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Sample records for extracerebellar progenitors grafted

  1. Neural Stem Cell or Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived GABA-ergic Progenitor Cell Grafting in an Animal Model of Chronic Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhya, Dinesh; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Geetha A.; Zanirati, Gabriele; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    Grafting of neural stem cells (NSCs) or GABA-ergic progenitor cells (GPCs) into the hippocampus could offer an alternative therapy to hippocampal resection in patients with drug-resistant chronic epilepsy, which afflicts >30% of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) cases. Multipotent, self-renewing NSCs could be expanded from multiple regions of the developing and adult brain, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). On the other hand, GPCs could be generated from the medial and lateral ganglionic eminences of the embryonic brain and from hESCs and hiPSCs. To provide comprehensive methodologies involved in testing the efficacy of transplantation of NSCs and GPCs in a rat model of chronic TLE, NSCs derived from the rat medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and MGE-like GPCs derived from hiPSCs are taken as examples in this unit. The topics comprise description of the required materials, reagents and equipment, methods for obtaining rat MGE-NSCs and hiPSC-derived MGE-like GPCs in culture, generation of chronically epileptic rats, intrahippocampal grafting procedure, post-grafting evaluation of the effects of grafts on spontaneous recurrent seizures and cognitive and mood impairments, analyses of the yield and the fate of graft-derived cells, and the effects of grafts on the host hippocampus. PMID:27532817

  2. Human fetal brain-derived neural stem/progenitor cells grafted into the adult epileptic brain restrain seizures in rat models of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haejin; Yun, Seokhwan; Kim, Il-Sun; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Soo Chul; Kim, Won-Joo; Park, Kook In

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) because this can suppress spontaneous recurrent seizures in animal models. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of human neural stem/progenitor cells (huNSPCs) for treating TLE, we transplanted huNSPCs, derived from an aborted fetal telencephalon at 13 weeks of gestation and expanded in culture as neurospheres over a long time period, into the epileptic hippocampus of fully kindled and pilocarpine-treated adult rats exhibiting TLE. In vitro, huNSPCs not only produced all three central nervous system neural cell types, but also differentiated into ganglionic eminences-derived γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons and released GABA in response to the depolarization induced by a high K+ medium. NSPC grafting reduced behavioral seizure duration, afterdischarge duration on electroencephalograms, and seizure stage in the kindling model, as well as the frequency and the duration of spontaneous recurrent motor seizures in pilocarpine-induced animals. However, NSPC grafting neither improved spatial learning or memory function in pilocarpine-treated animals. Following transplantation, grafted cells showed extensive migration around the injection site, robust engraftment, and long-term survival, along with differentiation into β-tubulin III+ neurons (∼34%), APC-CC1+ oligodendrocytes (∼28%), and GFAP+ astrocytes (∼8%). Furthermore, among donor-derived cells, ∼24% produced GABA. Additionally, to explain the effect of seizure suppression after NSPC grafting, we examined the anticonvulsant glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) levels in host hippocampal astrocytes and mossy fiber sprouting into the supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus in the epileptic brain. Grafted cells restored the expression of GDNF in host astrocytes but did not reverse the mossy fiber sprouting, eliminating the latter as potential mechanism. These results suggest that human fetal

  3. Human fetal brain-derived neural stem/progenitor cells grafted into the adult epileptic brain restrain seizures in rat models of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haejin Lee

    Full Text Available Cell transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE because this can suppress spontaneous recurrent seizures in animal models. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of human neural stem/progenitor cells (huNSPCs for treating TLE, we transplanted huNSPCs, derived from an aborted fetal telencephalon at 13 weeks of gestation and expanded in culture as neurospheres over a long time period, into the epileptic hippocampus of fully kindled and pilocarpine-treated adult rats exhibiting TLE. In vitro, huNSPCs not only produced all three central nervous system neural cell types, but also differentiated into ganglionic eminences-derived γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-ergic interneurons and released GABA in response to the depolarization induced by a high K+ medium. NSPC grafting reduced behavioral seizure duration, afterdischarge duration on electroencephalograms, and seizure stage in the kindling model, as well as the frequency and the duration of spontaneous recurrent motor seizures in pilocarpine-induced animals. However, NSPC grafting neither improved spatial learning or memory function in pilocarpine-treated animals. Following transplantation, grafted cells showed extensive migration around the injection site, robust engraftment, and long-term survival, along with differentiation into β-tubulin III+ neurons (∼34%, APC-CC1+ oligodendrocytes (∼28%, and GFAP+ astrocytes (∼8%. Furthermore, among donor-derived cells, ∼24% produced GABA. Additionally, to explain the effect of seizure suppression after NSPC grafting, we examined the anticonvulsant glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF levels in host hippocampal astrocytes and mossy fiber sprouting into the supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus in the epileptic brain. Grafted cells restored the expression of GDNF in host astrocytes but did not reverse the mossy fiber sprouting, eliminating the latter as potential mechanism. These results suggest

  4. Optogenetics reveal delayed afferent synaptogenesis on grafted human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avaliani, Natalia; Sørensen, Andreas Toft; Ledri, Marco

    2014-01-01

    properties such as tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents and action potentials (APs), as well as both spontaneous and evoked postsynaptic currents, indicating functional afferent synaptic inputs. The grafted cells had a distinct electrophysiological profile compared to host cells in the OHSCs with higher...... input resistance, lower resting membrane potential, and APs with lower amplitude and longer duration. To investigate the origin of synaptic afferents to the grafted lt-NES cell-derived neurons, the host neurons were transduced with Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and optogenetically activated by blue light...

  5. Effect of Extended-Release Niacin on Carotid Intima Media Thickness, Reactive Hyperemia, and Endothelial Progenitor Cell Mobilization: Insights From the Atherosclerosis Lesion Progression Intervention Using Niacin Extended Release in Saphenous Vein Grafts (ALPINE-SVG) Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Andres; Rangan, Bavana V; Coleman, Ameka; Xu, Hao; Kotsia, Anna; Christopoulos, Georgios; Sosa, Alan; Chao, Howard; Han, Henry; Abdurrahim, Guthbudeen; Roesle, Michele; de Lemos, James A; McGuire, Darren K; Packer, Milton; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2015-12-01

    Thirty-eight patients with intermediate (30%-60% diameter stenosis) saphenous vein graft lesions were randomized to extended-release niacin (ER-niacin) or placebo for 12 months. We sought to evaluate the impact of ER-niacin on carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), endothelial function, and endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) mobilization. Carotid B-mode ultrasound was used to image the common and internal carotid arteries, at baseline and at 12 months after enrollment. Reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry, as assessed with EndoPAT 2000 (Itamar Medical, Inc) and EPC mobilization assessed with flow cytometry, were measured at enrollment, and at 1 and 12 months. The baseline clinical characteristics were similar in the two study groups. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels tended to increase more in the ER-niacin group (5.9 ± 8.7 mg/dL vs 1.4 ± 7.1 mg/dL; P=.14). Between baseline and 12 months, right common carotid artery (0.96 ± 0.44 mm vs 0.70 ± 0.24 mm; P=.04), and left common carotid artery (0.80 ± 0.30 mm vs 0.70 ± 0.20 mm; P=.08) CIMT tended to decrease in the ER-niacin group, compared with no change in the placebo group. The change in logarithmic reactive hyperemia index between 1 month and 12 months was similar in patients receiving ER-niacin vs placebo (0.003 ± 0.12 vs -0.058 ± 0.12; P=.39), whereas EPC mobilization increased in the ER-niacin group and decreased in the placebo group (8.65 ± 28.41 vs -5.87 ± 30.23 EPC colony forming units/mL of peripheral blood; P=.02). ER-niacin did not have a significant impact on CIMT or endothelial function, but increased EPC mobilization.

  6. Cellular therapy after spinal cord injury using neural progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroemen, Maurice

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of cell-based therapies after spinal cord injury are explored. Particularly, the potential of adult derived neural progenitor cell (NPC) grafts to function as a permissive substrate for axonal regeneration was investigated. It was found that syngenic

  7. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics / Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting What Is Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) ... multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of the ...

  8. Stent graft placement for dysfunctional arteriovenous grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Gyeong Sik [Dept. of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, College of Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byung Seok; Ohm, Joon Young; Ahn, Moon Sang [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and outcomes of stent graft use in dysfunctional arteriovenous grafts. Eleven patients who underwent stent graft placement for a dysfunctional hemodialysis graft were included in this retrospective study. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene covered stent grafts were placed at the venous anastomosis site in case of pseudoaneurysm, venous laceration, elastic recoil or residual restenosis despite the repeated angioplasty. The patency of the arteriovenous graft was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Primary and secondary mean patency was 363 days and 741 days. Primary patency at 3, 6, and 12 months was 82%, 73%, and 32%, respectively. Secondary patency at the 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months was improved to 91%, 82%, 82%, 50%, and 25%, respectively. Fractures of the stent graft were observed in 2 patients, but had no effect on the patency. Stent graft placement in dysfunctional arteriovenous graft is useful and effective in prolonging graft patency.

  9. Distinct tissue formation by heterogeneous printing of osteo- and endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Wijnberg, Hans M; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2011-08-01

    The organ- or tissue-printing approach, based on layered deposition of cell-laden hydrogels, is a new technique in regenerative medicine suitable to investigate whether mimicking the anatomical organization of cells, matrix, and bioactive molecules is necessary for obtaining or improving functional engineered tissues. Currently, data on performance of multicellular printed constructs in vivo are limited. In this study we illustrate the ability of the system to print intricate porous constructs containing two different cell types--endothelial progenitors and multipotent stromal cells--and show that these grafts retain heterogeneous cell organization after subcutaneous implantation in immunodeficient mice. We demonstrate that cell differentiation leading to the expected tissue formation occurs at the site of the deposited progenitor cell type. While perfused blood vessels are formed in the endothelial progenitor cell-laden part of the constructs, bone formation is taking place in the multipotent stromal cell-laden part of the printed grafts.

  10. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Klassen, Henry

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the host response to murine retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) following transplantation to the subretinal space (SRS) of the pig. RPCs from GFP mice were transplanted subretinally in 18 nonimmunosuppressed normal or laser-treated pigs. Evaluation of the SRS was performed on hematoxylin...... mononuclear infiltration in the choroid with graft rejection occurring over 2-5 weeks. Serum analysis confirmed that mice and pigs are discordant species; however, a cell-mediated acute mechanism appears to be responsible, rather than an antibody-mediated rejection....

  11. Bone grafting: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Joshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafting is the process by which bone is transferred from a source (donor to site (recipient. Due to trauma from accidents by speedy vehicles, falling down from height or gunshot injury particularly in human being, acquired or developmental diseases like rickets, congenital defects like abnormal bone development, wearing out because of age and overuse; lead to bone loss and to replace the loss we need the bone grafting. Osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, mechanical supports are the four basic mechanisms of bone graft. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. An ideal bone graft material is biologically inert, source of osteogenic, act as a mechanical support, readily available, easily adaptable in terms of size, shape, length and replaced by the host bone. Except blood, bone is grafted with greater frequency. Bone graft indicated for variety of orthopedic abnormalities, comminuted fractures, delayed unions, non-unions, arthrodesis and osteomyelitis. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. By adopting different procedure of graft preservation its antigenicity can be minimized. The concept of bone banking for obtaining bone grafts and implants is very useful for clinical application. Absolute stability require for successful incorporation. Ideal bone graft must possess osteogenic, osteoinductive and osteocon-ductive properties. Cancellous bone graft is superior to cortical bone graft. Usually autologous cancellous bone graft are used as fresh grafts where as allografts are employed as an alloimplant. None of the available type of bone grafts possesses all these properties therefore, a single type of graft cannot be recomm-ended for all types of orthopedic abnormalities. Bone grafts and implants can be selected as per clinical problems, the equipments available and preference of

  12. Functional Blood Progenitor Markers in Developing Human Liver Progenitors

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    Orit Goldman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the early fetal liver, hematopoietic progenitors expand and mature together with hepatoblasts, the liver progenitors of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Previous analyses of human fetal livers indicated that both progenitors support each other's lineage maturation and curiously share some cell surface markers including CD34 and CD133. Using the human embryonic stem cell (hESC system, we demonstrate that virtually all hESC-derived hepatoblast-like cells (Hep cells transition through a progenitor stage expressing CD34 and CD133 as well as GATA2, an additional hematopoietic marker that has not previously been associated with human hepatoblast development. Dynamic expression patterns for CD34, CD133, and GATA2 in hepatoblasts were validated in human fetal livers collected from the first and second trimesters of gestation. Knockdown experiments demonstrate that each gene also functions to regulate hepatic fate mostly in a cell-autonomous fashion, revealing unprecedented roles of fetal hematopoietic progenitor markers in human liver progenitors.

  13. The poster as modernist progenitor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katherine Hauser

    2015-01-01

    Ruth E. Iskin’s The Poster: Art, Advertising. Design, and Collecting, 1860s-1900s positions the late-nineteenth-century advertising poster as the progenitor of valued modernist practices typically attached solely to photography and film...

  14. Evaluation of 'out-of-specification' CliniMACS CD34-selection procedures of hematopoietic progenitor cell-apheresis products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Braakman (Eric); G.J. Schuurhuis (Gerrit Jan); F.W.M.B. Preijers (Frank); C. Voermans; K. Theunissen; I. van Riet; W.E. Fibbe (Willem); I. Slaper-Cortenbach (Ineke)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Immunomagnetic selection of CD34+hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) using CliniMACS CD34 selection technology is widely used to provide high-purity HPC grafts. However, the number of nucleated cells and CD34+cells recommended by the manufacturer for processing in a single

  15. Evaluation of 'out-of-specification' CliniMACS CD34-selection procedures of hematopoietic progenitor cell-apheresis products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, E.; Schuurhuis, G. J.; Preijers, F. W. M. B.; Voermans, C.; Theunissen, K.; van Riet, I.; Fibbe, W. E.; Slaper-Cortenbach, I.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunomagnetic selection of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) using CliniMACS CD34 selection technology is widely used to provide high-purity HPC grafts. However, the number of nucleated cells and CD34+ cells recommended by the manufacturer for processing in a single procedure

  16. Evaluation of 'out-of-specification' CliniMACS CD34-selection procedures of hematopoietic progenitor cell-apheresis products.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, E.; Schuurhuis, G.J.; Preijers, F.W.M.B.; Voermans, C.; Theunissen, K.; Riet, I van; Fibbe, W.E.; Slaper-Cortenbach, I.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunomagnetic selection of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) using CliniMACS CD34 selection technology is widely used to provide high-purity HPC grafts. However, the number of nucleated cells and CD34+ cells recommended by the manufacturer for processing in a single procedure

  17. Mesenchymal progenitor cells for the osteogenic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors of the osteogenic lineage provide the flexibility for bone to grow, maintain its function and homeostasis. Traditionally, colony-forming-unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) have been regarded as surrogates for mesenchymal progenitors; however, this definition cannot address the function of these progenitors in their native setting. Transgenic murine models including lineage-tracing technologies based on the cre-lox system have proven to be useful in delineating mesenchymal progenitors in their native environment. Although heterogeneity of cell populations of interest marked by a promoter-based approach complicates overall interpretation, an emerging complexity of mesenchymal progenitors has been revealed. Current literatures suggest two distinct types of bone progenitor cells; growth-associated mesenchymal progenitors contribute to explosive growth of bone in early life, whereas bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors contribute to the much slower remodeling process and response to injury that occurs mainly in adulthood. More detailed relationships of these progenitors need to be studied through further experimentation.

  18. Bone grafts in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  19. Embryonic Heart Progenitors and Cardiogenesis

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    Brade, Thomas; Pane, Luna S.; Moretti, Alessandra; Chien, Kenneth R.; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart is a highly specialized organ, comprised of many different cell types arising from distinct embryonic progenitor populations during cardiogenesis. Three precursor populations have been identified to contribute to different myocytic and nonmyocytic cell lineages of the heart: cardiogenic mesoderm cells (CMC), the proepicardium (PE), and cardiac neural crest cells (CNCCs). This review will focus on molecular cues necessary for proper induction, expansion, and lineage-specific differentiation of these progenitor populations during cardiac development in vivo. Moreover, we will briefly discuss how the knowledge gained on embryonic heart progenitor biology can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies for the management of congenital heart disease as well as for improvement of cardiac function in ischemic heart disease. PMID:24086063

  20. Postnatal subventricular zone progenitors switch their fate to generate neurons with distinct synaptic input patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Namasivayam; Li, Zhijun; Oettl, Lars-Lennart; Bartsch, Dusan; Schönig, Kai; Kelsch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-15

    New granule cell neurons (GCs) generated in the neonatal and adult subventricular zone (SVZ) have distinct patterns of input synapses in their dendritic domains. These synaptic input patterns determine the computations that the neurons eventually perform in the olfactory bulb. We observed that GCs generated earlier in postnatal life had acquired an 'adult' synaptic development only in one dendritic domain, and only later-born GCs showed an 'adult' synaptic development in both dendritic domains. It is unknown to what extent the distinct synaptic input patterns are already determined in SVZ progenitors and/or by the brain circuit into which neurons integrate. To distinguish these possibilities, we heterochronically transplanted retrovirally labeled SVZ progenitor cells. Once these transplanted progenitors, which mainly expressed Mash1, had differentiated into GCs, their glutamatergic input synapses were visualized by genetic tags. We observed that GCs derived from neonatal progenitors differentiating in the adult maintained their characteristic neonatal synapse densities. Grafting of adult SVZ progenitors to the neonate had a different outcome. These GCs formed synaptic densities that corresponded to neither adult nor neonatal patterns in two dendritic domains. In summary, progenitors in the neonatal and adult brain generate distinct GC populations and switch their fate to generate neurons with specific synaptic input patterns. Once they switch, adult progenitors require specific properties of the circuit to maintain their characteristic synaptic input patterns. Such determination of synaptic input patterns already at the progenitor-cell level may be exploited for brain repair to engineer neurons with defined wiring patterns. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Enrichment of oral mucosa and skin keratinocyte progenitor/stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kenji; Marcelo, Cynthia L; Feinberg, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    The isolation of human oral mucosa/skin keratinocytes progenitor/stem cells is clinically important to regenerate epithelial tissues for the treatment of oral mucosa/skin defects. Researchers have attempted to isolate a keratinocyte progenitor/stem cell population using cell markers, rapid adherence to collagen type IV, and other methods. In this regard, one of the specific characteristics of keratinocyte progenitor/stem cells is that these cells have a smaller diameter than differentiated cells. This chapter describes methods used in our laboratory to set up primary human oral mucosa and skin keratinocytes in a chemically defined culture system devoid of animal derived products. We utilized the cells in a FDA-approved human clinical trial that involved the intraoral grafting of an ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalent to increase keratinized tissue around teeth. We also provide two protocols on how to sort keratinocytes using physical criterion, cell size, using a cell sorter and a serial filtration system.

  2. Circulating Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Vascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, O.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have altered levels and function of (bone marrow-derived) vascular progenitor cells (endothelial progenitor cells-EPC, smooth muscle progenitor cells-SPC) which may contribute to their accelerated atherosclerosis. The results from clinical and experimental studies in this

  3. Fatty acid binding protein 4 expression marks a population of adipocyte progenitors in white and brown adipose tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tizhong; Liu, Weiyi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissues regulate metabolism, reproduction, and life span. The development and growth of adipose tissue are due to increases of both adipocyte cell size and cell number; the latter is mediated by adipocyte progenitors. Various markers have been used to identify either adipocyte progenitors or mature adipocytes. The fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), commonly known as adipocyte protein 2 (aP2), has been extensively used as a marker for differentiated adipocytes. However, whether aP2 is expressed in adipogenic progenitors is controversial. Using Cre/LoxP-based cell lineage tracing in mice, we have identified a population of aP2-expressing progenitors in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of both white and brown adipose tissues. The aP2-lineage progenitors reside in the adipose stem cell niche and express adipocyte progenitor markers, including CD34, Sca1, Dlk1, and PDGFRα. When isolated and grown in culture, the aP2-expressing SVF cells proliferate and differentiate into adipocytes upon induction. Conversely, ablation of the aP2 lineage greatly reduces the adipogenic potential of SVF cells. When grafted into wild-type mice, the aP2-lineage progenitors give rise to adipose depots in recipient mice. Therefore, the expression of aP2 is not limited to mature adipocytes, but also marks a pool of undifferentiated progenitors associated with the vasculature of adipose tissues. Our finding adds to the repertoire of adipose progenitor markers and points to a new regulator of adipose plasticity.—Shan, T., Liu, W., Kuang, S. Fatty acid-binding protein 4 expression marks a population of adipocyte progenitors in white and brown adipose tissues. PMID:23047894

  4. Topical HDL administration reduces vein graft atherosclerosis in apo E deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yingmei; Gordts, Stephanie C; Chen, Feng; Hu, Yanhua; Van Craeyveld, Eline; Jacobs, Frank; Carlier, Vincent; Feng, Yuanbo; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xu, Qingbo; Ni, Yicheng; De Geest, Bart

    2011-02-01

    Use of autologous vein grafts for surgical revascularisation is limited by vein graft failure. Topical high-density lipoprotein (HDL) administration on the adventitial side of vein grafts was evaluated as a new therapeutic modality to improve vein graft patency and function. Caval veins of C57BL/6 apo E(-/-) mice were grafted to the right carotid arteries of recipient 3 month-old C57BL/6 TIE2-LacZ/apo E(-/-) mice. HDL (200 μg/ml; 50 μl) in 20% pluronic F-127 gel was applied on the adventitial side of vein grafts. Topical HDL application reduced intimal area by 55% (p < 0.001) at day 28 compared to control mice. Blood flow quantified by micro magnetic resonance imaging at day 28 was 2.8-fold (p < 0.0001) higher in grafts of topical HDL treated mice than in control mice. Topical HDL potently reduced intimal inflammation and resulted in enhanced endothelial regeneration as evidenced by a 1.9-fold (p < 0.05) increase in the number of CD31 positive endothelial cells. HDL potently enhanced migration and adhesion of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) in vitro, and these effects were dependent on signaling via scavenger receptor-BI, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, and NO, and on increased β1 integrin expression. Correspondingly, the number of CD31 β-galactosidase double positive cells, reflecting incorporated circulating progenitor cells, was 3.9-fold (p < 0.01) higher in grafts of HDL treated mice than in control grafts. Topical HDL administration on the adventitial side of vein grafts attenuates vein graft atherosclerosis via increased incorporation of circulating progenitor cells in the endothelium, enhanced endothelial regeneration, and reduced intimal inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Impact of Liver Graft Injury on Cancer Recurrence Posttransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Xian; Man, Kwan; Lo, Chung-Mau

    2017-11-01

    Liver transplantation is the most effective treatment for selected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. However, cancer recurrence, posttransplantation, remains to be the critical issue that affects the long-term outcome of hepatocellular carcinoma recipients. In addition to tumor biology itself, increasing evidence demonstrates that acute-phase liver graft injury is a result of hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury (which is an inevitable consequence during liver transplantation) and may promote cancer recurrence at late phase posttransplantation. The liver grafts from living donors, donors after cardiac death, and steatotic donors have been considered as promising sources of organs for liver transplantation and are associated with high incidence of liver graft injury. The acute-phase liver graft injury will trigger a series of inflammatory cascades, which may not only activate the cell signaling pathways regulating the tumor cell invasion and migration but also mobilize the circulating progenitor and immune cells to facilitate tumor recurrence and metastasis. The injured liver graft may also provide the favorable microenvironment for tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion through the disturbance of microcirculatory barrier function, induction of hypoxia and angiogenesis. This review aims to summarize the latest findings about the role and mechanisms of liver graft injury resulted from hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury on tumor recurrence posttransplantation, both in clinical and animal cohorts.

  6. Experimental interfascicular nerve grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, B R; Kline, D G; Coleman, W; Hudson, A R

    1979-09-01

    Twenty-nine adult rhesus monkeys underwent complete laceration of both tibial nerves at mid-thigh level and repair by different methods to study the relative efficacy of autogenous interfascicular nerve grafts. Sixteen animals in Group I had an interfascicular graft repair using short sural nerve autografts on one limb and fascicular repair without grafts on the other limb. Thirteen animals in Group II, after having a 1-cm segment of tibial nerve resected, had an interfascicular graft repair without tension in one limb and an epineurial repair under moderate tension in the other limb. Evoked nerve and muscle action potentials and muscle strenght in response to repetitive and tetanic stimulation were recorded as baseline values prelaceration and then on re-exploration at 4, 6, 9, or 12 months. All nerves were examined by light and electron microscopy. Electrophysiological data, particularly muscle strength response, showed non-graft repairs to be superior at 4 and 6 months of regeneration. However, by 9 and 12 months the graft repairs had caught up and were equal to the non-graft repairs. Histologically, it was observed that many axons missed the graft segments and were present in extrafascicular connective tissues. Nonetheless, enough axons regenerated to the distal nerve to explain the success of these relatively short grafts. From the results of these experiments, it is concluded that use of autogenous interfascicular grafts offers no advantage over end-to-end non-graft repair. When and end-to-end repair cannot be achieved, use of short interfascicular nerve grafts is feasible and will work.

  7. Spinal cord reconstitution with homologous neural grafts enables robust corticospinal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Ken; Lu, Paul; Nguyen, Kenny; Lee-Kubli, Corinne; Kumamaru, Hiromi; Yao, Lin; Knackert, Joshua; Poplawski, Gunnar; Dulin, Jennifer N; Strobl, Hans; Takashima, Yoshio; Biane, Jeremy; Conner, James; Zhang, Su-Chun; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2016-05-01

    The corticospinal tract (CST) is the most important motor system in humans, yet robust regeneration of this projection after spinal cord injury (SCI) has not been accomplished. In murine models of SCI, we report robust corticospinal axon regeneration, functional synapse formation and improved skilled forelimb function after grafting multipotent neural progenitor cells into sites of SCI. Corticospinal regeneration requires grafts to be driven toward caudalized (spinal cord), rather than rostralized, fates. Fully mature caudalized neural grafts also support corticospinal regeneration. Moreover, corticospinal axons can emerge from neural grafts and regenerate beyond the lesion, a process that is potentially related to the attenuation of the glial scar. Rat corticospinal axons also regenerate into human donor grafts of caudal spinal cord identity. Collectively, these findings indicate that spinal cord 'replacement' with homologous neural stem cells enables robust regeneration of the corticospinal projection within and beyond spinal cord lesion sites, achieving a major unmet goal of SCI research and offering new possibilities for clinical translation.

  8. Mucous membrane grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, H W A; Collin, J R O

    2008-01-01

    We review the use of mucous membrane grafting in the clinical management of dry eye-associated ocular surface disease. Literature review of the scientific evidence, presentation of guidelines and surgical details. The reformation and maintenance of a conjunctival fornix requires the addition of epithelial tissue, or a basement membrane which can be populated by healthy host epithelial cells. A healthy conjunctival or tarsal autograft, when available, is the ideal material. Oral mucosa does not contain goblet cells and therefore does not supplement the tear film: a full-thickness oral mucous membrane graft is the simplest graft to use if conjunctiva or tarsus is not available. Split-thickness mucosal grafts contract more, but are less bulky and pink than full-thickness grafts, and therefore should be used on the globe. Hard palate grafts are the thickest oral mucosal grafts and contract the least. Nasal mucosal grafts contain goblet cells that may contribute mucous to the tear film. This is maximised in turbinate mucosal grafts, which can relieve discomfort in extreme dry eye situations. Nasal septal cartilage contains fewer goblet cells, but adds rigidity. Amniotic membrane is thin and translucent-like conjunctiva, and possesses antiangiogenic, antiscarring and anti-inflammatory properties. It may become re-epithelialised with normal a conjunctival cell population and prevent postoperative cicatrisation, but requires the presence of healthy conjunctival stem cells to repopulate the graft, adequate lacrimal function to keep the graft moist, and a host site that is free from inflammation, otherwise it rapidly contracts. It can be combined with limbal transplantation and with an adjunctive antimetabolite.

  9. The poster as modernist progenitor

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine Hauser

    2015-01-01

    Ruth E. Iskin’s The Poster: Art, Advertising. Design, and Collecting, 1860s-1900s positions the late-nineteenth-century advertising poster as the progenitor of valued modernist practices typically attached solely to photography and film. Modernist biases separating high art from mass culture account for scholars ignoring posters, however the poster ushered in an innovative reductive graphic style as well as pioneered the notion of multiple originals.

  10. The poster as modernist progenitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Hauser

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ruth E. Iskin’s The Poster: Art, Advertising. Design, and Collecting, 1860s-1900s positions the late-nineteenth-century advertising poster as the progenitor of valued modernist practices typically attached solely to photography and film. Modernist biases separating high art from mass culture account for scholars ignoring posters, however the poster ushered in an innovative reductive graphic style as well as pioneered the notion of multiple originals.

  11. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Klassen, Henry

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the host response to murine retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) following transplantation to the subretinal space (SRS) of the pig. RPCs from GFP mice were transplanted subretinally in 18 nonimmunosuppressed normal or laser-treated pigs. Evaluation of the SRS was performed on hematoxylin...... inflammatory cells in the choroid near the transplantation site. Large choroidal infiltrates were evident at 2-5 weeks. Serum from naive and RPC-xenografted pigs contained significant levels of preformed IgG and IgM antibodies against murine antigens. Xenogeneic RPCs transplanted to the porcine SRS induced...... mononuclear infiltration in the choroid with graft rejection occurring over 2-5 weeks. Serum analysis confirmed that mice and pigs are discordant species; however, a cell-mediated acute mechanism appears to be responsible, rather than an antibody-mediated rejection....

  12. Cell fate analysis of embryonic ventral mesencephalic grafts in the 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Carvalho Neto

    Full Text Available Evidence from carefully conducted open label clinical trials suggested that therapeutic benefit can be achieved by grafting fetal dopaminergic (DAergic neurons derived from ventral mesencephalon (VM into the denervated striatum of Parkinson's disease (PD patients. However, two double-blind trials generated negative results reporting deleterious side effects such as prominent dyskinesias. Heterogeneous composition of VM grafts is likely to account for suboptimal clinical efficacy.We consider that gene expression patterns of the VM tissue needs to be better understood by comparing the genetic signature of the surviving and functioning grafts with the cell suspensions used for transplantation. In addition, it is crucial to assess whether the grafted cells exhibit the DAergic phenotype of adult substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc. To investigate this further, we used a GFP reporter mouse as source of VM tissue that enabled the detection and dissection of the grafts 6 weeks post implantation. A comparative gene expression analysis of the VM cell suspension and grafts revealed that VM grafts continue to differentiate post-implantation. In addition, implanted grafts showed a mature SNpc-like molecular DAergic phenotype with similar expression levels of TH, Vmat2 and Dat. However, by comparing gene expression of the adult SNpc with dissected grafts we detected a higher expression of progenitor markers in the grafts. Finally, when compared to the VM cell suspension, post-grafting there was a higher expression of markers inherent to glia and other neuronal populations.In summary, our data highlight the dynamic development of distinctive DAergic and non-DAergic gene expression markers associated with the maturation of VM grafts in vivo. The molecular signature of VM grafts and its functional relevance should be further explored in future studies aimed at the optimization of DAergic cell therapy approaches in PD.

  13. Melting graft wound syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiou-Mei Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Melting graft wound syndrome is characterized by progressive epidermal loss from a previously well-taken skin graft, healed burn, or donor site. It may result in considerable morbidity and require prolonged treatment. We report a 23-year-old flame-burned patient with second- to third-degree burns involving more than 70% of the total body surface area, whose condition was complicated with septic shock. The patient presented with erosions and ulcers occurring on previously well-taken skin graft recipient sites over both legs and progressive epidermal loss on donor sites over the back. The patient's presentation was compatible with the diagnosis of melting graft wound syndrome, and we successfully treated the patient with debridement and supportive treatment.

  14. Transplantation of human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells ameliorates renal injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongwei; Zhang, Wenjian; Xu, Shiqing; Lin, Hua; Sui, Weiguo; Liu, Honglin; Peng, Liang; Fang, Qing; Chen, Li; Lou, Jinning

    2017-06-27

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). Pancreas or islet transplantation has been reported to prevent the development of DN lesions and ameliorate or reverse existing glomerular lesions in animal models. Shortage of pancreas donor is a severe problem. Islets derived from stem cells may offer a potential solution to this problem. To evaluate the effect of stem cell-derived islet transplantation on DN in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced DM. Pancreatic progenitor cells were isolated from aborted fetuses of 8 weeks of gestation. And islets were prepared by suspension culture after a differentiation of progenitor cells in medium containing glucagon-like peptide-1 (Glp-1) and nicotinamide. Then islets were transplanted into the liver of diabetic rats via portal vein. Blood glucose, urinary volume, 24 h urinary protein and urinary albumin were measured once biweekly for 16 weeks. Graft survival was evaluated by monitoring human C-peptide level in rat sera and by immunohistochemical staining for human mitochondrial antigen and human C-peptide in liver tissue. The effect of progenitor-derived islets on filtration membrane was examined by electron microscopy and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Immunohistochemical staining, real-time PCR and western blot were employed for detecting fibronectin, protein kinase C beta (PKCβ), protein kinase A (PKA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Islet-like clusters derived from 8th gestational-week human fetal pancreatic progenitors survived in rat liver. And elevated serum level of human C-peptide was detected. Blood glucose, 24 h urinary protein and urinary albumin were lower in progenitor cell group than those in DN or insulin treatment group. Glomerular basement membrane thickness and fibronectin accumulation decreased significantly while podocytes improved morphologically in progenitor cell group. Furthermore, receptor of advanced glycation

  15. FGF8 activates proliferation and migration in mouse post-natal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cruz-Martinez

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8 is a key molecular signal that is necessary for early embryonic development of the central nervous system, quickly disappearing past this point. It is known to be one of the primary morphogenetic signals required for cell fate and survival processes in structures such as the cerebellum, telencephalic and isthmic organizers, while its absence causes severe abnormalities in the nervous system and the embryo usually dies in early stages of development. In this work, we have observed a new possible therapeutic role for this factor in demyelinating disorders, such as leukodystrophy or multiple sclerosis. In vitro, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were cultured with differentiating medium and in the presence of FGF8. Differentiation and proliferation studies were performed by immunocytochemistry and PCR. Also, migration studies were performed in matrigel cultures, where oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were placed at a certain distance of a FGF8-soaked heparin bead. The results showed that both migration and proliferation was induced by FGF8. Furthermore, a similar effect was observed in an in vivo demyelinating mouse model, where oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were observed migrating towards the FGF8-soaked heparin beads where they were grafted. In conclusion, the results shown here demonstrate that FGF8 is a novel factor to induce oligodendrocyte progenitor cell activation, migration and proliferation in vitro, which can be extrapolated in vivo in demyelinated animal models.

  16. Transplanting oligodendrocyte progenitors into the adult CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, R.J.M.; Blakemore, W.F. [Medical Research Council, Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    1997-01-01

    This review covers a number of aspects of the behaviour of oligodendrocyte progenitors following transplantation into the adult CNS. First, an account is given of the ability of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors, grown in tissue culture in the presence of PDGF and bFGF, to extensively remyelinate focal areas of persistent demyelination. Secondly, we describe how transplanted clonal cell lines of oligodendrocyte progenitors will differentiate in to astrocytes as will oligodendrocytes following transplantation into pathological environments in which both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are absent, thereby manifesting the bipotentially demonstrable in vitro but not during development. Finally, a series of studies examining the migratory behaviour of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors (modelled using the oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG4) are described. (author).

  17. Lung epithelial tip progenitors integrate glucocorticoid- and STAT3-mediated signals to control progeny fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laresgoiti, Usua; Rao, Chandrika; Brady, Jane L.; Richardson, Rachel V.; Batchen, Emma J.; Chapman, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient alveolar gas exchange capacity is a major contributor to lung disease. During lung development, a population of distal epithelial progenitors first produce bronchiolar-fated and subsequently alveolar-fated progeny. The mechanisms controlling this bronchiolar-to-alveolar developmental transition remain largely unknown. We developed a novel grafting assay to test if lung epithelial progenitors are intrinsically programmed or if alveolar cell identity is determined by environmental factors. These experiments revealed that embryonic lung epithelial identity is extrinsically determined. We show that both glucocorticoid and STAT3 signalling can control the timing of alveolar initiation, but that neither pathway is absolutely required for alveolar fate specification; rather, glucocorticoid receptor and STAT3 work in parallel to promote alveolar differentiation. Thus, developmental acquisition of lung alveolar fate is a robust process controlled by at least two independent extrinsic signalling inputs. Further elucidation of these pathways might provide therapeutic opportunities for restoring alveolar capacity. PMID:27578791

  18. Autologous fat grafting: use of closed syringe microcannula system for enhanced autologous structural grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander RW

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Robert W Alexander,1 David Harrell2 1Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Harvest-Terumo Inc, Plymouth, MA, USA Objectives: Provide background for use of acquiring autologous adipose tissue as a tissue graft and source of adult progenitor cells for use in cosmetic plastic surgery. Discuss the background and mechanisms of action of closed syringe vacuum lipoaspiration, with emphasis on accessing adipose-derived mesenchymal/stromal cells and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF for use in aesthetic, structural reconstruction and regenerative applications. Explain a proven protocol for acquiring high-quality autologous fat grafts (AFG with use of disposable, microcannula systems. Design: Explain the components and advantage of use of the patented super luer-lock and microcannulas system for use with the closed-syringe system. A sequential explanation of equipment selection for minimally traumatic lipoaspiration in small volumes is presented, including use of blunt injection cannulas to reduce risk of embolism. Results: Thousands of AFG have proven safe and efficacious for lipoaspiration techniques for large and small structural fat grafting procedures. The importance and advantages of gentle harvesting of the adipose tissue complex has become very clear in the past 5 years. The closed-syringe system offers a minimally invasive, gentle system with which to mobilize subdermal fat tissues in a suspension form. Resulting total nuclear counting of undifferentiated cells of the adipose-derived -SVF suggests that the yield achieved is better than use of always-on, constant mechanical pump applied vacuum systems. Conclusion: Use of a closed-syringe lipoaspiration system featuring disposable microcannulas offers a safe and effective means of harvesting small volumes of nonmanipulated adipose tissues and its accompanying progenitor cells within the SVF. Closed syringes and microcannulas are

  19. Progenitors of Supernovae Type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, S.; Nelemans, G.; Bours, M.; Portegies Zwart, S.; Claeys, J.; Mennekens, N.; Ruiter, A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the significance of Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) in many fields in astrophysics, SNeIa lack a theoretical explanation. The standard scenarios involve thermonuclear explosions of carbon/oxygen white dwarfs approaching the Chandrasekhar mass; either by accretion from a companion or by a merger of two white dwarfs. We investigate the contribution from both channels to the SNIa rate with the binary population synthesis (BPS) code SeBa in order to constrain binary processes such as the mass retention efficiency of WD accretion and common envelope evolution. We determine the theoretical rates and delay time distribution of SNIa progenitors and in particular study how assumptions affect the predicted rates.

  20. Red supergiants as supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ben

    2017-09-01

    It is now well-established from pre-explosion imaging that red supergiants (RSGs) are the direct progenitors of Type-IIP supernovae. These images have been used to infer the physical properties of the exploding stars, yielding some surprising results. In particular, the differences between the observed and predicted mass spectrum has provided a challenge to our view of stellar evolutionary theory. However, turning what is typically a small number of pre-explosion photometric points into the physical quantities of stellar luminosity and mass requires a number of assumptions about the spectral appearance of RSGs, as well as their evolution in the last few years of life. Here I will review what we know about RSGs, with a few recent updates on how they look and how their appearance changes as they approach supernova. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  1. [Chickenpox, burns and grafts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Zegers, J; Fidel Avendaño, L

    1979-01-01

    An outbreak of chickenpox that occurred at the Burns Repair Surgery Unit, Department of Children's Surgery, Hospital R. del Río, between June and November, 1975, is reported. 27 cases of burned children were studied, including analysis of correlations of the stages and outcome of the disease (varicela), the trauma (burns) and the graft (repair surgery). As a result, the authors emphasize the following findings: 1. Burns and their repair are not aggravating factors for varicella. In a small number of cases the exanthema looked more confluent in the graft surgical areas and in the first degree burns healing spontaneously. 2. Usually there was an uneventful outcome of graft repair surgery on a varicella patient, either during the incubation period, the acme or the convalescence. 3. The fact that the outmost intensity of secondary viremia of varicella occurs before the onset of exanthemia, that is, during the late incubation period, is confirmed.

  2. Grafts for Ridge Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E

    2015-08-07

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome.

  3. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Jamjoom

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome.

  4. Evaluation of alveolar grafting with tibial graft in adolescent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadique Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The tibial graft offers an excellent alternative to the conventional standard grafts such as iliac crest or rib grafts. The efficiency of the treatment measured at 6 months period on standard OPG or CT is comparable to the results obtained with the rib/iliac crest.

  5. Bone Graft Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... created in or between the bones of the spine by disease, injury, deformity or during a surgical procedure such as spinal ... be used in surgical procedures to stabilize the spine after a fracture or to correct deformity. What are Bone Graft Substitutes? Since both allograft ...

  6. Artery Bypass Grafting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    nary artery disease (CAD) was coronary artery bypass graft (CAB G) using a segment of saphenous vein interposed between the ascend- ing aorta and the coronary artery distal to the obstructing lesion. This was performed by David Sabiston of Duke University in 1962. With the use of the recently developed technique of ...

  7. Artery Bypass Grafting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    development of CABG without CPB as occurring in three stages. Figure 1: The early stage: Grafts were limited to ... This interest led to the development of techniques such as mini- mally invasive direct coronary artery surgery (MIDCAB), surgery ... Diazepam 0.1 rng/kg P0. Cyclimorph 0.lmg/kg IMI on call to theatre. Theatre ...

  8. Acrylonitrile grafted to PVDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Eitouni, Hany Basam

    2015-03-31

    PVDF-g-PAN has been synthesized by grafting polyacrylonitrile onto polyvinylidene fluoride using an ATRP/AGET method. The novel polymer is ionically conducive and has much more flexibility than PVDF alone, making it especially useful either as a binder in battery cell electrodes or as a polymer electrolyte in a battery cell.

  9. Aging, progenitor cell exhaustion, and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Frederick M; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J; Davis, Bryce H; Wang, Tao; Gregg, David; Ramaswami, Priya; Pippen, Anne M; Annex, Brian H; Dong, Chunming; Taylor, Doris A

    2003-07-29

    Atherosclerosis is largely attributed to chronic vascular injury, as occurs with excess cholesterol; however, the effect of concomitant vascular aging remains unexplained. We hypothesize that the effect of time in atherosclerosis progression is related to obsolescence of endogenous progenitor cells that normally repair and rejuvenate the arteries. Here we show that chronic treatment with bone marrow-derived progenitor cells from young nonatherosclerotic ApoE-/- mice prevents atherosclerosis progression in ApoE-/- recipients despite persistent hypercholesterolemia. In contrast, treatment with bone marrow cells from older ApoE-/- mice with atherosclerosis is much less effective. Cells with vascular progenitor potential are decreased in the bone marrow of aging ApoE-/- mice, but cells injected from donor mice engraft on recipient arteries in areas at risk for atherosclerotic injury. Our data indicate that progressive progenitor cell deficits may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis.

  10. The Masses of Supernova Remnant Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin

    2012-10-01

    One of the key constraints on the production of supernovae {SNe} is the initial mass of the stars that eventually end in these cataclysmic events. Historically it has been very difficult to obtain estimates of the masses of SN progenitors because there have only been a few dozen nearby events, only a handful of which have high-quality precursor imaging.We propose dramatically increasing the number of SNe with progenitor mass estimates by applying an exciting new technique to HST archival data in M31 and M33. Through detailed modeling of the stellar populations surrounding the location of any known SNe, we can constrain the progenitor mass. Since supernova remnants {SNRs} mark the locations of SNe for the past 20,000 years and M31 and M33 contain hundreds of these objects, detailed studies of the stellar populations at these locations will constrain the progenitor masses of potentially hundreds of events. After correlating archival HST imaging with the SNR positions, there is useful data for 137 SNRs. We have already measured the progenitor masses for 65 SNRs in M31 and plan to apply our method to 72 SNRs in M33. This proposal will fund the publication of our M31 measurements, analysis of the M33 SNRs, and public release of our photometry. Ultimately, our work will increase the existing sample of SN progenitor masses in the literature by a factor of 20.

  11. Siloxane-grafted membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Obligin, Alan S.

    1989-01-01

    Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional groups. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

  12. Multilineage Potential and Self-Renewal Define an Epithelial Progenitor Cell Population in the Adult Thymus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlia Wong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thymic epithelial cells (TECs are critical for T cell development and self-tolerance but are gradually lost with age. The existence of thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPCs in the postnatal thymus has been inferred, but their identity has remained enigmatic. Here, we assessed the entire adult TEC compartment in order to reveal progenitor capacity is retained exclusively within a subset of immature thymic epithelium displaying several hallmark features of stem/progenitor function. These adult TEPCs generate mature cortical and medullary lineages in a stepwise fashion, including Aire+ TEC, within fetal thymus reaggregate grafts. Although relatively quiescent in vivo, adult TEPCs demonstrate significant in vitro colony formation and self-renewal. Importantly, 3D-cultured TEPCs retain their capacity to differentiate into cortical and medullary TEC lineages when returned to an in vivo thymic microenvironment. No other postnatal TEC subset exhibits this combination of properties. The characterization of adult TEPC will enable progress in understanding TEC biology in aging and regeneration.

  13. The influence of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skardelly, Marco, E-mail: Marco.Skardelly@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Glien, Anja; Groba, Claudia; Schlichting, Nadine [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Kamprad, Manja [Institute of Clinical Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Meixensberger, Juergen [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Milosevic, Javorina [Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-12-10

    In allogenic and xenogenic transplantation, adequate immunosuppression plays a major role in graft survival, especially over the long term. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate has not been sufficiently explored. The focus of this study is to systematically investigate the effects of the following four different immunotherapeutic strategies on human neural progenitor cell survival/death, proliferation, metabolic activity, differentiation and migration in vitro: (1) cyclosporine A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor; (2) everolimus (RAD001), an mTOR-inhibitor; (3) mycophenolic acid (MPA, mycophenolate), an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and (4) prednisolone, a steroid. At the minimum effective concentration (MEC), we found a prominent decrease in hNPCs' proliferative capacity (BrdU incorporation), especially for CsA and MPA, and an alteration of the NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity. Cell death rate, neurogenesis, gliogenesis and cell migration remained mostly unaffected under these conditions for all four immunosuppressants, except for apoptotic cell death, which was significantly increased by MPA treatment. - Highlights: • Four immunosuppresants (ISs) were tested in human neural progenitor cells in vitro. • Cyclosporine A and mycophenolic acid showed a prominent anti-proliferative activity • Mycophenolic acid exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect. • NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity was occasionally induced by ISs. • Neuronal differentiation and migration potential remained unaffected by ISs treatment.

  14. Generation of Regionally Specified Neural Progenitors and Functional Neurons from Human Embryonic Stem Cells under Defined Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnete Kirkeby

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To model human neural-cell-fate specification and to provide cells for regenerative therapies, we have developed a method to generate human neural progenitors and neurons from human embryonic stem cells, which recapitulates human fetal brain development. Through the addition of a small molecule that activates canonical WNT signaling, we induced rapid and efficient dose-dependent specification of regionally defined neural progenitors ranging from telencephalic forebrain to posterior hindbrain fates. Ten days after initiation of differentiation, the progenitors could be transplanted to the adult rat striatum, where they formed neuron-rich and tumor-free grafts with maintained regional specification. Cells patterned toward a ventral midbrain (VM identity generated a high proportion of authentic dopaminergic neurons after transplantation. The dopamine neurons showed morphology, projection pattern, and protein expression identical to that of human fetal VM cells grafted in parallel. VM-patterned but not forebrain-patterned neurons released dopamine and reversed motor deficits in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

  15. Autologous fat grafting does not improve burn scar appearance: A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Shaili; Ramirez, Jesus Ignacio; Maguina, Pirko

    2017-05-01

    It has been proposed that fat grafts can improve the appearance of mature burn scars. The pluripotent progenitor cells contained within autologous adipose tissue grafts are believed to induce skin repair and improve scar appearance. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the effects of fat grafts on the appearance of mature burn scars. Pediatric burn survivors with mature scars were recruited for this study. A homogeneous scar measuring 10×5cm was randomized into two halves: one was injected with autologous fat graft and the other with normal saline. Scar injection was performed using standard Coleman technique. Appearance of the two scar halves was assessed, six to twelve months later by the operating surgeon, by blinded observers and by the blinded patients. Eight patients completed the study pilot with 6-12 month follow-up. Assessment by the patients did not clearly favor fat grafts or saline injections; the operating surgeon did not identify any differences on any of the patients; the blinded observers measured all scars using Vancouver Scar Scale and noticed no differences in pigmentation, vascularity and height; differences in pliability showed similar changes in both the fat grafted and control arms. After the pilot was completed, decision was made to stop enrolling patients for this study since no benefit to fat grafting was observed. Single treatment with autologous fat grafts did not improve mature pediatric burn scars when compared to normal saline injections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Safety concern between autologous fat graft, mesenchymal stem cell and osteosarcoma recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Perrot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant primary bone tumour in young adult treated by neo adjuvant chemotherapy, surgical tumor removal and adjuvant multidrug chemotherapy. For correction of soft tissue defect consecutive to surgery and/or tumor treatment, autologous fat graft has been proposed in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here a case of a late local recurrence of osteosarcoma which occurred 13 years after the initial pathology and 18 months after a lipofilling procedure. Because such recurrence was highly unexpected, we investigated the possible relationship of tumor growth with fat injections and with mesenchymal stem/stromal cell like cells which are largely found in fatty tissue. Results obtained in osteosarcoma pre-clinical models show that fat grafts or progenitor cells promoted tumor growth. SIGNIFICANCE: These observations and results raise the question of whether autologous fat grafting is a safe reconstructive procedure in a known post neoplasic context.

  17. Mast cell progenitor trafficking and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Jenny; Gurish, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are derived from the hematopoietic progenitors found in bone marrow and spleen. Committed mast cell progenitors are rare in bone marrow suggesting they are rapidly released into the blood where they circulate and move out into the peripheral tissues. This migration is controlled in a tissue specific manner. Basal trafficking to the intestine requires expression of α4β7 integrin and the chemokine receptor CXCR2 by the mast cell progenitors and expression of MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the intestinal endothelium; and is also controlled by dendritic cells expressing the transcriptional regulatory protein T-bet. None of these play a role in basal trafficking to the lung. With the induction of allergic inflammation in the lung, there is marked recruitment of committed mast cell progenitors to lung and these cells must express α4β7 and α4β1 integrins. Within the lung there is a requirement for expression of VCAM-1 on the endothelium that is regulated by CXCR2, also expressed on the endothelium. There is a further requirement for expression of the CCR2/CCL2 pathways for full recruitment of the mast cell progenitors to the antigen-inflamed lung.

  18. Cell therapy of hip osteonecrosis with autologous bone marrow grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernigou Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the reasons for bone remodeling leading to an insufficient creeping substitution after osteonecrosis in the femoral head may be the small number of progenitor cells in the proximal femur and the trochanteric region. Because of this lack of progenitor cells, treatment modalities should stimulate and guide bone remodeling to sufficient creeping substitution to preserve the integrity of the femoral head. Core decompression with bone graft is used frequently in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. In the current series, grafting was done with autologous bone marrow obtained from the iliac crest of patients operated on for early stages of osteonecrosis of the hip before collapse with the hypothesis that before stage of subchondral collapse, increasing the number of progenitor cells in the proximal femur will stimulate bone remodeling and creeping substitution and thereby improve functional outcome. Materials and Methods: Between 1990 and 2000, 342 patients (534 hips with avascular osteonecrosis at early stages (Stages I and II were treated with core decompression and autologous bone marrow grafting obtained from the iliac crest of patients operated on for osteonecrosis of the hip. The percentage of hips affected by osteonecrosis in this series of 534 hips was 19% in patients taking corticosteroids, 28% in patients with excessive alcohol intake, and 31% in patients with sickle cell disease. The mean age of the patients at the time of decompression and autologous bone marrow grafting was 39 years (range: 16-61 years. The aspirated marrow was reduced in volume by concentration and injected into the femoral head after core decompression with a small trocar. To measure the number of progenitor cells transplanted, the fibroblast colony forming unit was used as an indicator of the stroma cell activity. Results: Patients were followed up from 8 to 18 years. The outcome was determined by the changes in the Harris hip score

  19. Multipotent progenitor cells in gingival connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Benjamin P J; Ferre, François C; Couty, Ludovic; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Gourven, Murielle; Naveau, Adrien; Coulomb, Bernard; Lafont, Antoine; Gogly, Bruno

    2010-09-01

    The gum has an exceptional capacity for healing. To examine the basis for this property and explore the potential of conferring it to organs with inferior healing capacity, we sought the presence of progenitor cells in gingival connective tissue. Colony-forming units of fibroblast-enriched cells from gingival fibroblast cultures were assessed for expression of membrane markers of mesenchymal stem cells; capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondroblasts, and adipocytes; and engraftment efficiency after in vivo transfer. On the basis of their ability to differentiate into several lineages, proliferate from single cells, induce calcium deposits, and secrete collagen in vivo after transfer on hydroxyapatite carriers, we suggest that this population represents gingival multipotent progenitor cells. The discovery of progenitor cells in gingival connective tissue may help improve our understanding of how the wounded gum is capable of almost perfect healing and opens the prospect of cellular therapy for wound healing using readily available cells at limited risk to the patient.

  20. New insights into the cellular makeup and progenitor potential of palatal connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Emoke; Cenariu, Mihai; Kasaj, Adrian; Florea, Adrian; Soancă, Andrada; Roman, Alexandra; Georgiu, Carmen

    2017-12-01

    The present study investigated the regenerative potential of connective tissues harvested from two palatal areas widely used as donor sites for muco-gingival surgical approaches. Connective tissue grafts (CTGs) were obtained by de-epithelialisation of a free gingival graft (deCTG) and by a split flap approach from a previous donor site (reCTG). Two types of mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs) were isolated and were named de-epithelialised MSCs (deMSCs) and re-entry MSCs (reMSCs). The cells were characterised and cellular functionality was investigated. CTGs were evaluated using immunohistochemical and ultrastructural approaches. No significant differences were observed regarding the frequency of colony-forming unit- fibroblasts, migration potential, and population doubling time between the two cell lines (p > 0.05). Both cell lines showed positivity for CD105, CD73, CD90, and CD44 and negative expression for CD34/45, CD14, CD79a, and HLA-DR. MSCs from both cell lines successfully differentiated into osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. Cells expressing antigens characteristic of CD34+ stromal cells (CD34+, αSMA-, CD31-) were traced in both CTGs. Ultrastructural analysis highlighted the presence of putative progenitors, namely fibroblasts,-in the pericapillary regions and in remote regions of the lamina propria- and pericytes-surrounding the capillaries. This study provides supplementary arguments for the use of CTG grafts in clinical practice due to the presence of putative progenitor cell. However, results were inconclusive regarding clinical decision-making to determine optimal harvesting area. Prior harvesting in the donor area did not appear to alter the regenerative capabilities of the connective tissue. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  2. Evaluation of islets derived from human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells in diabetes treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Jian; Xu, Shi-Qing; Cai, Han-Qing; Men, Xiu-Li; Wang, Zai; Lin, Hua; Chen, Li; Jiang, Yong-Wei; Liu, Hong-Lin; Li, Cheng-Hui; Sui, Wei-Guo; Deng, Hong-Kui; Lou, Jin-Ning

    2013-01-01

    With the shortage of donor organs for islet transplantation, insulin-producing cells have been generated from different types of stem cell. Human fetal pancreatic stem cells have a better self-renewal capacity than adult stem cells and can readily differentiate into pancreatic endocrine cells, making them a potential source for islets in diabetes treatment. In the present study, the functions of pancreatic islets derived from human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Human pancreatic progenitor cells isolated from the fetal pancreas were expanded and differentiated into islet endocrine cells in culture. Markers for endocrine and exocrine functions as well as those for alpha and beta cells were analyzed by immunofluorescent staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To evaluate the functions of these islets in vivo, the islet-like structures were transplanted into renal capsules of diabetic nude mice. Immunohistochemical staining for human C-peptide and human mitochondrion antigen was applied to confirm the human origin and the survival of grafted islets. Human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells were able to expand in medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and leukemia inhibitor factor (LIF), and to differentiate into pancreatic endocrine cells with high efficiency upon the actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 and activin-A. The differentiated cells expressed insulin, glucagon, glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), GLUT2 and voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC), and were able to aggregate into islet-like structures containing alpha and beta cells upon suspension. These structures expressed and released a higher level of insulin than adhesion cultured cells, and helped to maintain normoglycemia in diabetic nude mice after transplantation. Human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells have good capacity for generating insulin producing cells and provide a promising potential source for diabetes treatment.

  3. Synergistic actions of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in vascularizing bioengineered tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo K Moioli

    Full Text Available Poor angiogenesis is a major road block for tissue repair. The regeneration of virtually all tissues is limited by angiogenesis, given the diffusion of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products is limited to a few hundred micrometers. We postulated that co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells improves angiogenesis of tissue repair and hence the outcome of regeneration. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using bone as a model whose regeneration is impaired unless it is vascularized. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs were isolated from each of three healthy human bone marrow samples and reconstituted in a porous scaffold. MSCs were seeded in micropores of 3D calcium phosphate (CP scaffolds, followed by infusion of gel-suspended CD34(+ hematopoietic cells. Co-transplantation of CD34(+ HSCs and CD34(- MSCs in microporous CP scaffolds subcutaneously in the dorsum of immunocompromised mice yielded vascularized tissue. The average vascular number of co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSC scaffolds was substantially greater than MSC transplantation alone. Human osteocalcin was expressed in the micropores of CP scaffolds and was significantly increased upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Human nuclear staining revealed the engraftment of transplanted human cells in vascular endothelium upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Based on additional in vitro results of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, we adsorbed VEGF with co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSCs in the microporous CP scaffolds in vivo, and discovered that vascular number and diameter further increased, likely owing to the promotion of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by VEGF. Together, co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may improve the regeneration of vascular dependent tissues such as bone

  4. Suction blister grafting - Modifications for easy harvesting and grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Suction blister grafting is a simple modality of treatment of patients with resistant and stable vitiligo. But raising the blisters may be time consuming and transferring to the recipient site may be difficult as the graft is ultrathin. By doing some modifications we can make the technique simpler and easier. We can decrease the blister induction time by intradermal injection of saline, exposure to Wood′s lamp, intrablister injection of saline. By these methods we can decrease the blister induction time from 2-3 hrs to 45-90 minutes. After harvesting the graft, it can be transferred to the recipient area by taking the graft on a sterile glass slide, on the gloved finger, rolling the graft over a sterile syringe and then spreading on the recipient area, or taking on the sterile wrapper of paraffin dressing and then placing over the recipient area.

  5. Ultrasonography of the LIMA graft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Hartman (Joost)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCoronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is a surgical procedure that has been in existence since 1967 [1]. Over the years, the use of the left internal mammary artery (LIMA), has been shown to be the conduit of choice for single or sequential bypass grafting to the anterior wall of the

  6. Endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, Cindy Johanna Maria

    2007-01-01

    Postnatally, Endothelial Progenitor Cells are needed to maintain the integrity of the endothelium (re-endothelialization) and to augment wound healing or vascularize hypoxic areas (neovascularization). Complex networks of different signals and regulators have been identified to be involved in these

  7. Binary progenitor models of type IIb supernovae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claeys, J.S.W.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326158707; de Mink, S.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833231; Pols, O.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/111811155; Eldridge, J.J.; Baes, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824739

    2011-01-01

    Massive stars that lose their hydrogen-rich envelope down to a few tenths of a solar mass explode as extended type IIb supernovae, an intriguing subtype that links the hydrogen-rich type II supernovae with the hydrogen-poor type Ib and Ic. The progenitors may be very massive single stars that lose

  8. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    exploring alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for cell based therapy in diabetes. Since in vitro culture of islet β-cells demonstrates loss in insulin (Beattie et al. 1999), several attempts have been made to identify stem / progenitor cells capable of differentiation into insulin-producing cells. Embryonic stem cells, which ...

  9. Cataclysmic Variables as Supernova Ia Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Kafka

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the identification of the progenitors of type Ia supernovae (SNeIa remains controversial, it is generally accepted that they originate from binary star systems in which at least one component is a carbon-oxygen white dwarf (WD; those systems are grouped under the wide umbrella of cataclysmic variables. Current theories for SNeIa progenitors hold that, either via Roche lobe overflow of the companion or via a wind, the WD accumulates hydrogen or helium rich material which is then burned to C and O onto the WD’s surface. However, the specifics of this scenario are far from being understood or defined, allowing for a wealth of theories fighting for attention and a dearth of observations to support them. I discuss the latest attempts to identify and study those controversial SNeIa progenitors. I also introduce the most promising progenitor in hand and I present observational diagnostics that can reveal more members of the category.

  10. Direct Conversion of Fibroblasts to Megakaryocyte Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Pulecio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Current sources of platelets for transfusion are insufficient and associated with risk of alloimmunization and blood-borne infection. These limitations could be addressed by the generation of autologous megakaryocytes (MKs derived in vitro from somatic cells with the ability to engraft and differentiate in vivo. Here, we show that overexpression of a defined set of six transcription factors efficiently converts mouse and human fibroblasts into MK-like progenitors. The transdifferentiated cells are CD41+, display polylobulated nuclei, have ploidies higher than 4N, form MK colonies, and give rise to platelets in vitro. Moreover, transplantation of MK-like murine progenitor cells into NSG mice results in successful engraftment and further maturation in vivo. Similar results are obtained using disease-corrected fibroblasts from Fanconi anemia patients. Our results combined demonstrate that functional MK progenitors with clinical potential can be obtained in vitro, circumventing the use of hematopoietic progenitors or pluripotent stem cells.

  11. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-24

    Apr 24, 2009 ... Phenotypic plasticity is a phenomenon that describes the occurrence of 2 or more distinct phenotypes under diverse conditions. This article discusses the work carried out over the past few years in understanding the potential of human pancreatic islet-derived progenitors for cell replacement therapy in ...

  12. Transplantation of porcine embryonic stem cells and their derived neuronal progenitors in a spinal cord injury rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenn-Rong; Liao, Chia-Hsin; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Chen, Yi-Ling; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Chen, Lih-Ren

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate therapeutic potential of green fluorescent protein expressing porcine embryonic stem (pES/GFP(+)) cells in A rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Undifferentiated pES/GFP(+) cells and their neuronal differentiation derivatives were transplanted into the contused spinal cord of the Long Evans rat, and in situ development of the cells was determined by using a live animal fluorescence optical imaging system every 15 days. After pES/GFP(+) cell transplantation, the behavior functional recovery of the SCI rats was assessed with the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan Locomotor Rating Scale (BBB scale), and the growth and differentiation of the grafted pES/GFP(+) cells in the SCI rats were analyzed by immunohistochemical staining. The relative green fluorescent protein expression level was decreased for 3 months after transplantation. The pES/GFP(+)-derived cells positively stained with neural specific antibodies of anti-NFL, anti-MBP, anti-SYP and anti-Tuj 1 were detected at the transplanted position. The SCI rats grafted with the D18 neuronal progenitors showed a significant functional recovery of hindlimbs and exhibited the highest BBB scale score of 15.20 ± 1.43 at week 24. The SCI rats treated with pES/GFP(+)-derived neural progenitors demonstrated a better functional recovery. Transplantation of porcine embryonic stem (pES)-derived D18 neuronal progenitors has treatment potential for SCI, and functional behavior improvement of grafted pES-derived cells in SCI model rats suggests the potential for further application of pES cells in the study of replacement medicine and functionally degenerative pathologies. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington Seattle, Box 351580, WA 98195 (United States); Murphy, Jeremiah W. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: zachjenn@uw.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a

  14. Finding the Progenitors to Today's Fossil Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lucas Edward; Irwin, Jimmy; White, Raymond; Wong, Ka-Wah; Maksym, Walter Peter; Dupke, Renato; Miller, Eric; Carrasco, Eleazar

    2018-01-01

    Fossil galaxy systems are classically thought to be the end result of galaxy group and cluster evolution, as galaxies experiencing dynamical friction sink to the center of the group potential and merge into a single, giant elliptical that dominates the rest of the members in both mass and luminosity. Most fossil systems discovered lie within z fossil progenitors are expected to be systems with imminent or ongoing major merging near the brightest group galaxy (BGG) that, when concluded, will meet the fossil criteria within the look back time. Since strong gravitational lensing preferentially selects groups merging along the line of sight, or systems with a high mass concentration like fossil systems, we searched the CASSOWARY survey of strong lensing events with the goal of determining if lensing systems have any predisposition to being fossil systems or progenitors. We present an analysis of 53 systems from the CASSOWARY catalog of strong lenses with redshifts ranging from 0.1 fossils while only 3% of non-lensing control groups are. We also find that 23% of the lensing groups are traditional fossil progenitors compared to 17% for the control sample. This suggests that searching for groups that exhibit strong gravitational lensing may be a more efficient way of finding fossil and pre-fossil systems. Cumulative galaxy luminosity functions of the lensing and non-lensing groups also indicate there may be, on average, a fundamental difference between the initial conditions of strong lensing and non-lensing systems for fossils, fossil progenitors, and even normal galaxy systems. This could point to not fossils but lensing systems as possibly having different initial group conditions than non-lensing systems. Future work will involve studying recently obtained Chandra and HST snapshots of eight previously unobserved fossil progenitors in the CASSOWARY catalog to see how the hot gas evolves as a function of time until fossil BGG formation.

  15. Characterization of Hemagglutinin Negative Botulinum Progenitor Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC, alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs to cause hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin positive progenitor toxin complex consists of BoNT, nontoxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and three hemagglutinin proteins; HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17. Hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes contain BoNT and NTNH as the minimally functional PTC (M-PTC, but not the three hemagglutinin proteins. Interestingly, the genome of hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes comprises open reading frames (orfs which encode for three proteins, but the existence of these proteins has not yet been extensively demonstrated. In this work, we demonstrate that these three proteins exist and form part of the PTC for hemagglutinin negative complexes. Several hemagglutinin negative strains producing BoNT/A, /E, and /F were found to contain the three open reading frame proteins. Additionally, several BoNT/A-containing bivalent strains were examined, and NAPs from both genes, including the open reading frame proteins, were associated with BoNT/A. The open reading frame encoded proteins are more easily removed from the botulinum complex than the hemagglutinin proteins, but are present in several BoNT/A and /F toxin preparations. These are not easily removed from the BoNT/E complex, however, and are present even in commercially-available purified BoNT/E complex.

  16. Graft intolerance syndrome requiring graft nephrectomy after late kidney graft failure: can it be predicted? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunthof, Kim L W; Verhoeks, Carmen M; van den Brand, Jan A J G; Hilbrands, Luuk B

    2018-02-01

    Graft nephrectomy is recommended in case of early graft failure. When the graft fails more than 3-6 months after transplantation, it is current practice to follow a wait-and-see policy. A common indication for graft removal is the graft intolerance syndrome. We aimed to create a risk prediction model for the occurrence of graft intolerance resulting in graft nephrectomy. We collected data of kidney transplantations performed in our center between 1980 and 2010 that failed at least 6 months after transplantation. We evaluated the association between baseline characteristics and the occurrence of graft nephrectomy because of graft intolerance using a competing risk regression model. Prognostic factors were included in a multivariate prediction model. In- and exclusion criteria were met in 288 cases. In 48 patients, the graft was removed because of graft intolerance. Donor age, the number of rejections, and shorter graft survival were predictive factors for graft nephrectomy because of the graft intolerance syndrome. These factors were included in a prediction rule. Using donor age, graft survival, and the number of rejections, clinicians can predict the need for graft nephrectomy with a reasonable accuracy. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  17. Interneuron progenitor transplantation to treat CNS dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad O Chohan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field.

  18. Noninvasive Imaging of Administered Progenitor Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R Bergmann, M.D., Ph.D.

    2012-12-03

    The objective of this research grant was to develop an approach for labeling progenitor cells, specifically those that we had identified as being able to replace ischemic heart cells, so that the distribution could be followed non-invasively. In addition, the research was aimed at determining whether administration of progenitor cells resulted in improved myocardial perfusion and function. The efficiency and toxicity of radiolabeling of progenitor cells was to be evaluated. For the proposed clinical protocol, subjects with end-stage ischemic coronary artery disease were to undergo a screening cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan using N-13 ammonia to delineate myocardial perfusion and function. If they qualified based on their PET scan, they would undergo an in-hospital protocol whereby CD34+ cells were stimulated by the administration of granulocytes-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). CD34+ cells would then be isolated by apharesis, and labeled with indium-111 oxine. Cells were to be re-infused and subjects were to undergo single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning to evaluate uptake and distribution of labeled progenitor cells. Three months after administration of progenitor cells, a cardiac PET scan was to be repeated to evaluate changes in myocardial perfusion and/or function. Indium oxine is a radiopharmaceutical for labeling of autologous lymphocytes. Indium-111 (In-111) decays by electron capture with a t{sub ½} of 67.2 hours (2.8 days). Indium forms a saturated complex that is neutral, lipid soluble, and permeates the cell membrane. Within the cell, the indium-oxyquinolone complex labels via indium intracellular chelation. Following leukocyte labeling, ~77% of the In-111 is incorporated in the cell pellet. The presence of red cells and /or plasma reduces the labeling efficacy. Therefore, the product needed to be washed to eliminate plasma proteins. This repeated washing can damage cells. The CD34 selected product was a 90

  19. POPULATION SYNTHESIS AND GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. FREYER

    2000-12-11

    Population synthesis studies of binaries are always limited by a myriad of uncertainties from the poorly understood effects of binary mass transfer and common envelope evolution to the many uncertainties that still remain in stellar evolution. But the importance of these uncertainties depends both upon the objects being studied and the questions asked about these objects. Here I review the most critical uncertainties in the population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors. With a better understanding of these uncertainties, binary population synthesis can become a powerful tool in understanding, and constraining, gamma-ray burst models. In turn, as gamma-ray bursts become more important as cosmological probes, binary population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors becomes an important tool in cosmology.

  20. A new system for quality control in hematopoietic progenitor cell units before reinfusion in autologous transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerpa, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Cecilia; Daniele, Nicola; Lanti, Alessandro; Adorno, Gaspare; Picardi, Alessandra; Arcese, William; Amadori, Sergio; Isacchi, Giancarlo; Zinno, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    In our Center, the cell viability, the integrity of the bag, and the clonogenic assay were evaluated before the reinfusion of hematopoietic progenitor cells-apheresis (HPC-A). This quality control (QC) should be made 14 days before the reinfusion to the patient to have the result of the functional test on the proliferative capacity of hematopoietic progenitors. This study was designed to assess the potential of an automatic cell counting system (NucleoCounter NC-3000, ChemoMetec) in our clinical routine as a support of the clonogenic assay and the cytofluorimetric analysis for the QC of the cryopreserved HPC-A. The cell viability was evaluated by flow cytometry using the modified International Society of Hematotherapy and Graft Engineering protocol. The proliferative potential was assessed by specific clonogenic tests using a commercial medium. Furthermore, we evaluated the cellular functionality with NucleoCounter NC-3000, by using two protocols: "vitality assay" and "mitochondrial potential assay." The evaluation of the total nucleated cells in preapoptosis measured by 5,5,6,6-tetrachloro-1,1,3,3-tetraethylbenzimidazol-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) assay showed a negative correlation (r=-0.43) with the total number of colonies (colony-forming unit [CFU]-granulocyte-macrophage progenitors plus burst-forming unit-erythroid progenitors plus CFU-granulocyte, erythroid, macrophage, megakaryocyte progenitors) obtained after seeding of 50 × 10(6) /L viable total nucleated cells. We observed a significant difference (p<0.0001) comparing the median number of colonies (166.70; SD, ± 136.36) obtained with a value of JC-1 less than 30% to the number of colonies (61.75; SD, ± 59.76) obtained with a value of JC-1 more than 30%. The evaluation of cell functionality by the use of the NucleoCounter NC-3000 is in agreement with results from clonogenic assay and can be considered an effective alternative in the routine laboratory. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  1. Pre-supernova properties of progenitors detected by HST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jim

    2017-08-01

    HST has provided essential data on the connection between core-collapse supernovae (SNe) and their massive star progenitors, both through precise post-explosion localization of nearby SNe, and by identification of progenitor stars in pre-explosion HST images. However, mounting evidence suggests that many SN progenitors exhibit outbursts and/or enhanced mass loss in the years preceding the SN, potentially affecting the progenitor properties measured by HST. Inferring progenitor characteristics such as stellar mass thus requires a better theoretical understanding of the pre-SN stellar evolution. A compelling mechanism for pre-SN outbursts is energy transport via gravity/acoustic waves within massive star SN progenitors. We propose to quantify the observable effects of wave-driven outbursts and mass loss in the final years of massive star lives using stellar evolution calculations incorporating wave energy transport. Our models will make predictions for progenitor luminosity in HST bands as a function of stellar mass and time before SN explosion. We will also model the SN light curves and spectra of stars with wave energy transport, which we can compare with SN observations to assert whether wave heating operated in the progenitors detected by HST. We will then revisit the interpretation of HST progenitor data and make predictions for future SN progenitor detections by HST.

  2. Could Cancer Initiate From Bone Marrow Progenitors?

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Nasr, Hmed; Hammami, Serria Turky; Zeghal, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Background Defining cancer stem cells and their origins is of much controversy,and constitutes a challenged knockout for cell targeting- anticancer drugs. Herein,we put forward a hypothetic model for cancer stem cells initiation from bone marrow stem cells. These later, will differentiate into an ancestral progenitor that activates a memorial program - the black box cassette- that is responsible of abnormal neo-organogenesis in the form of tumors and metastases. To approve this model, we assu...

  3. Endothelial progenitor cell biology in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Inderjeet; Syngle, Ashit; Krishan, Pawan

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are unique populations which have reparative potential in overcoming endothelial damage and reducing cardiovascular risk. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the endothelial progenitor cell population in AS patients and its potential relationships with disease variables. Endothelial progenitor cells were measured in peripheral blood samples from 20 AS and 20 healthy controls by flow cytometry on the basis of CD34 and CD133 expression. Disease activity was evaluated by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Functional ability was monitored by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). EPCs were depleted in AS patients as compared to healthy controls (CD34(+) /CD133(+) : 0.027 ± 0.010% vs. 0.044 ± 0.011%, P < 0.001). EPC depletions were significantly associated with disease duration (r = -0.52, P = 0.01), BASDAI (r = -0.45, P = 0.04) and C-reactive protein (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate endothelial progenitor cell depletion in AS patients. EPC depletions inversely correlate with disease duration, disease activity and inflammation, suggesting the pivotal role of inflammation in depletion of EPCs. EPC would possibly also serve as a therapeutic target for preventing cardiovascular disease in AS. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Coronary arteries bypass grafting stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ebrahimi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a major global problem. In addition, it is higher risk of mortality for women more than men are when develop in female gender Atherosclerotic plaques consist of deposits of fatty material in the tunica intima. The role of inflammatory process in CAD has been known from 1980’s. Several studies investigated the innate immunity and adaptive immunity roles in atherosclerosis and they concluded that it plays a key role in atherosclerosis. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG is a widely used method for the treatment of CAD. Based on the literature, CABG is the most common surgical operation done worldwide. In During the first 10 years after CABG, up to 50% of saphenous grafts will occlude. Graft restenosis is beginning with acute thrombosis, intima hyperplasia, and plaque formation. In this review, some molecular pathways of graft failure and restenosis such as apoptosis and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-ĸB are described.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of polypyrrole grafted chitin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprasad, A. T.; Latha, D.; Rao, Vijayalakshmi

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis and characterization of chitin grafted with polypyrrole (PPy) is reported in this paper. Chitin is soaked in pyrrole solution of various concentrations for different time intervals and polymerized using ammonium peroxy disulphate (APS) as an initiator. Grafting percentage of polypyrrole onto chitin is calculated from weight of chitin before and after grafting. Grafting of polymer is further verified by dissolution studies. The grafted polymer samples are characterized by FTIR, UV-Vis absorption spectrum, XRD, DSC, TGA, AFM, SEM and conductivity studies.

  6. Context-Dependent Development of Lymphoid Stroma from Adult CD34+ Adventitial Progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Wendland, Kerstin; Weishaupt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite the key role of primary and secondary lymphoid organ stroma in immunity, our understanding of the heterogeneity and ontogeny of these cells remains limited. Here, we identify a functionally distinct subset of BP3-PDPN+PDGFRβ+/α+CD34+ stromal adventitial cells in both lymph nodes (LNs......) and thymus that is located within the vascular niche surrounding PDPN-PDGFRβ+/α-Esam-1+ITGA7+ pericytes. CD34+ adventitial cells developed in late embryonic thymus and in postnatal LNs and in the thymus originated, along with pericytes, from a common anlage-seeding progenitor population. Using lymphoid organ...... re-aggregate grafts, we demonstrate that adult CD34+ adventitial cells are capable of differentiating into multiple lymphoid stroma-like subsets including pericyte-, FRC-, MRC-, and FDC-like cells, the development of which was lymphoid environment-dependent. These findings extend the current...

  7. Air Pump-Assisted Graft Centration, Graft Edge Unfolding, and Graft Uncreasing in Young Donor Graft Pre-Descemet Endothelial Keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Soosan; Narasimhan, Smita; Agarwal, Amar; Agarwal, Athiya; A I, Saijimol

    2017-08-01

    To assess an air pump-assisted technique for graft centration, graft edge unfolding, and graft uncreasing while performing pre-Descemet endothelial keratoplasty (PDEK) using young donor grafts. Continuous pressurized air infusion was used for graft centration, graft edge unfolding, and graft unwrinkling. Ten eyes of 10 patients underwent PDEK with donors aged below 40 years. In all eyes, the donor scrolled into tight scrolls. In all cases, the air pump-assisted technique was effective in positioning and centering the graft accurately and in straightening infolded graft edges and smoothing out graft creases and wrinkles. Endothelial cell loss was 38.6%. Postoperative best-corrected visual acuity at 6 months was 0.66 ± 0.25 in decimal equivalent. Continuous pressurized air infusion acted as a third hand providing a continuous pressure head that supported the graft and prevented graft dislocation as well as anterior chamber collapse during intraocular maneuvering. Adequate maneuvering space was available in all cases, and bleeding, if any, was tamponaded successfully in all cases. Although very young donor grafts may be used for PDEK, they are difficult to center and unroll completely before floating against host stroma. An air pump-assisted technique using continuous pressurized air infusion allows successful final graft positioning even with very young donor corneas. It thus makes surgery easier as several key steps are made easier to handle. It additionally helps in tamponading hemorrhage during peripheral iridectomy, increasing surgical space, preventing fluctuations in the anterior chamber depth, and promoting graft adherence.

  8. Neurogenin-2-transduced human neural progenitor cells attenuate neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il-Shin; Koo, Kyo Yeon; Jung, Kwangsoo; Kim, Miri; Kim, Il-Sun; Hwang, Kyujin; Yun, Seokhwan; Lee, Haejin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2017-05-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury leads to high mortality and neurodevelopmental disabilities. Multipotent neural progenitor cells (NPCs) with self-renewing capacity have the potential to reduce neuronal loss and improve the compromised environment in the HI brain injury. However, the therapeutic efficacy of neuronal-committed progenitor cells and the underlying mechanisms of recovery are not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study investigated the regenerative ability and action mechanisms of neuronally committed human NPCs (hNPCs) transduced with neurogenin-2 (NEUROG2) in neonatal HI brain injury. NEUROG2- or green fluorescent protein (GFP)-encoding adenoviral vector-transduced hNPCs (NEUROG2- or GFP-NPCs) were transplanted into neonatal mouse brains with HI injury. Grafted NEUROG2-NPCs showed robust dispersion and engraftment, prolonged survival, and neuronal differentiation in HI brain injury. NEUROG2-NPCs significantly improved neurological behaviors, decreased cellular apoptosis, and increased the neurite outgrowth and axonal sprouting in HI brain injury. In contrast, GFP-NPC grafts moderately enhanced axonal extension with limited behavioral recovery. Notably, NEUROG2-NPCs showed increased secretion of multiple factors, such as nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3 (NTF3), fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and thrombospondins 1 and 2 (THBS 1/2), which promoted SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell survival and neurite outgrowth. Thus, we postulate that NEUROG2-expressing human NPCs facilitate functional recovery after neonatal HI brain injury via their ability to secrete multiple factors that enhance neuronal survival and neuroplasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ex vivo virotherapy with myxoma virus does not impair hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Nancy Y; Bais, Swarna; Chan, Winnie M; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Rahman, Masmudur M; Moreb, Jan S; Rosenau, Emma H; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2016-03-01

    Relapsing disease is a major challenge after hematopoietic cell transplantation for hematological malignancies. Myxoma virus (MYXV) is an oncolytic virus that can target and eliminate contaminating cancer cells from auto-transplant grafts. The aims of this study were to examine the impact of MYXV on normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and define the optimal treatment conditions for ex vivo virotherapy. Bone marrow (BM) and mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (mPBSCs) from patients with hematologic malignancies were treated with MYXV at various time, temperature and incubation media conditions. Treated BM cells from healthy normal donors were evaluated using flow cytometry for MYXV infection, long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assay and colony-forming cell (CFC) assay. MYXV initiated infection in up to 45% of antigen-presenting monocytes, B cells and natural killer cells; however, these infections were uniformly aborted in >95% of all cells. Fresh graft sources showed higher levels of MYXV infection initiation than cryopreserved specimens, but in all cases less than 10% of CD34(+) cells could be infected after ex vivo MYXV treatment. MYXV did not impair LTC-IC colony numbers compared with mock treatment. CFC colony types and numbers were also not impaired by MYXV treatment. MYXV incubation time, temperature or culture media did not significantly change the percentage of infected cells, LTC-IC colony formation or CFC colony formation. Human hematopoietic cells are non-permissive for MYXV. Human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells were not infected and thus unaffected by MYXV ex vivo treatment. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacologic increase in HIF1α enhances hematopoietic stem and progenitor homing and engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Jennifer M; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Singh, Pratibha; Pelus, Louis M

    2014-01-09

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a lifesaving therapy for a number of immunologic disorders. For effective transplant, HSCs must traffic from the peripheral blood to supportive bone marrow niches. We previously showed that HSC trafficking can be enhanced by ex vivo treatment of hematopoietic grafts with 16-16 dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2). While exploring regulatory molecules involved in dmPGE2 enhancement, we found that transiently increasing the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1α) is required for dmPGE2-enhanced CXCR4 upregulation and enhanced migration and homing of stem and progenitor cells and that pharmacologic manipulation of HIF1α is also capable of enhancing homing and engraftment. We also now identify the specific hypoxia response element required for CXCR4 upregulation. These data define a precise mechanism through which ex vivo pulse treatment with dmPGE2 enhances the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells; these data also define a role for hypoxia and HIF1α in enhancement of hematopoietic transplantation.

  11. Allogenic tooth transplantation inhibits the maintenance of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kotaro; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Kenmotsu, Shinichi; Ohshima, Hayato

    2014-05-01

    Our recent study suggested that allogenic tooth transplantation may affect the maintenance of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells. This study aims to elucidate the influence of allograft on the maintenance of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells following tooth replantation and allo- or auto-genic tooth transplantation in mice using BrdU chasing, immunohistochemistry for BrdU, nestin and Ki67, in situ hybridization for Dspp, transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assay. Following extraction of the maxillary first molar in BrdU-labeled animals, the tooth was immediately repositioned in the original socket, or the roots were resected and immediately allo- or auto-grafted into the sublingual region in non-labeled or the same animals. In the control group, two types of BrdU label-retaining cells (LRCs) were distributed throughout the dental pulp: those with dense or those with granular reaction for BrdU. In the replants and autogenic transplants, dense LRCs remained in the center of dental pulp associating with the perivascular environment throughout the experimental period and possessed a proliferative capacity and maintained the differentiation capacity into the odontoblast-like cells or fibroblasts. In contrast, LRCs disappeared in the center of the pulp tissue by postoperative week 4 in the allografts. The disappearance of LRCs was attributed to the extensive apoptosis occurring significantly in LRCs except for the newly-differentiated odontoblast-like cells even in cases without immunological rejection. The results suggest that the host and recipient interaction in the allografts disturbs the maintenance of dense LRCs, presumably stem/progenitor cells, resulting in the disappearance of these cell types.

  12. Stromal Cells Act as Guardians for Endothelial Progenitors by Reducing Their Immunogenicity After Co-Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souidi, Naima; Stolk, Meaghan; Rudeck, Juliane; Strunk, Dirk; Schallmoser, Katharina; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Seifert, Martina

    2017-05-01

    Regeneration of injured tissues requires effective therapeutic strategies supporting vasculogenesis. The lack of instantly available autologous cell sources and immunogenicity of allogeneic endothelial (progenitor) cells limits clinical progress. Based on the immunosuppressive potency of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs), we investigated whether crosstalk between endothelial colony-forming progenitor cells (ECFCs) and MSCs during vasculogenesis could lower allogeneic T cell responses against ECFCs allowing long-term engraftment in vivo. Immunodeficient mice received subcutaneous grafts containing human ECFCs alone, or pairs of human ECFCs/MSCs from the same umbilical cord (UC) to study vasculogenesis in the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In vitro, cell surface marker changes due to interferon gamma (IFNγ) stimulation during ECFC/MSC coculture were determined and further effects on allostimulated T cell proliferation and cytotoxic lysis were measured. IFNγ-induced HLA-DR expression on ECFCs and MSCs, but both cell types had significantly less HLA-DR in cocultures. ECFC-induced T cell proliferation was abolished after MSC coculture as a result of HLA-DR downregulation and indolamin-2,3-dioxygenase activation. Additionally, allospecific CD8 + T cell-mediated lysis of ECFCs was reduced in cocultures. ECFC/MSC coapplication in immunodeficient mice not only promoted the generation of improved blood vessel architecture after 6 weeks, but also reduced intragraft immune cell infiltration and endothelial HLA-DR expression following PBMC reconstitution. Crosstalk between UC-derived ECFCs and MSCs after combined transplantation can lower the risk of ECFC rejection, thus enabling their coapplication for therapeutic vasculogenesis. Stem Cells 2017;35:1233-1245. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Photoreceptor Differentiation following Transplantation of Allogeneic Retinal Progenitor Cells to the Dystrophic Rhodopsin Pro347Leu Transgenic Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Klassen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Transplantation of stem, progenitor, or precursor cells has resulted in photoreceptor replacement and evidence of functional efficacy in rodent models of retinal degeneration. Ongoing work has been directed toward the replication of these results in a large animal model, namely, the pig. Methods. Retinal progenitor cells were derived from the neural retina of GFP-transgenic pigs and transplanted to the subretinal space of rhodopsin Pro347Leu-transgenic allorecipients, in the early stage of the degeneration and the absence of immune suppression. Results. Results confirm the survival of allogeneic porcine RPCs without immune suppression in the setting of photoreceptor dystrophy. The expression of multiple photoreceptor markers by grafted cells included the rod outer segment-specific marker ROM-1. Further evidence of photoreceptor differentiation included the presence of numerous photoreceptor rosettes within GFP-positive grafts, indicative of the development of cellular polarity and self-assembly into rudiments of outer retinal tissue. Conclusion. Together, these data support the tolerance of RPCs as allografts and demonstrate the high level of rod photoreceptor development that can be obtained from cultured RPCs following transplantation. Strategies for further progress in this area, together with possible functional implications, are discussed.

  14. Cyclosporine decreases vascular progenitor cell numbers after cardiac transplantation and attenuates progenitor cell growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, William R; Wang, Shaohua; Oi, Keiji; Bailey, Kent R; Tazelaar, Henry D; Caplice, Noel M; McGregor, Christopher G A

    2005-11-01

    Recent experimental evidence suggests that the neointimal proliferation seen in cardiac allograft vasculopathy may in part derive from recipient progenitor cells. The effect of cyclosporine on these circulating progenitors in the setting of cardiac transplantation is currently unknown. Three surgical series were performed: sham operation alone, sham operation with immunosuppression, and heterotopic porcine cardiac transplantation with immunosuppression. The sham operation involved laparotomy and consecutive clamping of the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava. Post-operative immunosuppression consisted of cyclosporine at therapeutic levels (100-300 ng/ml) and 0.5 mg/kg methylprednisolone. Endothelial outgrowth colony numbers (EOC(CFU)) and smooth muscle outgrowth colony numbers (SOC(CFU)) were quantified weekly for 4 weeks post-operatively. A series of in vitro experiments were performed to determine the effect of cyclosporine on the differentiation, migration, and proliferation of EOCs and SOCs. In the sham alone series there were no changes to either EOC(CFU) or SOC(CFU). In the sham with immunosuppression and the transplant series, both EOC(CFU) and SOC(CFU) fell in the first 2 weeks (p Cyclosporine, even at a low dose, prevented differentiation, inhibited proliferation, and attenuated migration of both EOCs and SOCs. Immunosuppression in the setting of cardiac transplantation causes a profound reduction in circulating progenitor cells capable of differentiating into endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This effect can in part be explained by the inhibitory effects of cyclosporine on progenitor growth and differentiation seen in this study.

  15. Fabrication of endothelial progenitor cell capture surface via DNA aptamer modifying dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Deng, Jinchuan; Yuan, Shuheng; Wang, Juan; Luo, Rifang; Chen, Si; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2016-11-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are mainly located in bone marrow and circulate, and play a crucial role in repairmen of injury endothelium. One of the most promising strategies of stents designs were considered to make in-situ endothelialization in vivo via EPC-capture biomolecules on a vascular graft to capture EPCs directly from circulatory blood. In this work, an EPC specific aptamer with a 34 bases single strand DNA sequence was conjugated onto the stent surface via dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film as a platform and linker. The assembled density of DNA aptamer could be regulated by controlling dopamine percentage in this copolymer film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle (WCA) and fluorescence test confirmed the successful immobilization of DNA aptamer. To confirm its biofunctionality and cytocompatibility, the capturing cells ability of the aptamer modified surface and the effects on the growth behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were investigated. The aptamer functionalized sample revealed a good EPC-capture ability, and had a cellular friendly feature for both EPC and EC growth, while not stimulated the hyperplasia of SMCs. And, the co-culture experiment of three types of cells confirmed the specificity capturing of EPCs to aptamer modified surface, rather than ECs and SMCs. These data suggested that this aptamer functionalized surface may have a large potentiality for the application of vascular grafts with targeted endothelialization.

  16. Bioengineering of functional human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Kentaro; Schwartz, Dana M; Zhou, Haiyang; Gilpin, Sarah E; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Ren, Xi; Sommer, Cesar A; Capilla, Amalia V; Mathisen, Douglas J; Goldstein, Allan M; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ott, Harald C

    2017-10-10

    Patients with short bowel syndrome lack sufficient functional intestine to sustain themselves with enteral intake alone. Transplantable vascularized bioengineered intestine could restore nutrient absorption. Here we report the engineering of humanized intestinal grafts by repopulating decellularized rat intestinal matrix with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal epithelium and human endothelium. After 28 days of in vitro culture, hiPSC-derived progenitor cells differentiate into a monolayer of polarized intestinal epithelium. Human endothelial cells seeded via native vasculature restore perfusability. Ex vivo isolated perfusion testing confirms transfer of glucose and medium-chain fatty acids from lumen to venous effluent. Four weeks after transplantation to RNU rats, grafts show survival and maturation of regenerated epithelium. Systemic venous sampling and positron emission tomography confirm uptake of glucose and fatty acids in vivo. Bioengineering intestine on vascularized native scaffolds could bridge the gap between cell/tissue-scale regeneration and whole organ-scale technology needed to treat intestinal failure patients.There is a need for humanised grafts to treat patients with intestinal failure. Here, the authors generate intestinal grafts by recellularizing native intestinal matrix with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived epithelium and human endothelium, and show nutrient absorption after transplantation in rats.

  17. [Collection of hematopoietic progenitor cells from healthy donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanić, Ines; Cepulić, Branka Golubić; Mazić, Sanja

    2009-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation is an established therapy for many hematologic disorders. HPCs may be collected from bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood. In order to minimize the risk for healthy HPC donors, thorough investigation is required before donation. The donor work-up should include medical history, physical examination, ECG, chest x-ray, blood count, coagulation screening, and testing for infectious disease markers. Donors should be fully informed on the donation procedure and sign an informed consent for donation. HPCs are traditionally collected from bone marrow with the donor in general anesthesia. The procedure includes multiple bone marrow aspirates from pelvic bones and at least overnight hospital stay. Although marrow donation is generally safe and well tolerated, minor complications like pain at the collection site, fatigue and pain on walking or sitting may occur in a relatively small proportion of donors (6%-20%). Major and life-threatening complications such as anesthesia-related events, mechanical injury to the bone, sacroiliac joint and sciatic nerve following marrow donation are relatively rare, being estimated to 0.1%-0.3% of cases. In the last decade, peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) have become an increasingly used altemative to bone marrow. PBPC transplantation offers faster hematopoietic recovery and lower early transplant-related morbidity and mortality. The incidence of acute graft vs. host disease (GvHD) is no greater than in bone marrow transplants. However, there is evidence for increased chronic GvHD, which is in part related to the higher number of T and NK cells that are collected with PBPC and re-infused to the patient. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to mobilize PBPCs for collection by leukapheresis. Leukapheresis is usually perfomed after 4 to 5 days of G-CSF subcutaneous administration at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. Vascular access

  18. The blood and vascular cell compatibility of heparin-modified ePTFE vascular grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Ryan A.; Van Lith, Robert; Jen, Michele C.; Allen, Josephine B.; Lapidos, Karen A.; Ameer, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular grafts do not mimic the antithrombogenic properties of native blood vessels and therefore have higher rates of complications that involve thrombosis and restenosis. We developed an approach for grafting bioactive heparin, a potent anticoagulant glycosaminoglycan, to the lumen of ePTFE vascular grafts to improve their interactions with blood and vascular cells. Heparin was bound to aminated poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) via its carboxyl functional groups onto POC-modified ePTFE grafts. The bioactivity and stability of the POC-immobilized heparin (POC–Heparin) were characterized via platelet adhesion and clotting assays. The effects of POC–Heparin on the adhesion, viability and phenotype of primary endothelial cells (EC), blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) obtained from endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) isolated from human peripheral blood, and smooth muscle cells were also investigated. POC–Heparin grafts maintained bioactivity under physiologically relevant conditions in vitro for at least one month. Specifically, POC–Heparin-coated ePTFE grafts significantly reduced platelet adhesion and inhibited whole blood clotting kinetics. POC–Heparin supported EC and BOEC adhesion, viability, proliferation, NO production, and expression of endothelial cell-specific markers von Willebrand factor (vWF) and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin). Smooth muscle cells cultured on POC–Heparin showed increased expression of α-actin and decreased cell proliferation. This approach can be easily adapted to modify other blood contacting devices such as stents where antithrombogenicity and improved endothelialization are desirable properties. PMID:23069711

  19. Studies on the differentiation of dopaminergic traits in human neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Donaldson, Angela E; Marshall, Cheryl E; Shen, James; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The development of cell replacement therapies for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) may depend upon the successful differentiation of human neural stem/progenitor cells into dopamine (DA) neurons. We show here that primary human neural progenitors (HNPs) can be expanded and maintained in culture both as neurospheres (NSPs) and attached monolayers where they develop into neurons and glia. When transplanted into the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat striatum, undifferentiated NSPs survive longer (60% graft survival at 8-16 weeks vs. 30% graft survival at 8-13 weeks) and migrate farther than their attached counterparts. While both NSP and attached cells continue to express neuronal traits after transplantation, the spontaneous expression of differentiated transmitter-related traits is not observed in either cell type. However, following predifferentiation in culture using a previously described cocktail of reagents, approximately 25% of HNPs can permanently express the DA enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), even following replating and removal of the DA differentiation cocktail. When these predifferentiated HNPs are transplanted into the brain, however, TH staining is not observed, either because expression is lost or TH-expressing cells preferentially die. Consistent with the latter view is a decrease in total cell survival and migration, and an enhanced glial response in these grafts. In contrast, we found that the overall survival of HNPs is improved when cells engraft near blood vessels or CSF compartments or when they are placed into an intact unlesioned brain, suggesting that there are factors, as yet unidentified, that can better support the development of engrafted HNPs.

  20. A vascular patch prepared from Thai silk fibroin and gelatin hydrogel incorporating simvastatin-micelles to recruit endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitiwuthikiat, Piyanuch; Ii, Masaaki; Saito, Takashi; Asahi, Michio; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Delayed re-endothelialization is one of the major disadvantages in synthetic vascular grafts, especially in small-diameter grafts (inner diameter <6 mm), leading to thrombosis and stenosis of the grafts. Simvastatin, a serum cholesterol-lowering drug, has promotional effects on endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) mobilization from bone marrow and recruitment to sites of vascular injury exhibiting acceleration of re-endothelialization. In this study, we prepared double-layer vascular patches from Thai silk fibroin/gelatin with gelatin hydrogel incorporating simvastatin-micelles (SM) for sustained release of simvastatin to recruit circulation EPCs. To enhance simvastatin solubility, simvastatin was entrapped in micelles of l-lactic acid oligomer-grafted gelatin. The drug loading efficiency was at 4.1 ± 0.5 μg/mg micelles. SM had a chemoattractive effect on EPCs comparable to nonmodified simvastatin. Gelatin hydrogel incorporating SM at 100 μM of simvastatin (GSM100) could enhance in vitro EPC activities of adhesion and proliferation. In vitro results showed the initial cell adhesion of 86%, specific growth rate of 15.33×10(-3) h(-1), and population doubling time of 46.21 h. In vivo implantation of the patches incorporating SM significantly increased the recruitment of circulating EPCs. From the results of immunofluorescence staining, they demonstrated the complete re-endothelialization on the implanted patches containing SM at 2 weeks after implantation in rat carotid arteries. The gelatin hydrogel incorporating SM could be an effective inner layer of multifunctional vascular grafts to accelerate re-endothelialization in vascular tissue engineering.

  1. Experimental model of cultured skin graft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alfredo Gragnani; Jeffrey R. Morgan; Lydia Masako Ferreira

    2004-01-01

    .... It permits the xenografting evaluation of cultured cells graft or of the genetically modified cells and of the association of the cultured cells and the dermal substitutes, the composite grafts, and of the autografting...

  2. Membrane Biophysics Define Neuron and Astrocyte Progenitors in the Neural Lineage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nourse, J.L; Prieto, J.L; Dickson, A.R; Lu, J; Pathak, M.M; Tombola, F; Demetriou, M; Lee, A.P; Flanagan, L.A

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) are heterogeneous populations of self‐renewing stem cells and more committed progenitors that differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes...

  3. Pigment Cell Progenitors in Zebrafish Remain Multipotent through Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Dinwiddie, April; Mahalwar, Prateek; Schach, Ursula; Linker, Claudia; Irion, Uwe; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-08-08

    The neural crest is a transient, multipotent embryonic cell population in vertebrates giving rise to diverse cell types in adults via intermediate progenitors. The in vivo cell-fate potential and lineage segregation of these postembryonic progenitors is poorly understood, and it is unknown if and when the progenitors become fate restricted. We investigate the fate restriction in the neural crest-derived stem cells and intermediate progenitors in zebrafish, which give rise to three distinct adult pigment cell types: melanophores, iridophores, and xanthophores. By inducing clones in sox10-expressing cells, we trace and quantitatively compare the pigment cell progenitors at four stages, from embryogenesis to metamorphosis. At all stages, a large fraction of the progenitors are multipotent. These multipotent progenitors have a high proliferation ability, which diminishes with fate restriction. We suggest that multipotency of the nerve-associated progenitors lasting into metamorphosis may have facilitated the evolution of adult-specific traits in vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Lavik, Erin B

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the survival, integration, and differentiation of mouse retinal progenitor cells after transplantation to the subretinal space of adult pigs.......To investigate the survival, integration, and differentiation of mouse retinal progenitor cells after transplantation to the subretinal space of adult pigs....

  5. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Evan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature...

  6. Laser injury promotes migration and integration of retinal progenitor cells into host retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Caihui; Klassen, Henry; Zhang, Xinmei; Young, Michael

    2010-06-04

    The migration and integration of grafted cells into diseased host tissue remains a critical challenge, particularly in the field of retinal progenitor cell (RPC) transplantation. It seems that natural physical barriers at the outer retina can impede the migration of grafted RPCs into the host retina. The purpose of this study was to investigate the integration and differentiation of murine RPCs transplanted into the subretinal space of mice with laser-induced damage to the outer retina. RPCs were harvested from the neural retinas of postnatal day 1 enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice. Retinal photocoagulation was performed using a diode laser. Two microl containing approximately 6x10(5) expanded RPCs in suspension were injected into the subretinal space of the recipient animals following laser treatment. Cell morphometry was performed to assess the integration of donor cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blot were performed on recipient retinas. Three weeks after transplantation, 1,158+/-320 cells per eye had migrated into the recipient outer nuclear layer (ONL). Most of these cells resided in the ONL around the retinal laser lesion. A subpopulation of these cells developed morphological features reminiscent of mature photoreceptors, expressed photoreceptor specific proteins including synaptic protein, and appeared to form synaptic connections with bipolar neurons. Retinal photocoagulation resulted in a significantly increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, and cluster differentiation 44 (CD44s), and a decreased expression of neurocan. Transplanted RPCs migrate and integrate into the laser-injured ONL where they differentiate into photoreceptors with morphological features reminiscent of mature photoreceptors, express synaptic protein, and appear to form synaptic connections with retinal bipolar neurons. Following retinal photocoagulation, the enhanced level of integration of grafted RPCs is partially associated with

  7. Predicting the nature of supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Jose H.

    2017-09-01

    Stars more massive than about 8 solar masses end their lives as a supernova (SN), an event of fundamental importance Universe-wide. The physical properties of massive stars before the SN event are very uncertain, both from theoretical and observational perspectives. In this article, I briefly review recent efforts to predict the nature of stars before death, in particular, by performing coupled stellar evolution and atmosphere modelling of single stars in the pre-SN stage. These models are able to predict the high-resolution spectrum and broadband photometry, which can then be directly compared with the observations of core-collapse SN progenitors. The predictions for the spectral types of massive stars before death can be surprising. Depending on the initial mass and rotation, single star models indicate that massive stars die as red supergiants, yellow hypergiants, luminous blue variables and Wolf-Rayet stars of the WN and WO subtypes. I finish by assessing the detectability of SN Ibc progenitors. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  8. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Enter the Aging Arena.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate eWilliamson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Age is a significant risk factor for the development of vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Although pharmacological treatments, including statins and anti-hypertensive drugs, have improved the prognosis for patients with cardiovascular disease, it remains a leading cause of mortality in those aged 65 years and over. Furthermore, given the increased life expectancy of the population in developed countries, there is a clear need for alternative treatment strategies. Consequently, the relationship between aging and progenitor cell-mediated repair is of great interest. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs play an integral role in the cellular repair mechanisms for endothelial regeneration and maintenance. However, EPCs are subject to age-associated changes that diminish their number in circulation and function, thereby enhancing vascular disease risk. A great deal of research is aimed at developing strategies to harness the regenerative capacity of these cells.In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the cells termed ‘EPCs’, examine the impact of age on EPC-mediated repair and identify therapeutic targets with potential for attenuating the age-related decline in vascular health via beneficial actions on EPCs.

  9. Dysfunctional Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and confers an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A key early event in atherosclerosis is endothelial dysfunction. Numerous groups have reported endothelial dysfunction in MetS. However, the measurement of endothelial function is far from optimum. There has been much interest recently in a subtype of progenitor cells, termed endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), that can circulate, proliferate, and dfferentiate into mature endothelial cells. EPCs can be characterized by the assessment of surface markers, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, VEGFR-2 (KDR). The CD34+KDR+ phenotype has been demonstrated to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular outcomes. MetS patients without diabetes or cardiovascular diseases have decreased EPC number and functionality as evidenced by decreased numbers of colony forming units, decreased adhesion and migration, and decreased tubule formation. Strategies that have been shown to upregulate and enhance EPC number and functionality include statins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and peroxisome-proliferator-activating-receptor gamma agonists. Mechanisms by which they affect EPC number and functionality need to be studied. Thus, EPC number and/or functionality could emerge as novel cellular biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease risk in MetS. PMID:21941528

  10. Preliminary evaluation of treatment efficacy of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell-differentiated cardiac pro-genitor cells in a myocardial injury mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truc Le-Buu Pham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, stem cell therapy has been investigated as a strategy to prevent or reverse damage to heart tissue. Although the results of cell transplantation in animal models and patients with myocardial ischemia are promising, the selection of the appropriate cell type remains an issue that requires consideration. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of cardiac progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia. The cardiac progenitor cells used for transplantation were differentiated from umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells. Animal models injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS and healthy mice were used as controls. Cell grafting was assessed by changes in blood pressure and histological evaluation. After 14 days of transplantation, the results demonstrated that the blood pressure of transplanted mice was stable, similar to healthy mice, whereas it fluctuated in PBS-injected mice. Histological analysis showed that heart tissue had regenerated in transplanted mice, but remained damaged in PBS-injected mice. Furthermore, trichrome staining revealed that the transplanted mice did not generate significant amount of scar tissue compared with PBS-injected control mice. In addition, the cardiac progenitor cells managed to survive and integrate with local cells in cell-injected heart tissue 14 days after transplantation. Most importantly, the transplanted cells did not exhibit tumorigenesis. In conclusion, cardiac progenitor cell transplantation produced a positive effect in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia. [Biomed Res Ther 2015; 2(12.000: 435-445

  11. Prevention of primary vascular graft infection with silver-coated polyester graft in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, H; Sandermann, J; Prag, J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a silver-coated vascular polyester graft in the prevention of graft infection after inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus in a porcine model.......To evaluate the efficacy of a silver-coated vascular polyester graft in the prevention of graft infection after inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus in a porcine model....

  12. Evaluation of Replacement Grafts and Punch Grafts in the Treatment of Vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ajit Kumar

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirtycasesof vitiligo eachwithminimum of two lesions undent replacement graft and multiple punch grafts in one lesion each. Complications observed at the recipient site like infection and raised nigosed surface were significantly more in replacement grafts. Hypopigmentation of the graft was significantly more when the disease was progressive.

  13. Mast cell progenitors: origin, development and migration to tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Hallgren, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells in tissues are developed from mast cell progenitors emerging from the bone marrow in a process highly regulated by transcription factors. Through the advancement of the multicolor flow cytometry technique, the mast cell progenitor population in the mouse has been characterized in terms of surface markers. However, only cell populations with enriched mast cell capability have been described in human. In naïve mice, the peripheral tissues have a constitutive pool of mast cell progenitors. Upon infections in the gut and in allergic inflammation in the lung, the local mast cell progenitor numbers increase tremendously. This review focuses on the origin and development of mast cell progenitors. Furthermore, the evidences for cells and molecules that govern the migration of these cells in mice in vivo are described. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Graft infections after surgical aortic reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, P.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular grafts are frequently used to reconstruct (part) of the aorta. Every surgical procedure caries a certain risk for infection and when a prosthetic aortic graft is implanted, this may lead to an aortic graft infection (AGI). Endovascular techniques have gradually replaced open

  15. Markers of primary graft dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for diagnosing transplant rejection, or a condition associated with transplant rejection, such as, primary graft dysfunction in a subject, to antigen probe arrays for performing such a diagnosis, and to antigen probe sets for generating such arrays....

  16. The caudal septum replacement graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2008-01-01

    To describe a technique for reconstructing the lost tip support in cases involving caudal septal and premaxillary deficiencies. The study included 120 patients with aesthetic and functional nasal problems resulting from the loss of caudal septal and premaxillary support. An external rhinoplasty approach was performed to reconstruct the lost support using a cartilaginous caudal septum replacement graft and premaxillary augmentation with Mersilene mesh. The majority of cases (75%) involved revisions in patients who had previously undergone 1 or more nasal surgical procedures. A caudal septum replacement graft was combined with premaxillary augmentation in 93 patients (77.5%). The mean follow-up period was 3 years (range, 1-12 years). The technique succeeded in correcting the external nasal deformities in all patients and resulted in a significant improvement in breathing in 74 patients (86%) with preoperative nasal obstruction. There were no cases of infection, displacement, or extrusion. The caudal septum replacement graft proved to be very effective in restoring the lost tip support in patients with caudal septal deficiency. Combining the graft with premaxillary augmentation using Mersilene mesh helped increase support and stability over long-term follow-up.

  17. Posterior repair with perforated porcine dermal graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bernard Taylor

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare postoperative vaginal incision separation and healing in patients undergoing posterior repair with perforated porcine dermal grafts with those that received grafts without perforations. Secondarily, the tensile properties of the perforated and non-perforated grafts were measured and compared. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a non-randomized retrospective cohort analysis of women with stage II or greater rectoceles who underwent posterior repair with perforated and non-perforated porcine dermal grafts (PelvicolTM CR Bard Covington, GA USA. The incidence of postoperative vaginal incision separation (dehiscence was compared. A secondary analysis to assess graft tensile strength, suture pull out strength, and flexibility after perforation was performed using standard test method TM 0133 and ASTM bending and resistance protocols. RESULTS: Seventeen percent of patients (21/127 who received grafts without perforations developed vaginal incision dehiscence compared to 7% (5/71 of patients who received perforated grafts (p = 0.078. Four patients with vaginal incision dehiscence with non-perforated grafts required surgical revision to facilitate healing. Neither tensile strength or suture pull out strength were significantly different between perforated and non-perforated grafts (p = 0.81, p = 0.29, respectively. There was no difference in the flexibility of the two grafts (p = 0.20. CONCLUSION: Perforated porcine dermal grafts retain their tensile properties and are associated with fewer vaginal incision dehiscences.

  18. Cardiac Progenitor Cell Extraction from Human Auricles

    KAUST Repository

    Di Nardo, Paolo

    2017-02-22

    For many years, myocardial tissue has been considered terminally differentiated and, thus, incapable of regenerating. Recent studies have shown, instead, that cardiomyocytes, at least in part, are slowly substituted by new cells originating by precursor cells mostly embedded into the heart apex and in the atria. We have shown that an elective region of progenitor cell embedding is represented by the auricles, non-contractile atria appendages that can be easily sampled without harming the patient. The protocol here reported describes how from auricles a population of multipotent, cardiogenic cells can be isolated, cultured, and differentiated. Further studies are needed to fully exploit this cell population, but, sampling auricles, it could be possible to treat cardiac patients using their own cells circumventing rejection or organ shortage limitations.

  19. Stem/Progenitor cells in vascular regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Xu, Qingbo

    2014-06-01

    A series of studies has been presented in the search for proof of circulating and resident vascular progenitor cells, which can differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells and pericytes in animal and human studies. In terms of pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, iPS, and partial-iPS cells, they display a great potential for vascular lineage differentiation. Development of stem cell therapy for treatment of vascular and ischemic diseases remains a major challenging research field. At the present, there is a clear expansion of research into mechanisms of stem cell differentiation into vascular lineages that are tested in animal models. Although there are several clinical trials ongoing that primarily focus on determining the benefits of stem cell transplantation in ischemic heart or peripheral ischemic tissues, intensive investigation for translational aspects of stem cell therapy would be needed. It is a hope that stem cell therapy for vascular diseases could be developed for clinic application in the future.

  20. Local density maxima: Progenitors of structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Y.; Shaham, J.

    1985-10-01

    Assuming structure is formed hierarchically from small to large scales, local density extrema are assumed to be the progenitors of structure. The density contrast profile around local maxima is given, to a good approximation, by the primordial two-point correlation function. The mean number density of objects of a given core mass is calculated as a function of the primordial power spectrum, p(k). Assuming p(k)proportionalk/sup n/, virialized halos in an 0 = 1.0 universe should follow pproportionalr/sup(-9 + 3n/)/(4 + n) for -1< or =n and pproportionalr S for -3< or =n< or =-1. In an open universe, rich clusters should have halos steeper than galactic halos. The observed structure is found to be consistent with 0 < 1.0 and n = -1.

  1. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  2. Dynamics of bone graft healing around implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Venkataraman

    2015-01-01

    A few questions arise pertaining to the use of bone grafts along with implants are whether these are successful in approximation with implant. Do they accelerate bone regeneration? Are all defects ultimately regenerated with new viable bone? Is the bone graft completely resorbed or integrated in new bone? Does the implant surface characteristic positively affect osseointegration when used with a bone graft? What type of graft and implant surface can be used that will have a positive effect on the healing type and time? Finally, what are the dynamics of bone graft healing around an implant? This review discusses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone graft healing in general and in vicinity of another foreign, avascular body, namely the implant surface, and further, the role of bone grafts in osseointegration and/or clinical success of the implants.

  3. Rod progenitor cells in the mature zebrafish retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ann C; Scholz, Tamera; Fadool, James M

    2008-01-01

    The zebrafish is an excellent model organism in which to study the retina's response to photoreceptor degeneration and/or acute injury. While much has been learned about the retinal stem and progenitor cells that mediate the damage response, several questions remain that cannot be addressed by acute models of injury. The development of genetic models, such as the XOPS-mCFP transgenic line, should further efforts to understand the nature of the signals that promote rod progenitor proliferation and differentiation following photoreceptor loss. This in turn may help to refine future approaches in higher vertebrates aimed at enhancing retinal progenitor cell activity for therapeutic purposes.

  4. Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Lineage Commitment in Myeloid Progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Franziska; Arkin, Ya'ara; Giladi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    mechanisms. Here, we comprehensively map myeloid progenitor subpopulations by transcriptional sorting of single cells from the bone marrow. We describe multiple progenitor subgroups, showing unexpected transcriptional priming toward seven differentiation fates but no progenitors with a mixed state....... Transcriptional differentiation is correlated with combinations of known and previously undefined transcription factors, suggesting that the process is tightly regulated. Histone maps and knockout assays are consistent with early transcriptional priming, while traditional transplantation experiments suggest...... that in vivo priming may still allow for plasticity given strong perturbations. These data establish a reference model and general framework for studying hematopoiesis at single-cell resolution....

  5. Luminal progenitors restrict their lineage potential during mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Veronica; Dasti, Alessandro; Huyghe, Mathilde; Lafkas, Daniel; Laurent, Cécile; Reyal, Fabien; Fre, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes.

  6. On the progenitor of the Type Ibc supernova 2012fh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samson A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Adams, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Little is observationally known about the progenitors of Type Ibc supernovae (SNe) or the typical activity of SNe progenitors in their final years. Here, we analyze deep Large Binocular Telescope imaging data spanning the 4 years before and after the Type Ic SN 2012fh using difference imaging. We place 1$\\sigma$ upper limits on the detection of the progenitor star at $M_R>-4.0$, $M_V>-3.8$, $M_B>-3.1$, and $M_U>-3.8$ mag. These limits are the tightest placed on a Type Ic SNe and they largely rule out single star evolutionary models in favor of a binary channel as the origin of this SN. We also constrain the activity of the progenitor to be small on an absolute scale, with the RMS $UBVR$ optical variability $<2500L_\\odot$ and long-term dimming or brightening trends $<1000L_\\odot/\\text{year}$ in all four bands.

  7. Post-surgical complications of symphyseal block graft with and without soft tissue grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhamdi, Ali S

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether soft tissue augmentation prior to block grafting will minimize post-block grafting soft tissue complications. This longitudinal controlled pilot study was conducted at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from October 2010 to January 2013. Fourteen sites requiring block grafting were divided into 2 groups: Group A - 7 sites in 6 patients were subjected to monocortical block graft (control); and Group B - 7 sites in 6 patients were subjected to soft tissue graft through new tunnel technique, followed by monocortical block graft (test). In Group A, 2 patients had wound dehiscence and graft exposure. The first that had an exposure of 3x4 mm resulted in 45% resorption of the graft. The second had an exposure of 4x5 mm followed by infection, which resulted in 75% resorption of the graft. In the other 5 cases, sites healed with no complications and minimal resorption (0-15%). In Group B - there were generalized 1-2 mm increases in the thickness of soft tissue following soft tissue graft. Recipient sites healed with no complications or infection following block grafting. Block graft resorption ranged from 0-15%. More complications were seen in those patients who did not receive soft tissue augmentation, thus demonstrating the importance of soft tissue preparation prior to block grafting, especially in patients having thin soft tissue.

  8. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Russell P.; Parikh, Megha A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H. M.; Smith, Benjamin M.; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R. Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50–79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema. PMID:28291826

  9. Identification, Characterization, and Utilization of Adult Meniscal Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    cells, stem cells, progenitor cells, meniscus healing , meniscus repair, osteoarthritis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...2. Keywords meniscus, meniscal cells, stem cells, progenitor cells, meniscus healing , meniscus repair, osteoarthritis 3. Overall Project Summary...Colonies will be compared for frequency and size. For colony forming assays, meniscus cells (P1) from 8wk old mice were seeded a density of 1000/25cm2

  10. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Margaret F; Tracy, Russell P; Parikh, Megha A; Hoffman, Eric A; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H M; Smith, Benjamin M; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50-79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema.

  11. Commitment of decidual haematopoietic progenitor cells in first trimester pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szereday, Laszlo; Miko, Eva; Meggyes, Matyas; Barakonyi, Aliz; Farkas, Balint; Varnagy, Akos; Bodis, Jozsef; Lynch, Lydia; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2012-01-01

    PROBLEM  The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotype and commitment of decidual haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) in healthy pregnant women and in women with early miscarriage. METHOD OF STUDY  Peripheral blood and decidual tissue from healthy and pathological pregnant women were examined for HPCs and lymphoid progenitors using flow cytometric analysis. RESULTS  Compared with peripheral blood, we found a significant increase in decidual HPCs in both healthy pregnant women and women with spontaneous abortion. T/NK, natural killer (NK), gamma-delta and NKT cell progenitors were identified in all peripheral blood and decidual samples. In pathologic pregnant women, the ratios of decidual T/NK and NK cell progenitors were significantly increased compared with healthy pregnant controls. CONCLUSION  We demonstrated decidual cells with haematopoietic progenitor cell phenotype in human decidua. Increased levels of NK progenitors in the decidua of women with early spontaneous abortion suggest a dysregulation of this pathway that may contribute to pregnancy failure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Evaluation of early coronary graft patency after coronary artery bypass graft surgery using multislice computed tomography angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissi Kamal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery is the standard of care in the treatment of advanced coronary artery disease, and its long-term results are affected by the failure of bypass grafts. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the early patency rate in coronary bypass grafts. Methods A total of 107 consecutive patients who underwent CABG were included in this study. Early graft patency was evaluated via computed tomography (CT angiography in the first week after surgery. Results There were a total of 366 grafts, comprised of 250 venous grafts and 116 arterial grafts. Multi-slice CT detected acute graft occlusions in 32 (8.7% of all the grafts, including 26 (10% of the 250 venous grafts and 6 (5% of the 116 arterial grafts. The patency rates obtained were 97.3% for the left internal mammary (IMA grafts, 50% for the radial artery grafts, and 50% for the right IMA grafts. Additionally, 107 (96.4% grafts to the left anterior descending artery (LAD were classified as patent, whereas 1 (30% of the 3 grafts in the left circumflex (LCX region and 1 (50% of the 2 grafts in the right coronary artery (RCA territory were found to be occluded. In the venous category, 8 (13.7% of the 58 grafts to LAD were found to be occluded. In the LCX region, 9 (8.5% of the 106 grafts were classified as occluded, while the remaining 97 (91.5% grafts were patent. The venous grafts to RCA were occluded in 9 (10.4% of the 86 grafts. Amongst the multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, pump time was significantly longer in the patients with occluded grafts than in those with patent grafts (P = 0.04. Conclusion The IMA grafts had the highest early patency rate amongst the coronary bypass grafts. However, the other arterial grafts were associated with a high rate of acute occlusions.

  13. Twist and its effect on ACL graft forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M. P.; Blankevoort, L.; ten Ham, A.; Verdonschot, N.; van Kampen, A.

    2004-01-01

    Graft tension is a controversial topic in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Evidence suggests a narrow range of graft tensions, which allow the graft to remodel to a stable and mature neoligament. In previous cadaver experiments, we showed that twisting the graft could modulate the graft

  14. Fixation of tibial plateau fractures with synthetic bone graft versus natural bone graft: a comparison study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ong, J C Y

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine differences in fracture stability and functional outcome between synthetic bone graft and natural bone graft with internal fixation of tibia plateau metaphyseal defects.

  15. Outcomes of AV Fistulas and AV Grafts after Interventional Stent-Graft Deployment in Haemodialysis Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelter, Christopher, E-mail: christopher.schmelter@klinikum-ingolstadt.de; Raab, Udo, E-mail: udo.raab@klinikum-ingolstadt.de [Klinikum Ingolstadt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lazarus, Friedrich, E-mail: friedrich.lazarus@klinikum-ingolstadt.de [Klinikum Ingolstadt, Department of Nephrology (Germany); Ruppert, Volker, E-mail: volker.ruppert@klinikum-ingolstadt.de [Klinikum Ingolstadt, Department of Vascular Surgery (Germany); Vorwerk, Dierk, E-mail: dierk.vorwerk@klinikum-ingolstadt.de [Klinikum Ingolstadt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe study was designed to assess outcomes of arteriovenous (AV) accesses after interventional stent-graft deployment in haemodialysis patients.Materials and Methods63 haemodialysis patients with 66 AV fistulas and AV grafts were treated by interventional stent-graft deployment from 2006 to 2012 at our hospital. Data of these patients were retrospectively analysed for location of deployed stent-grafts, occurrence and location of (re-)stenosis and (re-)thrombosis. Complex stenosis was the most frequent indication for stent-graft deployment (45.5 %), followed by complications of angioplasty with vessel rupture or dissection (31.8 %).ResultsA high rate of procedural success was achieved (98.5 %). The most frequent location of the deployed stent-graft was the draining vein (66.7 %). Stent-graft deployment was more frequent in AV grafts than in AV fistulas. Primary patency was 45.5 % at 6 month, 31.3 % at 12 month and 19.2 % at 24 month. Primary patency was significantly better for AV fistulas than for AV grafts with deployed stent-grafts. Patency of the deployed stent-graft was much better than overall AV access primary patency with deployed stent-graft. Re-stenosis with thrombosis was the most frequent indication for re-intervention. Most frequent location of re-stenosis was the draining vein (37.1 %), followed by stenosis at the AV access (29.5 %) and the deployed stent-graft (23.5 %).ConclusionRe-stenosis and re-thrombosis remain frequent in AV fistulas and AV grafts in haemodialysis patients despite stent-graft deployment. Re-stenosis of the deployed stent-graft is, only in the minority of the cases, responsible for AV access dysfunction.

  16. Hepatic progenitors for liver disease: current position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Conigliaro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alice Conigliaro1, David A Brenner2, Tatiana Kisseleva21University “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Cellulari ed Ematologia Policlinico Umberto I, V Clinica Medica, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: Liver regeneration restores the original functionality of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in response to injury. It is regulated on several levels, with different cellular populations contributing to this process, eg, hepatocytes, liver precursor cells, intrahepatic stem cells. In response to injury, mature hepatocytes have the capability to proliferate and give rise to new hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Meanwhile, liver precursor cells (oval cells have become the most recognized bipotential precursor cells in the damaged liver. They rapidly proliferate, change their cellular composition, and differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes to compensate for the cellular loss and maintain liver homeostasis. There is a growing body of evidence that oval cells originate from the intrahepatic stem cell(s, which in turn give(s rise to epithelial, including oval cells, and/or other hepatic cells of nonepithelial origin. Since there is a close relationship between the liver and hematopoiesis, bone marrow derived cells can also contribute to liver regeneration by the fusion of myeloid cells with damaged hepatocytes, or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. The current review discusses the contribution of different cells to liver regeneration and their characteristics.Keywords: hepatic progenitor, liver disease, liver precursor cells, oval cells, hepatocytes, intrahepatic stem cells, cholangiocytes

  17. Harmine stimulates proliferation of human neural progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Dakic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Harmine is the β-carboline alkaloid with the highest concentration in the psychotropic plant decoction Ayahuasca. In rodents, classical antidepressants reverse the symptoms of depression by stimulating neuronal proliferation. It has been shown that Ayahuasca presents antidepressant effects in patients with depressive disorder. In the present study, we investigated the effects of harmine in cell cultures containing human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs, 97% nestin-positive derived from pluripotent stem cells. After 4 days of treatment, the pool of proliferating hNPCs increased by 71.5%. Harmine has been reported as a potent inhibitor of the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase (DYRK1A, which regulates cell proliferation and brain development. We tested the effect of analogs of harmine, an inhibitor of DYRK1A (INDY, and an irreversible selective inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO but not DYRK1A (pargyline. INDY but not pargyline induced proliferation of hNPCs similarly to harmine, suggesting that inhibition of DYRK1A is a possible mechanism to explain harmine effects upon the proliferation of hNPCs. Our findings show that harmine enhances proliferation of hNPCs and suggest that inhibition of DYRK1A may explain its effects upon proliferation in vitro and antidepressant effects in vivo.

  18. The autologus graft of epithelial tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minaee B

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available With the intention of research about culture and autologus graft of epithelial tissue we used 4 french Albino Rabbits with an average age of 2 months. After reproduction on the support in EMEM (Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium we used this for graft after 4 weeks. This region which grafted total replaced. After fixation of this sample and passing them through various process, histological sections were prepared. These sections were stained with H & E and masson's trichrome and studied by light microscope. We succeeded in graft. We hope in the near future by using the method of epithelium tissue culture improving to treat burned patients.

  19. Plant grafting: insights into tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Charles W

    2017-02-01

    For millennia, people have cut and joined different plants together through a process known as grafting. The severed tissues adhere, the cells divide and the vasculature differentiates through a remarkable process of regeneration between two genetically distinct organisms as they become one. Grafting is becoming increasingly important in horticulture where it provides an efficient means for asexual propagation. Grafting also combines desirable roots and shoots to generate chimeras that are more vigorous, more pathogen resistant and more abiotic stress resistant. Thus, it presents an elegant and efficient way to improve plant productivity in vegetables and trees using traditional techniques. Despite this horticultural importance, we are only beginning to understand how plants regenerate tissues at the graft junction. By understanding grafting better, we can shed light on fundamental regeneration pathways and the basis for self/non-self recognition. We can also better understand why many plants efficiently graft whereas others cannot, with the goal of improving grafting so as to broaden the range of grafted plants to create even more desirable chimeras. Here, I review the latest findings describing how plants graft and provide insight into future directions in this emerging field.

  20. Graft union formation in artichoke grafting onto wild and cultivated cardoon: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchera, Alessandra; Pandozy, Gianmarco; Rinaldi, Simona; Crinò, Paola; Temperini, Olindo; Rea, Elvira

    2013-12-15

    In order to develop a non-chemical method such as grafting effective against well-known artichoke soil borne diseases, an anatomical study of union formation in artichoke grafted onto selected wild and cultivated cardoon rootstocks, both resistant to Verticillium wilt, was performed. The cardoon accessions Belgio (cultivated cardoon) and Sardo (wild cardoon) were selected as rootstocks for grafting combinations with the artichoke cv. Romolo. Grafting experiments were carried out in the autumn and spring. The anatomical investigation of grafting union formation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the grafting portions at the 3rd, 6th, 10th, 12th day after grafting. For the autumn experiment only, SEM analysis was also performed at 30 d after grafting. A high affinity between artichoke scion and cardoon rootstocks was observed, with some genotype differences in healing time between the two bionts. SEM images of scion/rootstock longitudinal sections revealed the appearance of many interconnecting structures between the two grafting components just 3d after grafting, followed by a vascular rearrangement and a callus development during graft union formation. De novo formation of many plasmodesmata between scion and rootstock confirmed their high compatibility, particularly in the globe artichoke/wild cardoon combination. Moreover, the duration of the early-stage grafting process could be influenced not only by the scion/rootstock compatibility, but also by the seasonal conditions, being favored by lower temperatures and a reduced light/dark photoperiod. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Human neural progenitors derived from integration-free iPSCs for SCI therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As a potentially unlimited autologous cell source, patient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide great capability for tissue regeneration, particularly in spinal cord injury (SCI. However, despite significant progress made in translation of iPSC-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs to clinical settings, a few hurdles remain. Among them, non-invasive approach to obtain source cells in a timely manner, safer integration-free delivery of reprogramming factors, and purification of NPCs before transplantation are top priorities to overcome. In this study, we developed a safe and cost-effective pipeline to generate clinically relevant NPCs. We first isolated cells from patients' urine and reprogrammed them into iPSCs by non-integrating Sendai viral vectors, and carried out experiments on neural differentiation. NPCs were purified by A2B5, an antibody specifically recognizing a glycoganglioside on the cell surface of neural lineage cells, via fluorescence activated cell sorting. Upon further in vitro induction, NPCs were able to give rise to neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. To test the functionality of the A2B5+ NPCs, we grafted them into the contused mouse thoracic spinal cord. Eight weeks after transplantation, the grafted cells survived, integrated into the injured spinal cord, and differentiated into neurons and glia. Our specific focus on cell source, reprogramming, differentiation and purification method purposely addresses timing and safety issues of transplantation to SCI models. It is our belief that this work takes one step closer on using human iPSC derivatives to SCI clinical settings.

  2. Fabrication of endothelial progenitor cell capture surface via DNA aptamer modifying dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin; Deng, Jinchuan; Yuan, Shuheng; Wang, Juan; Luo, Rifang; Chen, Si [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang, Jin, E-mail: jinxxwang@263.net [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Huang, Nan [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The dopamine/PEI film with controlled amine density was successfully prepared. • The DNA aptamer was assembled onto the film via electrostatic incorporation. • The A@DPfilmscanspecificallyandeffectivelycaptureEPCs. • The A@DP film can support the survival of ECs, control the hyperplasia of SMCs. • The dynamic/co-culture models are useful for studying cells competitive adhesion. - Abstract: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are mainly located in bone marrow and circulate, and play a crucial role in repairmen of injury endothelium. One of the most promising strategies of stents designs were considered to make in-situ endothelialization in vivo via EPC-capture biomolecules on a vascular graft to capture EPCs directly from circulatory blood. In this work, an EPC specific aptamer with a 34 bases single strand DNA sequence was conjugated onto the stent surface via dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film as a platform and linker. The assembled density of DNA aptamer could be regulated by controlling dopamine percentage in this copolymer film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle (WCA) and fluorescence test confirmed the successful immobilization of DNA aptamer. To confirm its biofunctionality and cytocompatibility, the capturing cells ability of the aptamer modified surface and the effects on the growth behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were investigated. The aptamer functionalized sample revealed a good EPC-capture ability, and had a cellular friendly feature for both EPC and EC growth, while not stimulated the hyperplasia of SMCs. And, the co-culture experiment of three types of cells confirmed the specificity capturing of EPCs to aptamer modified surface, rather than ECs and SMCs. These data suggested that this aptamer functionalized surface may have a large potentiality for the application of vascular grafts with targeted endothelialization.

  3. HEMATOPOIETIC PROGENITOR CELL CONTENT OF VERTEBRAL BODY MARROW USED FOR COMBINED SOLID ORGAN AND BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Witold B.; Fontes, Paulo A.; Rao, Abdul S.; Winkelstein, Alan; Ricordi, Camillo; Ball, Edward D.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    While cadaveric vertebral bodies (VB) have long been proposed as a suitable source of bone marrow (BM) for transplantation (BMT), they have rarely been used for this purpose. We have infused VB BM immediately following whole organ (WO) transplantation to augment donor cell chimerism. We quantified the hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) content of VB BM as well as BM obtained from the iliac crests (IC) of normal allogeneic donors (ALLO) and from patients with malignancy undergoing autologous marrow harvest (AUTO). Patients undergoing WOIBM transplantation also had AUTO BM harvested in the event that subsequent lymphohematopoietic reconstitution was required. Twenty-four VB BM, 24 IC BM-ALLO, 31 IC AUTO, and 24 IC WO-AUTO were harvested. VB BM was tested 12 to 72 hr after procurement and infused after completion ofWO grafting. IC BM was tested and then used or cryopreserved immediately. HPC were quantified by clonal assay measuring CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-GEMM, and by flow cytometry for CD34+ progenitor cells. On an average, 9 VB were processed during each harvest, and despite an extended processing time the number of viable nucleated cells obtained was significantly higher than that from IC. Furthermore, by HPC content, VB BM was equivalent to IC BM, which is routinely used for BMT. We conclude that VB BM is a clinically valuable source of BM for allogeneic transplantation. PMID:7701582

  4. Long-term functional benefits of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitors embedded into a fibrin scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Valérie; Vanneaux, Valérie; Bel, Alain; Nemetalla, Hany; Emmanuelle Boitard, Solène; Farouz, Yohan; Joanne, Pierre; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Robidel, Estelle; Mandet, Chantal; Hagège, Albert; Bruneval, Patrick; Larghero, Jérôme; Agbulut, Onnik; Menasché, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac-committed cells and biomimetic scaffolds independently improve the therapeutic efficacy of stem cells. In this study we tested the long-term effects of their combination. Eighty immune-deficient rats underwent permanent coronary artery ligation. Five to 7 weeks later, those with an echocardiographically measured ejection fraction (EF) ≤55% were re-operated on and randomly allocated to receive a cell-free fibrin patch (n = 25), a fibrin patch loaded with 700,000 human embryonic stem cells (ESC) pre-treated to promote early cardiac differentiation (SSEA-1(+) progenitors [n = 30]), or to serve as sham-operated animals (n = 25). Left ventricular function was assessed by echocardiography at baseline and every month thereafter until 4 months. Hearts were then processed for assessment of fibrosis and angiogenesis and a 5-component heart failure score was constructed by integrating the absolute change in left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) between 4 months and baseline, and the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based expression of natriuretic peptides A and B, myosin heavy chain 7 and periostin. All data were recorded and analyzed in a blinded manner. The cell-treated group consistently yielded better functional outcomes than the sham-operated group (p = 0.002 for EF; p = 0.01 for LVESV). Angiogenesis in the border zone was also significantly greater in the cell-fibrin group (p = 0.006), which yielded the lowest heart failure score (p = 0.04 vs sham). Engrafted progenitors were only detected shortly after transplantation; no grafted cells were identified after 4 months. There was no teratoma identified. A fibrin scaffold loaded with ESC-derived cardiac progenitors resulted in sustained improvement in contractility and attenuation of remodeling without sustained donor cell engraftment. A paracrine effect, possibly on innate reparative responses, is a possible mechanism for this enduring effect. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart

  5. Cell-Surface Protein Profiling Identifies Distinctive Markers of Progenitor Cells in Human Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Uezumi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle contains two distinct stem/progenitor populations. One is the satellite cell, which acts as a muscle stem cell, and the other is the mesenchymal progenitor, which contributes to muscle pathogeneses such as fat infiltration and fibrosis. Detailed and accurate characterization of these progenitors in humans remains elusive. Here, we performed comprehensive cell-surface protein profiling of the two progenitor populations residing in human skeletal muscle and identified three previously unrecognized markers: CD82 and CD318 for satellite cells and CD201 for mesenchymal progenitors. These markers distinguish myogenic and mesenchymal progenitors, and enable efficient isolation of the two types of progenitors. Functional study revealed that CD82 ensures expansion and preservation of myogenic progenitors by suppressing excessive differentiation, and CD201 signaling favors adipogenesis of mesenchymal progenitors. Thus, cell-surface proteins identified here are not only useful markers but also functionally important molecules, and provide valuable insight into human muscle biology and diseases.

  6. Autogenous femoral head as grafting material for mandibular augmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. D.; Raghoebar, G. M.; van der Wal, J. E.; Kalk, W. W. I.; Vissink, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bone grafting is commonly used for augmentation of the atrophic edentulous maxilla and mandible. Although bone substitutes and allogeneic frozen bone grafts have been applied successfully, fresh autogenous bone grafts remain the 'gold standard' in maxillofacial reconstructive surgery. A disadvantage

  7. Diffusion and Perfusion: The Keys to Fat Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger K. Khouri, Jr, BS

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: These models confirm that initial fat grafting survival is limited by oxygen diffusion. Preoperative expansion increases oxygen diffusion capacity allowing for additional graft retention. These models provide a scientific framework for testing the current fat grafting theories.

  8. Design and development of multilayer vascular graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Vascular graft is a widely-used medical device for the treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and aneurysm as well as for the use of vascular access and pediatric shunt, which are major causes of mortality and morbidity in this world. Dysfunction of vascular grafts often occurs, particularly for grafts with diameter less than 6mm, and is associated with the design of graft materials. Mechanical strength, compliance, permeability, endothelialization and availability are issues of most concern for vascular graft materials. To address these issues, we have designed a biodegradable, compliant graft made of hybrid multilayer by combining an intimal equivalent, electrospun heparin-impregnated poly-epsilon-caprolactone nanofibers, with a medial equivalent, a crosslinked collagen-chitosan-based gel scaffold. The intimal equivalent is designed to build mechanical strength and stability suitable for in vivo grafting and to prevent thrombosis. The medial equivalent is designed to serve as a scaffold for the activity of the smooth muscle cells important for vascular healing and regeneration. Our results have shown that genipin is a biocompatible crosslinker to enhance the mechanical properties of collagen-chitosan based scaffolds, and the degradation time and the activity of smooth muscle cells in the scaffold can be modulated by the crosslinking degree. For vascular grafting and regeneration in vivo, an important design parameter of the hybrid multilayer is the interface adhesion between the intimal and medial equivalents. With diametrically opposite affinities to water, delamination of the two layers occurs. Physical or chemical modification techniques were thus used to enhance the adhesion. Microscopic examination and graft-relevant functional characterizations have been performed to evaluate these techniques. Results from characterization of microstructure and functional properties, including burst strength, compliance, water permeability and suture

  9. The direct identification of core-collapse supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2017-09-01

    To place core-collapse supernovae (SNe) in context with the evolution of massive stars, it is necessary to determine their stellar origins. I describe the direct identification of SN progenitors in existing pre-explosion images, particularly those obtained through serendipitous imaging of nearby galaxies by the Hubble Space Telescope. I comment on specific cases representing the various core-collapse SN types. Establishing the astrometric coincidence of a SN with its putative progenitor is relatively straightforward. One merely needs a comparably high-resolution image of the SN itself and its stellar environment to perform this matching. The interpretation of these results, though, is far more complicated and fraught with larger uncertainties, including assumptions of the distance to and the extinction of the SN, as well as the metallicity of the SN environment. Furthermore, existing theoretical stellar evolutionary tracks exhibit significant variations one from the next. Nonetheless, it appears fairly certain that Type II-P (plateau) SNe arise from massive stars in the red supergiant phase. Many of the known cases are associated with subluminous Type II-P events. The progenitors of Type II-L (linear) SNe are less established. Among the stripped-envelope SNe, there are now a number of examples of cool, but not red, supergiants (presumably in binaries) as Type IIb progenitors. We appear now finally to have an identified progenitor of a Type Ib SN, but no known example yet for a Type Ic. The connection has been made between some Type IIn SNe and progenitor stars in a luminous blue variable phase, but that link is still thin, based on direct identifications. Finally, I also describe the need to revisit the SN site, long after the SN has faded, to confirm the progenitor identification through the star's disappearance and potentially to detect a putative binary companion that may have survived the explosion. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap

  10. Biodegradability of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) film grafted with vinyl acetate: Effect of grafting and saponification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Yuki [Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)]. E-mail: wada.yuki@jaea.go.jp; Seko, Noriaki [Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nagasawa, Naotsugu [Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Tamada, Masao [Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kasuya, Ken-ichi [Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Mitomo, Hiroshi [Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinyl acetate (VAc) onto poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) film was carried out. At a degree of grafting higher than 5%, the grafted films (PHB-g-VAc) completely lost the enzymatic degradability that is characteristic of PHB due to the grafted VAc covering the surface of the PHB film. However, the biodegradability of the PHB-g-VAc films was recovered when the films were saponified in alkali solution under optimum conditions. Graft chains of the PHB-g-VAc film reacted selectively to become biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The biodegradability of the saponified PHB-g-VAc film increased rapidly with time.

  11. Influence of ischemia before vein grafting on early hyperplasia of the graft and the dynamic changes of the intima after grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou RongJiang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate both the influence of ischemia before grafting on early hyperplasia of the vein grafts, and the dynamic changes of the intima after grafting in a rabbit model of vein graft disease. Methods We performed paired vein graft experiments under different ischemic conditions (15 vs. 60 min; 15 vs. 90 min in the neck of the rabbits and compared the differences between the grafts. Clopidogrel, an anti-platelet agent, was administered before and after surgery. Twenty-eight days after the grafting procedure, the veins were evaluated microscopically. The dynamic changes of the intima after grafting were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy over time. Results The vein grafts subjected to 60- or 90-min ischemia exhibited no differences compared to those subjected to 15-min ischemia in terms of the mean thickness of the intimal, medial, and adventitial layers of the graft. Similarly, there was no difference in the Ki-67 labeling index (proliferation marker between the vein grafts. Vein grafts with 15-min ischemia lost endothelial cells (ECs but healed by 3 days post graft, whereas vein grafts with 90-min ischemia suffered serious EC loss, which was restored with new ECs during days 2 to 14 post graft. Conclusions Ninety-minute ischemia before vein grafting can cause serious EC loss, but does not increase early intimal hyperplasia when clopidogrel is administered. Protecting the vein from ischemia and reperfusion injury preserves ECs.

  12. Spreader Grafts in Functional Rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Leslie; Papel, Ira D

    2016-02-01

    Management of the middle vault is paramount to achieving optimal aesthetic and functional outcomes in rhinoplasty. The ideal treatment for middle vault complications, such as internal nasal valve collapse, inverted-V deformity, and middle vault dorsal asymmetry, is prevention. Risk factors for middle vault problems in rhinoplasty that may be identified in preoperative consultation include short nasal bones, long and weak upper lateral cartilages, thin skin, previous trauma or surgery, preoperative positive Cottle maneuver, tension nose deformity, and anteriorly positioned inferior turbinates. When any of these risk factors are identified, preventive measures should be pursued. These include preservation of middle vault support structures, judicious resection in dorsal hump reduction, use of conservative osteotomies, and reconstruction of the cartilaginous middle vault with structural grafting. Spreader grafts have become the workhorse in middle vault reconstruction. They are invaluable in restoring nasal dorsal aesthetic lines, repairing or maintaining the internal nasal valve, and buttressing a corrected crooked nose. Functional and aesthetic problems related to the middle nasal vault are among the most common reasons for patients seeking revision rhinoplasty. Although complications in rhinoplasty are inevitable, underlying their etiology and instituting prophylactic treatment can significantly help reduce their occurrence. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Multimodality imaging of coronary artery bypass grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, Liesbeth Pauline

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes multiple imaging modalities to examine coronary artery bypass grafts, and the research which was performed to further develop noninvasive imaging techniques to detect stenoses in native coronary arteries and bypass grafts in patients who experienced recurrent chest pain after

  14. equipment grafting in telecommunication industry (case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    EQUIPMENT GRAFTING IN TELECOMMUNICATION INDUSTRY (CASE STUDY NIGERIA PSTN). Figur e 4. Design Layout. 4.0 O N - G O I N G E Q U I P M E N T. GRAFTING EFFORTS. For instance, the NITEL network covers the whole country with an extensive terrestrial network. It represents the PSTN (public switched ...

  15. Grafted hydroxypropyl guargum: Development, characterization and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    copolymers are much more efficient than the linear poly- mers because of their greater 'approachability' to the contaminants, which could be the result of the spreading effect of the dangling grafted PAM chains on the rigid polysaccharide backbone (Singh et al 2000). It was also observed that among all the graft copolymers ...

  16. Graft biomechanics following three corneal transplantation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehr Feizi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Graft biomechanical parameters after DSAEK are lower than those following PK and DALK. After PK and DALK in keratoconic eyes, these metrics are increased to normal values. These differences may have implications for interpreting intraocular pressure or planning graft refractive surgery after keratoplasty.

  17. Emerging concepts in liver graft preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Mohamed; Pantazi, Eirini; Folch-Puy, Emma; Baptista, Pedro M; García-Gil, Agustín; Adam, René; Roselló-Catafau, Joan

    2015-01-14

    The urgent need to expand the donor pool in order to attend to the growing demand for liver transplantation has obliged physicians to consider the use of suboptimal liver grafts and also to redefine the preservation strategies. This review examines the different methods of liver graft preservation, focusing on the latest advances in both static cold storage and machine perfusion (MP). The new strategies for static cold storage are mainly designed to increase the fatty liver graft preservation via the supplementation of commercial organ preservation solutions with additives. In this paper we stress the importance of carrying out effective graft washout after static cold preservation, and present a detailed discussion of the future perspectives for dynamic graft preservation using MP at different temperatures (hypothermia at 4 °C, normothermia at 37 °C and subnormothermia at 20 °C-25 °C). Finally, we highlight some emerging applications of regenerative medicine in liver graft preservation. In conclusion, this review discusses the "state of the art" and future perspectives in static and dynamic liver graft preservation in order to improve graft viability.

  18. Equipment Grafting in Telecommunication Industry (Case Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... existing network in the form of Upgrades and Expansion efforts. This paper appraises these grafting processes. It introduces the subject matter, highlights the performance capabilities and usage constraints of a variety of switching and transmission equipment. It also gives insight into the on-going grafting efforts in NITEL.

  19. Graft loss after pediatric liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieders, E; Peeters, PMJG; TenVergert, EM; de Jong, KP; Porte, RJ; Zwaveling, JH; Bijleveld, CMA; Gouw, ASH; Slooff, MJH

    Objective To describe the epidemiology and causes of graft loss after pediatric liver transplantation and to identify risk factors. Summary Background Data Graft failure after transplantation remains an important problem. It results in patient death or retransplantation, resulting in lower survival

  20. A novel initiating system for wool grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy Kandil Zahran

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new method for the grafting of methacrylic acid (MAA and other acrylic monomers onto wool fabric in aqueous medium. The novelty principally concerns the chemical approach of the redox grafting reaction that was carried out in the presence of sodium perborate (SPB initiator. Before the grafting reaction was started, the wool fabric was treated first with a freshly prepared ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS solution. The so-treated fabric formed, with SPB, an efficacious redox system capable of initiating grafting of methacrylic acid (MAA and other acrylic monomers onto the wool fabric. The effect of the polymerization conditions on the polymer criteria, namely, graft yield (%GY, homopolymer (%HP, total conversion (%TC, and grafting efficiency (%GE, was studied. These polymer criteria were found to depend spaciously upon concentrations of the Fe2+ ion (activator, SPB (initiator, and MAA, pH of the polymerization medium, duration and temperature of polymerization. The graft copolymerization reaction has also been carried out in the presence of polymerization activators (e.g. reductant transition metal ions and an inhibitor (e.g. hydroquinone. A suitable mechanism for the grafting processes has been suggested, in accordance with the experimental results.

  1. Limb conservation using non vascularised fibular grafts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    graft in limb reconstruction from bone loss due to trauma and infection. Bone loss can occur from severe high .... preserved in a diluted blood with normal saline till ; anastomosis was commenced. He also had cable grafting of the ... arm muscles was performed at the same time. The forearm was supported in below elbow ...

  2. A comparison between the HeRO graft and conventional arteriovenous grafts in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, George M; Glickman, Marc H; McLafferty, Robert B; Croston, J Kevin; Zarge, Joseph I; Katzman, Howard E; Peden, Eric K; Lawson, Jeffrey H; Martinez, Jeffrey M; Thackeray, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Venous stenosis and occlusion are a major cause of vascular access dysfunction and failure. The HeRO Graft bypasses occlusion and traverses stenosis with outflow directly into the central venous circulation. A randomized, multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the HeRO Graft relative to conventional AV grafts. The design was to enroll 143 patients in a 2:1 randomization ratio between HeRO and conventional AV control groups. Data on 72 subjects (52 HeRO Graft and 20 AV graft controls) were obtained. The HeRO Graft and control cohorts were comparable in baseline characteristics. Adequacy of dialysis, bacteremia rates, and adverse events were consistent between groups. Twelve month Kaplan-Meier estimates for primary and secondary patency rates were 34.8% and 67.6% in the HeRO Graft cohort, and 30.6% and 58.4% in the control cohort. There was no statistical difference in terms of patency between groups. The rates of intervention were 2.2/year for HeRO Graft and 1.6/year for the control (p = 0.100). Median days to loss of secondary patency was 238 for HeRO Graft versus 102 for the control (p = 0.032). The HeRO Graft appears to provide similar patency, adequacy of dialysis, and bacteremia rates to those of conventional AV grafts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Xenon treatment protects against cold ischemia associated delayed graft function and prolongs graft survival in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Watts, H R; Chong, M; Huang, H; Tralau-Stewart, C; Maxwell, P H; Maze, M; George, A J T; Ma, D

    2013-08-01

    Prolonged hypothermic storage causes ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in the renal graft, which is considered to contribute to the occurrence of the delayed graft function (DGF) and chronic graft failure. Strategies are required to protect the graft and to prolong renal graft survival. We demonstrated that xenon exposure to human proximal tubular cells (HK-2) led to activation of range of protective proteins. Xenon treatment prior to or after hypothermia-hypoxia challenge stabilized the HK-2 cellular structure, diminished cytoplasmic translocation of high-mobility group box (HMGB) 1 and suppressed NF-κB activation. In the syngeneic Lewis-to-Lewis rat model of kidney transplantation, xenon exposure to donors before graft retrieval or to recipients after engraftment decreased caspase-3 expression, localized HMGB-1 within nuclei and prevented TLR-4/NF-κB activation in tubular cells; serum pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were reduced and renal function was preserved. Xenon treatment of graft donors or of recipients prolonged renal graft survival following IRI in both Lewis-to-Lewis isografts and Fischer-to-Lewis allografts. Xenon induced cell survival or graft functional recovery was abolished by HIF-1α siRNA. Our data suggest that xenon treatment attenuates DGF and enhances graft survival. This approach could be translated into clinical practice leading to a considerable improvement in long-term graft survival. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  4. All-inside anterior cruciate ligament graft link: graft preparation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowitz, James H

    2012-12-01

    The anatomic single-bundle, all-inside anterior cruciate ligament graft-link technique requires meticulous graft preparation. The graft choice is no-incision allograft or gracilis-sparing, posterior semitendinosus autograft. The graft is linked, like a chain, to femoral and tibial TightRope cortical suspensory fixation devices with adjustable-length graft loops (Arthrex, Naples, FL) in the following manner: the graft is quadrupled, and the free ends are first whip-stitched and then sutured with a buried-knot technique, 4 times through each strand in a loop. The graft is placed on a tensioning station under approximately 20 lb of tension during arthroscopic preparation of the knee and then removed from the tensioner and inserted into all-inside femoral and tibial sockets through the anteromedial arthroscopic portal.

  5. Mechanisms of temporal identity regulation in mouse retinal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Pierre; Cayouette, Michel

    2015-01-01

    While much progress has been made in recent years toward elucidating the transcription factor codes controlling how neural progenitor cells generate the various glial and neuronal cell types in a particular spatial domain, much less is known about how these progenitors alter their output over time. In the past years, work in the developing mouse retina has provided evidence that a transcriptional cascade similar to the one used in Drosophila neuroblasts might control progenitor temporal identity in vertebrates. The zinc finger transcription factor Ikzf1 (Ikaros), an ortholog of Drosophila hunchback, was reported to confer early temporal identity in retinal progenitors and, more recently, the ortholog of Drosophila castor, Casz1, was found to function as a mid/late temporal identity factor that is negatively regulated by Ikzf1. The molecular mechanisms by which these temporal identity factors function in retinal progenitors, however, remain unknown. Here we briefly review previous work on the vertebrate temporal identity factors in the retina, and propose a model by which they might operate.

  6. Simultaneous characterization of progenitor cell compartments in adult human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porretti, Laura; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Colombo, Federico; Lopa, Raffaella; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Battiston, Carlo; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Bertolini, Francesco; Rebulla, Paolo; Prati, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The human liver is a complex tissue consisting of epithelial, endothelial, hematopoietic, and mesenchymal elements that probably derive from multiple lineage-committed progenitors, but no comprehensive study aimed at identifying and characterizing intrahepatic precursors has yet been published. Cell suspensions for this study were obtained by enzymatic digestion of liver specimens taken from 20 patients with chronic liver disease and 13 multiorgan donors. Stem and progenitor cells were first isolated, amplified, and characterized ex vivo according to previously validated methods, and then optimized flow cytometry was used to assess their relative frequencies and characterize their immunophenotypes in the clinical specimens. Stem and progenitor cells committed to hematopoietic, endothelial, epithelial, and mesenchymal lineages were clearly identifiable in livers from both healthy and diseased subjects. Within the mononuclear liver cell compartment, epithelial progenitors [epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)(+)/CD49f(+)/CD29(+)/CD45(-)] accounted for 2.7-3.5% whereas hematopoietic (CD34(+)/CD45(+)), endothelial [vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (KDR)(+)/CD146(+)/CD45(-)], and mesenchymal [CD73(+)/CD105(+)/CD90 (Thy-1)(+)/CD45 (-)] stem cells and progenitors accounted for smaller fractions (0.02-0.6%). The patients' livers had higher percentages of hematopoietic and endothelial precursors than those of the donors. In conclusion, we identified and characterized precursors committed to four different lineages in adult human liver. We also optimized a flow cytometry approach that will be useful in exploring the contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of liver disease.

  7. Grafting of styrene onto fluoropolymers films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldes, Adriana N.; Zen, Heloisa A.; Parra, Duclerc F.; Lugao, Ademar B.; Linardi, Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente], E-mail: angeral@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Grafting of styrene onto poly(vinylidenefluoride) (PVDF) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films was studied for the synthesis of ion exchange membranes. Radiation-induced grafting of styrene onto PVDF and PTFE films was investigated by simultaneous method using a Co{sup 60} source. The films of PVDF and PTFE were irradiated at total dose of 20 to 120 kGy and chemical changes were monitored after contact with styrene. Films of PTFE and PVDF were immersed in styrene/toluene 1:1 and were submitted to gamma radiation. After irradiation the samples were evaluated at periods of 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, at room temperature in order to measure the grafting degree. Results of infrared spectroscopic analysis (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and the degree of grafting (DOG) were evaluated. The characterization techniques showed that irradiated PVDF and PTFE films exhibited a much higher grafting degree at 120 kGy. (author)

  8. Posterolateral bone graft of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J M; Ebraheim, N A; An, H S; Jackson, W T

    1990-02-01

    A series of 30 high-energy tibial diaphyseal fractures in 30 patients were treated with posterolateral bone grafting (1984-1987). All of the fractures were open, a majority being Gustillo Type III with significant soft-tissue injury, comminution, or segmental bone loss. The common mechanisms of injury included motorcycle, pedestrian versus automobile, and motor vehicle accidents. Nineteen of 30 fractures were treated with a posterolateral bone graft within six months of the initial injury, and 11 of 30 were grafted after established nonunion. Union was obtained in 29 of 30 fractures (97%). Healing time from the time of grafting ranged from three to 12 months, with an average of 4.7 months. One patient had a below-knee amputation because of uncontrolled chronic osteomyelitis, drainage, and nonunion. Posterolateral bone grafts consistently produced rapid healing of delayed union as well as established nonunion.

  9. Graft Take-Rates After Tympanoplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Aabenhus, Kristine; Glad, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a prospective ear surgery database and investigate the graft take-rate and prognostic factors for graft take-rate in tympanoplasty using the database. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective database study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: A total of 1606 cases undergoing...... tympanoplasty types I to IV were registered in the database in the period from February 2004 to November 2013. INTERVENTION: A total of 837 cases underwent myringoplasty/tympanoplasty type I. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Graft take-rate and prognostic factors (age, discharge at time of surgery, tuba function...... was developed. The graft take-rate was found to be 93.0% at 2 to 6 months and 86.6% at more than 12 months. Except for a discharging ear at the time of surgery, no significant differences using χ² test of association were found when comparing graft take-rates for different prognostic factors or more advanced...

  10. Temporal Progression of Retinal Progenitor Cell Identity: Implications in Cell Replacement Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awais Javed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Retinal degenerative diseases, which lead to the death of rod and cone photoreceptor cells, are the leading cause of inherited vision loss worldwide. Induced pluripotent or embryonic stem cells (iPSCs/ESCs have been proposed as a possible source of new photoreceptors to restore vision in these conditions. The proof of concept studies carried out in mouse models of retinal degeneration over the past decade have highlighted several limitations for cell replacement in the retina, such as the low efficiency of cone photoreceptor production from stem cell cultures and the poor integration of grafted cells in the host retina. Current protocols to generate photoreceptors from stem cells are largely based on the use of extracellular factors. Although these factors are essential to induce the retinal progenitor cell (RPC fate from iPSCs/ESCs, developmental studies have shown that RPCs alter fate output as a function of time (i.e., their temporal identity to generate the seven major classes of retinal cell types, rather than spatial position. Surprisingly, current stem cell differentiation protocols largely ignore the intrinsic temporal identity of dividing RPCs, which we argue likely explains the low efficiency of cone production in such cultures. In this article, we briefly review the mechanisms regulating temporal identity in RPCs and discuss how they could be exploited to improve cone photoreceptor production for cell replacement therapies.

  11. Mobilization of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Using Inhibitors of CXCR4 and VLA-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettig, Michael P.; Ansstas, George; DiPersio, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Successful hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) requires the infusion of a sufficient number of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) that are capable of homing to the bone marrow cavity and regenerating durable trilineage hematopoiesis in a timely fashion. Stem cells harvested from peripheral blood are the most commonly used graft source in HSCT. While granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the most frequently used agent for stem cell mobilization, the use of G-CSF alone results in suboptimal stem cell yields in a significant proportion of patients. Both the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and the integrin α4β1 (VLA-4) play important roles in the homing and retention of HSPCs within the bone marrow microenvironment. Preclinical and/or clinical studies have shown that targeted disruption of the interaction of CXCR4 or VLA-4 with their ligands results in the rapid and reversible mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the peripheral circulation and is synergistic when combined with G-CSF. In this review we discuss the development of small molecule CXCR4 and VLA-4 inhibitors and how they may improve the utility and convenience of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. PMID:21886173

  12. Constitutive Expression of Adiponectin in Endothelial Progenitor Cells Protects a Rat Model of Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, as precursors to endothelial cells, play a significant part in the process of endogenous blood vessel repair and maintenance of endothelial integrity. Adiponectin (APN is an adipocyte-specific adipocytokine. In this study, we aim to test whether we transplant a combined graft of EPCs transfected with the adiponectin gene into a rat model of cerebral ischemia could improve functional recovery after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into a MCAO control group, a MCAO EPC treatment group, and a MCAO LV-APN-EPC treatment group. A focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion model was induced by the intraluminal suture method. After 2 h of reperfusion, EPCs were transplanted by injection through the tail vein. A rotarod test was conducted to assess behavioral function before MCAO and on days 1, 7, and 14 after MCAO. After 14 d, TTC staining, CD31 immunofluorescence, and TUNEL staining were used to evaluate infarct volume, microvessel density, and cell apoptosis. Results revealed that behavioral function, infarct area percentage, microvessel density, and cell apoptosis rates were more favorable in the LV-APN-EPC treatment group than in the EPC treatment group. These data suggested that gene-modified cell therapy may be a useful approach for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  13. Role of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in the reparative mechanisms of stable ischemic myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, D; Felice, F; Scatena, C; De Martino, A; Picoi, M L E; Mancini, N; Blasi, S; Menicagli, M; Di Stefano, R; Bortolotti, U; Naccarato, A G; Balbarini, A

    2017-09-14

    Mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) into circulation from bone marrow in patients with acute myocardial infarction has strong scientific evidence; less is known about EPC mobilization in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to investigate the association of stable ischemic heart disease with EPC levels in tissue and blood. Fifty-five consecutive patients admitted to a single treatment center for valve or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgeries were included in the study. Blood samples were collected in the morning before surgery and analyzed by flow-cytometry to determine peripheral EPC levels (EPC/ml). Tissue EPC (CD34+VEGFR2+) levels were assessed on a right atrial appendage segment. Mean age was 76±5years, 48% were men, and 53% had CAD The number of CD34+ VEGFR2+ cells in the tissue of patients with CAD was significantly higher (p<0.005) and circulating EPC showed a tendency to be reduced by approximately 20% in peripheral blood of patients with CAD when compared to those without CAD. Patients with stable CAD had higher EPC density values (EPC/mm2) and were more likely to have lower EPC blood levels when compare with normal controls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Endothelial progenitor cells induce transplant arteriosclerosis via VEGFR-1/2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaohua; Wang, Can; Yang, Shouguo; Hong, Tao; Wang, Fangshun; Xia, Limin; Wang, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Acute rejection (AR) after organ transplantation results in transplant arteriosclerosis (TA). Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are involved in tissue repair and blood vessel formation but are suspected to be a cause of TA. In this study, we introduced a syngeneic and allogeneic abdominal aortic transplant model with C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. Syngeneic and allogeneic grafts were histopathologically analyzed after transplantation. Bone marrow-derived EPCs were injected into transplant model animals to observe their distribution and temporal concentration changes. Changes of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR-1), phosphorylated VEGFR-1 (pVEGFR-1), VEGFR-2, pVEGFR-2, protein kinase B (Akt), pAkt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (Erk1), pErk1 levels in EPCs upon VEGF165 and the VEGFR inhibitor Vandetanib exposure were analyzed in vitro with western blotting. In the allogeneic transplant group, two weeks after transplantation, formations of new intima layers could be observed, and its proliferation gradually increased to four and six weeks post-transplantation (p arteriosclerosis induced by abdominal aorta transplantation by blocking VEGFRs in EPCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells at different locations in mice with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Hiroki; Nori, Satoshi; Nishimura, Soraya; Yasuda, Akimasa; Takano, Morito; Tsuji, Osahiko; Fujiyoshi, Kanehiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI); however, few studies have examined the optimal site of NS/PC transplantation in the spinal cord. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal transplantation site of NS/PCs for the treatment of SCI. Wild-type mice were generated with contusive SCI at the T10 level, and NS/PCs were derived from fetal transgenic mice. These NS/PCs ubiquitously expressed ffLuc-cp156 protein (Venus and luciferase fusion protein) and so could be detected by in vivo bioluminescence imaging 9 days postinjury. NS/PCs (low: 250,000 cells per mouse; high: 1 million cells per mouse) were grafted into the spinal cord at the lesion epicenter (E) or at rostral and caudal (RC) sites. Phosphate-buffered saline was injected into E as a control. Motor functional recovery was better in each of the transplantation groups (E-Low, E-High, RC-Low, and RC-High) than in the control group. The photon counts of the grafted NS/PCs were similar in each of the four transplantation groups, suggesting that the survival of NS/PCs was fairly uniform when more than a certain threshold number of cells were transplanted. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that brain-derived neurotropic factor expression was higher in the RC segment than in the E segment, and this may underlie why NS/PCs more readily differentiated into neurons than into astrocytes in the RC group. The location of the transplantation site did not affect the area of spared fibers, angiogenesis, or the expression of any other mediators. These findings indicated that the microenvironments of the E and RC sites are able to support NS/PCs transplanted during the subacute phase of SCI similarly. Optimally, a certain threshold number of NS/PCs should be grafted into the E segment to avoid damaging sites adjacent to the lesion during the injection procedure.

  16. Omega 3 fatty acids reduce myeloid progenitor cell frequency in the bone marrow of mice and promote progenitor cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sollars Vincent E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Omega 3 fatty acids have been found to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, and promote differentiation in various cell types. The processes of cell survival, expansion, and differentiation are of key importance in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We investigated the role of omega 3 fatty acids in controlling the frequency of various myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow of mice. Increased progenitor cell frequency and blocked differentiation are characteristics of hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage, such as myeloproliferative diseases and myeloid leukemias. Results We found that increasing the proportion of omega 3 fatty acids relative to the proportion of omega 6 fatty acids in the diet caused increased differentiation and reduced the frequency of myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow of mice. Furthermore, this had no adverse effect on peripheral white blood cell counts. Conclusion Our results indicate that omega 3 fatty acids impact hematopoietic differentiation by reducing myeloid progenitor cell frequency in the bone marrow and promoting progenitor cell differentiation. Further exploration of this discovery could lead to the use of omega 3 fatty acids as a therapeutic option for patients that have various disorders of hematopoiesis.

  17. CXCR4 expression in prostate cancer progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dubrovska

    Full Text Available Tumor progenitor cells represent a population of drug-resistant cells that can survive conventional chemotherapy and lead to tumor relapse. However, little is known of the role of tumor progenitors in prostate cancer metastasis. The studies reported herein show that the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, a key regulator of tumor dissemination, plays a role in the maintenance of prostate cancer stem-like cells. The CXCL4/CXCR12 pathway is activated in the CD44(+/CD133(+ prostate progenitor population and affects differentiation potential, cell adhesion, clonal growth and tumorigenicity. Furthermore, prostate tumor xenograft studies in mice showed that a combination of the CXCR4 receptor antagonist AMD3100, which targets prostate cancer stem-like cells, and the conventional chemotherapeutic drug Taxotere, which targets the bulk tumor, is significantly more effective in eradicating tumors as compared to monotherapy.

  18. In vitro toxicity of trichothecenes on rat haematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent-Massin, D; Thouvenot, D

    1995-01-01

    The fusarial toxicosis induced by trichothecenes is characterized by common syndromes such as vomiting, inflammation, haemorrhages, diarrhoea and haematological changes. Subchronic ingestion of trichothecenes causes a decrease in circulating white cells. This leukopenic change of animals is reported as a characteristic feature in the best known human disorder: Alimentary Toxic Aleukia (ATA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the haematologic disorders imputed to trichothecenes were a result of myelotoxicity by investigating in an in vitro model. Rat haematopoietic progenitors, Colony Forming Units-Granulocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GM), were cultured in the presence of several concentrations of four trichothecenes; T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) and deoxynivalenol (DON). All these trichothecenes were cytotoxic to rat haematopoietic progenitor cells. It is concluded that haematological disorders observed during trichothecene intoxication of animals are caused by the destruction of haematopoietic progenitors such as CFU-GM cells.

  19. A Cell-Enriched Engineered Myocardial Graft Limits Infarct Size and Improves Cardiac Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Perea-Gil, MS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI remains a dreadful disease around the world, causing irreversible sequelae that shorten life expectancy and reduce quality of life despite current treatment. Here, the authors engineered a cell-enriched myocardial graft, composed of a decellularized myocardial matrix refilled with adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (EMG-ATDPC. Once applied over the infarcted area in the swine MI model, the EMG-ATDPC improved cardiac function, reduced infarct size, attenuated fibrosis progression, and promoted neovascularization of the ischemic myocardium. The beneficial effects exerted by the EMG-ATDPC and the absence of identified adverse side effects should facilitate its clinical translation as a novel MI therapy in humans.

  20. Inflorescence stem grafting made easy in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar Nazia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant grafting techniques have deepened our understanding of the signals facilitating communication between the root and shoot, as well as between shoot and reproductive organs. Transmissible signalling molecules can include hormones, peptides, proteins and metabolites: some of which travel long distances to communicate stress, nutrient status, disease and developmental events. While hypocotyl micrografting techniques have been successfully established for Arabidopsis to explore root to shoot communications, inflorescence grafting in Arabidopsis has not been exploited to the same extent. Two different strategies (horizontal and wedge-style inflorescence grafting have been developed to explore long distance signalling between the shoot and reproductive organs. We developed a robust wedge-cleft grafting method, with success rates greater than 87%, by developing better tissue contact between the stems from the inflorescence scion and rootstock. We describe how to perform a successful inflorescence stem graft that allows for reproducible translocation experiments into the physiological, developmental and molecular aspects of long distance signalling events that promote reproduction. Results Wedge grafts of the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem were supported with silicone tubing and further sealed with parafilm to maintain the vascular flow of nutrients to the shoot and reproductive tissues. Nearly all (87% grafted plants formed a strong union between the scion and rootstock. The success of grafting was scored using an inflorescence growth assay based upon the growth of primary stem. Repeated pruning produced new cauline tissues, healthy flowers and reproductive siliques, which indicates a healthy flow of nutrients from the rootstock. Removal of the silicone tubing showed a tightly fused wedge graft junction with callus proliferation. Histological staining of sections through the graft junction demonstrated the differentiation of

  1. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    analyzing the true sensitivity of a multi-epoch supernova search and finds a Type Ia supernova rate from z ~ 0.01-0.1 of rV = 4.26$+1.39 +0.10\\atop{-1.93 -0.10}$h3 x 10-4 SNe Ia/yr/Mpc3 from a preliminary analysis of a subsample of the SNfactory prototype search. Several unusual supernovae were found in the course of the SNfactory prototype search. One in particular, SN 2002ic, was the first SN Ia to exhibit convincing evidence for a circumstellar medium and offers valuable insight into the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea and endothelial progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Qing Wang,1,* Qi Wu,2,* Jing Feng,3,4 Xin Sun5 1The Second Respiratory Department of the First People's Hospital of Kunming, Yunnan, People's Republic of China; 2Tianjin Haihe Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 3Respiratory Department of Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 5Respiratory Department of Tianjin Haihe Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA occurs in 4% of middle-aged men and 2% of middle-aged women in the general population, and the prevalence is even higher in specific patient groups. OSA is an independent risk factor for a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial injury could be the pivotal determinant in the development of cardiovascular pathology in OSA. Endothelial damage ultimately represents a dynamic balance between the magnitude of injury and the capacity for repair. Bone marrow–derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs within adult peripheral blood present a possible means of vascular maintenance that could home to sites of injury and restore endothelial integrity and normal function. Methods: We summarized pathogenetic mechanisms of OSA and searched for available studies on numbers and functions of EPCs in patients with OSA to explore the potential links between the numbers and functions of EPCs and OSA. In particular, we tried to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the effects of OSA on EPCs. Conclusion: Intermittent hypoxia cycles and sleep fragmentation are major pathophysiologic characters of OSA. Intermittent hypoxia acts as a trigger of oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, and sympathetic activation. Sleep fragmentation is associated with a burst of sympathetic activation and systemic inflammation. In most studies, a reduction in circulating EPCs has

  3. Evaluation of synthetic vascular grafts in a mouse carotid grafting model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex H P Chan

    Full Text Available Current animal models for the evaluation of synthetic grafts are lacking many of the molecular tools and transgenic studies available to other branches of biology. A mouse model of vascular grafting would allow for the study of molecular mechanisms of graft failure, including in the context of clinically relevant disease states. In this study, we comprehensively characterise a sutureless grafting model which facilitates the evaluation of synthetic grafts in the mouse carotid artery. Using conduits electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL we show the gradual development of a significant neointima within 28 days, found to be greatest at the anastomoses. Histological analysis showed temporal increases in smooth muscle cell and collagen content within the neointima, demonstrating its maturation. Endothelialisation of the PCL grafts, assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis and CD31 staining, was near complete within 28 days, together replicating two critical aspects of graft performance. To further demonstrate the potential of this mouse model, we used longitudinal non-invasive tracking of bone-marrow mononuclear cells from a transgenic mouse strain with a dual reporter construct encoding both luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP. This enabled characterisation of mononuclear cell homing and engraftment to PCL using bioluminescence imaging and histological staining over time (7, 14 and 28 days. We observed peak luminescence at 7 days post-graft implantation that persisted until sacrifice at 28 days. Collectively, we have established and characterised a high-throughput model of grafting that allows for the evaluation of key clinical drivers of graft performance.

  4. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 All antigens Neural Induced neural progeni....biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 All antigens Neural Induced neural progeni....biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 All antigens Others Multipotent otic progeni...ncedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 All antigens Neural Induced neural progeni....biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  8. The quiescent progenitors of four Type II supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Samson A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Adams, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present Large Binocular Telescope difference imaging data for the final years of four Type II supernovae progenitors. For all four, we find no significant evidence for stochastic or steady variability in the U, B, V, or R-bands. Our limits constrain variability to no more than roughly 5-10% of the expected R-band luminosities of the progenitors. These limits are comparable to the observed variability of red supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds. Based on these four events, the probability o...

  9. Systematic Features and Progenitor Dependence of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ko; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei

    We present our latest results of two-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulations for about 400 progenitors. Our self-consistent supernova models reveal the systematic features of core-collapse supernova properties such as neutrino luminosity and energy spectrum, explosion energy, remnant mass, and yield of radioactive 56Ni. We find that these explosion characteristics tend to show a monotonic increase as a function of mass accretion rate onto a shock. The accretion rate depends on the structure of the progenitor core and its envelope, which is well described by the compactness parameter.

  10. A gene therapy approach for long-term normalization of blood pressure in hypertensive mice by ANP-secreting human skin grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Jean-Philippe; Kim, Soo Mi; Terunuma, Atsushi; Qin, Yan; Tock, Christine L; Pfützner, Wolfgang; Ohyama, Manabu; Schnermann, Jurgen; Vogel, Jonathan C

    2010-01-19

    The use of bioengineered human skin as a bioreactor to deliver therapeutic factors has a number of advantages including accessibility that allows manipulation and monitoring of genetically modified cells. We demonstrate a skin gene therapy approach that can regulate blood pressure and treat systemic hypertension by expressing atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a hormone able to decrease blood pressure, in bioengineered human skin equivalents (HSE). Additionally, the expression of a selectable marker gene, multidrug resistance (MDR) type 1, is linked to ANP expression on a bicistronic vector and was coexpressed in the human keratinocytes and fibroblasts of the HSE that were grafted onto immunocompromised mice. Topical treatments of grafted HSE with the antimitotic agent colchicine select for keratinocyte progenitors that express both MDR and ANP. Significant plasma levels of human ANP were detected in mice grafted with HSE expressing ANP from either keratinocytes or fibroblasts, and topical selection of grafted HSE resulted in persistent high levels of ANP expression in vivo. Mice with elevated plasma levels of human ANP showed lower renin levels and, correspondingly, had lower systemic blood pressure than controls. Furthermore, mice with HSE grafts expressing human ANP did not develop elevated blood pressure when fed a high-salt diet. These findings illustrate the potential of this human skin gene therapy approach to deliver therapeutic molecules systemically for long-term treatment of diverse diseases.

  11. Adaptive significance of root grafting in trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.; Jones, R.

    1988-12-31

    Root grafting has long been observed in forest trees but the adaptive significance of this trait has not been fully explained. Various authors have proposed that root grafting between trees contributes to mechanical support by linking adjacent root systems. Keeley proposes that this trait would be of greatest advantage in swamps where soils provide poor mechanical support. He provides as evidence a greenhouse study of Nyssa sylvatica Marsh in which seedlings of swamp provenance formed between-individual root grafts more frequently than upland provenance seedlings. In agreement with this within-species study, Keeley observed that arid zone species rarely exhibit grafts. Keeley also demonstrated that vines graft less commonly than trees, and herbs never do. Since the need for mechanical support coincides with this trend, these data seem to support his model. In this paper, the authors explore the mechanisms and ecological significance of root grafting, leading to predictions of root grafting incidence. Some observations support and some contradict the mechanical support hypothesis.

  12. Strontium doping of bone graft extender

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Allografts are often used during revision hip replacement surgery for stabilization of the implant. Resorption of the allograft may exceed new bone formation, and instability of the prosthesis can develop. We investigated whether strontium could regulate the imbalance of fast resorption of allograft and slower formation of new bone, because it is both an anabolic and an anticatabolic agent. Method Strontium was added to the implant interface environment by doping a hydroxyapatite bone graft extender. 10 dogs each received 2 experimental titanium implants. The implants were inserted within a 2.7-mm concentric gap in cancellous bone. The gap was filled with 50% (v/v) allograft mixed with 50% bone graft extender. The extender either had 5% strontium doping (SrHA) or was undoped (HA). After 4 weeks, osseointegration and mechanical fixation were evaluated by histomorphometry and by push-out test. Results SrHA bone graft extender induced a 1.2-fold increase in volume of new bone, a 1.2-fold increase in allograft remaining in the gap, and a 1.4-fold increase in surface area of the bone graft extender material in contact with new bone compared to HA bone graft extender. All these increases were statistically significant. SrHA bone graft extender did not significantly improve ongrowth of bone onto the implants or improve any of the mechanical push-out parameters compared to HA bone graft extender. Interpretation Doping of the HA bone graft extender with 5% strontium increased gap healing, preserved more of the allograft in the gap, and increased the ongrowth of bone onto the bone graft extender material, but did not improve mechanical fixation. PMID:21895497

  13. The Rho-GTPase cdc42 regulates neural progenitor fate at the apical surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappello, Silvia; Attardo, Alessio; Wu, Xunwei

    2006-01-01

    the fundamental difference between these progenitors. Here we show that the conditional deletion of the small Rho-GTPase cdc42 at different stages of neurogenesis in mouse telencephalon results in an immediate increase in basal mitoses. Whereas cdc42-deficient progenitors have normal cell cycle length...... progenitors. Thus, cdc42 has a crucial role at the apical pole of progenitors, thereby regulating the position of mitoses and cell fate....

  14. Flow characteristics in narrowed coronary bypass graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernad, S. I. [Romanian Academy – Timisoara Branch, Mihai Viteazul Str. 24, RO-300223, Timisoara (Romania); Bosioc, A.; Totorean, A. F. [University Politehnica of Timisoara, Department of Hydraulic Machinery, Mihai Viteazul Str. 1, RO-300222, Timisoara (Romania); Bernad, E. S.; Petre, I. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Victor Babes Timisoara, P-ta Eftimie Murgu, 2, Timisoara (Romania)

    2016-06-08

    Tortuous saphenous vein graft (SVG) hemodynamics was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. Computed tomography (CT) technology is used for non-invasive bypass graft assessment 7 days after surgery. CT investigation shown two regions with severe shape remodelling first is an elbow type contortion and second is a severe curvature with tortuous area reduction. In conclusion, the helical flow induced by vessel torsion may stabilize the blood flow in the distal part of the SVG, reducing the flow disturbance and suppressing the flow separation, but in the distal end of the graft, promote the inflammatory processes in the vessels.

  15. File list: His.Oth.10.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: Unc.Oth.20.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  17. File list: Unc.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  18. File list: DNS.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: DNS.Oth.20.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Oth.Oth.10.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  17. File list: Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 Histone Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 Unclassified Neural Induced neural progeni...tors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238870,SRX238868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural progenitor cells... SRX315278,SRX315277,SRX667383,SRX668241,SRX315276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Adipocyte Adipose progenitor ...cells SRX127394,SRX127409,SRX127396,SRX127407,SRX127381,SRX127383 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progen...itor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progen...itor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are productsof interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaBarge, Mark A.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Villadsen, René

    2009-01-01

    combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells.Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well......, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages....

  12. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 Unclassified Neural Induced neural ...progenitors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 Unclassified Neural Induced neural ...progenitors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Induced neural... progenitors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  15. Hot callusing for propagation of American beech by grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Carey; Mary E. Mason; Paul Bloese; Jennifer L. Koch

    2013-01-01

    To increase grafting success rate, a hot callus grafting system was designed and implemented as part of a multiagency collaborative project to manage beech bark disease (BBD) through the establishment of regional BBD-resistant grafted seed orchards. Five years of data from over 2000 hot callus graft attempts were analyzed using a logistic regression model to determine...

  16. Graft Copolymerization of Acrylonitrile and Ethyl Methacrylate on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Graft copolymers of Acrylonitrile and ethyl methcrylate on dextrin were prepared by the use of ceric ion initiator in aqueous medium at 290C. The molecular weight of grafted poly(ethyl methacrylate) chains were higher than for polyacrylonitrile grafts; but the latter were more frequently grafted on the backbone polymer.

  17. Type Ia supernovae: explosions and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang Eitel

    2011-08-01

    that they somehow need to acquire mass if they are to explode as SN Ia. Currently there are two major scenarios for this mass acquisition. In the favoured single degenerate scenario the white dwarf accretes matter from a companion star which is much younger in its evolutionary state. The less favoured double degenerate scenario sees the merger of two white dwarfs (with a total combined mass of more than 1.38 Msun). This thesis has tried to answer the question about the mass acquisition in two ways. First the single degenerate scenario predicts a surviving companion post-explosion. We undertook an observational campaign to find this companion in two ancient supernovae (SN 1572 and SN 1006). Secondly, we have extended an existing code to extract the elemental and energy yields of SNe Ia spectra by automating spectra fitting to specific SNe Ia. This type of analysis, in turn, help diagnose to which of the two major progenitor scenarios is right.

  18. Feasibility of the Use of RapiGraft and Skin Grafting in Reconstructive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Dug Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSkin grafting is a relatively simple and thus widely used procedure. However, the elastic and structural quality of grafted skin is poor. Recently, various dermal substitutes have been developed to overcome this disadvantage of split-thickness skin grafts. The present study aims to determine the feasibility of RapiGraft as a new dermal substitute.MethodsThis prospective study included 20 patients with partial- or full-thickness skin defects; the patients were enrolled between January 2013 and March 2014. After skin defect debridement, the wound was divided into two parts by an imaginary line. Split-thickness skin grafting alone was performed on one side (group A, and RapiGraft and split-thickness skin grafting were used on the other side (group B. All patients were evaluated using photographs and self-questionnaires. The Manchester scar scale (MSS, a chromameter, and a durometer were used for the scar evaluation. The average follow-up period was 6 months.ResultsThe skin graft take rates were 93% in group A and 89% in group B, a non-significant difference (P=0.082. Statistically, group B had significantly lower MSS, vascularity, and pigmentation results than group A (P<0.05 for all. However, the groups did not differ significantly in pliability (P=0.155.ConclusionsThe present study indicates that a simultaneous application of RapiGraft and a split-thickness skin graft is safe and yields improved results. Therefore, we conclude that the use of RapiGraft along with skin grafting will be beneficial for patients requiring reconstructive surgery.

  19. Left Atrial Myxoma Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting with Patient Coronary Arterial Grafts: a Rarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kartik; Rahul, Kumar; Tarsaria, Malkesh; Malhotra, Amber

    2017-01-01

    The development of left atrial myxoma after coronary artery bypass graft surgery is a rare entity. A 60-year-old man with previous off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting four years ago with patent coronary grafts was diagnosed with left atrial mass. The patient underwent successful resection of the same through minimally invasive right anterolateral thoracotomy. Histopathology of the atrial mass confirmed the diagnosis of atrial myxoma.

  20. Delayed grafting for banked skin graft in lymph node flap transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad, Pedro; Date, Shivprasad; Orfaniotis, Georgios; Dower, Rory; Nicoli, Fabio; Maruccia, Michele; Lin, Shu-Ping; Chuang, Chu-Yi; Chuang, Tsan-Yu; Wang, Gou-Jen; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2017-02-01

    Over the last decade, lymph node flap (LNF) transfer has turned out to be an effective method in the management of lymphoedema of extremities. Most of the time, the pockets created for LNF cannot be closed primarily and need to be resurfaced with split thickness skin grafts. Partial graft loss was frequently noted in these cases. The need to prevent graft loss on these iatrogenic wounds made us explore the possibility of attempting delayed skin grafting. We have herein reported our experience with delayed grafting with autologous banked split skin grafts in cases of LNF transfer for lymphoedema of the extremities. Ten patients with International Society of Lymphology stage II-III lymphoedema of upper or lower extremity were included in this study over an 8-month period. All patients were thoroughly evaluated and subjected to lymph node flap transfer. The split skin graft was harvested and banked at the donor site, avoiding immediate resurfacing over the flap. The same was carried out in an aseptic manner as a bedside procedure after confirming flap viability and allowing flap swelling to subside. Patients were followed up to evaluate long-term outcomes. Flap survival was 100%. Successful delayed skin grafting was done between the 4th and 6th post-operative day as a bedside procedure under local anaesthesia. The split thickness skin grafts (STSG) takes more than 97%. One patient needed additional medications during the bedside procedure. All patients had minimal post-operative pain and skin graft requirement. The patients were also reported to be satisfied with the final aesthetic results. There were no complications related to either the skin grafts or donor sites during the entire period of follow-up. Delayed split skin grafting is a reliable method of resurfacing lymph node flaps and has been shown to reduce the possibility of flap complications as well as the operative time and costs. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Adverse reactions during transfusion of thawed haematopoietic progenitor cells from apheresis are closely related to the number of granulocyte cells in the leukapheresis product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Henao, G A; Resano, P M; Villegas, J M S; Manero, P P; Sánchez, J M; Bosch, M P; Codins, A E; Bruguera, M S; Infante, L R; Oyarzabal, A P; Soldevila, R N; Caiz, D C; Bosch, L M; Barbeta, E C; Ronda, J R G

    2010-10-01

    The infusion of thawed haematopoietic progenitor cells from apheresis (HPC-A) is associated with minor but frequent adverse reactions (ARs), which has been mainly attributed to dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO). Nevertheless, other factors may play a role in the pathogenesis of such toxicity. The ARs on a cohort of 423 cryopreserved HPC-A infusions for 398 patients in HPC transplantation program were analysed. ARs were reported in 105 graft infusions (24·8%) and most of them were graded as mild to moderate. The most frequently reported ARs were gastrointestinal and respiratory, and three patients presented epileptic seizure. The volume of DMSO/kg (P < 0·001), volume of red-blood-cells/kg (P = 0·02), number of nuclear cells (NCs)/kg (P <0·001) and number of granulocytes/kg (P<0·001) in the infused graft were significant in the univariate analysis for the occurrence of ARs. The amount of granulocytes/kg remained significant in the multivariate analysis (P<0·001). The grade of ARs also correlated with the amount of cryopreserved granulocytes. The incidence and grade of ARs during infusion of cryopreserved HPC-A are related to the amount of granulocytes in the graft. © 2010 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2010 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  2. Treatment of gingival recession in two surgical stages: Free gingival graft and connective tissue grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Paulo Sergio Gomes; Nunes, Marcelo Pereira; Pelegrine, Andre Antonio

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a clinical case of severe Miller Class II gingival recession treated by two stages of surgery that combined a free gingival graft and connective tissue grafting. First, a free gingival graft (FGG) was performed to obtain an adequate keratinized tissue level. Three months later, a connective tissue graft (CTG) was performed to obtain root coverage. The results indicated that the FGG allows for a gain in the keratinized tissue level and the CTG allows for root coverage with decreased recession level after 16 months. Therefore, for this type of specific gingival recession, the combination of FGG and CTG can be used.

  3. The progenitor of Nova Cygni 2006 (=V2362 Cyg)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeghs, D.; Greimel, R.; Drew, J.; Irwin, M.; Gaensicke, B.; Groot, P.J.; Knigge, C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the detection of the likely progenitor to Nova Cygni 2006 = V2362 Cyg (IAUC #8697, #8698, ATel #792) using images from the INT Photometric H-Alpha Survey (IPHAS; http://www.iphas.org). The field containing the classical nova was observed as part of our galactic plane survey on Aug. 3rd

  4. Mobilization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Simon N; van Os, Ronald P; Bunting, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Animal models have added significantly to our understanding of the mechanism(s) of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization. Such models suggest that changes in the interaction between the HSPC and the hematopoietic microenvironmental 'niche' (cellular and extracellular components)

  5. Progenitor models of Wolf-Rayet+O binary systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrovic, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413316556; Langer, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829498

    2007-01-01

    Since close WR+O binaries are the result of a strong interaction of both stars in massive close binary systems, they can be used to constrain the highly uncertain mass and angular momentum budget during the major mass- transfer phase. We explore the progenitor evolution of the three best suited WR+O

  6. Evolution of gamma-ray burst progenitors at low metallicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoon, S.C.; Langer, N.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the growing evidence that long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are associated with deaths of Wolf-Rayet stars, the evolutionary path of massive stars to GRBs and the exact nature of GRB progenitors remain poorly known. However, recent massive star evolutionary models indicate that — for sufficiently

  7. On the Progenitor of Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holgado, A. M.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hreibi, A.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimball, C.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Larson, S. L.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña Hernandez, I.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; (LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    On 2017 August 17 the merger of two compact objects with masses consistent with two neutron stars was discovered through gravitational-wave (GW170817), gamma-ray (GRB 170817A), and optical (SSS17a/AT 2017gfo) observations. The optical source was associated with the early-type galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of just ˜40 Mpc, consistent with the gravitational-wave measurement, and the merger was localized to be at a projected distance of ˜2 kpc away from the galaxy’s center. We use this minimal set of facts and the mass posteriors of the two neutron stars to derive the first constraints on the progenitor of GW170817 at the time of the second supernova (SN). We generate simulated progenitor populations and follow the three-dimensional kinematic evolution from binary neutron star (BNS) birth to the merger time, accounting for pre-SN galactic motion, for considerably different input distributions of the progenitor mass, pre-SN semimajor axis, and SN-kick velocity. Though not considerably tight, we find these constraints to be comparable to those for Galactic BNS progenitors. The derived constraints are very strongly influenced by the requirement of keeping the binary bound after the second SN and having the merger occur relatively close to the center of the galaxy. These constraints are insensitive to the galaxy’s star formation history, provided the stellar populations are older than 1 Gyr.

  8. Adult spinal cord radial glia display a unique progenitor phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Petit

    Full Text Available Radial glia (RG are primarily embryonic neuroglial progenitors that express Brain Lipid Binding Protein (Blbp a.k.a. Fabp7 and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (Gfap. We used these transcripts to demarcate the distribution of spinal cord radial glia (SCRG and screen for SCRG gene expression in the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas (ASCA. We reveal that neonatal and adult SCRG are anchored in a non-ventricular niche at the spinal cord (SC pial boundary, and express a "signature" subset of 122 genes, many of which are shared with "classic" neural stem cells (NSCs of the subventricular zone (SVZ and SC central canal (CC. A core expressed gene set shared between SCRG and progenitors of the SVZ and CC is particularly enriched in genes associated with human disease. Visualizing SCRG in a Fabp7-EGFP reporter mouse reveals an extensive population of SCRG that extend processes around the SC boundary and inwardly (through the SC white matter (WM, whose abundance increases in a gradient from cervical to lumbar SC. Confocal analysis of multiple NSC-enriched proteins reveals that postnatal SCRG are a discrete and heterogeneous potential progenitor population that become activated by multiple SC lesions, and that CC progenitors are also more heterogeneous than previously appreciated. Gene ontology analysis highlights potentially unique regulatory pathways that may be further manipulated in SCRG to enhance repair in the context of injury and SC disease.

  9. Long GRBs from Binary Stars: Runaway, Wolf-Rayet Progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantiello, M.; Yoon, S.C.; Langer, N.; Livio, M.

    2007-01-01

    The collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts requires a rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet star as progenitor. We test the idea of producing rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet stars in massive close binaries through mass accretion and consecutive quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution - the latter had previously

  10. Intersections of lung progenitor cells, lung disease and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla F. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cell biology approaches to study adult lung progenitor cells and lung cancer has brought a variety of new techniques to the field of lung biology and has elucidated new pathways that may be therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Recent results have begun to identify the ways in which different cell populations interact to regulate progenitor activity, and this has implications for the interventions that are possible in cancer and in a variety of lung diseases. Today's better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lung progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation, including understanding how multiple epigenetic factors affect lung injury repair, holds the promise for future better treatments for lung cancer and for optimising the response to therapy in lung cancer. Working between platforms in sophisticated organoid culture techniques, genetically engineered mouse models of injury and cancer, and human cell lines and specimens, lung progenitor cell studies can begin with basic biology, progress to translational research and finally lead to the beginnings of clinical trials.

  11. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Klassen, Henry

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the host response to murine retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) following transplantation to the subretinal space (SRS) of the pig. RPCs from GFP mice were transplanted subretinally in 18 nonimmunosuppressed normal or laser-treated pigs. Evaluation of the SRS was performed on hematoxylin...

  12. Human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells: a short history of nearly everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Patrick; Goumans, Marie-José; Doevendans, Pieter A; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2012-08-01

    The high occurrence of cardiac disease in the Western world has driven clinicians and cardiovascular biologists to look for alternative strategies to treat patients. A challenging approach is the use of stem cells to repair the heart, in itself an inspiring thought. In the past 10 years, stem cells from different sources have been under intense investigation and, as a result, a multitude of studies have been published on the identification, isolation, and characterization, of cardiovascular progenitor cells and repair in different animal models. However, relatively few cardiovascular progenitor populations have been identified in human hearts, including, but not limited to, cardiosphere-derived cells, cKit+ human cardiac stem cells , Isl1+ cardiovascular progenitors, and, in our lab, cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs). Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive summary of the past findings and present challenges for future therapeutic potential of CMPCs. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Compliance Study of Endovascular Stent Grafts Incorporated with Polyester and Polyurethane Graft Materials in both Stented and Unstented Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Guan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Compliance mismatch between stent graft and host artery may induce complications and blood flow disorders. However, few studies have been reported on stent graft compliance. This study aims to explore the deformation and compliance of stent graft in stented and unstented zones under three pressure ranges. Compliance of two stent grafts incorporated with polyurethane graft (nitinol-PU and polyester graft (nitinol-PET materials respectively were tested; the stents used in the two stent grafts were identical. For the circumferential deformation of the stent grafts under each pressure range, the nitinol-PET stent graft was uniform in both zones. The nitinol-PU stent graft was circumferentially uniform in the stented zone, however, it was nonuniform in the unstented zone. The compliance of the PU graft material was 15 times higher than that of the PET graft. No significant difference in compliance was observed between stented and unstented zones of the nitinol-PET stent graft regardless of the applied pressure range. However, for the nitinol-PU stent graft, compliance of the unstented PU region was approximately twice that of the stented region; thus, compliance along the length of the nitinol-PU stent graft was not constant and different from that of the nitinol-PET stent graft.

  14. StrataGraft skin substitute is well-tolerated and is not acutely immunogenic in patients with traumatic wounds: results from a prospective, randomized, controlled dose escalation trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centanni, John M.; Straseski, Joely A.; Wicks, April; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; Rasmussen, Cathy A.; Lokuta, Mary A.; Schurr, Michael J.; Foster, Kevin N.; Faucher, Lee D.; Caruso, Daniel M.; Comer, Allen R.; Allen-Hoffmann, B. Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to assess the immunogenicity and antigenicity of StrataGraft skin tissue in a randomized phase I/II clinical trial for the temporary management of full-thickness skin loss. Summary Background Data StrataGraft skin tissue consists of a dermal equivalent containing human dermal fibroblasts and a fully-stratified, biologically active epidermis derived from NIKS cells, a pathogen-free, long-lived, consistent, human keratinocyte progenitor. Methods Traumatic skin wounds often require temporary allograft coverage to stabilize the wound bed until autografting is possible. StrataGraft and cadaveric allograft were placed side-by-side on 15 patients with full-thickness skin defects for one week prior to autografting. Allografts were removed from the wound bed and examined for allogeneic immune responses. Immunohistochemistry and indirect immunofluorescence were used to assess tissue structure and cellular composition of allografts. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation assays, chromium-release assays, and development of antibodies were used to examine allogeneic responses. Results One week after patient exposure to allografts, there were no differences in the numbers of T or B lymphocytes or Langerhans cells present in StrataGraft skin substitute compared to cadaver allograft, the standard of care. Importantly, exposure to StrataGraft skin substitute did not induce the proliferation of patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells to NIKS keratinocytes or enhance cell-mediated lysis of NIKS keratinocytes in vitro. Similarly, no evidence of antibody generation targeted to the NIKS keratinocytes was seen. Conclusions These findings indicate that StrataGraft tissue is well-tolerated and not acutely immunogenic in patients with traumatic skin wounds. Notably, exposure to StrataGraft did not increase patient sensitivity toward or elicit immune responses against the NIKS keratinocytes. We envision this novel skin tissue technology will be widely used

  15. The science behind autologous fat grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bellini

    2017-12-01

    Despite ongoing concerns about survival and longevity of fat grafts after implantation and unpredictability of long-term outcome, fat has been successfully used as a filler in many differ clinic situation.

  16. Bone Grafts: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health) Journal Articles References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine) Article: Single posterior surgical management for lumbosacral tuberculosis: titanium mesh versus... Article: Wrapping grafting for congenital pseudarthrosis of ...

  17. Tissue-engineered fabrication of an osteochondral composite graft using rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J; Dennis, J E; Solchaga, L A; Awadallah, A S; Goldberg, V M; Caplan, A I

    2001-08-01

    This study tested the tissue engineering hypothesis that construction of an osteochondral composite graft could be accomplished using multipotent progenitor cells and phenotype-specific biomaterials. Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were culture-expanded and separately stimulated with transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) for chondrogenic differentiation or with an osteogenic supplement (OS). MSCs exposed to TGF-beta1 were loaded into a sponge composed of a hyaluronan derivative (HYAF-11) for the construction of the cartilage component of the composite graft, and MSCs exposed to OS were loaded into a porous calcium phosphate ceramic component for bone formation. Cell-loaded HYAFF-11 sponge and ceramic were joined together with fibrin sealant, Tisseel, to form a composite osteochondral graft, which was then implanted into a subcutaneous pocket in syngeneic rats. Specimens were harvested at 3 and 6 weeks after implantation, examined with histology for morphologic features, and stained immunohistochemically for type I, II, and X collagen. The two-component composite graft remained as an integrated unit after in vivo implantation and histologic processing. Fibrocartilage was observed in the sponge, and bone was detected in the ceramic component. Observations with polarized light indicated continuity of collagen fibers between the ceramic and HYAFF-11 components in the 6-week specimens. Type I collagen was identified in the neo-tissue in both sponge and ceramic, and type II collagen in the fibrocartilage, especially the pericellular matrix of cells in the sponge. These data suggest that the construction of a tissue-engineered composite osteochondral graft is possible with MSCs and different biomaterials and bioactive factors that support either chondrogenic or osteogenic differentiation.

  18. Vascularized fibular graft in infected tibial bone loss

    OpenAIRE

    C Cheriyan Kovoor; R Jayakumar; V V George; Vinod Padmanabhan; A J Guild; Sabin Viswanath

    2011-01-01

    Background : The treatment options of bone loss with infections include bone transport with external fixators, vascularized bone grafts, non-vascularized autogenous grafts and vascularized allografts. The research hypothesis was that the graft length and intact ipsilateral fibula influenced hypertrophy and stress fracture. We retrospectively studied the graft hypertrophy in 15 patients, in whom vascularized fibular graft was done for post-traumatic tibial defects with infection. Materials...

  19. Graft rejection in pediatric penetrating keratoplasty: Clinical features and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Kusumesh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed irreversible graft rejection was the leading cause of graft failure of pediatric PK. Though, the incidence (12.1% of graft rejection in current study was not high, but the percentage of reversal (25% was one of the lowest in literature because of delayed presentation and longer interval between corneal graft rejection and treatment. In addition, categorization of the type of graft rejection was very difficult and cumbersome in pediatric patients.

  20. The direct identification of core-collapse supernova progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D

    2017-10-28

    To place core-collapse supernovae (SNe) in context with the evolution of massive stars, it is necessary to determine their stellar origins. I describe the direct identification of SN progenitors in existing pre-explosion images, particularly those obtained through serendipitous imaging of nearby galaxies by the Hubble Space Telescope I comment on specific cases representing the various core-collapse SN types. Establishing the astrometric coincidence of a SN with its putative progenitor is relatively straightforward. One merely needs a comparably high-resolution image of the SN itself and its stellar environment to perform this matching. The interpretation of these results, though, is far more complicated and fraught with larger uncertainties, including assumptions of the distance to and the extinction of the SN, as well as the metallicity of the SN environment. Furthermore, existing theoretical stellar evolutionary tracks exhibit significant variations one from the next. Nonetheless, it appears fairly certain that Type II-P (plateau) SNe arise from massive stars in the red supergiant phase. Many of the known cases are associated with subluminous Type II-P events. The progenitors of Type II-L (linear) SNe are less established. Among the stripped-envelope SNe, there are now a number of examples of cool, but not red, supergiants (presumably in binaries) as Type IIb progenitors. We appear now finally to have an identified progenitor of a Type Ib SN, but no known example yet for a Type Ic. The connection has been made between some Type IIn SNe and progenitor stars in a luminous blue variable phase, but that link is still thin, based on direct identifications. Finally, I also describe the need to revisit the SN site, long after the SN has faded, to confirm the progenitor identification through the star's disappearance and potentially to detect a putative binary companion that may have survived the explosion.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from

  1. Endometrial stem/progenitor cells: the first 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargett, Caroline E.; Schwab, Kjiana E.; Deane, James A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The existence of stem/progenitor cells in the endometrium was postulated many years ago, but the first functional evidence was only published in 2004. The identification of rare epithelial and stromal populations of clonogenic cells in human endometrium has opened an active area of research on endometrial stem/progenitor cells in the subsequent 10 years. METHODS The published literature was searched using the PubMed database with the search terms ‘endometrial stem cells and menstrual blood stem cells' until December 2014. RESULTS Endometrial epithelial stem/progenitor cells have been identified as clonogenic cells in human and as label-retaining or CD44+ cells in mouse endometrium, but their characterization has been modest. In contrast, endometrial mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been well characterized and show similar properties to bone marrow MSCs. Specific markers for their enrichment have been identified, CD146+PDGFRβ+ (platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta) and SUSD2+ (sushi domain containing-2), which detected their perivascular location and likely pericyte identity in endometrial basalis and functionalis vessels. Transcriptomics and secretomics of SUSD2+ cells confirm their perivascular phenotype. Stromal fibroblasts cultured from endometrial tissue or menstrual blood also have some MSC characteristics and demonstrate broad multilineage differentiation potential for mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineages, indicating their plasticity. Side population (SP) cells are a mixed population, although predominantly vascular cells, which exhibit adult stem cell properties, including tissue reconstitution. There is some evidence that bone marrow cells contribute a small population of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells. The discovery of specific markers for endometrial stem/progenitor cells has enabled the examination of their role in endometrial proliferative disorders, including endometriosis, adenomyosis and Asherman

  2. Surface Grafting of Thermoresponsive Microgel Nanoparticles (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    was conducted via a surfactant - stabilized free-radical-precipitation polymerization in an aqueous environment in the presence of acrylic acid as a co...Onlinereach the reactive sites on the surface. This ‘‘excluded volume’’ barrier becomes more pronounced as the thickness of the teth- ered polymer layer...thermoresponsive PNIPAM-grafted layers. In essence, the proposed approach includes grafting of PNIPAM microgel nanoparticles containing reactive carboxyl

  3. Subepithelial connective tissue graft: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Alcarás Saraiva; Edson Alves de Campos; Rodrigo Cavassim; Shelon Cristina de Souza Pinto; Lucas Amaral Fontanari; Guilherme José Pimentel Lopes Oliveira; José Eduardo Cezar Sampaio

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and objective: Marginal tissue recession represents a common condition in Periodontology. Miller's Classes I and II recessions, in which the etiological factors are well diagnosed and eliminated, show great predictability of total coverage when the technique of subepithelial connective tissue graft is used. This technique success has been mainly attributed to the double blood supply for graft's nutrition, originating from the connective tissue of both the periosteum and flap. Cas...

  4. Autologous miniature punch grafting in stable vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal R; Murthy P; Kar P; Vijendran P

    2005-01-01

    Autologous miniature punch grafting with certain modifications was taken up in 54 sites in 30 patients with stable vitiligo for 6 months or more. The modifications were: (a) use of same sized disposable punches for both donor and recipient areas except over convex body surfaces, (b) use of Castraviejo′s scissors for harvesting donor grafts, (c) use of medial side of thigh as donor site and (d) not removing the primary dressing of the recipient site till 8 postoperaive day. The patients...

  5. Non-Anastomotic Rupture of a Woven Dacron Graft in the Descending Thoracic Aorta Treated with Endovascular Stent Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngok Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic structural failure of a Dacron graft resulting from the loss of structural integrity of the graft fabric can cause late graft complications. Late non-anastomotic rupture has traditionally been treated surgically via open thoracotomy. We report a case of the successful use of thoracic endovascular repair to treat a Dacron graft rupture in the descending aorta. The rupture occurred 20 years after the graft had been placed. Two stent grafts were placed at the proximal portion of the surgical graft, covering almost its entire length.

  6. Non-Anastomotic Rupture of a Woven Dacron Graft in the Descending Thoracic Aorta Treated with Endovascular Stent Grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngok; Kim, Gun-Jik; Kim, Young Eun; Hong, Seong Wook; Lee, Jong Tae

    2016-12-01

    The intrinsic structural failure of a Dacron graft resulting from the loss of structural integrity of the graft fabric can cause late graft complications. Late non-anastomotic rupture has traditionally been treated surgically via open thoracotomy. We report a case of the successful use of thoracic endovascular repair to treat a Dacron graft rupture in the descending aorta. The rupture occurred 20 years after the graft had been placed. Two stent grafts were placed at the proximal portion of the surgical graft, covering almost its entire length.

  7. Neural grafting for Parkinson's disease: challenges and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B Stoker

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative condition which causes a characteristic movement disorder secondary to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substanitia nigra. The motor disorder responds well to dopamine-replacement therapies, though these result in significant adverse effects due to non-physiological release of dopamine in the striatum, and off-target effects. Cell-based regenerative treatments offer a potential means for targeted replacement of dopamine, in a physiological manner. Dopaminergic neurons for cell-based therapies can be obtained from several sources. Fetal ventral mesencephalon tissue contains dopaminergic neuron progenitors, and has been transplanted into the striatum of PD patients with good results in a number of cases. However, the ethical implications and logistical challenges of using fetal tissue mean that fetal ventral mesencephalon is unlikely to be used in a widespread clinical setting. Induced pluripotent stem cells can be used to generate dopaminergic neurons for transplantation, providing a source of autologous tissue for grafting. This approach means that challenges associated with allografts, such as the potential for immune rejection, can be circumvented. However, the associated cost and difficulty in producing a standardized product from different cell lines means that, at present, this approach is not commercially viable as a cell-based therapy. Dopaminergic neurons derived from embryonic stem cells offer the most promising basis for a cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease, with trials due to commence in the next few years. Though there are ethical considerations to take into account when using embryonic tissue, the possibility of producing a standardized, optimized cell product means that this approach can be both effective, and commercially viable.

  8. Activity-dependent long-term plasticity of afferent synapses on grafted stem/progenitor cell-derived neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas Toft; Rogelius, Nina; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell-based cell replacement therapies aiming at restoring injured or diseased brain function ultimately rely on the capability of transplanted cells to promote functional recovery. The mechanisms by which stem cell-based therapies for neurological conditions can lead to functional recovery...

  9. Effect of Reishi polysaccharides on human stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Yu; Yang, Wen-Bin; Wong, Chi-Huey; Shih, Daniel Tzu-Bi

    2010-12-15

    The polysaccharide fraction of Ganoderma lucidum (F3) was found to benefit our health in many ways by influencing the activity of tissue stem/progenitor cells. In this study, F3 was found to promote the adipose tissue MSCs' aggregation and chondrosphere formation, with the increase of CAM (N-CAM, I-CAM) expressions and autokine (BMP-2, IL-11, and aggrecan) secretions, in an in vitro chondrogenesis assay. In a stem cell expansion culture, it possesses the thrombopoietin (TPO) and GM-CSF like functions to enhance the survival/renewal abilities of primitive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs). F3 was found to promote the dendrite growth of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the expression of cell adhesion molecules in the formation of immature dendritic cells (DC). On the other hand, F3 exhibited inhibitory effects on blood endothelial progenitor (EPC) colony formation, with concomitant reduction of cell surface endoglin (CD105) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) marker expressions, in the presence of angiogenic factors. A further cytokine array analysis revealed that F3 indeed inhibited the angiogenin synthesis and enhanced IL-1, MCP-1, MIP-1, RANTES, and GRO productions in the blood EPC derivation culture. Collectively, we have demonstrated that the polysaccharide fraction of G. lucidum F3 exhibits cytokine and chemokine like functions which are beneficial to human tissue stem/progenitor cells by modulating their CAM expressions and biological activities. These findings provide us a better the observation that F3 glycopolysaccharides indeed possesses anti-angiogenic and immune-modulating functions and promotes hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell homing for better human tissue protection, reducing disease progression and health. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of progenitor domains in the developing mouse thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vue, Tou Yia; Aaker, Joshua; Taniguchi, Aya; Kazemzadeh, Christina; Skidmore, Jennifer M; Martin, Donna M; Martin, James F; Treier, Mathias; Nakagawa, Yasushi

    2007-11-01

    To understand the molecular basis of the specification of thalamic nuclei, we analyzed the expression patterns of various transcription factors and defined progenitor cell populations in the embryonic mouse thalamus. We show that the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Olig3 is expressed in the entire thalamic ventricular zone and the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI). Next, we define two distinct progenitor domains within the thalamus, which we name pTH-R and pTH-C, located caudal to the ZLI. pTH-R is immediately caudal to the ZLI and expresses Nkx2.2, Mash1, and Olig3. pTH-C is caudal to pTH-R and expresses Ngn1, Ngn2, and Olig3. Short-term lineage analysis of Olig3-, Mash1-, Ngn1-, and Ngn2-expressing progenitor cells as well as tracing the Pitx2 cell lineage suggests that pTH-C is the only major source of thalamic nuclei containing neurons that project to the cerebral cortex, whereas pTH-R and ZLI are likely to produce distinct postmitotic populations outside of the cortex-projecting part of the thalamus. To determine if pTH-C is composed of subdomains, we characterized expression of the homeodomain protein Dbx1 and the bHLH protein Olig2. We show that Dbx1 is expressed in caudodorsal-high to rostroventral-low gradient within pTH-C. Analysis of heterozygous Dbx1(nlslacZ) knockin mice demonstrated that Dbx1-expressing progenitors preferentially give rise to caudodorsal thalamic nuclei. Olig2 is expressed in an opposite gradient within pTH-C to that of Dbx1. These results establish the molecular heterogeneity within the progenitor cells of the thalamus, and suggest that such heterogeneity contributes to the specification of thalamic nuclei. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  11. The oral mucosa graft: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Michael R; Lukose, Melissa A; Margarone, Joseph E; Barbagli, Guido; Miller, Kennon S; Chuang, Sung-Kiang

    2007-08-01

    We provide the reader with a critical, nonbiased, systematic review of current and precedent literature regarding the use of oral mucosa in the reconstruction of urethral defects associated with stricture and hypospadias/epispadias. We reviewed pertinent English literature from January 1966 through August 1, 2006 via the databases MEDLINE/PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and EMBASE Drugs and Pharmacology regarding the use of oral mucosa graft urethroplasty in the reconstruction of urethral defects associated with stricture and hypospadias/epispadias. Bibliographies of pertinent articles were explored for additional important literature. Data were stratified among studies that only used oral mucosa graft urethroplasty in the reconstruction of urethral defects associated with stricture, and those that used oral mucosa graft urethroplasty in the reconstruction of urethral defects associated with hypospadias/epispadias. Recipient site success in the reconstruction of defects associated with stricture was significantly associated with the location of graft placement (ventral vs dorsal, p oral mucosa harvest (labial vs buccal, p oral mucosa is a viable source of donor tissue displaying many characteristics of the ideal urethral graft. There are numerous variations of the oral mucosa graft urethroplasty technique. Herein comparisons are made.

  12. Refractive surgery following corneal graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alió, Jorge L; Abdou, Ahmed A; Abdelghany, Ahmed A; Zein, Ghassam

    2015-07-01

    To review the different surgical procedures for management of postkeratoplasty refractive errors after total suture removal. There are different surgical options to address residual refractive errors that frequently occur after corneal transplantation. The correction can be done on the corneal surface or intraocular with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation which requires complete tectonic and refractive stability after suture removal. The most commonly used procedures are photorefractive keratectomy, laser in-situ keratomileusis and Phakic IOLs. Keratoplasty has been profited by recent advances in refractive surgery. Custom excimer laser ablation is an alternative way to treat irregular errors. New IOL modalities are good practical options for a wide range of errors. Femtosecond laser, as a new option in the toolbox, can modify corneal grafting refractive results and assist corrective refractive procedures. Although being the most successful organ transplantation, keratoplasty is usually followed by significant ametropia. Different corrective modalities exist and the choice should fit ocular conditions, patient requirements, surgeon skills and the available technologies. Recent advances in ophthalmic surgery have improved the outcomes.

  13. Hamstring Graft Incorporation According to the Length of the Graft Inside Tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaignac, Etienne; Marot, Vincent; Faruch, Marie; Reina, Nicolas; Murgier, Jérôme; Accadbled, Franck; Berard, Emilie; Chiron, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a quadrupled semitendinosus (ST4) graft is an evolution of the standard technique with 2 hamstring tendons (semitendinosus + gracilis [STG]). However, there is no published comparison of how well these 2 types of hamstring grafts are incorporated into the bone tunnels. Because the ST4 graft is shorter, there is less graft material inside the tunnels. To use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare graft incorporation in the tibial bone tunnels 1 year after ACL reconstruction with either an STG graft or ST4 graft. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Sixty-two patients who underwent ACL reconstruction were enrolled prospectively: 31 with an ST4 graft and 31 with an STG graft. The same surgical technique, fixation method, and postoperative protocol were used in both groups. Graft incorporation and ligamentization were evaluated with MRI after 1 year of follow-up. The following parameters were evaluated: signal-to-noise quotient (SNQ), tibial tunnel enlargement, signal intensity at the bone-graft interface, and graft signal according to the Howell scale. The number of participants needed to show that the mean SNQ did not differ between the 2 techniques was 31 in each group (with a 1-sided alpha of 2.5% and a 1-sided beta of 10.0%). The Student t test was used to compare the distribution of continuous secondary endpoints. The mean SNQ was 5.2 ± 4.5 for the STG group and 5.9 ± 3.7 for the ST4 group ( P = .5100). The mean tibial tunnel widening was 93.7% ± 51.7% for the STG group versus 80.0% ± 42.9% for the ST4 group ( P = .2605). The groups did not differ in signal intensity at the bone-graft interface ( P = .7502) or in graft signal according to the Howell scale ( P = .4544). At the 1-year postoperative follow-up, incorporation and ligamentization of the STG and ST4 grafts were the same based on MRI analysis. The results were at least as good with the ST4 technique as with the standard STG technique in terms

  14. Xenopericardial roll graft replacement for infectious pseudoaneurysms and graft infections of the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Hiroshi; Endo, Hidehito; Noma, Mio; Ishii, Hikaru; Tsuchiya, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Akihiro; Takahashi, Yu; Inaba, Yusuke; Nishino, Yoshifumi; Nunokawa, Masao; Hosoi, Yutaka; Ikezoe, Tooru; Nemoto, Masaru; Makino, Yoshihisa; Nemoto, Yoko; Matsukura, Mitsuru; Sugiyama, Masanori; Abe, Nobutsugu; Takeuchi, Hirohisa; Nagao, Gen; Kondo, Eri; Yanagida, Osamu; Yoshino, Hideaki; Sudo, Kenichi

    2015-10-27

    Which graft material is the optimal graft material for the treatment of infected aortic aneurysms and aortic graft infections is still a matter of controversy. Orthotopic aortic reconstruction with intraoperatively prepared xenopericardial roll grafts without omentopexy was performed as the "initial" operation to treat aortic infection or as a "rescue" operation to treat graft infection. Mid-term outcomes were evaluated. Between 2009 and 2013, orthotopic xenopericardial roll graft replacement was performed to treat eight patients (male/female: 6/2; mean age: 69.5 [55-80] yr). Graft material: equine/bovine pericardium: 2/6; type of operation: initial 4/rescue 4; omentopexy 0. Additional operation: esophagectomy 2. Mean follow-up period: 2.6 ± 1.6 (1.1-5.1) years. Replacement: ascending 3, arch 1 (reconstruction of neck vessels with small xenopericardial roll grafts), descending 3, and thoracoabdominal 1. Pathogens: MRSA 2, MSSA 1, Candida 1, E. coli 1, oral bacillus 1, and culture negative 2. Postoperative local recurrence of infection: 0. Graft-related complications: stenosis 0, calcification 0, non-infectious pseudoaneurysm of anastomosis 2 (surgical repair: 1/TEVAR 1). In-hospital mortality: 2 (MOF: initial 1/rescue 1); Survival rate exclusive of in-hospital deaths (~3 y): 100 %, but one patient died of lung cancer (3.6 yr). Because xenopericardial roll grafts are not composed of synthetic material, the replacement procedure is simpler and less invasive than the standard procedure. Based on the favorable results obtained, this procedure may have the possibility to serve as an option for the treatment of aortic infections and aortic graft infections not only as a "rescue" treatment but as an "initial" treatment as well.

  15. Uncovering the Number and Clonal Dynamics of Mesp1 Progenitors during Heart Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Chabab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The heart arises from distinct sources of cardiac progenitors that independently express Mesp1 during gastrulation. The precise number of Mesp1 progenitors that are specified during the early stage of gastrulation, and their clonal behavior during heart morphogenesis, is currently unknown. Here, we used clonal and mosaic tracing of Mesp1-expressing cells combined with quantitative biophysical analysis of the clonal data to define the number of cardiac progenitors and their mode of growth during heart development. Our data indicate that the myocardial layer of the heart derive from ∼250 Mesp1-expressing cardiac progenitors born during gastrulation. Despite arising at different time points and contributing to different heart regions, the temporally distinct cardiac progenitors present very similar clonal dynamics. These results provide insights into the number of cardiac progenitors and their mode of growth and open up avenues to decipher the clonal dynamics of progenitors in other organs and tissues.

  16. Age-related dysfunction in mechano-transduction impairs differentiation of human mammary epithelial progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissier, Fanny A.; Garbe, James C.; Ananthanarayanan, Badriprasad; Miyano, Masaru; Lin, ChunHan; Jokela, Tiina; Kumar, Sanjay; Stampfer, Martha R.; Lorens, James B.; LaBarge, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dysfunctional progenitor and luminal cells with acquired basal cell properties accumulate during human mammary epithelia aging for reasons not understood. Multipotent progenitors from women aged modulus, and increased rigidity caused a differentiation bias towards myoepithelial cells while reducing production of luminal cells and progenitor maintenance. Lineage representation in progenitors from women >55 years was unaffected by physiological modulus changes. Efficient activation of Hippo pathway transducers YAP and TAZ was required for the modulus-dependent myoepithelial/basal-bias in younger progenitors. In older progenitors YAP/TAZ were only activated when stressed by extra-physiologically rigid matrices, which biased differentiation towards luminal-like phenotypes. YAP was primarily active in myoepithelia of younger breast tissues, but activity increased in luminal cells with age. Thus aging phenotypes of mammary epithelia may arise partly because alterations in Hippo pathway activation affect the processes of progenitor differentiation and lineage specificity. PMID:24910432

  17. ACL Revision in Synthetic ACL graft failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Zordán, J.; Escobar, G.; Collazo, C.; Palanconi, M.; Autorino, C.; Salinas, E. Alvarez

    2017-01-01

    The development of synthetic grafts as an alternative to biological grafts for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament dates from 1980. The interest is awakened due to the potential advantages of: The absence of morbidity associated with donor site, and early return to sport. However, this surgical technique has had multiple complications associated with graft: mechanical failures (synthetic graft failure, loss of fixation), synovial foreign body reaction, recurrent stroke, recurrent instability and ultimately, early osteoarthritis. Objectives: We describe the synthetic graft failure LCA, intraoperative findings and details of surgical technique. Methods: Patient 35 years old, with a history of ACL reconstruction four years of evolution in another health center, consultation with the Service knee arthroscopy for acute knee pain left knee during secondary sporting event to a rotation mechanism with fixed foot. On physical examination, presents and positive Lachman maneuver Pivot. Radiografia in a widening of the tibial tunnel is observed. NMR shows a discontinuity of fibers of synthetic graft. Results: First time arthroscopic revision where synthetic plastic LCA identifies with Disruption fiber pattern. Intraoperatively, hypertrophic chronic synovitis localized predominantly in intercóndilo is observed. debridement thereof is performed, and proceeds to the extraction of the synthetic ligament. Then he was made prior cruentado and revival of the edges of the tunnel, filling them with non-irradiated structural bone allograft. At four months as planned and after confirmation by studies incorporating bone graft was performed the second time with the new plastic ACL. It was planned like a primary graft surgery with autologous hamstring prepared in fourfold form, and fixation with modified transtibial technique Biotransfix system proximal and distal screw Biocomposite (arthrex®). A quadruple graft 9 mm was obtained, making good positioning of tunnels and stable

  18. Engineering the Biomaterial Interface of Prosthetic Vascular Grafts for Improving Thromboresistance and Biocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Ryan Akihiro

    The purpose of this dissertation is to develop novel biomaterials as therapies for treating cardiovascular disease. The first and second aims describe the creation of a new and facile approach for grafting bioactive heparin to the surface of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) vascular grafts using a thermally cross-linked poly(1,8 octanediol-co-citric acid) (POC) elastomer. The POC immobilized heparin (POC-Heparin) demonstrated excellent long term stability under physiological conditions for up to one month and significantly reduced platelet adhesion and maintained bioactive inhibition of whole blood clotting kinetics. POC-Heparin supported endothelial cell viability, proliferation, nitric oxide production and expression of endothelial cell specific markers von Willebrand factor and vascular endothelial-cadherin. This material was also capable of affecting vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype via increased expression of alpha-actin and decreased cell growth. The POC-Heparin coating is capable of significantly improving vascular graft thromboresistance, supporting endothelialization and inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell growth. This coating technology can be easily adapted to modify other blood contacting devices for simultaneously reducing thrombogenicity and improving endothelialization. Lastly, the third aim details the initial steps for developing materials which are capable of providing sustained release of bioactive signaling molecules such as stromal derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1) to promote recruitment of stem/progenitor cells. A copolymer based on citric acid, polyethylene glycol and N-isopropylacrylamide (CPN) was synthesized with enhanced electronegative charge and gelation properties for controlling SDF-1 protein encapsulation and delivery. Upon CPN gelation at 37°C, SDF-1 protein can be encapsulated with near 100% efficiency and deliver protein for up to 3 weeks. Using isolated blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) from human peripheral

  19. Physical properties of agave cellulose graft polymethyl methacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosli, Noor Afizah; Ahmad, Ishak; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Anuar, Farah Hannan [Polymer Research Centre (PORCE), School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    The grafting polymerization of methyl methacrylate and Agave cellulose was prepared and their structural analysis and morphology were investigated. The grafting reaction was carried out in an aqueous medium using ceric ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The structural analysis of the graft copolymers was carried out by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The graft copolymers were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). An additional peak at 1732 cm{sup −1} which was attributed to the C=O of ester stretching vibration of poly(methyl methacrylate), appeared in the spectrum of grafted Agave cellulose. A slight decrease of crystallinity index upon grafting was found from 0.74 to 0.68 for cellulose and grafted Agave cellulose, respectively. Another evidence of grafting showed in the FESEM observation, where the surface of the grafted cellulose was found to be roughed than the raw one.

  20. [Experimental study of allogenic tendon with sheath grafting in chicken].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y L; Wang, S L; Gao, X S

    2001-03-01

    To investigate availability of deep freeze stored allogenic tendon with sheath grafting in repairing the tendon and sheath defect in the II area of flexor digitorum tendon. Sixty chickens with tendon and sheath defect were divided into 2 groups randomly, group A was treated with allogenic grafting and group B was treated with autogenic grafting, these two groups were divided into two subgroups respectively, they were, group A1 allogenic tendon with whole sheath grafting, group A2 allogenic tendon with partial sheath grafting, group B1 autogenic tendon with whole sheath grafting and group B2 autogenic tendon with whole sheath grafting. All the allogenic grafts were treated by deep freeze. Histomorphological study, histoimmunological study and slipping function of the grafts were measured after operation. In group A1 and B1, the local reaction was sever, the nutrition of tendon graft was barricaded by the whole sheath resulting in adhesion, degeneration and necrosis. In group A2 and B2, the tendon graft healed well and little adhesion existed between tendon and sheath. The results showed that there were significant differences between tendon grafting with whole sheath and tendon grafting with partial sheath. Deep freeze store can reduce the immunogenicity of allogenic tendon with sheath. Allogenic tendon with partial sheath grafting can be used as a new biological material for repairing the tendon and sheath defect.

  1. The science behind autologous fat grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Elisa; Grieco, Michele P; Raposio, Edoardo

    2017-12-01

    Adipose grafting has undergone significant changes over time. Many different techniques have been followed by trying to improve the quality of the lipoaspirate and the survival of the fat graft after implantation. The purpose of this review is to analyse the historical evolution of the surgical harvesting and implant technique, describing the changes that have brought significant improvements, revolutionizing the aesthetic and functional results obtainable. A standard fat grafting technique is commonly performed in three stages: harvesting of adipose tissue from a suitable donor site; processing of the lipoaspirate to eliminate cellular debris, acellular oil and excess of infiltrated solution, reinjection of the purified adipose tissue. The most widely used surgical technique was described by Coleman. He modified and corrected the methods and results of his predecessors and proposed an atraumatic protocol for the treatment of adipose tissue.He reported that the key to successful fat grafting lies in the technique. In addition, he noticed that adipose tissue was not only a good filler, but improved the quality of the skin. In fact, fat grafts demonstrated to have not only dermal filler properties but also regenerative potential owing to the presence of stem cells in fat tissue. Adipose tissue, actually, is the closest to the ideal filler because it is readily available; easily obtainable, with low donor-site morbidity; repeatable; inexpensive; versatile; and biocompatible. There is an abundance of literature supporting the efficacy of fat grafting in both aesthetic and reconstructive cases. Recent studies have shown the utility of adipose-derived stem cells in the improvement of wound healing, describing their ability to regenerate soft tissues and their remodelling capacity provided by their unique cytokine and growth factor profiles.Despite ongoing concerns about survival and longevity of fat grafts after implantation and unpredictability of long-term outcome, fat

  2. Irradiation selects for p53-deficient hematopoietic progenitors.

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    Andriy Marusyk

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of mutations that drive cancer evolution constitute a major focus of cancer research. Consequently, dominant paradigms attribute the tumorigenic effects of carcinogens in general and ionizing radiation in particular to their direct mutagenic action on genetic loci encoding oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. However, the effects of irradiation are not limited to genetic loci that encode oncogenes and tumor suppressors, as irradiation induces a multitude of other changes both in the cells and their microenvironment which could potentially affect the selective effects of some oncogenic mutations. P53 is a key tumor suppressor, the loss of which can provide resistance to multiple genotoxic stimuli, including irradiation. Given that p53 null animals develop T-cell lymphomas with high penetrance and that irradiation dramatically accelerates lymphoma development in p53 heterozygous mice, we hypothesized that increased selection for p53-deficient cells contributes to the causal link between irradiation and induction of lymphoid malignancies. We sought to determine whether ionizing irradiation selects for p53-deficient hematopoietic progenitors in vivo using mouse models. We found that p53 disruption does not provide a clear selective advantage within an unstressed hematopoietic system or in previously irradiated BM allowed to recover from irradiation. In contrast, upon irradiation p53 disruption confers a dramatic selective advantage, leading to long-term expansion of p53-deficient clones and to increased lymphoma development. Selection for cells with disrupted p53 appears to be attributable to several factors: protection from acute irradiation-induced ablation of progenitor cells, prevention of irradiation-induced loss of clonogenic capacity for stem and progenitor cells, improved long-term maintenance of progenitor cell fitness, and the disabling/elimination of competing p53 wild-type progenitors. These studies

  3. Complications in skin grafts when continuing antithrombotic therapy prior to cutaneous surgery requiring skin grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarjis, Reem Dina; Jørgensen, Lone; Finnerup, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The risk of postoperative bleeding and wound healing complications in skin grafts among anticoagulated patients undergoing cutaneous surgery has not been firmly established. The objective was to examine the literature and assess the risk of postoperative bleeding or wound healing...... complications in skin grafts among anticoagulated patients, compared with patients who discontinue or patients who are not receiving antithrombotic therapy prior to cutaneous surgery requiring skin grafting. A systematic review examining the effect of antithrombotic therapy on cutaneous surgery was performed...... in terms of hemostasis by the surgeon and good pressure dressings. Care should be taken when operating on anticoagulated patients undergoing cutaneous surgery requiring skin grafting. However, graft failure is rare and, given the risk of thrombotic events, the reviewed studies recommend continuing all...

  4. New concepts and materials in microvascular grafting: prosthetic graft endothelial cell seeding and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Lio, A L; Jones, N F

    1998-01-01

    Microsurgical free tissue transfer is currently associated with very high success rates and few complications. While interposition vein grafting is clearly an important adjunct to the microsurgeon's armamentarium, it has been associated with higher free flap/replantation failures and complication rates. With appropriate flap planning and surgical techniques, the need for interposition vein grafting should be quite infrequent and hopefully avoided if at all possible. Nevertheless, when necessary, the vein graft remains the gold standard, with virtually all alternative interposition grafts demonstrating lower patency rates. One of the more promising areas of research is the concept of genetic manipulation of the endothelial cell via molecular biological techniques. It is likely that in the near future this may become a clinical reality, not only improving the patency of microsurgical anastomoses and interposition vein grafts, but quite possibly altering the target organ functionally as well.

  5. Allogeneic mesenchymal progenitor cells for posterolateral lumbar spine fusion in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Donna L; Lane, Joseph M; Seim, Howard B; Puttlitz, Christian M; Itescu, Silviu; Turner, A Simon

    2014-03-01

    Osteoconductive porous ceramic bone graft materials supplemented with mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) derived from autologous bone marrow aspirates have been shown to stimulate successful interbody and posterolateral spine fusion in preclinical models. Recent advances in immunomagnetic cell sorting have enabled purification and isolation of pluripotent stem cells from marrow aspirates and have expanded stem cell technology to allogeneic cell sources. Allogeneic MPC technology combined with appropriate synthetic biomaterial carriers could provide both the osteogenic and osteoconductive components needed for successful posterolateral spine fusion without the need for autologous bone harvest or expensive recombinant protein technology. To determine the safety and efficacy of a hydroxyapatite:tricalcium phosphate graft material supplemented with allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells in posterolateral lumbar spine fusion using an ovine model. Skeletally mature ewes underwent single-level instrumented posterolateral lumbar spine fusion using either autograft (AG), hydroxyapatite:tricalcium phosphate carrier (CP), or CP supplemented with allogeneic mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs). Three doses of MPCs were evaluated: 25 × 10⁶ cells (low dose, LD), 75 × 10⁶ cells (mid dose, MD), and 225 × 10⁶ cell (high dose, HD). Animals survived for either 4 or 9 months. Plain radiographs were acquired and scored for bridging bone at regular intervals during healing to monitor fusion development. Hematology, coagulation, and serum chemistry were monitored at regular intervals throughout the study to monitor animal health. After necropsy, computed tomography, high-resolution radiography, biomechanical testing, organ pathology, bone histopathology, and bone histomorphometry were conducted to monitor the safety and ascertain the efficacy of MPC treatment. MPC treatment in this spine fusion model resulted in no observed adverse systemic or local tissue responses

  6. Acute graft versus host disease

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    Vogelsang Georgia B

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and is a reaction of donor immune cells against host tissues. Activated donor T cells damage host epithelial cells after an inflammatory cascade that begins with the preparative regimen. About 35%–50% of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients will develop acute GVHD. The exact risk is dependent on the stem cell source, age of the patient, conditioning, and GVHD prophylaxis used. Given the number of transplants performed, we can expect about 5500 patients/year to develop acute GVHD. Patients can have involvement of three organs: skin (rash/dermatitis, liver (hepatitis/jaundice, and gastrointestinal tract (abdominal pain/diarrhea. One or more organs may be involved. GVHD is a clinical diagnosis that may be supported with appropriate biopsies. The reason to pursue a tissue biopsy is to help differentiate from other diagnoses which may mimic GVHD, such as viral infection (hepatitis, colitis or drug reaction (causing skin rash. Acute GVHD is staged and graded (grade 0-IV by the number and extent of organ involvement. Patients with grade III/IV acute GVHD tend to have a poor outcome. Generally the patient is treated by optimizing their immunosuppression and adding methylprednisolone. About 50% of patients will have a solid response to methylprednisolone. If patients progress after 3 days or are not improved after 7 days, they will get salvage (second-line immunosuppressive therapy for which there is currently no standard-of-care. Well-organized clinical trials are imperative to better define second-line therapies for this disease. Additional management issues are attention to wound infections in skin GVHD and fluid/nutrition management in gastrointestinal GVHD. About 50% of patients with acute GVHD will eventually have manifestations of chronic GVHD.

  7. Preoperative embolization of the graft superior mesenteric artery assists graft enterectomy in intestinal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ji; Tekin, Akin; Nishida, Seigo; Moon, Jang; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Levi, David; Weppler, Debbie; Tzakis, Andreas G

    2012-07-15

    Graft enterectomy after intestinal graft failure is challenging. We report our experience in preoperative embolization of graft superior mesenteric artery (SMA) to facilitate intestinal graft removal. A total of 22 isolated intestinal transplant recipients underwent graft enterectomy from July 1997 to February 2011 at the Miami Transplant Institute, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, of whom 6 patients underwent embolization of graft SMA seven times before graft enterectomy. The mean (SD) estimated blood loss in patients with or without embolization was 600 (173) versus 1437 (328) mL, respectively (P=0.02). The mean operation time in patients with or without embolization was 5.2 (1.2) versus 8.7 (1.3) hr, respectively (P=0.04). The mean change between preoperative and postoperative serum creatinine in patients with or without embolization was 0.2 (0.05) versus 0.16 (0.04), respectively (P=0.12). In patients with embolization, the warm ischemia time (from embolization to removal of the graft) was 6.9 (1.1) hr (range, 6-8.5 hr). Intraoperative and postoperative (24 hr) pH values were 7.36 (0.1) and 7.34 (0.1), respectively (P=0.71); intraoperative and postoperative (24 hr) lactate levels were 1.77 (0.8) and 1.56 (0.5) mmol/L, respectively (P=0.57). Preoperative embolization of graft SMA is a useful alternative to assist graft enterectomy in intestinal transplant recipients without causing severe acidosis, renal impairment, and hemodynamic instability.

  8. La violencia de hijos adolescentes contra sus progenitores La violencia de hijos adolescentes contra sus progenitores

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    Concepción Aroca Montolío

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available According to Prosecutor’s Office of the Minor, the accusation interposed by mothers and/or fathers victims by theirs children, along 2007 were 2603, in 2008 amounted 4.211, in 2009 there were 5.209 and in 2010 there were 8.000 accusations. Suede this worrying increase, the principal aim of our article is to check the scientific international and national documentation, from 1957 until the year 2010 that analyses the phenomenon of the adolescent violence against parents, to achieve an approximation to its keys that there allows us the comprehension and analysis of this serious familiar problem. For it we will analyse: (a the importance of this crime by means of criminological mediators: prevalence and incidence; (b the age and sex variables’ aggressors to be able to establish a basic profile about theirs and, (c the violence types that the teenagers wield to damage, prejudice and suffering against their progenitors, with the aim to obtain what they want. The information obtained in this research review and qualitative analysis, change in base to the methodology used and the type of sample under study to obtain conclusions. Even though, we wantto do research into needs to investigate this type of familiar violence, and from there, to do researches with rigorous scientific methodologies, unifying criteria and variables to be investigating, to be able to anticipate in this increasing problem that the parents have. Según la Fiscalía del Menor en el año 2007, las denuncias interpuestas por madres y/o padres, víctimas de malos tratos por sus hijos e hijas menores de edad, fueron 2.683. En 2008 ascendieron a 4.211, en 2009 se presentaron 5.209 y en el año 2010 se registraron 8.000 denuncias. Ante éste preocupante incremento, el objetivo principal de nuestro artículo es revisar la documentación científica que analiza la violencia filio-parental,  desde 1957 hasta el año 2011, para lograr una aproximación a sus claves que nos permita la

  9. Osteogenic induction of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells in novel synthetic polymer-hydrogel matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, M; Hutmacher, D W; Salgado, A J; Kaps, C; Ringe, J; Reis, R L; Sittinger, M; Brandwood, A; Schantz, J T

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the in vitro osteogenic potential of human mesenchymal progenitor cells in novel matrix architectures built by means of a three-dimensional bioresorbable synthetic framework in combination with a hydrogel. Human mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMPCs) were isolated from a human bone marrow aspirate by gradient centrifugation. Before in vitro engineering of scaffold-hMPC constructs, the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential was demonstrated by staining of neutral lipids and induction of bone-specific proteins, respectively. After expansion in monolayer cultures, the cells were enzymatically detached and then seeded in combination with a hydrogel into polycaprolactone (PCL) and polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite (PCL-HA) frameworks. This scaffold design concept is characterized by novel matrix architecture, good mechanical properties, and slow degradation kinetics of the framework and a biomimetic milieu for cell delivery and proliferation. To induce osteogenic differentiation, the specimens were cultured in an osteogenic cell culture medium and were maintained in vitro for 6 weeks. Cellular distribution and viability within three-dimensional hMPC bone grafts were documented by scanning electron microscopy, cell metabolism assays, and confocal laser microscopy. Secretion of the osteogenic marker molecules type I procollagen and osteocalcin was analyzed by semiquantitative immunocytochemistry assays. Alkaline phosphatase activity was visualized by p-nitrophenyl phosphate substrate reaction. During osteogenic stimulation, hMPCs proliferated toward and onto the PCL and PCL-HA scaffold surfaces and metabolic activity increased, reaching a plateau by day 15. The temporal pattern of bone-related marker molecules produced by in vitro tissue-engineered scaffold-cell constructs revealed that hMPCs differentiated better within the biomimetic matrix architecture along the osteogenic lineage.

  10. In situ bone tissue engineering via ultrasound-mediated gene delivery to endogenous progenitor cells in mini-pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bez, Maxim; Sheyn, Dmitriy; Tawackoli, Wafa; Avalos, Pablo; Shapiro, Galina; Giaconi, Joseph C.; Da, Xiaoyu; Ben David, Shiran; Gavrity, Jayne; Awad, Hani A.; Bae, Hyun W.; Ley, Eric J.; Kremen, Thomas J.; Gazit, Zulma; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Pelled, Gadi; Gazit, Dan

    2017-01-01

    More than 2 million bone-grafting procedures are performed each year using autografts or allografts. However, both options carry disadvantages, and there remains a clear medical need for the development of new therapies for massive bone loss and fracture nonunions. We hypothesized that localized ultrasound-mediated, microbubble-enhanced therapeutic gene delivery to endogenous stem cells would induce efficient bone regeneration and fracture repair. To test this hypothesis, we surgically created a critical-sized bone fracture in the tibiae of Yucatán mini-pigs, a clinically relevant large animal model. A collagen scaffold was implanted in the fracture to facilitate recruitment of endogenous mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) into the fracture site. Two weeks later, transcutaneous ultrasound-mediated reporter gene delivery successfully transfected 40% of cells at the fracture site, and flow cytometry showed that 80% of the transfected cells expressed MSC markers. Human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) plasmid DNA was delivered using ultrasound in the same animal model, leading to transient expression and secretion of BMP-6 localized to the fracture area. Micro–computed tomography and biomechanical analyses showed that ultrasound-mediated BMP-6 gene delivery led to complete radiographic and functional fracture healing in all animals 6 weeks after treatment, whereas nonunion was evident in control animals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that ultrasound-mediated gene delivery to endogenous mesenchy-mal progenitor cells can effectively treat nonhealing bone fractures in large animals, thereby addressing a major orthopedic unmet need and offering new possibilities for clinical translation. PMID:28515335

  11. Corneal Graft Rejection: Incidence and Risk Factors

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    Alireza Baradaran-Rafii

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine the incidence and risk factors of late corneal graft rejection after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP. METHODS: Records of all patients who had undergone PKP from 2002 to 2004 without immunosuppressive therapy other than systemic steroids and with at least one year of follow up were reviewed. The role of possible risk factors such as demographic factors, other host factors, donor factors, indications for PKP as well as type of rejection were evaluated. RESULTS: During the study period, 295 PKPs were performed on 286 patients (176 male, 110 female. Mean age at the time of keratoplasty was 38±20 (range, 40 days to 90 years and mean follow up period was 20±10 (range 12-43 months. Graft rejection occurred in 94 eyes (31.8% at an average of 7.3±6 months (range, 20 days to 39 months after PKP. The most common type of rejection was endothelial (20.7%. Corneal vascularization, regrafting, anterior synechiae, irritating sutures, active inflammation, additional anterior segment procedures, history of trauma, uncontrolled glaucoma, prior graft rejection, recurrence of herpetic infection and eccentric grafting increased the rate of rejection. Patient age, donor size and bilateral transplantation had no significant influence on graft rejection. CONCLUSION: Significant risk factors for corneal graft rejection include

  12. Grafting of styrene onto polypropylene membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zen, Heloisa A.; Geraldes, Adriana N.; Parra, Duclerc F.; Lugao, Ademar B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: helozen@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    The grafting of styrene onto polypropylene (PP) by simultaneous radiation was carried out. The effects of absorbed dose and the pos radiation period on the grafting yield were investigated. The experiment comprised PP films with 40{mu}m thickness exposed to gamma ionizing radiation at room temperature and nitrogen atmosphere. The films were immersed in styrene/toluene and then irradiated at total dose of 40, 80 and 100 kGy. After irradiation the samples were evaluated at periods of 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days at room temperature in order to observe the behavior of grafting degree. Structural, chemical changes and surface morphologies of the modified PP films were characterized by infrared spectroscopic analysis (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry analysis (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the degree of grafting (DOG) was gravimetrically determined. The simultaneous radiation indicated the dependency of the percent graft on the absorbed dose. The DOG values are higher when the film was submitted at 100 kGy dose. The thermal stability shows a decrease in the degradation temperature of the modified samples in comparison with the pure polymer. (author)

  13. Pericytes Stimulate Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Differentiation during CNS Remyelination

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    Alerie Guzman De La Fuente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the neurovascular niche in CNS myelin regeneration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that, upon demyelination, CNS-resident pericytes (PCs proliferate, and parenchymal non-vessel-associated PC-like cells (PLCs rapidly develop. During remyelination, mature oligodendrocytes were found in close proximity to PCs. In Pdgfbret/ret mice, which have reduced PC numbers, oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC differentiation was delayed, although remyelination proceeded to completion. PC-conditioned medium accelerated and enhanced OPC differentiation in vitro and increased the rate of remyelination in an ex vivo cerebellar slice model of demyelination. We identified Lama2 as a PC-derived factor that promotes OPC differentiation. Thus, the functional role of PCs is not restricted to vascular homeostasis but includes the modulation of adult CNS progenitor cells involved in regeneration.

  14. Is black-hole ringdown a memory of its progenitor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaretsos, Ioannis; Hannam, Mark; Sathyaprakash, B S

    2012-10-05

    We perform an extensive numerical study of coalescing black-hole binaries to understand the gravitational-wave spectrum of quasinormal modes excited in the merged black hole. Remarkably, we find that the masses and spins of the progenitor are clearly encoded in the mode spectrum of the ringdown signal. Some of the mode amplitudes carry the signature of the binary's mass ratio, while others depend critically on the spins. Simulations of precessing binaries suggest that our results carry over to generic systems. Using Bayesian inference, we demonstrate that it is possible to accurately measure the mass ratio and a proper combination of spins even when the binary is itself invisible to a detector. Using a mapping of the binary masses and spins to the final black-hole spin allows us to further extract the spin components of the progenitor. Our results could have tremendous implications for gravitational astronomy by facilitating novel tests of general relativity using merging black holes.

  15. Focus on biological identity of endothelial progenitors cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, V; Flore, R; Santoro, L; De Matteis, G; Giupponi, B; Li Puma, D D; Santoliquido, A

    2015-11-01

    Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) were discovered by Asahara et al in 1997 and defined as bone marrow CD34+/KDR+ cells endowed with angiogenic potentialities in vitro and in vivo. The most likely assumption is that EPCs consist of several cell subpopulations with functions targeted at accomplishing the post-natal neovascularization process in a synergic and complementary fashion. Indeed, the subsequent identification of numerous and differentiated hematic populations, characterized by the capacity to develop an endothelial phenotype, has posed a number of questions as to the real identity of EPCs. This concept does not represent a sterile speculation but rather it suggests important implications for the future practice of stem cell therapy. The aim of this report was to explore through a critical analysis the two main experimental methodologies, in vitro culture and flow cytometry, applied to EPCs, followed by a brief revaluation of the endothelial progenitors employing a globally functional approach.

  16. Epigenetic Reprogramming of Muscle Progenitors: Inspiration for Clinical Therapies

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    Silvia Consalvi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of regenerative medicine, based on the potential of stem cells to restore diseased tissues, epigenetics is becoming a pivotal area of interest. Therapeutic interventions that promote tissue and organ regeneration have as primary objective the selective control of gene expression in adult stem cells. This requires a deep understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms controlling transcriptional programs in tissue progenitors. This review attempts to elucidate the principle epigenetic regulations responsible of stem cells differentiation. In particular we focus on the current understanding of the epigenetic networks that regulate differentiation of muscle progenitors by the concerted action of chromatin-modifying enzymes and noncoding RNAs. The novel exciting role of exosome-bound microRNA in mediating epigenetic information transfer is also discussed. Finally we show an overview of the epigenetic strategies and therapies that aim to potentiate muscle regeneration and counteract the progression of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD.

  17. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, António; Martins, Paula; Paiva, Artur; Pereira, Ana Margarida; Marques, Margarida; Castela, Eduardo; Sena, Cristina; Seiça, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between circulating endothelial progenitor cell count and endothelial activation in a pediatric population with obesity. Observational and transversal study, including 120 children and adolescents with primary obesity of both sexes, aged 6-17 years, who were recruited at this Cardiovascular Risk Clinic. The control group was made up of 41 children and adolescents with normal body mass index. The variables analyzed were: age, gender, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipid profile, leptin, adiponectin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, E-selectin, asymmetric dimethylarginine and circulating progenitor endothelial cell count. Insulin resistance was correlated to asymmetric dimethylarginine (ρ=0.340; p=0.003), which was directly, but weakly correlated to E-selectin (ρ=0.252; p=0.046). High sensitivity C-reactive protein was not found to be correlated to markers of endothelial activation. Systolic blood pressure was directly correlated to body mass index (ρ=0.471; p<0.001) and the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (ρ=0.230; p=0.012), and inversely correlated to adiponectin (ρ=-0.331; p<0.001) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (ρ=-0.319; p<0.001). Circulating endothelial progenitor cell count was directly, but weakly correlated, to body mass index (r=0.211; p=0.016), leptin (ρ=0.245; p=0.006), triglyceride levels (r=0.241; p=0.031), and E-selectin (ρ=0.297; p=0.004). Circulating endothelial progenitor cell count is elevated in obese children and adolescents with evidence of endothelial activation, suggesting that, during infancy, endothelial repairing mechanisms are present in the context of endothelial activation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Endothelial progenitor cells, cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Rossella; Felice, Francesca; Feriani, Roberto; Balbarini, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute substantially to preservation of a structurally and functionally intact endothelium. EPCs home in to the sites of endothelial injury and ischemia, where they proliferate, differentiate and integrate into the endothelial layer or exert a paracrine function by producing vascular growth factors. This review will focus on successful lifestyle interventions that aim to maintain vascular health through beneficial actions on cell populations with vasculogenic potential. The results of the studies proving the role of healthy lifestyle are particularly emphasized.

  19. Identification of Novel Human NK Cell Progenitor Subsets

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    Priyanka Sathe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the pathways and regulation of human haematopoiesis, in particular, lymphopoiesis, is vital to manipulation of these processes for therapeutic purposes. However, although haematopoiesis has been extensively characterised in mice, translation of these findings to human biology remains rudimentary. Here, we describe the isolation of three progenitor subsets from human foetal bone marrow that represent differential stages of commitment to the natural killer (NK cell lineage based on IL-15 responsiveness. We identify CD7 as a marker of IL-15 responsive progenitors in human bone marrow and find that this expression is maintained throughout commitment and maturation. Within the CD7+ fraction, we focussed on the lineage potential of three subsets based on CD127 and CD117 expression and observed restricted lymphoid and biased NK cell potential amongst subsets. We further demonstrate the presence of subsets similar in both phenotype and function in umbilical cord blood and the bone marrow of humanised mice, validating these as appropriate sources of progenitors for the investigation of human haematopoiesis. Overall, we describe several stages in the process of lymphopoiesis that will form the basis of investigating the regulators of this process in humans.

  20. Superluminous supernova progenitors have a half-solar metallicity threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Wan; Smartt, Stephen J.; Yates, Rob M.; Nicholl, Matt; Krühler, Thomas; Schady, Patricia; Dennefeld, Michel; Inserra, Cosimo

    2017-09-01

    Host galaxy properties provide strong constraints on the stellar progenitors of superluminous supernovae. By comparing a sample of 19 low-redshift (z explosion site is likely lower than the integrated host value. We found that superluminous supernova hosts do not always have star formation rates higher than typical star-forming galaxies of the same mass. However, we confirm that high absolute specific star formation rates are a feature of superluminous supernova host galaxies, but interpret this as simply a consequence of the anticorrelation between gas-phase metallicity and specific star formation rate and the requirement of on-going star formation to produce young, massive stars greater than ∼10-20 M⊙. Based on our sample, we propose an upper limit of ˜ 0.5 Z_{⊙} for forming superluminous supernova progenitors (assuming an N2 metallicity diagnostic and a solar oxygen abundance of 8.69). Finally, we show that if magnetar powering is the source of the extreme luminosity, then the required initial spins appear to be correlated with metallicity of the host galaxy. This correlation needs further work, but if it applies, it is a powerful link between the supernova parameters and nature of the progenitor population.

  1. Dendritic Cell Lineage Potential in Human Early Hematopoietic Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Helft

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional dendritic cells (cDCs are thought to descend from a DC precursor downstream of the common myeloid progenitor (CMP. However, a mouse lymphoid-primed multipotent progenitor has been shown to generate cDCs following a DC-specific developmental pathway independent of monocyte and granulocyte poiesis. Similarly, here we show that, in humans, a large fraction of multipotent lymphoid early progenitors (MLPs gives rise to cDCs, in particular the subset known as cDC1, identified by co-expression of DNGR-1 (CLEC9A and CD141 (BDCA-3. Single-cell analysis indicates that over one-third of MLPs have the potential to efficiently generate cDCs. cDC1s generated from CMPs or MLPs do not exhibit differences in transcriptome or phenotype. These results demonstrate an early imprinting of the cDC lineage in human hematopoiesis and highlight the plasticity of developmental pathways giving rise to human DCs.

  2. Endothelial Progenitor Cells for Diagnosis and Prognosis in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Oriana Aragona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify, evaluate, and synthesize evidence on the predictive power of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in cardiovascular disease, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources. MEDLINE was searched using keywords related to “endothelial progenitor cells” and “endothelium” and, for the different categories, respectively, “smoking”; “blood pressure”; “diabetes mellitus” or “insulin resistance”; “dyslipidemia”; “aging” or “elderly”; “angina pectoris” or “myocardial infarction”; “stroke” or “cerebrovascular disease”; “homocysteine”; “C-reactive protein”; “vitamin D”. Study Selection. Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 927 database hits, 43 quantitative studies were included. Data Syntheses. EPC count has been suggested for cardiovascular risk estimation in the clinical practice, since it is currently accepted that EPCs can work as proangiogenic support cells, maintaining their importance as regenerative/reparative potential, and also as prognostic markers. Conclusions. EPCs showed an important role in identifying cardiovascular risk conditions, and to suggest their evaluation as predictor of outcomes appears to be reasonable in different defined clinical settings. Due to their capability of proliferation, circulation, and the development of functional progeny, great interest has been directed to therapeutic use of progenitor cells in atherosclerotic diseases. This trial is registered with registration number: Prospero CRD42015023717.

  3. NOTCH signaling in skeletal progenitors is critical for fracture repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuicui; Inzana, Jason A.; Mirando, Anthony J.; Liu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Jie; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Awad, Hani A.; Hilton, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture nonunions develop in 10%–20% of patients with fractures, resulting in prolonged disability. Current data suggest that bone union during fracture repair is achieved via proliferation and differentiation of skeletal progenitors within periosteal and soft tissues surrounding bone, while bone marrow stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) and other skeletal progenitors may also contribute. The NOTCH signaling pathway is a critical maintenance factor for BMSCs during skeletal development, although the precise role for NOTCH and the requisite nature of BMSCs following fracture is unknown. Here, we evaluated whether NOTCH and/or BMSCs are required for fracture repair by performing nonstabilized and stabilized fractures on NOTCH-deficient mice with targeted deletion of RBPjk in skeletal progenitors, maturing osteoblasts, and committed chondrocytes. We determined that removal of NOTCH signaling in BMSCs and subsequent depletion of this population result in fracture nonunion, as the fracture repair process was normal in animals harboring either osteoblast- or chondrocyte-specific deletion of RBPjk. Together, this work provides a genetic model of a fracture nonunion and demonstrates the requirement for NOTCH and BMSCs in fracture repair, irrespective of fracture stability and vascularity. PMID:26950423

  4. No hot and luminous progenitor for Tycho's supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T. E.; Ghavamian, P.; Badenes, C.; Gilfanov, M.

    2017-11-01

    Type Ia supernovae have proven vital to our understanding of cosmology, both as standard candles and for their role in galactic chemical evolution; however, their origin remains uncertain. The canonical accretion model implies a hot and luminous progenitor that would ionize the surrounding gas out to a radius of 10-100 pc for 100,000 years after the explosion. Here, we report stringent upper limits on the temperature and luminosity of the progenitor of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572), determined using the remnant itself as a probe of its environment. Hot, luminous progenitors that would have produced a greater hydrogen ionization fraction than that measured at the radius of the present remnant ( 3 pc) can thus be excluded. This conclusively rules out steadily nuclear-burning white dwarfs (supersoft X-ray sources), as well as disk emission from a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf accreting approximately greater than 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 (recurrent novae; M⊙ is equal to one solar mass). The lack of a surrounding Strömgren sphere is consistent with the merger of a double white dwarf binary, although other more exotic scenarios may be possible.

  5. No effect of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (OP-1) on the incorporation of impacted bone grafts in a realistic acetabular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buma, Pieter; Arts, J J Chris; Gardeniers, Jean W M; Verdonschot, Nico; Schreurs, B Willem

    2008-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) accelerate bone repair in experimental and clinical conditions. Impacted Morsellized Cancellous Bone grafts (MCB) are successfully used to reconstruct bone defects after failed hip implants. The main question in this study was if BMP-7 (OP-1) mixed with MCB could accelerate the incorporation of MCB and prevents the formation of a soft tissue interface after remodeling of the MCB. A large loaded defect in the acetabulum of goats was reconstructed with a wire mesh and with MCB or MCB mixed with OP-1. After 6 weeks, no differences were found in the revascularization process, in the number of osteoclasts resorbing the MCB, and in the thickness and appearance of the fibrous interface between MCB with or without OP-1. After 6 weeks, enchondral bone had formed in the bone graft layer and on the periosteal anterior and superior rim in the OP-1 group only. More periosteal bone and more bone in the holes of the mesh had been formed in most OP-1 goats. Most MCB was replaced by new lamellar bone after 15 weeks in both groups. We speculate that during or directly after impaction most of the OP-1 is released from the carrier inducing an early effect outside the reconstructive layer at the periosteal side of the acetabulum. Probably most OP-1 has left the reconstruction by the time new vessels and progenitors reached the bone graft. These results do not support the use of OP-1 in impaction bone grafting in patients.

  6. Tip Refinement Grafts: The Designer Tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Rollin K

    2009-01-01

    In cosmetic rhinoplasty, the patient's satisfaction is most often determined by the quality of the tip surgery, but perfecting a technique for consistently attractive tips can be challenging. As a result, rhinoplasty surgery is now entering a new era of "designer tip" operations, wherein surgeons can employ a combination of open suture tip techniques and tip refinement grafts to achieve consistent results. The grafts are made from excised lateral crural cartilage and, depending upon the specific aesthetic goals, the shape can include the following:domal, shield, diamond, folded, or combination. It is possible to alter dome-defining points, tip point, projection,definition, volume, and size and shape. A study of 100 consecutive female rhinoplasties indicated that tip sutures alone were used in 36% of cases, while a tip refinement graft was added to a sutured tip in 59% of cases.

  7. Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenoma After Ovarian Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajau-Prevot, Carole; Le Gac, Yann Tanguy; Chevreau, Christine; Cohade, Clémentine; Gatimel, Nicolas; Parinaud, Jean; Leandri, Roger

    2017-06-01

    Freezing strips of ovarian cortex before chemotherapy followed by transplantation is an experimental method to preserve fertility for reproductive-aged women with cancer. We report a case of a cancer patient who developed a mucinous cystadenoma in a grafted piece of ovarian cortex. A 32-year-old woman with a Ewing sarcoma had ovarian cryopreservation using cortical strip freezing before receiving chemotherapy. Five years later she had no ovarian function, and the strips were thawed and grafted back onto the ovary. She spontaneously became pregnant 1 year after this procedure and delivered a healthy neonate near term. During the cesarean delivery, a 5×3-cm cyst was removed from the graft. On pathologic evaluation, it was determined to be a mucinous cystadenoma. Ovarian pathology can develop in previously frozen ovarian cortex tissue after transplantation back onto the ovary. This suggests that routine gynecologic surveillance remains important for these women.

  8. Meshed split skin graft for extensive vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas C

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available A 30 year old female presented with generalized stable vitiligo involving large areas of the body. Since large areas were to be treated it was decided to do meshed split skin graft. A phototoxic blister over recipient site was induced by applying 8 MOP solution followed by exposure to UVA. The split skin graft was harvested from donor area by Padgett dermatome which was meshed by an ampligreffe to increase the size of the graft by 4 times. Significant pigmentation of the depigmented skin was seen after 5 months. This procedure helps to cover large recipient areas, when pigmented donor skin is limited with minimal risk of scarring. Phototoxic blister enables easy separation of epidermis thus saving time required for dermabrasion from recipient site.

  9. [Vascular trombosis of renal graft: 9 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaroud, Hayet; Béji, Soumaya; Ben Hamida, Fethi; Rais, Lamia; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; El Younsi, Fethi; Ben Moussa, Fatma; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Bardi, Rafika; Ayed, Khaled; Chebil, Mohamed; Kheder, Adel

    2008-04-01

    Allograft renal thrombosis can occur in 1 to 6% of cases. Many predisposing factors has been identified especially alteration of coagulation. We analyzed in this study frequency and predisposing factors of renal graft thrombosis. We report a retrospective study including 319 renal transplant recipients. Nine patients (2.8%) presented veinous graft thrombosis in 5 cases and arterial thombosis in 4 cases. There were 6 men and 3 women aged of 30.6 years meanly (10-56) which developed the thrombosis 6 days (1-48) after the transplantation. All patients were detransplanted after 16.2 days and 1 patient died. Thrombosis constitute an important cause of graft loss. A perfect surgical technic and prophylactic treatment in high risk patients are necessary to reduce this complication.

  10. Autologous miniature punch grafting in stable vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopal R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous miniature punch grafting with certain modifications was taken up in 54 sites in 30 patients with stable vitiligo for 6 months or more. The modifications were: (a use of same sized disposable punches for both donor and recipient areas except over convex body surfaces, (b use of Castraviejo′s scissors for harvesting donor grafts, (c use of medial side of thigh as donor site and (d not removing the primary dressing of the recipient site till 8 postoperaive day. The patients were given systemic PUVASOL after the procedure for a period of three months and mean pigment spread was noted at each site. Results showed that the extent of repigmentation varied among the recipient sites, the maximum being over upper eyelids, axillae and umbilicus. The modifications in the standard procedure were found to produce less complications, like cobblestoning, graft rejection.

  11. Coracoid graft positioning in the Latarjet procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Tobias M; Graveleau, Nicolas; Bohu, Yoann; Pansard, Erwan; Klouche, Shahnaz; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The success of shoulder stabilization with the Latarjet procedure depends on the correct positioning of the coracoid graft at the glenoid. The aim of this study was to assess intra-observer reproducibility and inter-observer reproducibility of a new standardized CT scan analysis for coracoid graft positioning in the axial plane after the Latarjet procedure and to assess the positioning in the study group. A consecutive series of 27 patients (22 men, 5 woman, 26.1 ± 6.4 years-13 right, 14 left shoulders) were followed up with CT scans between 2010 and 2012. The analysis of the CT scans (2.4 ± 0.7 months postoperatively) was performed with Osirix™ software. The assessment included two criteria in the axial plane: relation of the graft to the articular surface of the glenoid and impingement of the graft with the maximal humeral head circumference. Grafts were judged to be lateral, congruent, flush or medial. The strength of intra-observer agreement and inter-observer agreement was measured by the Kappa coefficient. The Kappa coefficient for intra-observer agreement was "substantial" (K = 0.64 ± 0.14, z = 4.6) to "almost perfect" (K = 0.81 ± 0.14, z = 5.7). The Kappa coefficient for inter-observer variability was "substantial" (K = 0.59 ± 0.14, z = 4.3) to "almost perfect" (K = 0.89 ± 0.14, z = 6.0). In our study, in the axial plane, 3 (11 %) transplants were lateral; 6 (22 %) transplants were congruent; 16 (60 %) flush and 2 (7 %) medial. This standardized CT scan analysis after Latarjet procedure has shown to accurately describe graft positioning in the axial plane with both good intra-observer reproducibility and inter-observer reproducibility. Case series, treatment study, Level IV.

  12. Autologous Fat Grafting for Whole Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H. L. Howes, MBBS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: This is the first reported case of a patient who had a single-stage large-volume breast reconstruction with autologous fat grafting, following rotation flap approach (RoFA mastectomy. The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the viability of reconstruction of the breast by autologous fat grafting alone, in the context of RoFA mastectomy. The hypothesis was that there would be minimal interval loss of autologous fat on the whole breast reconstruction side. Right RoFA mastectomy was used for resection of an invasive primary breast cancer and resulted in the right breast skin envelope. Eleven months later, the patient underwent grafting of 400 ml of autologous fat into the skin envelope and underlying pectoralis major muscle. Outcome was assessed by using a validated 3D laser scan technique for quantitative breast volume measurement. Other outcome measures included the BREAST-Q questionnaire and 2D clinical photography. At 12-month follow-up, the patient was observed to have maintenance of volume of the reconstructed breast. Her BREAST-Q scores were markedly improved compared with before fat grafting, and there was observable improvement in shape, contour, and symmetry on 2D clinical photography. The 2 new techniques, RoFA mastectomy and large-volume single-stage autologous fat grafting, were used in combination to achieve a satisfactory postmastectomy breast reconstruction. Novel tools for measurement of outcome were the 3D whole-body laser scanner and BREAST-Q questionnaire. This case demonstrates the potential for the use of fat grafting for reconstruction. Outcomes in a larger patient populations are needed to confirm these findings.

  13. Utilization of arterial grafts in foot replantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selami S. Sirvan, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Our subject is a 36-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with bilateral lower extremity amputation at the level of the distal third of the tibia after a car accident. Surgery was planned for below-knee amputation of the right lower extremity and replantation of the left foot. The arteries dissected from the iatrogenically amputated segment were used as grafts to repair vascular gaps during the replantation. The patient's follow-up had been problem free. We concluded that whenever possible, amputated parts unsuitable for replantation should be examined thoroughly and neurovascular structures that might be used as grafts should be preserved.

  14. Utilization of arterial grafts in foot replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvan, Selami S; Dagdelen, Daghan; Akgun Demir, Isil; Cezairlioglu, Mecd Atif; Sezer, Hasan Basri; Karsidag, Semra

    2017-03-01

    Our subject is a 36-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with bilateral lower extremity amputation at the level of the distal third of the tibia after a car accident. Surgery was planned for below-knee amputation of the right lower extremity and replantation of the left foot. The arteries dissected from the iatrogenically amputated segment were used as grafts to repair vascular gaps during the replantation. The patient's follow-up had been problem free. We concluded that whenever possible, amputated parts unsuitable for replantation should be examined thoroughly and neurovascular structures that might be used as grafts should be preserved.

  15. Observational properties of massive black hole binary progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainich, R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Shenar, T.; Marchant, P.; Eldridge, J. J.; Sander, A. A. C.; Hamann, W.-R.; Langer, N.; Todt, H.

    2018-01-01

    Context. The first directly detected gravitational waves (GW 150914) were emitted by two coalescing black holes (BHs) with masses of ≈ 36 M⊙ and ≈ 29 M⊙. Several scenarios have been proposed to put this detection into an astrophysical context. The evolution of an isolated massive binary system is among commonly considered models. Aims: Various groups have performed detailed binary-evolution calculations that lead to BH merger events. However, the question remains open as to whether binary systems with the predicted properties really exist. The aim of this paper is to help observers to close this gap by providing spectral characteristics of massive binary BH progenitors during a phase where at least one of the companions is still non-degenerate. Methods: Stellar evolution models predict fundamental stellar parameters. Using these as input for our stellar atmosphere code (Potsdam Wolf-Rayet), we compute a set of models for selected evolutionary stages of massive merging BH progenitors at different metallicities. Results: The synthetic spectra obtained from our atmosphere calculations reveal that progenitors of massive BH merger events start their lives as O2-3V stars that evolve to early-type blue supergiants before they undergo core-collapse during the Wolf-Rayet phase. When the primary has collapsed, the remaining system will appear as a wind-fed high-mass X-ray binary. Based on our atmosphere models, we provide feedback parameters, broad band magnitudes, and spectral templates that should help to identify such binaries in the future. Conclusions: While the predicted parameter space for massive BH binary progenitors is partly realized in nature, none of the known massive binaries match our synthetic spectra of massive BH binary progenitors exactly. Comparisons of empirically determined mass-loss rates with those assumed by evolution calculations reveal significant differences. The consideration of the empirical mass-loss rates in evolution calculations will

  16. Sulfonated hydrocarbon graft architectures for cation exchange membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Møller; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2013-01-01

    A synthetic strategy to hydrocarbon graft architectures prepared from a commercial polysulfone and aimed as ion exchange membrane material is proposed. Polystyrene is grafted from a polysulfone macroinitiator by atom transfer radical polymerization, and subsequently sulfonated with acetyl sulfate...

  17. Rootstock growth and development for increased graft success of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-01

    . A study was carried out to evaluate the effects of rootstock diameter (at root collar), skills and experience of grafters on mango seedling thinning and grafting. Skilled and unskilled grafters were involved in grafting mango.

  18. Tympanoplasty: does dry or wet temporalis fascia graft matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G B; Kumar, D; Aggarwal, K; Garg, S; Arora, R; Kumar, S

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the success rate of dry and wet temporalis fascia grafts in type I underlay tympanoplasty. A prospective, randomised study was conducted. One hundred adult patients (males and females) with chronic suppurative otitis media (mucosal type) were divided into 2 groups of 50 each: one group underwent dry graft tympanoplasty and the other underwent wet graft tympanoplasty. Fibroblast count was calculated in dry and wet grafts. The dry graft and wet graft groups had overall surgical success rates of 82 and 90 per cent, respectively; this finding was not statistically significant. A statistically significant high fibroblast count was observed in wet grafts, but it did not correlate with surgical success. A dry or wet temporalis fascia graft does not influence the outcome of tympanoplasty type I.

  19. Advances in Classification and Research Methods of Lung Epithelial Stem 
and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhua DENG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and characterization of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and understanding of their specific role in lung physiopathology are critical for preventing and controlling lung diseases including lung cancer. In this review, we summarized recent advances in classification and research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were region-specific, which primarily included basal cells and duct cells in proximal airway, Clara cells, variant Clara cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells and induced krt5+ cells in bronchioles, type II alveolar cells and type II alveolar progenitor cells in alveoli. The research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were mainly focused on lung injury models, lineage-tracing experiments, three dimensional culture, transplantation, chronic labeled cells and single-cell transcriptome analysis. Lastly, the potential relationship between lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and lung cancer as well as lung cancer stem cell-targeted drug development were briefly reviewed.

  20. Fetal hepatic progenitors support long-term expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a coculture system that establishes DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors as the authentic supportive cells for expansion of hematopoietic stem (HSCs) and progenitor cells. In 1-week cultures supplemented with serum and supportive cytokines, both cocultured DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors and their conditioned medium supported rapid expansion of hematopoietic progenitors and a small increase in HSC numbers. In 2- and 3-week cultures DLK(+) cells, but not their conditioned medium, continuously and significantly (>20-fold) expanded both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Physical contact between HSCs and DLK(+) cells was crucial to maintaining this long-term expansion. Similar HSC expansion (approximately sevenfold) was achieved in cocultures using a serum-free, low cytokine- containing medium. In contrast, DLK(-) cells are incapable of expanding hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that hepatic progenitors are the principle supportive cells for HSC expansion in the fetal liver. Copyright © 2013 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Advances in Classification and Research Methods of Lung Epithelial Stem 
and Progenitor Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Minhua; Li, Jinhua; Gan, Ye; Chen, Ping

    2017-02-20

    Isolation and characterization of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and understanding of their specific role in lung physiopathology are critical for preventing and controlling lung diseases including lung cancer. In this review, we summarized recent advances in classification and research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were region-specific, which primarily included basal cells and duct cells in proximal airway, Clara cells, variant Clara cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells and induced krt5+ cells in bronchioles, type II alveolar cells and type II alveolar progenitor cells in alveoli. The research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were mainly focused on lung injury models, lineage-tracing experiments, three dimensional culture, transplantation, chronic labeled cells and single-cell transcriptome analysis. Lastly, the potential relationship between lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and lung cancer as well as lung cancer stem cell-targeted drug development were briefly reviewed.

  2. Neural progenitors generated from the mesenchymal stem cells of first-trimester human placenta matured in the hypoxic-ischemic rat brain and mediated restoration of locomotor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S; Koh, S-E; Maeng, S; Lee, W-D; Lim, J; Lee, Y-J

    2011-03-01

    Term placenta is a great reservoir of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), however, the potential of the earlier placenta is largely unknown. In this report, we established 17 MSC lines from 19 first-trimester human placenta (fPMSC). fPMSC proliferated for 90-150 days in vitro and by enhanced cellular interaction, fPMSC differentiated into nestin-expressing neural progenitor cells (fPMSC-NP), accompanied by inductions of immature neuron-specific genes. Therapeutic effect of the fPMSC-NP was tested in the animal model of hypoxia-ischemia (HI) which was devastating to dopaminergic neurons and to locomotor activity. Improvement of motor activity was evident as early as 2 weeks after transplantation of the fPMSC-NP into bilateral striatum and became indistinguishable from that of the age-matched normal animals by 8 weeks but no spontaneous recovery was observed in the control-grafted animals. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the implanted fPMSC-NP matured into ectodermal cells including the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing neurons in the recipient striatum. So, the improved motor behavior was likely due to the dopaminergic differentiation of the implanted fPMSC-NP in the dopaminergic-denervated host brain. Based on this result, we propose that progenitors may be more advantageous than the terminally differentiated cells for the purpose of cell replacement therapies since the progenitors are easily obtainable and are expected to be more pliable to the new environment. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Striatal grafts in a rat model of Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzman, R; Meyer, M; Lövblad, K O

    1999-01-01

    Survival and integration into the host brain of grafted tissue are crucial factors in neurotransplantation approaches. The present study explored the feasibility of using a clinical MR scanner to study striatal graft development in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Rat fetal lateral ganglionic...... eminences grown as free-floating roller-tube cultures can be successfully grafted in a rat Huntington model and that a clinical MR scanner offers a useful noninvasive tool for studying striatal graft development....

  4. Hemocompatibility of Chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) Grafted Polyurethane Tubing

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun-Su; Tomczyk, Nancy; Kandel, Judith; Composto, Russell J.; Eckmann, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The activation and adhesion of platelets or whole blood exposed to chitosan (CH) grafted surfaces is used to evaluate the hemocompatibility of biomaterials. The biomaterial surfaces are polyurethane (PU) tubes grafted with an inner poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and an outer CH or quaternary ammonium modified CH (CH-Q) brush. The CH, CH-Q and PAA grafted layers were characterized by ellipsometry and fluorescence microscopy. Material wear tests demonstrate that CH (CH-Q) is stably grafted onto PU tu...

  5. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Klassen, Henry

    2006-01-01

    -eosin (H&E)-stained sections. Serum samples were taken from naive and RPC-grafted pigs and mouse-reactive antibody responses were assessed. At 1 week, histology showed a few perivascular lymphocytes consistent with a mild retinal vasculitis, and depigmentation of the RPE with large numbers of mononuclear...

  6. Exploring the activated adipogenic niche: Interactions of macrophages and adipocyte progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Thacker, Robert I.; Hall, Brian Eric; Kong, Raymond; Granneman, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Adult adipose tissue contains a large supply of progenitors that can renew fat cells for homeostatic tissue maintenance and adaptive growth or regeneration in response to external challenges. However, the in vivo mechanisms that control adipocyte progenitor behavior are poorly characterized. We recently demonstrated that recruitment of adipocyte progenitors by macrophages is a central feature of adipose tissue remodeling under various adipogenic conditions. Catabolic remodeling of white adipo...

  7. Biology of the Adult Hepatic Progenitor Cell: “Ghosts in the Machine”

    OpenAIRE

    Darwiche, Houda; Petersen, Bryon E.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter reviews some of the basic biological principles governing adult progenitor cells of the liver and the mechanisms by which they operate. If scientists were better able to understand the conditions that govern stem cell mechanics in the liver, it may be possible to apply that understanding in a clinical setting for use in the treatment or cure of human pathologies. This chapter gives a basic introduction to hepatic progenitor cell biology and explores what is known about progenitor...

  8. Advances in Classification and Research Methods of Lung Epithelial Stem 
and Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Deng,Minhua; Li, Jinhua; Gan, Ye; Chen, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and understanding of their specific role in lung physiopathology are critical for preventing and controlling lung diseases including lung cancer. In this review, we summarized recent advances in classification and research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were region-specific, which primarily included basal cells and duct cells in proximal airway, Clara ce...

  9. The Influence of Barrier Membranes on Autologous Bone Grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielkens, P. F. M.; Schortinghuis, J.; de Jong, J. R.; Paans, A. M. J.; Ruben, J. L.; Raghoebar, G. M.; Stegenga, B.; Bos, R. R. M.

    2008-01-01

    In implant dentistry, there is continuing debate regarding whether a barrier membrane should be applied to cover autologous bone grafts in jaw augmentation. A membrane would prevent graft remodeling with resorption and enhance graft incorporation. We hypothesized that membrane coverage does not

  10. the use of free autogenous rib grafts in maxillofacial reconstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Ofori-Adjei

    2006-12-01

    Dec 1, 2006 ... indications for grafting included ameloblastoma, malignant disease, cyst, ankylosis, and trauma. Either rib bone only or with cartilage were used. In. 90% of patients (26/29) the graft healed unevent- fully. Two patients had dehiscence of the wound with exposure of the graft intraorally within two weeks of ...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3930 - Bone grafting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3930 Bone grafting material. (a) Identification... “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Bone Grafting Material Devices.” (See § 872.1(e) for... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone grafting material. 872.3930 Section 872.3930...

  12. Pressure induced graft-co-polymerization of acrylonitrile onto ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    sent communication, we report for the first time the graft co-polymerization of S. cilliare fibre under pressure. The advantage of pressure induced grafting has ..... disorder in the crystalline pattern of the main polymeric backbone by the grafted units of the polyacrylonitrile chains. 4. Conclusions. It has been found that upon ...

  13. Defense mechanisms involved in disease resistance of grafted vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetable grafting with resistant rootstocks is an effective strategy to control a variety of soil-borne diseases and root-knot nematodes in the Cucurbitaceae and Solanaceae. In addition, improved resistance to some foliar diseases and viruses has also been reported in grafted plants. Hence, graft...

  14. Anterior Palatal Island Advancement Flap for Bone Graft Coverage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anterior Palatal Island Advancement Flap for Bone Graft. Coverage: Technical Note. Amin Rahpeyma, Saeedeh Khajehahmadi1. INTRODUCTION. The most important step in bone graft augmentation of alveolar process is soft tissue coverage. Dehiscence of the wound leads to graft exposure and subsequent problems.

  15. Synthesis and optimization of polyacrylamide and gum arabic graft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Graft copolymerization of polyacrylamide onto gum arabic was carried out in aqueous medium at room temperature (30oC) using various initiator (ceric ion) and monomer (acrylamide) concentrations. The extent of graft copolymer formation was determined in terms of percentage graft yield. The results obtained showed that ...

  16. Anterior palatal island advancement flap for bone graft coverage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Palatal Island Advancement Flap was effective in bone graft coverage in premaxillary edentulous area. Conclusion: It can be used as an aid for bone graft coverage of premaxillary edentulous ridge, where the need for mucosa is small in width but long in length. Keywords: Anterior maxilla, bone graft, dental implant, ...

  17. Aortic Graft Infection: Graphene Shows the Way to an Infection-Resistant Vascular Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Patelis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aortic graft infection is a potentially lethal complication of open and endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms. Graphene is the only existing two-dimensional material, and its unique structure gives graphene and its derivatives a plethora of original characteristics. Among other characteristics, graphene demonstrates bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects that could potentially resolve the problem of graft infection in the future. Data already exist in literature supporting this antibacterial effect of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide. Combining these materials with other substances enhances the antibacterial effect. Additionally, it looks feasible to expect antibiotic-delivering graphene-based graft materials in the future. Based on already published data, we could conclude that regarding graphene and its derivatives, the blessing of bactericidal effect comes with the curse of human cells toxicity. Therefore, it is important to find a fine balance between the desired antibacterial and the adverse cytotoxic effect before graphene is used in graft materials for humans.

  18. HeRO graft versus lower extremity grafts in hemodialysis patients with long standing renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Marc H

    2016-03-01

    The role of the HeRO graft in central venous pathology has been defined in the literature and clinically. There have been two publications or abstracts that have compared the patency rates and outcomes of this graft to the lower extremity graft. The outcomes of both publications leads to an algorithm suggested by the author in determining which procedure should be used for specific patients. Both papers trend to show that lower extremity grafts have improved patency rates when compared to the HeRO device in the upper extremity. The author will use these data to demonstrate that in younger patients and in patients with low morbidity and mortality, salvaging the upper extremity area for access may show that the HeRO device provides benefit for these patients.

  19. Experimental vascular graft for liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobori, L; Nemeth, T; Nemes, B; Dallos, G; Sotonyi, P; Fehervari, [No Value; Patonai, A; Slooff, MJH; Jaray, J; De Jong, KP

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic artery thrombosis is a major cause of graft failure in liver transplantation. Use of donor interponates are common, but results are controversial because of necrosis or thrombosis after rejection. Reperfusion injury, hypoxia and free radical production determinate the survival. The aim of

  20. Tissue Engineering: Creating Living Cardiovascular Grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muylaert, D.E.P.

    2016-01-01

    When heart valves or coronary arteries fail, the surgical implantation of a replacement structure can be a life-saving operation. Right now, replacement vessels for bypass grafting are harvested from the leg or chest of the patient, which is an additional and invasive procedure. Similarly, heart

  1. Dynamics of solvent-free grafted nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2012-01-01

    The diffusivity and structural relaxation characteristics of oligomer-grafted nanoparticles have been investigated with simulations of a previously proposed coarse-grained model at atmospheric pressure. Solvent-free, polymer-grafted nanoparticles as well as grafted nanoparticles in a melt were compared to a reference system of bare (ungrafted) particles in a melt. Whereas longer chains lead to a larger hydrodynamic radius and lower relative diffusivity for grafted particles in a melt, bulk solvent-free nanoparticles with longer chains have higher relative diffusivities than their short chain counterparts. Solvent-free nanoparticles with short chains undergo a glass transition as indicated by a vanishing diffusivity, diverging structural relaxation time and the formation of body-centered-cubic-like order. Nanoparticles with longer chains exhibit a more gradual increase in the structural relaxation time with decreasing temperature and concomitantly increasing particle volume fraction. The diffusivity of the long chain nanoparticles exhibits a minimum at an intermediate temperature and volume fraction where the polymer brushes of neighboring particles overlap, but must stretch to fill the interparticle space. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Contact lens fitting following corneal graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotka, Loretta B; Lindsay, Richard G

    2003-07-01

    Contact lens fitting may be required following keratoplasty for either optical or therapeutic reasons. Optical indications for contact lens fitting include the correction of irregular astigmatism, high regular astigmatism, anisometropia and secondary aniseikonia, as well as simple ametropia, where the patient desires to wear contact lenses in preference to spectacles. Therapeutic lenses are not routinely fitted following keratoplasty, although this management is advised in certain cases, such as when there are protruding sutures or epithelial healing is impaired. Designing a contact lens for a patient who has undergone keratoplasty will require the practitioner to carefully assess all the relevant features of the corneal graft. In this regard, there are many factors that need to be considered including the diameter of the graft zone, the topographical relationship between the host cornea and donor cornea, the corneal (graft) toricity and the location of the graft. Special designs, such as reverse geometry lenses, or more complex contact lens modalities, such as piggyback contact lens systems, may be required to achieve success in fitting.

  3. CORPOROPLASTY WITH SAPHENOUS VEIN GRAFT IN THE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    less rigid erections and are currently re- sponding to oral measures and lCl. Penile numbness occurred in four patients with dorsal plaques, and it was self limiting within six months. We encountered no complaint of penile shortening or impo- tence. Conclusion The saphenous vein presents a reasonable alternative grafting ...

  4. Proline and benzylpenicillin derivatives grafted into mesoporous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    between proline-MCM-41 and acetone. Keywords. Proline; MCM-41; hybrid catalysts; grafting; aldol reaction; enamine. 1. Introduction. The catalytic asymmetric aldol reaction is a fundamental C–C bond forming reaction in chemistry and biology. In 1970's, an asymmetric intramolecular aldol reaction catalysed by proline ...

  5. Graft Copolymerization and Characterization of Styrene with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2017-05-24

    May 24, 2017 ... 1Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Northwest University, P.M.B 3220, Kano, Nigeria. 2Department of Pure and ... In this study, styrene was successfully grafted onto chitosan by conventional free radical polymerization technique, using ..... radical species is very high, chain transfer and reaction ...

  6. Cellular grafts in management of leucoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular grafting methods constitute important advances in the surgical management of leucoderma. Different methods such as noncultured epidermal suspensions, melanocyte cultures, and melanocyte-keratinocyte cultures have all been shown to be effective. This article reviews these methods.

  7. Photoactivated surface grafting from PVDF surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthelot, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.berthelot@cea.fr [Chemistry of Surfaces and Interfaces, CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SPCSI, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Le, Xuan Tuan; Jegou, Pascale; Viel, Pascal [Chemistry of Surfaces and Interfaces, CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SPCSI, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Boizot, Bruno [Laboratory of Irradiated Solids UMR 7642 CEA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, CEA-DSM/IRAMIS LSI, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128, Palaiseau Cedex (France); Baudin, Cecile; Palacin, Serge [Chemistry of Surfaces and Interfaces, CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SPCSI, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-09-01

    Economic and easy methods to tune surface properties of polymers as Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) without altering bulk properties are of major interest for different applications as biotechnological devices, medical implant device... UV irradiation appears as one of the simplest, easy and safe method to modify surface properties. In the case of self-initiated grafting, it is generally assumed that the pre-treatment of the PVDF surface with UV irradiation can yield alkyl and per-oxy radicals originating from breaking bonds and capable of initiating the subsequent surface grafting polymerizations. Surprisingly, the present work shows that it is possible to obtain polymer grafting using low energetic UV-A irradiation (3.1-3.9 eV) without breaking PVDF bonds. An EPR study has been performed in order to investigate the nature of involved species. The ability of the activated PVDF surface to graft different kinds of hydrophilic monomers using the initiated surface polymerization method has been tested and discussed on the basis of ATR FT-IR, XPS and NMR HRMAS results.

  8. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  9. BKV-infection in kidney graft dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Montagner

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: BKV nephropathy (BKN causes kidney graft loss, whose specific diagnosis is invasive and might be predicted by the early detection of active viral infection. OBJECTIVE: Determine the BKV-infection prevalence in late kidney graft dysfunction by urinary decoy cell (DC and viral DNA detection in urine (viruria and blood (viremia; active infection. METHODS: Kidney recipients with >1 month follow-up and creatinine >1.5 mg/dL and/or recent increasing >20% (n = 120 had their urine and blood tested for BKV by semi-nested PCR, DC searching, and graft biopsy. PCR-positive patients were classified as 1+, 2+, 3+. DC, viruria and viremia prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio (LR were determined (Table 2x2. Diagnosis efficacy of DC and viruria were compared to viremia. RESULTS: DC prevalence was 25%, viruria 61.7%, and viremia 42.5%. Positive and negative patients in each test had similar clinical, immunossupressive, and histopathological characteristics. There was no case of viremia with chronic allograft nephropathy and, under treatment with sirolimus, patients had a lower viruria prevalence (p = 0.043. Intense viruria was the single predictive test for active infection (3+; LR = 2.8.1,6-4,9 CONCLUSION: DC, BKV-viruria and -viremia are commun findings under late kidney graft dysfunction. Viremia could only be predicted by intense viruria. These results should be considered under the context of BKN confirmation.

  10. Synthesis and properties of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) graft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Novel biopolymer-based superabsorbent hydrogels were prepared by grafting crosslinked poly (N-vinyl pyrollidin and 2-Acrylamido-2-methyl propan sulfonic acid (PNVP-co-PAMPS) chains onto CMC backbones through a free radical polymerization method. A proposed mechanism for superabsorbent hydrogel formation ...

  11. Synthesis of Polymer Grafted Magnetite Nanoparticle with the Highest Grafting Density via Controlled Radical Polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Babu Kothandapani; Dhamodharan Raghavachari

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The surface-initiated ATRP of benzyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, and styrene from magnetite nanoparticle is investigated, without the use of sacrificial (free) initiator in solution. It is observed that the grafting density obtained is related to the polymerization kinetics, being higher for faster polymerizing monomer. The grafting density was found to be nearly 2 chains/nm2for the rapidly polymerizing benzyl methacrylate. In contrast, for the less rapidly polymerizing styren...

  12. The comparison between the absorption rate of rib cartilage graft with conchal cartilage graft in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Shahrokh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cartilage grafts is one integral component in the various fields of plastic surgery particular rhinoplasty. Surgeons usually use from various sources, including the septum of the nose, ears and rib. Complications such deformity and reabsorbtion may be created with use of the cartilage. Area of the removal of cartilage can prevent these complications. The aim of this study was to compare the absorption rate and viability of cartilage autograft between two common donor site, the rib and the concha. Methods: This experimental study was performed on October 2014 in animal laboratory of Hazrat Fatima Hospital, Tehran, Iran. In this study, 15 New Zealand white male rabbits, weighing 2000-2500 g, approximately 12 to 16 weeks of age were used. In each rabbit, a piece of one ear and one cartilage was excised. After careful weighting of grafts, we implanted the rib cartilage graft into the left pocket and the conchal cartilage graft into the right one. After 8 weeks, the grafts were removed and weighed precisely and photography was carried out. The specimens were fixed in 10% formalin solution for histologic examination was. An example of hematoxylin and eosin staining and cut (H&E were performed and samples of live chondrocytes and fibrosis were examined by a pathologist. Results: We lost 3 rabbits during our study. The results showed that the average weight of a graft from the ear within 2 months, but this increase was not statistically significant (P= 0.152. In the rib graft weight loss over 2 months, and this reduction was statistically significant (P= 0.009. The resorption between two group was not significant but the amount of fibrosis was more in conchal cartilage graft. Conclusion: According to the study it can be concluded that absorption rib cartilage is somewhat better results than the cartilage of the ear. More studies, in addition to cartilage implants longer human studies can contribute to more accurate conclusions.

  13. Impact of bone graft harvesting techniques on bone formation and graft resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saulacic, Nikola; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Jensen, Simon S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Harvesting techniques can affect cellular parameters of autogenous bone grafts in vitro. Whether these differences translate to in vivo bone formation, however, remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of different harvesting techniques on bone fo......: Transplantation of autogenous bone particles harvested with four techniques in the present model resulted in moderate differences in terms of bone formation and graft resorption....

  14. Effect of Grafting Method, Graft Cover and Foliar Spray of some Mineral Elements on Persian Walnut Graft-take and Winter Survival Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Rezaee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Persian walnut (Juglans regia L. is an important nut crop in Iran and many parts of the world. One of the major challenges of growing walnut is planting of non-grafted walnut trees in orchards, which leads to the reduction of yield, quality and productivity of walnut orchards. Compared to the other fruit trees, walnut grafting is difficult and even newly grafted walnut seedlings are vulnerable to fall or winter frost chilling, so that most of the seedlings are lost after subjecting to the cold winter. There are a few studies reporting successful grafting in outdoor conditions, however, final grafting take after winter has been usually ignored. Hence, increased walnut grafting success and improved tree growth after grafting through foliar nutrient application may lead to increased tolerance of chilling. Therefore, main goals of this research were to investigate the effect of some graft covers and role of foliar spray of calcium, boron and zinc on the reduction of frost damage in newly grafted seedlings under outdoor conditions. Materials and methods: This research was conducted at agricultural research station, Khoy city, west Azerbaijan province, during 2012-2014. In the first experiment, three methods of grafting including cleft, bark and V-shaped, and two kinds of graft covers including moist sawdust and superabsorbent plus cotton wool were investigated in terms of grafting success and quality of seedlings. In the second experiment, effect of the three above-mentioned grafting methods and two levels of foliar spray including sequential spray of Ca (4 ppm, B and Zn (2% (3 times during growth season and control (no spray were studied in terms of frost damage. The experiments conducted in factorial based on randomized complete block design with 10 trees in each plot. Data were collected 45 days after grafting take, final grafting take after one winter, subsequent scion growth length and diameter and concentration of Ca, B and Zn in

  15. Synthesis of Polymer Grafted Magnetite Nanoparticle with the Highest Grafting Density via Controlled Radical Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Kothandapani; Dhamodharan, Raghavachari

    2009-09-01

    The surface-initiated ATRP of benzyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, and styrene from magnetite nanoparticle is investigated, without the use of sacrificial (free) initiator in solution. It is observed that the grafting density obtained is related to the polymerization kinetics, being higher for faster polymerizing monomer. The grafting density was found to be nearly 2 chains/nm2 for the rapidly polymerizing benzyl methacrylate. In contrast, for the less rapidly polymerizing styrene, the grafting density was found to be nearly 0.7 chain/nm2. It is hypothesized that this could be due to the relative rates of surface-initiated polymerization versus conformational mobility of polymer chains anchored by one end to the surface. An amphiphilic diblock polymer based on 2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate is synthesized from the polystyrene monolayer. The homopolymer and block copolymer grafted MNs form stable dispersions in various solvents. In order to evaluate molecular weight of the polymer that was grafted on to the surface of the nanoparticles, it was degrafted suitably and subjected to gel permeation chromatography analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to confirm the grafting reaction.

  16. Synthesis of Polymer Grafted Magnetite Nanoparticle with the Highest Grafting Density via Controlled Radical Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Kothandapani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The surface-initiated ATRP of benzyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, and styrene from magnetite nanoparticle is investigated, without the use of sacrificial (free initiator in solution. It is observed that the grafting density obtained is related to the polymerization kinetics, being higher for faster polymerizing monomer. The grafting density was found to be nearly 2 chains/nm2for the rapidly polymerizing benzyl methacrylate. In contrast, for the less rapidly polymerizing styrene, the grafting density was found to be nearly 0.7 chain/nm2. It is hypothesized that this could be due to the relative rates of surface-initiated polymerization versus conformational mobility of polymer chains anchored by one end to the surface. An amphiphilic diblock polymer based on 2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate is synthesized from the polystyrene monolayer. The homopolymer and block copolymer grafted MNs form stable dispersions in various solvents. In order to evaluate molecular weight of the polymer that was grafted on to the surface of the nanoparticles, it was degrafted suitably and subjected to gel permeation chromatography analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to confirm the grafting reaction.

  17. Modulation of graft architectures for enhancing hydrophobic interaction of biomolecules with thermoresponsive polymer-grafted surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idota, Naokazu; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Jun; Sakai, Kiyotaka; Okano, Teruo

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the effects of graft architecture of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) brush surfaces on thermoresponsive aqueous wettability changes and the temperature-dependent hydrophobic interaction of steroids in silica capillaries (I.D.: 50 μm). PIPAAm brushes were grafted onto glass substrates by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) that is one of the living radical polymerization techniques. Increases in the graft density and chain length of PIPAAm brushes increased the hydration of polymer brushes, resulting in the increased hydrophilic properties of the surface below the transition temperature of PIPAAm at 32 °C. More hydrophobic surface properties were also observed on surfaces modified with the block copolymers of IPAAm and n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) than that with IPAAm homopolymer-grafted surfaces over the transition temperature. Using PBMA-b-PIPAAm-grafted silica capillaries, the baseline separation of steroids was successfully achieved by only changing temperature. The incorporation of hydrophobic PBMA chains in grafted PIPAAm enhanced the hydrophobic interaction with testosterone above the transition temperature. The surface modification of hydrophobicity-enhanced thermoresponsive polymers is a promising method for the preparation of thermoresponsive biointerfaces that can effectively modulated their biomolecule and cell adsorption with the wide dynamic range of hydrophilic/hydrophobic property change across the transition temperature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Anti-thymocyte globulin as graft-versus-host disease prevention in the setting of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a review from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Frédéric; Mohty, Mohamad; Blaise, Didier; Socié, Gérard; Labopin, Myriam; Esteve, Jordi; Ciceri, Fabio; Giebel, Sebastian; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Savani, Bipin N; Schmid, Christoph; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is increasingly used as treatment for patients with life-threatening blood diseases. Its curative potential is largely based on immune-mediated graft-versus-leukemia effects caused by donor T cells contained in the graft. Unfortunately, donor T cells are also the cause of graft-versus-host disease. The vast majority of human leukocyte antigen-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants are nowadays carried out with peripheral blood stem cells as the stem cell source. In comparison with bone marrows, peripheral blood stem cells contain more hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells but also one log more T cells. Consequently, the use of peripheral blood stem cells instead of bone marrow has been associated with faster hematologic recovery and a lower risk of relapse in patients with advanced disease, but also with a higher incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. These observations have been the basis for several studies aimed at assessing the impact of immunoregulation with anti-thymocyte globulin on transplantation outcomes in patients given human leukocyte antigen-matched peripheral blood stem cells from related or unrelated donors. After a brief introduction on anti-thymocyte globulin, this article reviews recent studies assessing the impact of anti-thymocyte globulin on transplantation outcomes in patients given peripheral blood stem cells from human leukocyte antigen-matched related or unrelated donors as well as in recipients of grafts from human leukocyte antigen haploidentical donors. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  19. Paracrine effects of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells: cyclooxygenase-2/prostacyclin pathway in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Mei Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial dysfunction is the pathophysiological characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. Some paracrine factors secreted by bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (BMEPCs have the potential to strengthen endothelial integrity and function. This study investigated whether BMEPCs have the therapeutic potential to improve monocrotaline (MCT-induced PAH via producing vasoprotective substances in a paracrine fashion. METHODS AND RESULTS: Bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells were cultured for 7 days to yield BMEPCs. 24 hours or 3 weeks after exposure to BMEPCs in vitro or in vivo, the vascular reactivity, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression, prostacyclin (PGI2 and cAMP release in isolated pulmonary arteries were examined respectively. Treatment with BMEPCs could improve the relaxation of pulmonary arteries in MCT-induced PAH and BMEPCs were grafted into the pulmonary bed. The COX-2/prostacyclin synthase (PGIS and its progenies PGI2/cAMP were found to be significantly increased in BMEPCs treated pulmonary arteries, and this action was reversed by a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS398. Moreover, the same effect was also observed in conditioned medium obtained from BMEPCs culture. CONCLUSIONS: Implantation of BMEPCs effectively ameliorates MCT-induced PAH. Factors secreted in a paracrine fashion from BMEPCs promote vasoprotection by increasing the release of PGI2 and level of cAMP.

  20. Ovarian monocyte progenitor cells: phenotypic and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Cherry J; Sanberg, Paul R; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Haraguchi, Soichi; Lerner, Danika; Baldwin, Margi; El-Badri, Nagwa S

    2005-04-01

    Leukocytes of the macrophage lineage are abundant in the ovarian tissues and have an important function in both follicular development and regression of postovulatory follicles. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that continuous production of macrophages in the ovarian stroma is maintained by a resident population of progenitors. We established a long-term culture of ovarian follicular stromal cells from BALB/c and green fluorescent protein-transgenic (GFP-TG) C57BL/6 mice. Nonadherent cells were collected and tested for hematopoietic function in vitro and in vivo. Histological and ultrastructural analyses revealed a homogenous population of monocyte-like rounded cells. Nonadherent cells continued to proliferate in culture for several months without senescence. When plated at very low density in methylcellulose, these cells formed colonies consisting of monocyte-like cells. Ovarian monocyte-like cells reacted with CD45, CD11b, CD11c, and Ly6-Gr-1 cell surface markers. A distinct CD45low population within these cells reacted with CD117 (C-kit) surface marker, suggestive of a primitive hematopoietic progenitor. Fifty thousand nonadherent cells failed to provide radioprotection to lethally irradiated mice and thus were not considered to be equivalent to pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. Ovarian nonadherent stromal cells were positive for alkaline phosphatase but lacked embryonic cell antigens stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA-1) and Oct-4. We conclude that in the ovaries, a higher requirement for macrophages is provided by a resident stromal population of progenitors whose progeny is restricted to the production of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage.

  1. Prostate progenitor cells proliferate in response to castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Shi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Androgen-deprivation is a mainstay of therapy for advanced prostate cancer but tumor regression is usually incomplete and temporary because of androgen-independent cells in the tumor. It has been speculated that these tumor cells resemble the stem/progenitor cells of the normal prostate. The purpose of this study was to examine the response of slow-cycling progenitor cells in the adult mouse prostate to castration. Proliferating cells in the E16 urogenital sinus were pulse labeled by BrdU administration or by doxycycline-controlled labeling of the histone-H2B GFP mouse. A small population of labeled epithelial cells in the adult prostate localized at the junction of the prostatic ducts and urethra. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS showed that GFP label-retaining cells were enriched for cells co-expressing stem cell markers Sca-1, CD133, CD44 and CD117 (4- marker cells; 60-fold enrichment. FACS showed, additionally, that 4-marker cells were androgen receptor positive. Castration induced proliferation and dispersal of E16 labeled cells into more distal ductal segments. When naïve adult mice were administered BrdU daily for 2 weeks after castration, 16% of 4-marker cells exhibited BrdU label in contrast to only 6% of all epithelial cells (P < 0.01. In sham-castrated controls less than 4% of 4-marker cells were BrdU labeled (P < 0.01. The unexpected and admittedly counter-intuitive finding that castration induced progenitor cell proliferation suggests that androgen deprivation therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer could not only exert pleiotrophic effects on tumor sub-populations but may induce inadvertent expansion of tumor stem cells.

  2. Aberrant lymphatic endothelial progenitors in lymphatic malformation development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June K Wu

    Full Text Available Lymphatic malformations (LMs are vascular anomalies thought to arise from dysregulated lymphangiogenesis. These lesions impose a significant burden of disease on affected individuals. LM pathobiology is poorly understood, hindering the development of effective treatments. In the present studies, immunostaining of LM tissues revealed that endothelial cells lining aberrant lymphatic vessels and cells in the surrounding stroma expressed the stem cell marker, CD133, and the lymphatic endothelial protein, podoplanin. Isolated patient-derived CD133+ LM cells expressed stem cell genes (NANOG, Oct4, circulating endothelial cell precursor proteins (CD90, CD146, c-Kit, VEGFR-2, and lymphatic endothelial proteins (podoplanin, VEGFR-3. Consistent with a progenitor cell identity, CD133+ LM cells were multipotent and could be differentiated into fat, bone, smooth muscle, and lymphatic endothelial cells in vitro. CD133+ cells were compared to CD133- cells isolated from LM fluids. CD133- LM cells had lower expression of stem cell genes, but expressed circulating endothelial precursor proteins and high levels of lymphatic endothelial proteins, VE-cadherin, CD31, podoplanin, VEGFR-3 and Prox1. CD133- LM cells were not multipotent, consistent with a differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell phenotype. In a mouse xenograft model, CD133+ LM cells differentiated into lymphatic endothelial cells that formed irregularly dilated lymphatic channels, phenocopying human LMs. In vivo, CD133+ LM cells acquired expression of differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell proteins, podoplanin, LYVE1, Prox1, and VEGFR-3, comparable to expression found in LM patient tissues. Taken together, these data identify a novel LM progenitor cell population that differentiates to form the abnormal lymphatic structures characteristic of these lesions, recapitulating the human LM phenotype. This LM progenitor cell population may contribute to the clinically refractory behavior of LMs.

  3. Aberrant lymphatic endothelial progenitors in lymphatic malformation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, June K; Kitajewski, Christopher; Reiley, Maia; Keung, Connie H; Monteagudo, Julie; Andrews, John P; Liou, Peter; Thirumoorthi, Arul; Wong, Alvin; Kandel, Jessica J; Shawber, Carrie J

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic malformations (LMs) are vascular anomalies thought to arise from dysregulated lymphangiogenesis. These lesions impose a significant burden of disease on affected individuals. LM pathobiology is poorly understood, hindering the development of effective treatments. In the present studies, immunostaining of LM tissues revealed that endothelial cells lining aberrant lymphatic vessels and cells in the surrounding stroma expressed the stem cell marker, CD133, and the lymphatic endothelial protein, podoplanin. Isolated patient-derived CD133+ LM cells expressed stem cell genes (NANOG, Oct4), circulating endothelial cell precursor proteins (CD90, CD146, c-Kit, VEGFR-2), and lymphatic endothelial proteins (podoplanin, VEGFR-3). Consistent with a progenitor cell identity, CD133+ LM cells were multipotent and could be differentiated into fat, bone, smooth muscle, and lymphatic endothelial cells in vitro. CD133+ cells were compared to CD133- cells isolated from LM fluids. CD133- LM cells had lower expression of stem cell genes, but expressed circulating endothelial precursor proteins and high levels of lymphatic endothelial proteins, VE-cadherin, CD31, podoplanin, VEGFR-3 and Prox1. CD133- LM cells were not multipotent, consistent with a differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell phenotype. In a mouse xenograft model, CD133+ LM cells differentiated into lymphatic endothelial cells that formed irregularly dilated lymphatic channels, phenocopying human LMs. In vivo, CD133+ LM cells acquired expression of differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell proteins, podoplanin, LYVE1, Prox1, and VEGFR-3, comparable to expression found in LM patient tissues. Taken together, these data identify a novel LM progenitor cell population that differentiates to form the abnormal lymphatic structures characteristic of these lesions, recapitulating the human LM phenotype. This LM progenitor cell population may contribute to the clinically refractory behavior of LMs.

  4. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplantation grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie M; Moreb, Jan S; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2012-10-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after autologous stem cell transplantation. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellular apoptosis while fully sparing normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The specificity of this elimination is based on strong binding of the virus to myeloma cells coupled with an inability of the virus to bind or infect CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. These 2 features allow myxoma to readily identify and distinguish even low levels of myeloma cells in complex mixtures. This ex vivo rabbit-specific oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus treatment also effectively inhibits systemic in vivo engraftment of human myeloma cells into immunodeficient mice and results in efficient elimination of primary CD138(+) myeloma cells contaminating patient hematopoietic cell products. We conclude that ex vivo myxoma treatment represents a safe and effective method to selectively eliminate myeloma cells from hematopoietic autografts before reinfusion. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osório, M. Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group...... has ensued; understanding the natural history of the targeted disease; defining the optimal cell phenotype for each disorder; achieving safe and scalable cellular compositions; designing age-appropriate controlled clinical trials; and for autologous therapy of genetic disorders, achieving the safe...

  6. SN Ia archaeology: Searching for the relics of progenitors past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Tyrone E.; Gilfanov, Marat; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Rest, Armin

    2016-06-01

    Despite the critical role that SNe Ia play in the chemical enrichment of the Universe and their great importance in measuring cosmological distances, we still don't know for certain how they arise. In the canonical form of the ``single-degenerate'' scenario, a white dwarf grows through the nuclear burning of matter accreted at its surface from some companion star. This renders it a hot, luminous object (a supersoft X-ray source or SSS, 10^5-10^6K, 10^{38} erg/s) for up to a million years prior to explosion. Past efforts to directly detect the progenitors of very recent, nearby SNe Ia in archival soft X-ray images have produced only upper limits, and are only constraining assuming progenitors with much higher temperatures than known SSSs. In this talk, I will outline an alternative approach: given that such objects should be strong sources of ionizing radiation, one may instead search the environment surrounding nearby SN Ia remnants for interstellar matter ionized by the progenitor. Such fossil nebulae should extend out to tens of parsecs and linger for roughly the recombination timescale in the ISM, of order 10,000 — 100,000 years. Progress on this front has been hampered by the failure to detect nebulae surrounding most known SSSs using 1m class telescopes in the early 1990s. I will present new benchmark calculations for the emission-line nebulae expected to surround such objects, demonstrating that previous non-detections are entirely consistent with the low ISM densities expected in the vicinity of most SN Ia progenitors (Woods & Gilfanov, 2016). Modern large optical telescopes are now well able to reach the required limiting surface brightness needed to find such faint emission. With this in mind, I will introduce our new narrow-band survey for fossil nebulae surrounding young Magellanic SN Ia remnants and SSSs, already underway using the Magellan Baade telescope (PI: Alejandro Clocchiatti). In addition to opening a new era of SN Ia archaeology, I will show

  7. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT...... of epithelial tissues. We hypothesize the existence of adaptation mechanisms that regulate the formation and stability of AJs in different cellular contexts to allow the dynamic behavior of these complexes during tissue homeostasis and remodeling....

  8. Osteopontin neutralisation abrogates the liver progenitor cell response and fibrogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, J D; Swiderska-Syn, M; Dollé, L; Reid, D; Eksteen, B; Claridge, L; Briones-Orta, M A; Shetty, S; Oo, Y H; Riva, A; Chokshi, S; Papa, S; Mi, Z; Kuo, P C; Williams, R; Canbay, A; Adams, D H; Diehl, A M; van Grunsven, L A; Choi, S S; Syn, W K

    2015-07-01

    Chronic liver injury triggers a progenitor cell repair response, and liver fibrosis occurs when repair becomes deregulated. Previously, we reported that reactivation of the hedgehog pathway promotes fibrogenic liver repair. Osteopontin (OPN) is a hedgehog-target, and a cytokine that is highly upregulated in fibrotic tissues, and regulates stem-cell fate. Thus, we hypothesised that OPN may modulate liver progenitor cell response, and thereby, modulate fibrotic outcomes. We further evaluated the impact of OPN-neutralisation on murine liver fibrosis. Liver progenitors (603B and bipotential mouse oval liver) were treated with OPN-neutralising aptamers in the presence or absence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, to determine if (and how) OPN modulates liver progenitor function. Effects of OPN-neutralisation (using OPN-aptamers or OPN-neutralising antibodies) on liver progenitor cell response and fibrogenesis were assessed in three models of liver fibrosis (carbon tetrachloride, methionine-choline deficient diet, 3,5,-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine diet) by quantitative real time (qRT) PCR, Sirius-Red staining, hydroxyproline assay, and semiquantitative double-immunohistochemistry. Finally, OPN expression and liver progenitor response were corroborated in liver tissues obtained from patients with chronic liver disease. OPN is overexpressed by liver progenitors in humans and mice. In cultured progenitors, OPN enhances viability and wound healing by modulating TGF-β signalling. In vivo, OPN-neutralisation attenuates the liver progenitor cell response, reverses epithelial-mesenchymal-transition in Sox9+ cells, and abrogates liver fibrogenesis. OPN upregulation during liver injury is a conserved repair response, and influences liver progenitor cell function. OPN-neutralisation abrogates the liver progenitor cell response and fibrogenesis in mouse models of liver fibrosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  9. Osteopontin Neutralization Abrogates the Liver Progenitor Cell Response and Fibrogenesis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, J; Swiderska-Syn, M; Dollé, L; Reid, D; Eksteen, B; Claridge, L; Briones-Orta, MA; Shetty, S; Oo, YH; Riva, A; Chokshi, S; Papa, S; Mi, Z; Kuo, PC; Williams, R; Canbay, A; Adams, DH; Diehl, AM; van Grunsven, LA; Choi, SS; Syn, WK

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic liver injury triggers a progenitor-cell repair-response, and liver fibrosis occurs when repair becomes de-regulated. Previously, we reported that reactivation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway promotes fibrogenic liver-repair. Osteopontin (OPN) is a Hh-target, and a cytokine that is highly upregulated in fibrotic tissues, and regulates stem-cell fate. Thus, we hypothesized that OPN may modulate liver progenitor-cell response, and thereby, modulate fibrotic outcomes. We further evaluated the impact of OPN-neutralization on murine liver fibrosis. Methods Liver progenitors (603B and BMOL) were treated with OPN-neutralizing aptamers in the presence or absence of TGF–β, to determine if (and how) OPN modulates liver progenitor function. Effects of OPN-neutralization (using OPN-aptamers or OPN-neutralizing antibodies) on liver progenitor-cell response and fibrogenesis were assessed in three models of liver fibrosis (carbon tetrachloride, methionine-choline deficient diet, 3, 5,-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine diet) by qRTPCR, Sirius-Red staining, hydroxyproline assay, and semi-quantitative double-immunohistochemistry. Finally, OPN expression and liver progenitor response were corroborated in liver tissues obtained from patients with chronic liver disease. Results OPN is over-expressed by liver progenitors in humans and mice. In cultured progenitors, OPN enhances viability and wound-healing by modulating TGF-β signaling. In vivo, OPN-neutralization attenuates the liver progenitor-cell response, reverses epithelial-mesenchymal-transition in Sox9+ cells, and abrogates liver fibrogenesis. Conclusions OPN upregulation during liver injury is a conserved repair-response, and influences liver progenitor-cell function. OPN-neutralization abrogates the liver progenitor-cell response and fibrogenesis in mouse models of liver fibrosis. PMID:24902765

  10. A grafting from approach to graft polystyrene chains at the surface of graphene nanolayers by RAFT polymerization: Various graft densities from hydroxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roghani-Mamaqani, Hossein, E-mail: r.mamaghani@sut.ac.ir [Department of Polymer Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, PO Box 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khezri, Khezrollah [School of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, PO Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: (3-Aminopropyl) triethoxysilane was grafted at the surface of GO in low and high different graft densities to yield GOHAL and GOHAH, respectively. Subsequently, 2-(dodecylthiocarbonothioylthio)-2-methylpropionic acid (RA) was attached at the surface of GOHAL and GOHAH by an amidation reaction to yield GOHRL and GOHRH, respectively. Then, GOHRL and GOHRH were used in grafting from RAFT polymerization of styrene. - Highlights: • A RAFT agent grafted GO was used in grafting from RAFT polymerization of styrene. • The efficiency of RAFT agent attachment at the surface of GO is 41.12% for high density sample. • Polystyrene molecular weight is decreased by the addition of graphene content and also graft density of RAFT agent. - Abstract: (3-Aminopropyl) triethoxysilane was grafted at the surface of GO in low and high different graft densities to yield GOHAL and GOHAH, respectively. Subsequently, 2-(dodecylthiocarbonothioylthio)-2-methylpropionic acid (RA) was attached at the surface of GOHAL and GOHAH by an amidation reaction to yield GOHRL and GOHRH, respectively. Then, GOHRL and GOHRH were used in grafting from RAFT polymerization of styrene. Grafting of APTES and RA was approved by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Expansion of graphene interlayer by oxidation and functionalization processes was evaluated by X-ray diffraction. Conversion values of styrene were calculated using gas chromatography. Molecular weight and PDI values of attached polystyrene (PS) chains were studied by size exclusion chromatography. Thermogravimetric analysis was also used to investigate the degradation temperatures, char contents, and graft contents of modifiers and PS chains. GOHRH and GOHRL reach to char content of 55.3 and 45.2% at 600 °C, which shows that weight ratio of modifier (APTES and RA moieties) is 15.3 and 5.2%, respectively. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies show that

  11. Free and microvascular bone grafting in the irradiated dog mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altobelli, D.E.; Lorente, C.A.; Handren, J.H. Jr.; Young, J.; Donoff, R.B.; May, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Microvascular and free rib grafts were placed in 4.5 cm defects in an edentate mandibular body defect 18 to 28 days after completion of 50 Gy of irradiation from a /sup 60/Co source. The animals were sacrificed from two to forty weeks postoperatively and evaluated clinically, radiographically, and histologically. There was a marked difference in the alveolar mucosal viability with the two grafts. Mucosal dehiscence was not observed over any of the microvascular grafts, but was present in seven-eighths of the free grafts. Union of the microvascular bone graft to the host bone occurred within six weeks. In contrast, after six weeks the free graft was sequestered in all the animals. An unexpected finding with both types of graft was the marked subperiosteal bone formation. This bone appeared to be derived from the host bed, stabilizing and bridging the defects bilaterally. The results suggest that radiated periosteum may play an important role in osteogenesis.

  12. Ultrasound assisted polyacrylamide grafting on nano-fibrillated cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaeishoar, Haleh; Sabbaghan, Maryam; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S

    2018-02-01

    Polyacrylamide has been grafted onto nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC-g-PAM) under mild conditions. This was accomplished by developing and optimizing an ultrasound assisted protocol in the presence of potassium persulfate initiator. The synthesis was optimized on the basis of maximizing grafting percentage and grafting efficiency by varying the initiator and monomer concentration. The data shows that ultrasound has a profound effect in promoting the grafting of PAM onto NFC. The intended grafting was confirmed and the properties of the new co-polymers were examined by elemental analyses, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Intrinsic viscosity determinations in 0.1M cupriethylenediamine solutions for the NFC-g-PAM copolymers and the starting NFC and PAM homopolymer revealed that grafting of PAM onto nanofibrillated cellulose has a profound effect on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the graft polymers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ESR spectroscopic investigations of the radiation-grafting of fluoropolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, G.; Roduner, E. [University of Stuttgart (Germany); Brack, H.P.; Scherer, G.G. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    ESR spectroscopic investigations have clarified the influence of several preparative parameters on the reaction rates and yields obtained in the radiation-grafting method used at PSI to prepare proton-conducting polymer membranes. At a given irradiation dose, a higher concentration of reactive radical sites was detected in ETFE films than in FEP films. This higher concentration explains the higher grafting levels and rates of the ETFE films found in our previous grafting experiments. Taken together, the in-situ ESR experiments and grafting experiments show that the rates of disappearance of radical species and grafting rates and final grafting levels depend strongly on the reaction temperature and the oxygen content of the system. Average grafted chain lengths were calculated to contain about 1,000 monomer units. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs.

  14. Modification of cotton-cellulose by preirradiation grafting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacs, E. [Institute of Isotopes and Surface, Chemical Research Center (CRC), Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HAS), P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)]. E-mail: takacs@iki.kfki.hu; Wojnarovits, L. [Institute of Isotopes and Surface, Chemical Research Center (CRC), Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HAS), P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Borsa, J. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Mueegyetem rkp. 3, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Papp, J. [Institute of Isotopes and Surface, Chemical Research Center (CRC), Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HAS), P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Hargittai, P. [Institute of Isotopes and Surface, Chemical Research Center (CRC), Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HAS), P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Korecz, L. [Institute of Structural Chemistry, Chemical Research Center (CRC), Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HAS), P.O. Box 17, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2005-07-01

    Acrylamide (AAm), acylic acid (Aac), 2-hydroxypropil acrylate (HPA), 2-hydroxypropil methacrylate (HPMA) and N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (BAAm) were grafted to cotton-cellulose by the preirradiation method. The samples were characterized by ESR, degree of polymerization (DP) and tensile strength measurements, by FTIR, gravimetry, X-ray diffraction and iodine sorption. The grafting yield was strongly monomer dependent: the highest yield was found for HPMA, for HPA a medium yield, whereas for the others relatively low values were measured. Grafting improved the swelling of the samples. The highest increase in swelling was observed on samples grafted with Aac and BAAm showing saturation at about 270% at natural pH. For AAm, HPA and HPMA at low grafting yield an increase in swelling was found and then the swelling decreased with increasing grafting yield. No direct connection was found between the grafting yield and the swelling properties.

  15. Modification of cotton-cellulose by preirradiation grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, E.; Wojnárovits, L.; Borsa, J.; Papp, J.; Hargittai, P.; Korecz, L.

    2005-07-01

    Acrylamide (AAm), acylic acid (Aac), 2-hydroxypropil acrylate (HPA), 2-hydroxypropil methacrylate (HPMA) and N,N‧-methylene bisacrylamide (BAAm) were grafted to cotton-cellulose by the preirradiation method. The samples were characterized by ESR, degree of polymerization (DP) and tensile strength measurements, by FTIR, gravimetry, X-ray diffraction and iodine sorption. The grafting yield was strongly monomer dependent: the highest yield was found for HPMA, for HPA a medium yield, whereas for the others relatively low values were measured. Grafting improved the swelling of the samples. The highest increase in swelling was observed on samples grafted with Aac and BAAm showing saturation at about 270% at natural pH. For AAm, HPA and HPMA at low grafting yield an increase in swelling was found and then the swelling decreased with increasing grafting yield. No direct connection was found between the grafting yield and the swelling properties.

  16. Heparin-bonded expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular graft for femoropopliteal and femorocrural bypass grafting: 1-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosiers, Marc; Deloose, Koen; Verbist, Jürgen; Schroë, Herman; Lauwers, Geert; Lansink, Wouter; Peeters, Patrick

    2006-02-01

    Several prosthetic materials have been used for femoropopliteal bypass grafting in patients with peripheral vascular disease in whom a venous bypass is not possible. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) is the most commonly used, but patency results have not always equaled those achieved with vein, especially in below-knee reconstructions. This study assessed the performance of a new heparin-bonded ePTFE vascular graft that was designed to provide resistance to thrombosis and thereby decrease early graft failures and possibly prolong patency. From June 2002 to June 2003, 86 patients (62 men and 24 women; mean age, 70 years; 99 diseased limbs) were enrolled prospectively in a nonrandomized, multicenter study of the heparin-bonded ePTFE graft. Fifty-five above-knee and 44 below-knee (including 21 femorocrural) procedures were performed. Follow-up evaluations consisted of clinical examinations, ultrasonographic studies, and distal pulse assessments. Patency and limb salvage rates were assessed by using life-table analyses. All grafts were patent immediately after implantation. There were no graft infections or episodes of prolonged anastomotic bleeding. During the 1-year follow-up, 10 patients died, 15 grafts occluded, and 5 major amputations were performed. The overall primary and secondary 1-year patency rates were 82% and 97%, respectively. The limb salvage rate in patients with critical limb ischemia (n = 41) was 87%. Primary patency rates according to bypass type were 84%, 81%, and 74% for above-knee femoropopliteal, below-knee femoropopliteal, and femorocrural bypasses, respectively; the corresponding secondary patency rates were 96%, 100%, and 100%. In this study, the heparin-bonded ePTFE graft provided promising early patency and limb salvage results, with no device-related complications, in patients with occlusive vascular disease. Longer-term and randomized studies are warranted to determine whether this graft provides results superior to those achieved

  17. Comparative transcriptomic analysis identifies genes differentially expressed in human epicardial progenitors and hiPSC-derived cardiac progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnergren, Jane; Drowley, Lauren; Plowright, Alleyn T; Brolén, Gabriella; Goumans, Marie-José; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Sartipy, Peter; Wang, Qing-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Regenerative therapies hold great potential to change the treatment paradigm for cardiac diseases. Human cardiac progenitor cells can be used for drug discovery in this area and also provide a renewable source of cardiomyocytes. However, a better understanding of their characteristics is critical for interpreting data obtained from drug screening using these cells. In the present study, we performed global transcriptional analysis of two important sources of cardiac progenitors, i.e., patient epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs) and cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we also compared the gene expression profiles of these cells when they were cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We identified 3,289 mRNAs that were differentially expressed between EPDCs and CPCs. Gene ontology annotation and pathway enrichment analyses further revealed possible unique functions of these two cell populations. Notably, the impact of hypoxia vs normoxia on gene expression was modest and only a few genes (e.g., AK4, ALDOC, BNIP3P1, PGK1, and SLC2A1) were upregulated in EPDCs and CPCs after the cells were exposed to low oxygen for 24 h. Finally, we also performed a focused analysis of the gene expression patterns of a predefined set of 92 paracrine factors. We identified 30 of these genes as differentially expressed, and 29 were expressed at higher levels in EPDCs compared with CPCs. Taken together, the results of the present study advance our understanding of the transcriptional programs in EPDCs and CPCs and highlights important differences and similarities between these cell populations. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Lack of cross-sensitization between α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout porcine and allogeneic skin grafts permits serial grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Alexander; Leonard, David A; Leto Barone, Angelo; Keegan, Josh; Mallard, Christopher; Sachs, David H; Kurtz, Josef M; Cetrulo, Curtis L

    2014-06-27

    The current standard of care for burns requiring operative treatment consists of early burn excision and autologous split-thickness skin grafting. However, in large burns, sufficient donor sites may not be available to achieve total coverage, necessitating temporary coverage with allogeneic human cadaver skin grafts or synthetic skin substitutes. A previous study from this laboratory demonstrated that skin grafts from alpha-1,3 galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) miniature swine enjoyed survival comparable to that of allogeneic skin grafts in baboons. In the present study, we have evaluated the immune response against sequential GalT-KO and allogeneic skin grafts to determine whether such serial grafts could extend the period of temporary wound coverage before definitive grafting with autologous skin. We report that rejection of primary GalT-KO skin grafts led to an anti-xenogeneic humoral response with no evidence for sensitization to alloantigens nor acceleration of rejection of allogeneic skin grafts. Similarly, presensitization with allogeneic skin did not lead to accelerated rejection of xenogeneic skin. These data suggest that GalT-KO skin grafts could provide an early first-line treatment in the management of severe burns that would not preclude subsequent use of allografts, and that serial grafting of GalT-KO skin and allogeneic skin could potentially be used to provide an extended period of temporary burn wound coverage.

  19. Comparison of mesencephalic free-floating tissue culture grafts and cell suspension grafts in the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Morten; Widmer, H R; Wagner, B

    1998-01-01

    , calbindin, and parvalbumin showed no differences in the neuronal expression of these proteins between the two graft types. In conclusion, we found comparable dopaminergic cell survival and functional effects of tissue-culture grafts and cell-suspension grafts, which currently is the type of graft most......Ventral mesencephalon (VM) of fetal rat and human origin grown as free-floating roller-tube (FFRT) cultures can survive subsequent grafting to the adult rat striatum. To further explore the functional efficacy of such grafts, embryonic day 13 ventral mesencephalic tissue was grafted either after 7...... days in culture or directly as dissociated cell suspensions, and compared with regard to neuronal survival and ability to normalize rotational behavior in adult rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions. Other lesioned rats received injections of cell-free medium and served as controls...

  20. Graft Infection Masquerading as Rheumatologic Disease: a Rare Case of Aortobifemoral Graft Infection Presenting as Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Stephanie A; Delgadillo, Daniel; MacGuidwin, Elizabeth; Greenberg, Joshua I; Jameson, Andrew P

    2017-05-01

    Prosthetic vascular graft procedures are a common treatment modality for peripheral vascular disease. A relatively common complication is graft infection, occurring at a rate of 0.5-5%. When they occur, graft infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Vascular graft infections also represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the physician METHODS: Here, we report a case where the rare finding of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy was an important indication of underlying aortic graft infection that was initially misdiagnosed. A review of the literature revealed 34 cases of vascular graft infection associated with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. The mean interval from surgery to time of infection was approximately 5 years. Mortality was 35%. When combined with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, vascular graft infection was complicated by an aortoenteric fistula in 53% of the cases. The complexity of this case highlights the challenges physicians face in order to diagnose and treat this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henry, C.J.; Casas-Selves, M.; Kim, J.; Zaberezhnyy, V.; Aghili, L.; Daniel, A.E.; Jimenez, L.; Azam, T.; McNamee, E.N.; Clambey, E.T.; Klawitter, J.; Serkova, N.J.; Tan, A.C.; Dinarello, C.A.; DeGregori, J.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed

  2. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression.

  3. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylases induces astrocytic differentiation of neural progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Anirban; Dhara, Sujoy K; Swetenburg, Raymond; Mithani, Miloni; Cao, Kaixiang; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Fan, Yuhong; Stice, Steven L

    2013-07-01

    Understanding how to specify rapid differentiation of human neural progenitor towards enriched non-transformed human astrocyte progenitors will provide a critical cell source to further our understanding of how astrocytes play a pivotal role in neural function and development. Human neural progenitors derived from pluripotent embryonic stem cells and propagated in adherent serum-free cultures provide a fate restricted renewable source for quick production of neural cells; however, such cells are highly refractive to astrocytogenesis and show a strong neurogenic bias, similar to neural progenitors from the early embryonic central nervous system (CNS). We found that several astrocytic genes are hypermethylated in such progenitors potentially preventing generation of astrocytes and leading to the proneuronal fate of these progenitors. However, epigenetic modification by Azacytidine (Aza-C) and Trichostatin A (TSA), with concomitant signaling from BMP2 and LIF in neural progenitor cultures shifts this bias, leading to expression of astrocytic markers as early as 5days of differentiation, with near complete suppression of neuronal differentiation. The resultant cells express major astrocytic markers, are amenable to co-culture with neurons, can be propagated as astrocyte progenitors and are cryopreservable. Although previous reports have generated astrocytes from pluripotent cells, the differentiation required extensive culture or selection based on cell surface antigens. The development of a label free and rapid differentiation process will expedite future derivation of astrocytes from various sources pluripotent cells including, but not limited to, human astrocytes associated with various neurological diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Interleukin-1 regulates Hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia); M. Peeters (Marian); E. Haak (Esther); K. van der Horn (Karin); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are

  5. Are the models for type Ia supernova progenitors consistent with the properties of supernova remnants?,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badenes, C.; Hughes, J.P.; Bravo, E.; Langer, N.

    2007-01-01

    We explore the relationship between the models for progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae and the properties of the supernova remnants that evolve after the explosion. Most models for Type Ia progenitors in the single-degenerate scenario predict substantial outflows during the presupernova

  6. Effects of hematopoietic growth factors on purified bone marrow progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Bot (Freek)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe have used highly enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells and in-vitro culture to examine the following questions: 1. The effects of recombinant lL-3 and GM-CSF on proliferation and differentiation of enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells have not been clearly defined: - how do IL~3

  7. Successful periodontal ligament regeneration by periodontal progenitor preseeding on natural tooth root surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangaria, Smit Jayant; Ito, Yoshihiro; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2011-10-01

    The regeneration of lost periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone is the purpose of periodontal tissue engineering. The goal of the present study was to assess the suitability of 3 odontogenic progenitor populations from dental pulp, PDL, and dental follicle for periodontal regeneration when exposed to natural and synthetic apatite surface topographies. We demonstrated that PDL progenitors featured higher levels of periostin and scleraxis expression, increased adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential, and pronounced elongated cell shapes on barren root chips when compared with dental pulp and dental follicle cells. When evaluating the effect of surface characteristics on PDL progenitors, natural root surfaces resulted in elongated PDL cell shapes, whereas PDL progenitors on synthetic apatite surfaces were rounded or polygonal. In addition, surface coatings affected PDL progenitor gene expression profiles: collagen I coatings enhanced alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expression levels and laminin-1 coatings increased epidermal growth factor (EGF), nestin, cadherin 1, and keratin 8 expression. PDL progenitors seeded on natural tooth root surfaces in organ culture formed new periodontal fibers after 3 weeks of culture. Finally, replantation of PDL progenitor-seeded tooth roots into rat alveolar bone sockets resulted in the complete formation of a new PDL and stable reattachment of teeth over a 6-month period. Together, these findings indicate that periodontal progenitor cell type as well as mineral surface topography and molecular environment play crucial roles in the regeneration of true periodontal anchorage.

  8. Small molecule GSK-3 inhibitors increase neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Christian; Mix, Eilhard; Frahm, Jana; Glass, Anne; Müller, Jana; Schmitt, Oliver; Schmöle, Anne-Caroline; Klemm, Kristin; Ortinau, Stefanie; Hübner, Rayk; Frech, Moritz J; Wree, Andreas; Rolfs, Arndt

    2011-01-13

    Human neural progenitor cells provide a source for cell replacement therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, there is great interest in mechanisms and tools to direct the fate of multipotent progenitor cells during their differentiation to increase the yield of a desired cell type. We tested small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) for their functionality and their influence on neurogenesis using the human neural progenitor cell line ReNcell VM. Here we report the enhancement of neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells by treatment with GSK-3 inhibitors. We tested different small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 i.e. LiCl, sodium-valproate, kenpaullone, indirubin-3-monoxime and SB-216763 for their ability to inhibit GSK-3 in human neural progenitor cells. The highest in situ GSK-3 inhibitory effect of the drugs was found for kenpaullone and SB-216763. Accordingly, kenpaullone and SB-216763 were the only drugs tested in this study to stimulate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway that is antagonized by GSK-3. Analysis of human neural progenitor differentiation revealed an augmentation of neurogenesis by SB-216763 and kenpaullone, without changing cell cycle exit or cell survival. Small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 enhance neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells and may be used to direct the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and application of human adult stem or progenitor cell organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Schutgens, Frans; Verhaar, Marianne C; Clevers, Hans

    Adult stem or progenitor cell organoids are 3D adult-organ-derived epithelial structures that contain self-renewing and organ-specific stem or progenitor cells as well as differentiated cells. This organoid culture system was first established in murine intestine and subsequently developed for

  10. Co-transplantation of endothelial progenitor cells and pancreatic islets to induce long-lasting normoglycemia in streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Quaranta

    Full Text Available Graft vascularization is a crucial step to obtain stable normoglycemia in pancreatic islet transplantation. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs contribute to neoangiogenesis and to the revascularization process during ischaemic events and play a key role in the response to pancreatic islet injury. In this work we co-transplanted EPCs and islets in the portal vein of chemically-induced diabetic rats to restore islet vascularization and to improve graft survival. Syngenic islets were transplanted, either alone or with EPCs derived from green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic rats, into the portal vein of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Blood glucose levels were monitored and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests were performed. Real time-PCR was carried out to evaluate the gene expression of angiogenic factors. Diabetic-induced rats showed long-lasting (6 months normoglycemia upon co-transplantation of syngenic islets and EPCs. After 3-5 days from transplantation, hyperglycaemic levels dropped to normal values and lasted unmodified as long as they were checked. Further, glucose tolerance tests revealed the animals' ability to produce insulin on-demand as indexed by a prompt response in blood glucose clearance. Graft neovascularization was evaluated by immunohistochemistry: for the first time the measure of endothelial thickness revealed a donor-EPC-related neovascularization supporting viable islets up to six months after transplant. Our results highlight the importance of a newly formed viable vascular network together with pancreatic islets to provide de novo adequate supply in order to obtain enduring normoglycemia and prevent diabetes-related long-term health hazards.

  11. Co-transplantation of endothelial progenitor cells and pancreatic islets to induce long-lasting normoglycemia in streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Paola; Antonini, Sara; Spiga, Saturnino; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Curcio, Michele; Mulas, Giovanna; Diana, Marco; Marzola, Pasquina; Mosca, Franco; Longoni, Biancamaria

    2014-01-01

    Graft vascularization is a crucial step to obtain stable normoglycemia in pancreatic islet transplantation. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to neoangiogenesis and to the revascularization process during ischaemic events and play a key role in the response to pancreatic islet injury. In this work we co-transplanted EPCs and islets in the portal vein of chemically-induced diabetic rats to restore islet vascularization and to improve graft survival. Syngenic islets were transplanted, either alone or with EPCs derived from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats, into the portal vein of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Blood glucose levels were monitored and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests were performed. Real time-PCR was carried out to evaluate the gene expression of angiogenic factors. Diabetic-induced rats showed long-lasting (6 months) normoglycemia upon co-transplantation of syngenic islets and EPCs. After 3-5 days from transplantation, hyperglycaemic levels dropped to normal values and lasted unmodified as long as they were checked. Further, glucose tolerance tests revealed the animals' ability to produce insulin on-demand as indexed by a prompt response in blood glucose clearance. Graft neovascularization was evaluated by immunohistochemistry: for the first time the measure of endothelial thickness revealed a donor-EPC-related neovascularization supporting viable islets up to six months after transplant. Our results highlight the importance of a newly formed viable vascular network together with pancreatic islets to provide de novo adequate supply in order to obtain enduring normoglycemia and prevent diabetes-related long-term health hazards.

  12. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiece, I; Briddell, R

    2001-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells have the potential for providing benefit in a variety of clinical settings. These include cells for support of patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy, as a target for replacement gene therapy, and as a source of cells for immunotherapy. The limitation to many of these applications has been the total absolute number of defined target cells. Therefore many investigators have explored methods to culture hematopoietic cells in vitro to increase the numbers of these cells. Studies attempting to expand hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells, and mature cells in vitro have become possible over the past decade due to the availability of recombinant growth factors and cell selection technologies. To date, no studies have demonstrated convincing data on the expansion of true stem cells, and so the focus of this review is the expansion of committed progenitor cells and mature cells. A number of clinical studies have been preformed using a variety of culture conditions, and several studies are currently in progress that explore the use of ex vivo expanded cells. These studies will be discussed in this review. There are evolving data that suggest that there are real clinical benefits associated with the use of the expanded cells; however, we are still at the early stages of understanding how to optimally culture different cell populations. The next decade should determine what culture conditions and what cell populations are needed for a range of clinical applications.

  13. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Fre, Silvia

    2013-10-14

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive "triple negative" human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2(SAT) transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells.

  14. Selection of progenitors for increase in oil content in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Isabela da Silva Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The low genetic diversity brings limitation to breeding, because genetically similar genotypes share alleles in common, causing little complementarity and low vigor due to the low levels of heterozygosity in crosses. The objective of this work was to analyze the oil content and genetic diversity of soybean genotypes (Glycine max (L. Merrill based on QTL regions of this trait for choice of progenitors for increase in oil content. Twenty-two genotypes with wide variation in oil content, including cultivars with high oil contents, were cultivated in different Brazilian conditions and the oil content of the grains was quantified by infrared spectrometry. Microsatellite markers selected based on QTL regions for oil content in soybean were analyzed to estimate the genetic diversity. In these studies, a wide variation in oil content (17.28-23.01% and a reasonable diversity among the genotypes were observed, being PI181544 the most divergent genotype, followed by Suprema. The genotypes PI371610/Suprema and Suprema/CD01RR8384 showed genetic distance and higher oil contents in the grains, while the cultivars Suprema and CD01RR8384 had the highest oil contents and proved to be little genetically related. These genotypes are promising progenitors for selection of high oil content in soybean.

  15. THE PROGENITOR OF SN 2011ja: CLUES FROM CIRCUMSTELLAR INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborti, Sayan [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ray, Alak; Yadav, Naveen [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Smith, Randall [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ryder, Stuart [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Sutaria, Firoza [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore (India); Dwarkadas, Vikram V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chandra, Poonam [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON K7K 7B4 (Canada); Pooley, David [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX (United States); Roy, Rupak, E-mail: schakraborti@fas.harvard.edu [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital (India)

    2013-09-01

    Massive stars, possibly red supergiants, which retain extended hydrogen envelopes until core collapse, produce Type II plateau (IIP) supernovae. The ejecta from these explosions shocks the circumstellar matter originating from the mass loss of the progenitor during the final phases of its life. This interaction accelerates particles to relativistic energies which then lose energy via synchrotron radiation in the shock-amplified magnetic fields and inverse Compton scattering against optical photons from the supernova. These processes produce different signatures in the radio and X-ray parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Observed together, they allow us to break the degeneracy between shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification. In this work, we use X-rays observations from the Chandra and radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array to study the relative importance of processes which accelerate particles and those which amplify magnetic fields in producing the non-thermal radiation from SN 2011ja. We use radio observations to constrain the explosion date. Multiple Chandra observations allow us to probe the history of variable mass loss from the progenitor. The ejecta expands into a low-density bubble followed by interaction with a higher density wind from a red supergiant consistent with M{sub ZAMS} {approx}> 12 M{sub Sun }. Our results suggest that a fraction of Type IIP supernovae may interact with circumstellar media set up by non-steady winds.

  16. No surviving evolved companions of the progenitor of SN 1006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Hernández, Jonay I; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Tabernero, Hugo M; Montes, David; Canal, Ramon; Méndez, Javier; Bedin, Luigi R

    2012-09-27

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to occur when a white dwarf made of carbon and oxygen accretes sufficient mass to trigger a thermonuclear explosion. The accretion could be slow, from an unevolved (main-sequence) or evolved (subgiant or giant) star (the single-degenerate channel), or rapid, as the primary star breaks up a smaller orbiting white dwarf (the double-degenerate channel). A companion star will survive the explosion only in the single-degenerate channel. Both channels might contribute to the production of type Ia supernovae, but the relative proportions of their contributions remain a fundamental puzzle in astronomy. Previous searches for remnant companions have revealed one possible case for SN 1572 (refs 8, 9), although that has been questioned. More recently, observations have restricted surviving companions to be small, main-sequence stars, ruling out giant companions but still allowing the single-degenerate channel. Here we report the results of a search for surviving companions of the progenitor of SN 1006 (ref. 14). None of the stars within 4 arc minutes of the apparent site of the explosion is associated with the supernova remnant, and we can firmly exclude all giant and subgiant stars from being companions of the progenitor. In combination with previous results, our findings indicate that fewer than 20 per cent of type Ia supernovae occur through the single-degenerate channel.

  17. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN GRAFT SUCCESS AND CLIMATIC VALUES IN WALNUT (JUGLANS REGIA L.)

    OpenAIRE

    T Karadeniz

    2006-01-01

    The study determines the graft take of walnut in Ordu province located in the East Black Sea Region. Grafting studies were carried out in nursery conditions in late August from 1993 to 2000. During these years, a total of 87 264 applied grafts were evaluated by using patch-grafting method. The graft take varied from 29% to 64 % depending on years. Relations between the graft take and climate conditions were also considered. Graft take under nursery conditions was affected by especially relati...

  18. Preparation of Proteoglycan Mimetic Graft Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipper, Matt J; Place, Laura W

    2016-01-01

    Proteoglycans are proteins with pendant glycosaminoglycan polysaccharide side chains. The method described here enables the preparation of graft copolymers with glycosaminoglycan side chains, which mimic the structure and composition of proteoglycans. By controlling the stoichiometry, graft copolymers can be obtained with a wide range of glycosaminoglycan side-chain densities. The method presented here uses a three-step reaction mechanism to first functionalize a hyaluronic acid backbone, followed by reductive amination to couple the glycosaminoglycan side chain to the backbone, by the reducing end. Proteoglycan mimics like the ones proposed here could be used to study the structure-property relationships of proteoglycans and to introduce the biochemical and biomechanical properties of proteoglycans into biomaterials and therapeutic formulations.

  19. CORNEAL GRAFTING SURGERY, POSTOPERATIVE CARE AND COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Pfeifer

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Keratoplasty done by experienced surgeon is the most successful transplantation of human tissue. Success rate is over 95% in noncomplicated cases.Extremely important is follow up. Immediate and proper care can reduce damage to the transplanted tissue and prolong its live time. Endothelial cell density is decreasing with time and also with every rejection episode. After 10 years 35% of grafts fail and patients have to be regrafted.Conclusions. In young patients the life expectancy is high. The expected lifetime of grafted corneas in PKP (penetrating keratoplasty is shorter; therefore the DLK (deep lamelar keratoplasty is surgical procedure of choice in these patients. Care about proper corneas for transplantation is taken by Eye banks.

  20. Autologous Fat Grafting Improves Facial Nerve Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Klinger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 45-year-old male patient who presented a retractile and painful scar in the nasolabial fold due to trauma which determined partial motor impairment of the mouth movements. We subsequently treated him with autologous fat grafting according to Coleman’s technique. Clinical assessments were performed at 5 and 14 days and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgical procedure and we observed a progressive release of scar retraction together with an important improvement of pain symptoms. A second procedure was performed 6 months after the previous one. We observed total restoration of mimic movements within one-year follow-up. The case described confirms autologous fat grafting regenerative effect on scar tissue enlightening a possible therapeutic effect on peripheral nerve activity, hypothesizing that its entrapment into scar tissue can determine a partial loss of function.

  1. Limb conservation using non vascularised fibular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omololu, B; Ogunlade, S O; Alonge, T O

    2002-01-01

    This paper highlights the use of non-vascularised fibular graft in limb reconstruction from bone loss due to trauma and infection. Bone loss can occur from severe high velocity injuries due to road traffic accidents, severe neglected infections, and osteolytic tumours. In majority of cases, the surgeon is left with the only option of an amputation especially where there is no access to microvascular surgery and microvascular bone grafting devices. This is a major problem in the West African subregion hence the need for this article. We present illustrative cases of limb conservation in an adult involved in a high velocity trauma and a child with a destructive osteolytic infection culminating in bone loss. The patients are still been followed up in our surgical outpatient clinics.

  2. Exploring the activated adipogenic niche: interactions of macrophages and adipocyte progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Thacker, Robert I; Hall, Brian Eric; Kong, Raymond; Granneman, James G

    2014-01-01

    Adult adipose tissue contains a large supply of progenitors that can renew fat cells for homeostatic tissue maintenance and adaptive growth or regeneration in response to external challenges. However, the in vivo mechanisms that control adipocyte progenitor behavior are poorly characterized. We recently demonstrated that recruitment of adipocyte progenitors by macrophages is a central feature of adipose tissue remodeling under various adipogenic conditions. Catabolic remodeling of white adipose tissue by β3-adrenergic receptor stimulation requires anti-inflammatory M2-polarized macrophages to clear dying adipocytes and to recruit new brown adipocytes from progenitors. In this Extra Views article, we discuss in greater detail the cellular elements of adipogenic niches and report a strategy to isolate and characterize the subpopulations of macrophages and adipocyte progenitors that actively participate in adrenergic tissue remodeling. Further characterization of these subpopulations may facilitate identification of new cellular targets to improve metabolic and immune function of adipose tissue.

  3. Yap controls stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the mouse postnatal epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverdam, Annemiek; Claxton, Christina; Zhang, Xiaomeng; James, Gregory; Harvey, Kieran F; Key, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Tissue renewal is an ongoing process in the epithelium of the skin. We have begun to examine the genetic mechanisms that control stem/progenitor cell activation in the postnatal epidermis. The conserved Hippo pathway regulates stem cell turnover in arthropods through to vertebrates. Here we show that its downstream effector, yes-associated protein (YAP), is active in the stem/progenitor cells of the postnatal epidermis. Overexpression of a C-terminally truncated YAP mutant in the basal epidermis of transgenic mice caused marked expansion of epidermal stem/progenitor cell populations. Our data suggest that the C-terminus of YAP controls the balance between stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in the postnatal interfollicular epidermis. We conclude that YAP functions as a molecular switch of stem/progenitor cell activation in the epidermis. Moreover, our results highlight YAP as a possible therapeutic target for diseases such as skin cancer, psoriasis, and epidermolysis bullosa.

  4. Specification of excitatory neurons in the developing cerebral cortex: progenitor diversity and environmental influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcos R; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The mature cerebral cortex harbors a heterogeneous population of glutamatergic neurons, organized into a highly intricate histological architecture. Classically, this mixed population of neurons was thought to be generated sequentially from a seemingly homogenous group of progenitors under the influence of external cues. This view, however, has been challenged in the last decade by evidences pointing to the existence of fate-restricted neuronal progenitors in the developing neocortex. Here, we review classical studies using cell transplantation, retroviral labeling and cell culture, as well as new data from genetic fate-mapping analysis, to discuss the lineage relationships between neocortical progenitors and subclasses of excitatory neurons. We also propose a temporal model to conciliate the existence of fate-restricted progenitors alongside multipotent progenitors in the neocortex. Finally, we discuss evidences for a critical period of plasticity among post mitotic excitatory cortical neurons when environmental influences could change neuronal cell fate.

  5. Osseous-Cartilaginous Spreader Graft and Nasal Framework Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ors, Safvet

    2017-10-01

    Revision rhinoplasties and saddle nose deformities usually require grafting for reconstruction. Between January 1, 2000, and January 1, 2017, autologous rib grafts were used in 127 secondary and tertiary rhinoplasty patients [(57/127 females) and (70/127 males)]. Osseous-cartilaginous rib grafts (OCRGs) were divided into three parts (i.e., 1/3 upper peripheral, 1/3 central, and 1/3 lower peripheral). The harvested OCRGs were also shaped as vertical strips using a number 11 scalpel blade. These OCRGs were shaped to form the L-strut cartilaginous graft (LSCGs), osseous-cartilaginous spreader grafts (OCSGs), osseous-cartilaginous onlay grafts, nasal valve grafts (NVGs), and lower lateral cartilaginous grafts (LLCGs). The upper peripheral portion of the rib was usually used as an onlay graft for dorsal reshaping. The shape of this part was minimally convex after being cut from the main graft, and the convex shape was very appropriate for use as an onlay graft. The middle portion of the graft that consisted of the osseous and cartilaginous structure was used for the OCSGs. The middle portion of the graft that contained only cartilage was used for the LSCGs, NVGs, and LLCGs. OCRGs were used for the dorsal, alar, septal, upper lateral, and columellar struts for all patients. OCSGs were used for all of the septal grafts to provide further stability. In the nasal valve failure patients, the rib cartilage was fixed onto the lower lateral and upper lateral cartilage and was sutured using polyglactin to improve nasal valve function. One edge of the graft was sutured over the septum, and the other edge was positioned against the maxillary crest to allow for air flow at the nasal valve. After an OCSG was sutured to the septum, a flat and smooth dorsum was shaped before the dorsal onlay graft was placed and fixed. The bone fragments of the grafts that consisted of spreader and onlay grafts were tied to the radix nasi bone without any space. After 6 months of follow-up, a

  6. Novel anterior cruciate ligament graft fixation device reduces slippage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez MJ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mandi J Lopez,1 Allen Borne,2 W Todd Monroe,3 Prakash Bommala,1 Laura Kelly,1 Nan Zhang11Laboratory for Equine and Comparative Orthopedic Research, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 2Louisiana State University, New Orleans Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, New Orleans, 3Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USAAbstract: Clinically significant laxity occurs in 10%–30% of knees after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Graft slippage and tension loss at the hamstring graft tibial fixation site during and after reconstruction surgery contribute to postoperative joint laxity and are detrimental to long-term knee stability and graft properties. Limiting graft slippage will reduce associated complications. We sought to compare the in vitro mechanical properties and in vivo joint stabilization, postoperative limb use, and graft incorporation of the novel GraftGrab™ (GG device designed to reduce hamstring graft tibial fixation slippage with the commercially available bioabsorbable Bio-Post™ and spiked washer (BP. Mechanical testing was performed on canine tibia-hamstring graft constructs to quantify initial fixation properties. In vivo joint stabilization, postoperative limb use and graft incorporation of hamstring graft reconstructions were determined in a canine model. Outcomes included tibial translation and ground reaction forces preoperatively and 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, three-dimensional graft and bone tunnel dimensions at the latter two time points, and graft-bone microstructure, as well as mechanical properties 8 weeks after implantation. Immediately after fixation, all grafts slipped from the BP constructs versus about 30% of GG constructs. In vivo limb use remained low, and tibial translation increased with time in the BP cohort. These results together

  7. LATE RENAL GRAFT REJECTION: PATHOLOGY AND PROGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Stolyarevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rejection has always been one of the most important cause of late renal graft dysfunction. Aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of different clinico-pathological variants of rejection that cause late graft dysfunction, and evaluate their impact on long-term outcome. Materials and methods. This is a retrospective study that analyzed 294 needle core biopsy specimens from 265 renal transplant recipients with late (48,8 ± 46,1 months after transplantation allograft dysfunction caused by late acute rejection (LAR, n = 193 or chronic rejection (CR, n = 78 or both (n = 23. C4d staining was performed by immunofl uorescence (IF on frozen sections using a standard protocol. Results. Peritubular capillary C4d deposition was identifi ed in 36% samples with acute rejection and in 62% cases of chronic rejection (including 67% cases of transplant glomerulopathy, and 50% – of isolated chronic vasculopathy. 5-year graft survival for LAR vs CR vs their combination was 47, 13 and 25%, respectively. The outcome of C4d– LAR was (p < 0,01 better than of C4d+ acute rejection: at 60 months graft survival for diffuse C4d+ vs C4d− was 33% vs 53%, respectively. In cases of chronic rejection C4d+ vs C4d– it was not statistically signifi cant (34% vs 36%. Conclusion. In long-term allograft biopsy C4d positivity is more haracteristic for chronic rejection than for acute rejection. Only diffuse C4d staining affects the outcome. C4d– positivity is associated with worse allograft survival in cases of late acute rejection, but not in cases of chronic rejection. 

  8. Cell seeding chamber for bone graft substitutes

    OpenAIRE

    Hennig, J.; Schieker, Matthias; Seitz, H.

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for bone graft substitutes that are used as osteoconductive scaffolds in the treatment of bone defects and fractures. Achieving optimal bone regeneration requires initial cell seeding of the scaffolds prior to implantation. The cell seeding chamber is a closed assembly. It works like a sandglass. The position of the scaffold is between two reservoirs containing the fluid (e. g. blood). The fluid at the upper reservoir flows through the scaffold driven by gravity....

  9. Bilateral Mooren’s ulcer – Customised corneal graft with additional amniotic membrane graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Vipul; Siddharthan, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Mooren’s ulcer (MU) is a rare and painful peripheral corneal ulceration which occurs in the absence of any associated scleritis, and any detectable systemic disease. A 60-year-old male patient was referred to us with bilateral peripheral corneal ulceration. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in both eyes was counting finger at one metre. The right eye showed a 180° thinning with perforation at 8 o’clock position. The left eye showed a 360° thinning with central contact lens type cornea. After complete blood analysis we started the patient on cyclophosphamide orally along with high doses of oral steroids. A crescentic excision of the thinned cornea and crescentic customised corneal graft with additional amniotic membrane graft (AMG) was done first for the right eye and a 360° peripheral lamellar corneal graft with additional AMG for the left eye. The BCVA of RE was 1/60 improving to 6/36 with plus ten aphakic glasses and LE was 3/60. Hand fashioned full thickness crescentic customised corneal graft with additional AMG and a peripheral 360° lamellar corneal graft with additional AMG in these cases are a novel approach to Mooren’s ulcer with gratifying results. PMID:26155087

  10. Bilateral Mooren's ulcer - Customised corneal graft with additional amniotic membrane graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Vipul; Siddharthan, K S

    2015-01-01

    Mooren's ulcer (MU) is a rare and painful peripheral corneal ulceration which occurs in the absence of any associated scleritis, and any detectable systemic disease. A 60-year-old male patient was referred to us with bilateral peripheral corneal ulceration. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in both eyes was counting finger at one metre. The right eye showed a 180° thinning with perforation at 8 o'clock position. The left eye showed a 360° thinning with central contact lens type cornea. After complete blood analysis we started the patient on cyclophosphamide orally along with high doses of oral steroids. A crescentic excision of the thinned cornea and crescentic customised corneal graft with additional amniotic membrane graft (AMG) was done first for the right eye and a 360° peripheral lamellar corneal graft with additional AMG for the left eye. The BCVA of RE was 1/60 improving to 6/36 with plus ten aphakic glasses and LE was 3/60. Hand fashioned full thickness crescentic customised corneal graft with additional AMG and a peripheral 360° lamellar corneal graft with additional AMG in these cases are a novel approach to Mooren's ulcer with gratifying results.

  11. Bone maintenance 5 to 10 years after sinus grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, M S; Kent, J N; Kallukaran, F U; Thunthy, K; Weinberg, R

    1998-06-01

    This radiographic study determined the amount of bone around hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated dental implants that were placed into bone-grafted maxillary sinuses. Postoperative complex motion tomograms using the Grossman technique were taken on 16 patients who had 27 maxillary sinus grafts performed using particulate autogenous iliac bone with and without demineralized bone, autogenous iliac corticocancellous block with and without demineralized bone, and autogenous jaw bone with demineralized bone. Bone levels were measured from the new floor of the grafted sinus to the apex of the implant and to the alveolar crest. The resulting bone level measures were compared with the type of graft used. All patients had been restored for 5 to 10 years after simultaneous graft and implant placement. For all patients summed together, the average amount of bone from the top of the graft to the apex of the implant was 3.3 +/- 3.1 mm, and the average amount of bone from the top of the graft to the alveolar crest was 17.6 +/- 3.1 mm. The average level of bone in the sinuses of patients grafted with autogenous iliac bone was greater than the average level of bone in those grafted with autogenous bone combined with demineralized bone. The results of this study indicate that autogenous bone grafts are maintained in the maxillary sinus, but the results with autogenous bone alone are better than when demineralized bone is added. However, this difference may not be clinically significant.

  12. Bone grafts utilized in dentistry: an analysis of patients' preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ramón Fuentes; Bucchi, Cristina; Navarro, Pablo; Beltrán, Víctor; Borie, Eduardo

    2015-10-20

    Many procedures currently require the use of bone grafts to replace or recover bone volume that has been resorbed. However, the patient's opinion and preferences must be taken into account before implementing any treatment. Researchers have focused primarily on assessing the effectiveness of bone grafts rather than on patients' perceptions. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore patients' opinions regarding the different types of bone grafts used in dental treatments. One hundred patients were randomly chosen participated in the study. A standardized survey of 10 questions was used to investigate their opinions regarding the different types of bone grafts used in dental treatments. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the different variables, and absolute frequencies and percentages were used as summary measures. A value of p grafts with the lowest rates of refusal were autologous grafts (3 %) and alloplastics (2 %). No significant differences were found between the various types of bone grafts in the sociodemographic variables or the refusal/acceptance variable. Similarly, no significant relations were observed between a specific religious affiliation and the acceptance/refusal rates of the various types of graft. Allografts and xenografts elicited the highest refusal rates among the surveyed patients, and autologous bone and alloplastics were the most accepted bone grafts. Moreover, no differences were found in the sociodemographic variables or religious affiliations in terms of the acceptance/refusal rates of the different bone grafts.

  13. Research of Customized Aortic Stent Graft Manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xin; Liu, Muhan

    2017-03-01

    Thoracic descending aorta diseases include aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm, of which the natural mortality rate is extremely high. At present, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been widely used as an effective means for the treatment of descending aortic disease. Most of the existing coating stents are standard design, which are unable to meet the size or structure of different patients. As a result, failure of treatment would be caused by dimensional discrepancy between stent and vessels, which could lead to internal leakage or rupture of blood vessels. Therefore, based on rapid prototyping sacrificial core - coating forming (RPSC-CF), a customized aortic stent graft manufactured technique has been proposed in this study. The aortic stent graft consists of film and metallic stent, so polyether polyurethane (PU) and nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy with good biocompatibility were chosen. To minimum film thickness without degrading performance, effect of different dip coating conditions on the thickness of film were studied. To make the NiTi alloy exhibit super-elasticity at body temperature (37°C), influence of different heat treatment conditions on austenite transformation temperature (Af) and mechanical properties were studied. The results show that the customized stent grafts could meet the demand of personalized therapy, and have good performance in blasting pressure and radial support force, laying the foundation for further animal experiment and clinical experiment.

  14. [Robot-assisted Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Go

    2016-07-01

    The application for robot-assisted coronary surgery ranges from internal thoracic artery (ITA) harvesting with hand-sewn anastomoses to totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting (TECAB), either on- or off-pump. The bilateral IMA can be harvested with the aid of a surgical robot and then multivessel bypass grafting can follow. Such robot-assisted minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting is called "ThoraCAB". Surgical robots cannot only endoscopically harvest the ITA but they can also anastomose the coronary artery in TECAB. But TECAB still has the difficulties, such as narrow surgical field in Japanese patients. Both procedures have the significant advantages of minimizing surgical trauma, such as reduced comlications, faster return back to normal activities and being improved cosmesis, and which have resulted in the development of minimally invasive surgery. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery for structural heart disease has been approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) since December 2015, however, robot-assisted cardiac surgery for TECAB has not been approved yet in Japan.

  15. Transabdominal sacrocolpopexy with autologous rectus fascia graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nitya; Quirouet, Adrienne; Goldman, Howard B

    2016-08-01

    Extrusion and infection are potential postoperative complications when using synthetic mesh for abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Long-term follow-up in the Colpopexy and Urinary Reduction Efforts (CARE) trial revealed an estimated 9.9 % risk of mesh extrusion. There are 26 reports of spondylodiscitis after sacrocolpopexy with synthetic mesh. These surgical risks may be decreased by using autologous fascia. To date, there have been no reports of extrusion or spondylodiscitis after using autologous fascia for sacrocolpopexy. This video demonstrates transabdominal sacrocolpopexy with an autologous rectus fascia graft. A 76-year-old woman with symptomatic stage 3 prolapse also had a history of diverticulitis and sigmoid abscess requiring sigmoid colectomy with end colostomy and incidental left ureteral transection with subsequent left nephrostomy tube placement. She presented for colostomy reversal, ureteral reimplantation, and prolapse repair. Given the need for concomitant colon and ureteral reconstruction, the risk of infection was potentially higher if synthetic mesh were used. The patient therefore underwent transabdominal sacrocolpopexy with autologous rectus fascia graft. At 4 months' follow-up the patient reported resolution of her symptoms and on examination she had no pelvic organ prolapse. Transabdominal sacrocolpopexy using autologous rectus fascia graft is a feasible option, especially in cases in which infection and synthetic mesh extrusion risks are potentially higher.

  16. Patient's Perception About Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelminda Maria Bulhões Mendonça

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The diagnosis of coronary artery disease referred for heart surgery has an important psychological component. The purpose of this study was to access the difficulties experienced by individuals awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting and to determine strategies that facilitate adaptation to a new lifestyle, modified by the disease. METHODS: A qualitative, exploratory study involving patients admitted to a university teaching hospital in the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting. Semi-structured interviews were performed in accordance with a previously defined script based on the study objective. Each transcription was read in its entirety to verify the representativeness, homogeneity and pertinence of the data obtained (pre-analysis, followed by separation of categories of analysis. RESULTS: The descriptions of this study show that patients admitted to the completion of coronary artery bypass grafting experience a wide range of psychological difficulties, considering that surgery acquires interpretations that vary according to individuals' subjectivity. The patients recognized the benefit of being able to discuss their feelings as a means of diminishing their fear and anxiety. CONCLUSION: Helping patients find resources to confront more positively the daily hospitalization is an important aspect for the health care professionals who assist them. This goal can be achieved through modification of the biomedical model of care for a biopsychosocial view. The investment of time and attention is of fundamental importance and aims to overcome existing deficiencies that interfere with the outcome of patients after cardiac surgery.

  17. Improvement of tomato local varieties by grafting in organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Marta M.; Villena, Jaime; Moreno, Carmen; García, Arántzazu M.; Mancebo, Ignacio; Meco, Ramón

    2015-04-01

    Grafting is the union of two or more pieces of living plant tissue that grow as a single plant. The early use of grafted vegetables was associated with protected cultivation which involves successive cropping (Lee et al., 2010). For this reason, in the past, grafting was used with vegetable crops to limit the effects of soil-borne diseases. However, the reasons for grafting as well as the kinds of vegetable grafted have increased considerably over the years. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), one of the most important horticultural crops in the world, the effect of grafting has also been widely studied. These effects on commercial tomato varieties can be summarized in increasing plant vigor and crop yield or inducing tolerance to abiotic stresses, although the effects on tomato fruit quality or on the sensory properties are not so patent (David et al., 2008). However, a few studies about the effect of grafting on local tomato varieties, which are especially recommended for organic production in spite of their lower yields in many cases, have been developed. In this work we evaluated the effect of grafting on tomato local varieties under organic management using vigorous commercial rootstocks, and aspects related to vigor, yield and tomato fruit composition were analyzed. In general terms, grafting increased the plant vigor, the crop yield and the fruit antioxidant content, although no modification of morphological fruit attributes was observed. Keywords: grafting, Solanum lycopersicum L., local varieties, organic farming. References: Davis A.R., Perkins-Veazie P., Hassell R., Levi A., King S.R., Zhang X. 2008. Grafting effects on vegetable quality. HortScience 43(6): 1670-1671. Lee J.M., Kubota C., Tsao S.J., Bie Z., Hoyos-Echevarría P., Morra L., Oda M. 2010. Current status of vegetable grafting: Diffusion, grafting techniques, automation. Scientia Horticulturae 127: 93-105.

  18. Tropoelastin inhibits intimal hyperplasia of mouse bioresorbable arterial vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Tadahisa; Agarwal, Riddhima; Tara, Shuhei; Yi, Tai; Lee, Yong-Ung; Breuer, Christopher K; Weiss, Anthony S; Shinoka, Toshiharu

    2017-04-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia, which results from the activation, proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), is a detrimental condition for vascular stents or vascular grafts that leads to stenosis. Preventing neointimal hyperplasia of vascular grafts is critically important for the success of arterial vascular grafts. We hypothesized that tropoelastin seeding onto the luminal surface of the graft would prevent neointimal hyperplasia through suppressing neointimal smooth muscle cell proliferation. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of tropoelastin seeding in preventing neointimal hyperplasia of bioresorbable arterial vascular grafts. Poly (glycolic acid) (PGA) fiber mesh coated with poly (l-lactic-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) scaffolds reinforced by poly (l-lactic acid) (PLA) nano-fibers were prepared as bioresorbable arterial grafts. Tropoelastin was then seeded onto the luminal surface of the grafts. Tropoelastin significantly reduced the thickness of the intimal layer. This effect was mainly due to a substantial reduction the number of cells that stained positive for SMC (α-SMA) and PCNA in the vessel walls. Mature elastin and collagen type I and III were unchanged with tropoelastin treatment. This study demonstrates that tropoelastin seeding is beneficial in preventing SMC proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia in bioresorbable arterial vascular grafts. Small resorbable vascular grafts can block due to the over-proliferation of smooth muscle cells in neointimal hyperplasia. We show here that the proliferation of these cells is restricted in this type of graft. This is achieved with a simple dip, non-covalent coating of tropoelastin. It is in principle amendable to other grafts and is therefore an attractive process. This study is particularly significant because: (1) it shows that smooth muscle cell proliferation can be reduced while still accommodating the growth of endothelial cells, (2) small vascular grafts with an internal

  19. Dynamic, nondestructive imaging of a bioengineered vascular graft endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce M Whited

    Full Text Available Bioengineering of vascular grafts holds great potential to address the shortcomings associated with autologous and conventional synthetic vascular grafts used for small diameter grafting procedures. Lumen endothelialization of bioengineered vascular grafts is essential to provide an antithrombogenic graft surface to ensure long-term patency after implantation. Conventional methods used to assess endothelialization in vitro typically involve periodic harvesting of the graft for histological sectioning and staining of the lumen. Endpoint testing methods such as these are effective but do not provide real-time information of endothelial cells in their intact microenvironment, rather only a single time point measurement of endothelium development. Therefore, nondestructive methods are needed to provide dynamic information of graft endothelialization and endothelium maturation in vitro. To address this need, we have developed a nondestructive fiber optic based (FOB imaging method that is capable of dynamic assessment of graft endothelialization without disturbing the graft housed in a bioreactor. In this study we demonstrate the capability of the FOB imaging method to quantify electrospun vascular graft endothelialization, EC detachment, and apoptosis in a nondestructive manner. The electrospun scaffold fiber diameter of the graft lumen was systematically varied and the FOB imaging system was used to noninvasively quantify the affect of topography on graft endothelialization over a 7-day period. Additionally, results demonstrated that the FOB imaging method had a greater imaging penetration depth than that of two-photon microscopy. This imaging method is a powerful tool to optimize vascular grafts and bioreactor conditions in vitro, and can be further adapted to monitor endothelium maturation and response to fluid flow bioreactor preconditioning.

  20. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda LoGuidice

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix–only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in

  1. Viral-mediated gene transfer to mouse primary neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephanie M; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Sauter, Sybille L; Davidson, Beverly L

    2002-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells may provide for cell replacement or gene delivery vehicles in neurodegen-erative disease therapies. The expression of therapeutic proteins by neural progenitors would be enhanced by viral-mediated gene transfer, but the effects of several common recombinant viruses on primary progenitor cell populations have not been tested. To address this issue, we cultured cells from embryonic day 16-18 mouse brain in serum-free medium containing epidermal growth factor or basic fibroblast growth factor, and investigated how transduction with recombinant viral vectors affected maintenance and differentiation properties of progenitor cells. Neurosphere cultures were incubated with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), adeno-associated virus (AAV) or ade-noviral (Ad) constructs expressing either beta-galactosidase or enhanced green fluorescent protein at low multiplicity of infection. Nestin-positive neurospheres were regenerated after incubation of single progenitor cells with FIV, indicating that FIV-mediated gene transfer did not inhibit progenitor cell self-renewal. In contrast, adenovirus induced differentiation into glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes. The AAV serotypes tested did not effectively transduce progenitor cells. FIV-transduced progenitors retained the potential for differentiation into neurons and glia in vitro, and when transplanted into the striatum of normal adult C57BL/6 mice differentiated into glia, or remained undifferentiated. In the presence of tumor cells, FIV-transduced progenitors migrated significantly from the injection site. Our results suggest that FIV-based vectors can transduce progenitor cell populations in vitro, with maintenance of their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types or to respond to injury within the central nervous system. These results hold promise for the use of genetically manipulated stem cells for CNS therapies.

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