for the agricultural production and coordinate land management to improve ecological environment. The experiment took place under rotation cropping, winter wheat-summer maize, on a 15° slope purple soil in Chongqing (China) within the Three Gorges Region (TGR). Four treatments, control (CK) without fertilizer, combined manure with chemical fertilizer (T1), chemical fertilization (T2), and chemical fertilizer with increasing fertilization (T3), were designed on experimental runoff plots for a long-term observation aiming to study their effects on soil erosion and nutrients losses. The results showed that fertilization reduced surface runoff and nutrient losses as compared to CK. T1, T2, and T3, compared to CK, reduced runoff volume by 35.7, 29.6, and 16.8 %, respectively and sediment yield by 40.5, 20.9, and 49.6 %, respectively. Regression analysis results indicated that there were significant relationships between soil loss and runoff volume in all treatments. The combined manure with chemical fertilizer (T1) treatment highly reduced total nitrogen and total phosphorus losses by 41.2 and 33.33 %, respectively as compared with CK. Through this 5-year experiment, we can conclude that, on the sloping purple soil, the combined application of manure with fertilizer is beneficial for controlling runoff sediments losses and preventing soil erosion.

  12. PAH desorption from river floodplain soils using supercritical fluid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Cajthaml, Tomás; Hofmann, Thilo

    2008-12-01

    Sequential supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was performed in order to estimate desorption of PAHs from river floodplain soils which contain coal and coal-derived particles. Original soils, soils' light fractions (rhoextractable contaminants ranged from decades for 2-4-ring PAHs and hundreds of years for 5-6-ring PAHs. We demonstrate that, despite high soil PAH concentrations which are due to coal and coal-derived particles, the general environmental risk is reduced by the very slow and extremely slow desorption rates.

  13. Transgenic barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) expressing the wheat aluminium resistance gene (TaALMT1) shows enhanced phosphorus nutrition and grain production when grown on an acid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhaize, Emmanuel; Taylor, Phillip; Hocking, Peter J; Simpson, Richard J; Ryan, Peter R; Richardson, Alan E

    2009-06-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), genetically modified with the Al(3+) resistance gene of wheat (TaALMT1), was compared with a non-transformed sibling line when grown on an acidic and highly phosphate-fixing ferrosol supplied with a range of phosphorus concentrations. In short-term pot trials (26 days), transgenic barley expressing TaALMT1 (GP-ALMT1) was more efficient than a non-transformed sibling line (GP) at taking up phosphorus on acid soil, but the genotypes did not differ when the soil was limed. Differences in phosphorus uptake efficiency on acid soil could be attributed not only to the differential effects of aluminium toxicity on root growth between the genotypes, but also to differences in phosphorus uptake per unit root length. Although GP-ALMT1 out-performed GP on acid soil, it was still not as efficient at taking up phosphorus as plants grown on limed soil. GP-ALMT1 plants grown in acid soil possessed substantially smaller rhizosheaths than those grown in limed soil, suggesting that root hairs were shorter. This is a probable reason for the lower phosphorus uptake efficiency. When grown to maturity in large pots, GP-ALMT1 plants produced more than twice the grain as GP plants grown on acid soil and 80% of the grain produced by limed controls. Expression of TaALMT1 in barley was not associated with a penalty in either total shoot or grain production in the absence of Al(3+), with both genotypes showing equivalent yields in limed soil. These findings demonstrate that an important crop species can be genetically engineered to successfully increase grain production on an acid soil.

  14. Experimental PCR Data on Soil DNA Extracts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bacillus species and B. anthracis presence/absence data were determined in 4,770 soil samples collected across the contiguous United States, in cooperation with the...

  15. Experimental PCR Data on Soil DNA Extracts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bacillus species and B. anthracis presence/absence data were determined in 4,770 soil samples collected across the contiguous United States, in cooperation with the...

  16. Estimating the extractability of potentially toxic metals in urban soils: A comparison of several extracting solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrid, F. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Reinoso, R. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Florido, M.C. [Departamento de Cristalografia, Mineralogia y Quimica Agricola, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes, s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Diaz Barrientos, E. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Ajmone-Marsan, F. [DI.VA.P.R.A., Chimica Agraria, Universita di Torino, Via Leonardo da Vinci, 44, 10095 Grugliasco, Torino (Italy); Davidson, C.M. [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G1 1XL, Scotland (United Kingdom); Madrid, L. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: madrid@irnase.csic.es

    2007-06-15

    Metals released by the extraction with aqua regia, EDTA, dilute HCl and sequential extraction (SE) by the BCR protocol were studied in urban soils of Sevilla, Torino, and Glasgow. By multivariate analysis, the amounts of Cu, Pb and Zn liberated by any method were statistically associated with one another, whereas other metals were not. The mean amounts of all metals extracted by HCl and by SE were well correlated, but SE was clearly underestimated by HCl. Individual data for Cu, Pb and Zn by both methods were correlated only if each city was considered separately. Other metals gave poorer relationships. Similar conclusions were reached comparing EDTA and HCl, with much lower values for EDTA. Dilute HCl extraction cannot thus be recommended for general use as alternative to BCR SE in urban soils. - Dilute HCl extraction is tested as an alternative to the BCR sequential extraction in urban soils.

  17. Phosphorus dynamics in Swedish agricultural soils as influenced by fertilization and mineralogical properties: Insights gained from batch experiments and XANES spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Ann Kristin; Hesterberg, Dean; Klysubun, Wantana; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2016-10-01

    The soil chemistry of phosphorus (P) is important for understanding the processes governing plant availability as well as the risk of environmental losses of P. The objective of this research was to investigate both the speciation and the pH-dependent solubility patterns of P in clayey agricultural soils in relation to soil mineralogy and fertilization history. The study focused on soil samples from six fields that were subjected to different P fertilization regimes for periods of 45 to 57years. Soil P speciation was analyzed by P K-edge XANES spectroscopy and chemical fractionation, sorption isotherms were constructed, and dissolved P was measured as a function of pH. The XANES fitting results showed that organic P and P adsorbed to Fe and Al (hydr)oxides were common P constituents in all soils. Calcium phosphates were identified in five of six soil samples. The XANES results also indicated an increase in P adsorbed to Al and to a lesser extent Fe (hydr)oxides as a result of fertilization. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity from the P K-edge XANES analysis was most strongly correlated with HCl-digestible P (r=0.81***). Consistent with the XANES analysis, laboratory sorption isotherm models showed that the Freundlich sorption coefficient (KF) was most closely related to oxalate-extractable Al. Greater proportions of Ca phosphate in two of the heavily fertilized soils in combination with enhanced PO4 solubilization upon sample acidification indicated neoformation of Ca-phosphate precipitates. The results for the unfertilized soil samples generally showed a minimum in dissolved PO4 between pH6.5 and 7.5, with increases particularly at lower pH. This behavior can be explained either by the dissolution of Al-hydroxide-type sorbents or Ca phosphates at lower pH. In fertilized soils, there was no consistent trend in pH-dependent solubilization of P, with a complex relationship to solid-phase speciation. To conclude, inorganic P species changed most dynamically in

  18. The degree of phosphorus saturation of agricultural soils in Germany: Current and future risk of diffuse P loss and implications for soil P management in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, P; Pöthig, R; Venohr, M

    2017-12-01

    Decades of intensive agricultural production with excessive application of P fertilizer have resulted in the accumulation of P in soils, threatening water bodies in most industrialized countries with eutrophication. In our study, we elucidated the risk of P loss of German agricultural soils by transforming provided monitoring data of plant-available P determined by the calcium-acetate-lactate (PCAL) and double-lactate method (PDL) into the degree of phosphorus saturation (DPS). As water-soluble phosphorus (WSP) is correlated to DPS, we derived a pedotransfer function (PTF) between PCAL and WSP for different soil types. Considering all soils together resulted in WSP=0.1918×PCAL (R(2)=0.80, n=54). Subsequently, risk parameters DPS and EPC0 were calculated from PCAL and PDL monitoring data (n>337,000) by using the determined PTF and soil type-independent correlations with WSP, as published in an earlier study. Calculated DPS values from monitoring data indicated high risks of dissolved P loss for >76% of German arable soils. Recent suggestions by the Association of German Agricultural Analytical and Research Institutes (VDLUFA) to reduce recommended PCAL levels are crucial for the reduction of P loss risks in the future. The accuracy of predicted DPS and EPC0 values by CAL and other methods used in Europe to estimate plant-available P is limited by the soil type-dependency of these methods. Consequently, we recommend considering WSP as an agri-environmental soil P test across Europe. Our results indicate that a WSP level in soils can be defined that constitutes a reasonable compromise between the securing of agronomic production and the fulfillment of environmental goals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of crop rotation and management system on water-extractable organic matter concentration, structure, and bioavailability in a chernozemic agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Na; Wilson, Henry F; Saiers, James E; Entz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) in soil affects contaminant mobility and toxicity, heterotrophic production, and nutrient cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This study focuses on the influences of land use history and agricultural management practices on the water extractability of organic matter and nutrients from soils. Water-extractable organic matter was extracted from soils under different crop rotations (an annual rotation of wheat-pea/bean-wheat-flax or a perennial-based rotation of wheat-alfalfa-alfalfa-flax) and management systems (organic or conventional) and examined for its concentration, composition, and biodegradability. The results show that crop rotations including perennial legumes increased the concentration of water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) and water-extractable organic nitrogen (WEON) and the biodegradability of WEOC in soil but depleted the quantity of water-extractable organic phosphorus (WEOP) and water-extractable reactive phosphorus. The 30-d incubation experiments showed that bioavailable WEOC varied from 12.5% in annual systems to 22% for perennial systems. The value of bioavailable WEOC was found to positively correlate with WEON concentrations and to negatively correlate with C:N ratio and the specific ultraviolet absorbance of WEOM. No significant treatment effect was present with the conventional and organic management practices, which suggested that WEOM, as the relatively labile pool in soil organic matter, is more responsive to the change in crop rotation than to mineral fertilizer application. Our results indicated that agricultural landscapes with contrasting crop rotations are likely to differentially affect rates of microbial cycling of organic matter leached to soil waters. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  20. The role of phosphorus, magnesium and potassium availability in soil fungal exploration of mineral nutrient sources in Norway spruce forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, Nicholas P; Berner, Christoffer; Smits, Mark M; Krám, Pavel; Wallander, Håkan

    2016-07-01

    We investigated fungal growth and community composition in buried meshbags, amended with apatite, biotite or hornblende, in Norway spruce (Picea abies) forests of varying nutrient status. Norway spruce needles and soil collected from forests overlying serpentinite had low levels of potassium and phosphorus, those from granite had low levels of magnesium, whereas those from amphibolite had comparably high levels of these nutrients. We assayed the fungal colonization of meshbags by measuring ergosterol content and fungal community with 454 sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region. In addition, we measured fine root density. Fungal biomass was increased by apatite amendment across all plots and particularly on the K- and P-deficient serpentinite plots, whereas hornblende and biotite had no effect on fungal biomass on any plots. Fungal community (total fungal and ectomycorrhizal) composition was affected strongly by sampling location and soil depth, whereas mineral amendments had no effect on community composition. Fine root biomass was significantly correlated with fungal biomass. Ectomycorrhizal communities may respond to increased host-tree phosphorus demand by increased colonization of phosphorus-containing minerals, but this does not appear to translate to a shift in ectomycorrhizal community composition. This growth response to nutrient demand does not appear to exist for potassium or magnesium limitation.

  1. Phosphorus forms and mineralization potentials of Alabama upland cotton production soils amended with poultry litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    The essential role of phosphorus (P) in almost all biological processes has led to its extensive studies. Phosphorus in its inorganic form (Pi) is required for metabolic reactions and energy transfer. In contrast, organic P (Po) forms become bioavailable usually after hydrolysis to Pi. Organic P dep...

  2. Determination of the Most Important Soil Parameters Affecting the Availability of Phosphorus in Sistan Plain, Using Connection Weight Method in Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phosphorus is important as an essential element in the production of agricultural products. On the other hand, its ability to induce essential micronutrient deficiency and its negative effects on the environment, have attracted more attention to this element. The knowledge of phosphorus availability conditions in the soil and consequently the accurate management of fertilizer consumption has a key role in the environmental protection. The degree of phosphorus absorption in the soil depends on the environmental factors, soil characteristics and compositions, and phosphorus fertilizer which have been used. The amount of available phosphorus in the soil has relationship with some of the physical and chemical properties of the soil. Since, the soil characteristics are important factors in the reaction of phosphorus in the soil, the present study aimed to investigate and determine the most important soil characteristics affecting the availability of phosphorus using regression and artificial neural network techniques, in the soils of Sistan plain. Materials and Methods: Soil sampling was done in 1.5×1.5 km intervals, from 0-30 cm depth, and 200 soil samples were taken. The amounts of available phosphorus and the soil properties including the percentages of clay , organic matter, calcium carbonate and the amount of pH were measured. Then, stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to determine linear relation between available phosphorus and the soil properties. In order to model and validate the regression model, respectively 80 and 20% of data were selected and entered into SPSS software. To train the neural network, multilayer perceptron (MLP network was used by MATLAB 7.6 package. In this type of network, 70% of data is selected for training, 15% for validation and 15% for testing the model. Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and hyperbolic tangent (as a transfer function were used to train the network. The numbers of

  3. The combined effect of fertiliser nitrogen and phosphorus on herbage yield and change in soil nutrients of a grass/clover and grass-only sward

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schils, R.L.M.; Snijders, P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The combined effect of reduced nitrogen ( N ) and phosphorus ( P ) application on the production of grass- only and grass/ clover swards was studied in a five- year cutting experiment on a marine clay soil, established on newly sown swards. Furthermore, changes in soil N, P and carbon ( C ) were

  4. Phosphorus absorption by of corn hybrids grown in savana soils; Absorcao de fosforo por hibridos de milho cultivados em solo de cerrado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Cristiano [Fazenda Amazonas, Serra Azul, SP (Brazil); Muraoka, Takashi [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2002-12-01

    In the past years the savana region has been one of the main agricultural expansion areas, however their soils present high limitation for plant growth due their high acidity, low natural fertility, and low phosphorus availability. The objective of this work was to compare 30 of the main recommended maize (Zea mays L.) hybrids for the cerrado region in relation to their ability to absorb poorly-available soil phosphorus through the {sup 32}P isotopic dilution technique, using a Typic Dystrarox cultivated for 20 years and another under natural vegetation. Differences in absorption ability were observed among hybrids, seven classified as efficient, sixteen mildly efficient and seven inefficient, for the case of soil cultivated for 20 years. The plant growth and phosphorus concentration in the natural soil was lower due to its low fertility. (author)

  5. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  6. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  7. Metal Concentrations in Soil Paste Extracts as Affected by Extraction Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip M.G. Tack

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Saturated paste extracts are sometimes used to estimate metal levels in the soil solution. To assess the significance of heavy-metal concentrations measured in saturation extracts, soil paste extracts were prepared with distilled water in amounts ranging from 60–200% of the moisture content at saturation. Trace metals behaved as if a small pool consistently was dissolved independent of the extraction ratio applied. Metal concentrations in the solution hence were not buffered by the solid phase, but the observed behaviour would allow the estimation of metal concentrations in the soil solution as a function of moisture content. The behaviour of iron and manganese suggested that some microbial reduction occurred. The intensity increased with increasing extraction ratio but not to the extent of affecting dissolution of trace elements.

  8. Remediation of Contaminated Soils By Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, A.; Zanetti, M. C.; Banchero, M.; Fiore, S.; Manna, L.

    The contaminants that can be found in soils are many, inorganic, like heavy metals, as well as organic. Among the organic contaminants, oil and coal refineries are responsi- ble for several cases of soil contamination with PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocar- bons). Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have toxic, carcinogenic and mu- tagenic effects. Limits have been set on the concentration of most contaminants, and growing concern is focusing on soil contamination issues. USA regulations set the maximum acceptable level of contamination by PAHs equal to 40 ppm at residential sites and 270 ppm at industrial sites. Stricter values are usually adopted in European Countries. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction is a possible alternative technology to remove volatile organic compounds from contaminated soils. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) offers many advantages over conventional solvent extraction. Super- critical fluids combine gaseous properties as a high diffusion coefficient, and liquid properties as a high solvent power. The solvent power is strongly pressure-dependent near supercritical conditions: selective extractions are possible without changing the solvent. Solute can be separate from the solvent depressurising the system; therefore, it is possible to recycle the solvent and recover the contaminant. Carbon dioxide is frequently used as supercritical fluid, because it has moderate critical conditions, it is inert and available in pure form. In this work, supercritical fluid extraction technology has been used to remove a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon from contaminated soils. The contaminant choice for the experiment has been naphthalene since several data are available in literature. G. A. Montero et al. [1] studied soil remediation with supercrit- ical carbon dioxide extraction technology; these Authors have found that there was a mass-transfer limitation. In the extraction vessel, the mass transfer coefficient in- creases with the

  9. Accumulation and translocation of sparingly soluble manure phosphorus in different types of soils after long-term excessive inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. UUSITALO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available When phosphorus (P is applied to soils in excess of plant P demand, P accumulation takes place. By means of P fractionation, we studied the fate of P in 35 soils that had received long-term surplus P rates as fox and mink manure P (F&MM-P, considered as a sparingly soluble P source. We compared these data with those from the same soils under a more typical P management, i.e., fields amended with soluble P sources superphosphate and dairy manure (SP+DM. Fractionation of manures according to the Hedley procedure suggested limited solubility of F&MM-P, two-thirds of the F&MM-P being soluble in acid (HCl only. In mineral soils, surplus F&MM-P accumulated for the most part as HCl-P (poorly available, whereas in organic soils accumulation occurred largely as NaOH-soluble (moderately available and labile P. Translocation of F&MM-P was evidenced by P fractionation and by agronomic P test: subsurface soil of F&MM-amended fields contained more P than the same soils in fields amended with SP+DM. In the 35 soils that had received surplus F&MM-P, agronomic P status was classified as “excessive” in 90% of the samples taken from the plough layer, in 75% of those from 20–40 cm depth, and in 50% of those from 40–60 cm depth. In the reference soils amended with SP+DM, “excessive” P status was recorded for 23% of the plough layer samples and 4% of the subsurface samples. These results show that manure P which appears as sparingly soluble in P fractionation may in a longer term increase the content of labile soil P and translocate in the soil profile when applied in high rates.;

  10. [Research on mineralization process of organic phosphorus in black soil in Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shaohua; Yu, Wantai; Zhang, Lu; Shen, Shanmin

    2005-10-01

    Buried bag and incubation experiments were conducted to study mineralization process of organic phosphorus in black soil in Northeast China under different time sequences. The results showed that both the content and mineralized velocity of organic P decreased gradually as time went on, the cumulative mineralized rate increased step by step, whether it was used by the method of incubation or buried bag. Under incubation, two treatments' mineralized velocity reached the maximum at first month (31.67, 38.75 mg x kg(-1) x month(-1), respectively), and their cumulative mineralized rate and mineralized velocity at six months were 7.94%, 13.26 mg x kg(-1) x month(-1) and 9.24%, 17.99 mg x kg(-1) x month(-1), respectively. Under buried bag, the mineralized velocity of five treatments all reached the maximum at first year (55.67, 55.65, 49.60, 19.71, 22.52 mg x kg(-1) month(-1), respectively), and the cumulative mineralized rate and mineralized velocity of maize root and wheat root treatments at three years both were approximately 50% and 35 mg x kg(-1) x month(-1), which were higher than those under soybean root andgrass root treatments. From two methods of studies on the mineralization process of organic P, it could be seen that the original content of organic P influenced its mineralized rate and mineralized velocity: the higher of the original content of organic P, the higher of its mineralized rate and mineralized velocity.

  11. Long-term diffuse phosphorus pollution dynamics under the combined influence of land use and soil property variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haobo; Ouyang, Wei; Wu, Haotian; Liu, Hongbin; Andrea, Critto

    2017-02-01

    Analyses of the spatial-temporal distribution of diffuse pollution in agricultural regions are essential to the sustained management of water resources. Although nutrients, such as phosphorus fertilizers, can promote crop growth while improving soil fertility, excessive nutrient inputs can produce diffuse pollution, which may results in water quality degradation. The objective of this paper is to employ the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) to estimate diffuse P effects on temporal and spatial distributions for a typical agricultural watershed and to identify the conjunct and independent influences of long-term land use and soil properties variation on diffuse P. With the validated model, the four-period simulation results (from 1979 to 2009) indicate that land use changes from agricultural development increased diffuse P yields. However, regarding updated soil properties, no significant differences of P yield were found between 1979 and 2009, demonstrating that impact of the cropland expansion were naturalized with soil property variations. An F-test was employed to assess the essentiality of all of the variables examined during the simulation period, and the test results indicated that diffuse P loading was more sensitive to soil properties than to land use. Before the P pollution control project about the land use optimization planning, it is more effective to distinguish the impacts of land use and soil properties.

  12. Effects of phosphorus addition on soil microbial biomass and community composition in three forest types in tropical China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Tao;

    2012-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition in humid tropical regions may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forest on old weathered soil found in these regions. From January 2007 to August 2009, we studied the responses of soil microbial biomass and community composition to P addition (in two monthly...... portions at level of 15 g P m-2 yr-1) in three tropical forests in southern China. The forests were an old-growth forest and two disturbed forests (mixed species and pine dominated). The objective was to test the hypothesis that P addition would increase microbial biomass and change the composition...... of the microbial community, and that the old-growth forests would be more sensitive to P addition due to its higher soil N availability. Microbial biomass C (MBC) was estimated twice a year and the microbial community structure was quantified by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis at the end of the experiment...

  13. Influence of pH on hydrothermal treatment of swine manure: Impact on extraction of nitrogen and phosphorus in process water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpo, U; Ross, A B; Camargo-Valero, M A; Fletcher, L A

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the influence of pH on extraction of nitrogen and phosphorus from swine manure following hydrothermal treatment. Conditions include thermal hydrolysis (TH) at 120°C and 170°C, and hydrothermal carbonisation (HTC) at 200°C and 250°C in either water alone or in the presence of 0.1M NaOH, H2SO4, CH3COOH or HCOOH. Phosphorus extraction is pH and temperature dependent and is enhanced under acidic conditions. The highest level of phosphorus is extracted using H2SO4 reaching 94% at 170°C. The phosphorus is largely retained in the residue for all other conditions. The extraction of nitrogen is not as significantly influenced by pH, although the maximum N extraction is achieved using H2SO4. A significant level of organic-N is extracted into the process waters following hydrothermal treatment. The results indicate that operating hydrothermal treatment in the presence of acidic additives has benefits in terms of improving the extraction of phosphorus and nitrogen.

  14. Disponibilidade de cádmio e chumbo para milho em solo adubado com fertilizantes fosfatados Cadmium and lead availability to corn in soil amended with phosphorus fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriberto Vagner de Souza Freitas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fertilizantes fosfatados são utilizados intensamente na agricultura, pois a baixa disponibilidade de P frequentemente limita o rendimento das culturas nas condições brasileiras. Esses fertilizantes, entretanto, constituem uma via de entrada de metais pesados no solo. Este trabalho objetivou avaliar o potencial de contaminação do solo por Cd e Pb adicionados por diferentes fertilizantes fosfatados, bem como a absorção destes por plantas de milho. Foram aplicadas cinco doses de diferentes fontes de P: superfosfato simples, superfosfato triplo, fosfato de Araxá, termofosfato de Yoorin e fosfato natural de Gafsa. As doses de P equivaleram a 0, 100, 300, 500 e 800 kg ha-1 de P2O5. Dois cultivos sucessivos com milho foram conduzidos no solo. O fosfato natural de Gafsa apresentou os maiores teores de Cd e Pb. Entre os fertilizantes acidulados, o superfosfato simples apresentou maior teor de Cd e Pb, e o termofosfato, maior concentração de Pb do que os acidulados. A aplicação de fosfato de Gafsa proporcionou as maiores concentrações de Pb na parte aérea do milho no primeiro cultivo. Este fosfato também foi responsável pelo maior teor de Cd nas plantas no segundo cultivo. O ácido cítrico foi mais eficiente em prever os teores disponíveis de Cd, enquanto o DTPA estimou melhor os teores de Pb.Phosphorus fertilizers are intensively used in Brazil, since the low availability of phosphorus often limits yields in tropical soils. However, these fertilizers can be a entranceway for soil contamination with heavy metals. This study was carried out to investigate heavy metal contamination caused by the application of five different phosphorus fertilizers as well as the metal uptake by corn (Zea mays plants. The fertilizers simple superphosphate, triple superphosphate, Araxá rock phosphate, Yoorin thermophosphate, and Gafsa rock phosphate were applied at rates of 0, 100, 300, 500 and 800 kg ha-1 P2O5 in two successive corn cycles. The highest Cd

  15. Resistive heating enhanced soil vapor extraction of chlorinated solvents from trichloroethylene contaminated silty, low permeable soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zutphen, M. van; Heron, G.; Enfield, C.G.; Christensen, T.H.

    1998-01-01

    A 2D-laboratory box experiment (12 x 56 x 116 cm) was conducted to simulate the enhancement of soil vapor extraction by the application of low frequency electrical heating Uoule heating) for the remediation of a low permeable, silty soil contaminated with trichloroethylene. Joule heating enlarged th

  16. Some extractable iron contents as influenced by some organic manures application in the soils of Lake Geriyo, Adamawa state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddiq Abdullahi Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic manures are safer sources of plant nutrients and a good source of micronutrients therefore; pot experiments were carried out to estimate some extractable iron contents as influenced by organic manure application in the soils of Lake Geriyo, Adamawa state, Nigeria. Two types of organic manures; poultry droppings, cow dung and control were used for the experiment. Three levels of organic manures; 5, 10 and 15 tons per hectare (ton ha-1 and three sampling time (30, 60 and 90 DAS were laid down in a completely randomized (CRD design replicated three times. Results obtained revealed that rate, type of organic manures and time of submergence significantly (P ≤ 0.05 changed Fe content in the soil. Mean extractable iron concentrations of 42.01, 56.13 and 24.63 mgkg-1 were recorded for ammonium oxalate extractable iron, Citrate Bicarbonate Dithionite extractable iron and sodium pyrophosphate extractable iron in the first experiment while 45.81, 59.29 and 28.89 mgkg-1 were recorded for the second experiment respectively. However, CBD which extracts both amorphous and crystalline Fe recorded the highest Fe contents throughout the treatments with poultry droppings applied pots recording superior values than that of cowdung manure. similarly, higher values of oxa-Fe and Pyro-Fe were recorded in both manures compared to the control. In conclusion poultry droppings may result in iron accumulation and toxicity hence should be used with caution in the soil of Lake Geriyo and similar soils to avoid serious soil reduction leading to iron toxicity and soil phosphorus antagonism.

  17. Aggregate structure and carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in native and cultivated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Metadata only record This study evaluates the impact of cultivation on soil organic matter loss in North American grassland soils by measuring numerous aggregate- and nutrient-related soil indicators. Macroaggregates were more stable in native soil than in cultivated soil. In both soils, more C, N, and P were present in macroaggregates than in microaggregates.

  18. The applicability of Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) to extract lipid biomarkers from soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Jansen; K.G.J. Nierop; M.C. Kotte; P. de Voogt; J.M. Verstraten

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the ability of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) to extract selected lipid biomarkers (C-19=C-34 n-alkanes, n-alcohols and n-fatty acids as well as dehydroabietic acid and P-sitosterol) from a sandy soil profile under Corsican pine. Two organic layers (moss and F1) as well as two

  19. Phosphorus status of soils from contrasting forested ecosystems in southwestern Siberia: effects of microbiological and physicochemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Achat

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Siberian forest is a tremendous repository of terrestrial organic carbon (C, which may increase owing to climate change, potential increases in ecosystem productivity and hence C sequestration. Phosphorus (P availability could limit the C sequestration potential, but tree roots may mine the soil deep to increase access to mineral P. Improved understanding and quantification of the processes controlling P availability in surface and deep soil layers of Siberian forest ecosystems are thus required. The objectives of the present study were to (1 evaluate P status of surface and deep soil horizons from different forest plots in southwestern Siberia and (2 assess the effects of physicochemical soil properties, microbiological activity and decomposition processes on soil P fractions and availability. Results revealed high concentrations of total P (879–1042 mg kg−1 in the surface mineral soils and plant-available phosphate ions. In addition, plant-available phosphate ions accumulated in the subsoil, suggesting that deeper root systems may mine sufficient available P for the trees and the potentially enhanced growth and C sequestration, may not be P-limited. Because the proportions of total organic P were large in the surface soil layers (47–56% of total P, we concluded that decomposition processes may play a significant role in P availability. However, microbiological activity and decomposition processes varied between the study plots and higher microbiological activity resulted in smaller organic P fractions and consequently larger available inorganic P fractions. In the studied Siberian soils, P availability was also controlled by the physicochemical soil properties, namely Al and Fe oxides and soil pH.

  20. Phosphorus status of soils from contrasting forested ecosystems in southwestern Siberia: effects of microbiological and physicochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achat, D. L.; Bakker, M. R.; Augusto, L.; Derrien, D.; Gallegos, N.; Lashchinskiy, N.; Milin, S.; Nikitich, P.; Raudina, T.; Rusalimova, O.; Zeller, B.; Barsukov, P.

    2013-02-01

    The Siberian forest is a tremendous repository of terrestrial organic carbon (C), which may increase owing to climate change, potential increases in ecosystem productivity and hence C sequestration. Phosphorus (P) availability could limit the C sequestration potential, but tree roots may mine the soil deep to increase access to mineral P. Improved understanding and quantification of the processes controlling P availability in surface and deep soil layers of Siberian forest ecosystems are thus required. The objectives of the present study were to (1) evaluate P status of surface and deep soil horizons from different forest plots in southwestern Siberia and (2) assess the effects of physicochemical soil properties, microbiological activity and decomposition processes on soil P fractions and availability. Results revealed high concentrations of total P (879-1042 mg kg-1 in the surface mineral soils) and plant-available phosphate ions. In addition, plant-available phosphate ions accumulated in the subsoil, suggesting that deeper root systems may mine sufficient available P for the trees and the potentially enhanced growth and C sequestration, may not be P-limited. Because the proportions of total organic P were large in the surface soil layers (47-56% of total P), we concluded that decomposition processes may play a significant role in P availability. However, microbiological activity and decomposition processes varied between the study plots and higher microbiological activity resulted in smaller organic P fractions and consequently larger available inorganic P fractions. In the studied Siberian soils, P availability was also controlled by the physicochemical soil properties, namely Al and Fe oxides and soil pH.

  1. Phosphorus absorption and use efficiency by Lotus spp. under water stress conditions in two soils: A pot experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Castillo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The response to P and water deficiencies of forage Lotus species has not been sufficiently studied in the Andisol and Vertisol soil orders in Chile's marginal areas. A pot experiment under cover was carried out between October 2007 and March 2008 to study the effects of P and soil water availability (SWA on DM production, P absorption, and P use efficiency in Lotus spp. The experiment included three Lotus (L. corniculatus L., L. tenuis Waldst. & Kit. ex Willd., and L. uliginosus Schkuhr species, two soils (Andisol and Vertisol, two contrasting P levels (low and high, and two SWA levels (10% and 100%. A completely randomized design with a 3 x 2 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement with four replicates was used. Accumulated shoot and root DM, P absorption and efficiency, and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM colonization were measured. Phosphorus absorption was significantly higher in Andisol with 100% SWA and high P in the three species, which was reflected in P efficiency where the species exhibited higher P absorption efficiency (PAE and P utilization efficiency (PUE with low P, and mean of the three species with low P and high SWA. When the P level was low, L. uliginosus showed the highest PAE and L. corniculatus exhibited the highest PUE. Phosphorus efficiency was also influenced by AM colonization since on the average mycorrhization in the three species was significantly higher in the low P treatments. Differences existed among species for DM production, response to P, P absorption, PAE, and PUE.

  2. Necessity of Purification during Bacterial DNA Extraction with Environmental Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun Jeong; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Son, Ahjeong

    2017-08-08

    Complexity and heterogeneity of soil samples have often implied the inclusion of purification steps in conventional DNA extraction for PCR assays. Unfortunately the purification steps are also time and labor intensive. Therefore the necessity of DNA purification was re-visited and investigated for a variety of environmental soil samples that contained various amounts of PCR inhibitors. Bead beating and centrifugation was used as the baseline (without purification) method for DNA extraction. Its performance was compared with that of conventional DNA extraction kit (with purification). The necessity criteria for DNA purification were established with environmental soil samples. Using lysis conditions at 3000 rpm for 3 minutes with 0.1 mm glass beads, centrifugation time of 10 minutes and 1:10 dilution ratio, the baseline method outperformed conventional DNA extraction on cell seeded sand samples. Further investigation with PCR inhibitors (i.e., humic acids, clay, and magnesium) showed that sand samples containing less than 10 ug/g humic acids and 70% clay may not require purifications. Interestingly, the inhibition pattern of magnesium ion was different from other inhibitors due to the complexation interaction of magnesium ion with DNA fragments. It was concluded that DNA extraction method without purification is suitable for soil samples that have less than 10 ug/g of humic acids, less than 70% clay content and less than 0.01% magnesium ion content.

  3. A Device for Simulating Soil Nutrient Extraction and Plant Uptake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xu-Jian; LAI Yong-Lin; MO Jin-Yu; SHEN Hong

    2012-01-01

    In situ evaluating the availability of soil nutrients has been a challenge.In this study,a new type of Device for Simulating Soil Nutrient Extraction and Plant Uptake (DSSNEPU) and its operating procedures were introduced.The device consists of a sampling tube,a fluid supply system,a low pressure system,a tube sheath and an elution cylinder.The sampling tube was firstly soaked in the solution of 0.5 mol L-1 NaHCO3 and then buried into soils.The fluid supply system was connected to the sampling tube and the deionized water was supplied.During the period,low pressure system started a vacuum for 3 min every 10 min interval.After extraction,the sampling tube was removed and the nutrients on the sampling tube were eluted with 0.5 mol L-1 HC1.The elution solution was used for nutrient measurement.The amounts of P and K extracted by DSSNEPU reached the maximal values after 4 h.No significant increases of P and K were observed for longer extraction duration.The optimal temperature for extracting P and K was 30 ℃ in this experiment.Extracted P and K were increased by 83.3% and 84.6% with the employment of low pressure system in comparison to those without employing low pressure system.Correlation analysis indicated that P and K extracted by DSSNEPU were highly correlated with those by conventional chemical extraction and by plant uptake.The above results suggest that this device is applicable to assess the availability of nutrients in soils.

  4. Effects of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Fertilization on Soil pH-Plant Productivity Relationships in Upland Grasslands of Northern Greece

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. D. VERESOGLOU; O. K. VOULGARI; R. SEN; A. P. MAMOLOS; D. S. VERESOGLOU

    2011-01-01

    The potential role of soil pH in modulating plant productivity was assessed on the basis of dry mass,harvested in the form of 0.25 m2 quadrats,in two low-productivity upland grasslands of northern Greece subjected to annual factorial nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization (15 g N m-2 year-1 and 10 g P m-2 year-1) over a minimum period of 3 years.It was hypothesized that under these particular conditions,a positive relationship would exist between soil pH and plant productivity and,further,that N or P fertilizer application of a nutrient limited system,would result in a weakening of this positive relationship.A significant positive relationship was confirmed between soil pH and plant productivity in one of the two study areas and a positive trend in the other.Moreover,plant productivity increase,following fertilization,appeared to have a detrimental effect on the soil pH-plant productivity relationship.Findings support the original hypotheses and strengthen the idea that plant diversity-mediated soil pH-plant productivity relationships are a result of the more intense plant speciation that occurred under the more "typical" soil conditions of higher pH in temperate as opposed to tropical regions.

  5. Soil phosphorus depletion and shifts in plant communities change bacterial community structure in a long-term grassland management trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Karen L; Wratten, Steve; Lear, Gavin

    2013-06-01

    Agricultural systems rely on healthy soils and their sustainability requires understanding the long-term impacts of agricultural practices on soils, including microbial communities. We examined the impact of 17 years of land management on soil bacterial communities in a New Zealand randomized-block pasture trial. Significant variation in bacterial community structure related to mowing and plant biomass removal, while nitrogen fertilizer had no effect. Changes in soil chemistry and legume abundance described 52% of the observed variation in the bacterial community structure. Legumes (Trifolium species) were absent in unmanaged plots but increased in abundance with management intensity; 11% of the variation in soil bacterial community structure was attributed to this shift in the plant community. Olsen P explained 10% of the observed heterogeneity, which is likely due to persistent biomass removal resulting in P limitation; Olsen P was significantly lower in plots with biomass removed (14 mg kg(-1) ± 1.3SE) compared with plots that were not mown, or where biomass was left after mowing (32 mg kg(-1) ± 1.6SE). Our results suggest that removal of plant biomass and associated phosphorus, as well as shifts in the plant community, have greater long-term impacts on soil bacterial community structure than application of nitrogen fertilizers.

  6. Chinese tallow trees (Triadica sebifera from the invasive range outperform those from the native range with an active soil community or phosphorus fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhang

    Full Text Available Two mechanisms that have been proposed to explain success of invasive plants are unusual biotic interactions, such as enemy release or enhanced mutualisms, and increased resource availability. However, while these mechanisms are usually considered separately, both may be involved in successful invasions. Biotic interactions may be positive or negative and may interact with nutritional resources in determining invasion success. In addition, the effects of different nutrients on invasions may vary. Finally, genetic variation in traits between populations located in introduced versus native ranges may be important for biotic interactions and/or resource use. Here, we investigated the roles of soil biota, resource availability, and plant genetic variation using seedlings of Triadica sebifera in an experiment in the native range (China. We manipulated nitrogen (control or 4 g/m(2, phosphorus (control or 0.5 g/m(2, soil biota (untreated or sterilized field soil, and plant origin (4 populations from the invasive range, 4 populations from the native range in a full factorial experiment. Phosphorus addition increased root, stem, and leaf masses. Leaf mass and height growth depended on population origin and soil sterilization. Invasive populations had higher leaf mass and growth rates than native populations did in fresh soil but they had lower, comparable leaf mass and growth rates in sterilized soil. Invasive populations had higher growth rates with phosphorus addition but native ones did not. Soil sterilization decreased specific leaf area in both native and exotic populations. Negative effects of soil sterilization suggest that soil pathogens may not be as important as soil mutualists for T. sebifera performance. Moreover, interactive effects of sterilization and origin suggest that invasive T. sebifera may have evolved more beneficial relationships with the soil biota. Overall, seedlings from the invasive range outperformed those from the native

  7. Chinese tallow trees (Triadica sebifera) from the invasive range outperform those from the native range with an active soil community or phosphorus fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Yaojun; Wang, Hong; Zou, Jianwen; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Two mechanisms that have been proposed to explain success of invasive plants are unusual biotic interactions, such as enemy release or enhanced mutualisms, and increased resource availability. However, while these mechanisms are usually considered separately, both may be involved in successful invasions. Biotic interactions may be positive or negative and may interact with nutritional resources in determining invasion success. In addition, the effects of different nutrients on invasions may vary. Finally, genetic variation in traits between populations located in introduced versus native ranges may be important for biotic interactions and/or resource use. Here, we investigated the roles of soil biota, resource availability, and plant genetic variation using seedlings of Triadica sebifera in an experiment in the native range (China). We manipulated nitrogen (control or 4 g/m(2)), phosphorus (control or 0.5 g/m(2)), soil biota (untreated or sterilized field soil), and plant origin (4 populations from the invasive range, 4 populations from the native range) in a full factorial experiment. Phosphorus addition increased root, stem, and leaf masses. Leaf mass and height growth depended on population origin and soil sterilization. Invasive populations had higher leaf mass and growth rates than native populations did in fresh soil but they had lower, comparable leaf mass and growth rates in sterilized soil. Invasive populations had higher growth rates with phosphorus addition but native ones did not. Soil sterilization decreased specific leaf area in both native and exotic populations. Negative effects of soil sterilization suggest that soil pathogens may not be as important as soil mutualists for T. sebifera performance. Moreover, interactive effects of sterilization and origin suggest that invasive T. sebifera may have evolved more beneficial relationships with the soil biota. Overall, seedlings from the invasive range outperformed those from the native range, however

  8. Spatial 2D distribution of the proportion of soil phosphorus uptake by maize and soybean caused by tillage and fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixiao; Mollier, Alain; Ziadi, Noura; Messiga, Aimé Jean; Parent, Leon-Étienne; Morel, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Plant-available soil phosphorus (P) accumulates primarily in the topsoil due to P fertilization and P released from crop residues. In contrast with conventional tillage (moldboard plough, MP), conservation tillage [e.g. no-till, (NT)] often leads to higher P concentrations in the topsoil mainly due to the absence of mixing between soil, fertilizer, and crop residues. Our objective was to estimate the proportion of P uptake from a given soil mass across the soil profile under maize and soybean as the product of root surface density proportions and local plant-available soil P. This study was conducted on a long-term field experiment initiated in 1992 in southern Quebec, Canada, and established on a clay-loam soil under MP and NT systems. The experiment was factorially treated with three P doses (0, 17.5 and 35 kg P ha-1 applied as triple superphosphate on maize at 5 cm depth and at 5 cm on one side of the crop row). Soil was sampled at flowering stage at five depths (0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30 and 30-40 cm) and three horizontal distances perpendicular to the crop row (5, 15 and 25 cm) in 2014 and 2015 to map a grid soil P availability to plants, e.g. phosphate ion concentrations in solution and the time-dependent amount of phosphate ions that can equilibrate- solution by diffusion, root distribution, and consequently crop P uptake, which was calculated as the fraction of plant-available soil P intercepted by surface roots. In general, NT tended to have higher soil P status in the upper soil layer and lower soil P status in the deeper soil layer compared to MP ; confirming previous results obtained from the same experimental site. This variation along the soil profile was significantly affected by sampling distance to crop row with higher concentration observed at 5-cm distance mainly because of the placement of P fertilizers. The 2D distribution of P uptake depended on tillage practice and P fertilization. There was higher proportions of P uptake from the 0-10 and 0

  9. Pyrophosphate coupling with chelant-enhanced soil flushing of field contaminated soils for heavy metal extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dickson Y S; Lo, Irene M C

    2012-01-15

    This study investigated the influence of flushing duration, [S,S]-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) dosage, humic acid and various combinations of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), EDDS and tetrasodium pyrophosphate (Na(4)P(2)O(7)) on metal extraction during soil flushing, through column experiments. A lesser extent of enhancement in metal extraction efficiencies was found when the flushing duration and the dosage of EDDS was doubled, compared to their efficiencies measured at pore volume 100. Metal extraction efficiency was mainly influenced by the initial metal distribution in the soils rather than the flushing duration and the EDDS-to-metal molar ratio. Humic acid of less than 10mg/L as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) posed an insignificant effect on metal extraction during EDDS enhanced soil flushing. The extraction rate of Ni by EDTA and EDDS was time dependent, and was initially fast in the case of EDDS, whereas it was slow for EDTA. However, the overall Ni extraction efficiency by EDTA was higher when the flushing time was longer. Na(4)P(2)O(7) promoted the mineral dissolution which enhanced the metal extraction as a result of soil disruption. The order of metal extraction by Na(4)P(2)O(7) was Ni>Cr>Cu, probably be due to the different affinities between metals and P(2)O(7)(4-). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Phosphorus dynamics in soils irrigated with reclaimed waste water or fresh water - A study using oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, I.; Shaviv, A.; Young, M.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S.; Paytan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Transformations of phosphate (Pi) in different soil fractions were tracked using the stable isotopic composition of oxygen in phosphate (??18Op) and Pi concentrations. Clay soil from Israel was treated with either reclaimed waste water (secondary, low grade) or with fresh water amended with a chemical fertilizer of a known isotopic signature. Changes of ??18Op and Pi within different soil fractions, during a month of incubation, elucidate biogeochemical processes in the soil, revealing the biological and the chemical transformation impacting the various P pools. P in the soil solution is affected primarily by enzymatic activity that yields isotopic equilibrium with the water molecules in the soil solution. The dissolved P interacts rapidly with the loosely bound P (extracted by bicarbonate). The oxides and mineral P fractions (extracted by NaOH and HCl, respectively), which are considered as relatively stable pools of P, also exhibited isotopic alterations in the first two weeks after P application, likely related to the activity of microbial populations associated with soil surfaces. Specifically, isotopic depletion which could result from organic P mineralization was followed by isotopic enrichment which could result from preferential biological uptake of depleted P from the mineralized pool. Similar transformations were observed in both soils although transformations related to biological activity were more pronounced in the soil treated with reclaimed waste water compared to the fertilizer treated soil. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Effects of freeze-thaw on soil nitrogen and phosphorus availability at the Keerqin Sandy Lands, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qiong; ZENG De-hui; FAN Zhi-ping

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory simulated freeze-thaw was conducted to determine the effects of freeze-thaw on soil nutrient availability in temperate semi-arid regions. Soil samples were collected from sandy soils (0-20 cm) of three typical ecosystems (grassland, Mongolian pine plantation and poplar plantation) in southeastern Keerqin Sandy Lands of China and subjected to freeze-thaw treatment (-12℃ for 10 days, then 20℃ for 10 days) or incubated at constant temperature (20℃ for 20 days). Concentrations of the soil NO3--N, NH4+-N, NaHCO3 extractable inorganic P (LPi) and microbial biomass P (MBP) were determined on three occasions: at the start of the incubation, immediate post-thawing and at the 10th day post-thawing. The results showed that soil net nitrification and N mineralization rates at three sites were negatively affected by freeze-thaw treatment, and decreased by 50%-85% as compared to the control, of which the greatest decline occurred in the soil collected from poplar plantation. In contrast, the concentration of soil NH4+-N, NaHCO3 extractable inorganic P (LPi) and microbial biomass P were insignificantly influenced by freeze-thaw except that LPi and NH4+-N showed a slight increase immediate post-thawing. The effects of freeze-thaw on soil N transformation were related to soil biological processes and the relatively constant available P was ascribed to severe soil aridity.

  12. Effect of fertilization in interaction with glyphosate on the availability of phosphorus in rice soils of Corrientes - Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micaela biassoni, Maria; Rey Montoya, Tania; Herber, Luciana; De Geronimo, Eduardo; Aparicio, Virginia

    2017-04-01

    The rice crop (Oryza sativa) in the province of Corrientes, Argentina, represents 46% of the national production. To obtain potential yields, adequate practices of fertilization, pesticides application, and management of the irrigation system are needed. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) are key minerals in rice production. In Argentina, P deficiency is a common problem in rice crops and represents a main yield limiting factor, therefore P fertilization is a regular practice. On the other hand, glyphosate is widely used to control weeds. This molecule is rapidly inactivated in soil due to the adsorption to clay particles and organic matter, however, is excluded from adsorption sites by inorganic phosphates. Meanwhile, both practices of fertilization and herbicide application can interact and influence the phosphate nutrition of rice plants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different doses of fertilizer in interaction with glyphosate on the availability of soil phosphorus. A field experiment following a completely randomized design was carried out with four replicates. We evaluated four levels of fertilization (0-18-40): Control: 0 kg ha-1, Dose 1: 120 kg ha-1, Dose 2: 150 kg ha-1, Dose 3: 180 kg ha-1; and two levels of Glyphosate: with (Gly) or without (no-Gly) application. Soil sampling was carried out at three moments along crop season: vegetative stage before irrigation (V4), in floral primordial differentiation (DPF) with flooded soil, and at physiological maturity (MF). The method used for the determination of P was Bray & Kurtz I. We found a negative relation and non-significant interaction (p glyphosate for adsorption sites and they were available in soil solution while herbicide molecules were retained by colloidal particles.

  13. Acid Release from an Acid Sulfate Soil Sample Under Successive Extractions with Different Extractants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An acid sulfate soil sample was successively extracted with deionized water, 1 mol L-1 KCI and 0.000 5 mol L-1 Ca(OH)2 solutions. The results showed that only very small amounts of acidity were extracted by deionized water, possibly through slow jarosite hydrolysis. Acid release through jarosite hydrolysis was greatly enhanced by Ca(OH)2 extraction at the expense of the added OH- being neutralized by the acid released. Successive extraction of the sample with KCI removed the largest amounts of acidity from the sample. However, it is likely that the major form of acidity released by KC1 extraction was exchangeable acidity. The results also show the occurrence of low or non charged A1 and Fe species in water and Ca(OH)2 extracts after first a few extractions. It appears that such a phenomenon was related to a decreasing EC value with increasing number of extractions.

  14. Direct Extraction and Amplification of DNA from Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Jack T.; Leung, K.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise that describes the direct extraction and purification of DNA from a small soil sample. Also discusses the subsequent amplification of a 343-bp Tn7 transposate A gene fragment (tnsA) from a strain of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 3732RNL11. Contains 21 references. (DDR)

  15. Direct Extraction and Amplification of DNA from Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Jack T.; Leung, K.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise that describes the direct extraction and purification of DNA from a small soil sample. Also discusses the subsequent amplification of a 343-bp Tn7 transposate A gene fragment (tnsA) from a strain of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 3732RNL11. Contains 21 references. (DDR)

  16. Effects of soil oven-drying on concentrations and speciation of trace metals and dissolved organic matter in soil solution extracts of sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, G.F.; Groenenberg, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Weak salt extracts can be used to assess the availability of trace metals for leaching and uptake by soil organisms and plants in soil. Before extraction, the International Organization for Standardization recommends to dry soils in an oven at a temperature of 40 °C. Effects of soil oven-drying on

  17. Effects of soil oven-drying on concentrations and speciation of trace metals and dissolved organic matter in soil solution extracts of sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, G.F.; Groenenberg, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Weak salt extracts can be used to assess the availability of trace metals for leaching and uptake by soil organisms and plants in soil. Before extraction, the International Organization for Standardization recommends to dry soils in an oven at a temperature of 40 °C. Effects of soil oven-drying on d

  18. Valorisation of Phosphorus Extracted from Dairy Cattle Slurry and Municipal Solid Wastes Digestates as a Fertilizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, V.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Labrincha, J.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is a vital cell component and an essential and irreplaceable element. Yet at the current rate of exploitation, the phosphate’s reserves will be fast depleted. Dairy cattle slurry and digestates from anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes (MSW) are organic wastes containing phosp...

  19. Extraction of ammonium and phosphorus from swine manure digestate and their recovery in purified forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation and recovery of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from animal wastes is important in agriculture because of the high cost of commercial fertilizers and for environmental reasons. The objective of this work was to develop new technology for simultaneous N and P recovery suitable for anaero...

  20. Responses of soil microbial communities and enzyme activities to nitrogen and phosphorus additions in Chinese fir plantations of subtropical China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, W. Y.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, X. Y.; Fu, X. L.; Chen, F. S.; Wang, H. M.; Sun, X. M.; Wen, X. F.

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) additions to forest ecosystems are known to influence various above-ground properties, such as plant productivity and composition, and below-ground properties, such as soil nutrient cycling. However, our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their functions respond to nutrient additions in subtropical plantations is still not complete. In this study, we added N and P to Chinese fir plantations in subtropical China to examine how nutrient additions influenced soil microbial community composition and enzyme activities. The results showed that most soil microbial properties were responsive to N and/or P additions, but responses often varied depending on the nutrient added and the quantity added. For instance, there were more than 30 % greater increases in the activities of β-glucosidase (βG) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) in the treatments that received nutrient additions compared to the control plot, whereas acid phosphatase (aP) activity was always higher (57 and 71 %, respectively) in the P treatment. N and P additions greatly enhanced the phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) abundance especially in the N2P (100 kg ha-1 yr-1 of N +50 kg ha-1 yr-1 of P) treatment; the bacterial PLFAs (bacPLFAs), fungal PLFAs (funPLFAs) and actinomycic PLFAs (actPLFAs) were about 2.5, 3 and 4 times higher, respectively, than in the CK (control). Soil enzyme activities were noticeably higher in November than in July, mainly due to seasonal differences in soil moisture content (SMC). βG or NAG activities were significantly and positively correlated with microbial PLFAs. These findings indicate that βG and NAG would be useful tools for assessing the biogeochemical transformation and metabolic activity of soil microbes. We recommend combined additions of N and P fertilizer to promote soil fertility and microbial activity in this kind of plantation.

  1. Phosphorus limitation, soil-borne pathogens and the coexistence of plant species in hyperdiverse forests and shrublands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, Etienne; Lambers, Hans; Burgess, Treena I; Wright, S Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Hyperdiverse forests occur in the lowland tropics, whereas the most species-rich shrublands are found in regions such as south-western Australia (kwongan) and South Africa (fynbos). Despite large differences, these ecosystems share an important characteristic: their soils are strongly weathered and phosphorus (P) is a key growth-limiting nutrient. Soil-borne pathogens are increasingly being recognized as drivers of plant diversity in lowland tropical rainforests, but have received little attention in species-rich shrublands. We suggest a trade-off in which the species most proficient at acquiring P have ephemeral roots that are particularly susceptible to soil-borne pathogens. This could equalize out the differences in competitive ability among co-occurring species in these ecosystems, thus contributing to coexistence. Moreover, effective protection against soil-borne pathogens by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi might explain the occurrence of monodominant stands of ECM trees and shrubs amongst otherwise species-rich communities. We identify gaps in our knowledge which need to be filled in order to evaluate a possible link between P limitation, fine root traits, soil-borne pathogens and local plant species diversity. Such a link may help to explain how numerous plant species can coexist in hyperdiverse rainforests and shrublands, and, conversely, how monodominant stands can develop in these ecosystems.

  2. Arsenic uptake by arbuscular mycorrhizal maize (Zea mays L.) grown in an arsenic-contaminated soil with added phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus mosseae) and phosphorus (P) addition (100 mg/kg soil) on arsenic (As)uptake by maize plants (Zea mays L.) from an As-contaminated soil were examined in a glasshouse experiment. Non-mycorrhizal and zero-P addition controls were included. Plant biomass and concentrations and uptake of As, P, and other nutrients, AM colonization, root lengths, and hyphal length densities were determined. The results indicated that addition of P significantly inhibited root colonization and development of extraradical mycelium. Root length and dry weight both increased markedly with mycorrhizal colonization under the zero-P treatments, but shoot and root biomass of AM plants was depressed by P application. AM fungal inoculation decreased shoot As concentrations when no P was added, and shoot and root As concentrations of AM plants increased 2.6 and 1.4 times with P addition, respectively. Shoot and root uptake of P, Mn, Cu, and Zn increased, but shoot Fe uptake decreased by 44.6%, with inoculation,when P was added. P addition reduced shoot P, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn uptake of AM plants, but increased root Fe and Mn uptake of the nonmycorrhizal ones. AM colonization therefore appeared to enhance plant tolerance to As in low P soil, and have some potential for the phytostabilization of As-contaminated soil, however, P application may introduce additional environmental risk by increasing soil As mobility.

  3. Soil nitrogen drives community-level phosphorus resorption in a co-limited system: evidence from a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, C. R.; Yanai, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Fertilization studies in northeastern forests suggest that forest productivity may be co-limited by nitrogen and phosphorus. Foliar nutrient resorption is a crucial conservation mechanism for plants. Resorption controls litterfall nutrient concentration, and litterfall is the largest aboveground nutrient flux in this system. Previous studies have attempted to link the foliar resorption of P to soil P status with mixed results. We propose that in an N and P co-limited system, foliar resorption of P may be linked to N availability. Here we compare the foliar chemistry of six hardwood tree species to soil chemistry across 18 plots in 6 stands in Bartlett Experimental Forest, New Hampshire. Resorption efficiency was calculated by species as the percent difference between green and senesced leaves. We weighted the resorption efficiencies for dominant tree species in each plot by their litterfall mass to create a community-level estimate of resorption for each plot. Estimates of soil N content to 30 centimeters in the mineral soil were strongly correlated with community-level estimates of both P resorption efficiency (p=0.002) and proficiency (p=0.006). At the population level, this trend was observed in four of the six tree species sampled. Neither N nor P resorption was correlated with any of the soil P fractions we examined. If N availability drives biological P conservation, it would provide an important mechanism for the coupled cycling of N and P in co-limited systems.

  4. Arsenic uptake by arbuscular mycorrhizal maize (Zea mays L.) grown in an arsenic-contaminated soil with added phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yun-sheng; Chen, Bao-dong; Christie, Peter; Smith, F Andrew; Wang, You-shan; Li, Xiao-lin

    2007-01-01

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus mosseae) and phosphorus (P) addition (100 mg/kg soil) on arsenic (As) uptake by maize plants (Zea mays L.) from an As-contaminated soil were examined in a glasshouse experiment. Non-mycorrhizal and zero-P addition controls were included. Plant biomass and concentrations and uptake of As, P, and other nutrients, AM colonization, root lengths, and hyphal length densities were determined. The results indicated that addition of P significantly inhibited root colonization and development of extraradical mycelium. Root length and dry weight both increased markedly with mycorrhizal colonization under the zero-P treatments, but shoot and root biomass of AM plants was depressed by P application. AM fungal inoculation decreased shoot As concentrations when no P was added, and shoot and root As concentrations of AM plants increased 2.6 and 1.4 times with P addition, respectively. Shoot and root uptake of P, Mn, Cu, and Zn increased, but shoot Fe uptake decreased by 44.6%, with inoculation, when P was added. P addition reduced shoot P, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn uptake of AM plants, but increased root Fe and Mn uptake of the nonmycorrhizal ones. AM colonization therefore appeared to enhance plant tolerance to As in low P soil, and have some potential for the phytostabilization of As-contaminated soil, however, P application may introduce additional environmental risk by increasing soil As mobility.

  5. Phosphorus applications improved the soil microbial responses under nitrogen additions in Chinese fir plantations of subtropical China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Dandan; Yang, Yang; Tang, Yuqian; Wang, Huimin; Chen, Fusheng; Sun, Xiaomin

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition and low soil phosphorus (P) content aggravate the P limitation in subtropical forest soils. However, the responses of soil microbial communities, enzyme kinetics, and N cycling genes to P additions in subtropical plantations are still not clear. The hypothesis that P application can alleviate the limitation and improve the soil microbial properties was tested by long term field experiment in the Chinese fir plantations in subtropical China. Thirty 20m×20m plots were established in November 2011 and six different treatments were randomly distributed with five replicates. The treatments are control (CK, no N and P application), low N addition (N1: 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1), high N addition (N2: 100 kg N ha-1 yr-1), P addition (P: 50 kg P ha-1 yr-1), low N and P addition (N1P: 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and 50 kg P ha-1 yr-1) and high N and P addition (N2P: 100 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and 50 kg P ha-1 yr-1). A suite of responses of soil microorganism across four years (2012-2015) during three seasons (spring, summer and autumn) were measured. Following 4 years of N amendments, fertilized soils were more acidic and had lower soil microbial biomass carbon contents than CK. However, P alleviated the soil acidification and increased the soil microbial biomass carbon contents. Increases in microbial PLFA biomarkers and exoenzyme kinetics in N fertilized plots were observed in the initial year (2013) but reduced since then (2014 and 2015). Whereas P amendments increased the soil PLFA biomarkers and exoenzyme kinetics through the four years except that the acid phosphatase activities declined after 3 years applications. P applications enhanced the soil N cycling by increases the abundances of nitrifiers (ammonia-oxidizing archea) and denitrifiers (nos Z, norG, and nirK). The bacterial and fungal residue carbons (calculated by amino sugar indicators) were higher under NP fertilizations than the other treatments. Our results suggest that P application could improve the soil

  6. Spatiotemporal dynamics of phosphorus release, oxygen consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after localised soil amendment with organic fertilisers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christel, Wibke [Department for Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Department of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture, Danish Environmental Protection Agency, 1401 Copenhagen C (Denmark); Zhu, Kun [Department for Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Hoefer, Christoph [Rhizosphere Ecology and Biogeochemistry Group, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Kreuzeder, Andreas [Rhizosphere Ecology and Biogeochemistry Group, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Land Salzburg, Natur- und Umweltschutz, Gewerbe (Abteilung 5), Michael-Pacher-Straße 36, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Santner, Jakob [Rhizosphere Ecology and Biogeochemistry Group, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Division of Agronomy, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Bruun, Sander; Magid, Jakob [Department for Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Jensen, Lars Stoumann, E-mail: lsj@plen.ku.dk [Department for Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark)

    2016-06-01

    Organic fertilisation inevitably leads to heterogeneous distribution of organic matter and nutrients in soil, i.e. due to uneven surface spreading or inhomogeneous incorporation. The resulting localised hotspots of nutrient application will induce various biotic and abiotic nutrient turnover processes and fixation in the residuesphere, giving rise to distinct differences in nutrient availability, soil oxygen content and greenhouse gas (GHG) production. In this study we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of the reaction of manure solids and manure solids char with soil, focusing on their phosphorus (P) availability, as current emphasis on improving societal P efficiency through recycling waste or bio-based fertilisers necessitates a sound understanding of their behaviour. Soil layers amended at a constant P application rate with either pig manure solids or char made from pig manure solids were incubated for three weeks between layers of non-amended, P-depleted soil. Spatial and temporal changes in and around the amendment layers were simultaneously investigated in this study using a sandwich sensor consisting of a planar oxygen optode and multi-element diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) gels, combined with GHG emission measurements. After three weeks of incubation, the soil containing a layer amended with manure solids had a lower overall O{sub 2} content and had emitted significantly more CO{sub 2} than the non-amended control or the char-amended soil. The P availability from manure solids was initially higher than that from the char, but decreased over time, whereas from the char-amended layer P availability increased in the same period. In both treatments, increases in P availability were confined to the amended soil layer and did not greatly affect P availability in the directly adjacent soil layers during the three-week incubation. These results highlight the importance of placing organic P fertilisers close to where the plant roots will grow in

  7. Changes in the Content of Soil Phosphorus after its Application into Chernozem and Haplic Luvisol and the Effect on Yields of Barley Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Lošák

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pot experiment was established in vegetation hall in the year 2015. Spring barley, variety KWS Irina, was grown. Two different soils – chernozem from Brno (with a low phosphorus content and alkali soil reaction – 7.37 and haplic luvisol from Jaroměřice nad Rokytnou (with a high phosphorus content and slightly acid soil reaction – 6.01 were used for comparison. The rates of phosphorus in the form of triple superphosphate (45 % P2O5 were increased from 0.3 – 0.6 – 1.2 g per pot (5 kg of soil – Mitscherlich pots. Nitrogen was applied in the form of CAN (27 % N at a rate of 1 g N per pot in all the treatments incl. the control. Using statistical analysis, significant differences were found between the two soil types both in terms of the postharvest soil P content and yields of aboveground biomass. The content of post‑harvest soil phosphorus increased significantly with the applied rate (96 – 141 – 210 mg/kg in chernozem and 128 – 179 – 277 mg/kg in haplic luvisol. Dry matter yields of the aboveground biomass grown on chernozem were the lowest in the control treatment not fertilised with P (38.97 g per pot and increased significantly with the P rate applied (46.02 – 47.28 g per pot, although there were no significant differences among the fertilised treatments. On haplic luvisol phosphorus fertilisation was not seen at all, demonstrating that the weight of the biomass in all the treatments was balanced (48.12 – 49.63 g per pot.

  8. An Experimental Method to Quantify Extractable Amino Acids in Soils from Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xian-you; WU Liang-huan; CAO Xiao-chuang; Sarkar Animesh; ZHU Yuan-hong

    2013-01-01

    The extraction and comparison of soil amino acids using different extractants (deionized water, K2SO4, Na2SO4, NaCl, KCl) were reported. Results showed that 0.5 mol L-1 K2SO4 with a 5 times extraction was a better method to assess the concentration of extractable amino acids in soils. The total amino acids extracted from soil planted for tea were similar to the total inorganic nitrogen. While they extracted from vegetable soil and paddy soil were much lower than the total inorganic nitrogen.

  9. Soil phosphorus dynamic, balance and critical P values in long-term fertilization experiment in Taihu Lake region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Lin-lin; SHEN Ming-xing; LU Chang-yin; WANG Hai-hou; ZHOU Xin-wei; JIN Mei-juan; WU Tong-dong

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an important macronutrient for plant but can also cause potential environmental risk. In this paper, we studied the long-term fertilizer experiment (started 1980) to assess the soil P dynamic, balance, critical P value and the crop yield response in Taihu Lake region, China. To avoid the effect of nitrogen (N) and potassium (K), only the folowing treatments were chosen for subsequent discussion, including: C0 (control treatment without any fertilizer or organic manure), CNK treatment (mineral N and K only), CNPK (balanced fertilization with mineral N, P and K), MNK (integrated organic ma-nure and mineral N and K), and MNPK (organic manure plus balanced fertilization). The results revealed that the response of wheat yield was more sensitive than rice, and no signiifcant differences of crop yield had been detected among MNK, CNPK and MNPK until 2013. Dynamic and balance of soil total P (TP) and Olsen-P showed soil TP pool was enlarged signiifcantly over consistent fertilization. However, the diminishing marginal utility of soil Olsen-P was also found, indicating that high-level P application in the present condition could not increase soil Olsen-P contents anymore. Linear-linear and Mitscherlich models were used to estimate the critical value of Olsen-P for crops. The average critical P value for rice and wheat was 3.40 and 4.08 mg kg–1, respectively. The smaler critical P value than in uplands indicated a stronger ability of P supply for crops in this paddy soil. We concluded that no more mineral P should be applied in rice-wheat system in Taihu Lake region if soil Olsen-P is higher than the critical P value. The agricultural technique and management referring to acti-vate the plant-available P pool are also considerable, such as integrated use of low-P organic manure with mineral N and K.

  10. [Effects of phosphorus application on translocation of lead, zinc and cadmium in the soil-plant system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bi-Ling; Xie, Zheng-Miao

    2008-11-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to determine the influence of phosphorus (P) application on the translocation and accumulation of lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd) in a soil solid-liquid-plant system using a plant Swamp Morningglory (Ipomoea aquatica Forak) as an indicator and Visual MINTEQ model. A contaminated soil containing 22,830 mg x kg(-1) Pb, 746 mg x kg(-1) Zn, and 10 mg x kg(-1) Cd was in the root was significantly decreased after P application, while the Zn concentration were increased, but no impact on Cd concentration after P application, compared to the control. Further more, concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cd in plant tissue were sharply reduced after P application by 53%-92%, 35%-71%, and 59%-86%, respectively; Concentrations decreased exponentially with increasing amount of P; Relationship between Pb and Zn (r = 0.993, p < 0.01), between Pb and Cd (r = 0.986, p < 0.01) suggested that there was a positive relationship between the mechanisms controlling the phytoavailability of Pb, Zn, and Cd. It was suggested that Cd concentrations in the soil solution were reduced generally by P application as a result of the increased soil pH, and Zn concentrations were no change, but Pb concentrations were increased. Species distribution showed that PbHPO4, PbOH+ and PbH2PO4+ were the main complexation species of Pb in the soil equilibrium solution after P application. It was also suggested that Pb accumulation by root were negatively correlated to Pb in soil solution with coefficient of -0.872 (p < 0.05), and that water soluble Zn and Cd concentrations were reduced while the concentrations in root tissues were increased after P addition. These results indicate the difference between Zn, Cd and Pb and suggest that P as KH2PO4 successfully decreased the phytotoxicity of Pb, Zn, and Cd in the contaminated soil.

  11. Use of near-infrared spectroscopy to assess phosphorus fractions of different plant availability in forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Todt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractionation of soil P into fractions of different plant availability is a common approach to characterize the P status of forest soils. However, quantification of organic and inorganic P fractions in different extracts is labour-intensive and therefore rarely applied for large sample numbers. Therefore, we examined whether different P fractions can be predicted using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. We used the Hedley method with increasingly strong extractants to determine P in fractions of different plant availability and measured NIR spectra for soil samples from sites of the German forest soil inventory and from a nature reserve in south-eastern China. The R2 of NIRS calibrations to predict P in individual Hedley fractions ranged between 0.08 and 0.85. When these were pooled into labile, moderately labile and stable fractions, R2 of calibration models was between 0.38 and 0.88. Model prediction quality was higher for organic than for inorganic P fractions and increased with the homogeneity of soil sample sets. Useful models were obtained for samples originating from one soil type in subtropical China, whereas prediction models for sample sets from a range of soil types in Germany were only moderately useful or not useful. Our results indicate that prediction of Hedley P fractions with NIRS is a promising approach to replace conventional analysis, if models are developed for sets of soil samples with similar physical and chemical properties.

  12. Evaluation of a simple, non-alkaline extraction protocol to quantify soil ergosterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ridder-Duine, A.S.; Smant, W.; Van der Wal, A.; Van Veen, J.A.; De Boer, W.

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of soil ergosterol is increasingly used as an estimate for soil fungal biomass. Several methods for extraction of ergosterol from soil have been published, perhaps the simplest being that described by Gong, P., Guan, X., Witter, E. [2001. A rapid method to extract ergosterol from soil

  13. Extraction DNA from Activated Sludge-Comparing with Soil Sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢冰; 奚旦立; 陈季华

    2003-01-01

    DNA directly extraction from activated sludge and soil sample with enzyme lyses methods was investigated in this paper. DNA yield from activated sludge was 3.0 mg/g. VLSS, and 28.2-43.8 μg/g soil respectively. The resulting DNA is suitable for PCR.By studied methods, higher quality and quantity of sludge DNA could be obtained rapidly and inexpensively from large number of samples, and the PCR product obtained from this protocol was not affected by contaminated higher concentration of heavy metals.

  14. What is the P value of Siberian soils? Soil phosphorus status in south-western Siberia and comparison with a global data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédoire, Félix; Bakker, Mark R.; Augusto, Laurent; Barsukov, Pavel A.; Derrien, Delphine; Nikitich, Polina; Rusalimova, Olga; Zeller, Bernd; Achat, David L.

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is particularly strong in northern Eurasia and substantial ecological changes are expected in this extensive region. The reshaping and migration northwards of bioclimatic zones may offer opportunities for agricultural development in western and central Siberia. However, the bioclimatic vegetation models currently employed for projections still do not consider soil fertility, in spite of this being highly critical for plant growth. In the present study, we surveyed the phosphorus (P) status in the south-west of Siberia where soils have developed on loess parent material. We selected six sites differing in pedoclimatic conditions and the soil was sampled at different depths down to 1 m in aspen (Populus tremula L.) forest as well as in grassland areas. The P status was assessed by conventional methods and by isotope dilution kinetics. We found that P concentrations and stocks, as well as their distribution through the soil profile, were fairly homogeneous on the regional scale studied, although there were some differences between sites (particularly in organic P). The young age of the soils, together with slow kinetics of soil formation processes have probably not yet resulted in a sufficiently wide range of soil physico-chemical conditions to observe a more diverging P status. The comparison of our data set with similar vegetation contexts on the global scale revealed that the soils of south-western Siberia, and more generally of northern Eurasia, often have (very) high levels of total, organic and inorganic P. The amount of plant-available P in topsoils, estimated by the isotopically exchangeable phosphate ions, was not particularly high but was intermediate on the global scale. However, large stocks of plant-available P are stored in subsurface layers which currently have low fine-root exploration intensities. These results suggest that the P resource is unlikely to constrain vegetation growth and agricultural development under the present

  15. [Effect of human disturbance on ecological stoichiometry characteristics of soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in Minjiang River estuarine wetland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Qi; Zeng, Cong-Sheng; Zhong, Chun-Qi; Tong, Chuan

    2010-10-01

    To clarify responses of soil ecological stoichiometry in wetland to human disturbance, the ecological stoichiometry characteristics of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus elements of soil in Phragmites australis marsh, grassland, flat breed aquatics, cropland, pond aquaculture after human disturbance and abandoned cropland after human disturbance restoration in Minjiang River estuary were analyzed. The results showed: averaged values of C/N, C/P, N/P ratios were declined as the human disturbance increment, which appeared that Phragmites australis marsh, grassland (lower human disturbance, 25.53, 156.06, 6.11 and 27.58, 158.99, 5.78) were bigger than flat breed aquatics (medium human disturbance, 25.02, 96.90, 3.87), and flat breed aquatics (medium human disturbance) were bigger than cropland, pond aquaculture (higher human disturbance, 17.55, 46.19, 2.65 and 22.30, 57.51, 2.62). Compared with cropland, C/N, C/P, N/P ratios in abandoned cropland (human disturbance restoration) were (19.95, 63.81, 3.18) higher. The influencing factors were changed with the human disturbance intensity. Soil C/N ratios showed relatively small variation between different human disturbance and soil depth, while C/P and N/P ratios showed a high heterogeneity. The ratio of carbon to nutrition had preferable indication for carbon storage.

  16. Phosphorus Sorption Kinetics in Reclaimed Lignite Mine Soils under Different Age Stands of Robinia pseudoacacia L. in Northeast Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Slazak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the work were to study phosphorus (P dynamics in postmining soils under short rotation coppices at different stages of Robinia pseudoacacia L. growth (2, 3, 4, and 14 years old. From the results obtained, the amount of total P, total organic P, plant available P, and P stock increased with increasing age of R. pseudoacacia. However, values were very low compared to that recommended for optimum plant growth, reflecting a general deficit in P. Additionally, the P sorption and desorption processes were investigated. The total P sorption capacity obtained from the laboratory experiments was on average, 2.5 times greater for soils under the oldest R. pseudoacacia than values measured at the younger sites. Values of P saturation factor (α were comparatively lower compared to that reported in the literature. This may be attributed primarily to the less P saturation of the postmining soils, coupled with rather small contents of oxalate iron Feox and aluminium Alox (sum of 47 mmol kg−1. Results demonstrate significant difference between 2 and 14 years old R. pseudoacacia; thus establishing of short rotation coppice (SRC on degraded marginal sites may be a valuable method of soil reclamations.

  17. The effect of increasing salinity and forest mortality on soil nitrogen and phosphorus mineralization in tidal freshwater forested wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Gregory B.; Krauss, Ken W.; Lockaby, B. Graeme; Conner, William H.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2013-01-01

    Tidal freshwater wetlands are sensitive to sea level rise and increased salinity, although little information is known about the impact of salinification on nutrient biogeochemistry in tidal freshwater forested wetlands. We quantified soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) mineralization using seasonal in situ incubations of modified resin cores along spatial gradients of chronic salinification (from continuously freshwater tidal forest to salt impacted tidal forest to oligohaline marsh) and in hummocks and hollows of the continuously freshwater tidal forest along the blackwater Waccamaw River and alluvial Savannah River. Salinification increased rates of net N and P mineralization fluxes and turnover in tidal freshwater forested wetland soils, most likely through tree stress and senescence (for N) and conversion to oligohaline marsh (for P). Stimulation of N and P mineralization by chronic salinification was apparently unrelated to inputs of sulfate (for N and P) or direct effects of increased soil conductivity (for N). In addition, the tidal wetland soils of the alluvial river mineralized more P relative to N than the blackwater river. Finally, hummocks had much greater nitrification fluxes than hollows at the continuously freshwater tidal forested wetland sites. These findings add to knowledge of the responses of tidal freshwater ecosystems to sea level rise and salinification that is necessary to predict the consequences of state changes in coastal ecosystem structure and function due to global change, including potential impacts on estuarine eutrophication.

  18. Hydrology and Soil Manipulations of Iron-Rich Ditch Mesocosms Provide Little Evidence of Phosphorus Capture within the Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, David E; Needelman, Brian A; Kleinman, Peter J A; Rabenhorst, Martin C; Momen, Bahram; Wester, David B

    2017-05-01

    Agricultural drainage ditches function as first-order streams and affect nutrient management. Soil mesocosms from a ditch featuring a vertical (increasing upward) gradient in iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) were subjected to hydraulic and soil treatments. These manipulations mimicked aspects of dredging and controlled drainage and inspected the soil release and retention of P. Treatments did not remove P from simulated groundwater. Throughput water either gained in P (lack of dredging, especially under Fe-reducing conditions) or had P concentrations indistinguishable from input water (dredging). Undredged mesocosms, when Fe-reducing, released Fe and P simultaneously. Simultaneous release of P and Fe from our Fe-reducing mesocosms indicates a mechanism whereby P capture occurs by Fe precipitation upon emergence to aerated surficial waters. Upwelling and surficial phases of ditch hydrology and the lowering of the ditch surface on dredging complicate interpretation of traditional means of describing ditch P retention and release. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Soil N2O fluxes along an elevation gradient of tropical montane forests under experimental nitrogen and phosphorus addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Anke; Matson, Amanda; Corre, Marife; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-10-01

    Nutrient deposition to tropical forests is increasing, which could affect soil fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), a powerful greenhouse gas. We assessed the effects of 35-56 months of moderate nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) additions on soil N2O fluxes and net soil N-cycling rates, and quantified the relative contributions of nitrification and denitrification to N2O fluxes. In 2008, a nutrient manipulation experiment was established along an elevation gradient (1000, 2000 and 3000 m) of montane forests in southern Ecuador. Treatments included control, N, P and N+P addition (with additions of 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and 10 kg P ha-1 yr-1). Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured using static, vented chambers and N cycling was determined using the buried bag method. Measurements showed that denitrification was the main N2O source at all elevations, but that annual N2O emissions from control plots were low, and decreased along the elevation gradient (0.57 ± 0.26 to 0.05 ± 0.04 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1). We attributed the low fluxes to our sites’ conservative soil N cycling as well as gaseous N losses possibly being dominated by N2. Contrary to the first 21 months of the experiment, N addition did not affect N2O fluxes during the 35-56 month period, possibly due to low soil moisture contents during this time. With P addition, N2O fluxes and mineral N concentrations decreased during Months 35-56, presumably because plant P limitations were alleviated, increasing plant N uptake. Nitrogen plus phosphorus addition showed similar trends to N addition, but less pronounced given the counteracting effects of P addition. The combined results from this study (Months 1-21 and 35-56) showed that effects of N and P addition on soil N2O fluxes were not linear with time of exposure, highlighting the importance of long-term studies.

  20. Soil N2O fluxes along an elevation gradient of tropical montane forests under experimental nitrogen and phosphorus addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke K. Müller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient deposition to tropical forests is increasing, which could affect soil fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O, a powerful greenhouse gas. We assessed the effects of 35-56 months of moderate nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P additions on soil N2O fluxes and net soil N-cycling rates, and quantified the relative contributions of nitrification and denitrification to N2O fluxes. In 2008, a nutrient manipulation experiment was established along an elevation gradient (1000, 2000 and 3000 m of montane forests in southern Ecuador. Treatments included control, N, P and N+P addition (with additions of 50 kg N ha−1 yr-1 and 10 kg P ha−1 yr-1. Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured using static, vented chambers and N cycling was determined using the buried bag method. Measurements showed that denitrification was the main N2O source at all elevations, but that annual N2O emissions from control plots were low, and decreased along the elevation gradient (0.57