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Sample records for extracellular matrix cell

  1. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

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    Wilschut, Karlijn J. [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Haagsman, Henk P. [Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3584 CL, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelen, Bernard A.J., E-mail: b.a.j.roelen@uu.nl [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  2. Starved epithelial cells uptake extracellular matrix for survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranen, Taru; Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Curry, Natasha L.; Hwang, Julie; DuBois, Cory D.; Coloff, Jonathan L.; Hitchcock, Daniel S.; Clish, Clary B.; Brugge, Joan S.; Kalaany, Nada Y.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular matrix adhesion is required for normal epithelial cell survival, nutrient uptake and metabolism. This requirement can be overcome by oncogene activation. Interestingly, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR leads to apoptosis of matrix-detached, but not matrix-attached cancer cells, suggesting that matrix-attached cells use alternate mechanisms to maintain nutrient supplies. Here we demonstrate that under conditions of dietary restriction or growth factor starvation, where PI3K/mTOR signalling is decreased, matrix-attached human mammary epithelial cells upregulate and internalize β4-integrin along with its matrix substrate, laminin. Endocytosed laminin localizes to lysosomes, results in increased intracellular levels of essential amino acids and enhanced mTORC1 signalling, preventing cell death. Moreover, we show that starved human fibroblasts secrete matrix proteins that maintain the growth of starved mammary epithelial cells contingent upon epithelial cell β4-integrin expression. Our study identifies a crosstalk between stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells under starvation that could be exploited therapeutically to target tumours resistant to PI3K/mTOR inhibition. PMID:28071763

  3. Cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell adhesion are linked by syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakideeri Karat, Sandeep Gopal; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-cell junctions that employ microfilaments are sites of tension. They are important for tissue repair, morphogenetic movements and can be emblematic of matrix contraction in fibrotic disease and the stroma of solid tumors. One cell surface receptor, syndeca...

  4. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

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    An, Steven S., E-mail: san@jhsph.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Kim, Jina [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Ahn, Kwangmi [Division of Biostatistics, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Trepat, Xavier [CIBER, Enfermedades Respiratorias, 07110 Bunyola (Spain); Drake, Kenneth J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Fredberg, Jeffrey J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Biswal, Shyam [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  5. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Steven S.; Kim, Jina; Ahn, Kwangmi; Trepat, Xavier; Drake, Kenneth J.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Biswal, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses. PMID:19327344

  6. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction

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    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Mataveli, Fábio D’Aguiar [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Evaluate the effects of VEGF{sub 165} gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF{sub 165} treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF{sub 165}. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF{sub 165}, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF{sub 165} seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct.

  7. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

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    Jessica L Eisenberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jessica L Eisenberg1,2, Asmahan Safi3, Xiaoding Wei3, Horacio D Espinosa3, GR Scott Budinger2, Desire Takawira1, Susan B Hopkinson1, Jonathan CR Jones1,21Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, 2Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USAAim: The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins.Methods: Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy.Results: We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM.Conclusions: An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung.Keywords: alveolar epithelial cells, fibrosis, extracellular matrix, substrate stiffness

  8. Regulation of pituitary hormones and cell proliferation by components of the extracellular matrix

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    M. Paez-Pereda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is a three-dimensional network of proteins, glycosaminoglycans and other macromolecules. It has a structural support function as well as a role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The extracellular matrix conveys signals through membrane receptors called integrins and plays an important role in pituitary physiology and tumorigenesis. There is a differential expression of extracellular matrix components and integrins during the pituitary development in the embryo and during tumorigenesis in the adult. Different extracellular matrix components regulate adrenocorticotropin at the level of the proopiomelanocortin gene transcription. The extracellular matrix also controls the proliferation of adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cells. On the other hand, laminin regulates the production of prolactin. Laminin has a dynamic pattern of expression during prolactinoma development with lower levels in the early pituitary hyperplasia and a strong reduction in fully grown prolactinomas. Therefore, the expression of extracellular matrix components plays a role in pituitary tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the remodeling of the extracellular matrix affects pituitary cell proliferation. Matrix metalloproteinase activity is very high in all types of human pituitary adenomas. Matrix metalloproteinase secreted by pituitary cells can release growth factors from the extracellular matrix that, in turn, control pituitary cell proliferation and hormone secretion. In summary, the differential expression of extracellular matrix components, integrins and matrix metalloproteinase contributes to the control of pituitary hormone production and cell proliferation during tumorigenesis.

  9. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  10. Extracellular Matrix Ligand and Stiffness Modulate Immature Nucleus Pulposus Cell-Cell Interactions

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    Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Darling, Eric M.; Chen, Jun; Setton, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    The nucleus pulposus (NP) of the intervertebral disc functions to provide compressive load support in the spine, and contains cells that play a critical role in the generation and maintenance of this tissue. The NP cell population undergoes significant morphological and phenotypic changes during maturation and aging, transitioning from large, vacuolated immature cells arranged in cell clusters to a sparse population of smaller, isolated chondrocyte-like cells. These morphological and organizational changes appear to correlate with the first signs of degenerative changes within the intervertebral disc. The extracellular matrix of the immature NP is a soft, gelatinous material containing multiple laminin isoforms, features that are unique to the NP relative to other regions of the disc and that change with aging and degeneration. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that a soft, laminin-rich extracellular matrix environment would promote NP cell-cell interactions and phenotypes similar to those found in immature NP tissues. NP cells were isolated from porcine intervertebral discs and cultured in matrix environments of varying mechanical stiffness that were functionalized with various matrix ligands; cellular responses to periods of culture were assessed using quantitative measures of cell organization and phenotype. Results show that soft (<720 Pa), laminin-containing extracellular matrix substrates promote NP cell morphologies, cell-cell interactions, and proteoglycan production in vitro, and that this behavior is dependent upon both extracellular matrix ligand and substrate mechanical properties. These findings indicate that NP cell organization and phenotype may be highly sensitive to their surrounding extracellular matrix environment. PMID:22087260

  11. Extracellular matrix ligand and stiffness modulate immature nucleus pulposus cell-cell interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Gilchrist

    Full Text Available The nucleus pulposus (NP of the intervertebral disc functions to provide compressive load support in the spine, and contains cells that play a critical role in the generation and maintenance of this tissue. The NP cell population undergoes significant morphological and phenotypic changes during maturation and aging, transitioning from large, vacuolated immature cells arranged in cell clusters to a sparse population of smaller, isolated chondrocyte-like cells. These morphological and organizational changes appear to correlate with the first signs of degenerative changes within the intervertebral disc. The extracellular matrix of the immature NP is a soft, gelatinous material containing multiple laminin isoforms, features that are unique to the NP relative to other regions of the disc and that change with aging and degeneration. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that a soft, laminin-rich extracellular matrix environment would promote NP cell-cell interactions and phenotypes similar to those found in immature NP tissues. NP cells were isolated from porcine intervertebral discs and cultured in matrix environments of varying mechanical stiffness that were functionalized with various matrix ligands; cellular responses to periods of culture were assessed using quantitative measures of cell organization and phenotype. Results show that soft (<720 Pa, laminin-containing extracellular matrix substrates promote NP cell morphologies, cell-cell interactions, and proteoglycan production in vitro, and that this behavior is dependent upon both extracellular matrix ligand and substrate mechanical properties. These findings indicate that NP cell organization and phenotype may be highly sensitive to their surrounding extracellular matrix environment.

  12. Extracellular matrix structure.

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    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  13. Cellular contractility and extracellular matrix stiffness regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity in pancreatic cancer cells.

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    Haage, Amanda; Schneider, Ian C

    2014-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is often driven by local invasion and metastasis. Recently, mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment have been identified as potent regulators of invasion and metastasis, while matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically known as significant enhancers of cancer cell migration and invasion. Here we have been able to sensitively measure MMP activity changes in response to specific extracellular matrix (ECM) environments and cell contractility states. Cells of a pancreatic cancer cell line, Panc-1, up-regulate MMP activities between 3- and 10-fold with increased cell contractility. Conversely, they down-regulate MMP activities when contractility is blocked to levels seen with pan-MMP activity inhibitors. Similar, albeit attenuated, responses are seen in other pancreatic cancer cell lines, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1. In addition, MMP activity was modulated by substrate stiffness, collagen gel concentration, and the degree of collagen cross-linking, when cells were plated on collagen gels ranging from 0.5 to 5 mg/ml that span the physiological range of substrate stiffness (50-2000 Pa). Panc-1 cells showed enhanced MMP activity on stiffer substrates, whereas BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 cells showed diminished MMP activity. In addition, eliminating heparan sulfate proteoglycans using heparinase completely abrogated the mechanical induction of MMP activity. These results demonstrate the first functional link between MMP activity, contractility, and ECM stiffness and provide an explanation as to why stiffer environments result in enhanced cell migration and invasion.

  14. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Xiao-Ping Chen; Wan-Guang Zhang; Feng Zhang; Shuai Xiang; Han-Hua Dong; Lei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between nonparenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover.CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  15. Extracellular matrix proteins modulate asthmatic airway smooth muscle cell proliferation via an autocrine mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Peter R A; Burgess, Janette K; Underwood, P Anne; Au, Wendy; Poniris, Maree H; Tamm, Michael; Ge, Qi; Roth, Michael; Black, Judith L

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway remodeling is a key feature of persistent asthma and includes alterations in the extracellular matrix protein profile around the airway smooth muscle (ASM) and hyperplasia of the ASM. We have previously shown that nonasthmatic ASM cells in culture produce a range of extracellular

  16. Depressed immune surveillance against cancer: role of deficient T cell: extracellular matrix interactions.

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    Górski, A; Castronovo, V; Stepień-Sopniewska, B; Grieb, P; Ryba, M; Mrowiec, T; Korczak-Kowalska, G; Wierzbicki, P; Matysiak, W; Dybowska, B

    1994-07-01

    Although T cells infiltrate malignant tumors, the local immune response is usually inefficient and tumors escape destruction. While extracellular matrix proteins strongly costimulate T cell responses in normal individuals, our studies indicate that peripheral blood T cells from cancer patients and tumor infiltrating cells respond poorly or are resistant to stimulative signals mediated by collagen I and IV and fibronectin. Moreover, the adhesive properties of cancer T cells are markedly depressed. Those functional deficiencies are paralleled by variable deficits in integrin and non-integrin T cell receptors for extracellular matrix. Immunotherapy with BCG causes a dramatic but transient increase in T cell: ECM interactions.

  17. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

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    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells.

  18. Extracellular Matrix Proteins

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    Linda Christian Carrijo-Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin family members have been implicated in development, regeneration, and pathological processes, but their roles are unclear. Interestingly, these proteins are found abundant in the venom of the Lonomia obliqua caterpillar. Lipocalins are β-barrel proteins, which have three conserved motifs in their amino acid sequence. One of these motifs was shown to be a sequence signature involved in cell modulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a synthetic peptide comprising the lipocalin sequence motif in fibroblasts. This peptide suppressed caspase 3 activity and upregulated Bcl-2 and Ki-67, but did not interfere with GPCR calcium mobilization. Fibroblast responses also involved increased expression of proinflammatory mediators. Increase of extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin, was observed. Increase in collagen content was also observed in vivo. Results indicate that modulation effects displayed by lipocalins through this sequence motif involve cell survival, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cytokine signaling. Such effects can be related to the lipocalin roles in disease, development, and tissue repair.

  19. Guided extracellular matrix formation from fibroblast cells cultured on bio-inspired configurable multiscale substrata

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    Won-Gyu Bae

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering complex extracellular matrix (ECM is an important challenge for cell and tissue engineering applications as well as for understanding fundamental cell biology. We developed the methodology for fabrication of precisely controllable multiscale hierarchical structures using capillary force lithography in combination with original wrinkling technique for the generation of well-defined native ECM-like platforms by culturing fibroblast cells on the multiscale substrata [1]. This paper provides information on detailed characteristics of polyethylene glycol-diacrylate multiscale substrata. In addition, a possible model for guided extracellular matrix formation from fibroblast cells cultured on bio-inspired configurable multiscale substrata is proposed.

  20. Mammary epithelial cell: Influence of extracellular matrix composition and organization during development and tumorigenesis

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    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine T.; Dembo, Micah; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Stromal–epithelial interactions regulate mammary gland development and are critical for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The extracellular matrix, which is a proteinaceous component of the stroma, regulates mammary epithelial growth, survival, migration and differentiation through a repertoire of transmembrane receptors, of which integrins are the best characterized. Integrins modulate cell fate by reciprocally transducing biochemical and biophysical cues between the cell and the extracellular matrix, facilitating processes such as embryonic branching morphogenesis and lactation in the mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal responses to regulate processes including branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation. Malignant transformation of the breast is also associated with significant matrix remodeling and a progressive stiffening of the stroma that can enhance mammary epithelial cell growth, perturb breast tissue organization, and promote cell invasion and survival. In this review, we discuss the role of stromal–epithelial interactions in normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell behavior. We specifically focus on how dynamic modulation of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix elicit a dialogue with the mammary epithelium through transmembrane integrin receptors to influence tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis and malignant transformation. PMID:17719831

  1. Molecular Control of Vascular Tube Morphogenesis and Stabilization: Regulation by Extracellular Matrix, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George E.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia

    Recent studies have revealed a critical role for both extracellular matrices and matrix metalloproteinases in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis and stabilization in three-dimensional (3D) tissue environments. Key interactions involve endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes, which coassemble to affect vessel formation, remodeling, and stabilization events during development and postnatal life. EC-pericyte interactions control extracellular matrix remodeling events including vascular basement membrane matrix assembly, a necessary step for endothelial tube maturation and stabilization. ECs form tube networks in 3D extracellular matrices in a manner dependent on integrins, membrane-type metalloproteinases, and the Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1. Recent work has defined an EC lumen signaling complex of proteins composed of these proteins that controls 3D matrix-specific signaling events required for these processes. The EC tube formation process results in the creation of a network of proteolytically generated vascular guidance tunnels. These tunnels are physical matrix spaces that regulate vascular tube remodeling and represent matrix conduits into which pericytes are recruited to allow dynamic cell-cell interactions with ECs. These dynamic EC-pericyte interactions induce vascular basement membrane matrix deposition, leading to vessel maturation and stabilization.

  2. Extracellular matrix stiffness modulates VEGF calcium signaling in endothelial cells: individual cell and population analysis.

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    Derricks, Kelsey E; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Nugent, Matthew A

    2015-09-01

    Vascular disease and its associated complications are the number one cause of death in the Western world. Both extracellular matrix stiffening and dysfunctional endothelial cells contribute to vascular disease. We examined endothelial cell calcium signaling in response to VEGF as a function of extracellular matrix stiffness. We developed a new analytical tool to analyze both population based and individual cell responses. Endothelial cells on soft substrates, 4 kPa, were the most responsive to VEGF, whereas cells on the 125 kPa substrates exhibited an attenuated response. Magnitude of activation, not the quantity of cells responding or the number of local maximums each cell experienced distinguished the responses. Individual cell analysis, across all treatments, identified two unique cell clusters. One cluster, containing most of the cells, exhibited minimal or slow calcium release. The remaining cell cluster had a rapid, high magnitude VEGF activation that ultimately defined the population based average calcium response. Interestingly, at low doses of VEGF, the high responding cell cluster contained smaller cells on average, suggesting that cell shape and size may be indicative of VEGF-sensitive endothelial cells. This study provides a new analytical tool to quantitatively analyze individual cell signaling response kinetics, that we have used to help uncover outcomes that are hidden within the average. The ability to selectively identify highly VEGF responsive cells within a population may lead to a better understanding of the specific phenotypic characteristics that define cell responsiveness, which could provide new insight for the development of targeted anti- and pro-angiogenic therapies.

  3. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Controls VEGF Signaling and Processing in Endothelial Cells.

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    Sack, Kelsey D; Teran, Madelane; Nugent, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) drives endothelial cell maintenance and angiogenesis. Endothelial cell behavior is altered by the stiffness of the substrate the cells are attached to suggesting that VEGF activity might be influenced by the mechanical cellular environment. We hypothesized that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness modifies VEGF-cell-matrix tethering leading to altered VEGF processing and signaling. We analyzed VEGF binding, internalization, and signaling as a function of substrate stiffness in endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin (Fn) linked polyacrylamide gels. Cell produced extracellular matrices on the softest substrates were least capable of binding VEGF, but the cells exhibited enhanced VEGF internalization and signaling compared to cells on all other substrates. Inhibiting VEGF-matrix binding with sucrose octasulfate decreased cell-internalization of VEGF and, inversely, heparin pre-treatment to enhance Fn-matrix binding of VEGF increased cell-internalization of VEGF regardless of matrix stiffness. β1 integrins, which connect cells to Fn, modulated VEGF uptake in a stiffness dependent fashion. Cells on hard surfaces showed decreased levels of activated β1 and inhibition of β1 integrin resulted in a greater proportional decrease in VEGF internalization than in cells on softer matrices. Extracellular matrix binding is necessary for VEGF internalization. Stiffness modifies the coordinated actions of VEGF-matrix binding and β1 integrin binding/activation, which together are critical for VEGF internalization. This study provides insight into how the microenvironment may influence tissue regeneration and response to injury and disease. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2026-2039, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) mediate cell-to-cell interactions and interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a prototypic member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily of CAMs, mediates adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic i...

  5. HEPARINS MODULATE EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX AND PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS OF CULTURED RAT MESANGIAL CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLTHUIS, A; BOES, A; BERDEN, JHM

    Heparins blunt the development of glomerulosclerosis in several disease models in the rat and this protective effect may be related to suppression of glomerular cell proliferation. In this study the direct effect of heparins on another key event in glomerulosclerosis, extracellular matrix (ECM)

  6. The ECM-Cell Interaction of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix on Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM is composed primarily of the network type II collagen (COLII and an interlocking mesh of fibrous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs, hyaluronic acid (HA, and chondroitin sulfate (CS. Articular cartilage ECM plays a crucial role in regulating chondrocyte metabolism and functions, such as organized cytoskeleton through integrin-mediated signaling via cell-matrix interaction. Cell signaling through integrins regulates several chondrocyte functions, including differentiation, metabolism, matrix remodeling, responses to mechanical stimulation, and cell survival. The major signaling pathways that regulate chondrogenesis have been identified as wnt signal, nitric oxide (NO signal, protein kinase C (PKC, and retinoic acid (RA signal. Integrins are a large family of molecules that are central regulators in multicellular biology. They orchestrate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions from embryonic development to mature tissue function. In this review, we emphasize the signaling molecule effect and the biomechanics effect of cartilage ECM on chondrogenesis.

  7. Controlling cell-matrix traction forces by extracellular geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2013-03-01

    We present a minimal continuum model of strongly adhering cells as active contractile isotropic media and use the model for studying the effect of the geometry of the adhesion patch in controlling the spatial distribution of traction and cellular stresses. Activity is introduced as a contractile, hence negative, spatially homogeneous contribution to the pressure. The model shows that patterning of adhesion regions can be used to control traction stress distribution and yields several results consistent with experimental observations. Specifically, the cell spread area is found to increase with substrate stiffness and an analytic expression of the dependence is obtained for circular cells. The correlation between the magnitude of traction stresses and cell boundary curvature is also demonstrated and analyzed.

  8. Extracellular matrix in oral squamous cell carcinoma: Friend or foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta R Patankar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The observations of this study revealed altered staining reactions of the collagenous stroma and glycoproteins suggesting that tumor cells may release certain enzymes that play a role in the manipulation of ECM to enhance their own survival.

  9. Cancer cell metabolism regulates extracellular matrix degradation by invadopodia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horssen, R. van; Buccione, R.; Willemse, M.P.; Cingir, S.; Wieringa, B.; Attanasio, F.

    2013-01-01

    Transformed cancer cells have an altered metabolism, characterized by a shift towards aerobic glycolysis, referred to as 'the Warburg phenotype'. A change in flux through mitochondrial OXPHOS and cytosolic pathways for ATP production and a gain of capacity for biomass production in order to sustain

  10. Cells must express components of the planar cell polarity system and extracellular matrix to support cytonemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2016-09-03

    Drosophila dorsal air sac development depends on Decapentaplegic (Dpp) and Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) proteins produced by the wing imaginal disc and transported by cytonemes to the air sac primordium (ASP). Dpp and FGF signaling in the ASP was dependent on components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) system in the disc, and neither Dpp- nor FGF-receiving cytonemes extended over mutant disc cells that lacked them. ASP cytonemes normally navigate through extracellular matrix (ECM) composed of collagen, laminin, Dally and Dally-like (Dlp) proteins that are stratified in layers over the disc cells. However, ECM over PCP mutant cells had reduced levels of laminin, Dally and Dlp, and whereas Dpp-receiving ASP cytonemes navigated in the Dally layer and required Dally (but not Dlp), FGF-receiving ASP cytonemes navigated in the Dlp layer, requiring Dlp (but not Dally). These findings suggest that cytonemes interact directly and specifically with proteins in the stratified ECM.

  11. How cells sense extracellular matrix stiffness: a material’s perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappmann, Britta; Chen, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in which cells reside have emerged as an important regulator of cell fate. While materials based on natural ECM have been used to implicate the role of substrate stiffness for cell fate decisions, it is difficult in these matrices to isolate mechanics from other structural parameters. In contrast, fully synthetic hydrogels offer independent control over physical and adhesive properties. New synthetic materials that also recreate the fibrous structural hierarchy of natural matrices are now being designed to study substrate mechanics in more complex ECMs. This perspective examines the ways in which new materials are being used to advance our understanding of how extracellular matrix stiffness impacts cell function. PMID:23611564

  12. Label-free Imaging of Arterial Cells and Extracellular Matrix Using a Multimodal CARS Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han-Wei; Le, Thuc T; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2008-04-01

    A multimodal nonlinear optical imaging system that integrates coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), sum-frequency generation (SFG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) on the same platform was developed and applied to visualize single cells and extracellular matrix in fresh carotid arteries. CARS signals arising from CH(2)-rich membranes allowed visualization of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of the arterial wall. Additionally, CARS microscopy allowed vibrational imaging of elastin and collagen fibrils which are also rich in CH(2) bonds. The extracellular matrix organization were further confirmed by TPEF signals arising from elastin's autofluorescence and SFG signals arising from collagen fibrils' non-centrosymmetric structure. Label-free imaging of significant components of arterial tissues suggests the potential application of multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy to monitor onset and progression of arterial diseases.

  13. Epithelial cell-extracellular matrix interactions and stem cells in airway epithelial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coraux, Christelle; Roux, Jacqueline; Jolly, Thomas; Birembaut, Philippe

    2008-08-15

    In healthy subjects, the respiratory epithelium forms a continuous lining to the airways and to the environment, and plays a unique role as a barrier against external deleterious agents to protect the airways from the insults. In respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis, or asthma, the airway epithelium is frequently remodeled and injured, leading to the impairment of its defense functions. The rapid restoration of the epithelial barrier is crucial for these patients. The complete regeneration of the airway epithelium is a complex phenomenon, including not only the epithelial wound repair but also the epithelial differentiation to reconstitute a fully well differentiated and functional epithelium. The regeneration implies two partners: the epithelial stem/progenitor cells and factors able to regulate this process. Among these factors, epithelial cells-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a crucial role. The secretion of a provisional ECM, the cell-ECM relationships through epithelial receptors, and the remodeling of the ECM by proteases (mainly matrix metalloproteinases) contribute not only to airway epithelial repair by modulating epithelial cell migration and proliferation, but also to the differentiation of repairing cells leading to the complete restoration of the wounded epithelium. A better characterization of resident stem cells and of effectors of the regeneration process is an essential prerequisite to propose new regenerative therapeutics to patients suffering from infectious/inflammatory respiratory diseases.

  14. Casein gene expression in mouse mammary epithelial cell lines: Dependence upon extracellular matrix and cell type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, D.; Oborn, C.J. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Li, M.L.; Bissell, M.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1987-09-01

    The COMMA-D mammary cell line exhibits mammary-specific functional differentiation under appropriate conditions in cell culture. The cytologically heterogeneous COMMA-D parental line and the clonal lines DB-1, TA-5, and FA-1 derived from the COMMA-D parent were examined for similar properties of functional differentiation. In monolayer cell culture, the cell lines DB-1, TA-5, FA-1, and MA-4 were examined for expression of mammary-specific and epithelial-specific proteins by an indirect immunofluorescence assay. The clonal cell lines were relatively homogeneous in their respective staining properties and seemed to represent three subpopulations found in the heterogeneous parental COMMA-D lines. None of the four clonal lines appeared to represent myoepithelial cells. The cell lines were examined for expression of {beta}-casein mRNA in the presence or absence of prolactin. The inducibility of {beta}-casein in the COMMA-D cell line was further enhanced by a reconstituted basement membrane preparation enriched in laminin, collagen IV, and proteoglycans. These results support the hypothesis that the functional response of inducible mammary cell populations is a result of interaction among hormones, multiple extracellular matrix components, and specific cell types.

  15. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  16. Oral lichen sclerosus expressing extracellular matrix proteins and IgG4-positive plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Aquino Xavier, Flavia Calo; Prates, Alisio Alves; Gurgel, Clarissa Araujo; De Souza, Tulio Geraldo; Andrade, Rodrigo Guimaraes; Goncalves Ramos, Eduardo Antonio; Pedreira Ramalho, Luciana Maria; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2014-09-16

    Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a mucocutaneous disease with uncommon oral involvement. The etiology is not yet well understood, but LS has been associated with autoimmune, genetic, and immunological factors. We report a 47-year-old man with LS that exhibited an asymptomatic white plaque with red patches on the maxillary alveolar mucosa extending to the labial mucosa. He had no other skin disease. Positive immunostaining for tenascin and scarcity of fibronectin suggested extracellular matrix reorganization. Elastin immunostaining indicated a reduction of elastic fibers. Immunoexpression of collagen IV in blood vessels and its absence in the epithelial basement membrane, together with diffuse MMP-9 immunoexpression, suggested altered proteolytic activity. Mast cell staining bordering areas of sclerosis indicated a possible role in the synthesis of collagen. IgG4 positivity in plasma cells suggested a role in the fibrogenesis. This is an unusual presentation of oral LS and we discuss immunohistochemical findings regarding cellular and extracellular matrix components.

  17. The planar cell polarity protein VANGL2 coordinates remodeling of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B Blairanne; Mundell, Nathan; Dunlap, Julie; Jessen, Jason

    2012-07-01

    Understanding how planar cell polarity (PCP) is established, maintained, and coordinated in migrating cell populations is an important area of research with implications for both embryonic morphogenesis and tumor cell invasion. We recently reported that the PCP protein Vang-like 2 (VANGL2) regulates the endocytosis and cell surface level of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14 or MT1-MMP). Here, we further discuss these findings in terms of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, cell migration, and zebrafish gastrulation. We also demonstrate that VANGL2 function impacts the focal degradation of ECM by human cancer cells including the formation or stability of invadopodia. Together, our findings implicate MMP14 as a downstream effector of VANGL2 signaling and suggest a model whereby the regulation of pericellular proteolysis is a fundamental aspect of PCP in migrating cells.

  18. In vitro enhancement of extracellular matrix formation as natural bioscaffold for stem cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naroeni, Aroem; Shalihah, Qonitha; Meilany, Sofy

    2017-02-01

    Growing cells in plastic with liquid media for in vitro study is very common but far from physiological. The use of scaffold materials is more biocompatible. Extracellular matrix provides tissue integrity which acts as a native scaffold for cell attachment and interaction, as well as it serves as a reservoir for growth factors. For this reason, we have developed natural scaffold from mice fibroblast to form a natural scaffold for stem cell culture. Fibroblasts were cultured under crowded condition and lysed to form natural scaffold. The natural scaffold formation was observed using immunofluorescence which then will be used and tested for stem cell propagation and differentiation.

  19. Shrink Wrapping Cells in a Defined Extracellular Matrix to Modulate the Chemo-Mechanical Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchesko, Rachelle N; Szymanski, John M; Sahu, Amrita; Feinberg, Adam W

    2014-09-01

    Cell-matrix interactions are important for the physical integration of cells into tissues and the function of insoluble, mechanosensitive signaling networks. Studying these interactions in vitro can be difficult because the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that adsorb to in vitro cell culture surfaces do not fully recapitulate the ECM-dense basement membranes to which cells such as cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells adhere to in vivo. Towards addressing this limitation, we have developed a surface-initiated assembly process to engineer ECM proteins into nanostructured, microscale sheets that can be shrink wrapped around single cells and small cell ensembles to provide a functional and instructive matrix niche. Unlike current cell encapsulation technology using alginate, fibrin or other hydrogels, our engineered ECM is similar in density and thickness to native basal lamina and can be tailored in structure and composition using the proteins fibronectin, laminin, fibrinogen, and/or collagen type IV. A range of cells including C2C12 myoblasts, bovine corneal endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes survive the shrink wrapping process with high viability. Further, we demonstrate that, compared to non-encapsulated controls, the engineered ECM modulates cytoskeletal structure, stability of cell-matrix adhesions and cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments.

  20. Podoplanin-mediated cell adhesion through extracellular matrix in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneki, Masayuki; Yamazaki, Manabu; Maruyama, Satoshi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), one of the representative mucin-like type-I transmembrane glycoproteins specific to lymphatic endothelial cells, is expressed in various cancers including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). On the basis of our previous studies, we have developed the hypothesis that PDPN functions in association with the extracellular matrix (ECM) from the cell surface side. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular role of PDPN in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration in oral SCC cells. Forty-four surgical specimens of oral SCC were used for immunohistochemistry for PDPN, and the expression profiles were correlated with their clinicopathological properties. Using ZK-1, a human oral SCC cell system, and five other cell systems, we examined PDPN expression levels by immunofluorescence, western blotting, and real-time PCR. The effects of transient PDPN knockdown by siRNA in ZK-1 were determined for cellular functions in terms of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion in association with CD44 and hyaluronan. Cases without PDPN-positive cells were histopathologically classified as less-differentiated SCC, and SCC cells without PDPN more frequently invaded lymphatics. Adhesive properties of ZK-1 were significantly inhibited by siRNA, and PDPN was shown to collaborate with CD44 in cell adhesion to tether SCC cells with hyaluronan-rich ECM of the narrow intercellular space as well as with the stromal ECM. There was no siRNA effect in migration. We have demonstrated the primary function of PDPN in cell adhesion to ECM, which is to secondarily promote oral SCC cell proliferation.

  1. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  2. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Identifies Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression by Pancreatic Circulating Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Ting

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are shed from primary tumors into the bloodstream, mediating the hematogenous spread of cancer to distant organs. To define their composition, we compared genome-wide expression profiles of CTCs with matched primary tumors in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, isolating individual CTCs using epitope-independent microfluidic capture, followed by single-cell RNA sequencing. CTCs clustered separately from primary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, showing low-proliferative signatures, enrichment for the stem-cell-associated gene Aldh1a2, biphenotypic expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and expression of Igfbp5, a gene transcript enriched at the epithelial-stromal interface. Mouse as well as human pancreatic CTCs exhibit a very high expression of stromal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, including SPARC, whose knockdown in cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasiveness. The aberrant expression by CTCs of stromal ECM genes points to their contribution of microenvironmental signals for the spread of cancer to distant organs.

  3. Nitric oxide regulates cell behavior on an interactive cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Qi; Zhang, Lijun; Redman, Travis; Qi, Shaohai; Zhao, Feng

    2015-12-01

    During tissue injury and wound healing process, there are dynamic reciprocal interactions among cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediating molecules which are crucial for functional tissue repair. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the key mediating molecules that can positively regulate various biological activities involved in wound healing. Various ECM components serve as binding sites for cells and mediating molecules, and the interactions further stimulate cellular activities. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can migrate to the wound site and contribute to tissue regeneration through differentiation and paracrine signaling. The objective of this work was to investigate the regulatory effect of NO on hMSCs in an interactive ECM-rich microenvironment. In order to mimic the in vivo stromal environment in wound site, a cell-derived ECM scaffold that was able to release NO within the range of in vivo wound fluid NO level was fabricated. Results showed that the micro-molar level of NO released from the ECM scaffold had an inhibitory effect on cellular activities of hMSCs. The NO impaired cell growth, altered cell morphology, disrupted the F-actin organization, also decreased the expression of focal adhesion related molecules integrin α5 and paxillin. These results may contribute to the elucidation of how NO acts on hMSCs in wound healing process.

  4. Human epidermal keratinocyte cell response on integrin-specific artificial extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin, Monica Suryana; Chua, Alvin Wen Choong; Ma, Dong Rui; Lee, Seng Teik; Fong, Eileen

    2014-08-01

    Cell-matrix interactions play critical roles in regulating cellular behavior in wound repair and regeneration of the human skin. In particular, human skin keratinocytes express several key integrins such as alpha5beta1, alpha3beta1, and alpha2beta1 for binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) present in the basement membrane in uninjured skin. To mimic these key integrin-ECM interactions, artificial ECM (aECM) proteins containing functional domains derived from laminin 5, type IV collagen, fibronectin, and elastin are prepared. Human skin keratinocyte cell responses on the aECM proteins are specific to the cell-binding domain present in each construct. Keratinocyte attachment to the aECM protein substrates is also mediated by specific integrin-material interactions. In addition, the aECM proteins are able to support the proliferation of keratinocyte stem cells, demonstrating their promise for use in skin tissue engineering.

  5. Differential gene regulation under altered gravity conditions in follicular thyroid cancer cells: relationship between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulbrich, C.; Pietsch, J.; Grosse, J.; Wehland, M.; Schulz, H.; Saar, K.; Hübner, N.; Hauslage, J.; Hemmersbach, R.; Braun, M.; van Loon, J.; Vagt, N.; Egli, M.; Richter, P.; Einspanier, R.; Sharbati, S.; Baltz, T.; Infanger, M.; Ma, X.; Grimm, D.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins, adhesion molecules, and cytoskeletal proteins form a dynamic network interacting with signalling molecules as an adaptive response to altered gravity. An important issue is the exact differentiation between real microgravity responses of the cells or cellular reactions

  6. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: Applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram eRavindran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world’s population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinical translation. We have investigated the possibility of using somatic mesenchymal stem cells from other sources for dental pulp tissue regeneration using a biomimetic dental pulp extracellular matrix (ECM incorporated scaffold. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and human bone marrow stromal cells (HMSCs were investigated for their ability to differentiate towards an odontogenic lineage. In vitro real-time PCR results coupled with histological and immunohistochemical examination of the explanted tissues confirmed the ability of PDLSCs and HMSCs to form a vascularized pulp-like tissue. These findings indicate that the dental pulp stem derived ECM scaffold stimulated odontogenic differentiation of PDLSCs and HMSCs without the need for exogenous addition of growth and differentiation factors. This study represents a translational perspective toward possible therapeutic application of using a combination of somatic stem cells and extracellular matrix for pulp regeneration.

  7. Extracellular matrix proteins regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qike K.; Lee, KangAe; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells undergo transdifferentiation via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) upon treatment with matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3). In rigid microenvironments, MMP3 upregulates expression of Rac1b, which translocates to the cell membrane to promote induction of reactive oxygen species and EMT. Here we examine the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in this process. Our data show that the basement membrane protein laminin suppresses the EMT response in MMP3-treated cells, whereas fibronectin promotes EMT. These ECM proteins regulate EMT via interactions with their specific integrin receptors. α6-integrin sequesters Rac1b from the membrane and is required for inhibition of EMT by laminin. In contrast, α5-integrin maintains Rac1b at the membrane and is required for the promotion of EMT by fibronectin. Understanding the regulatory role of the ECM will provide insight into mechanisms underlying normal and pathological development of the mammary gland. PMID:23660532

  8. Migration of tumor cells and leukocytes in extracellular matrix : proteolytic and nonproteolytic strategies for overcoming tissue barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Katarina

    2003-01-01

    The extracellular matrix within connective tissues represents a structural scaffold as well as a barrier for motile cells, such as invading tumor cells or passenger leukocytes. It remains unclear how different cell types utilize matrix-degrading enzymes for proteolytic migration strategies and, on the other hand, non-proteolytic strategies to overcome 3D fibrillar matrix networks. To monitor cell migration, a 3D collagen model in vitro or the mouse dermis in vivo were used, in combination wit...

  9. Epilysin (MMP-28) is deposited to the basolateral extracellular matrix of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Tuomas J; Illman, Sara A; Lohi, Jouko; Keski-Oja, Jorma

    2009-03-01

    Epilysin (MMP-28) is a conserved member of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family. It is expressed in various normal tissues, and induced in wounds and in developing and regenerating nerves. Epilysin induces TGF-beta mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition, but its other functions are largely unknown. We have characterized the localization of both catalytically active and mutated inactive, overexpressed epilysin in established epithelial cell lines. We found that epilysin was localized abundantly to the basolateral side of the cells and associated with the extracellular matrix (ECM) as verified by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy. Overexpression of epilysin in MDCK cells resulted in a drastic reduction of basolateral ECM, as observed by the disappearance of collagen type IV, laminin and fibronectin. Cultivation of epilysin expressing MDCK cells in defined serum free medium resulted in the restoration of these proteins to the ECM. The levels of fibronectin and collagen IV were, however, reduced in epilysin expressing cells under the serum free conditions, and degradation fragments of collagen IV were detected supporting the activation of proteolysis by epilysin. Epilysin was observed in its unprocessed 50 kDa active form in the ECM of MDCK cells under serum free conditions whereas in cells cultured in serum containing it was processed to the 48 kDa form. Current results indicate that epilysin associates with the basolateral ECM of cultured epithelial cells, where it plausibly plays a role in the regulation of matrix composition and turnover.

  10. Human cardiac extracellular matrix supports myocardial lineage commitment of pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberwallner, Barbara; Brodarac, Andreja; Anić, Petra;

    2015-01-01

    lysis buffer, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and foetal bovine serum (FBS). Murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were seeded and grown in standard culture, on cECM or on non-specific ECM preparations (Matrigel® or Geltrex®). Cell......OBJECTIVES: Cross-talk between organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) and stem cells is often assumed but has not been directly demonstrated. We developed a protocol for the preparation of human cardiac ECM (cECM) and studied whether cECM has effects on pluripotent stem cell differentiation...... that may be useful for future cardiac regeneration strategies in patients with end-stage heart failure. METHODS: Of note, 0.3 mm-thick cECM slices were prepared from samples of myocardium from patients with end-stage non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy, using a three-step protocol involving hypotonic...

  11. Myogenic Progenitor Cells Control Extracellular Matrix Production by Fibroblasts during Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher S; Kirby, Tyler J; Kosmac, Kate; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2017-01-05

    Satellite cells, the predominant stem cell population in adult skeletal muscle, are activated in response to hypertrophic stimuli and give rise to myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) within the extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds myofibers. This ECM is composed largely of collagens secreted by interstitial fibrogenic cells, which influence satellite cell activity and muscle repair during hypertrophy and aging. Here we show that MPCs interact with interstitial fibrogenic cells to ensure proper ECM deposition and optimal muscle remodeling in response to hypertrophic stimuli. MPC-dependent ECM remodeling during the first week of a growth stimulus is sufficient to ensure long-term myofiber hypertrophy. MPCs secrete exosomes containing miR-206, which represses Rrbp1, a master regulator of collagen biosynthesis, in fibrogenic cells to prevent excessive ECM deposition. These findings provide insights into how skeletal stem and progenitor cells interact with other cell types to actively regulate their extracellular environments for tissue maintenance and adaptation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of biomimetic nanocomposites as bone extracellular matrix for human osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Arundhati; Mitra, Tapas; Gnanamani, Arumugam; Das, Manas; Kundu, Patit Paban

    2016-05-05

    Here, we have developed biomimetic nanocomposites containing chitosan, poly(vinyl alcohol) and nano-hydroxyapatite-zinc oxide as bone extracellular matrix for human osteoblastic cells and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed interconnected macroporous structures. Moreover, in this study, the problem related to fabricating a porous composite with good mechanical strength has been resolved by incorporating 5wt% of nano-hydroxyapatite-zinc oxide into chitosan-poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix; the present composite showed high tensile strength (20.25MPa) while maintaining appreciable porosity (65.25%). These values are similar to human cancellous bone. These nanocomposites also showed superior water uptake, antimicrobial and biodegradable properties than the previously reported results. Compatibility with human blood and pH was observed, indicating nontoxicity of these materials to the human body. Moreover, proliferation of osteoblastic MG-63 cells onto the nanocomposites was also observed without having any negative effect.

  13. Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: composition of the extracellular matrix and expression of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoazec, J Y; Flejou, J F; D'Errico, A; Couvelard, A; Kozyraki, R; Fiorentino, M; Grigioni, W F; Feldmann, G

    1995-10-01

    We studied by immunohistochemistry 25 cases of focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) to evaluate the composition of the extracellular matrix and the expression and distribution of endothelial cell-cell adhesion molecules and integrin receptors. The extracellular matrix of FNH retained the overall organization of that of normal liver. The matrix of central scars resembled that of portal tracts. The main difference was the presence of large vitronectin deposits, which might indicate the existence of local hemodynamic disturbances. The matrix lining the sinusoid-like vessels running in the hyperplastic parenchyma retained characteristic features of the normal perisinusoidal matrix, such as the presence of tenascin. In the zone surrounding the central scars, it contained large amounts of laminin, von Willebrand factor, and thrombospondin, suggesting the development of perisinusoidal fibrosis. Laminin deposition was accompanied by the induction of cell-cell adhesion molecules on adjacent endothelial cells and by the up-regulation of specific integrin receptors on both hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells. In conclusion, our study: (1) reinforces the hypothesis that FNH is merely a hyperplastic response of liver parenchyma to local vascular abnormalities, and (2) shows that the lesions of perisinusoidal fibrosis associated with FNH are accompanied by the induction of integrin receptors on hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells.

  14. Extracellular matrix and cell surface as determinants of connective tissue differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solursh, M

    1989-09-01

    This paper reviews in vitro studies, largely from the author's laboratory, concerning the conditions that are permissive for the differentiation of limb bud mesenchymal cells into chondrocytes. In high-density cell culture, even in a defined medium, the same normal sequence of events that is found in vivo in developing cartilage is also observed. This system can be used to study heritable disorders in model systems such as in mutant mouse embryos. In addition, single mesenchymal cells can differentiate into hypertrophic chondrocytes in hydrated collagen gel or agarose cultures. A rounded cell shape promotes chondrogenesis, while a flattened cell shape promotes fibroblast differentiation. The actin cytoskeleton is shown to play a central role in regulating connective tissue cell differentiation. By use of such cell culture manipulations, it is now possible to grow large numbers of fibroblastic cells from human biopsy material for storage and to carry out experimental studies after re-expression of chondrogenesis in gel cultures. It is suggested that cytoskeletal-extracellular matrix interactions play a fundamental role in connective tissue differentiation. Matrix receptors might be developmentally regulated and modify epithelial effects on mesenchymal cells. In this way mesenchymal cells differentiate in a highly organized manner in spatial and temporal terms.

  15. Responses of cultured neural retinal cells to substratum-bound laminin and other extracellular matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R; Jerdan, J; Hewitt, A T

    1985-11-01

    The responses of cultured chick embryo retinal neurons to several extracellular matrix molecules are described. Retinal cell suspensions in serum-free medium containing the "N1" supplement (J. E. Bottenstein, S. D. Skaper, S. Varon, and J. Sato, 1980, Exp. Cell Res. 125, 183-190) were seeded on tissue culture plastic surfaces pretreated with polyornithine (PORN) and with one of the factors to be tested. Substantial cell survival could be observed after 72 hr in vitro on PORN pretreated with serum or laminin, whereas most cells appeared to be degenerating on untreated PORN, PORN-fibronectin, and PORN-chondronectin. Cell attachment, although quantitatively similar for all these substrata, was temperature-dependent on serum and laminin but not on fibronectin or untreated PORN. In a short-term bioassay, neurite development was abundant on laminin, scarce on serum and fibronectin, and absent on PORN. No positive correlation between cell spreading and neurite production could be seen: cell spreading was more extensive on PORN and fibronectin than on laminin or serum, while on laminin-treated dishes, spreading was similar for neurite-bearing and non-neurite-bearing cells. Laminin effects on retinal neurons were clearly substratum dependent. When bound to tissue culture plastic, laminin showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell attachment and did not stimulate neurite development. PORN-bound laminin, on the other hand, did not affect cell attachment but caused marked stimulation of neurite development, suggesting that laminin conformation and/or the spatial distribution of active sites play an important role in the neurite-promoting function of this extracellular matrix molecule. Investigation of the embryonic retina with ELISA and immunocytochemical methods showed that laminin is present in this organ during development. Therefore, in vivo and in vitro observations are consistent with the possibility that laminin might influence neuronal development in the retina.

  16. Bone regeneration with osteogenically enhanced mesenchymal stem cells and their extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Bret H; McCarley, Matthew R; Krause, Ulf; Zeitouni, Suzanne; Froese, Jeremiah J; McNeill, Eoin P; Chaput, Christopher D; Sampson, H Wayne; Gregory, Carl A

    2015-01-01

    Although bone has remarkable regenerative capacity, about 10% of long bone fractures and 25% to 40% of vertebral fusion procedures fail to heal. In such instances, a scaffold is employed to bridge the lesion and accommodate osteoprogenitors. Although synthetic bone scaffolds mimic some of the characteristics of bone matrix, their effectiveness can vary because of biological incompatibility. Herein, we demonstrate that a composite prepared with osteogenically enhanced mesenchymal stem cells (OEhMSCs) and their extracellular matrix (ECM) has an unprecedented capacity for the repair of critical-sized defects of murine femora. Furthermore, OEhMSCs do not cause lymphocyte activation, and ECM/OEhMSC composites retain their in vivo efficacy after cryopreservation. Finally, we show that attachment to the ECM by OEhMSCs stimulates the production of osteogenic and angiogenic factors. These data demonstrate that composites of OEhMSCs and their ECM could be utilized in the place of autologous bone graft for complex orthopedic reconstructions.

  17. Naturally Occurring Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Dermal Regeneration: Do They Really Need Cells?

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    A. M. Eweida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pronounced effect of extracellular matrix (ECM scaffolds in supporting tissue regeneration is related mainly to their maintained 3D structure and their bioactive components. These decellularized matrix scaffolds could be revitalized before grafting via adding stem cells, fibroblasts, or keratinocytes to promote wound healing. We reviewed the online published literature in the last five years for the studies that performed ECM revitalization and discussed the results of these studies and the related literature. Eighteen articles met the search criteria. Twelve studies included adding cells to acellular dermal matrix (ADM, 3 studies were on small intestinal mucosa (SIS, one study was on urinary bladder matrix (UBM, one study was on amniotic membrane, and one study included both SIS and ADM loaded constructs. We believe that, in chronic and difficult-to-heal wounds, revitalizing the ECM scaffolds would be beneficial to overcome the defective host tissue interaction. This belief still has to be verified by high quality randomised clinical trials, which are still lacking in literature.

  18. Changes in extracellular matrix composition regulate cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human mesangial cells.

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    Alique, Matilde; Calleros, Laura; Luengo, Alicia; Griera, Mercedes; Iñiguez, Miguel Ángel; Punzón, Carmen; Fresno, Manuel; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2011-04-01

    Glomerular diseases are characterized by a sustained synthesis and accumulation of abnormal extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen type I. The extracellular matrix transmits information to cells through interactions with membrane components, which directly activate many intracellular signaling events. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggests that eicosanoids derived from cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 participate in a number of pathological processes in immune-mediated renal diseases, and it is known that protein kinase B (AKT) may act through different transcription factors in the regulation of the COX-2 promoter. The present results show that progressive accumulation of collagen I in the extracellular medium induces a significant increase of COX-2 expression in human mesangial cells, resulting in an enhancement in PGE(2) production. COX-2 overexpression is due to increased COX-2 mRNA levels. The study of the mechanism implicated in COX-2 upregulation by collagen I showed focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation. Furthermore, we observed that the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway by collagen I and collagen I-induced COX-2 overexpression was abolished by PI3K and AKT inhibitors. Additionally, we showed that the cAMP response element (CRE) transcription factor is implicated. Finally, we studied COX-2 expression in an animal model, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hypertensive rats. In renal tissue and vascular walls, COX-2 and collagen type I content were upregulated. In summary, our results provide evidence that collagen type I increases COX-2 expression via the FAK/PI3K/AKT/cAMP response element binding protein signaling pathway.

  19. Detachment of esophageal carcinoma cells from extracellular matrix causes relocalization of death receptor 5 and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Chao Liu; Jun Zhang; Shi-Gui Liu; Rong Gao; Zhang-Fu Long; Ke Tao; Yuan-Fang Ma

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of detachment of esophageal cancer cells from extracellular matrix on the localization of death receptor 5 (DR5) and apoptosis.METHODS: Anchorage-dependent EC9706 cells of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were pretreated or not treated with brefeldin A. Detached cells were harvested by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid digestion. Expression and localization of DR5 in these cells were determined by immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence assays, as well as flow cytometry analysis. Apoptosis of EC9706 cells was detected by flow cytometry after stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled annexin V/propidium iodide. Activation of caspase 8 was detected by Western blot analysis.RESULTS: Immunocytochemical assay indicated that DR5 was predominantly perinuclear in adherent cells but was mainly localized in cell membrane in detached cells. In addition, immunofluorescence assay also confirmed the above-mentioned results, and further demonstrated that DR5 was present in the form of coarse granules in detached cells, but in the form of fine granules in adherent cells. Cytometry analysis revealed higher levels of DR5 expression on the surfaces of brefeldin-A-untreated cells than on the surfaces of brefeldin-A-treated cells, but brefeldin A treatment did not affect the total DR5 expression levels. Moreover, nocodazole did not influence the extracelluar DR5 expression levels in EC9706 cells. Apoptosis assay revealed that detached cells were more sensitive to DR5 antibody-induced apoptosis than adherent cells. Western blotting showed that caspase 8 was activated in temporarily detached cells 4 h earlier than in adherent cells.CONCLUSION: Progress from adhesion to detachment of EC9706 cells causes DR5 relocalization, and promotes cytoplasmic translocation of DR5 to cell surfaces via a Golgi-dependent pathway. Moreover, it might also result in DR5 aggregation to render apoptosis of detached cells.

  20. Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrix: Basic Characteristics and Current Applications in Orthopedic Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixiang; Zhu, Yun; Li, Jia; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Liu, Shichen; Yang, Jianhua; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and intricate microenvironment with excellent biophysical, biomechanical, and biochemical properties, which can directly or indirectly regulate cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and differentiation, as well as plays key roles in homeostasis and regeneration of tissues and organs. The ECM has attracted a great deal of attention with the rapid development of tissue engineering in the field of regenerative medicine. Tissue-derived ECM scaffolds (also referred to as decellularized tissues and whole organs) are considered a promising therapy for the repair of musculoskeletal defects, including those that are widely used in orthopedics, although there are a few shortcomings. Similar to tissue-derived ECM scaffolds, cell-derived ECM scaffolds also have highly advantageous biophysical and biochemical properties, in particular their ability to be produced in vitro from a number of different cell types. Furthermore, cell-derived ECM scaffolds more closely resemble native ECM microenvironments. The products of cell-derived ECM have a wide range of biomedical applications; these include reagents for cell culture substrates and biomaterials for scaffolds, hybrid scaffolds, and living cell sheet coculture systems. Although cell-derived ECM has only just begun to be investigated, it has great potential as a novel approach for cell-based tissue repair in orthopedic tissue engineering. This review summarizes and analyzes the various types of cell-derived ECM products applied in cartilage, bone, and nerve tissue engineering in vitro or in vivo and discusses future directions for investigation of cell-derived ECM.

  1. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

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    Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better

  2. Photobiomodulation on human annulus fibrosus cells during the intervertebral disk degeneration: extracellular matrix-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Min Ho; Kim, Kyoung Soo; Yoo, Chang Min; Shin, Jae Hee; Nam, Hyo Geun; Jeong, Jin Su; Kim, Joo Han; Lee, Kwang Ho; Choi, Hyuk

    2016-05-01

    Destruction of extracellular matrix (ECM) leads to degeneration of the intervertebral disk (IVD), which is a major contributor to many spine disorders. IVD degeneration is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), which are secreted by immune cells, including macrophages and neutrophils. The cytokines modulate ECM-modifying enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in human annulus fibrosus (AF) cells. The resulting imbalance in catabolic and anabolic enzymes can cause generalized back, neck, and low back pain (LBP). Photobiomodulation (PBM) is known to regulate inflammatory responses and wound healing. The aim of this study was to mimic the degenerative IVD microenvironment, and to investigate the effect of a variety of PBM conditions (wavelength: 635, 525, and 470 nm; energy density: 16, 32, and 64 J/cm(2)) on the production of ECM-modifying-enzymes by AF cells under degenerative conditions induced by macrophage-conditioned medium (MCM), which contains pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-β secreted by macrophage during the development of intervertebral disk inflammation. We showed that the MCM-stimulated AF cells express imbalanced ratios of TIMPs (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) and MMPs (MMP-1 and MMP-3). PBM selectively modulated the production of ECM-modifying enzymes in AF cells. These results suggest that PBM can be a therapeutic tool for degenerative IVD disorders.

  3. Force-induced unfolding of fibronectin in the extracellular matrix of living cells.

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    Michael L Smith

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Whether mechanically unfolded fibronectin (Fn is present within native extracellular matrix fibrils is controversial. Fn extensibility under the influence of cell traction forces has been proposed to originate either from the force-induced lengthening of an initially compact, folded quaternary structure as is found in solution (quaternary structure model, where the dimeric arms of Fn cross each other, or from the force-induced unfolding of type III modules (unfolding model. Clarification of this issue is central to our understanding of the structural arrangement of Fn within fibrils, the mechanism of fibrillogenesis, and whether cryptic sites, which are exposed by partial protein unfolding, can be exposed by cell-derived force. In order to differentiate between these two models, two fluorescence resonance energy transfer schemes to label plasma Fn were applied, with sensitivity to either compact-to-extended conformation (arm separation without loss of secondary structure or compact-to-unfolded conformation. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies revealed that a significant fraction of fibrillar Fn within a three-dimensional human fibroblast matrix is partially unfolded. Complete relaxation of Fn fibrils led to a refolding of Fn. The compactly folded quaternary structure with crossed Fn arms, however, was never detected within extracellular matrix fibrils. We conclude that the resting state of Fn fibrils does not contain Fn molecules with crossed-over arms, and that the several-fold extensibility of Fn fibrils involves the unfolding of type III modules. This could imply that Fn might play a significant role in mechanotransduction processes.

  4. Haemodynamic and extracellular matrix cues regulate the mechanical phenotype and stiffness of aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Caitlin; Osborne, Lukas D; Guilluy, Christophe; Chen, Zhongming; O'Brien, E Tim; Reader, John S; Burridge, Keith; Superfine, Richard; Tzima, Ellie

    2014-06-11

    Endothelial cells (ECs) lining blood vessels express many mechanosensors, including platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), that convert mechanical force into biochemical signals. While it is accepted that mechanical stresses and the mechanical properties of ECs regulate vessel health, the relationship between force and biological response remains elusive. Here we show that ECs integrate mechanical forces and extracellular matrix (ECM) cues to modulate their own mechanical properties. We demonstrate that the ECM influences EC response to tension on PECAM-1. ECs adherent on collagen display divergent stiffening and focal adhesion growth compared with ECs on fibronectin. This is because of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent serine phosphorylation and inactivation of RhoA. PKA signalling regulates focal adhesion dynamics and EC compliance in response to shear stress in vitro and in vivo. Our study identifies an ECM-specific, mechanosensitive signalling pathway that regulates EC compliance and may serve as an atheroprotective mechanism that maintains blood vessel integrity in vivo.

  5. Ultrasound Technologies for the Spatial Patterning of Cells and Extracellular Matrix Proteins and the Vascularization of Engineered Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Kelley A.

    Technological advancements in the field of tissue engineering could save the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. Currently, two of the primary challenges preventing tissue engineers from developing functional replacement tissues and organs are the need to recreate complex cell and extracellular microenvironments and to vascularize the tissue to maintain cell viability and function. Ultrasound is a form of mechanical energy that can noninvasively and nondestructively interact with tissues at the cell and protein level. In this thesis, novel ultrasound-based technologies were developed for the spatial patterning of cells and extracellular matrix proteins and the vascularization of three-dimensional engineered tissue constructs. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields were utilized to noninvasively control the spatial organization of cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within collagen-based engineered tissue. Additionally, ultrasound induced thermal mechanisms were exploited to site-specifically pattern various extracellular matrix collagen microstructures within a single engineered tissue construct. Finally, ultrasound standing wave field technology was used to promote the rapid and extensive vascularization of three-dimensional tissue constructs. As such, the ultrasound technologies developed in these studies have the potential to provide the field of tissue engineering with novel strategies to spatially pattern cells and extracellular matrix components and to vascularize engineered tissue, and thus, could advance the fabrication of functional replacement tissues and organs in the field of tissue engineering.

  6. Differential sensitivity of epithelial cells to extracellular matrix in polarity establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemura, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Establishment of apical-basal polarity is crucial for epithelial sheets that form a compartment in the body, which function to maintain the environment in the compartment. Effects of impaired polarization are easily observed in three-dimensional (3-D) culture systems rather than in two-dimensional (2-D) culture systems. Although the mechanisms for establishing the polarity are not completely understood, signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM) are considered to be essential for determining the basal side and eventually generating polarity in the epithelial cells. To elucidate the common features and differences in polarity establishment among various epithelial cells, we analyzed the formation of epithelial apical-basal polarity using three cell lines of different origin: MDCK II cells (dog renal tubules), EpH4 cells (mouse mammary gland), and R2/7 cells (human colon) expressing wild-type α-catenin (R2/7 α-Cate cells). These cells showed clear apical-basal polarity in 2-D cultures. In 3-D cultures, however, each cell line displayed different responses to the same ECM. In MDCK II cells, spheroids with a single lumen formed in both Matrigel and collagen gel. In R2/7 α-Cate cells, spheroids showed similar apical-basal polarity as that seen in MDCK II cells, but had multiple lumens. In EpH4 cells, the spheroids displayed an apical-basal polarity that was opposite to that seen in the other two cell types in both ECM gels, at least during the culture period. On the other hand, the three cell lines showed the same apical-basal polarity both in 2-D cultures and in 3-D cultures using the hanging drop method. The three lines also had similar cellular responses to ECM secreted by the cells themselves. Therefore, appropriate culture conditions should be carefully determined in advance when using various epithelial cells to analyze cell polarity or 3-D morphogenesis.

  7. Differential sensitivity of epithelial cells to extracellular matrix in polarity establishment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenobu Yonemura

    Full Text Available Establishment of apical-basal polarity is crucial for epithelial sheets that form a compartment in the body, which function to maintain the environment in the compartment. Effects of impaired polarization are easily observed in three-dimensional (3-D culture systems rather than in two-dimensional (2-D culture systems. Although the mechanisms for establishing the polarity are not completely understood, signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM are considered to be essential for determining the basal side and eventually generating polarity in the epithelial cells. To elucidate the common features and differences in polarity establishment among various epithelial cells, we analyzed the formation of epithelial apical-basal polarity using three cell lines of different origin: MDCK II cells (dog renal tubules, EpH4 cells (mouse mammary gland, and R2/7 cells (human colon expressing wild-type α-catenin (R2/7 α-Cate cells. These cells showed clear apical-basal polarity in 2-D cultures. In 3-D cultures, however, each cell line displayed different responses to the same ECM. In MDCK II cells, spheroids with a single lumen formed in both Matrigel and collagen gel. In R2/7 α-Cate cells, spheroids showed similar apical-basal polarity as that seen in MDCK II cells, but had multiple lumens. In EpH4 cells, the spheroids displayed an apical-basal polarity that was opposite to that seen in the other two cell types in both ECM gels, at least during the culture period. On the other hand, the three cell lines showed the same apical-basal polarity both in 2-D cultures and in 3-D cultures using the hanging drop method. The three lines also had similar cellular responses to ECM secreted by the cells themselves. Therefore, appropriate culture conditions should be carefully determined in advance when using various epithelial cells to analyze cell polarity or 3-D morphogenesis.

  8. Platelet-tumor cell interaction with the subendothelial extracellular matrix: relationship to cancer metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahalom, J.; Biran, S.; Fuks, Z.; Vlodavsky, I. (Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Radiation and Clinical Oncology); Eldor, A. (Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Hematology)

    1985-04-01

    Dissemination of neoplastic cells within the body involves invasion of blood vessels by tumor cells. This requires adhesion of blood-borne cells to the luminal surface of the vascular endothelium, invasion through the endothelial cell layer and local dissolution of the subendothelial basement membrane. The authors studied the interaction of platelets and tumor cells with cultured vascular endothelial cells and their secreted basement membrane-like extracellular matrix (ECM). Interaction of platelets with this ECM was associated with platelet activation, aggregation and degradation of heparan sulfate in the ECM by means of the platelet heparitinase. Biochemical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies have demonstrated that platelets may detect even minor gaps between adjacent endothelial cells and degrade the ECM heparan sulfate. Platelets were also shown to recruit lymphoma cells into minor gaps in the vascular endothelium. It is suggested that the platelet heparitinase is involved in the impairment of the integrity of the vessel wall and thus play a role in tumor cell metastasis.

  9. In vitro evaluation of the interactions between human corneal endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin San; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Giegengack, Matthew; Khan, Faraaz A; Khang, Gilson; Soker, Shay

    2013-02-01

    The corneal endothelium is the innermost cell layer of the cornea and rests on Descemet's membrane consisting of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins which can directly affect the cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, proliferation, polarity, morphogenesis and function. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between the ECM environment and human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), with the ultimate goal to improve cell proliferation and function in vitro. To evaluate the interaction of HCECs with ECM proteins, cells were seeded on ECM-coated tissue culture dishes, including collagen type I (COL I), collagen type IV (COL IV), fibronectin (FN), FNC coating mix (FNC) and laminin (LM). Cell adhesion and proliferation of HCECs on each substratum and expression of CEC markers were studied. The results showed that HCECs plated on the COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC-coated plates had enhanced cell adhesion initially; the number for COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC was significantly higher than the control (P < 0.05). In addition, cells grown on ECM protein-coated dishes showed more compact cellular morphology and CEC marker expression compared to cells seeded on uncoated dishes. Collectively, our results suggest that an adequate ECM protein combination can provide a long-term culture environment for HCECs for corneal endothelium transplantation.

  10. Function of cancer cell-derived extracellular matrix in tumor progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao-Feng Xiong; Ren Xu

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential component of the tumor microenvironment. Cancer development and progression are associated with increased ECM deposition and crosslink. The chemical and physical signals elicited from ECM are necessary for cancer cell proliferation and invasion. It is well recognized that stromal cells are a major source of ECM proteins. However, recent studies showed that cancer cells are also an active and important component in ECM remodeling. Cancer cells deposit a signiifcant amount of collagen, ifbronectin, and tenascin C (TNC). Recent studies demonstrate that these cancer cell-derived ECM proteins enhance cancer cell survival and promote cancer cell colonization at distant sites. ECM-related enzymes and chaperone proteins, such as prolyl-4-hydroxylase, lysyl-hydroxylase, lysyl oxidase, and heat shock protein 47, are also highly expressed in cancer cells. Inhibition of these enzymes signiifcantly reduces cancer growth, invasion, and metastasis. These factors suggest that the cancer cell-derived ECM is crucial for cancer progression and metastasis. Therefore, targeting these ECM proteins and ECM-related enzymes is a potential strategy for cancer treatment.

  11. Discrete Element Framework for Modelling Extracellular Matrix, Deformable Cells and Subcellular Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Wong, Kelvin K L; Joldes, Grand R; Rich, Addison J; Tan, Chin Wee; Burgess, Antony W; Smith, David W

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a framework for modelling biological tissues based on discrete particles. Cell components (e.g. cell membranes, cell cytoskeleton, cell nucleus) and extracellular matrix (e.g. collagen) are represented using collections of particles. Simple particle to particle interaction laws are used to simulate and control complex physical interaction types (e.g. cell-cell adhesion via cadherins, integrin basement membrane attachment, cytoskeletal mechanical properties). Particles may be given the capacity to change their properties and behaviours in response to changes in the cellular microenvironment (e.g., in response to cell-cell signalling or mechanical loadings). Each particle is in effect an 'agent', meaning that the agent can sense local environmental information and respond according to pre-determined or stochastic events. The behaviour of the proposed framework is exemplified through several biological problems of ongoing interest. These examples illustrate how the modelling framework allows enormous flexibility for representing the mechanical behaviour of different tissues, and we argue this is a more intuitive approach than perhaps offered by traditional continuum methods. Because of this flexibility, we believe the discrete modelling framework provides an avenue for biologists and bioengineers to explore the behaviour of tissue systems in a computational laboratory.

  12. Discrete Element Framework for Modelling Extracellular Matrix, Deformable Cells and Subcellular Components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce S Gardiner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a framework for modelling biological tissues based on discrete particles. Cell components (e.g. cell membranes, cell cytoskeleton, cell nucleus and extracellular matrix (e.g. collagen are represented using collections of particles. Simple particle to particle interaction laws are used to simulate and control complex physical interaction types (e.g. cell-cell adhesion via cadherins, integrin basement membrane attachment, cytoskeletal mechanical properties. Particles may be given the capacity to change their properties and behaviours in response to changes in the cellular microenvironment (e.g., in response to cell-cell signalling or mechanical loadings. Each particle is in effect an 'agent', meaning that the agent can sense local environmental information and respond according to pre-determined or stochastic events. The behaviour of the proposed framework is exemplified through several biological problems of ongoing interest. These examples illustrate how the modelling framework allows enormous flexibility for representing the mechanical behaviour of different tissues, and we argue this is a more intuitive approach than perhaps offered by traditional continuum methods. Because of this flexibility, we believe the discrete modelling framework provides an avenue for biologists and bioengineers to explore the behaviour of tissue systems in a computational laboratory.

  13. Stromal fibroblasts mediate extracellular matrix remodeling and invasion of scirrhous gastric carcinoma cells.

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    Hideki Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Scirrhous gastric carcinoma (SGC has the worst prognosis of all gastric cancers, owing to its rapid expansion by invasion and frequent peritoneal dissemination. Due to the increased proliferation of stromal fibroblasts (SFs that occurs within SGC lesions and the peritoneal metastatic sites, SFs have been proposed to support the progression of this disease. However, the biological and molecular basis and the pathological role of the intercellular interaction between SGC cells and SFs remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of SFs in the invasion of the extracellular matrix (ECM by SGC cells. When SGC cells were cocultured with SFs derived from SGC tissue on three-dimensional (3D Matrigel, they were attracted together to form large cellular aggregates that invaded within the Matrigel. Time-lapse imaging revealed that this process was associated with extensive contraction and remodeling of the ECM. Immunofluorescence and biochemical analysis showed that SGC cells stimulate phosphorylation of myosin light chain and actomyosin-mediated mechanical remodeling of the ECM by SFs. By utilizing this assay system for inhibitor library screening, we have identified several inhibitors that potently suppress the cooperation between SGC cells and SFs to form the invasive structures. Among them, a Src inhibitor dasatinib impaired the interaction between SGC cells and SFs both in vitro and in vivo and effectively blocked peritoneal dissemination of SGC cells. These results indicate that SFs mediate mechanical remodeling of the ECM by SGC cells, thereby promoting invasion and peritoneal dissemination of SGC.

  14. Artificial Polymeric Scaffolds as Extracellular Matrix Substitutes for Autologous Conjunctival Goblet Cell Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Storr-Paulsen, Thomas; Wang, Annie L.; Ghezzi, Chiara E.; Wang, Siran; Fullana, Matthew; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Utheim, Tor P.; Islam, Rakibul; Griffith, May; Islam, M. Mirazul; Hodges, Robin R.; Wnek, Gary E.; Kaplan, David L.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We fabricated and investigated polymeric scaffolds that can substitute for the conjunctival extracellular matrix to provide a substrate for autologous expansion of human conjunctival goblet cells in culture. Methods We fabricated two hydrogels and two silk films: (1) recombinant human collagen (RHC) hydrogel, (2) recombinant human collagen 2-methacryloylxyethyl phosphorylcholine (RHC-MPC) hydrogel, (3) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) modified silk, and (4) poly-D-lysine (PDL) coated silk, and four electrospun scaffolds: (1) collagen, (2) poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), (3) poly(caprolactone) (PCL), and (4) poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Coverslips and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were used for comparison. Human conjunctival explants were cultured on scaffolds for 9 to 15 days. Cell viability, outgrowth area, and the percentage of cells expressing markers for stratified squamous epithelial cells (cytokeratin 4) and goblet cells (cytokeratin 7) were determined. Results Most of cells grown on all scaffolds were viable except for PCL in which only 3.6 ± 2.2% of the cells were viable. No cells attached to PVA scaffold. The outgrowth was greatest on PDL-silk and PET. Outgrowth was smallest on PCL. All cells were CK7-positive on RHC-MPC while 84.7 ± 6.9% of cells expressed CK7 on PDL-silk. For PCL, 87.10 ± 3.17% of cells were CK7-positive compared to PET where 67.10 ± 12.08% of cells were CK7-positive cells. Conclusions Biopolymer substrates in the form of hydrogels and silk films provided for better adherence, proliferation, and differentiation than the electrospun scaffolds and could be used for conjunctival goblet cell expansion for eventual transplantation once undifferentiated and stratified squamous cells are included. Useful polymer scaffold design characteristics have emerged from this study. PMID:27832279

  15. Extracellular matrix-dependent differentiation of rabbit tracheal epithelial cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Squiban, A; Boisvieux-Ulrich, E; Guilianelli, C; Houcine, O; Geraud, G; Guennou, C; Marano, F

    1994-01-01

    The differentiation of tracheal epithelial cells in primary culture was investigated according to the nature of the extracellular matrix used. Cultures obtained by the explant technique were realized on a type I collagen substratum either as a thin, dried coating or as a thick, hydrated gel supplemented with culture medium and serum. These two types of substratum induced distinct cell morphology and cytokeratin expression in the explant derived cells. Where cells are less proliferating (from Day 7 to 10 of culture), differentiation was evaluated by morphologic ultrastructural observations, immunocytochemical detection of cytokeratins, and determination of cytokeratin pattern by biochemical analysis. The epithelium obtained on gel was multilayered, with small, round basal cells under large, flattened upper cells. The determination of the keratin pattern expressed by cells grown on gel revealed an expression of keratin 13, already considered as a specific marker of squamous metaplasia, that diminished with retinoic acid treatment. Present results demonstrated by confocal microscopy that K13-positive cells were large upper cells with a dense keratin network, whereas lower cells were positively stained with a specific monoclonal antibody to basal cells (KB37). Moreover, keratin neosynthesis analysis pointed out a higher expression of K6, a marker of hyperproliferation, on gel than on coating. All these data suggest a differentiation of rabbit tracheal epithelial cells grown on gel toward squamous metaplasia. By contrast, the epithelium observed on coating is nearly a monolayer of very large and spread out cells. No K13-positive cells were observed, but an increase in the synthesis of simple epithelium marker (K18) was detected. These two substrata, similar in composition and different in structure, induce separate differentiation and appear as good tools to explore the mechanisms of differentiation of epithelial tracheal cells.

  16. Phospholipids reduce gastric cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Petra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nidation of floating tumour cells initiates peritoneal carcinosis and limits prognosis of gastro-intestinal tumours. Adhesion of tumour cells to extracellular matrix components is a pivotal step in developing peritoneal dissemination of intraabdominal malignancies. Since phospholipids efficaciously prevented peritoneal adhesion formation in numerous animal studies we investigated their capacity to reduce adhesions of gastric cancer cells to extracellular matrix components (ECM. Methods Human gastric cancer cells (NUGC-4, Japanese Cancer Research Resources Bank, Tokyo, Japan were used in this study. Microtiter plates were coated with collagen IV (coll, laminin (ln and fibronectin (fn. Non-specific protein binding of the coated wells was blocked by adding 1% (w/v BSA (4°C, 12 h and rinsing the wells with Hepes buffer. 50.000 tumour cells in 100 μl medium were seeded into each well. Beside the controls, phospholipids were added in concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0/100 μl medium. After an incubation interval of 30 min, attached cells were fixed and stained with 0.1% (w/v crystal violet. The dye was resuspended with 50 μl of 0.2% (v/v Triton X-100 per well and colour yields were then measured by an ELISA reader at 590 nm. Optical density (OD showed a linear relationship to the amount of cells and was corrected for dying of BSA/polystyrene without cells. Results The attachment of gastric cancer cells to collagen IV, laminin, and fibronectin could be significantly reduced up to 53% by phospholipid concentrations of 0.5 mg/100 μl and higher. Conclusion These results, within the scope of additional experimental studies on mice and rats which showed a significant reduction of peritoneal carcinosis, demonstrated the capacity of phospholipids in controlling abdominal nidation of tumour cells to ECM components. Lipid emulsions may be a beneficial adjunct in surgery of gastrointestinal malignancies.

  17. Red blood cell lysate modulates the expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Amir; Li, Yunyuan; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Ghahary, Aziz

    2012-11-01

    During the early stage of wound healing process, blood clots can be served as a temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) to let skin cell migration and proliferation. The red blood cells are generally thought as inert bystanders in the early and inflammatory phase of wound healing. Here, we provide evidence that red blood cells (RBC) also play an important role in modulation of key ECM components such as type-I collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study, we used western blot analysis and showed a significant increase in the level of MMP-1, 2, 3. Furthermore, we found that RBC lysate significantly down-regulates type-I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin while up-regulates fibronectin expression in dermal fibroblasts. To further explore the mechanism by which RBC lysate modulates MMP-1 expression, the effect of inhibitors for three MAPK signaling pathways on RBC inducing MMP-1 expression by dermal fibroblasts were tested. The result showed that the inhibitor of ERK1/2 could abrogate the stimulatory effect of RBC lysate on MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts. Consistently, RBC treatment results in an increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in dermal fibroblast. In conclusion, these findings suggest that RBC lysate can modulate the expression of MMPs and key ECM components which are important in healing process.

  18. Ginkgo biloba extract suppresses hypertrophy and extracellular matrix accumulation in rat mesangial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-yun WANG; Xiao-xing YIN; Yun-ming WU; Dao-quan TANG; Yuan-yuan GAO; Mei-rong WAN; Xiao-yu HOU; Bei ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effects of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb) on the hypertrophy of mesangial cells and the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in mesangial cells. Methods: Cultured mesangial cells were allotted into 7 groups: normal group, solvent control group, high glucose group, low dose of EGb group, moderate dose of EGb group, high dose of EGb group, and captopril group. Activities of cell antioxidases, S phase percentage and G0/G1 phase percentage, collagen Ⅳ and laminin, Smad2/3 and Smad7, TGF-β1, Mrna were measured by different methods. Results: For EGb-treated groups, when compared with high glucose group, the cell percentage of S phase was raised and the percentage of G0/G1 was lowered. The intensity of oxidative stress was weakened. The expression of Smad2/3 was greatly decreased and Smad7 was increased. Collagen Ⅳ, laminin and TGF-β1 Mrna were also reduced. Conclusion: EGb can suppress cell hypertrophy and the accumulation of ECM in rat mesangial cells, which means it could play a vital role in the delay of glomerulosclerosis in diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Establishment and characterization of human engineered cells stably expressing large extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Daekee; Kang, Gwang-Sik; Han, Dong Keun; Park, Kwideok; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel-coated culture plates have been used to study the relationship between the ECM microenvironment and stem cell behavior. However, it is unclear whether ECM-coated dishes mimic the natural ECM microenvironment because the architecture of the ECM is constructed of randomly distributed fibers. The purpose of this study was the production and confirmation of human engineered cell lines stably expressing large ECM proteins such as collagen I/II and fibronectin. First, large (over 10 kb) ECM vectors encoding human collagen I/II and fibronectin were constructed and the circular vectors were linearized. Second, the linear ECM vectors were introduced into immortalized human embryonic kidney cells using various transfection methods. The polyethylenimine and liposome methods showed higher efficiencies than electroporation for transfection of these large vectors. Third, human ECM engineered cells were established by stable integration of the vector into the genomic DNA and resulted in stable overexpression of mRNA and proteins. In summary, human engineered cell lines stably expressing large ECM proteins such as human collagen I/II and fibronectin were successfully prepared, and secretion of the ECM components into the surrounding environment was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Thus, human ECM engineered cells naturally secreting ECM components could be valuable for studying the relationship between the native ECM microenvironment and stem cell behavior.

  20. Static stretch affects neural stem cell differentiation in an extracellular matrix-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmoli, Janahan; Pathak, Medha M.; McDonnell, Lisa P.; Nourse, Jamison L.; Tombola, Francesco; Earthman, James C.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2015-02-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) fate is strongly influenced by mechanotransduction as modulation of substrate stiffness affects lineage choice. Other types of mechanical stimuli, such as stretch (tensile strain), occur during CNS development and trauma, but their consequences for NSPC differentiation have not been reported. We delivered a 10% static equibiaxial stretch to NSPCs and examined effects on differentiation. We found static stretch specifically impacts NSPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes, but not neurons or astrocytes, and this effect is dependent on particular extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin linkages. Generation of oligodendrocytes from NSPCs was reduced on laminin, an outcome likely mediated by the α6 laminin-binding integrin, whereas similar effects were not observed for NSPCs on fibronectin. Our data demonstrate a direct role for tensile strain in dictating the lineage choice of NSPCs and indicate the dependence of this phenomenon on specific substrate materials, which should be taken into account for the design of biomaterials for NSPC transplantation.

  1. Proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis of smooth muscle cells cultured from human coronary atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. MacLeod (Donald); B.H. Strauss (Bradley); J. Escaned (Javier); V.A.W.M. Umans (Victor); R-J. van Suylen (Robert-Jan); A. Verkerk (Anton); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M. de Jong (Marcel)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to examine the proliferative capacity and extracellular matrix synthesis of human coronary plaque cells in vitro. BACKGROUND. Common to both primary atherosclerosis and restenosis are vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and production of ex

  2. beta-Catenin signaling is required for TGF-beta(1)-induced extracellular matrix production by airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarsma, Hoeke A.; Menzen, Mark H.; Halayko, Andrew J.; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2011-01-01

    Baarsma HA, Menzen MH, Halayko AJ, Meurs H, Kerstjens HA, Gosens R. beta-Catenin signaling is required for TGF-beta(1)-induced extracellular matrix production by airway smooth muscle cells. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 301: L956-L965, 2011. First published September 9, 2011; doi: 10.1152/ajplu

  3. Influence of the extracellular matrix on endogenous and transplanted stem cells after brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars eRoll

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The limited regeneration capacity of the adult central nervous system requires strategies to improve recovery of patients. In this context, the interaction of endogenous as well as transplanted stem cells with their environment is crucial. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms could help to improve regeneration by targeted manipulation.In the course of reactive gliosis, astrocytes upregulate Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and start, in many cases, to proliferate. Beside GFAP, subpopulations of these astroglial cells coexpress neural progenitor markers like Nestin. Although cells express these markers, the proportion of cells that eventually give rise to neurons is limited in many cases in vivo compared to the situation in vitro. In the first section, we present the characteristics of endogenous progenitor-like cells and discuss the differences in their neurogenic potential in vitro and in vivo.As the environment plays an important role for survival, proliferation, migration, and other processes, the second section of the review describes changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM, a complex network that contains numerous signaling molecules. It appears that signals in the damaged central nervous system lead to an activation and de-differentiation of astrocytes, but do not effectively promote neuronal differentiation of these cells. Factors that influence stem cells during development are upregulated in the damaged brain as part of an environment resembling a stem cell niche. We give a general description of the ECM composition, with focus on stem cell-associated factors like the glycoprotein Tenascin-C.Stem cell transplantation is considered as potential treatment strategy. Interaction of transplanted stem cells with the host environment is critical for the outcome of stem cell-based therapies. Possible mechanisms involving the ECM by which transplanted stem cells might improve recovery are discussed in the last section.

  4. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and motil...... as well as matrix constitution and protein crosslinking. Here we summarize roles of the three major matrix receptor types, with emphasis on how they function in tumor progression. [on SciFinder(R)]......Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization...... and motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromols. are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin...

  5. IAPP modulates cellular autophagy, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix metabolism in human intervertebral disc cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinghuo; Song, Yu; Liu, Wei; Wang, Kun; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuai; Duan, Zhenfeng; Shao, Zengwu; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenic process of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is characterized by imbalance in the extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism. Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells have important roles in maintaining the proper structure and tissue homeostasis of disc ECM. These cells need adequate supply of glucose and oxygen. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) exerts its biological effects by regulating glucose metabolism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of IAPP in degenerated IVD tissue, and IAPP modulation of ECM metabolism in human NP cells, especially the crosstalk mechanism between apoptosis and autophagy in these cells. We found that the expression of IAPP and Calcr-RAMP decreased considerably during IDD progression, along with the decrease in the expression of AG, BG, and Col2A1. Induction of IAPP in NP cells by transfection with pLV-IAPP enhanced the synthesis of aggrecan and Col2A1 and attenuated the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1. Upregulation of IAPP also affected the expression of the catabolic markers—matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 3, 9 and 13 and ADAMTS 4 and 5. Downregulation of IAPP by siRNA inhibited the expression of anabolic genes but increased the expression of catabolic genes and inflammatory factors. The expressions of autophagic and apoptotic markers in NP cells transfected with pLV-IAPP were upregulated, including BECLIN1, ATG5, ATG7, LC3 II/I and Bcl-2, while significantly increase in the expression of Bax and Caspase-3 in NP cells transfected with pLV-siIAPP. Mechanistically, PI3K/AKT-mTOR and p38/JNK MAPK signal pathways were involved. We propose that IAPP might play a pivotal role in the development of IDD, by regulating ECM metabolism and controlling the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy in NP, thus potentially offering a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of IDD.

  6. Fucan inhibits Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) adhesion to fibronectin by binding to the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Hugo A; Franco, Célia R; Trindade, Edvaldo S; Veiga, Silvio S; Leite, Edda L; Nader, Helena B; Dietrich, Carl P

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, sulfated fucans have emerged as an important class of natural biopolymers. In this study, the anti-adhesive activity of a fucan from the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi was analyzed using tumorigenic cells: wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and the mutant type deficient in xylosyltransferase (CHO-745). Fibronectin (FN) was used as substrate for cell attachment. For both cell types, this fucan has shown a dose-dependent anti-adhesive effect, reaching saturation at around 400 mug/mL. This effect was abolished by desulfation of the fucan. In addition, this polymer exhibited the highest inhibitory effect in comparison to other sulfated polysaccharides. The fucan was biotinylated and used as a probe to identify its action sites. Biotinylated fucan was detected in the extracellular matrix environment by confocal microscopy and flow cytometric analysis, but not at the cell surface. The results suggest that the fucan shows anti-adhesive activity by binding directly to FN, and blocking FN sites that are recognized by cell surface ligands, possibly the integrin family.

  7. Influence of extracellular matrix proteins and substratum topography on corneal epithelial cell alignment and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Vijaykrishna; McKee, Clayton; Cheung, Wai; Naik, Rachel; Nealey, Paul F; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J

    2013-08-01

    The basement membrane (BM) of the corneal epithelium presents biophysical cues in the form of topography and compliance that can impact the phenotype and behaviors of cells and their nuclei through modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. In addition, it is also well known that the intrinsic biochemical attributes of BMs can modulate cell behaviors. In this study, the influence of the combination of exogenous coating of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) (fibronectin-collagen [FNC]) with substratum topography was investigated on cytoskeletal architecture as well as alignment and migration of immortalized corneal epithelial cells. In the absence of FNC coating, a significantly greater percentage of cells aligned parallel with the long axis of the underlying anisotropically ordered topographic features; however, their ability to migrate was impaired. Additionally, changes in the surface area, elongation, and orientation of cytoskeletal elements were differentially influenced by the presence or absence of FNC. These results suggest that the effects of topographic cues on cells are modulated by the presence of surface-associated ECM proteins. These findings have relevance to experiments using cell cultureware with biomimetic biophysical attributes as well as the integration of biophysical cues in tissue-engineering strategies and the development of improved prosthetics.

  8. Extracellular Matrix-dependent Pathways in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Reveal Potential Targets for Anticancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevicius, Vaidotas; Vasauskas, Gintautas; Noreikiene, Rimante; Kuodyte, Karolina; Valius, Mindaugas; Suziedelis, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells grown in a 3D culture are more resistant to anticancer therapy treatment compared to those in a monolayer 2D culture. Emerging evidence has suggested that the key reasons for increased cell survival could be gene expression changes in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction-dependent manner. Global gene-expression changes were obtained in human colorectal carcinoma HT29 and DLD1 cell lines between 2D and laminin-rich (lr) ECM 3D growth conditions by gene-expression microarray analysis. The most significantly altered functional categories were revealed by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. The microarray data revealed that 841 and 1190 genes were differentially expressed in colorectal carcinoma DLD1 and HT29 cells. KEGG analysis indicated that the most significantly altered categories were cell adhesion, mitogen-activated protein kinase and immune response. Our results indicate altered pathways related to cancer development and progression and suggest potential ECM-regulated targets for the development of anticancer therapies. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Interdigital cell death in the embryonic limb is associated with depletion of Reelin in the extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Interdigital cell death is a physiological regression process responsible for sculpturing the digits in the embryonic vertebrate limb. Changes in the intensity of this degenerative process account for the different patterns of interdigital webbing among vertebrate species. Here, we show that Reelin is present in the extracellular matrix of the interdigital mesoderm of chick and mouse embryos during the developmental stages of digit formation. Reelin is a large extracellular glycoprotein which...

  10. Transchromosomic cell model of Down syndrome shows aberrant migration, adhesion and proteome response to extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotter Finbarr E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic birth defect. Congenital heart defects (CHD are seen in 40% of DS children, and >50% of all atrioventricular canal defects in infancy are caused by trisomy 21, but the causative genes remain unknown. Results Here we show that aberrant adhesion and proliferation of DS cells can be reproduced using a transchromosomic model of DS (mouse fibroblasts bearing supernumerary HSA21. We also demonstrate a deacrease of cell migration in transchromosomic cells independently of their adhesion properties. We show that cell-autonomous proteome response to the presence of Collagen VI in extracellular matrix is strongly affected by trisomy 21. Conclusion This set of experiments establishes a new model system for genetic dissection of the specific HSA21 gene-overdose contributions to aberrant cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and specific proteome response to collagen VI, cellular phenotypes linked to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  11. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of extracellular matrix with cells regulates their adhesion, migration and proliferation, and it is believed that damage to vascular matrix components is a factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Evidence has been provided for a role for the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase)...

  12. Modulating cell adhesion dynamics on carbon nanotube monolayer engineered with extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ning; Wong, Chee C; Gong, Ying X; Tan, Samuel C W; Chan, Vincent; Liao, Kin

    2010-04-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may have potentials for tissue engineering applications because of their unparalleled physical properties, little has been known on the cell adhesion mechanisms on model CNT monolayer pertaining to the design of novel cell therapeutics device. In this study, the adhesion dynamics of primary porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on CNT monolayer were elucidated with confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy. Moreover, CNT monolayer (CNT-ML) was functionalized with two typical extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN) in order to promote its biocompatibility. First, it is shown by atomic force microscopy that the topographical features of CNT-ML were dependent on the types of immobilized ECM protein. Second, significant time lag in adhesion contact evolution (around 10 min) for PEFs was found on both CNT-ML and CNT-COL compared to the negligible time lag on CNT-FN. It was found that adhesion energy of PEFs on the CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces reached steady state at 60 and 30 min after cell seeding compared to 70 min on CNT-ML surface. At steady state, the adhesion energy of PEFs on the CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces was about twice as much than that on the CNT-ML surface. Moreover, immobilization of collagen or fibronectin on CNT monolayer led to an increase in seeding efficiency and proliferation rate of PEFs. Scanning electron microscopy and immunostaining together demonstrated that PEFs displayed an elongated morphology and highly polarized actin network on both CNT-COL and CNT-FN surfaces, whereas PEFs displayed nonuniform cell morphology and actin organization on the CNT-ML surface. Overall, our results demonstrated that the biophysical responses and biological behavior of PEFs on unmodified or functionalized CNT monolayer were different. Functionalization of CNT through extracellular matrix

  13. Silicon-based quantum dots induce inflammation in human lung cells and disrupt extracellular matrix homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Miruna-Silvia; Sima, Cornelia; Cinteza, Ludmila Otilia; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-08-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are nanocrystalline semiconductor materials that have been tested for biological applications such as cancer therapy, cellular imaging and drug delivery, despite the serious lack of information of their effects on mammalian cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential of Si/SiO2 QDs to induce an inflammatory response in MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. Cells were exposed to different concentrations of Si/SiO2 QDs (25-200 μg·mL(-1)) for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. The results obtained showed that uptake of QDs was dependent on biocorona formation and the stability of nanoparticles in various biological media (minimum essential medium without or with 10% fetal bovine serum). The cell membrane damage indicated by the increase in lactate dehydrogenase release after exposure to QDs was dose- and time-dependent. The level of lysosomes increased proportionally with the concentration of QDs, whereas an accumulation of autophagosomes was also observed. Cellular morphology was affected, as shown by the disruption of actin filaments. The enhanced release of nitric oxide and the increase in interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 protein expression suggested that nanoparticles triggered an inflammatory response in MRC-5 cells. QDs decreased the protein expression and enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 and also MMP-1 caseinase activity, whereas the protein levels of MMP-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 increased. The present study reveals for the first time that silicon-based QDs are able to generate inflammation in lung cells and cause an imbalance in extracellular matrix turnover through a differential regulation of MMPs and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 protein expression.

  14. Morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of extracellular matrix changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Agrawal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, including its progression from dysplasia to carcinoma, "field effects", genetic changes in tumor associated mucosa (TAM and effect of matrix metalloproteinases in breaking down of matrix proteins to facilitate invasion, has been well documented. However, what remains to be done is to extrapolate this knowledge to improve patient care. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the extracellular matrix (ECM changes with the routine histochemical stains available to most histopathologists. Materials and Methods: The study includes 72 cases of OSCC in which the tumor and adjacent normal appearing areas were sampled to study the ECM changes with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E and Verhoeff′s-Van Gieson elastic stain (VVG. Results: Basophilic fragmentation of collagen (H and E and clumped short elastic fibers (VVG were seen in 12 (16.7% cases. Of the remaining cases, 18 (25% had a dense lymphocytic infiltrate and had no demonstrable elastic fibers. Those cases with H and E changes were further studied and compared with normal mucosa for ultrastructural changes. The ultrastructural study demonstrated an increase in oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibers and decrease in collagen fibers with some transformation changes associated with OSCCs and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: Changes in transformation of collagen to elastic fibers and also the loss of both the fibers in areas of lymphocytic infiltration possibly indicate degradation of ECM fibers by factors released from the lymphocytes or tumor cells and the limiting effect on the tumor by ECM remodeling.

  15. A FAK-Cas-Rac-lamellipodin signaling module transduces extracellular matrix stiffness into mechanosensitive cell cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yong Ho; Mui, Keeley L; Hsu, Bernadette Y; Liu, Shu-Lin; Cretu, Alexandra; Razinia, Ziba; Xu, Tina; Puré, Ellen; Assoian, Richard K

    2014-06-17

    Tissue and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness is transduced into intracellular stiffness, signaling, and changes in cellular behavior. Integrins and several of their associated focal adhesion proteins have been implicated in sensing ECM stiffness. We investigated how an initial sensing event is translated into intracellular stiffness and a biologically interpretable signal. We found that a pathway consisting of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), the adaptor protein p130Cas (Cas), and the guanosine triphosphatase Rac selectively transduced ECM stiffness into stable intracellular stiffness, increased the abundance of the cell cycle protein cyclin D1, and promoted S-phase entry. Rac-dependent intracellular stiffening involved its binding partner lamellipodin, a protein that transmits Rac signals to the cytoskeleton during cell migration. Our findings establish that mechanotransduction by a FAK-Cas-Rac-lamellipodin signaling module converts the external information encoded by ECM stiffness into stable intracellular stiffness and mechanosensitive cell cycling. Thus, lamellipodin is important not only in controlling cellular migration but also for regulating the cell cycle in response to mechanical signals.

  16. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  17. Extracellular matrix regulates enhanced eotaxin expression in asthmatic airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Vivien; Burgess, Janette K; Ratoff, Jonathan C; O'connor, Brian J; Greenough, Anne; Lee, Tak H; Hirst, Stuart J

    2006-01-01

    RATIONALE: Altered airway smooth muscle (ASM) function and enrichment of the extracellular matrix (ECM) with fibronectin and collagen are key features of asthma. Previously, we have reported these ECM proteins enhance ASM synthetic function. OBJECTIVE: We compared ASM cultured from endobronchial bio

  18. Rhinovirus infection induces extracellular matrix protein deposition in asthmatic and nonasthmatic airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuo, Curtis; Lim, Sam; King, Nicholas J C; Johnston, Sebastian L; Burgess, Janette K; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G

    2011-01-01

    Airway remodeling, which includes increases in the extracellular matrix (ECM), is a characteristic feature of asthma and is correlated to disease severity. Rhinovirus (RV) infections are associated with increased risk of asthma development in young children and are the most common cause of asthma ex

  19. Up-regulated expression of extracellular matrix remodeling genes in phagocytically challenged trabecular meshwork cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine M Porter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, the tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic function in TM cells is thought to play an important role in the normal functioning of the outflow pathway. Dysfunction of phagocytosis could lead to abnormalities of outflow resistance and increased intraocular pressure (IOP. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are completely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression profile analysis of human TM cells phagocytically challenged to E. coli or pigment under physiological and oxidative stress environment were performed using Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 array and analyzed with Genespring GX. Despite the differential biological response elicited by E. coli and pigment particles, a number of genes, including MMP1, MMP3, TNFSF11, DIO2, KYNU, and KCCN2 showed differential expression with both phagocytic ligands in all conditions. Data was confirmed by qPCR in both human and porcine TM cells. Metacore pathway analysis and the usage of recombinant adenovirus encoding the dominant negative mutant of IkB identified NF-κB as a transcription factor mediating the up-regulation of at least MMP1 and MMP3 in TM cells with phagocytosis. In-gel zymography demonstrated increased collagenolytic and caseinolytic activities in the culture media of TM cells challenge to E. coli. In addition, collagenolytic I activity was further confirmed using the self-quenched fluorescent substrate DQ-Collagen I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we report for the first time the differential gene expression profile of TM cells phagocytically challenged with either E. coli or pigment. Our data indicate a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  20. Biocompatibility of pure titanium modified by human endothelial cell-derived extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang Jin, E-mail: jinxxwang@263.net [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhu Ying; Tu Qiufen; Huang Nan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) used to modify biomaterial surface is a promising method for improving cardiovascular material hemocompatibility. In the present work, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are cultured and native ECM is obtained on pure titanium surface. Fourier infrared spectrum (FTIR) test proves the existence of amide I and amide II band on the modified titanium surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) further confirms the chemical composition and binding types of the ECM proteins on the titanium substrate. The results of light microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) exhibit the morphology of HUVEC derived ECM. There are higher water contact angles on the ECM modified samples. Furthermore, some ECM components, including fibronectin (FN), laminin (LN) and type IV collagen (IV-COL) are presented on ECM-covered titanium surface by immunofluorescence staining. The biological behavior of cultured HUVECs and adherent platelets on different samples are investigated by in vitro HUVECs culture and platelet adhesion. Cells exhibit better morphology and their proliferation ability greatly improve on the ECM-covered titanium. At the same time, the platelet adhesion and spreading are inhibited on ECM-covered titanium surface. These investigations demonstrate that ECM produced by HUVECs cannot only improve adhesion and proliferation ability of endothelial cell but also inhibit adhesion and activation of platelets. Thus, the approach described here may provide a basis for preparation of modified surface in cardiovascular implants application.

  1. Linearized texture of three-dimensional extracellular matrix is mandatory for bladder cancer cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Massimo; Nebuloni, Manuela; Allevi, Raffaele; Zerbi, Pietro; Longhi, Erika; Lucianò, Roberta; Locatelli, Irene; Pecoraro, Angela; Indrieri, Marco; Speziali, Chantal; Doglioni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering simulating the native microenvironment is of utmost importance. As a major component of the microenvironment, the extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to tissue homeostasis, whereas modifications of native features are associated with pathological conditions. Furthermore, three-dimensional (3D) geometry is an important feature of synthetic scaffolds favoring cell stemness, maintenance and differentiation. We analyzed the 3D structure, geometrical measurements and anisotropy of the ECM isolated from (i) human bladder mucosa (basal lamina and lamina propria) and muscularis propria; and, (ii) bladder carcinoma (BC). Next, binding and invasion of bladder metastatic cell line was observed on synthetic scaffold recapitulating anisotropy of tumoral ECM, but not on scaffold with disorganized texture typical of non-neoplastic lamina propria. This study provided information regarding the ultrastructure and geometry of healthy human bladder and BC ECMs. Likewise, using synthetic scaffolds we identified linearization of the texture as a mandatory feature for BC cell invasion. Integrating microstructure and geometry with biochemical and mechanical factors could support the development of an innovative synthetic bladder substitute or a tumoral scaffold predictive of chemotherapy outcomes. PMID:27779205

  2. Extracellular matrix proteins expression profiling in chemoresistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynaecological malignancies. Extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect drug resistance by preventing the penetration of the drug into cancer cells and increased resistance to apoptosis. This study demonstrates alterations in the expression levels of ECM components and related genes in cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, topotecan-, and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line. Affymetrix Gene Chip Human Genome Array Strips were used for hybridisations. The genes that had altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scatter plots. The genes that were up- or downregulated more than fivefold were selected and listed. Among the investigated genes, 28 genes were upregulated, 10 genes were downregulated, and two genes were down- or upregulated depending on the cell line. Between upregulated genes 12 were upregulated very significantly--over 20-fold. These genes included COL1A2, COL12A1, COL21A1, LOX, TGFBI, LAMB1, EFEMP1, GPC3, SDC2, MGP, MMP3, and TIMP3. Four genes were very significantly downregulated: COL11A1, LAMA2, GPC6, and LUM. The expression profiles of investigated genes provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and the expression of ECM components. Identifying correlations between investigated genes and drug resistance will require further analysis.

  3. Extracellular matrix proteins interact with cell-signaling pathways in modifying risk of achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Colleen J; van der Merwe, Lize; Cook, Jill; Handley, Christopher J; Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between variants within genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and components of cell-signaling pathways within the extracellular matrix, and determine the relative contribution of these variants to Achilles tendinopathy risk in a polygenic model. A total of 339 asymptomatic control participants and 179 participants clinically diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy were genotyped for variants within six genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and three genes encoding components of cell-signaling pathways. Logistic regression, stepwise selection, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to select and evaluate genetic interactions and determine the relative contribution of these variants to overall genetic risk. The strongest, best fit polygenic risk model included the variables sex, three COL27A1 variants (rs4143245; rs1249744; rs946053), COL5A1 rs12722, CASP8 rs1045485, and CASP8 rs2824129 with an area under the ROC curve of 0.737 and the maximum sum of sensitivity and specificity indicators equal to 134%. Significant interactions between genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and genes encoding components of the cell-signaling pathways modify risk of Achilles tendinopathy.

  4. Repair of Traumatic Skeletal Muscle Injury with Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded on Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    Hammers D. W., Le L. N., Gokhale R., Sarathy A., Song T. J., Tierney M. T., Suggs L. J., Walters T. J., Farrar R. P., 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...vivo. Bioma terials 30, 2393, 2009. 65. Beattie, A.J., et al. Chemoattraction of Progenitor Cells by Remodeling Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds

  5. Molecular constituents of the extracellular matrix in rat liver mounting a hepatic progenitor cell response for tissue repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig; Jelnes, Peter; Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2013-01-01

    Tissue repair in the adult mammalian liver occurs in two distinct processes, referred to as the first and second tiers of defense. We undertook to characterize the changes in molecular constituents of the extracellular matrix when hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) respond in a second tier of defense...

  6. Topographical extracellular matrix cues on anticancer drug-induced cytotoxicity in stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangho; Kim, Yeon Ju; Bae, Won-Gyu; Jang, Kyung-Jin; Lim, Ki Taek; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Choung, Yun-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, cell chip-based platforms have begun to show promise as a means of corroborating the findings of in vivo animal tests for cytotoxicity, and perhaps in the future partially replacing the need for such animal models. In contrast to the conventional culture methods, micro- and nanofabrication techniques can be utilized to provide a set of mechanostimulatory signals to the cells that mimic the context of extracellular matrix (ECM) of the tissue in which a particular cell line resides. Here, we report periodic lateral topographic striations, with a pitch ranging approximately from 200 to 800 nm with an intention to mimic a common geometry of fibrils in the ECM such as collagen or elastin, as a platform for investigating anticancer drug-induced cytotoxicity in stem cells. The ECM cues could facilitate perimeter, elongation, and gap junction formation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which eventually influenced the fate of cells in terms of death and survival against the common chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. Interestingly, the appropriate inhibition of gap junctions of MSCs on the ECM mimicking substrates could prevent the cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity through the inhibition of the cisplatin-induced 'death signal communication' as compared to that on the flat substrates. Our results imply that nanoscale topography is an important consideration for chip-based cytotoxicity assays, which uniquely enable the consideration and rational design of ECM-like topographic features, and furthermore, that the natural topography of the ECM in the context of stem cell niches may serve as an important indicator for chemotherapeutic agent sensitivity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. clickECM: Development of a cell-derived extracellular matrix with azide functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, S M; Keller, S; Wieland, D E; Wittmann, V; Tovar, G E M; Bach, M; Kluger, P J

    2016-12-10

    In vitro cultured cells produce a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that remains intact after decellularization. The biological complexity derived from the variety of distinct ECM molecules makes these matrices ideal candidates for biomaterials. Biomaterials with the ability to guide cell function are a topic of high interest in biomaterial development. However, these matrices lack specific addressable functional groups, which are often required for their use as a biomaterial. Due to the biological complexity of the cell-derived ECM, it is a challenge to incorporate such functional groups without affecting the integrity of the biomolecules within the ECM. The azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click reaction, Huisgen-reaction) is an efficient and specific ligation reaction that is known to be biocompatible when strained alkynes are used to avoid the use of copper (I) as a catalyst. In our work, the ubiquitous modification of a fibroblast cell-derived ECM with azides was achieved through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering by adding the azide-modified monosaccharide Ac4GalNAz (1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-N-azidoacetylgalactosamine) to the cell culture medium. The resulting azide-modified network remained intact after removing the cells by lysis and the molecular structure of the ECM proteins was unimpaired after a gentle homogenization process. The biological composition was characterized in order to show that the functionalization does not impair the complexity and integrity of the ECM. The azides within this "clickECM" could be accessed by small molecules (such as an alkyne-modified fluorophore) or by surface-bound cyclooctynes to achieve a covalent coating with clickECM.

  8. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celebi, Betuel; Pineault, Nicolas [Hema-Quebec, Research and Development Department, Quebec City, G1V 5C3, PQ (Canada); Mantovani, Diego, E-mail: nicolas.pineault@hema-quebec.qc.ca [Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Materials Engineering and University Hospital Research Center, Laval University, Quebec City, G1V 0A6, PQ (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  9. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, Betül; Mantovani, Diego; Pineault, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  10. Role of Connective Tissue Growth Factor in Extracellular Matrix Degradation in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun; ZHU Zhonghua; LIU Jianshe; YANG Xiao; FU Ling; DENG Anguo

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in renal tubular cells induced by transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and to explore the role of CTGF in the degradation of renal extracellular matrix (ECM), a human proximal tubular epithelial cell line (HKC) was cultured in vitro. Cationic lipid-mediated CTGF antisense ODN was transfected into HKC. After HKC were stimulated with TGF-β1 (5 μg/L), the mRNA level of PAI-1 was detected by RT-PCR. Intracellular PAI-1 protein synthesis was assessed by flow cytometry. The secreted PAI-1 in the media was determined by Western blot. The results showed that TGF-β1 could induce tubular CTGF and PAI-1 mRNA expression. The PAI-1 mRNA expression induced by TGF-β1 was significantly inhibited by CTGF antisense ODN. CTGF antisense ODN also inhibited intracellular PAI-1 protein synthesis and lowered the levels of PAI-1 protein secreted into the media. It was concluded that CTGF might play a crucial role in the degradation of excessive ECM during tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and blocking the biological effect of CTGF may be a novel way in preventing renal fibrosis.

  11. Planar cell polarity proteins differentially regulate extracellular matrix organization and assembly during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Michael R; Mundell, Nathan A; Sawyer, Leah M; Dunlap, Julie A; Jessen, Jason R

    2013-11-01

    Zebrafish gastrulation cell movements occur in the context of dynamic changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and require the concerted action of planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins that regulate cell elongation and mediolateral alignment. Data obtained using Xenopus laevis gastrulae have shown that integrin-fibronectin interactions underlie the formation of polarized cell protrusions necessary for PCP and have implicated PCP proteins themselves as regulators of ECM. By contrast, the relationship between establishment of PCP and ECM assembly/remodeling during zebrafish gastrulation is unclear. We previously showed that zebrafish embryos carrying a null mutation in the four-pass transmembrane PCP protein vang-like 2 (vangl2) exhibit increased matrix metalloproteinase activity and decreased immunolabeling of fibronectin. These data implicated for the first time a core PCP protein in the regulation of pericellular proteolysis of ECM substrates and raised the question of whether other zebrafish PCP proteins also impact ECM organization. In Drosophila melanogaster, the cytoplasmic PCP protein Prickle binds Van Gogh and regulates its function. Here we report that similar to vangl2, loss of zebrafish prickle1a decreases fibronectin protein levels in gastrula embryos. We further show that Prickle1a physically binds Vangl2 and regulates both the subcellular distribution and total protein level of Vangl2. These data suggest that the ability of Prickle1a to impact fibronectin organization is at least partly due to effects on Vangl2. In contrast to loss of either Vangl2 or Prickle1a function, we find that glypican4 (a Wnt co-receptor) and frizzled7 mutant gastrula embryos with disrupted non-canonical Wnt signaling exhibit the opposite phenotype, namely increased fibronectin assembly. Our data show that glypican4 mutants do not have decreased proteolysis of ECM substrates, but instead have increased cell surface cadherin protein expression and increased intercellular

  12. Scleraxis is required for cell lineage differentiation and extracellular matrix remodeling during murine heart valve formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levay, Agata K; Peacock, Jacqueline D; Lu, Yinhui; Koch, Manuel; Hinton, Robert B; Kadler, Karl E; Lincoln, Joy

    2008-10-24

    Heart valve structures, derived from mesenchyme precursor cells, are composed of differentiated cell types and extracellular matrix arranged to facilitate valve function. Scleraxis (scx) is a transcription factor required for tendon cell differentiation and matrix organization. This study identified high levels of scx expression in remodeling heart valve structures at embryonic day 15.5 through postnatal stages using scx-GFP reporter mice and determined the in vivo function using mice null for scx. Scx(-/-) mice display significantly thickened heart valve structures from embryonic day 17.5, and valves from mutant mice show alterations in valve precursor cell differentiation and matrix organization. This is indicated by decreased expression of the tendon-related collagen type XIV, increased expression of cartilage-associated genes including sox9, as well as persistent expression of mesenchyme cell markers including msx1 and snai1. In addition, ultrastructure analysis reveals disarray of extracellular matrix and collagen fiber organization within the valve leaflet. Thickened valve structures and increased expression of matrix remodeling genes characteristic of human heart valve disease are observed in juvenile scx(-/-) mice. In addition, excessive collagen deposition in annular structures within the atrioventricular junction is observed. Collectively, our studies have identified an in vivo requirement for scx during valvulogenesis and demonstrate its role in cell lineage differentiation and matrix distribution in remodeling valve structures.

  13. Cells Sensing Mechanical Cues: Stiffness Influences the Lifetime of Cell-Extracellular Matrix Interactions by Affecting the Loading Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Sun, Zhenglong; Chen, Xiaofei; Li, Jing; Xu, Yue; Zu, Yan; Hu, Jiliang; Han, Dong; Yang, Chun

    2016-01-26

    The question of how cells sense substrate mechanical cues has gained increasing attention among biologists. By introducing contour-based data analysis to single-cell force spectroscopy, we identified a loading-rate threshold for the integrin α2β1-DGEA bond beyond which a dramatic increase in bond lifetime was observed. On the basis of mechanical cues (elasticity or topography), the effective spring constant of substrates k is mapped to the loading rate r under actomyosin pulling speed v, which, in turn, affects the lifetime of the integrin-ligand bond. Additionally, downregulating v with a low-dose blebbistatin treatment promotes the neuronal lineage specification of mesenchymal stem cells on osteogenic stiff substrates. Thus, sensing of the loading rate is central to how cells sense mechanical cues that affect cell-extracellular matrix interactions and stem cell differentiation.

  14. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Wang; Zheng-wei Li; Min Luo; Ya-jun Li; Ke-qiang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some re-spects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the poly-lactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve ifbers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylac-tic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is ben-eifcial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was found with the

  15. Ornamenting 3D printed scaffolds with cell-laid extracellular matrix for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Song, Tae-Ha; Rijal, Girdhari; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    3D printing technique is the most sophisticated technique to produce scaffolds with tailorable physical properties. But, these scaffolds often suffer from limited biological functionality as they are typically made from synthetic materials. Cell-laid mineralized ECM was shown to be potential for improving the cellular responses and drive osteogenesis of stem cells. Here, we intend to improve the biological functionality of 3D-printed synthetic scaffolds by ornamenting them with cell-laid mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) that mimics a bony microenvironment. We developed bone graft substitutes by using 3D printed scaffolds made from a composite of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and mineralized ECM laid by human nasal inferior turbinate tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs). A rotary flask bioreactor was used to culture hTMSCs on the scaffolds to foster formation of mineralized ECM. A freeze/thaw cycle in hypotonic buffer was used to efficiently decellularize (97% DNA reduction) the ECM-ornamented scaffolds while preserving its main organic and inorganic components. The ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds supported osteoblastic differentiation of newly-seeded hTMSCs by upregulating four typical osteoblastic genes (4-fold higher RUNX2; 3-fold higher ALP; 4-fold higher osteocalcin; and 4-fold higher osteopontin) and increasing calcium deposition compared to bare 3D printed scaffolds. In vivo, in ectopic and orthotopic models in rats, ECM-ornamented scaffolds induced greater bone formation than that of bare scaffolds. These results suggest a valuable method to produce ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds as off-the-shelf bone graft substitutes that combine tunable physical properties with physiological presentation of biological signals.

  16. Promotion of hepatic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on decellularized cell-deposited extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongliang; Liu, Xiaozhen; Peng, Liang; Gao, Zhiliang; Ye, Yun; Su, Yujie; Zhao, Qiyi; Wang, Ke; Gong, Yihong; He, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between stem cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) are requisite for inducing lineage-specific differentiation and maintaining biological functions of mesenchymal stem cells by providing a composite set of chemical and structural signals. Here we investigated if cell-deposited ECM mimicked in vivo liver's stem cell microenvironment and facilitated hepatogenic maturation. Decellularization process preserved the fibrillar microstructure and a mix of matrix proteins in cell-deposited ECM, such as type I collagen, type III collagen, fibronectin, and laminin that were identical to those found in native liver. Compared with the cells on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) cultured on cell-deposited ECM showed a spindle-like shape, a robust proliferative capacity, and a suppressed level of intracellular reactive oxygen species, accompanied with upregulation of two superoxide dismutases. Hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from BM-MSCs on ECM were determined with a more intensive staining of glycogen storage, an elevated level of urea biosynthesis, and higher expressions of hepatocyte-specific genes in contrast to those on TCPS. These results demonstrate that cell-deposited ECM can be an effective method to facilitate hepatic maturation of BM-MSCs and promote stem-cell-based liver regenerative medicine.

  17. Promotion of Hepatic Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Decellularized Cell-Deposited Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between stem cells and extracellular matrix (ECM are requisite for inducing lineage-specific differentiation and maintaining biological functions of mesenchymal stem cells by providing a composite set of chemical and structural signals. Here we investigated if cell-deposited ECM mimicked in vivo liver's stem cell microenvironment and facilitated hepatogenic maturation. Decellularization process preserved the fibrillar microstructure and a mix of matrix proteins in cell-deposited ECM, such as type I collagen, type III collagen, fibronectin, and laminin that were identical to those found in native liver. Compared with the cells on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs cultured on cell-deposited ECM showed a spindle-like shape, a robust proliferative capacity, and a suppressed level of intracellular reactive oxygen species, accompanied with upregulation of two superoxide dismutases. Hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from BM-MSCs on ECM were determined with a more intensive staining of glycogen storage, an elevated level of urea biosynthesis, and higher expressions of hepatocyte-specific genes in contrast to those on TCPS. These results demonstrate that cell-deposited ECM can be an effective method to facilitate hepatic maturation of BM-MSCs and promote stem-cell-based liver regenerative medicine.

  18. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell–cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable....

  19. Shotgun proteomics and network analysis between plasma membrane and extracellular matrix proteins from rat olfactory ensheathing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yisong; Teng, Xiaohua; Yang, Xiaoxu; Song, Qing; Lu, Rong; Xiong, Jixian; Liu, Bo; Zeng, Nianju; Zeng, Yu; Long, Jia; Cao, Rui; Lin, Yong; He, Quanze; Chen, Ping; Lu, Ming; Liang, Songping

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a special type of glial cells that have characteristics of both astrocytes and Schwann cells. Evidence suggests that the regenerative capacity of OECs is induced by soluble, secreted factors that influence their microenvironment. These factors may regulate OECs self-renewal and/or induce their capacity to augment spinal cord regeneration. Profiling of plasma membrane and extracellular matrix through a high-throughput expression proteomics approach was undertaken to identify plasma membrane and extracellular matrix proteins of OECs under serum-free conditions. 1D-shotgun proteomics followed with gene ontology (GO) analysis was used to screen proteins from primary culture rat OECs. Four hundred and seventy nonredundant plasma membrane proteins and 168 extracellular matrix proteins were identified, the majority of which were never before reported to be produced by OECs. Furthermore, plasma membrane and extracellular proteins were classified based on their protein-protein interaction predicted by STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data. The proteomic profiling of the OECs plasma membrane proteins and their connection with the secretome in serum-free culture conditions provides new insights into the nature of their in vivo microenvironmental niche. Proteomic analysis for the discovery of clinical biomarkers of OECs mechanism warrants further study.

  20. Generation of priming mesenchymal stem cells with enhanced potential to differentiate into specific cell lineages using extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na Rae; Yun, Jung Im; Park, Young Hyun; Ahn, Ji Yeon; Kim, Choonghyo; Choi, Jung Hoon; Lee, Eunsong; Lim, Jeong Mook; Lee, Seung Tae

    2013-07-01

    Poor understanding of the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has resulted in a low differentiation yield, and has hindered their application in medicine. As a solution, priming MSCs sensitive to signaling, thus stimulating differentiation into a specific cell lineage, may improve the differentiation yield. To demonstrate this, priming MSCs were produced by using a gelatin matrix for the isolation of primary MSCs from bone-marrow-derived primary cells. Subsequently, cellular characteristics and sensitivity to specific differentiation signals were analyzed at passage five. Compared to non-priming MSCs, priming MSCs showed no significant differences in cellular characteristics, but demonstrated a significant increase in sensitivity to neurogenic differentiation signals. These results demonstrate that generation of priming MSCs by specific extracellular signaling increases the rate of differentiation into a cell-specific lineage.

  1. Optimization of Liver Decellularization Maintains Extracellular Matrix Micro-Architecture and Composition Predisposing to Effective Cell Seeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Maghsoudlou

    Full Text Available Hepatic tissue engineering using decellularized scaffolds is a potential therapeutic alternative to conventional transplantation. However, scaffolds are usually obtained using decellularization protocols that destroy the extracellular matrix (ECM and hamper clinical translation. We aim to develop a decellularization technique that reliably maintains hepatic microarchitecture and ECM components. Isolated rat livers were decellularized by detergent-enzymatic technique with (EDTA-DET or without EDTA (DET. Histology, DNA quantification and proteomics confirmed decellularization with further DNA reduction with the addition of EDTA. Quantification, histology, immunostaining, and proteomics demonstrated preservation of extracellular matrix components in both scaffolds with a higher amount of collagen and glycosaminoglycans in the EDTA-DET scaffold. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray phase contrast imaging showed microarchitecture preservation, with EDTA-DET scaffolds more tightly packed. DET scaffold seeding with a hepatocellular cell line demonstrated complete repopulation in 14 days, with cells proliferating at that time. Decellularization using DET preserves microarchitecture and extracellular matrix components whilst allowing for cell growth for up to 14 days. Addition of EDTA creates a denser, more compact matrix. Transplantation of the scaffolds and scaling up of the methodology are the next steps for successful hepatic tissue engineering.

  2. Cells in 3D matrices under interstitial flow: effects of extracellular matrix alignment on cell shear stress and drag forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, John A; Lichter, Seth; Swartz, Melody A

    2010-03-22

    Interstitial flow is an important regulator of various cell behaviors both in vitro and in vivo, yet the forces that fluid flow imposes on cells embedded in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), and the effects of matrix architecture on those forces, are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate how fiber alignment can affect the shear and pressure forces on the cell and ECM. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, we show that while the solutions of the Brinkman equation accurately estimate the average fluid shear stress and the drag forces on a cell within a 3D fibrous medium, the distribution of shear stress on the cellular surface as well as the peak shear stresses remain intimately related to the pericellular fiber architecture and cannot be estimated using bulk-averaged properties. We demonstrate that perpendicular fiber alignment of the ECM yields lower shear stress and pressure forces on the cells and higher stresses on the ECM, leading to decreased permeability, while parallel fiber alignment leads to higher stresses on cells and increased permeability, as compared to a cubic lattice arrangement. The Spielman-Goren permeability relationships for fibrous media agreed well with CFD simulations of flow with explicitly considered fibers. These results suggest that the experimentally observed active remodeling of ECM fibers by fibroblasts under interstitial flow to a perpendicular alignment could serve to decrease the shear and drag forces on the cell.

  3. PRDM14 Promotes the Migration of Human Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Through Extracellular Matrix Degradation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Bi; Han-Bing Shi; Ting Zhang; Ge Cui

    2015-01-01

    Background:As a novel molecular markerof non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC),PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing protein 14 (PRDM 14) is over-expressed in NSCLC tumor tissues.Extracellular matrix degradation mediated by the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) is one of the most important mechanism in lung cancer metastasis.This study aimed to determine if PRDM 14 promoted the migration of NSCLC cells through extracellular matrix degradation mediated by change of MMP/TIMP expression.Methods:The expression of PRDM14 was down-regulated in human cell line A 549 after transfection with lentiviral vector-mediated short-hairpin ribonucleic acids (shRNAs) which targeted the PRDM 14 promoter.Cellular migration ofshRNA-infected cells was detected by a scratch wound healing assay and transwell cell migration assay.Expression levels of MMP1,MMP2,TIMP1,and TIMP2 were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results:Migration ofPRDM 14-shRNA-infected cells was significantly inhibited relative to control cells as measured by the scratch wound healing (P < 0.05) and transwell cell migration assays (P < 0.01).The expression of MMP1 in A549 cells infected by PRDM14-shRNA was down-regulated significantly (P < 0.01),whereas the expression of TIMPl and TIMP2 was up-regulated significantly (P < 0.01).Conclusions:PRDM 14 accelerates A549 cells migration in vitro through extracellular matrix degradation.PRDM 14 is considered as a potential therapeutic target in metastatic NSCLC.

  4. Bone marrow derived cell-seeded extracellular matrix: A novel biomaterial in the field of wound management

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    V. Remya

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Extensive or irreversible damage to the skin often requires additional skin substitutes for reconstruction. Biomaterials have become critical components in the development of effective new medical therapies for wound care. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a cell matrix construct (bone marrow-derived cells (BMdc seeded extracellular matrix [ECM] was used as a biological substitute for the repair of full-thickness skin wound. ECM was developed by decellularizing fish swim bladder (FSB. Goat bone marrow-derived cells (G-BMdc were seeded over this decellularized matrix. Efficacy of this cell matrix construct in wound repair was tested by implanting it over 20 mm2 × 20 mm2 size fullthickness skin wound created over the dorsum of rat. The study was conducted in 16 clinically healthy adult rats of either sex. The animals were randomly divided into 2 equal groups of 8 animals each. In Group I, animal’s wounds were repaired with a cellular FSB matrix. In Group II, wounds were repaired with G-BMdc seeded a cellular FSB matrix. Immune response and efficacy of healing were analyzed. Results: Quality of healing and immuno tolerance to the biological substitute was significantly better in Group II than Group I. Conclusion: Seeding with BMdc increases the wound healing potency and modulates the immune response to a significantly negligible level. The BMdc seeded acellular FSB matrix was found to be a novel biomaterial for wound management.

  5. Extracellular matrix proteins involved in pseudoislets formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elisa; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Langlois, A; Bietiger, William; Krafft, Mp; Pinget, Michel; Sigrist, Séverine

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are known to mediate, through integrins, cell adhesion and are involved in a number of cellular processes, including insulin expression and secretion in pancreatic islets. We investigated whether expression of some extracellular matrix proteins were implied in islets-like structure formation, named pseudoislets. For this purpose, we cultured the β-cell line, RINm5F, during 1, 3, 5 and 7 days of culture on treated or untreated culture plate to form adherent cells or pseudoislets and analysed insulin, collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin 5 and β1-integrin expression. We observed that insulin expression and secretion were increased during pseudoislets formation. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry an aggregation of insulin secreting cells in the centre of the pseudoislets. Peripheral β-cells of pseudoislets did not express insulin after 7 days of culture. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed a transient expression of type IV collagen in pseudoislets for the first 3 days of culture. Study of fibronectin expression indicated that adherent cells expressed more fibronectin than pseudoislets. In contrast, laminin 5 was more expressed in pseudoislets than in adherent cells. Finally, expression of β1-integrin was increased in pseudoislets as compared to adherent cells. In conclusion, laminin 5 and collagen IV might be implicated in pseudoislets formation whereas fibronectin might be involved in cell adhesion. These data suggested that extracellular matrix proteins may enhance the function of pseudoislets.

  6. A photoactivatable nanopatterned substrate for analyzing collective cell migration with precisely tuned cell-extracellular matrix ligand interactions.

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    Yoshihisa Shimizu

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML, and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions.

  7. α2 Integrin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 act sequentially to induce differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into odontoblast-like cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Kawai, Rie; Hase, Naoko; Hiyama, Taiki; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki [Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8651 (Japan); Kondo, Ayami [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan); Nakata, Kazuhiko [Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8651 (Japan); Mogi, Makio, E-mail: makio@dpc.agu.ac.jp [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported that interleukin 1β acts via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 to regulate cell proliferation and suppress apoptosis in α2 integrin-positive odontoblast-like cells differentiated from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we characterize the signal cascade underpinning odontoblastic differentiation in mouse ES cells. The expression of α2 integrin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (Emmprin), and MMP-3 mRNA and protein were all potently increased during odontoblastic differentiation. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) disruption of the expression of these effectors potently suppressed the expression of the odontoblastic biomarkers dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1 and alkaline phosphatase, and blocked odontoblast calcification. Our siRNA, western blot and blocking antibody analyses revealed a unique sequential cascade involving α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3 that drives ES cell differentiation into odontoblasts. This cascade requires the interaction between α2 integrin and Emmprin and is potentiated by exogenous MMP-3. Finally, although odontoblast-like cells potently express α2, α6, αV, β1, and β3, integrins, we confirmed that β1 integrin acts as the trigger for ES cell differentiation, apparently in complex with α2 integrin. These results demonstrate a unique and unanticipated role for an α2 integrin-, Emmprin-, and MMP-3-mediated signaling cascade in driving mouse ES cell differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Odontoblast differentiation requires activation of α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3. • α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3 form a sequential signaling cascade. • β1 integrin acts a specific trigger for odontoblast differentiation. • The role of these effectors is highly novel and unanticipated.

  8. Bioprinting 3D cell-laden hydrogel microarray for screening human periodontal ligament stem cell response to extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; Ji, Yuan; Huang, Guoyou; Ling, Kai; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-22

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease negatively affecting up to 15% of adults worldwide. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) hold great promises for periodontal tissue regeneration, where it is necessary to find proper extracellular matrix (ECM) materials (e.g., composition, concentration). In this study, we proposed a bioprinting-based approach to generate nano-liter sized three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden hydrogel array with gradient of ECM components, through controlling the volume ratio of two hydrogels, such as gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) dimethacrylate. The resulting cell-laden array with a gradient of GelMA/PEG composition was used to screen human PDLSC response to ECM. The behavior (e.g., cell viability, spreading) of human PDLSCs in GelMA/PEG array were found to be depended on the volume ratios of GelMA/PEG, with cell viability and spreading area decreased along with increasing the ratio of PEG. The developed approach would be useful for screening cell-biomaterial interaction in 3D and promoting regeneration of functional tissue.

  9. Staurosporine and extracellular matrix proteins mediate the conversion of small cell lung carcinoma cells into a neuron-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murmann, Tamara; Carrillo-García, Carmen; Veit, Nadine; Courts, Cornelius; Glassmann, Alexander; Janzen, Viktor; Madea, Burkhard; Reinartz, Markus; Harzen, Anne; Nowak, Michael; Perner, Sven; Winter, Jochen; Probstmeier, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) represent highly aggressive tumors with an overall five-year survival rate in the range of 5 to 10%. Here, we show that four out of five SCLC cell lines reversibly develop a neuron-like phenotype on extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, laminin or thrombospondin upon staurosporine treatment in an RGD/integrin-mediated manner. Neurite-like processes extend rapidly with an average speed of 10 µm per hour. Depending on the cell line, staurosporine treatment affects either cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase or induction of polyploidy. Neuron-like conversion, although not accompanied by alterations in the expression pattern of a panel of neuroendocrine genes, leads to changes in protein expression as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It is likely that SCLC cells already harbour the complete molecular repertoire to convert into a neuron-like phenotype. More extensive studies are needed to evaluate whether the conversion potential of SCLC cells is suitable for therapeutic interventions.

  10. Staurosporine and extracellular matrix proteins mediate the conversion of small cell lung carcinoma cells into a neuron-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Murmann

    Full Text Available Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs represent highly aggressive tumors with an overall five-year survival rate in the range of 5 to 10%. Here, we show that four out of five SCLC cell lines reversibly develop a neuron-like phenotype on extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, laminin or thrombospondin upon staurosporine treatment in an RGD/integrin-mediated manner. Neurite-like processes extend rapidly with an average speed of 10 µm per hour. Depending on the cell line, staurosporine treatment affects either cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase or induction of polyploidy. Neuron-like conversion, although not accompanied by alterations in the expression pattern of a panel of neuroendocrine genes, leads to changes in protein expression as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It is likely that SCLC cells already harbour the complete molecular repertoire to convert into a neuron-like phenotype. More extensive studies are needed to evaluate whether the conversion potential of SCLC cells is suitable for therapeutic interventions.

  11. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Styrczewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD, phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  12. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  13. Cell migration in schizophrenia: Patient-derived cells do not regulate motility in response to extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Jing Yang; Sutharsan, Ratneswary; Fan, Yongjun; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2017-03-09

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychiatric disorder linked to a large number of risk genes. The function of these genes in disease etiology is not fully understood but pathway analyses of genomic data suggest developmental dysregulation of cellular processes such as neuronal migration and axon guidance. Previous studies of patient-derived olfactory cells show them to be more motile than control-derived cells when grown on a fibronectin substrate, motility that is dependent on focal adhesion kinase signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate whether schizophrenia patient-derived cells are responsive to other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that bind integrin receptors. Olfactory neurosphere-derived cells from nine patients and nine matched controls were grown on ECM protein substrates at increasing concentrations and their movement was tracked for 24h using automated high-throughput imaging. Control-derived cells increased their motility as the ECM substrate concentration increased, whereas patient-derived cell motility was little affected by ECM proteins. Patient and control cells had appropriate integrin receptors for these ECM substrates and detected them as shown by increases in focal adhesion number and size in response to ECM proteins, which also induced changes in cell morphology and cytoskeleton. These observations indicate that patient cells failed to translate the detection of ECM proteins into appropriate changes in cell motility. In a sense, patient cells act like a moving car whose accelerator is jammed, moving at the same speed without regard to the external environment. This focuses attention on cell motility regulation rather than speed as key to impairment of neuronal migration in the developing brain in schizophrenia.

  14. Bidirectional extracellular matrix signaling during tissue morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2009-01-01

    Normal tissue development and function are regulated by the interplay between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM provides biochemical and mechanical contextual information that is conveyed from the cell membrane through the cytoskeleton to the nucleus to direct cell phenotype. Cells, in turn, remodel the ECM and thereby sculpt their local microenvironment. Here we review the mechanisms by which cells interact with, respond to, and influence the ECM, with particular emphasis placed on the role of this bidirectional communication during tissue morphogenesis. We also discuss the implications for successful engineering of functional tissues ex vivo. PMID:19896886

  15. SU-F-SPS-08: Measuring the Interaction Of DDR Cell Receptors and Extracellular Matrix Collagen in Prostate Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J; Sarkar, A; Hoffmann, P [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Suhail, A; Fridman, R [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Discoidin domain receptors (DDR) have recently been recognized as important players in cancer progression. DDRs are cell receptors that interact with collagen, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. However the detailed mechanism of their interaction is unclear. Here we attempted to examine their interaction in terms of structural (surface topography), mechanical (rupture force), and kinetic (binding probability) information on the single molecular scale with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: The Quantitative Nano-mechanical property Mapping (QNM) mode of AFM allowed to assess the cells in liquid growth media at their optimal physiological while being viable. Human benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line was genetically regulated to suppress DDR expression (DDR- cells) and was compared with naturally DDR expressing cells (DDR+). Results: Binding force measurements (n = 1000) were obtained before and after the two groups were treated with fibronectin (FN), an integrin-inhibiting antibody to block the binding of integrin. The quantification indicates that cells containing DDR bind with collagen at a most probable force of 80.3–83.0 ±7.6 pN. The probability of them binding is 0.167 when other interactions (mainly due to integrin-collagen binding) are minimized. Conclusion: Together with further force measurements at different pulling speeds will determine dissociation rate, binding distance and activation barrier. These parameters in benign cells provides some groundwork in understanding DDR’s behavior in various cell microenvironments such as in malignant tumor cells. Funding supported by Richard Barber Interdisciplinary Research Program of Wayne State University.

  16. Dextran sulphate crowding and sodium deoxycholate lysis of primary breast fibroblast cells achieve extracellular matrix deposition and decellularization for breast cancer stem cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroem Naruni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Lingkungan mikro yaitu sel stromal dam matriks ekstraseluler saat ini dinyatakansebagai kontributor dalam perkembangan tumor. Beberapa penelitian telah mengembangkan matriksekstraseluler yang mendukung perkembangan sel in vitro. Matriks ekstraseluler adalah suatu komplekssusunan supramolekuler dari berbagai macam glycoprotein dan proteoglycan. Matriks ekstraselulermenyediakan integritas jaringan, bertindak sebagai scaffold alami tempat sel melekat dan berinteraksiserta berperan sebagai reservoir pertumbuhan sel. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendapatkan deposisidan deselularisasi yang optimal pada matriks ekstraseluler.Metode: Dalam penelitian ini, kami mengembangkan cells crowder untuk meningkatkan deposit matriksekstraseluler dari kultur sel primer fibroblast payudara yang diperoleh dari spesimen hasil operasimammoplasty. Dextran 500 kDa ditambahkan dalam media kultur DMEM lengkap yang telah ditambahkan0.5% FBS dan 100μM L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate. Setelah tujuh hari, sel dilisis dengan menggunakanSodium Deoxycolate (DOC.Hasil: Deposisi matriks ekstraseluler dan proses deselulerisasi dari sel primer fibroblas payudara dapatterdeteksi dengan menggunakan antibodi Rabbit anti human fibronectin yang selanjutnya ditambahkandengan anti rabbit IgG yang telah dikonjugasi dengan Alexa Fluor 488.Kesimpulan: Penambahan dextran sulfat dan prosesing lysis dengan sodium deoxycolate dapatmeningkatkan deposisi dan menghasilkan deselularisasi matriks ekstraseluler. (Health Science Journalof Indonesia 2015;6:43-7Kata kunci: matriks ekstra selular, kanker mammae, stem cell, sel fibroblast AbstractBackground: The microenvironment including stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM is now consideredan active contributor to tumor progression. Certain studies have developed ECM which supports a suitable cellulargrowth in vitro. The ECM is a complex supramolecular assembly of a variety of glycoproteins and proteoglycans.Extracellular

  17. Histochemical evidence of osteoclastic degradation of extracellular matrix in osteolytic metastasis originating from human lung small carcinoma (SBC-5) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio; Takeuchi, Kiichi; Freitas, Paulo H L; Kawano, Yoshiro; Hoshino, Masaaki; Oda, Kimimitsu; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of osteoclast migration and the degradation of unmineralized extracellular matrix in an osteolytic metastasis by examining a well-standardized lung cancer metastasis model of nude mice. SBC-5 human lung small carcinoma cells were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of 6-week-old BALB/c nu/nu mice under anesthesia. At 25-30 days after injection, the animals were sacrificed and their femora and/or tibiae were removed for histochemical analyses. Metastatic lesions were shown to occupy a considerable area extending from the metaphyses to the bone marrow region. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive osteoclasts were found in association with an alkaline phosphatase (ALPase)-positive osteoblastic layer lining the bone surface, but could also be localized in the ALPase-negative stromal tissues that border the tumor nodules. These stromal tissues were markedly positive for osteopontin, and contained a significant number of TRAPase-positive osteoclasts expressing immunoreactivity for CD44. We thus speculated that, mediating its affinity for CD44, osteopontin may serve to facilitate osteoclastic migration after their formation associated with ALPase-positive osteoblasts. We next examined the localization of cathepsin K and matrix metallo-proteinase-9 (MMP-9) in osteoclasts. Osteoclasts adjacent to the bone surfaces were positive for both proteins, whereas those in the stromal tissues in the tumor nests showed only MMP-9 immunoreactivity. Immunoelectron microscopy disclosed the presence of MMP-9 in the Golgi apparatus and in vesicular structures at the baso-lateral cytoplasmic region of the osteoclasts found in the stromal tissue. MMP-9-positive vesicular structures also contained fragmented extracellular materials. Thus, osteoclasts appear to either select an optimized function, namely secreting proteolytic enzymes from ruffled borders during bone resorption, or recognize the surrounding extracellular

  18. Growth factor priming differentially modulates components of the extracellular matrix proteome in chondrocytes and synovium-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Alegre-Aguarón

    Full Text Available To make progress in cartilage repair it is essential to optimize protocols for two-dimensional cell expansion. Chondrocytes and SDSCs are promising cell sources for cartilage repair. We previously observed that priming with a specific growth factor cocktail (1 ng/mL transforming growth factor-β1, 5 ng/mL basic fibroblast growth factor, and 10 ng/mL platelet-derived growth factor-BB in two-dimensional culture, led to significant improvement in mechanical and biochemical properties of synovium-derived stem cell (SDSC-seeded constructs. The current study assessed the effect of growth factor priming on the proteome of canine chondrocytes and SDSCs. In particular, growth factor priming modulated the proteins associated with the extracellular matrix in two-dimensional cultures of chondrocytes and SDSCs, inducing a partial dedifferentiation of chondrocytes (most proteins associated with cartilage were down-regulated in primed chondrocytes and a partial differentiation of SDSCs (some collagen-related proteins were up-regulated in primed SDSCs. However, when chondrocytes and SDSCs were grown in pellet culture, growth factor-primed cells maintained their chondrogenic potential with respect to glycosaminoglycan and collagen production. In conclusion, the strength of the label-free proteomics technique is that it allows for the determination of changes in components of the extracellular matrix proteome in chondrocytes and SDSCs in response to growth factor priming, which could help in future tissue engineering strategies.

  19. Mechanical influence of tissue culture plates and extracellular matrix on mesenchymal stem cell behavior: A topical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Falisi, Giovanni; Rastelli, Claudio; Palmieri, Francesca; Gargari, Marco; Zavan, Barbara; Paduano, Francesco; Benagiano, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineering applications need a continuous development of new biomaterials able to generate an ideal cell-extracellular matrix interaction. The stem cell fate is regulated by several factors, such as growth factors or transcription factors. The most recent literature has reported several publications able to demonstrate that environmental factors also contribute to the regulation of stem cell behavior, leading to the opinion that the environment plays the major role in the cell differentiation.The interaction between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and extracellular environment has been widely described, and it has a crucial role in regulating the cell phenotype. In our laboratory (Tecnologica Research Institute, Crotone, Italy), we have recently studied how several physical factors influence the distribution and the morphology of MSCs isolated from dental pulp, and how they are able to regulate stem cell differentiation. Mechanical and geometrical factors are only a small part of the environmental factors able to influence stem cell behavior, however, this influence should be properly known: in fact, this assumption must be clearly considered during those studies involving MSCs; furthermore, these interactions should be considered as an important bias that involves an high number of studies on the MSCs, since in worldwide laboratories the scientists mostly use tissue culture plates for their experiments.

  20. Integrin-mediated interactions with extracellular matrix proteins for nucleus pulposus cells of the human intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgen, D T; Gilchrist, C L; Richardson, W J; Isaacs, R E; Brown, C R; Yang, K L; Chen, J; Setton, L A

    2013-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the human intervertebral disc is rich in molecules that interact with cells through integrin-mediated attachments. Porcine nucleus pulposus (NP) cells have been shown to interact with laminin (LM) isoforms LM-111 and LM-511 through select integrins that regulate biosynthesis and cell attachment. Since human NP cells lose many phenotypic characteristics with age, attachment and interaction with the ECM may be altered. Expression of LM-binding integrins was quantified for human NP cells using flow cytometry. The cell-ECM attachment mechanism was determined by quantifying cell attachment to LM-111, LM-511, or type II collagen after functionally blocking specific integrin subunits. Human NP cells express integrins β1, α3, and α5, with over 70% of cells positive for each subunit. Blocking subunit β1 inhibited NP cell attachment to all substrates. Blocking subunits α1, α2, α3, and α5 simultaneously, but not individually, inhibits NP cell attachment to laminins. While integrin α6β1 mediated porcine NP cell attachment to LM-111, we found integrins α3, α5, and β1 instead contributed to human NP cell attachment. These findings identify integrin subunits that may mediate interactions with the ECM for human NP cells and could be used to promote cell attachment, survival, and biosynthesis in cell-based therapeutics.

  1. Oxidation modifies the structure and function of the extracellular matrix generated by human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Christine Y; Degendorfer, Georg; Hammer, Astrid; Whitelock, John M; Malle, Ernst; Davies, Michael J

    2014-04-15

    ECM (extracellular matrix) materials, such as laminin, perlecan, type IV collagen and fibronectin, play a key role in determining the structure of the arterial wall and the properties of cells that interact with the ECM. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of peroxynitrous acid, an oxidant generated by activated macrophages, on the structure and function of the ECM laid down by HCAECs (human coronary artery endothelial cells) in vitro and in vivo. We show that exposure of HCAEC-derived native matrix components to peroxynitrous acid (but not decomposed oxidant) at concentrations >1 μM results in a loss of antibody recognition of perlecan, collagen IV, and cell-binding sites on laminin and fibronectin. Loss of recognition was accompanied by decreased HCAEC adhesion. Real-time PCR showed up-regulation of inflammation-associated genes, including MMP7 (matrix metalloproteinase 7) and MMP13, as well as down-regulation of the laminin α2 chain, in HCAECs cultured on peroxynitrous acid-treated matrix compared with native matrix. Immunohistochemical studies provided evidence of co-localization of laminin with 3-nitrotyrosine, a biomarker of peroxynitrous acid damage, in type II-III/IV human atherosclerotic lesions, consistent with matrix damage occurring during disease development in vivo. The results of the present study suggest a mechanism through which peroxynitrous acid modifies endothelial cell-derived native ECM proteins of the arterial basement membrane in atherosclerotic lesions. These changes to ECM and particularly perlecan and laminin may be important in inducing cellular dysfunction and contribute to atherogenesis.

  2. The extracellular matrix of plants: Molecular, cellular and developmental biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    A symposium entitled ``The Extracellular Matrix of Plants: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology was held in Tamarron, Colorado, March 15--21, 1996. The following topics were explored in addresses by 43 speakers: structure and biochemistry of cell walls; biochemistry, molecular biology and biosynthesis of lignin; secretory pathway and synthesis of glycoproteins; biosynthesis of matrix polysaccharides, callose and cellulose; role of the extracellular matrix in plant growth and development; plant cell walls in symbiosis and pathogenesis.

  3. Engineering of the extracellular matrix: working toward neural stem cell programming and neurorestoration--concept and progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J; Tirrell, David A

    2003-05-01

    In the concept of neurorestoration, cellular and structural elements that have been lost are replaced, and their function is restored. Central to this therapeutic strategy is the transplantation of neural progenitor cells such as clonogenically expanded stem cells. Stem cells make decisions regarding fate and patterning in response to external environmental signals. The therapeutic effectiveness of neural stem cells may be facilitated by the ability to manipulate these signals in a temporal and spatially appropriate fashion. Artificial deoxyribonucleic acid and artificial protein technology combines elements of protein engineering, molecular biology, and recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology to produce proteins with functional domains derived from naturally occurring proteins and represents a potentially powerful tool to modulate stem cell behavior. To this end, we have developed three artificial extracellular matrix proteins that incorporate the active domain of hJagged1 and hDelta1 into an elastin backbone. hJagged1 and hDelta1 are members of the DSL family of ligands to the Notch receptor, a signaling system that is very important in development and is the strongest known signal to instruct neural progenitor cells to choose glial fates over neuronal fates. The successful cloning of the artificial genes was confirmed by test digestions with appropriate restriction enzymes as well as direct deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing. In addition, we have demonstrated that all three artificial extracellular matrix proteins express at a high level in a prokaryotic host. This report describes the concept and progress in an entirely novel and previously unreported approach to modulate neural stem cell behavior. Its future application could include in vitro processing of stem cells before transplantation, supporting and programming the cells after transplantation, as well as the development of bioactive biomaterials.

  4. Influence of culture conditions and extracellular matrix alignment on human mesenchymal stem cells invasion into decellularized engineered tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhamer, Nathan K; Moore, Dusty L; Lobo, Fluvio L; Klair, Nathaniel T; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2015-05-01

    The variables that influence the in vitro recellularization potential of decellularized engineered tissues, such as cell culture conditions and scaffold alignment, have yet to be explored. The goal of this work was to explore the influence of insulin and ascorbic acid and extracellular matrix (ECM) alignment on the recellularization of decellularized engineered tissue by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Aligned and non-aligned tissues were created by specifying the geometry and associated mechanical constraints to fibroblast-mediated fibrin gel contraction and remodelling using circular and C-shaped moulds. Decellularized tissues (matrices) of the same alignment were created by decellularization with detergents. Ascorbic acid promoted the invasion of hMSCs into the matrices due to a stimulated increase in motility and proliferation. Invasion correlated with hyaluronic acid secretion, α-smooth muscle actin expression and decreased matrix thickness. Furthermore, hMSCs invasion into aligned and non-aligned matrices was not different, although there was a difference in cell orientation. Finally, we show that hMSCs on the matrix surface appear to differentiate toward a smooth muscle cell or myofibroblast phenotype with ascorbic acid treatment. These results inform the strategy of recellularizing decellularized engineered tissue with hMSCs.

  5. Planar cell polarity genes regulate polarized extracellular matrix deposition during frog gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Toshiyasu; Davidson, Lance; Asashima, Makoto; Keller, Ray

    2005-04-26

    The noncanonical wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway [1] regulates the mediolaterally (planarly) polarized cell protrusive activity and intercalation that drives the convergent extension movements of vertebrate gastrulation [2], yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We report that perturbing expression of Xenopus PCP genes, Strabismus (Xstbm), Frizzled (Xfz7), and Prickle (Xpk), disrupts radially polarized fibronectin fibril assembly on mesodermal tissue surfaces, mediolaterally polarized motility, and intercalation. Polarized motility is restored in Xpk-perturbed explants but not in Xstbm- or Xfz7-perturbed explants cultured on fibronectin surfaces. The PCP complex, including Xpk, first regulates polarized surface assembly of the fibronectin matrix, which is necessary for mediolaterally polarized motility, and then, without Xpk, has an additional and necessary function in polarizing motility. These results show that the PCP complex regulates several cell polarities (radial, planar) and several processes (matrix deposition, motility), by indirect and direct mechanisms, and acts in several modes, either with all or a subset of its components, during vertebrate morphogenesis.

  6. Fenofibrate attenuated glucose-induced mesangial cells proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis via PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zeng

    Full Text Available Excess mesangial extracellular matrix (ECM and mesangial cell proliferation is the major pathologic feature of diabetic nephropathy (DN. Fenofibrate, a PPARα agonist, has been shown to attenuate extracellular matrix formation in diabetic nephropathy. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect remain to be elucidated. In this study, the effect of fenofibrate on high-glucose induced cell proliferation and extracellular matrix exertion and its mechanisms were investigated in cultured rat mesangial cells by the methylthiazoletetrazolium (MTT assay, flow cytometry and western blot. The results showed that treatment of mesangial cells (MCs with fenofibrate repressed high-glucose induced up-regulation of extracellular matrix Collagen-IV, and inhibited entry of cell cycle into the S phase. This G1 arrest and ECM inhibition was caused by the reduction of phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and AKT. On the contrary, PPARα siRNA accelerated high glucose-induced cell cycle progression by ERK1/2 and AKT activation. Taken together, fenofibrate ameliorated glucose-induced mesangial cell proliferation and matrix production via its inhibition of PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Such mechanisms may contribute to the favorable effects of treatment using fenofibrate in diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Interdigital cell death in the embryonic limb is associated with depletion of Reelin in the extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Mendoza, M J; Lorda-Diez, C I; Montero, J A; García-Porrero, J A; Hurlé, J M

    2013-01-01

    Interdigital cell death is a physiological regression process responsible for sculpturing the digits in the embryonic vertebrate limb. Changes in the intensity of this degenerative process account for the different patterns of interdigital webbing among vertebrate species. Here, we show that Reelin is present in the extracellular matrix of the interdigital mesoderm of chick and mouse embryos during the developmental stages of digit formation. Reelin is a large extracellular glycoprotein which has important functions in the developing nervous system, including neuronal survival; however, the significance of Reelin in other systems has received very little attention. We show that reelin expression becomes intensely downregulated in both the chick and mouse interdigits preceding the establishment of the areas of interdigital cell death. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factors, which are cell survival signals for the interdigital mesoderm, intensely upregulated reelin expression, while BMPs, which are proapototic signals, downregulate its expression in the interdigit. Gene silencing experiments of reelin gene or its intracellular effector Dab-1 confirmed the implication of Reelin signaling as a survival factor for the limb undifferentiated mesoderm. We found that Reelin activates canonical survival pathways in the limb mesoderm involving protein kinase B and focal adhesion kinase. Our findings support that Reelin plays a role in interdigital cell death, and suggests that anoikis (apoptosis secondary to loss of cell adhesion) may be involved in this process. PMID:24030152

  8. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  9. Light and electron microscopic study of epithelial cells from the human oviduct and uterus subcultured on extracellular matrix gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh; Ashtiani, Saeed Kazemi; Eftekhari-Yazdi, Poopak

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the structure of epithelial cells from the human oviduct and uterus on extracellular matrix (ECM) gel in the first passage. Human oviducts and endometrial tissues were obtained from patients undergoing total hysterectomy; the epithelial cells, having been isolated by enzyme digestion, were cultured on polystyrene plastic surfaces. The epithelial nature of the cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, and their morphology was examined by microscopy. Cells of an epithelial nature were then trypsinized and cultured on an ECM gel-coated filter insert for 5 days. The cells, in parallel with the tissues, were subsequently prepared for transmission electron microscopy. Plastic-cultured cells had no sign of differentiation and appeared as elongated spindle cells in sections. These cells looked columnar and highly polarized after being cultured on ECM gel surfaces. They were similar to epithelial cells from the corresponding tissue fragment. Cultured on ECM gel, the ciliated epithelial cells of human oviducts appeared ultrastructurally similar to glandular cells from the human uterus. Cilia did not form under culture conditions. It seems that human uterine and oviduct epithelial cells can acquire polarized morphology and differentiated states on ECM gel after having lost it on plastic surfaces and that ECM gel by itself is not enough to induce cilia formation in culture.

  10. Extracellular matrix derived from periodontal ligament cells maintains their stemness and enhances redifferentiation via the Wnt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Chun; Song, Zhong-Chen; Xia, Yi-Ru; Shu, Rong

    2017-09-07

    Large numbers of viable cells cannot be obtained from periodontal ligament tissues of patients with periodontitis. Therefore, it is imperative to establish an ex vivo environment that can support cell proliferation and delay senescence. Here, we have successfully reconstructed a native extracellular matrix (ECM), derived from early-passage human periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) using the NH4 OH/Triton X-100 protocol. The ECM was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and immunostaining for specific ECM proteins (collagen I and fibronectin). Late-passage ECM-expanded PDLCs exhibited a much higher proliferation index and lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), confirmed by the increased expression of pluripotent markers. and enhanced osteogenic capacity. Interestingly, the Wnt pathway was suppressed during the ECM expansion-mediated increase in pluripotency, but was activated in an osteogenic differentiation environment, as confirmed by treatment with the XAV-939 β-catenin inhibitor or the SP600125 c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor. Cell sheets formed by ECM-expanded PDLCs exhibited an enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration capacity compared to those formed on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) surfaces in vivo. Taken together, the cell-free ECM provides a tissue-specific cell niche for the ex vivo expansion of PDLCs while retaining stemness and osteogenic potential, partially via the Wnt pathway. This represents a promising matrix for future applications in periodontal tissue regeneration therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Skip Regulates TGF-β1-Induced Extracellular Matrix Degrading Proteases Expression in Human PC-3 Prostate Cancer Cells

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    Victor Villar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether Ski-interacting protein (SKIP regulates TGF-β1-stimulated expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and uPA Inhibitor (PAI-1 in the androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell model. Materials and Methods. PC-3 prostate cancer cell line was used. The role of SKIP was evaluated using synthetic small interference RNA (siRNA compounds. The expression of uPA, MMP-9, and PAI-1 was evaluated by zymography assays, RT-PCR, and promoter transactivation analysis. Results. In PC-3 cells TGF-β1 treatment stimulated uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 expressions. The knockdown of SKIP in PC-3 cells enhanced the basal level of uPA, and TGF-β1 treatment inhibited uPA production. Both PAI-1 and MMP-9 production levels were increased in response to TGF-β1. The ectopic expression of SKIP inhibited both TGF-β1-induced uPA and MMP-9 promoter transactivation, while PAI-1 promoter response to the factor was unaffected. Conclusions. SKIP regulates the expression of uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 stimulated by TGF-β1 in PC-3 cells. Thus, SKIP is implicated in the regulation of extracellular matrix degradation and can therefore be suggested as a novel therapeutic target in prostate cancer treatment.

  12. Effects of cell-attachment and extracellular matrix on bone formation in vivo in collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max M Villa

    Full Text Available Cell-based tissue engineering can be used to replace missing or damaged bone, but the optimal methods for delivering therapeutic cells to a bony defect have not yet been established. Using transgenic reporter cells as a donor source, two different collagen-hydroxyapatite (HA scaffolds, and a critical-size calvarial defect model, we investigated the effect of a cell-attachment period prior to implantation, with or without an extracellular matrix-based seeding suspension, on cell engraftment and osteogenesis. When quantitatively compared, the in-house scaffold implanted immediately had a higher mean radiopacity than in-house scaffolds incubated overnight. Both scaffold types implanted immediately had significantly higher area fractions of donor cells, while the in-house collagen-HA scaffolds implanted immediately had higher area fractions of the mineralization label compared with groups incubated overnight. When the cell loading was compared in vitro for each delivery method using the in-house scaffold, immediate loading led to higher numbers of delivered cells. Immediate loading may be preferable in order to ensure robust bone formation in vivo. The use of a secondary ECM carrier improved the distribution of donor cells only when a pre-attachment period was applied. These results have improved our understanding of cell delivery to bony defects in the context of in vivo outcomes.

  13. Long-term reduction of T-cell intracellular antigens reveals a transcriptome associated with extracellular matrix and cell adhesion components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Núñez

    Full Text Available Knockdown of T-cell intracellular antigens TIA1 and TIAR contributes to a cellular phenotype characterised by uncontrolled proliferation and tumorigenesis. Massive-scale poly(A+ RNA sequencing of TIA1 or TIAR-knocked down HeLa cells reveals transcriptome signatures comprising genes and functional categories potentially able to modulate several aspects of membrane dynamics associated with extracellular matrix and focal/cell adhesion events. The transcriptomic heterogeneity is the result of differentially expressed genes and RNA isoforms generated by alternative splicing and/or promoter usage. These results suggest a role for TIA proteins in the regulation and/or modulation of cellular homeostasis related to focal/cell adhesion, extracellular matrix and membrane and cytoskeleton dynamics.

  14. Process Extension from Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Motor Neurons through Synthetic Extracellular Matrix Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Daniel Devaud

    This thesis focuses on studying the extension of motor axons through synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) PEG hydrogels that have been modified with biochemical functionalities to render them more biologically relevant. Specifically, the research strategy is to encapsulate embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons (ESMNs) in synthetic PEG hydrogels crosslinked through three different chemistries providing three mechanisms for dynamically tuning material properties. First, a covalently crosslinked, enzymatically degradable hydrogel is developed and exploited to study the biophysical dynamics of axon extension and matrix remodeling. It is demonstrated that dispersed motor neurons require a battery of adhesive peptides and growth factors to maintain viability and extend axons while those in contact with supportive neuroglial cells do not. Additionally, cell-degradable crosslinker peptides and a soft modulus mimicking that of the spinal cord are requirements for axon extension. However, because local degradation of the hydrogel results in a cellular environment significantly different than that of the bulk, enzymatically degradable peptide crosslinkers were replaced with reversible covalent hydrazone bonds to study the effect of hydrogel modulus on axon extension. This material is characterized in detail and used to measure forces involved in axon extension. Finally, a hydrogel with photocleavable linkers incorporated into the network structure is exploited to explore motor axon response to physical channels. This system is used to direct the growth of motor axons towards co-cultured myotubes, resulting in the formation of an in vitro neural circuit.

  15. Mesenchymal Transition of High-Grade Breast Carcinomas Depends on Extracellular Matrix Control of Myeloid Suppressor Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Sangaletti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM contributes to the biological and clinical heterogeneity of breast cancer, and different prognostic groups can be identified according to specific ECM signatures. In high-grade, but not low-grade, tumors, an ECM signature characterized by high SPARC expression (ECM3 identifies tumors with increased epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, reduced treatment response, and poor prognosis. To better understand how this ECM3 signature is contributing to tumorigenesis, we expressed SPARC in isogenic cell lines and found that SPARC overexpression in tumor cells reduces their growth rate and induces EMT. SPARC expression also results in the formation of a highly immunosuppressive microenvironment, composed by infiltrating T regulatory cells, mast cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. The ability of SPARC to induce EMT depended on the localization and suppressive function of myeloid cells, and inhibition of the suppressive function MDSCs by administration of aminobisphosphonates could revert EMT, rendering SPARC-overexpressing tumor cells sensitive to Doxil. We conclude that that SPARC is regulating the interplay between MDSCs and the ECM to drive the induction of EMT in tumor cells.

  16. Coating extracellular matrix proteins on a (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated glass substrate for improved cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiro-taka; Ishihara, Seiichiro; Harada, Ichiro; Mizutani, Takeomi; Ishikawa, Masayori; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that a (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated glass surface is superior to an untreated glass surface for coating with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins when used as a cell culture substrate to observe cell physiology and behavior. We found that MDCK cells cultured on untreated glass coated with ECM removed the coated ECM protein and secreted different ECM proteins. In contrast, the cells did not remove the coated ECM protein when seeded on (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated (i.e., silanized) glass coated with ECM. Furthermore, the morphology and motility of cells grown on silanized glass differed from those grown on non-treated glass, even when both types of glass were initially coated with laminin. We also found that cells on silanized glass coated with laminin had higher motility than those on silanized glass coated with fibronectin. Based on our results, we suggest that silanized glass is a more suitable cell culture substrate than conventional non-treated glass when coated by ECM for observations of ECM effects on cell physiology.

  17. Neovibsanin B increases extracellular matrix proteins in optic nerve head cells via activation of Smad signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Xu, Wei; Rong, Ao; Lin, Yan; Qiu, Xu-Ling; Qu, Shen; Lan, Xian-Hai

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the effect of neovibsanin B on the synthesis and deposition of ECM proteins and the signalling pathways used in optic nerve head (ONH) astrocytes and lamina cribrosa (LC) cells. For investigation of the signalling pathway used by neovibsanin B, ONH cells were treated with neovibsanin B. Western blot and immunostaining analyses were used to examine the phosphorylation of proteins involved in Smad and non-Smad signalling pathway. The results revealed that ONH cells on treatment with neovibsanin B showed enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Neovibsanin B induced phosphorylation of canonical signalling proteins, Smad2/3. However phosphorylation of non-canonical signalling proteins, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) 1/2 remained unaffected. There was also increase in co-localization of pSmad2/3 with Co-Smad4 in the nucleus of ONH astrocytes and LC cells indicating activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway. Treatment of ONH cells with SIS3, inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation reversed the neovibsanin B stimulated ECM expression as well as activation of canonical pathway signalling molecules. In addition, inhibition of Smad2 or Smad3 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) also suppressed neovibsanin B stimulated ECM protein synthesis in ONH astrocytes and LC cells. Thus neovibsanin B utilizes the canonical Smad signalling pathway to stimulate ECM synthesis in human ONH cells. The neovibsanin B induced ECM synthesis and activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway may be due to its effect on transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2). However, further studies are under process to understand the mechanism.

  18. Thermoreversible copolymer gels for extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, B; Kim, S W; Bae, Y H

    2000-07-01

    To improve the properties of a reversible synthetic extracellular matrix based on a thermally reversible polymer, copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid were prepared in benzene with varying contents of acrylic acid (0 to 3%) and the thermal properties were evaluated. The poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and copolymers made with acrylic acid had molecular weights from 0.8 to 1.7 x10(6) D. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed the high-molecular-weight acrylic acid copolymers had similar onset temperatures to the homopolymers, but the peak width was considerably increased with increasing acrylic acid content. DSC and cloud point measurements showed that polymers with 0 to 3% acrylic acid exhibit a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) transition between 30 degrees and 37 degrees C. In swelling studies, the homopolymer showed significant syneresis at temperatures above 31 degrees C. Copolymers with 1 and 1.5% showed syneresis beginning at 32 degrees and 37 degrees C, respectively. At 37 degrees C the copolymers with 1.5-3% acrylic acid showed little or no syneresis. Due to the high water content and a transition near physiologic conditions (below 37 degrees C), the polymers with 1.5-2.0% acrylic acid exhibited properties that would be useful in the development of a refillable synthetic extracellular matrix. Such a matrix could be applied to several cell types, including islets of Langerhans, for a biohybrid artificial pancreas.

  19. Comparison of four decontamination treatments on porcine renal decellularized extracellular matrix structure, composition, and support of human renal cortical tubular epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornejad, Nafiseh; Nielsen, Jeffery J; Morris, Ryan J; Gassman, Jason R; Reynolds, Paul R; Roeder, Beverly L; Cook, Alonzo D

    2016-03-01

    Engineering whole organs from porcine decellularized extracellular matrix and human cells may lead to a plentiful source of implantable organs. Decontaminating the porcine decellularized extracellular matrix scaffolds is an essential step prior to introducing human cells. However, decontamination of whole porcine kidneys is a major challenge because the decontamination agent or irradiation needs to diffuse deep into the structure to eliminate all microbial contamination while minimizing damage to the structure and composition of the decellularized extracellular matrix. In this study, we compared four decontamination treatments that could be applicable to whole porcine kidneys: 70% ethanol, 0.2% peracetic acid in 1 M NaCl, 0.2% peracetic acid in 4% ethanol, and gamma (γ)-irradiation. Porcine kidneys were decellularized by perfusion of 0.5% (w/v) aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate and the four decontamination treatments were optimized using segments (n = 60) of renal tissue to ensure a consistent comparison. Although all four methods were successful in decontamination, γ-irradiation was very damaging to collagen fibers and glycosaminoglycans, leading to less proliferation of human renal cortical tubular epithelium cells within the porcine decellularized extracellular matrix. The effectiveness of the other three optimized solution treatments were then all confirmed using whole decellularized porcine kidneys (n = 3). An aqueous solution of 0.2% peracetic acid in 1 M NaCl was determined to be the best method for decontamination of porcine decellularized extracellular matrix.

  20. Raman spectroscopy in biomedicine – non-invasive in vitro analysis of cells and extracellular matrix components in tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchle, Eva; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an established laser-based technology for the quality assurance of pharmaceutical products. Over the past few years, Raman spectroscopy has become a powerful diagnostic tool in the life sciences. Raman spectra allow assessment of the overall molecular constitution of biological samples, based on specific signals from proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates, and inorganic crystals. Measurements are non-invasive and do not require sample processing, making Raman spectroscopy a reliable and robust method with numerous applications in biomedicine. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy allows the highly sensitive discrimination of bacteria. Rama spectra retain information on continuous metabolic processes and kinetics such as lipid storage and recombinant protein production. Raman spectra are specific for each cell type and provide additional information on cell viability, differentiation status, and tumorigenicity. In tissues, Raman spectroscopy can detect major extracellular matrix components and their secondary structures. Furthermore, the non-invasive characterization of healthy and pathological tissues as well as quality control and process monitoring of in vitro-engineered matrix is possible. This review provides comprehensive insight to the current progress in expanding the applicability of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of living cells and tissues, and serves as a good reference point for those starting in the field. PMID:23161832

  1. Tenascin-C in the extracellular matrix promotes the selection of highly proliferative and tubulogenesis-defective endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Tercia Rodrigues [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Laboratorio de Biologia da Celula Endotelial e da Angiogenese (LabAngio), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Carvalho da Fonseca, Anna Carolina [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nunes, Sara Santana; Oliveira da Silva, Aline [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Laboratorio de Biologia da Celula Endotelial e da Angiogenese (LabAngio), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Dubois, Luiz Gustavo Feijo; Faria, Jane; Kahn, Suzana Assad [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Viana, Nathan Bessa [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Laboratorio de Pincas Oticas, Coordenacao de Programas de Estudos Avancados, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Marcondes, Jorge [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Servico de Neurocirurgia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Legrand, Chantal [Institut Universitaire d' Hematologie, Universite Paris-Diderot, Paris 7, INSERM U553, Paris (France); Moura-Neto, Vivaldo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); and others

    2011-09-10

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contains important cues for tissue homeostasis and morphogenesis. The matricellular protein tenascin-C (TN-C) is overexpressed in remodeling tissues and cancer. In the present work, we studied the effect of different ECM-which exhibited a significant diversity in their TN-C content-in endothelial survival, proliferation and tubulogenic differentiation: autologous (endothelial) ECM devoid of TN-C, but bearing large amounts of FN; fibroblast ECM, bearing both high TN-C and FN contents; and finally, glioma-derived matrices, usually poor in FN, but very rich in TN-C. HUVECs initially adhered to the immobilized matrix produced by U373 MG glioma cells, but significantly detached and died by anoikis (50 to 80%) after 24 h, as compared with cells incubated with endothelial and fibroblast matrices. Surviving endothelial cells (20 to 50%) became up to 6-fold more proliferative and formed 74-97% less tube-like structures in vitro than cells grown on non-tumoral matrices. An antibody against the EGF-like repeats of tenascin-C (TN-C) partially rescued cells from the tubulogenic defect, indicating that this molecule is responsible for the selection of highly proliferative and tubulogenic defective endothelial cells. Interestingly, by using defined substrata, in conditions that mimic glioma and normal cell ECM composition, we observed that fibronectin (FN) modulates the TN-C-induced selection of endothelial cells. Our data show that TN-C is able to modulate endothelial branching morphogenesis in vitro and, since it is prevalent in matrices of injured and tumor tissues, also suggest a role for this protein in vascular morphogenesis, in these physiological contexts.

  2. PGF2alpha induced differential expression of genes involved in turnover of extracellular matrix in rat decidual cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callegari Eduardo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the rat, the decidual tissue is an important component for maternal recognition of pregnancy. Decidualization can be induced by either the implantation of the blastocyst or by artificial stimuli. The process of decidua formation or decidualization, is characterized by growth and differentiation of endometrial stromal cells. Prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2α has been shown to be involved in inhibition of implantation, alteration of embryo development, induction of luteal regression, and the mediation of pregnancy loss induced by microorganism infections. In order to establish a direct role for PGF2α in decidual function, we have evaluated its effects on the expression of an extensive array of genes using primary decidual cell culture. Upon treatment with PGF2α sixty genes were significantly down-regulated whereas only six genes were up-regulated (from a total of 1176 genes studied. Interestingly, the majority of the genes inhibited by PGF2α are either directly or indirectly involved in the turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Genes such as gelatinase A (MMP2, cathepsin L, tissue inhibitor metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP2 and 3 (TIMP3, plasminogen activator inhibitor1 (PAI1, tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA, urokinase plasminogen activator (tPA, endothelin 1, calponin, carboxypeptidase D and calponin acidic were down regulated. The opposite effect was observed for prostromelysin 53 kDa (proMMP3, plasma proteinase I alpha and alpha 1 antiproteinase, all of which were significantly up-regulated by PGF2α. The results strongly suggest that the abortificient role of elevated levels of PGF2α after implantation is due, in large part, to inhibition of genes involved in the normal turnover of the extracellular matrix necessary for decidual formation.

  3. Increased extracellular matrix density decreases MCF10A breast cell acinus formation in 3D culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Amanda; Yang, Chih-Chao; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Dean, Delphine; Deitch, Sandy; Burg, Karen J L; Dréau, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to the generation and dynamic of normal breast tissue, in particular to the generation of polarized acinar and ductal structures. In vitro 3D culture conditions, including variations in the composition of the ECM, have been shown to directly influence the formation and organization of acinus-like and duct-like structures. Furthermore, the density of the ECM appears to also play a role in the normal mammary tissue and tumour formation. Here we show that the density of the ECM directly influences the number, organization and function of breast acini. Briefly, non-malignant human breast MCF10A cells were incubated in increasing densities of a Matrigel®-collagen I matrix. Elastic moduli near and distant to the acinus structures were measured by atomic force microscopy, and the number of acinus structures was determined. Immunochemistry was used to investigate the expression levels of E-cadherin, laminin, matrix metalloproteinase-14 and ß-casein in MCF10A cells. The modulus of the ECM was significantly increased near the acinus structures and the number of acinus structures decreased with the increase in Matrigel-collagen I density. As evaluated by the expression of laminin, the organization of the acinus structures present was altered as the density of the ECM increased. Increases in both E-cadherin and MMP14 expression by MCF10A cells as ECM density increased were also observed. In contrast, MCF10A cells expressed lower ß-casein levels as the ECM density increased. Taken together, these observations highlight the key role of ECM density in modulating the number, organization and function of breast acini.

  4. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ly, David; Burgess, Janette K.; Brock, Thomas G.; Lee, Tak H.; Black, Judith L.; Oliver, Brian G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Van Ly D, Burgess JK, Brock TG, Lee TH, Black JL, Oliver BG. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 303: L239-L250, 2012. First published Ma

  5. Formation of organoid structures and extracellular matrix production in an intestinal epithelial cell line during long-term in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambuy, Y; De Angelis, I

    1986-09-01

    During the long-term in vitro maintenance of an epithelial cell line established from rat duodenum (IEC-17) we have observed progressive morphological changes which, after approximately 4-5 months in culture, led to a loss of substrate adherence and to the formation of organoid structures characterized by organized layers of cells separated by continuous extracellular-like material and delimiting close lumina. The cells exhibited a defined polarity with deposition of extracellular matrix components on one side and development of microvilli on the opposite surface. The morphological changes observed did not appear to be the expression of spontaneous transformation since the cells retained a normal diploid rat karyotype and did not grow in soft agar. In this report we present the optical and electron microscopical characterization of the progressive organotypic differentiation of the cell line. Further studies are currently in progress to characterize the extracellular matrix during the process of differentiation.

  6. The generation of hybrid electrospun nanofiber layer with extracellular matrix derived from human pluripotent stem cells, for regenerative medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtrichman, Ronit; Zeevi-Levin, Naama; Zaid, Rinat; Barak, Efrat; Fishman, Bettina; Ziskind, Anna; Shulman, Rita; Novak, Atara; Avrahami, Ron; Livne, Erella; Lowenstein, Lior; Zussman, Eyal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has been utilized as a biological scaffold for tissue engineering applications in a variety of body systems, due to its bioactivity and biocompatibility. In the current study we developed a modified protocol for the efficient and reproducible derivation of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) from human embryonic stem cells as well as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) originating from hair follicle keratinocytes (HFKTs). ECM was produced from these MPCs and characterized in comparison to adipose mesenchymal stem cell ECM, demonstrating robust ECM generation by the excised HFKT-iPSC-MPCs. Exploiting the advantages of electrospinning we generated two types of electrospun biodegradable nanofiber layers (NFLs), fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), which provide mechanical support for cell seeding and ECM generation. Elucidating the optimized decellularization treatment we were able to generate an available "off-the-shelf" implantable product (NFL-ECM). Using rat subcutaneous transplantation model we demonstrate that this stem-cell-derived construct is biocompatible and biodegradable and holds great potential for tissue regeneration applications.

  7. Comparative adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to human buccal epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rachael P C; Williams, David W; Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are very closely related pathogenic yeast species. Despite their close relationship, C. albicans is a far more successful colonizer and pathogen of humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if the disparity in the virulence of the two species is attributed to differences in their ability to adhere to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) and/or extracellular matrix proteins. When grown overnight at 30°C in yeast extract peptone dextrose, genotype 1 C. dubliniensis isolates were found to be significantly more adherent to human BECs than C. albicans or C. dubliniensis genotypes 2-4 (P albicans to human BECs was observed, and C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans adhered to BECs in significantly greater numbers than the other C. dubliniensis genotypes (P albicans to type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, and proline-rich peptides. These data suggest that C. albicans is not more adherent to epithelial cells or matrix proteins than C. dubliniensis and therefore other factors must contribute to the greater levels of virulence exhibited by C. albicans.

  8. Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dzobo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs represent an area being intensively researched for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. MSCs may provide the opportunity to treat diseases and injuries that currently have limited therapeutic options, as well as enhance present strategies for tissue repair. The cellular environment has a significant role in cellular development and differentiation through cell–matrix interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of adipose-derived MSCs (ad-MSCs in the context of a cell-derived matrix so as to model the in vivo physiological microenvironment. The fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (fd-ECM did not affect ad-MSC morphology, but reduced ad-MSC proliferation. Ad-MSCs cultured on fd-ECM displayed decreased expression of integrins α2 and β1 and subsequently lost their multipotency over time, as shown by the decrease in CD44, Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG gene expression. The fd-ECM induced chondrogenic differentiation in ad-MSCs compared to control ad-MSCs. Loss of function studies, through the use of siRNA and a mutant Notch1 construct, revealed that ECM-mediated ad-MSCs chondrogenesis requires Notch1 and β-catenin signaling. The fd-ECM also showed anti-senescence effects on ad-MSCs. The fd-ECM is a promising approach for inducing chondrogenesis in ad-MSCs and chondrogenic differentiated ad-MSCs could be used in stem cell therapy procedures.

  9. Defining the extracellular matrix using proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The cell microenvironment has a profound influence on the behaviour, growth and survival of cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides not only mechanical and structural support to cells and tissues but also binds soluble ligands and transmembrane receptors to provide spatial coordination of signalling processes. The ability of cells to sense the chemical, mechanical and topographical features of the ECM enables them to integrate complex, multiparametric information into a coherent response to the surrounding microenvironment. Consequently, dysregulation or mutation of ECM components results in a broad range of pathological conditions. Characterization of the composition of ECM derived from various cells has begun to reveal insights into ECM structure and function, and mechanisms of disease. Proteomic methodologies permit the global analysis of subcellular systems, but extracellular and transmembrane proteins present analytical difficulties to proteomic strategies owing to the particular biochemical properties of these molecules. Here, we review advances in proteomic approaches that have been applied to furthering our understanding of the ECM microenvironment. We survey recent studies that have addressed challenges in the analysis of ECM and discuss major outcomes in the context of health and disease. In addition, we summarize efforts to progress towards a systems-level understanding of ECM biology. PMID:23419153

  10. Culturing on decellularized extracellular matrix enhances antioxidant properties of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaozhen [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhou, Long; Chen, Xi [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Liu, Tao [Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Pan, Guoqing; Cui, Wenguo; Li, Mao; Luo, Zong-Ping [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Pei, Ming [Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Yang, Huilin [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gong, Yihong, E-mail: gongyih@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); He, Fan, E-mail: fanhe@suda.edu.cn [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) have attracted great interest in clinical application because of their regenerative potential and their lack of ethical issues. Our previous studies showed that decellularized cell-deposited extracellular matrix (ECM) provided an in vivo-mimicking microenvironment for MSCs and facilitated in vitro cell expansion. This study was conducted to analyze the cellular response of UC-MSCs when culturing on the ECM, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular antioxidative enzymes, and the resistance to exogenous oxidative stress. After decellularization, the architecture of cell-deposited ECM was characterized as nanofibrous, collagen fibrils and the matrix components were identified as type I and III collagens, fibronectin, and laminin. Compared to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) plates, culturing on ECM yielded a 2-fold increase of UC-MSC proliferation and improved the percentage of cells in the S phase by 2.4-fold. The levels of intracellular ROS and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in ECM-cultured cells were reduced by 41.7% and 82.9%, respectively. More importantly, ECM-cultured UC-MSCs showed enhanced expression and activity of intracellular antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, up-regulated expression of silent information regulator type 1, and suppressed phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Furthermore, a continuous treatment with exogenous 100 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dramatically inhibited osteogenic differentiation of UC-MSCs cultured on TCPS, but culturing on ECM retained the differentiation capacity for matrix mineralization and osteoblast-specific marker gene expression. Collectively, by providing sufficient cell amounts and enhancing antioxidant capacity, decellularized ECM can be a promising cell culture platform for in vitro expansion of UC-MSCs. - Highlights: • Decellularization preserved the architecture and components of cell

  11. Stiffness of hyaluronic acid gels containing liver extracellular matrix supports human hepatocyte function and alters cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Daniel B; Zimmerman, Cynthia; Skardal, Aleksander; Atala, Anthony; Shupe, Thomas D

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering and cell based liver therapies have utilized primary hepatocytes with limited success due to the failure of hepatocytes to maintain their phenotype in vitro. In order to overcome this challenge, hyaluronic acid (HA) cell culture substrates were formulated to closely mimic the composition and stiffness of the normal liver cellular microenvironment. The stiffness of the substrate was modulated by adjusting HA hydrogel crosslinking. Additionally, the repertoire of bioactive molecules within the HA substrate was bolstered by supplementation with normal liver extracellular matrix (ECM). Primary human hepatocyte viability and phenotype were determined over a narrow physiologically relevant range of substrate stiffnesses from 600 to 4600Pa in both the presence and absence of liver ECM. Cell attachment, viability, and organization of the actin cytoskeleton improved with increased stiffness up to 4600Pa. These differences were not evident in earlier time points or substrates containing only HA. However, gene expression for the hepatocyte markers hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and albumin significantly decreased on the 4600Pa stiffness at day 7 indicating that cells may not have maintained their phenotype long-term at this stiffness. Function, as measured by albumin secretion, varied with both stiffness and time in culture and peaked at day 7 at the 1200Pa stiffness, slightly below the stiffness of normal liver ECM at 3000Pa. Overall, gel stiffness affected primary human hepatocyte cell adhesion, functional marker expression, and morphological characteristics dependent on both the presence of liver ECM in gel substrates and time in culture.

  12. Microarray-based detection and expression analysis of extracellular matrix proteins in drug‑resistant ovarian cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Multiple drug resistance (MDR) development leads to resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Microarray methods can provide information regarding new candidate genes that can play a role in resistance to cytostatic drugs. Extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into cancer tissue as well as increased apoptosis resistance. In the present study, we report changes in the ECM and related gene expression pattern in methotrexate-, cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, vincristine-, topotecan- and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the W1 ovarian cancer cell line. The resistant variants of the W1 cell line were generated by stepwise selection of cells with an increasing concentration of the indicated drugs. Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Genome U219 Array Strips were used for hybridizations. Independent t-tests were used to determinate the statistical significance of results. Genes whose expression levels were higher than the assumed threshold (upregulated, >5-fold and downregulated, 20-fold. These genes were: ITGB1BP3, COL3A1, COL5A2, COL15A1, TGFBI, DCN, LUM, MATN2, POSTN and EGFL6. The expression of seven genes decreased very significantly: ITGA1, COL1A2, LAMA2, GPC3, KRT23, VIT and HMCN1. The expression pattern of ECM and related genes provided the preliminary view into the role of ECM components in cytostatic drug resistance of cancer cells. The exact role of the investigated genes in drug resistance requires further investigation.

  13. Development of an in situ evaluation system for neural cells using extracellular matrix-modeled gel culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Ikegami, Yasuhiro; Mizumachi, Hideyuki; Shirakigawa, Nana; Ijima, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer culture is the most popular cell culture method. However, the cells may not respond as they do in vivo because the culture conditions are different from in vivo conditions. However, hydrogel-embedding culture, which cultures cells in a biocompatible culture substrate, can produce in vivo-like cell responses, but in situ evaluation of cells in a gel is difficult. In this study, we realized an in vivo-like environment in vitro to produce cell responses similar to those in vivo and established an in situ evaluation system for hydrogel-embedded cell responses. The extracellular matrix (ECM)-modeled gel consisted of collagen and heparin (Hep-col) to mimic an in vivo-like environment. The Hep-col gel could immobilize growth factors, which is important for ECM functions. Neural stem/progenitor cells cultured in the Hep-col gel grew and differentiated more actively than in collagen, indicating an in vivo-like environment in the Hep-col gel. Second, a thin-layered gel culture system was developed to realize in situ evaluation of the gel-embedded cells. Cells in a 200-μm-thick gel could be evaluated clearly by a phase-contrast microscope and immunofluorescence staining through reduced optical and diffusional effects. Finally, we found that the neural cells cultured in this system had synaptic connections and neuronal action potentials by immunofluorescence staining and Ca(2+) imaging. In conclusion, this culture method may be a valuable evaluation system for neurotoxicity testing. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Resorbable extracellular matrix grafts in urologic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Santucci

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is an increasingly large body of literature concerning tissue-engineering products that may be used in urology. Some of these are quite complex (such as multilayer patient-specific cell-seeded implants yet the most simple and successful products to date are also the most uncomplicated: resorbable acellular extra-cellular matrices (ECMs harvested from animals. ECMs have been used in a variety of difficult urologic reconstruction problems, and this review is intended to summarize this complex literature for the practicing urologist. METHODS: Medline search of related terms such as "SIS, small intestinal submucosa, ECM, extracellular matrix, acellular matrix and urologic reconstruction". Manuscripts missed in the initial search were taken from the bibliographies of the primary references. RESULTS: Full review of potential clinical uses of resorbable extra-cellular matrices in urologic reconstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Currently, the "state of the art" in tissue engineering solutions for urologic reconstruction means resorbable acellular xenograft matrices. They show promise when used as a pubovaginal sling or extra bolstering layers in ureteral or urethral repairs, although recent problems with inflammation following 8-ply pubovaginal sling use and failures after 1- and 4-ply SIS repair of Peyronie's disease underscore the need for research before wide adoption. Preliminary data is mixed concerning the potential for ECM urethral patch graft, and more data is needed before extended uses such as bladder augmentation and ureteral replacement are contemplated. The distant future of ECMs in urology likely will include cell-seeded grafts with the eventual hope of producing "off the shelf" replacement materials. Until that day arrives, ECMs only fulfill some of the requirements for the reconstructive urologist.

  15. Aberrant production of extracellular matrix proteins and dysfunction in kidney endothelial cells with a short duration of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutzmacher, Cathy; Park, SunYoung; Zhao, Yun; Morrison, Margaret E; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In the United States, microvascular complications during diabetic nephropathy contribute to high morbidity and mortality rates. However, the cell-autonomous impact of diabetes on kidney endothelial cell function requires further investigation. Male Akita/+ [autosomal dominant mutation in the insulin II gene (Ins2)] mice reproducibly develop diabetes by 4 wk of age. Here, we examined the impact a short duration of diabetes had on kidney endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells were prepared from nondiabetic and diabetic mice (4 wk of diabetes) to delineate the early changes in endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice following 4 wk of diabetes demonstrated aberrant expression of extracellular matrix proteins including decreased osteopontin and increased fibronectin expression which correlated with increased α5-integrin expression. These changes were associated with the attenuation of migration and capillary morphogenesis. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice had decreased VEGF levels but increased levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) and NO, suggesting uncoupling of VEGF-mediated NO production. Knocking down eNOS expression in Akita/+ kidney endothelial cells increased VEGF expression, endothelial cell migration, and capillary morphogenesis. Furthermore, attenuation of sprouting angiogenesis of aortas from Akita/+ mice with 8 wk of diabetes was restored in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. These studies demonstrate that aberrant endothelial cell function with a short duration of diabetes may set the stage for vascular dysfunction and rarefaction at later stages of diabetes.

  16. Tumorigenic Potential of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Stanley; Hymowitz, Michelle; Rollo, Ellen E.; Mann, Richard; Conner, Cathleen E.; Cao, Jian; Foda, Hussein D.; Tompkins, David C.; Toole, Bryan P.

    2001-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  17. From mechanotransduction to extracellular matrix gene expression in fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquet, Matthias; Gelman, Laurent; Lutz, Roman; Maier, Silke

    2009-05-01

    Tissue mechanics provide an important context for tissue growth, maintenance and function. On the level of organs, external mechanical forces largely influence the control of tissue homeostasis by endo- and paracrine factors. On the cellular level, it is well known that most normal cell types depend on physical interactions with their extracellular matrix in order to respond efficiently to growth factors. Fibroblasts and other adherent cells sense changes in physical parameters in their extracellular matrix environment, transduce mechanical into chemical information, and integrate these signals with growth factor derived stimuli to achieve specific changes in gene expression. For connective tissue cells, production of the extracellular matrix is a prominent response to changes in mechanical load. We will review the evidence that integrin-containing cell-matrix adhesion contacts are essential for force transmission from the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton, and describe novel experiments indicating that mechanotransduction in fibroblasts depends on focal adhesion adaptor proteins that might function as molecular springs. We will stress the importance of the contractile actin cytoskeleton in balancing external with internal forces, and describe new results linking force-controlled actin dynamics directly to the expression of specific genes, among them the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C. As assembly lines for diverse signaling pathways, matrix adhesion contacts are now recognized as the major sites of crosstalk between mechanical and chemical stimuli, with important consequences for cell growth and differentiation.

  18. Effects of astragalosides from Radix Astragali on high glucose-induced proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation in glomerular mesangial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHEN, XIAO; WANG, DONG-DONG; WEI, TONG; HE, SU-MEI; ZHANG, GUAN-YING; WEI, QUN-LI

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) exhibits a deteriorating course that may lead to end-stage renal failure. Astragalosides have been clinically tested for the treatment of DN, but the mechanism is unclear at present. In this study, the effects of astragalosides were investigated on high glucose-induced proliferation and expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), type IV collagen (colIV) and fibronectin (FN) in glomerular mesangial cells (MCs). Cell proliferation was determined by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine assay, and the expression of TGF-β1, CTGF, colIV and FN mRNA and proteins in MCs was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and ELISA assay, respectively. The results showed that high glucose clearly induced the proliferation of MCs and increased the expression of TGF-β1, CTGF, colIV and FN. Treatment with 50, 100, 200 µg/ml astragalosides inhibited cell proliferation and the expression of TGF-β1, CTGF, colIV and FN induced by high glucose. Thus, it is concluded that astragalosides inhibit the increased cell proliferation and expression of major extracellular matrix proteins that are induced by high glucose, indicating their value for the prophylaxis and therapy of DN. PMID:27313676

  19. Cathepsin B is up-regulated and mediates extracellular matrix degradation in trabecular meshwork cells following phagocytic challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Porter

    Full Text Available Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, a tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic activity in TM cells is thought to play an important role in outflow pathway physiology. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are unknown. Here we investigated the effects of chronic phagocytic stress on lysosomal function using different phagocytic ligands (E. coli, carboxylated beads, collagen I-coated beads, and pigment. Lysotracker red co-localization and electron micrographs showed the maturation of E. coli- and collagen I-coated beads-containing phagosomes into phagolysosomes. Maturation of phagosomes into phagolysosomes was not observed with carboxylated beads or pigment particles. In addition, phagocytosis of E. coli and collagen I-coated beads led to increased lysosomal mass, and the specific up-regulation and activity of cathepsin B (CTSB. Higher levels of membrane-bound and secreted CTSB were also detected. Moreover, in vivo zymography showed the intralysosomal degradation of ECM components associated with active CTSB, as well as an overall increased gelatinolytic activity in phagocytically challenged TM cells. This increased gelatinolytic activity with phagocytosis was partially blocked with an intracellular CTSB inhibitor. Altogether, these results suggest a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  20. Effects of myenteric denervation on extracellular matrix fibers and mast cell distribution in normal stomach and gastric lesions

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    Estofolete Cássia F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study the effect of myenteric denervation induced by benzalconium chloride (BAC on distribution of fibrillar components of extracellular matrix (ECM and inflammatory cells was investigated in gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG. Rats were divided in four experimental groups: non-denervated (I and denervated stomach (II without MNNG treatment; non-denervated (III and denervated stomachs (IV treated with MNNG. For histopathological, histochemical and stereological analysis, sections of gastric fragments were stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin, Picrosirius-Hematoxylin, Gomori reticulin, Weigert's Resorcin-Fuchsin, Toluidine Blue and Alcian-Blue/Safranin (AB-SAF. Results BAC denervation causes an increase in the frequency of reticular and elastic fibers in the denervated (group II compared to the non-denervated stomachs (group I. The treatment of the animals with MNNG induced the development of adenocarcinomas in non-denervated and denervated stomachs (groups III and IV, respectively with a notable increase in the relative volume of the stroma, the frequency of reticular fibers and the inflammatory infiltrate that was more intense in group IV. An increase in the frequency of elastic fibers was observed in adenocarcinomas of denervated (group IV compared to the non-denervated stomachs (group III that showed degradation of these fibers. The development of lesions (groups III and IV was also associated with an increase in the mast cell population, especially AB and AB-SAF positives, the latter mainly in the denervated group IV. Conclusions The results show a strong association in the morphological alteration of the ECM fibrillar components, the increased density of mast cells and the development of tumors induced by MNNG in the non-denervated rat stomach or denervated by BAC. This suggests that the study of extracellular and intracellular components of tumor microenvironment contributes

  1. [The influence of substrate from extracellular matrix proteins on karyotypic variability of the Indian muntjac skin fibroblast two cell lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polianskaia, G G; Kol'tsova, A M

    2013-01-01

    The effect of cell culture conditions on numerical and structural karyotypic variability was investigated in two Indian muntjac skin fibroblast "markerless" cell lines, M and MT. The cells cultivated on the substrate consisting of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), synthesized by human mesenchymal stem cells (SC5-MSC). The character of cell distribution for chromosome number of cell line M changed after cultivation for 1 and 4 days as compared to control cells, which were cultured on hydrophilic surface without ECM-coating. These changes involve a significant decrease in frequency of cells with modal numbers of chromosomes and an increase in frequency of cells with lower chromosome numbers. Many new types of additional structural variants of the karyotype (SVK) appear. MT cell line, differing from M line in the number of homologous chromosomes, demonstrated similar with M line the character of cell distribution for chromosome number only for 1 day after cultivating on the ECM-substrate, but not after 4 days in the same culture conditions, no difference from the control cells was observed. The observed alterations seem to be due to disturbances in correct chromosome segregation process, which were caused by abrupt shift in the cell culture conditions. The analysis of the structural karyotypic variability revealed significant increase in frequency of chromosomal aberrations in M cell line for 1 and 4 days in culture on the ECM-substrate as compared to the control cells. The frequency of dicentric chromosomes (telomeric associations) was increased and constituted more than 50% of all chromosome aberrations. No increase in frequency of chromosome aberrations was observed for MT cells cultured in the same conditions. The obtained results show that the cell lines of the same origin but of different karyotypic structure react to substrate in a different way. In contrast to M line, in MT line a fast normalization of numerical karyotypic characteristics and no enhancement

  2. Overexpression of Cell Surface Cytokeratin 8 in Multidrug-Resistant MCF-7/MX Cells Enhances Cell Adhesion to the Extracellular Matrix

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    Fang Liu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that multiple complex mechanisms may be involved, simultaneously or complementarily, in the emergence and development of multidrug resistance (MDR in various cancers. Cell adhesion-mediated MDR is one such mechanism. In the present study, we initially observed increased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins by the MDR human breast tumor cell line MCF-7/MX compared to its parental cells. We then used a strategy that combined antibody-based screening technique and mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify membrane proteins that contribute to the enhanced adhesion of MCF-7/MX cells. Using MCF-7/MX cells as immunogen, we isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody, 9C6, that preferentially reacts with MCF-7/MX cells over the parental MCF-7 cells. The molecular target of 9C6 was identified as cytokeratin 8 (CK8, which was found to be overexpressed on the cell surface of MCF-7/MX cells. We further observed that down-regulation of cell surface levels of CK8 through siRNA transfection significantly inhibited MCF-7/MX cell adhesion to fibronectin and vitronectin. In addition, anti-CK8 siRNA partially reversed the MDR phenotype of MCF-7/MX cells. Taken together, our results suggest that alterations in the expression level and cellular localization of CK8 may play a significant role in enhancing the cellular adhesion of MDR MCF-7/MX cells.

  3. Extracellular Matrix Molecules Facilitating Vascular Biointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K.C. Ng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available All vascular implants, including stents, heart valves and graft materials exhibit suboptimal biocompatibility that significantly reduces their clinical efficacy. A range of biomolecules in the subendothelial space have been shown to play critical roles in local regulation of thrombosis, endothelial growth and smooth muscle cell proliferation, making these attractive candidates for modulation of vascular device biointegration. However, classically used biomaterial coatings, such as fibronectin and laminin, modulate only one of these components; enhancing endothelial cell attachment, but also activating platelets and triggering thrombosis. This review examines a subset of extracellular matrix molecules that have demonstrated multi-faceted vascular compatibility and accordingly are promising candidates to improve the biointegration of vascular biomaterials.

  4. Influence of tissue- and cell-scale extracellular matrix distribution on the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, C.C. van

    2013-01-01

    The insufficient load-bearing capacity of today's tissue- engineered (TE) cartilage limits its clinical application. Generally, cartilage TE studies aim to increase the extracellular matrix (ECM) content, as this is thought to determine the load-bearing properties of the cartilage. However, there ar

  5. Gene and miRNA expression signature of Lewis lung carcinoma LLC1 cells in extracellular matrix enriched microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevicius, Vaidotas; Vasauskas, Gintautas; Bulotiene, Danute; Butkyte, Stase; Jarmalaite, Sonata; Rotomskis, Ricardas; Suziedelis, Kestutis

    2016-10-11

    The extracellular matrix (ECM), one of the key components of tumor microenvironment, has a tremendous impact on cancer development and highly influences tumor cell features. ECM affects vital cellular functions such as cell differentiation, migration, survival and proliferation. Gene and protein expression levels are regulated in cell-ECM interaction dependent manner as well. The rate of unsuccessful clinical trials, based on cell culture research models lacking the ECM microenvironment, indicates the need for alternative models and determines the shift to three-dimensional (3D) laminin rich ECM models, better simulating tissue organization. Recognized advantages of 3D models suggest the development of new anticancer treatment strategies. This is among the most promising directions of 3D cell cultures application. However, detailed analysis at the molecular level of 2D/3D cell cultures and tumors in vivo is still needed to elucidate cellular pathways most promising for the development of targeted therapies. In order to elucidate which biological pathways are altered during microenvironmental shift we have analyzed whole genome mRNA and miRNA expression differences in LLC1 cells cultured in 2D or 3D culture conditions. In our study we used DNA microarrays for whole genome analysis of mRNA and miRNA expression differences in LLC1 cells cultivated in 2D or 3D culture conditions. Next, we indicated the most common enriched functional categories using KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. Finally, we validated the microarray data by quantitative PCR in LLC1 cells cultured under 2D or 3D conditions or LLC1 tumors implanted in experimental animals. Microarray gene expression analysis revealed that 1884 genes and 77 miRNAs were significantly altered in LLC1 cells after 48 h cell growth under 2D and ECM based 3D cell growth conditions. Pathway enrichment results indicated metabolic pathway, MAP kinase, cell adhesion and immune response as the most significantly altered

  6. Epithelial expression of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer/CD147 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in neoplasms and precursor lesions derived from cutaneous squamous cells: An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayva, Sebnem Kupana; Karabulut, Ayse Anil; Akatli, Ayşe Nur; Atasoy, Pinar; Bozdogan, Onder

    2013-10-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (CD147) is a transmembrane glycoprotein involved in the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The study investigated CD147 and MMP-2 expression in epidermis of cutaneous squamous lesions. CD147 and MMP-2 expressions were evaluated immunohistochemically in 44 specimens: 18 actinic keratoses (AK), 6 squamous cell carcinomas in situ (SCCIS), 13 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC; peritumoral and invasive portions assessed), and 7 normal skins. Patterns of expression were assessed, with MMP-2 in nuclei (MMP-2n) and cytoplasm (MMP-2c) evaluated separately. The expression of each marker was quantified using a calculated immunohistochemical/histologic score (H-score). Correlations were analyzed for the marker H-scores in each study group. Associations between H-scores and histopathologic parameters were also evaluated. CD147 H-score was the highest in SCC (invasive islands), followed by AK, SCCIS, and control specimens, respectively. MMP-2n and MMP-2c H-scores were the highest in AK, followed by SCCIS, SCC, and control specimens, respectively. MMP-2c and MMP-2n H-scores were significantly higher in peritumoral epidermis than in invasive islands of SCC. MMP-2c and CD147 H-scores were positively correlated in the peritumoral SCCs. CD147 H-score was positively correlated with tumor differentiation in SCC. The findings suggest that overexpression of CD147 plays a role in the development of SCC.

  7. Extracellular matrix as a driver for lung regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Jenna L; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-03-01

    Extracellular matrix has manifold roles in tissue mechanics, guidance of cellular behavior, developmental biology, and regenerative medicine. Over the past several decades, various pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown that many connective tissues may be replaced and/or regenerated using suitable extracellular matrix scaffolds. More recently, decellularization of lung tissue has shown that gentle removal of cells can leave behind a "footprint" within the matrix that may guide cellular adhesion, differentiation and homing following cellular repopulation. Fundamental issues like understanding matrix composition and micro-mechanics remain difficult to tackle, largely because of a lack of available assays and tools for systematically characterizing intact matrix from tissues and organs. This review will critically examine the role of engineered and native extracellular matrix in tissue and lung regeneration, and provide insights into directions for future research and translation.

  8. The Promoting Effect of the Extracellular Matrix Peptide TNIIIA2 Derived from Tenascin-C in Colon Cancer Cell Infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideo; Sasada, Manabu; Kamiya, Sadahiro; Ito, Yuka; Watanabe, Hikaru; Okada, Yuko; Ishibashi, Kazuma; Iyoda, Takuya; Yanaka, Akinori; Fukai, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) molecule tenascin C (TNC) is known to be highly expressed under various pathological conditions such as inflammation and cancer. It has been reported that the expression of TNC is correlated with the malignant potential of cancer. In our laboratory, it was found that the peptide derived from the alternative splicing domain A2 in TNC, termed TNIIIA2, has been shown to influence a variety of cellular processes, such as survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of TNC/TNIIIA2 on the invasion and metastasis of colon cancer cells, Colon26-M3.1, or PMF-Ko14, using an in vitro and in vivo experimental system. The degree of cell invasion was increased by the addition of TNC and TNIIIA2 in a dose-dependent manner. The invasion by TNC and TNIIIA2 were suppressed by an MMP inhibitor or TNIIIA2-blocking antibody. In an in vivo experiment, pulmonary metastasis was promoted conspicuously by the addition of TNIIIA2. In this study, we found that colon cancer cell invasion and metastasis was accelerated by TNC/TNIIIA2 via MMP induction. This result suggests the possibility of a new strategy targeting TNC/TNIIIA2 for colon cancer. PMID:28106752

  9. RNA interference targeting extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (CD147) inhibits growth and increases chemosensitivity in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F; Zeng, Y L; Zhang, X G; Chen, W J; Yang, R; Li, S J

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inducer (EMMPRIN CD147) has been implicated in the growth and survival of malignant cells. However, its presence and role in cervical cancer cells has not been well-studied. In the present study, small interfering RNA (siRNA) was designed and synthesized to breakdown the expression of CD147. The present data demonstrated that 24 and 48 hours after transfecting CD147 siRNA, both the CD147 mRNA and protein expression were significantly inhibited as determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry. Meanwhile, simultaneous silencing of CD147 resulted in distinctly increasing MMP-9, VEGF, and MDR-1. Further studies demonstrated decreased CD147 expression, resulted in G1/S phase transition with flow cytometry analysis, as well as the resistance of the cells to 5-FU. These findings provide further evidence that CD147 may become a promising therapeutic target for human cervical cancer and a potential chemotherapy-sensitizing agent.

  10. Parathyroid hormone inhibits TGF-β/Smad signaling and extracellular matrix proteins upregulation in rat mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fang-Fang; Xiao, Ze-Ling; Chen, Hong-Min; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jian; Yu, Hong; Zhang, Bai-Fang

    2016-09-23

    Accumulation of glomerular matrix is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy. TGF-β1 is a major cytokine mediating the production of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on TGF-β1 and high glucose-induced upregulation of ECM proteins in primary mesangial cells from Sprague-Dawley rat. The results showed that PTH pretreatment prevented TGF-β1 and high glucose-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation and consequent upregulation of fibronectin and type IV collagen within 4 h. The inhibitory effect of PTH is due to PTH1R activation, because knocking down PTH 1 receptor (PTH1R) by RNA interference reversed the inhibitory effect of PTH on TGF-β1 and high glucose-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation and ECM upregulation. Furthermore, it is found that PTH1R associated with TGF-β type II receptor (TβR II) and both receptors internalized into the cytoplasm when mesangial cells were stimulated with PTH alone. The internalization of TβR II might reduce the amount of membrane TβR II, attenuate the sensitivity of mesangial cells to TGF-β1, and therefore inhibit Smad activation and ECM upregulation induced by TGF-β1 and high glucose. Further studies are needed to know whether the endocytic receptors are to be degraded or recycled, and evaluate the role of PTH in TGF-β1 signaling more comprehensively.

  11. Effect of extracellular matrix on bovine spermatogonial stem cells and gene expression of niche factors regulating their development in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarinejad, V; Tajik, P; Movahedin, M; Youssefi, R; Shafiei, S; Mazaheri, Z

    2015-06-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) could influence cells function through providing structural and functional networks facilitating the cellular interactions. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of culture on ECM versus plastic on bovine spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and growth factors regulating their development. Following isolation, bovine testicular cells were cultured on ECM-coated or uncoated (control) plates for 12 days. The colonization of SSCs was assessed by inverted microscope and the gene expression was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR. The colonization rate was greater in ECM than the control group (P<0.05). The expression of markers of undifferentiated spermatogonia increased in response to conventional culture (P<0.05). Conversely, the expression of ckit as a marker for differentiated spermatogonia was reduced following culture in the control and ECM groups (P<0.05), but this decrease was less in ECM group (P<0.05). Accordingly, while cells cultured on uncoated plates had greater expression of markers of undifferentiated spermatogonia (P<0.05), cells cultured on ECM-coated plates showed higher expression of ckit (P<0.05). Moreover, culture on ECM resulted in higher expression of kit ligand (Kitlg; P<0.05), whereas culture on plastic led to greater expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf; P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study revealed that the permissive effect of ECM on bovine SSCs differentiation in vitro, which was probably mediated through upregulation of KITLG expression. Moreover, the results imply that GDNF might contribute to germ cells self-renewal during conventional culture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell-cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable. Recent studies have shown the potential of hydrogels to mimic native ECM. Such an engineered native-like ECM is more likely to provide cells with rational cues for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. The research for novel biomaterials has led to an extension of the scope and techniques used to fabricate biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In this article, we detail the progress of the current state-of-the-art engineering methods to create cell-encapsulating hydrogel tissue constructs as well as their applications in in vitro models in biomedicine.

  13. Control of extracellular matrix assembly by syndecan-2 proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klass, C M; Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    2000-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and organization is maintained by transmembrane signaling and integrins play major roles. We now show that a second transmembrane component, syndecan-2 heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is pivotal in matrix assembly. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were stably...

  14. Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sheng; Ding, Fei; Gong, Leiiei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is produced by the resident cells in tissues and organs, and secreted into the surrounding medium to provide biophysical and biochemical support to the surrounding cells due to its content of diverse bioactive molecules. Recently, the extracellular matrix has been used as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Emerging studies demonstrate that extracellular matrix scaffolds are able to create a favorable regenerative microenvironment, promote tissue-specific remodeling, and act as an inductive template for the repair and functional reconstruction of skin, bone, nerve, heart, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, and other organs. In the current review, we will provide a critical overview of the structure and function of various types of extracellular matrix, the construction of three-dimensional extracellular matrix scaffolds, and their tissue engineering applications, with a focus on translation of these novel tissue engineered products to the clinic. We will also present an outlook on future perspectives of the extracellular matrix in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Cardiac fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (biomatrix) as a model for the studies of cardiac primitive cell biological properties in normal and pathological adult human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, Clotilde; Di Meglio, Franca; Miraglia, Rita; Sacco, Anna Maria; Romano, Veronica; Bancone, Ciro; Della Corte, Alessandro; Montagnani, Stefania; Nurzynska, Daria

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac tissue regeneration is guided by stem cells and their microenvironment. It has been recently described that both cardiac stem/primitive cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) change in pathological conditions. This study describes the method for the production of ECM typical of adult human heart in the normal and pathological conditions (ischemic heart disease) and highlights the potential use of cardiac fibroblast-derived ECM for in vitro studies of the interactions between ECM components and cardiac primitive cells responsible for tissue regeneration. Fibroblasts isolated from adult human normal and pathological heart with ischemic cardiomyopathy were cultured to obtain extracellular matrix (biomatrix), composed of typical extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen and fibronectin, and matricellular proteins, laminin, and tenascin. After decellularization, this substrate was used to assess biological properties of cardiac primitive cells: proliferation and migration were stimulated by biomatrix from normal heart, while both types of biomatrix protected cardiac primitive cells from apoptosis. Our model can be used for studies of cell-matrix interactions and help to determine the biochemical cues that regulate cardiac primitive cell biological properties and guide cardiac tissue regeneration.

  16. Cardiac Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix (Biomatrix as a Model for the Studies of Cardiac Primitive Cell Biological Properties in Normal and Pathological Adult Human Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clotilde Castaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tissue regeneration is guided by stem cells and their microenvironment. It has been recently described that both cardiac stem/primitive cells and extracellular matrix (ECM change in pathological conditions. This study describes the method for the production of ECM typical of adult human heart in the normal and pathological conditions (ischemic heart disease and highlights the potential use of cardiac fibroblast-derived ECM for in vitro studies of the interactions between ECM components and cardiac primitive cells responsible for tissue regeneration. Fibroblasts isolated from adult human normal and pathological heart with ischemic cardiomyopathy were cultured to obtain extracellular matrix (biomatrix, composed of typical extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen and fibronectin, and matricellular proteins, laminin, and tenascin. After decellularization, this substrate was used to assess biological properties of cardiac primitive cells: proliferation and migration were stimulated by biomatrix from normal heart, while both types of biomatrix protected cardiac primitive cells from apoptosis. Our model can be used for studies of cell-matrix interactions and help to determine the biochemical cues that regulate cardiac primitive cell biological properties and guide cardiac tissue regeneration.

  17. Electrical stimulation of neural stem cells mediated by humanized carbon nanotube composite made with extracellular matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Nadine Wong Shi; Jan, Edward; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2009-01-01

    One of the key challenges to engineering neural interfaces is to minimize their immune response toward implanted electrodes. One potential approach is to manufacture materials that bear greater structural resemblance to living tissues and by utilizing neural stem cells. The unique electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes make them excellent candidates for neural interfaces, but their adoption hinges on finding approaches for "humanizing" their composites. Here we demonstrated the fabrication of layer-by-layer assembled composites from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and laminin, which is an essential part of human extracellular matrix. Laminin-SWNT thin films were found to be conducive to neural stem cells (NSC) differentiation and suitable for their successful excitation. We observed extensive formation of functional neural network as indicated by the presence of synaptic connections. Calcium imaging of the NSCs revealed generation of action potentials upon the application of a lateral current through the SWNT substrate. These results indicate that the protein-SWNT composite can serve as materials foundation of neural electrodes with chemical structure better adapted with long-term integration with the neural tissue.

  18. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Promotes Extracellular Matrix Remodelling and Limits Embryo Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Stuart P.; Quiñonero, Alicia; Martínez, Sebastián; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Invasion of the trophoblast into the maternal decidua is regulated by both the trophoectoderm and the endometrial stroma, and entails the action of tissue remodeling enzymes. Trophoblast invasion requires the action of metalloproteinases (MMPs) to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and in turn, decidual cells express tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs). The balance between these promoting and restraining factors is a key event for the successful outcome of pregnancy. Gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) that unpacks condensed chromatin activating gene expression. In this study we analyze the effect of histone acetylation on the expression of tissue remodeling enzymes and activity of human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) related to trophoblast invasion control. Treatment of hESCs with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) increased the expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 while decreased MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA and have an inhibitory effect on trophoblast invasion. Moreover, histone acetylation is detected at the promoters of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 genes in TSA-treated. In addition, in an in vitro decidualized hESCs model, the increase of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression is associated with histone acetylation at the promoters of these genes. Our results demonstrate that histone acetylation disrupt the balance of ECM modulators provoking a restrain of trophoblast invasion. These findings are important as an epigenetic mechanism that can be used to control trophoblast invasion. PMID:22291969

  19. Extracellular matrix heparin induces alteration of the cell adhesion during brain development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ushakova, GA; Nikonenko, IR; Nikonenko, AG; Skibo, GG

    2002-01-01

    The studies of neuronal cell-glycosaminoglycan interactions indicate an increasing interest in the question of how heparin can mediate adhesion properties of the cell. We have found that high levels of both N-CAM concentration and heparin-binding activity were noticed in the early stages of brain fo

  20. Evaluation of silk biomaterials in combination with extracellular matrix coatings for bladder tissue engineering with primary and pluripotent cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Franck

    Full Text Available Silk-based biomaterials in combination with extracellular matrix (ECM coatings were assessed as templates for cell-seeded bladder tissue engineering approaches. Two structurally diverse groups of silk scaffolds were produced by a gel spinning process and consisted of either smooth, compact multi-laminates (Group 1 or rough, porous lamellar-like sheets (Group 2. Scaffolds alone or coated with collagen types I or IV or fibronectin were assessed independently for their ability to support attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of primary cell lines including human bladder smooth muscle cells (SMC and urothelial cells as well as pluripotent cell populations, such as murine embryonic stem cells (ESC and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells. AlamarBlue evaluations revealed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds promoted the highest degree of primary SMC and urothelial cell attachment in comparison to uncoated Group 2 controls and all Group 1 scaffold variants. Real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical (IHC analyses demonstrated that both fibronectin-coated silk groups were permissive for SMC contractile differentiation as determined by significant upregulation of α-actin and SM22α mRNA and protein expression levels following TGFβ1 stimulation. Prominent expression of epithelial differentiation markers, cytokeratins, was observed in urothelial cells cultured on both control and fibronectin-coated groups following IHC analysis. Evaluation of silk matrices for ESC and iPS cell attachment by alamarBlue showed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds promoted the highest levels in comparison to all other scaffold formulations. In addition, real time RT-PCR and IHC analyses showed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds facilitated ESC and iPS cell differentiation toward both urothelial and smooth muscle lineages in response to all trans retinoic acid as assessed by induction of uroplakin and contractile gene and protein expression. These

  1. Biomimetic extracellular matrix mediated somatic stem cell differentiation: applications in dental pulp tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world's population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues.

  2. Biomimetic Extracellular Matrix Mediated Somatic Stem Cell Differentiation: Applications in Dental Pulp Tissue Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram eRavindran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world’s population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues.

  3. Biomimetic extracellular matrix mediated somatic stem cell differentiation: applications in dental pulp tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world's population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues. PMID:25954205

  4. Breast cancer cell cyclooxygenase-2 expression alters extracellular matrix structure and function and numbers of cancer associated fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamachary, Balaji; Stasinopoulos, Ioannis; Kakkad, Samata; Penet, Marie-France; Jacob, Desmond; Wildes, Flonne; Mironchik, Yelena; Pathak, Arvind P; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2017-01-31

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a critically important mediator of inflammation that significantly influences tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. We investigated the role of COX-2 expressed by triple negative breast cancer cells in altering the structure and function of the extracellular matrix (ECM). COX-2 downregulation effects on ECM structure and function were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy of tumors derived from triple negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, and a derived clone stably expressing a short hairpin (shRNA) molecule downregulating COX-2. MRI of albumin-GdDTPA was used to characterize macromolecular fluid transport in vivo and SHG microscopy was used to quantify collagen 1 (Col1) fiber morphology. COX-2 downregulation decreased Col1 fiber density and altered macromolecular fluid transport. Immunohistochemistry identified significantly fewer activated cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in low COX-2 expressing tumors. Metastatic lung nodules established by COX-2 downregulated cells were infrequent, smaller, and contained fewer Col1 fibers.COX-2 overexpression studies were performed with tumors derived from triple negative SUM-149 breast cancer cells lentivirally transduced to overexpress COX-2. SHG microscopy identified significantly higher Col1 fiber density in COX-2 overexpressing tumors with an increase of CAFs. These data expand upon the roles of COX-2 in shaping the structure and function of the ECM in primary and metastatic tumors, and identify the potential role of COX-2 in modifying the number of CAFs in tumors that may have contributed to the altered ECM.

  5. Characterization of cell surface and extracellular matrix remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense chemotaxis-like 1 signal transduction pathway mutants by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Amanda Nicole; Siuti, Piro; Bible, Amber N; Alexandre, Gladys; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the regulation of multiple behaviors in response to changes in the environment, including motility patterns, exopolysaccharide production, and cell-to-cell interactions. In Azospirillum brasilense, cell surface properties, including exopolysaccharide production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from A. brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation, suggesting an associated modulation of cell surface properties. Using atomic force microscopy, distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains were detected. Whereas the wild-type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix after 24 h, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition, lectin-binding assays, and comparison of lipopolysaccharides profiles suggest that the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and the cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that disruption of the Che1 pathway is correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix, which likely result from changes in surface polysaccharides structure and/or composition.

  6. Characterization of cell surface and extracellular matrix remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense chemotaxis-like 1 signal transduction pathway mutants by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the regulation of multiple behaviors in response to changes in the environment, including motility patterns, exopolysaccharide production, and cell-to-cell interactions. In Azospirillum brasilense, cell surface properties, including exopolysaccharide production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from A. brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation, suggesting an associated modulation of cell surface properties. Using atomic force microscopy, distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains were detected. Whereas the wild-type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix after 24 h, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition, lectin-binding assays, and comparison of lipopolysaccharides profiles suggest that the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and the cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that disruption of the Che1 pathway is correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix, which likely result from changes in surface polysaccharides structure and/or composition.

  7. Fibrolamellar carcinoma of the liver: composition of the extracellular matrix and expression of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoazec, J Y; Flejou, J F; D'Errico, A; Fiorentino, M; Zamparelli, A; Bringuier, A F; Feldmann, G; Grigioni, W F

    1996-11-01

    We have analyzed the composition of the tumor stroma and the expression of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion molecules in 11 cases of fibrolamellar carcinoma of the liver (FLC), in comparison with 34 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 8 cases of focal nodular hyperplasia. Fibrolamellar carcinoma was characterized by the presence of large amounts of tenascin in tumor stroma and by the scarce expression of basement membrane components at the contact of neoplastic clusters. Like normal hepatocytes, neoplastic cells constantly expressed the alpha1 integrin chain, lacked the beta4 integrin chain, and coexpressed E-cadherin and the hepatocyte N-related cadherin. Abnormalities in the expression of cell adhesion molecules, including altered cadherin expression, alphaV integrin chain induction, and CD44 expression, were detected in the majority of cases. The composition of the tumor stroma and the pattern of expression of cell adhesion molecules in fibrolamellar carcinoma were reminiscent of those observed in grade III and grade IV hepatocellular carcinomas. Our results therefore show that, despite its slow local growth and good prognosis, fibrolamellar carcinoma expresses many characteristics usually associated with clinically aggressive malignancies. Further studies are needed to identify the factors responsible for the apparent dissociation between clinical behavior and biological characteristics in this tumor.

  8. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF, along with hyaluronic acid (HA and platelet-rich plasma (PRP activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM, and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees.

  9. Non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis elicits a reduced infectivity profile with corresponding modifications to the cell wall and extracellular matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Bacon

    Full Text Available A key feature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is its ability to become dormant in the host. Little is known of the mechanisms by which these bacilli are able to persist in this state. Therefore, the focus of this study was to emulate environmental conditions encountered by M. tuberculosis in the granuloma, and determine the effect of such conditions on the physiology and infectivity of the organism. Non-replicating persistent (NRP M. tuberculosis was established by the gradual depletion of nutrients in an oxygen-replete and controlled environment. In contrast to rapidly dividing bacilli, NRP bacteria exhibited a distinct phenotype by accumulating an extracellular matrix rich in free mycolate and lipoglycans, with increased arabinosylation. Microarray studies demonstrated a substantial down-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism in NRP bacteria. Despite this reduction in metabolic activity, cells were still able to infect guinea pigs, but with a delay in the development of disease when compared to exponential phase bacilli. Using these approaches to investigate the interplay between the changing environment of the host and altered physiology of NRP bacteria, this study sheds new light on the conditions that are pertinent to M. tuberculosis dormancy and how this organism could be establishing latent disease.

  10. Force spectroscopy of hepatocytic extracellular matrix components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsunthon, R., E-mail: YongsuntR@Corning.com [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); Baker, W.A.; Bryhan, M.D.; Baker, D.E.; Chang, T.; Petzold, O.N.; Walczak, W.J.; Liu, J.; Faris, R.A.; Senaratne, W.; Seeley, L.A.; Youngman, R.E. [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We present atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy data of live hepatocytes (HEPG2/C3A liver cell line) grown in Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, a complex solution of salts and amino acids commonly used for cell culture. Contact-mode imaging and force spectroscopy of this system allowed correlation of cell morphology and extracellular matrix (ECM) properties with substrate properties. Force spectroscopy analysis of cellular 'footprints' indicated that the cells secrete large polymers (e.g., 3.5 {mu}m contour length and estimated MW 1000 kDa) onto their substrate surface. Although definitive identification of the polymers has not yet been achieved, fluorescent-labeled antibody staining has specified the presence of ECM proteins such as collagen and laminin in the cellular footprints. The stretched polymers appear to be much larger than single molecules of known ECM components, such as collagen and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, thus suggesting that the cells create larger entangled, macromolecular structures from smaller components. There is strong evidence which suggests that the composition of the ECM is greatly influenced by the hydrophobicity of the substrate surface, with preferential production and/or adsorption of larger macromolecules on hydrophobic surfaces.

  11. Biophysical control of invasive tumor cell behavior by extracellular matrix microarchitecture

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Shawn P.; Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Cynthia A. Reinhart-King

    2012-01-01

    Fibrillar collagen gels, which are used extensively in vitro to study tumor-microenvironment interactions, are composed of a cell-instructive network of interconnected fibers and pores whose organization is sensitive to polymerization conditions such as bulk concentration, pH, and temperature. Using confocal reflectance microscopy and image autocorrelation analysis to quantitatively assess gel microarchitecture, we show that additional polymerization parameters including culture media formula...

  12. Flavonoids suppress human glioblastoma cell growth by inhibiting cell metabolism, migration, and by regulating extracellular matrix proteins and metalloproteinases expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Balbino L; Oliveira, Mona N; Coelho, Paulo L C; Pitanga, Bruno P S; da Silva, Alessandra B; Adelita, Taís; Silva, Victor Diógenes A; Costa, Maria de F D; El-Bachá, Ramon S; Tardy, Marcienne; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Costa, Silvia L

    2015-12-01

    The malignant gliomas are very common primary brain tumors with poor prognosis, which require more effective therapies than the current used, such as with chemotherapy drugs. In this work, we investigated the effects of several polyhydroxylated flavonoids namely, rutin, quercetin (F7), apigenin (F32), chrysin (F11), kaempferol (F12), and 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone (F2) in human GL-15 glioblastoma cells. We observed that all flavonoids decreased the number of viable cells and the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, they damaged mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum, inducing apoptosis. Flavonoids also induced a delay in cell migration, related to a reduction in filopodia-like structures on the cell surface, reduction on metalloproteinase (MMP-2) expression and activity, as well as an increase in intra- and extracellular expression of fibronectin, and intracellular expression of laminin. Morphological changes were also evident in adherent cells characterized by the presence of a condensed cell body with thin and long cellular processes, expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Therefore, these flavonoids should be tested as potential antitumor agents in vitro and in vivo in other malignant glioma models.

  13. Influence of select extracellular matrix proteins on mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic commitment in three-dimensional contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Bayona, Silvia; Guiza-Arguello, Viviana; Qu, Xin; Munoz-Pinto, Dany J; Hahn, Mariah S

    2012-12-01

    Growth factors have been shown to be powerful mediators of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) osteogenic differentiation. However, their use in tissue engineered scaffolds not only can be costly but also can induce undesired responses in surrounding tissues. Thus, the ability to specifically promote MSC osteogenic differentiation in the absence of exogenous growth factors via the manipulation of scaffold material properties would be beneficial. The current work examines the influence of select extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on MSC osteogenesis toward the goal of developing scaffolds with intrinsically osteoinductive properties. Fibrinogen (FG), fibronectin (FN) and laminin-1 (LN) were chosen for evaluation due to their known roles in bone morphogenesis or bone fracture healing. These proteins were conjugated into poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels and their effects on encapsulated 10T½ MSCs were evaluated. Specifically, following 1week of culture, mid-term markers of various MSC lineages were examined in order to assess the strength and specificity of the observed osteogenic responses. PEG-LN gels demonstrated increased levels of the osteogenic transcription factor osterix relative to day 0 levels. In addition, PEG-FG and PEG-LN gels were associated with increased deposition of bone ECM protein osteocalcin relative to PEG-FN gels and day 0. Importantly, the osteogenic response associated with FG and LN appeared to be specific in that markers for chondrocytic, smooth muscle cell and adipocytic lineages were not similarly elevated relative to day 0 in these gels. To gain insight into the integrin dynamics underlying the observed differentiation results, initial integrin adhesion and temporal alterations in cell integrin profiles were evaluated. The associated results suggest that α(2), α(v) and α(6) integrin subunits may play key roles in integrin-mediated osteogenesis.

  14. Arnica montana Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression in a Macrophage Cell Line Differentiated to Wound-Healing Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzotto, Marta; Bonafini, Clara; Olioso, Debora; Baruzzi, Anna; Bettinetti, Laura; Di Leva, Francesca; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Bellavite, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Arnica montana (Arnica m.) is used for its purported anti-inflammatory and tissue healing actions after trauma, bruises, or tissue injuries, but its cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. This work tested Arnica m. effects on gene expression using an in vitro model of macrophages polarized towards a "wound-healing" phenotype. The monocyte-macrophage human THP-1 cell line was cultured and differentiated with phorbol-myristate acetate and Interleukin-4, then exposed for 24h to Arnica m. centesimal (c) dilutions 2c, 3c, 5c, 9c, 15c or Control. Total RNA was isolated and cDNA libraries were sequenced with a NextSeq500 sequencer. Genes with significantly positive (up-regulated) or negative (down-regulated) fold changes were defined as differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A total of 20 DEGs were identified in Arnica m. 2c treated cells. Of these, 7 genes were up-regulated and 13 were down-regulated. The most significantly up-regulated function concerned 4 genes with a conserved site of epidermal growth factor-like region (pArnica m. (3c, 5c, 9c, 15c), although with a lower effect size. We further tested the healing potential of Arnica m. 2c in a scratch model of wound closure based on the motility of bone marrow-derived macrophages and found evidence of an accelerating effect on cell migration in this system. The results of this work, taken together, provide new insights into the action of Arnica m. in tissue healing and repair, and identify extracellular matrix regulation by macrophages as a therapeutic target.

  15. Differential Expression of Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules in Fetal-Origin Amniotic Epithelial Cells of Preeclamptic Pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Sun Kim

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a common disease that can occur during human pregnancy and is a leading cause of both maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Inadequate trophoblast invasion and deficient remodeling of uterine spiral arteries are associated with preeclampsia (PE. The development of this syndrome is thought to be related to multiple factors. Recently, we isolated patient-specific human amniotic epithelial cells (AECs from the placentas of 3 women with normal pregnancy and 3 with preeclamptic pregnancy. Since the characteristics of human AECs in PE are different from those in normal pregnancy, we sought to confirm the genes differentially expressed between preeclamptic pregnancy and normal pregnancy. Therefore, we performed transcriptome analysis to investigate the candidate genes associated with the possible pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Pathway analysis was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG online resource. In this study, we selected a total of 12 pathways and focused on extracellular matrix-related and biological adhesion molecules. Using RT-PCR array and real-time PCR, we confirmed that COL16A1, ITGB2, and LAMA3 were significantly up-regulated, but ITGA1, ITGA3, ITGA6, MMP1, MMP3, MMP10 and MMP11 were significantly down-regulated in preeclamptic fetal origin cells. Taken together, we suggest that the genes and pathways identified here may be responsible for the occurrence and development of PE, and controlling their expression may play a role in communication with fetal-maternal placenta to keep normal pregnancy.

  16. Differential Expression of Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules in Fetal-Origin Amniotic Epithelial Cells of Preeclamptic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Sun; Yu, Ji Hea; Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Ah Leum; Jo, Mi Hyun; Kim, MinGi; Cho, Sung-Rae; Kim, Young-Han

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a common disease that can occur during human pregnancy and is a leading cause of both maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Inadequate trophoblast invasion and deficient remodeling of uterine spiral arteries are associated with preeclampsia (PE). The development of this syndrome is thought to be related to multiple factors. Recently, we isolated patient-specific human amniotic epithelial cells (AECs) from the placentas of 3 women with normal pregnancy and 3 with preeclamptic pregnancy. Since the characteristics of human AECs in PE are different from those in normal pregnancy, we sought to confirm the genes differentially expressed between preeclamptic pregnancy and normal pregnancy. Therefore, we performed transcriptome analysis to investigate the candidate genes associated with the possible pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Pathway analysis was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) online resource. In this study, we selected a total of 12 pathways and focused on extracellular matrix-related and biological adhesion molecules. Using RT-PCR array and real-time PCR, we confirmed that COL16A1, ITGB2, and LAMA3 were significantly up-regulated, but ITGA1, ITGA3, ITGA6, MMP1, MMP3, MMP10 and MMP11 were significantly down-regulated in preeclamptic fetal origin cells. Taken together, we suggest that the genes and pathways identified here may be responsible for the occurrence and development of PE, and controlling their expression may play a role in communication with fetal-maternal placenta to keep normal pregnancy.

  17. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to a

  18. In vitro cartilage production using an extracellular matrix-derived scaffold and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-hong; YANG Qiang; XIA Qun; PENG Jiang; LU Shi-bi; GUO Quan-yi; MA Xin-long

    2013-01-01

    Background Cartilage repair is a challenging research area because of the limited healing capacity of adult articular cartilage.We had previously developed a natural,human cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived scaffold for in vivo cartilage tissue engineering in nude mice.However,before these scaffolds can be used in clinical applications in vivo,the in vitro effects should be further explored.Methods We produced cartilage in vitro using a natural cartilage ECM-derived scaffold.The scaffolds were fabricated by combining a decellularization procedure with a freeze-drying technique and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),micro-computed tomography (micro-CT),histological staining,cytotoxicity assay,biochemical and biomechanical analysis.After being chondrogenically induced,the induction results of BMSCs were analyzed by histology and Immunohisto-chemistry.The attachment and viability assessment of the cells on scaffolds were analyzed using SEM and LIVE/DEAD staining.Cell-scaffold constructs cultured in vitro for 1 week and 3 weeks were analyzed using histological and immunohistochemical methods.Results SEM and micro-CT revealed a 3-D interconnected porous structure.The majority of the cartilage ECM was found in the scaffold following the removal of cellular debris,and stained positive for safranin O and collagen Ⅱ.Viability staining indicated no cytotoxic effects of the scaffold.Biochemical analysis showed that collagen content was (708.2±44.7)μg/mg,with GAG (254.7±25.9) μg/mg.Mechanical testing showed the compression moduli (E) were (1.226±0.288) and (0.052±0.007) MPa in dry and wet conditions,respectively.Isolated canine bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) were induced down a chondrogenic pathway,labeled with PKH26,and seeded onto the scaffold.Immunofluorescent staining of the cell-scaffold constructs indicated that chondrocyte-like cells were derived from seeded BMSCs and excreted ECM.The cell-scaffold constructs contained

  19. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  20. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  1. Proliferation of progeria cells is enhanced by lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α) through expression of extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidak, Sandra; Kubben, Nard; Dechat, Thomas; Foisner, Roland

    2015-10-01

    Lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α) localizes throughout the nucleoplasm and interacts with the fraction of lamins A/C that is not associated with the peripheral nuclear lamina. The LAP2α-lamin A/C complex negatively affects cell proliferation. Lamins A/C are encoded by LMNA, a single heterozygous mutation of which causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). This mutation generates the lamin A variant progerin, which we show here leads to loss of LAP2α and nucleoplasmic lamins A/C, impaired proliferation, and down-regulation of extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly, contrary to wild-type cells, ectopic expression of LAP2α in cells expressing progerin restores proliferation and extracellular matrix expression but not the levels of nucleoplasmic lamins A/C. We conclude that, in addition to its cell cycle-inhibiting function with lamins A/C, LAP2α can also regulate extracellular matrix components independently of lamins A/C, which may help explain the proliferation-promoting function of LAP2α in cells expressing progerin.

  2. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness and Architecture Govern Intracellular Rheology in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Erin L.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the complex interplay between the extracellular mechanical environment and the mechanical properties that characterize the dynamic intracellular environment. To elucidate this relationship in cancer, we probe the intracellular environment using particle-tracking microrheology. In three-dimensional (3D) matrices, intracellular effective creep compliance of prostate cancer cells is shown to increase with increasing extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness, whereas modulating E...

  3. Neoplastic and stromal cells contribute to an extracellular matrix gene expression profile defining a breast cancer subtype likely to progress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Triulzi

    Full Text Available We recently showed that differential expression of extracellular matrix (ECM genes delineates four subgroups of breast carcinomas (ECM1, -2, -3- and -4 with different clinical outcome. To further investigate the characteristics of ECM signature and its impact on tumor progression, we conducted unsupervised clustering analyses in 6 additional independent datasets of invasive breast tumors from different platforms for a total of 643 samples. Use of four different clustering algorithms identified ECM3 tumors as an independent group in all datasets tested. ECM3 showed a homogeneous gene pattern, consisting of 58 genes encoding 43 structural ECM proteins. From 26 to 41% of the cases were ECM3-enriched, and analysis of datasets relevant to gene expression in neoplastic or corresponding stromal cells showed that both stromal and breast carcinoma cells can coordinately express ECM3 genes. In in vitro experiments, β-estradiol induced ECM3 gene production in ER-positive breast carcinoma cell lines, whereas TGFβ induced upregulation of the genes leading to ECM3 gene classification, especially in ER-negative breast carcinoma cells and in fibroblasts. Multivariate analysis of distant metastasis-free survival in untreated breast tumor patients revealed a significant interaction between ECM3 and histological grade (p = 0.001. Cox models, estimated separately in grade I-II and grade III tumors, indicated a highly significant association between ECM3 and worse survival probability only in grade III tumors (HR = 3.0, 95% CI = 1.3-7.0, p = 0.0098. Gene Set Enrichment analysis of ECM3 compared to non-ECM3 tumors revealed significant enrichment of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT genes in both grade I-II and grade III subsets of ECM3 tumors. Thus, ECM3 is a robust cluster that identifies breast carcinomas with EMT features but with accelerated metastatic potential only in the undifferentiated (grade III phenotype. These findings support the

  4. The effect of extracellular pH on matrix turnover by cells of the bovine nucleus pulposus

    OpenAIRE

    Razaq, Sajjad; Wilkins, Robert J.; Urban, Jill P. G.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that very acidic conditions can be found in degenerate discs. The effect of these acid conditions on matrix turnover are, however, unknown. This study aimed to examine the effect of acidity on production of matrix components and on agents which break down the matrix in order to gain insight into the effect of pathological values of pH on matrix turnover. Cells were isolated from the nucleus of bovine discs and from bovine articular cartilage, embedded in alginate beads ...

  5. [Actin cytoskeleton organization and spreading of bone marrow stromal cells and cartilage cells during their combined and independent cultivation on different extracellular matrix proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhenberg, E I; Nikolaenko, N S; Pinaev, G P

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the mutual influence of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and cartilage cells we studied the organization of their actin cytoskeleton and cell spreading on different extracellular matrix proteins--laminin 2/4, collagen type I or fibronectin. It has been shown that the most pronounced difference in morphological characteristics of the cells such as their form, size and actin cytoskeleton organization occur in the case of interaction with fibronectin. So, after separate brief incubation of both cell types on fibronectin, the average area of BMSCs spreading was about 4 times greater than the area of the cartilage cell spreading. However, in the co-culture of these cells in a ratio of 1:1, the average jointed spreading area on fibronctin was nearly 1.5 times less than the theoretically calculated. To determine the nature of exposure of the cells to each other we have studied spreading of these cells in the media conditioned by another cell type. We have found that the area of BMSC's spreading in the medium conditioned by cartilage cells is markedly smaller than the area of spreading of the same cells in the control medium. These data suggest that the cartilage cells secrete factors that reduce BMSC's spreading.

  6. Interleukin-1{beta} regulates cell proliferation and activity of extracellular matrix remodelling enzymes in cultured primary pig heart cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitta, Karina; Brandt, Berenice [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Wuensch, Annegret [Institute of Molecular Animal Breeding and Biotechnology, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Steinfath, Markus; Scholz, Jens [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Albrecht, Martin, E-mail: Albrecht@anaesthesie.uni-kiel.de [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Levels of IL-1{beta} are increased in the pig myocardium after infarction. {yields} Cultured pig heart cells possess IL-1 receptors. {yields} IL-1{beta} increases cell proliferation of pig heart cells in-vitro. {yields} IL-1{beta} increases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in pig heart cells in-vitro. {yields} IL-1{beta} may be important for tissue remodelling events after myocardial infarction. -- Abstract: After myocardial infarction, elevated levels of interleukins (ILs) are found within the myocardial tissue and IL-1{beta} is considered to play a major role in tissue remodelling events throughout the body. In the study presented, we have established a cell culture model of primary pig heart cells to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of IL-1{beta} on cell proliferation as well as expression and activity of enzymes typically involved in tissue remodelling. Primary pig heart cell cultures were derived from three different animals and stimulated with recombinant pig IL-1{beta}. RNA expression was detected by RT-PCR, protein levels were evaluated by Western blotting, activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was quantified by gelatine zymography and cell proliferation was measured using colorimetric MTS assays. Pig heart cells express receptors for IL-1 and application of IL-1{beta} resulted in a dose-dependent increase of cell proliferation (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 24 h). Gene expression of caspase-3 was increased by IL-1{beta} (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h), and pro-caspase-3 but not active caspase was detected in lysates of pig heart cells by Western blotting. MMP-2 gene expression as well as enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were increased by IL-1{beta} (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h for gene expression, 48 and 72 h for enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively). Our in vitro data suggest that IL-1{beta} plays a major role in the events of tissue remodelling in the heart. Combined

  7. Reconstruction of rabbit urethra using urethral extracellular matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨嗣星; 姚颐; 胡云飞; 宋超; 王玲珑; 金化民

    2004-01-01

    Background Urethral reconstruction for both congenital and acquired etiologies remains a challenge for most urologic surgeons. Tissue engineering has been proposed as a strategy for urethral reconstruction. The purpose of This study was to determine whether a naturally derived extracellular matrix substitute developed for urethral reconstruction would be suitable for urethral repair in an animal model.Methods A urethral segmental defect was created in 20 male rabbits. The urethral extracellular matrix, obtained and processed from rabbit urethral tissue, was trimmed and transplanted to repair the urethral defect. Then, the regenerated segment was studied histologically by haematoxylin-eosin staining and Van Gieson staining at 10 days, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 24 weeks postoperation. Retrograde urethrography was used to evaluate the function of the regenerated urethras of 4 rabbits 10 and 24 weeks after the operation. The urodynamics of 4 rabbits from the experimental group and control group Ⅰ were assessed and compared. In addition, 4 experimental group rabbits were examined by a urethroscope 24 weeks after the operation.Results At 10 days after operation, epithelial cells had migrated from each side, and small vessels were observed in the extracellular matrix. The matrix and adjacent areas of the host tissue were infiltrated with inflammatory cells. The epithelium covered the extracellular matrix fully at 3 weeks postoperation. Well-formed smooth-muscle cells were first confirmed after 6 weeks, at which point the inflammatory cells had disappeared. At 24 weeks postoperation, the regenerated tissue was equivalent to the normal urethra. Urethrography and urodynamic evaluations showed that there was no difference between normal tissue and regenerated tissue.Conclusions Urethral extracellular matrix appears to be a useful material for urethral repair in rabbits. The matrix can be processed easily and has good characteristics for tissue handling and urethral function.

  8. Vitamin A Deficiency and Alterations in the Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Barber

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A or retinol which is the natural precursor of several biologically active metabolites can be considered the most multifunctional vitamin in mammals. Its deficiency is currently, along with protein malnutrition, the most serious and common nutritional disorder worldwide. It is necessary for normal embryonic development and postnatal tissue homeostasis, and exerts important effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These actions are produced mainly by regulating the expression of a variety of proteins through transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Extracellular matrix proteins are among those whose synthesis is known to be modulated by vitamin A. Retinoic acid, the main biologically active form of vitamin A, influences the expression of collagens, laminins, entactin, fibronectin, elastin and proteoglycans, which are the major components of the extracellular matrix. Consequently, the structure and macromolecular composition of this extracellular compartment is profoundly altered as a result of vitamin A deficiency. As cell behavior, differentiation and apoptosis, and tissue mechanics are influenced by the extracellular matrix, its modifications potentially compromise organ function and may lead to disease. This review focuses on the effects of lack of vitamin A in the extracellular matrix of several organs and discusses possible molecular mechanisms and pathologic implications.

  9. Syndecans as receptors and organizers of the extracellular matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Gopal, Sandeep; Couchman, John

    2009-01-01

    and signalling molecules, such as protein kinases. Some aspects of syndecan signalling are understood but much remains to be learned. The functions of syndecans in regulating cell adhesion and extracellular matrix assembly are described here. Evidence from null mice suggests that syndecans have roles......, the collagens and glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix are prominent. Frequently, they do so in conjunction with other receptors, most notably the integrins. For this reason, they are often referred to as "co-receptors". However, just as with integrins, syndecans can interact with actin-associated proteins...

  10. Extracellular S100A4(mts1) stimulates invasive growth of mouse endothelial cells and modulates MMP-13 matrix metalloproteinase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Birgitte; Ornås, Dorte; Grigorian, Mariam

    2004-01-01

    S100A4(mts1) protein expression has been strongly associated with metastatic tumor progression. It has been suggested as a prognostic marker for a number of human cancers. It is proposed that extracellular S100A4 accelerates cancer progression by stimulating the motility of endothelial cells......, thereby promoting angiogenesis. Here we show that in 3D culture mouse endothelial cells (SVEC 4-10) respond to recombinant S100A4 by stimulating invasive growth of capillary-like structures. The outgrowth is not dependent on the stimulation of cell proliferation, but rather correlates...... with the transcriptional modulation of genes involved in the proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Treatment of SVEC 4-10 with the S100A4 protein leads to the transcriptional activation of collagenase 3 (MMP-13) mRNA followed by subsequent release of the protein from the cells. Beta-casein zymography...

  11. Extracellular matrix components in peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Francisco; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Injured axons of the peripheral nerve are able to regenerate and, eventually, reinnervate target organs. However, functional recovery is usually poor after severe nerve injuries. The switch of Schwann cells to a proliferative state, secretion of trophic factors, and the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules (such as collagen, laminin, or fibronectin) in the distal stump are key elements to create a permissive environment for axons to grow. In this review, we focus attention on the ECM components and their tropic role in axonal regeneration. These components can also be used as molecular cues to guide the axons through artificial nerve guides in attempts to better mimic the natural environment found in a degenerating nerve. Most used scaffolds tested are based on natural molecules that form the ECM, but use of synthetic polymers and functionalization of hydrogels are bringing new options. Progress in tissue engineering will eventually lead to the design of composite artificial nerve grafts that may replace the use of autologous nerve grafts to sustain regeneration over long gaps.

  12. Immuohistochemical study on smooth muscle cell proliferation, phenotypic modulation, and extracellular matrix accumulation in venous arterial grafts in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-da; ZHU Hai-long

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the kinetics and distribution of smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, phenotypic modulation, and various extracellular matrix (ECM) components accumulation during vein graft remodeling. Methods: Normal vein and vein graft in carotid arteries were examined on d 4, d 7, d 14, d 60 and d180 after bypass grafting with immunohistochemical markers of cellular proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA), cytoskeletal protein production (α-actin SMC), myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms, ECM proteins, and histochemistry (hematoxylin eosin and Elastica-van Gieson stain). Results: Normal veins demonstrated an extremely low level of cellular proliferation and expressed as adult phenotype SMCs in media. After bypass grafting, medial SMCs in the graft appeared to be damaged and began to proliferate on d 4, and subsequently migrated and formed the neointima on d 7. Thereafter, the neointima thickened throughout the 180-day period of the experiment, although the neointimal SMC proliferation decreased after d 14. Meanwhile SMCs underwent a distinct phenotypic change from normal adult type to embryonic type.On d 60, embryonic phenotype SMCs began to return to the adult phenotype, but remain to be present in the neointima for as long as 180 d. ECM components including type Ⅰ collagen, heparin sulfate proteoglucan (HSPG), and dermatan sulfate proteoglcan (decorin) were detected within the neointima on d 7. Thereafter,the accumulation of ECM increased progressively with time. On d 180, a large amount of ECM components were found in the neointima. HSPG mainly accumulated in the superficial and cellular region of the neointima, decorin, on other hand, located in hypocellular area deep in neointima. Type Ⅰ collagen scatted in both regions. The elastic fibers became rich and arranged continuously in the neointima. Conclusion.. The neointima of vein graft was initially formed by proliferation of the embryonic-type SMCs and then thickened infinitely

  13. Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein Inhibits Phosphate Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, J; Churchill, L J; Debnam, E. S.; Unwin, R J

    2008-01-01

    The role of putative humoral factors, known as phosphatonins, in phosphate homeostasis and the relationship between phosphate handling by the kidney and gastrointestinal tract are incompletely understood. Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE), one of several candidate phosphatonins, promotes phosphaturia, but whether it also affects intestinal phosphate absorption is unknown. Here, using the in situ intestinal loop technique, we demonstrated that short-term infusion of MEPE inhibits...

  14. Airway smooth muscle - Its relationship to the extracellular matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Black, Judith L.; Burgess, Janette K.; Johnson, Peter R.A.

    2003-01-01

    The airway smooth muscle cell has a variety of properties, which confer on it the ability to participate actively in the inflammatory process and the remodeling events, which accompany severe, persistent asthma. Among these properties is its relationship to the extracellular matrix (ECM) with which

  15. The importance of cell density in the interpretation of growth factor effects on collagenase IV activity release and extracellular matrix production from C6 astrocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, M; McDonald, W; Del Maestro, R F

    1998-09-01

    We have examined the influence of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on the release of collagenase type IV activity and the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules using C6 astrocytoma cells in monolayer culture. Collagenase type IV activity was significantly increased in a dose dependent manner in the low cell density group by treatment with FGF-2 and VEGF but significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion in the high cell density group. These results were corroborated using Western blot technique with an antibody to gelatinase A. Addition of exogenous laminin and fibronectin to the media decreased collagenase type IV activity in a dose dependent fashion with the minimum concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml. Laminin and fibronectin reached a concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml in only the high cell density group after treatment with the growth factors tested. These findings indicate that C6 astrocytoma cells appear to have two regulatory mechanisms for collagenase type IV activity which are dependent on cell density. In a low cell density, C6 astrocytoma cells respond to the dominant effect of FGF-2 and VEGF by increasing the release of collagenase IV activity. In a high cell density collagenase type IV activity is decreased due to it's down regulation by released ECM molecules in response to FGF-2 and VEGF. These regulatory mechanisms may be crucial to the understanding of the coordination of tumor-associated angiogenesis by malignant glial cells.

  16. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  17. Proteome-level display by 2-dimensional chromatography of extracellular matrix-dependent modulation of the phenotype of bladder cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Anil

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extracellular matrix can have a profound effect upon the phenotype of cancer cells. Previous work has shown that growth of bladder cancer cells on a matrix derived from normal basement membrane suppresses many malignant features that are displayed when the cells are grown on a matrix that has been modified by malignant tumors. This work was undertaken to investigate proteome-level changes as determined by a new commercially available proteome display involving 2-dimensional chromatography for bladder cancer cells grown on different extracellular matrix preparations that modulate the expression of the malignant phenotype. Results Depending on the matrix, between 1300 and 2000 distinct peaks were detected by two-dimensional chromatographic fractionation of 2.1 – 4.4 mg of total cellular protein. The fractions eluting from the reversed-phase fractionation were suitable for mass spectrometric identification following only lyophilization and trypsin digestion and achieved approximately 10-fold higher sensitivity than was obtained with gel-based separations. Abundant proteins that were unique to cells grown on one of the matrices were identified by mass spectrometry. Following concentration, peaks of 0.03 AU provided unambiguous identification of protein components when 10% of the sample was analyzed, whereas peaks of 0.05 AU was approximately the lower limit of detection when the entire sample was separated on a gel and in-gel digestion was used. Although some fractions were homogeneous, others were not, and up to 3 proteins per fraction were identified. Strong evidence for post-translational modification of the unique proteins was noted. All 13 of the unique proteins from cells grown on Matrigel were related to MYC pathway. Conclusion The system provides a viable alternative to 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis for proteomic display of biological systems. The findings suggest the importance of MYC to the malignant phenotype

  18. The incorporation of extracellular matrix proteins in protein polymer hydrogels to improve encapsulated beta-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenken-Rothkopf, Liese N; Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S; Davis, Nicolynn E; Forster, Ryan; Barron, Annelise E; Fontaine, Magali J

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial encapsulation of islets has been proposed to improve the long-term success of islet transplantation by recreating a suitable microenvironment and enhancing cell-matrix interactions that affect cellular function. Protein polymer hydrogels previously showed promise as a biocompatible scaffold by maintaining high cell viability. Here, enzymatically-crosslinked protein polymers were used to investigate the effects of varying scaffold properties and of introducing ECM proteins on the viability and function of encapsulated MIN6 β-cells. Chemical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel were modified by altering the protein concentrations while collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin were incorporated to reestablish cell-matrix interactions lost during cell isolation. Rheology indicated all hydrogels formed quickly, resulting in robust, elastic hydrogels with Young's moduli similar to soft tissue. All hydrogels tested supported both high MIN6 β-cell viability and function and have the potential to serve as an encapsulation platform for islet cell delivery in vivo.

  19. Precise stacking of decellularized extracellular matrix based 3D cell-laden constructs by a 3D cell printing system equipped with heating modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Geunseon; Min, Kyung-Hyun; Kim, Changhwan; Lee, Jeong-Seok; Kang, Donggu; Won, Joo-Yun; Cho, Dong-Woo; Kim, Jun-Young; Jin, Songwan; Yun, Won-Soo; Shim, Jin-Hyung

    2017-08-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell printing systems allow the controlled and precise deposition of multiple cells in 3D constructs. Hydrogel materials have been used extensively as printable bioinks owing to their ability to safely encapsulate living cells. However, hydrogel-based bioinks have drawbacks for cell printing, e.g. inappropriate crosslinking and liquid-like rheological properties, which hinder precise 3D shaping. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the influence of various factors (e.g. bioink concentration, viscosity, and extent of crosslinking) on cell printing and established a new 3D cell printing system equipped with heating modules for the precise stacking of decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM)-based 3D cell-laden constructs. Because the pH-adjusted bioink isolated from native tissue is safely gelled at 37 °C, our heating system facilitated the precise stacking of dECM bioinks by enabling simultaneous gelation during printing. We observed greater printability compared with that of a non-heating system. These results were confirmed by mechanical testing and 3D construct stacking analyses. We also confirmed that our heating system did not elicit negative effects, such as cell death, in the printed cells. Conclusively, these results hold promise for the application of 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering and drug development.

  20. Organ-specific chemotactic factors present in lung extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerra, R F; Nathanson, S D

    1989-05-01

    The preferential colonization of a distant organ by a circulating tumor cell (organ specific metastasis) may be regulated by chemotactic factors present within the extracellular matrix of the host organ. Organ-specific extracellular matrix was prepared from murine kidney and lung by high salt extraction and DNAase/RNAase digestion. A soluble protein fraction (S2) from each of the matricies was obtained by 4 M guanidine extraction and was tested for organ-specific chemotactic activity in a modified Boyden chamber. The lung colonizing B16-F10 and B16-BL6 tumor cell lines demonstrated organ-specific motility only toward the lung extract. The low metastasizing B16 parental line and liver colonizing B16-L4b line showed no preference for either lung or kidney. The lung activity resolves into five fractions by gel filtration chromatography, with the highest activity eluting at Mr approximately 71,000. Chemotactic factors present in lung extracellular matrix may regulate the preferential colonization of an organ by stimulating the migration of tumor cells in a specific manner. These factors may be released during the degradation of the extracellular matrix.

  1. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  2. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Watson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This

  3. Extracellular matrix mediates epithelial effects on chondrogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solursh, M; Jensen, K L; Zanetti, N C; Linsenmayer, T F; Reiter, R S

    1984-10-01

    It has been previously observed that single chick embryonic limb mesenchymal cells can differentiate into chondrocytes without cell-cell interactions when cultured in collagen or agarose gels. In the present study, limb ectoderm, but not dermis, inhibits chondrogenesis when placed on such collagen gel cultures. The inhibitory influence can be transmitted extensive distances in the gel, even when the ectoderm is placed on a porous filter. Collagen gels, preconditioned with limb ectoderms, are also inhibitory to chondrogenesis. On the other hand, chondrogenesis is less inhibited by ectoderm when the mesenchymal cells are placed in agarose. These results suggest that the antichondrogenic effect of limb ectoderm is mediated through alterations of the collagenous extracellular matrix and support the idea that the extracellular matrix must be considered as an organized, functional unit capable of regulating cell differentiation.

  4. Anchorless surface associated glycolytic enzymes from Lactobacillus plantarum 299v bind to epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenting, Jacob; Beck, Hans Christian; Vrang, Astrid; Riemann, Holger; Ravn, Peter; Hansen, Anne Maria; Antonsson, Martin; Ahrné, Siv; Israelsen, Hans; Madsen, Søren

    2013-06-12

    An important criterion for the selection of a probiotic bacterial strain is its ability to adhere to the mucosal surface. Adhesion is usually mediated by proteins or other components located on the outer cell surface of the bacterium. In the present study we characterized the adhesive properties of two classical intracellular enzymes glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and enolase (ENO) isolated from the outer cell surface of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. None of the genes encoded signal peptides or cell surface anchoring motifs that could explain their extracellular location on the bacterial surface. The presence of the glycolytic enzymes on the outer surface was verified by western blotting using polyclonal antibodies raised against the specific enzymes. GAPDH and ENO showed a highly specific binding to plasminogen and fibronectin whereas GAPDH but not ENO showed weak binding to mucin. Furthermore, a pH dependent and specific binding of GAPDH and ENO to intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells at pH 5 but not at pH 7 was demonstrated. The results showed that these glycolytic enzymes could play a role in the adhesion of the probiotic bacterium L. plantarum 299v to the gastrointestinal tract of the host. Finally, a number of probiotic as well non-probiotic Lactobacillus strains were analyzed for the presence of GAPDH and ENO on the outer surface, but no correlation between the extracellular location of these enzymes and the probiotic status of the applied strains was demonstrated.

  5. A fucan from the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi inhibits Chinese hamster ovary cell adhesion to several extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A.O. Rocha

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Fucans, a family of sulfated polysaccharides present in brown seaweed, have several biological activities. Their use as drugs would offer the advantage of no potential risk of contamination with viruses or particles such as prions. A fucan prepared from Spatoglossum schröederi was tested as a possible inhibitor of cell-matrix interactions using wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 and the mutant type deficient in xylosyltransferase (CHO-745. The effect of this polymer on adhesion properties with specific extracellular matrix components was studied using several matrix proteins as substrates for cell attachment. Treatment with the polymer inhibited the adhesion of fibronectin to both CHO-K1 (2 x 10(5(and CHO-745 (2 x 10(5 and 5 x 10(5 cells. No effect was detected with laminin, using the two cell types. On the other hand, adhesion to vitronectin was inhibited in CHO-K1 cells and adhesion to type I collagen was inhibited in CHO-745 cells. In spite of this inhibition, the fucan did not affect either cell proliferation or cell cycle. These results demonstrate that this polymer is a new anti-adhesive compound with potential pharmacological applications.

  6. A fucan from the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi inhibits Chinese hamster ovary cell adhesion to several extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, H A; Franco, C R; Trindade, E S; Carvalho, L C; Veiga, S S; Leite, E L; Dietrich, C P; Nader, H B

    2001-05-01

    Fucans, a family of sulfated polysaccharides present in brown seaweed, have several biological activities. Their use as drugs would offer the advantage of no potential risk of contamination with viruses or particles such as prions. A fucan prepared from Spatoglossum schröederi was tested as a possible inhibitor of cell-matrix interactions using wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and the mutant type deficient in xylosyltransferase (CHO-745). The effect of this polymer on adhesion properties with specific extracellular matrix components was studied using several matrix proteins as substrates for cell attachment. Treatment with the polymer inhibited the adhesion of fibronectin to both CHO-K1 (2 x 10(5)) and CHO-745 (2 x 10(5) and 5 x 10(5)) cells. No effect was detected with laminin, using the two cell types. On the other hand, adhesion to vitronectin was inhibited in CHO-K1 cells and adhesion to type I collagen was inhibited in CHO-745 cells. In spite of this inhibition, the fucan did not affect either cell proliferation or cell cycle. These results demonstrate that this polymer is a new anti-adhesive compound with potential pharmacological applications.

  7. Structure and barrier properties of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells are affected by extracellular matrix protein coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkio, Anni; Hongisto, Heidi; Kaarniranta, Kai; Uusitalo, Hannu; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Skottman, Heli

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a vital role in cell morphology, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells. We investigated the role of ECM proteins on the structure and function of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells during their differentiation and maturation from hESCs into RPE cells in adherent differentiation cultures on several human ECM proteins found in native human Bruch's membrane, namely, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin, fibronectin, and vitronectin, as well as on commercial substrates of xeno-free CELLstart™ and Matrigel™. Cell pigmentation, expression of RPE-specific proteins, fine structure, as well as the production of basal lamina by hESC-RPE on different protein coatings were evaluated after 140 days of differentiation. The integrity of hESC-RPE epithelium and barrier properties on different coatings were investigated by measuring transepithelial resistance. All coatings supported the differentiation of hESC-RPE cells as demonstrated by early onset of cell pigmentation and further maturation to RPE monolayers after enrichment. Mature RPE phenotype was verified by RPE-specific gene and protein expression, correct epithelial polarization, and phagocytic activity. Significant differences were found in the degree of RPE cell pigmentation and tightness of epithelial barrier between different coatings. Further, the thickness of self-assembled basal lamina and secretion of the key ECM proteins found in the basement membrane of the native RPE varied between hESC-RPE cultured on compared protein coatings. In conclusion, this study shows that the cell culture substrate has a major effect on the structure and basal lamina production during the differentiation and maturation of hESC-RPE potentially influencing the success of cell integrations and survival after cell transplantation.

  8. Stroma and extracellular matrix proteins in canine tumours

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, studies on temporal and spatial changes in stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in canine gastrointestinal (GIT) tumours and canine transmissible venereal (CTVT) tumours are described. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic transformation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, and ECM changes were investigated. We found that the myofibroblast is the most common stromal cell in canine GIT epithelial tumours and most likely originated from pre-existing fibroblast...

  9. Extracellular matrix stiffness and architecture govern intracellular rheology in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Erin L; Bonnecaze, Roger T; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2009-08-19

    Little is known about the complex interplay between the extracellular mechanical environment and the mechanical properties that characterize the dynamic intracellular environment. To elucidate this relationship in cancer, we probe the intracellular environment using particle-tracking microrheology. In three-dimensional (3D) matrices, intracellular effective creep compliance of prostate cancer cells is shown to increase with increasing extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness, whereas modulating ECM stiffness does not significantly affect the intracellular mechanical state when cells are attached to two-dimensional (2D) matrices. Switching from 2D to 3D matrices induces an order-of-magnitude shift in intracellular effective creep compliance and apparent elastic modulus. However, for a given matrix stiffness, partial blocking of beta1 integrins mitigates the shift in intracellular mechanical state that is invoked by switching from a 2D to 3D matrix architecture. This finding suggests that the increased cell-matrix engagement inherent to a 3D matrix architecture may contribute to differences observed in viscoelastic properties between cells attached to 2D matrices and cells embedded within 3D matrices. In total, our observations show that ECM stiffness and architecture can strongly influence the intracellular mechanical state of cancer cells.

  10. Regulation of Osteoblast Survival by the Extracellular Matrix and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus. Ruth K.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Spaceflight adversely affects the skeleton, posing a substantial risk to astronaut's health during long duration missions. The reduced bone mass observed in growing animals following spaceflight is due at least in part to inadequate bone formation by osteoblasts. Thus, it is of central importance to identify basic cellular mechanisms underlying normal bone formation. The fundamental ideas underlying our research are that interactions between extracellular matrix proteins, integrin adhesion receptors, cytoplasmic signaling and cytoskeletal proteins are key ingredients for the proper functioning of osteoblasts, and that gravity impacts these interactions. As an in vitro model system we used primary fetal rat calvarial cells which faithfully recapitulate osteoblast differentiation characteristically observed in vivo. We showed that specific integrin receptors ((alpha)3(beta)1), ((alpha)5(beta)1), ((alpha)8(betal)1) and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, laminin) were needed for the differentiation of immature osteoblasts. In the course of maturation, cultured osteoblasts switched from depending on fibronectin and laminin for differentiation to depending on these proteins for their very survival. Furthermore, we found that manipulating the gravity vector using ground-based models resulted in activation of key intracellular survival signals generated by integrin/extracellular matrix interactions. We are currently testing the in vivo relevance of some of these observations using targeted transgenic technology. In conclusion, mechanical factors including gravity may participate in regulating survival via cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix. This leads us to speculate that microgravity adversely affects the survival of osteoblasts and contributes to spaceflight-induced osteoporosis.

  11. Differential expression pattern of extracellular matrix molecules during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlhorn, A T; Niemeyer, P; Kaiser, S;

    2006-01-01

    Adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADASCs) or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are considered as alternative cell sources for cell-based cartilage repair due to their ability to produce cartilage-specific matrix. This article addresses the differential expression pattern of extra......Adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADASCs) or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are considered as alternative cell sources for cell-based cartilage repair due to their ability to produce cartilage-specific matrix. This article addresses the differential expression pattern...... mRNA was monitored via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Corresponding ECM synthesis was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry. After chondroinduction, expression of collagen type II, type X, COMP and aggrecan mRNA was 3-15-fold higher than in ADASCs. The type IIA splicing...... form of alpha(1)-procollagen type II was expressed in both populations, and the type IIB splicing form was exclusively detected in BMSCs. In response to TGF-beta, collagen type II and X were secreted more strongly by BMSCs than by ADASCs. BMSCs express a more mature phenotype than ADASCs after...

  12. Extracellular matrix gel is necessary for in vitro cultivation of insulin producing cells from human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Feng; WU De-quan; HU Yan-hua; JIN Guang-xin

    2008-01-01

    Background Pancreatic islet cell transplantation is an effective approach to treat type 1 diabetes. However, this therapy is not widely used because of the severe shortage of transplantable donor islets. This study investigated whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood (UCB) could be transdifferentiated into insulin producing cells in vitro and the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) gel in this procedure.Methods Human UCB samples were collected and MSCs were isolated. MSCs specific marker proteins were analyzed by a flow cytometer. The capacities of osteoblast and adipocyte to differentiate were tested. Differentiation into islet like cell was induced by a 15-day protocol with or without ECM gel. Pancreatic characteristics were evaluated with immunofluorescence, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Insulin content and release in response to glucose stimulation were detected with chemiluminescent immunoassay system.Results Sixteen MSCs were isolated from 42 term human UCB units (38%). Human UCB-MSCs expressed MSCs specific markers and could be induced in vitro into osteoblast and adipocyte. Islet like cell clusters appeared about 9 days after pancreatic differentiation in the inducing system with ECM gel. The insulin positive cells accounted for (25.2±3.4)% of the induced cells. The induced cells expressed islet related genes and hormones, but were not very responsive to glucose challenge. When MSCs were induced without ECM gel, clusters formation and secretion of functional islet proteins could not be observed.Conclusions Human UCB-MSCs can differentiate into islet like cells in vitro and ECM gel plays an important role in pancreatic endocrine cell maturation and formation of three dimensional structures.

  13. Balance between apoptosis or survival induced by changes in extracellular-matrix composition in human mesangial cells: a key role for ILK-NFκB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Nogal, María; Luengo, Alicia; Olmos, Gemma; Lasa, Marina; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel; Calleros, Laura

    2012-12-01

    Renal fibrosis is the final outcome of many clinical conditions that lead to chronic renal failure, characterized by a progressive substitution of cellular elements by extracellular-matrix proteins, in particular collagen type I. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms responsible for human mesangial cell survival, conditioned by changes in extracellular-matrix composition. Our results indicate that collagen I induces apoptosis in cells but only after inactivation of the pro-survival factor NFκB by either the super-repressor IκBα or the PDTC inhibitor. Collagen I activates a death pathway, through ILK/GSK-3β-dependent Bim expression. Moreover, collagen I significantly increases NFκB-dependent transcription, IκBα degradation and p65/NFκB translocation to the nucleus; it activates β1 integrin and this is accompanied by increased activity of ILK which leads to AKT activation. Knockdown of ILK or AKT with small interfering RNA suppresses the increase in NFκB activity. NFκB mediates cell survival through the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. Our data suggest that human mesangial cells exposed to abnormal collagen I are protected against apoptosis by a complex mechanism involving integrin β1/ILK/AKT-dependent NFκB activation with consequent Bcl-xL overexpression, that opposes a simultaneously activated ILK/GSK-3β-dependent Bim expression and this dual mechanism may play a role in the progression of glomerular dysfunction.

  14. Association between pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and prognosis in cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, Henry Johanna Maria Antonius Adrianus

    2014-01-01

    Growth and progression of cervical carcinoma is dependent on a complex interaction between cervical carcinoma cells and composition of the extracellular matrix. For local progression as well as metastasizing, the extracellular matrix needs to be rearranged creating space for tumor cells to expand an

  15. Extracellular matrix structure governs invasion resistance in bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadell, Carey D; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-08-01

    Many bacteria are highly adapted for life in communities, or biofilms. A defining feature of biofilms is the production of extracellular matrix that binds cells together. The biofilm matrix provides numerous fitness benefits, including protection from environmental stresses and enhanced nutrient availability. Here we investigate defense against biofilm invasion using the model bacterium Vibrio cholerae. We demonstrate that immotile cells, including those identical to the biofilm resident strain, are completely excluded from entry into resident biofilms. Motile cells can colonize and grow on the biofilm exterior, but are readily removed by shear forces. Protection from invasion into the biofilm interior is mediated by the secreted protein RbmA, which binds mother-daughter cell pairs to each other and to polysaccharide components of the matrix. RbmA, and the invasion protection it confers, strongly localize to the cell lineages that produce it.

  16. The PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway Mediates the High Glucose-Induced Expression of Extracellular Matrix Molecules in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged hyperglycemia is an important risk factor of the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR. Extracellular matrix molecules, such as fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin, are associated with fibrotic membranes. In this study, we investigated the expression of fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin in RPE cells under high glucose conditions. Furthermore, we also detected the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt under high glucose conditions in RPE cells. Our results showed that high glucose upregulated fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin expression, and activated Akt in RPE cells. We also found that pretreatment with LY294002 (an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase abolished high glucose-induced expression of fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin in RPE cells. Thus, high glucose induced the expression of fibronectin, collagen IV, and laminin through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in RPE cells, and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may contribute to the formation of fibrotic membrane during the development of DR.

  17. Decellularized matrices as in vitro models of extracellular matrix in tumor tissues at different malignant levels: Mechanism of 5-fluorouracil resistance in colorectal tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Tanaka, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    Chemoresistance is a major barrier for tumor chemotherapy. It is well-known that chemoresistance increases with tumor progression. Chemoresistance is altered by both genetic mutations and the alteration of extracellular microenvironment. Particularly, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is remodeled during tumor progression. Therefore, ECM remodeling is expected to cause the acquisition of chemoresistance in highly malignant tumor tissue. Here, we prepared cultured cell-derived decellularized matrices that mimic native ECM in tumor tissues at different stages of malignancy, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance was compared among these matrices. 5-FU resistance of colorectal tumor cells increased on the matrices derived from highly malignant tumor HT-29 cells, although the resistance did not increase on the matrices derived from low malignant tumor SW480 cells and normal CCD-841-CoN cells. The resistance on HT-29 cell-derived matrices increased through the activation of Akt and the upregulation of ABCB1 and ABCC1 without cell growth promotion, suggesting that ECM remodeling plays important roles in the acquisition of chemoresistance during tumor progression. It is expected that our decellularized matrices, or "staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices", will become preferred cell culture substrates for in vitro analysis of comprehensive ECM roles in chemoresistance and the screening and pharmacokinetic analysis of anti-cancer drugs.

  18. A systems-level approach to parental genomic imprinting: the imprinted gene network includes extracellular matrix genes and regulates cell cycle exit and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Adhami, Hala; Evano, Brendan; Le Digarcher, Anne; Gueydan, Charlotte; Dubois, Emeric; Parrinello, Hugues; Dantec, Christelle; Bouschet, Tristan; Varrault, Annie; Journot, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that restrains the expression of ∼ 100 eutherian genes in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. The reason for this selective targeting of genes with seemingly disparate molecular functions is unclear. In the present work, we show that imprinted genes are coexpressed in a network that is regulated at the transition from proliferation to quiescence and differentiation during fibroblast cell cycle withdrawal, adipogenesis in vitro, and muscle regeneration in vivo. Imprinted gene regulation is not linked to alteration of DNA methylation or to perturbation of monoallelic, parent-of-origin-dependent expression. Overexpression and knockdown of imprinted gene expression alters the sensitivity of preadipocytes to contact inhibition and adipogenic differentiation. In silico and in cellulo experiments showed that the imprinted gene network includes biallelically expressed, nonimprinted genes. These control the extracellular matrix composition, cell adhesion, cell junction, and extracellular matrix-activated and growth factor-activated signaling. These observations show that imprinted genes share a common biological process that may account for their seemingly diverse roles in embryonic development, obesity, diabetes, muscle physiology, and neoplasm.

  19. Effects of Free Anthraquinones Extract from the Rhubarb on Cell Proliferation and Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in High Glucose Cultured-Mesangial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyun; Fang, Hui; Dong, Bingzheng; Wang, Dongdong; Li, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Lijuan; Wei, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage failure of the kidney, but the efficacy of currently available strategies for the prevention of DN remains unsatisfactory. In this study, we investigated the effects of free anthraquinones (FARs) extract, which was extracted from the rhubarb and purified by macroporous resin DM130 with gradient mixtures of ethanol/water as the lelution solvents, in high glucose-cultured glomerular mesangial cells (MCs). The cell proliferation was determined by CCK-8 assay, the levels of TGF-β1, CTGF, ColIV and FN proteins in the supernatant of MCs were measured by ELISA assays, and the mRNA levels of these four genes were detected by RT-PCR. The results showed that the increased proliferation of MCs, the mRNA levels and protein expression of TGF-β1, CTGF, ColIV and FN induced by high glucose were inhibited after the treatment with the FARs extract. This indicated that FARs extract could inhibit cell proliferation and the expression of main extracellular matrix induced by high glucose in MCs. The FARs extract exhibited potential values for prophylaxis and therapy of DN. PMID:26557014

  20. Micro-pattern formation of extracellular matrix (ECM) layers by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and cell culture on the patterned ECMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Ayumi; Asano, Toshifumi; Urisu, Tsuneo; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2011-12-01

    A new patterning technique for the extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited on a Si substrate was developed with the use of a low-frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma and a metal stencil mask. The development of such a patterning technique for cell arrangement is a crucial step for the development of future cell chips. In this study, optimal process conditions for ECM patterning over the size of a typical single chip (about 1 cm2) were achieved and the obtained ECM patterns were directly observed by fluorescence labelling. It was also demonstrated that HEK293 cells (human embryo kidney cells) attach to and proliferate on the ECM layer patterned by this technique, arranging themselves on the Si substrate in the mask pattern.

  1. Membrane vesicles containing matrix metalloproteinase-9 and fibroblast growth factor-2 are released into the extracellular space from mouse mesoangioblast stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Maria Elena; Geraci, Fabiana; Turturici, Giuseppina; Taverna, Simona; Albanese, Ida; Sconzo, Gabriella

    2010-07-01

    Certain proteins, including fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), have proved very effective in increasing the efficacy of mesoangioblast stem cell therapy in repairing damaged tissue. We provide the first evidence that mouse mesoangioblast stem cells release FGF-2 and MMP-9 in their active form through the production of membrane vesicles. These vesicles are produced and turned over continuously, but are stable for some time in the extracellular milieu. Mesoangioblasts shed membrane vesicles even under oxygen tensions that are lower than those typically used for cell culture and more like those of mouse tissues. These findings suggest that mesoangioblasts may themselves secrete paracrine signals and factors that make damaged tissues more amenable to cell therapy through the release of membrane vesicles. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Fibronectin Deposition Participates in Extracellular Matrix Assembly and Vascular Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Hielscher

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM has been demonstrated to facilitate angiogenesis. In particular, fibronectin has been documented to activate endothelial cells, resulting in their transition from a quiescent state to an active state in which the cells exhibit enhanced migration and proliferation. The goal of this study is to examine the role of polymerized fibronectin during vascular tubulogenesis using a 3 dimensional (3D cell-derived de-cellularized matrix. A fibronectin-rich 3D de-cellularized ECM was used as a scaffold to study vascular morphogenesis of endothelial cells (ECs. Confocal analyses of several matrix proteins reveal high intra- and extra-cellular deposition of fibronectin in formed vascular structures. Using a small peptide inhibitor of fibronectin polymerization, we demonstrate that inhibition of fibronectin fibrillogenesis in ECs cultured atop de-cellularized ECM resulted in decreased vascular morphogenesis. Further, immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses reveal decreased expression of stromal matrix proteins in the absence of polymerized fibronectin with high co-localization of matrix proteins found in association with polymerized fibronectin. Evaluating vascular kinetics, live cell imaging showed that migration, migration velocity, and mean square displacement, are disrupted in structures grown in the absence of polymerized fibronectin. Additionally, vascular organization failed to occur in the absence of a polymerized fibronectin matrix. Consistent with these observations, we tested vascular morphogenesis following the disruption of EC adhesion to polymerized fibronectin, demonstrating that block of integrins α5β1 and αvβ3, abrogated vascular morphogenesis. Overall, fibronectin deposition in a 3D cell-derived de-cellularized ECM appears to be imperative for matrix assembly and vascular morphogenesis.

  3. Targeting the extracellular matrix to disrupt cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Freja Albjerg Venning; Lena eWullkopf; Janine T. Erler

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multi-step process, with each step involving intricate cross-talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the extracellular matrix (ECM). Many ECM proteins are significantly de-regulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic ca...

  4. The extracellular matrix in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua-Rodríguez, Jacob; Oskarsson, Thordur

    2016-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is increasingly recognized as an important regulator in breast cancer. ECM in breast cancer development features numerous changes in composition and organization when compared to the mammary gland under homeostasis. Matrix proteins that are induced in breast cancer include fibrillar collagens, fibronectin, specific laminins and proteoglycans as well as matricellular proteins. Growing evidence suggests that many of these induced ECM proteins play a major functional role in breast cancer progression and metastasis. A number of the induced ECM proteins have moreover been shown to be essential components of metastatic niches, promoting stem/progenitor signaling pathways and metastatic growth. ECM remodeling enzymes are also markedly increased, leading to major changes in the matrix structure and biomechanical properties. Importantly, several ECM components and ECM remodeling enzymes are specifically induced in breast cancer or during tissue regeneration while healthy tissues under homeostasis express exceedingly low levels. This may indicate that ECM and ECM-associated functions may represent promising drug targets against breast cancer, providing important specificity that could be utilized when developing therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Extracellular matrix production by nucleus pulposus and bone marrow stem cells in response to altered oxygen and glucose microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syeda M; Buckley, Conor T

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow (BM) stem cells may be an ideal source of cells for intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. However, the harsh biochemical microenvironment of the IVD may significantly influence the biological and metabolic vitality of injected stem cells and impair their repair potential. This study investigated the viability and production of key matrix proteins by nucleus pulposus (NP) and BM stem cells cultured in the typical biochemical microenvironment of the IVD consisting of altered oxygen and glucose concentrations. Culture-expanded NP cells and BM stem cells were encapsulated in 1.5% alginate and ionically crosslinked to form cylindrical hydrogel constructs. Hydrogel constructs were maintained under different glucose concentrations (1, 5 and 25 mM) and external oxygen concentrations (5 and 20%). Cell viability was measured using the Live/Dead® assay and the production of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), and collagen was quantified biochemically and histologically. For BM stem cells, IVD-like micro-environmental conditions (5 mM glucose and 5% oxygen) increased the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. In contrast, low glucose conditions (1 mM glucose) combined with 5% external oxygen concentration promoted cell death, inhibiting proliferation and the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. NP-encapsulated alginate constructs were relatively insensitive to oxygen concentration or glucose condition in that they accumulated similar amounts of sGAG under all conditions. Under IVD-like microenvironmental conditions, NP cells were found to have a lower glucose consumption rate compared with BM cells and may in fact be more suitable to adapt and sustain the harsh microenvironmental conditions. Considering the highly specialised microenvironment of the central NP, these results indicate that IVD-like concentrations of low glucose and low oxygen are critical and influential for the survival and biological behaviour of stem cells. Such findings may promote and accelerate

  6. Effects of Arg-Gly-Asp-modified elastin-like polypeptide on pseudoislet formation via up-regulation of cell adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Min; Jung, Gwon-Soo; Park, Jin-Kyu; Choi, Seong-Kyoon; Jeon, Won Bae

    2013-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in controlling the β-cell morphology, survival and insulin secretary functions. An RGD-modified elastin-like polypeptide (RGD-ELP), TGPG[VGRGD(VGVPG)(6)](20)WPC, has been reported previously as a bioactive matrix. In this study, to investigate whether RGD-ELP affects β-cell growth characteristics and insulin secretion, β-TC6 cells were cultured on the RGD-ELP coatings prepared via thermally induced phase transition. On RGD-ELP, β-TC6 cells clustered into an islet-like architecture with high cell viability. Throughout 7days' culture, the proliferation rate of the cells within a pseudoislet was similar to that of monolayer culture. Under high glucose (25mM), β-TC6 pseudoislets showed up-regulated insulin gene expression and exhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Importantly, the mRNA and protein abundances of cell adhesion molecules (CAM) E-cadherin and connexin-36 were much higher in pseudoislets than in monolayer cells. The siRNA-mediated inhibition of E-cadherin or connexin-36 expression severely limited pseudoislet formation. In addition, the mRNA levels of collagen types I and IV, fibronectin and laminin were significantly elevated in pseudoislets. The results suggest that RGD-ELP promotes pseudoislet formation via up-regulation of the CAM and ECM components. The functional roles of RGD-ELP are discussed in respect of its molecular composition.

  7. Hypoxia-increased expression of genes involved in inflammation, dedifferentiation, pro-fibrosis, and extracellular matrix remodeling of human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiafe, Bridget; Adesida, Adetola; Churchill, Thomas; Adewuyi, Esther Ekpe; Li, Zack; Metcalfe, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO) is characterized by exaggerated stretch, hydrodynamic pressure, and inflammation which cause significant damage and fibrosis to the bladder wall. Several studies have implicated hypoxia in its pathophysiology. However, the isolated progressive effects of hypoxia on bladder cells are not yet defined. Sub-confluent normal human bladder smooth muscle cells (hbSMC) were cultured in 3% O2 tension for 2, 24, 48, and 72 h. RNA, cellular proteins, and secreted proteins were used for gene expression analysis, immunoblotting, and ELISA, respectively. Transcription of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α and HIF2α were transiently induced after 2 h of hypoxia (p inflammation, de-differentiation, pro-fibrotic changes, and increased extracellular matrix expression. This elucidates mechanisms of hypoxia-driven bladder deterioration in bladder cells, which is important in tailoring in vivo experiments and may ultimately translate into improved clinical outcomes.

  8. DMPD: Fragments of extracellular matrix as mediators of inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18243041 Fragments of extracellular matrix as mediators of inflammation. Adair-Kirk...l) Show Fragments of extracellular matrix as mediators of inflammation. PubmedID 18243041 Title Fragments of extrace... TL, Senior RM. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2008;40(6-7):1101-10. Epub 2007 Dec 24. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csm

  9. Extracellular Matrix-Dependent Generation of Integration- and Xeno-Free iPS Cells Using a Modified mRNA Transfection Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-In; Lee, Seo-Young; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) hold great promise in the field of regenerative medicine, especially immune-compatible cell therapy. The most important safety-related issues that must be resolved before the clinical use of iPS cells include the generation of "footprint-free" and "xeno-free" iPS cells. In this study, we sought to examine whether an extracellular matrix- (ECM-) based xeno-free culture system that we recently established could be used together with a microRNA-enhanced mRNA reprogramming method for the generation of clinically safe iPS cells. The notable features of this method are the use of a xeno-free/feeder-free culture system for the generation and expansion of iPS cells rather than the conventional labor-intensive culture systems using human feeder cells or human feeder-conditioned medium and the enhancement of mRNA-mediated reprogramming via the delivery of microRNAs. Strikingly, we observed the early appearance of iPS cell colonies (~11 days), substantial reprogramming efficiency (~0.2-0.3%), and a high percentage of ESC-like colonies among the total colonies (~87.5%), indicating enhanced kinetics and reprogramming efficiency. Therefore, the combined method established in this study provides a valuable platform for the generation and expansion of clinically safe (i.e., integration- and xeno-free) iPS cells, facilitating immune-matched cell therapy in the near future.

  10. Synergistic interactions of blood-borne immune cells, fibroblasts and extracellular matrix drive repair in an in vitro peri-implant wound healing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Melanie A.; Waser, Jasmin; Milleret, Vincent; Gerber, Isabel; Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Foolen, Jasper; Hoerstrup, Simon P.; Schlottig, Falko; Vogel, Viola

    2016-02-01

    Low correlations of cell culture data with clinical outcomes pose major medical challenges with costly consequences. While the majority of biomaterials are tested using in vitro cell monocultures, the importance of synergistic interactions between different cell types on paracrine signalling has recently been highlighted. In this proof-of-concept study, we asked whether the first contact of surfaces with whole human blood could steer the tissue healing response. This hypothesis was tested using alkali-treatment of rough titanium (Ti) surfaces since they have clinically been shown to improve early implant integration and stability, yet blood-free in vitro cell cultures poorly correlated with in vivo tissue healing. We show that alkali-treatment, compared to native Ti surfaces, increased blood clot thickness, including platelet adhesion. Strikingly, blood clots with entrapped blood cells in synergistic interactions with fibroblasts, but not fibroblasts alone, upregulated the secretion of major factors associated with fast healing. This includes matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to break down extracellular matrix and the growth factor VEGF, known for its angiogenic potential. Consequently, in vitro test platforms, which consider whole blood-implant interactions, might be superior in predicting wound healing in response to biomaterial properties.

  11. Neutrophils contribute to fracture healing by synthesizing fibronectin+ extracellular matrix rapidly after injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastian, Okan W.; Koenderman, Leo; Alblas, Jacqueline; Leenen, Luke P H; Blokhuis, Taco J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of inflammatory cells in bone regeneration remains unclear. We hypothesize that leukocytes contribute to fracture healing by rapidly synthesizing an "emergency extracellular matrix (ECM)" before stromal cells infiltrate the fracture hematoma (FH) and synthesize the eventual collagenous bone

  12. Extracellular matrix composition significantly influences pancreatic stellate cell gene expression pattern: role of transgelin in PSC function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Minoti V; Yang, Lu; Phillips, Phoebe A; Xu, Zhihong; Kaplan, Warren; Cowley, Mark; Pirola, Romano C; Wilson, Jeremy S

    2013-09-15

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are responsible for the fibrotic matrix of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In vitro protocols examining PSC biology have usually involved PSCs cultured on plastic, a nonphysiological surface. However, PSCs cultured on physiological matrices, e.g., Matrigel (normal basement membrane) and collagen (fibrotic pancreas), may have distinctly different behaviors compared with cells cultured on plastic. Therefore, we aimed to 1) compare PSC gene expression after culture on plastic, Matrigel, and collagen I; 2) validate the gene array data for transgelin, the most highly dysregulated gene in PSCs grown on activating vs. nonactivating matrices, at mRNA and protein levels; 3) examine the role of transgelin in PSC function; and 4) assess transgelin expression in human chronic pancreatitis sections. Culture of PSCs on different matrices significantly affected their gene expression pattern. 146, 619, and 432 genes, respectively, were differentially expressed (P PSC proliferation and also reduced platelet-derived growth factor-induced PSC migration. Notably, transgelin was highly expressed in chronic pancreatitis in stromal areas and periacinar spaces but was absent in acinar cells. These findings suggest that transgelin is a potentially useful target protein to modulate PSC function so as to ameliorate pancreatic fibrosis.

  13. Activation of Yes-Associated Protein in Low-Grade Meningiomas Is Regulated by Merlin, Cell Density, and Extracellular Matrix Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Kuniaki; Natsume, Atsushi; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motomura, Kazuya; Alim, Adiljan; Tanaka, Ichidai; Senga, Takeshi; Harada, Ichiro; Fukuyama, Ryuichi; Sumiyoshi, Naoyuki; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2015-07-01

    The NF2 gene product Merlin is a protein containing ezrin, radixin, and moesin domains; it is a member of the 4.1 protein superfamily associated with the membrane cytoskeleton and also interacts with cell surface molecules. The mammalian Hippo cascade, a downstream signaling cascade of merlin, inactivates the Yes-associated protein (YAP). Yes-associated protein is activated by loss of the NF2 gene and functions as an oncogene in meningioma cells; however, the factors controlling YAP expression, phosphorylation, and subcellular localization in meningiomas have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that merlin expression is heterogeneous in 1 NF2 gene-negative and 3 NF2 gene-positive World Health Organization grade I meningiomas. In the NF2 gene-positive meningiomas, regions with low levels of merlin (tumor rims) had greater numbers of cells with nuclear YAP versus regions with high merlin levels (tumor cores). Merlin expression and YAP phosphorylation were also affected by cell density in the IOMM-Lee and HKBMM human meningioma cell lines; nuclear localization of YAP was regulated by cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness in IOMM-Lee cells. These results suggest that cell density and ECM stiffness may contribute to the heterogeneous loss of merlin and increased nuclear YAP expression in human meningiomas.

  14. Decreased expression of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 is involved in degradation of extracellular matrix surrounding cervical cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masakazu; Kawana, Kei; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Fujimoto, Asaha; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Nakamura, Hiroe; Nishida, Haruka; Inoue, Tomoko; Taguchi, Ayumi; Takahashi, Juri; Kojima, Satoko; Yamashita, Aki; Tomio, Kensuke; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-02-01

    The plasminogen activator (PA) system consists of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor (uPA and uPAR). PAI-1 inhibits the activation of uPA (which converts plasminogen to plasmin), and is involved in cancer invasion and metastasis, by remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) through regulating plasmin. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of cells within tumors, and are thought to be involved in tumor recurrence and metastasis. Considering these facts, we investigated the relationship between PAI-1 and cervical CSCs. We used ALDH1 as a marker of cervical CSCs. First, we demonstrated that culturing ALDH1-high cells and ALDH-low cells on collagen IV-coted plates increased their expression of active PAI-1 (ELISA), and these increases were suggested to be at mRNA expression levels (RT-qPCR). Secondly, we demonstrated PAI-1 was indeed involved in the ECM maintenance. With gelatin zymography assays, we found that ALDH1-high cells and ALDH-low cells expressed pro-matrix metalloproteinase-2 (pro-MMP-2) irrespective of their coatings. With gelatinase/collagenase assay kit, we confirmed that collagenase activity was increased when ALDH1-low cells were exposed to TM5275, a small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1. Putting the data together, we hypothesized that cancer cells adhered to basal membrane secrete abundant PAI-1, on the other hand, cancer cells (especially CSCs rather than non-CSCs) distant from basal membrane secrete less PAI-1, which makes the ECM surrounding CSCs more susceptible to degradation. Our study could be an explanation of conflicting reports, where some researchers found negative impacts of PAI-1 expression on clinical outcomes and others not, by considering the concept of CSCs.

  15. Integrin-mediated traction force enhances paxillin molecular associations and adhesion dynamics that increase the invasiveness of tumor cells into a three-dimensional extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhdjian, Armen H; Kai, FuiBoon; Rubashkin, Matthew G; Prahl, Louis S; Przybyla, Laralynne M; McGregor, Alexandra L; Bell, Emily S; Barnes, J Matthew; DuFort, Christopher C; Ou, Guanqing; Chang, Alice C; Cassereau, Luke; Tan, Steven J; Pickup, Michael W; Lakins, Jonathan N; Ye, Xin; Davidson, Michael W; Lammerding, Jan; Odde, David J; Dunn, Alexander R; Weaver, Valerie M

    2017-06-01

    Metastasis requires tumor cells to navigate through a stiff stroma and squeeze through confined microenvironments. Whether tumors exploit unique biophysical properties to metastasize remains unclear. Data show that invading mammary tumor cells, when cultured in a stiffened three-dimensional extracellular matrix that recapitulates the primary tumor stroma, adopt a basal-like phenotype. Metastatic tumor cells and basal-like tumor cells exert higher integrin-mediated traction forces at the bulk and molecular levels, consistent with a motor-clutch model in which motors and clutches are both increased. Basal-like nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells also display an altered integrin adhesion molecular organization at the nanoscale and recruit a suite of paxillin-associated proteins implicated in invasion and metastasis. Phosphorylation of paxillin by Src family kinases, which regulates adhesion turnover, is similarly enhanced in the metastatic and basal-like tumor cells, fostered by a stiff matrix, and critical for tumor cell invasion in our assays. Bioinformatics reveals an unappreciated relationship between Src kinases, paxillin, and survival of breast cancer patients. Thus adoption of the basal-like adhesion phenotype may favor the recruitment of molecules that facilitate tumor metastasis to integrin-based adhesions. Analysis of the physical properties of tumor cells and integrin adhesion composition in biopsies may be predictive of patient outcome. © 2017 Mekhdjian, Kai, Rubashkin, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. Micro- and macrorheology of jellyfish extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Camille; Abou, Bérengère; Ponton, Alain; Cornelissen, Annemiek J M

    2012-01-04

    Mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play a key role in tissue organization and morphogenesis. Rheological properties of jellyfish ECM (mesoglea) were measured in vivo at the cellular scale by passive microrheology techniques: microbeads were injected in jellyfish ECM and their Brownian motion was recorded to determine the mechanical properties of the surrounding medium. Microrheology results were compared with macrorheological measurements performed with a shear rheometer on slices of jellyfish mesoglea. We found that the ECM behaved as a viscoelastic gel at the macroscopic scale and as a much softer and heterogeneous viscoelastic structure at the microscopic scale. The fibrous architecture of the mesoglea, as observed by differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, was in accord with these scale-dependent mechanical properties. Furthermore, the evolution of the mechanical properties of the ECM during aging was investigated by measuring microrheological properties at different jellyfish sizes. We measured that the ECM in adult jellyfish was locally stiffer than in juvenile ones. We argue that this stiffening is a consequence of local aggregations of fibers occurring gradually during aging of the jellyfish mesoglea and is enhanced by repetitive muscular contractions of the jellyfish.

  17. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Mediates Apoptosis and Extracellular Matrix Metabolic Imbalances Possibly via p38 MAPK Activation in Rat Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate whether high glucose-induced oxidative stress is implicated in apoptosis of rat nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs and abnormal expression of critical genes involved in the metabolic balance of extracellular matrix (ECM. Methods. NPCs were cultured with various concentrations of glucose to detect cell viability and apoptosis. Cells cultured with high glucose (25 mM were untreated or pretreated with N-acetylcysteine or a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production was evaluated. Activation of p38 MAPK was measured by Western blot. The expression of ECM metabolism-related genes, including type II collagen, aggrecan, SRY-related high-mobility-group box 9 (Sox-9, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1, was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results. High glucose reduced viability of NPCs and induced apoptosis. High glucose resulted in increased ROS generation and p38 MAPK activation. In addition, it negatively regulated the expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, Sox-9, and TIMP-1 and positively regulated MMP-3 expression. These results were changed by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine or SB 202190. Conclusions. High glucose might promote apoptosis of NPCs, trigger ECM catabolic pathways, and inhibit its anabolic activities, possibly through a p38 MAPK-dependent oxidative stress mechanism.

  18. A Novel Function for Arabidopsis CYCLASE1 in Programmed Cell Death Revealed by Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Analysis of Extracellular Matrix Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah J; Kroon, Johan T M; Simon, William J; Slabas, Antoni R; Chivasa, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Programmed cell death is essential for plant development and stress adaptation. A detailed understanding of the signal transduction pathways that regulate plant programmed cell death requires identification of the underpinning protein networks. Here, we have used a protagonist and antagonist of programmed cell death triggered by fumonisin B1 as probes to identify key cell death regulatory proteins in Arabidopsis. Our hypothesis was that changes in the abundance of cell death-regulatory proteins induced by the protagonist should be blocked or attenuated by concurrent treatment with the antagonist. We focused on proteins present in the mobile phase of the extracellular matrix on the basis that they are important for cell-cell communications during growth and stress-adaptive responses. Salicylic acid, a plant hormone that promotes programmed cell death, and exogenous ATP, which can block fumonisin B1-induced cell death, were used to treat Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures prior to isobaric-tagged relative and absolute quantitation analysis of secreted proteins. A total of 33 proteins, whose response to salicylic acid was suppressed by ATP, were identified as putative cell death-regulatory proteins. Among these was CYCLASE1, which was selected for further analysis using reverse genetics. Plants in which CYCLASE1 gene expression was knocked out by insertion of a transfer-DNA sequence manifested dramatically increased cell death when exposed to fumonisin B1 or a bacterial pathogen that triggers the defensive hypersensitive cell death. Although pathogen inoculation altered CYCLASE1 gene expression, multiplication of bacterial pathogens was indistinguishable between wild type and CYCLASE1 knockout plants. However, remarkably severe chlorosis symptoms developed on gene knockout plants in response to inoculation with either a virulent bacterial pathogen or a disabled mutant that is incapable of causing disease in wild type plants. These results show that CYCLASE1, which

  19. Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) suppresses attachment and spreading of breast cancer cells on 2D and 3D extracellular matrix components by altering focal adhesion-associated signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic dissemination of cancer cells from primary tumor to secondary sites is a multi-step process that depends heavily on the ability of cancer cells to respond to the microenvironmental cues, such as changes in composition of surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), by adapting their adhesion a...

  20. ALMS1-deficient fibroblasts over-express extra-cellular matrix components, display cell cycle delay and are resistant to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Zulato

    Full Text Available Alström Syndrome (ALMS is a rare genetic disorder (483 living cases, characterized by many clinical manifestations, including blindness, obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiomyopathy. ALMS is caused by mutations in the ALMS1 gene, encoding for a large protein with implicated roles in ciliary function, cellular quiescence and intracellular transport. Patients with ALMS have extensive fibrosis in nearly all tissues resulting in a progressive organ failure which is often the ultimate cause of death. To focus on the role of ALMS1 mutations in the generation and maintenance of this pathological fibrosis, we performed gene expression analysis, ultrastructural characterization and functional assays in 4 dermal fibroblast cultures from ALMS patients. Using a genome-wide gene expression analysis we found alterations in genes belonging to specific categories (cell cycle, extracellular matrix (ECM and fibrosis, cellular architecture/motility and apoptosis. ALMS fibroblasts display cytoskeleton abnormalities and migration impairment, up-regulate the expression and production of collagens and despite the increase in the cell cycle length are more resistant to apoptosis. Therefore ALMS1-deficient fibroblasts showed a constitutively activated myofibroblast phenotype even if they do not derive from a fibrotic lesion. Our results support a genetic basis for the fibrosis observed in ALMS and show that both an excessive ECM production and a failure to eliminate myofibroblasts are key mechanisms. Furthermore, our findings suggest new roles for ALMS1 in both intra- and extra-cellular events which are essential not only for the normal cellular function but also for cell-cell and ECM-cell interactions.

  1. Surface presentation of biochemical cues for stem cell expansion - Spatial distribution of growth factors and self-assembly of extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingyu

    Despite its great potential applications to stem cell technology and tissue engineering, matrix presentation of biochemical cues such as growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) components remains undefined. This is largely due to the difficulty in preserving the bioactivities of signaling molecules and in controlling the spatial distribution, cellular accessibility, molecular orientation and intermolecular assembly of the biochemical cues. This dissertation comprises of two parts that focuses on understanding surface presentation of a growth factor and ECM components, respectively. This dissertation addresses two fundamental questions in stem cell biology using two biomaterials platforms. How does nanoscale distribution of growth factor impact signaling activation and cellular behaviors of adult neural stem cells? How does ECM self-assembly impact human embryonic stem cell survival and proliferation? The first question was addressed by the design of a novel quantitative platform that allows the control of FGF-2 molecular presentation locally as either monomers or clusters when tethered to a polymeric substrate. This substrate-tethered FGF-2 enables a switch-like signaling activation in response to dose titration of FGF-2. This is in contrast to a continuous MAPK activation pattern elicited by soluble FGF-2. Consequently, cell proliferation, and spreading were also consistent with this FGF-2 does-response pattern. We demonstrated that the combination of FGF-2 concentration and its cluster size, rather than concentration alone, serves as the determinants to govern its biological effect on neural stem cells. The second part of this dissertation was inspired by the challenge that hESCs have extremely low clonal efficiency and hESC survival is critically dependent on cell substrate adhesion. We postulated that ECM integrity is a critical factor in preventing hESC anchorage-dependent apoptosis, and that the matrix for feeder-free culture need to be properly

  2. Keratin 8/18 Regulation of Cell Stiffness-Extracellular Matrix Interplay through Modulation of Rho-Mediated Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, François; Myrand Lapierre, Marie-Eve; Sheng, Yunlong; Marceau, Normand

    2012-01-01

    Cell mechanical activity generated from the interplay between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the actin cytoskeleton is essential for the regulation of cell adhesion, spreading and migration during normal and cancer development. Keratins are the intermediate filament (IF) proteins of epithelial cells, expressed as pairs in a lineage/differentiation manner. Hepatic epithelial cell IFs are made solely of keratins 8/18 (K8/K18), hallmarks of all simple epithelia. Notably, our recent work on these epithelial cells has revealed a key regulatory function for K8/K18 IFs in adhesion/migration, through modulation of integrin interactions with ECM, actin adaptors and signaling molecules at focal adhesions. Here, using K8-knockdown rat H4 hepatoma cells and their K8/K18-containing counterparts seeded on fibronectin-coated substrata of different rigidities, we show that the K8/K18 IF-lacking cells lose their ability to spread and exhibit an altered actin fiber organization, upon seeding on a low-rigidity substratum. We also demonstrate a concomitant reduction in local cell stiffness at focal adhesions generated by fibronectin-coated microbeads attached to the dorsal cell surface. In addition, we find that this K8/K18 IF modulation of cell stiffness and actin fiber organization occurs through RhoA-ROCK signaling. Together, the results uncover a K8/K18 IF contribution to the cell stiffness-ECM rigidity interplay through a modulation of Rho-dependent actin organization and dynamics in simple epithelial cells. PMID:22685604

  3. Keratin 8/18 regulation of cell stiffness-extracellular matrix interplay through modulation of Rho-mediated actin cytoskeleton dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Bordeleau

    Full Text Available Cell mechanical activity generated from the interplay between the extracellular matrix (ECM and the actin cytoskeleton is essential for the regulation of cell adhesion, spreading and migration during normal and cancer development. Keratins are the intermediate filament (IF proteins of epithelial cells, expressed as pairs in a lineage/differentiation manner. Hepatic epithelial cell IFs are made solely of keratins 8/18 (K8/K18, hallmarks of all simple epithelia. Notably, our recent work on these epithelial cells has revealed a key regulatory function for K8/K18 IFs in adhesion/migration, through modulation of integrin interactions with ECM, actin adaptors and signaling molecules at focal adhesions. Here, using K8-knockdown rat H4 hepatoma cells and their K8/K18-containing counterparts seeded on fibronectin-coated substrata of different rigidities, we show that the K8/K18 IF-lacking cells lose their ability to spread and exhibit an altered actin fiber organization, upon seeding on a low-rigidity substratum. We also demonstrate a concomitant reduction in local cell stiffness at focal adhesions generated by fibronectin-coated microbeads attached to the dorsal cell surface. In addition, we find that this K8/K18 IF modulation of cell stiffness and actin fiber organization occurs through RhoA-ROCK signaling. Together, the results uncover a K8/K18 IF contribution to the cell stiffness-ECM rigidity interplay through a modulation of Rho-dependent actin organization and dynamics in simple epithelial cells.

  4. The molecular elasticity of the extracellular matrix protein tenascin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhauser, Andres F.; Marszalek, Piotr E.; Erickson, Harold P.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    1998-05-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are thought to provide a rigid mechanical anchor that supports and guides migrating and rolling cells. Here we examine the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix protein tenascin by using atomic-force-microscopy techniques. Our results indicate that tenascin is an elastic protein. Single molecules of tenascin could be stretched to several times their resting length. Force-extension curves showed a saw-tooth pattern, with peaks of force at 137pN. These peaks were ~25nm apart. Similar results have been obtained by study of titin. We also found similar results by studying recombinant tenascin fragments encompassing the 15 fibronectin type III domains of tenascin. This indicates that the extensibility of tenascin may be due to the stretch-induced unfolding of its fibronectin type III domains. Refolding of tenascin after stretching, observed when the force was reduced to near zero, showed a double-exponential recovery with time constants of 42 domains refolded per second and 0.5 domains per second. The former speed of refolding is more than twice as fast as any previously reported speed of refolding of a fibronectin type III domain,. We suggest that the extensibility of the modular fibronectin type III region may be important in allowing tenascin-ligand bonds to persist over long extensions. These properties of fibronectin type III modules may be of widespread use in extracellular proteins containing such domain,.

  5. Structure and function of the skeletal muscle extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Allison R; Lieber, Richard L

    2011-09-01

    The skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in muscle fiber force transmission, maintenance, and repair. In both injured and diseased states, ECM adapts dramatically, a property that has clinical manifestations and alters muscle function. Here we review the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of skeletal muscle ECM; describe the cells that contribute to the maintenance of the ECM; and, finally, overview changes that occur with pathology. New scanning electron micrographs of ECM structure are also presented with hypotheses about ECM structure–function relationships. Detailed structure–function relationships of the ECM have yet to be defined and, as a result, we propose areas for future study.

  6. Cellular Traction Stresses Mediate Extracellular Matrix Degradation by Invadopodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrell, Rachel J.; Parekh, Aron

    2014-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, matrix rigidity can drive oncogenic transformation via altered cellular proliferation and migration. Cells sense extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical properties with intracellular tensile forces generated by actomyosin contractility. These contractile forces are transmitted to the matrix surface as traction stresses which mediate mechanical interactions with the ECM. Matrix rigidity has been shown to increase proteolytic ECM degradation by cytoskeletal structures known as invadopodia that are critical for cancer progression suggesting that cellular contractility promotes invasive behavior. However, both increases and decreases in traction stresses have been associated with metastatic behavior. Therefore, the role of cellular contractility in invasive migration leading to metastasis is unclear. To determine the relationship between cellular traction stresses and invadopodia activity, we characterized the invasive and contractile properties of an aggressive carcinoma cell line utilizing polyacrylamide gels of different rigidities. We found that ECM degradation and traction stresses were linear functions of matrix rigidity. Using calyculin A to augment myosin contractility, we also found that traction stresses were strongly predictive of ECM degradation. Overall, our data suggest that cellular force generation may play an important part in invasion and metastasis by mediating invadopodia activity in response to the mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24412623

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a continuous invader-host cell cross talk with participation of extracellular matrix and adhesion and chemoattractant molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino A.P.M.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence have shown that Trypanosoma cruzi interacts with host extracellular matrix (ECM components producing breakdown products that play an important role in parasite mobilization and infectivity. Parasite-released antigens also modulate ECM expression that could participate in cell-cell and/or cell-parasite interactions. Increased expression of ECM components has been described in the cardiac tissue of chronic chagasic patients and diverse target tissues including heart, thymus, central nervous system and skeletal muscle of experimentally T. cruzi-infected mice. ECM components may adsorb parasite antigens and cytokines that could contribute to the establishment and perpetuation of inflammation. Furthermore, T. cruzi-infected mammalian cells produce cytokines and chemokines that not only participate in the control of parasitism but also contribute to the establishment of chronic inflammatory lesions in several target tissues and most frequently lead to severe myocarditis. T. cruzi-driven cytokines and chemokines may also modulate VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 adhesion molecules on endothelial cells of target tissues and play a key role in cell recruitment, especially of activated VLA-4+LFA-1+CD8+ T lymphocytes, resulting in a predominance of this cell population in the inflamed heart, central nervous system and skeletal muscle. The VLA-4+-invading cells are surrounded by a fine network of fibronectin that could contribute to cell anchorage, activation and effector functions. Since persistent "danger signals" triggered by the parasite and its antigens are required for the establishment of inflammation and ECM alterations, therapeutic interventions that control parasitism and selectively modulate cell migration improve ECM abnormalities, paving the way for the development of new therapeutic strategies improving the prognosis of T. cruzi-infected individuals.

  8. Three-dimensional reconstruction of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Allison R; Bushong, Eric A; Deerinck, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Lieber, Richard L

    2014-12-01

    The skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) supports muscle's passive mechanical function and provides a unique environment for extracellular tissues such as nerves, blood vessels, and a cadre of mononuclear cells. Within muscle ECM, collagen is thought to be the primary load-bearing protein, yet its structure and organization with respect to muscle fibers, tendon, and mononuclear cells is unknown. Detailed examination of extracellular collagen morphology requires high-resolution electron microscopy performed over relatively long distances because multinucleated muscle cells are very long and extend from several millimeters to several centimeters. Unfortunately, there is no tool currently available for high resolution ECM analysis that extends over such distances relevant to muscle fibers. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy is reported here to examine skeletal muscle ECM ultrastructure over hundreds of microns. Ruthenium red staining was implemented to enhance contrast and utilization of variable pressure imaging reduced electron charging artifacts, allowing continuous imaging over a large ECM volume. This approach revealed previously unappreciated perimysial collagen structures that were reconstructed via both manual and semi-automated segmentation methods. Perimysial collagen structures in the ECM may provide a target for clinical therapies aimed at reducing skeletal muscle fibrosis and stiffness.

  9. Microtubules regulate GEF-H1 in response to extracellular matrix stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Jessica N.; Ponik, Suzanne M.; Garcia-Mendoza, Maria G.; Pehlke, Carolyn A.; Inman, David R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Breast epithelial cells sense the stiffness of the extracellular matrix through Rho-mediated contractility. In turn, matrix stiffness regulates RhoA activity. However, the upstream signaling mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that the Rho exchange factor GEF-H1 mediates RhoA activation in response to extracellular matrix stiffness. We demonstrate the novel finding that microtubule stability is diminished by a stiff three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix, which leads to the activation of GEF-H1. Surprisingly, activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway did not contribute to stiffness-induced GEF-H1 activation. Loss of GEF-H1 decreases cell contraction of and invasion through 3D matrices. These data support a model in which matrix stiffness regulates RhoA through microtubule destabilization and the subsequent release and activation of GEF-H1. PMID:22593214

  10. Interleukin-1-mediated effects of normal oral keratinocytes and head and neck squamous carcinoma cells on extracellular matrix related gene expression in fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakelius, Malin; Koskela, Anita; Reyhani, Vahid; Ivarsson, Mikael; Grenman, Reidar; Rubin, Kristofer; Gerdin, Bengt; Nowinski, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    The composition of tumor stroma and the activity of tumor associated fibroblasts are important for tumor growth. Interactions between carcinoma cells and fibroblasts regulate the turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, the in vitro effects of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells (UT-SCC-30 and UT-SCC-87) on fibroblast expression of genes for ECM components and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), were compared to those of normal oral keratinocytes (NOK). Cocultures with fibroblasts in collagen gels and keratinocytes with the two cell types separated by a semi permeable membrane were used, and relative gene expression was measured with real-time PCR. All investigated genes were regulated by NOK and the SCCs. The downregulation of pro-collagens α1(I) and α1(III) was more pronounced in cocultures with NOK, while the expression of CCN2 and fibronectin was downregulated by both NOK and the SCCs to a similar extent. UT-SCC-87, but not UT-SCC-30, secreted significantly more IL-1α than NOK. A recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist reversed many of the observed effects on fibroblast gene expression suggesting involvement of IL-1 in cocultures with NOK as well as with SCCs. The observed differential effects on fibroblast gene expression suggest that NOK are more antifibrotic compared to UT-SCC-30 and UT-SCC-87. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms behind ECM turnover in tumors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Danggui Buxue Tang, a traditional Chinese herbal decoction, on high glucose-induced proliferation and expression of extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Hao-Liang; Zhang, Ying-Wen; Zhou, Bi-Fa; Zhen, Rui-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage failure of the kidney, but the efficacy of currently available strategies for the prevention of DN remains unsatisfactory. In this study, we investigated the effects of Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT), a Chinese herbal decoction prepared from Radix Astragali (RA) and Radix Angelicae sinensis (RAS), on high glucose-induced proliferation and expression of laminin, type IV collagen (collagen IV) and fibronectin in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). The cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay, and the expression of collagen IV, laminin and fibronectin in GMCs was detected by ELISA assay. It was shown that high glucose clearly induced the proliferation of GMCs and increased the release of collagen IV, laminin and fibronectin. Treatment with RA, RAS and DBT inhibited cell proliferation and the expression of collagen IV, laminin and fibronectin induced by high glucose, with DBT, especially at the highest concentration (DBT20), exhibiting a stronger effect than RA and RAS alone. Thus, it is concluded that DBT inhibits increased cell proliferation and the expression of major extracellular matrix proteins that are induced by high glucose, indicating its value for prophylaxis and therapy of DN at the early stages.

  12. Chitosan microspheres with an extracellular matrix-mimicking nanofibrous structure as cell-carrier building blocks for bottom-up cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Gao, Huai-Ling; Shen, Li-Li; Pan, Zhao; Mao, Li-Bo; Wu, Tao; He, Jia-Cai; Zou, Duo-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-01-07

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE) which closely mimic the physicochemical properties of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) have been proven to advantageously favor cell attachment, proliferation, migration and new tissue formation. Recently, as a valuable alternative, a bottom-up TE approach utilizing cell-loaded micrometer-scale modular components as building blocks to reconstruct a new tissue in vitro or in vivo has been proved to demonstrate a number of desirable advantages compared with the traditional bulk scaffold based top-down TE approach. Nevertheless, micro-components with an ECM-mimicking nanofibrous structure are still very scarce and highly desirable. Chitosan (CS), an accessible natural polymer, has demonstrated appealing intrinsic properties and promising application potential for TE, especially the cartilage tissue regeneration. According to this background, we report here the fabrication of chitosan microspheres with an ECM-mimicking nanofibrous structure for the first time based on a physical gelation process. By combining this physical fabrication procedure with microfluidic technology, uniform CS microspheres (CMS) with controlled nanofibrous microstructure and tunable sizes can be facilely obtained. Especially, no potentially toxic or denaturizing chemical crosslinking agent was introduced into the products. Notably, in vitro chondrocyte culture tests revealed that enhanced cell attachment and proliferation were realized, and a macroscopic 3D geometrically shaped cartilage-like composite can be easily constructed with the nanofibrous CMS (NCMS) and chondrocytes, which demonstrate significant application potential of NCMS as the bottom-up cell-carrier components for cartilage tissue engineering.

  13. A review of decellurization methods caused by an urgent need for quality control of cell-free extracellular matrix' scaffolds and their role in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawecki, Marek; Łabuś, Wojciech; Klama-Baryla, Agnieszka; Kitala, Diana; Kraut, Malgorzata; Glik, Justyna; Misiuga, Marcelina; Nowak, Mariusz; Bielecki, Tomasz; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra

    2017-02-14

    The natural extracellular matrix (ECM),thanks to its specific properties (e.g., collagenous lattice, a reservoir of growth factors, ECM-cell anchoring areas, an optimal pH and CO2 ),ensures an optimal microenvironment for homeostatic and regenerative cell development. In the context of regenerative medicine, ECM is a lair for residual and infiltrative cells. The aim of the clinical usage of cell-free ECM scaffolds is the enhancement of tissue regeneration with possible minimization of an adverse host reaction on allogeneic or xenogeneic biomaterial. Thus, the objective of decellularization is to obtain acellular grafts characterized by optimal biological properties, such as a lack of remaining cellular elements (e.g., cell membrane phospholipids and proteins, nucleic acids, mitochondria), lack of immunogenicity, lack of calcification promotion and lack of cytotoxicity (e.g., in unrinsed detergents). Furthermore, cell-free ECM scaffolds should present the optimal mechanical and structural properties that may ensure the biocompatibility of the graft. The maintenance of the ultrastructure composition of the ECM is one of the most important goals of decellularization. All physical, chemical, and biological methods proposed (used separately or in combination to extract cells from tissues/organs) are not 100% effective in cell removal and always cause a disruption of the ECM texture, as well as a probable loss of important structure components. Although cell-free ECM scaffolds are generally classified as medical devices, there are no widely accepted or legally defined criteria for quality control/evaluation methods of obtained matrices. Such criteria must be provided. Some of them have been proposed in this manuscript. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Extracellular matrix of the bovine ovarian membrana granulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, R J; Irving Rodgers, H F

    2002-05-31

    Much is known about the control of the development of ovarian follicles by growth factors and hormones. The study of extracellular matrix in the ovary, though, is a relatively new area. To date much research has focused on identifying the matrix components present, and more recently, its production and the physiological roles. In this review we focus on the changes that occur in the follicular basal lamina from primordial follicles through to ovulation and formation of the corpus luteum, the changes that occur during follicular atresia, and we discuss our observations of a novel matrix which forms in the membrana granulosa. The follicular basal lamina changes considerably during follicular development in its expression pattern of type IV collagens. Of the laminin chains examined, there appears only to be an increase in amount, except for laminin alpha2. It is expressed only in a small proportion of healthy antral follicles and in the majority of atretic antral follicles. Call-Exner bodies have the same composition as the basal lamina, except they do not contain laminin alpha2, even when the follicular basal lamina does. The novel matrix that develops within the membrana granulosa is similar in composition to Call-Exner bodies which occur predominantly in preantral follicles, except that it is far more common in large antral follicles, does not induce polarization of the surrounding granulosa cells, and does not contain follicular fluid-like material as the Call-Exner bodies of some species do. The expression of this matrix occurs prior to and during the time when granulosa cells express steroidogenic enzymes. It does not exist in corpora lutea. In addition large luteal cells, derived from granulosa cells, do not appear to have a basal lamina. These findings suggest that the maturational changes in the membrana granulosa are accompanied by changes in the matrix.

  15. Collagens and retinal Müller cells in healthy and diseased vitreoretinal interface : the regulatory role of extracellular matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bu, Shao

    2015-01-01

    Collagenen en Retinale Müller Cellen in de Gezonde en Pathologisch Veranderde Vitreoretinale Grenslaag --de regulatoire rol van de extracellulaire matrix De vitreoretinale grenslaag omvat het corticale glasvocht, de membrana limitans interna en de eindvoetjes van de retinale Müller cellen.

  16. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  17. The gene expression of human endothelial cells is modulated by subendothelial extracellular matrix proteins: short-term response to laminar shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlupac, Jaroslav; Filova, Elena; Havlikova, Jana; Matejka, Roman; Riedel, Tomas; Houska, Milan; Brynda, Eduard; Pamula, Elzbieta; Rémy, Murielle; Bareille, Reine; Fernandez, Philippe; Daculsi, Richard; Bourget, Chantal; Bacakova, Lucie; Bordenave, Laurence

    2014-08-01

    Vascular surgery for atherosclerosis is confronted by the lack of a suitable bypass material. Tissue engineering strives to produce bio-artificial conduits to provide resistance to thrombosis. The objectives of our study were to culture endothelial cells (EC) on composite assemblies of extracellular matrix proteins, and to evaluate the cellular phenotype under flow. Cell-adhesive assemblies were fabricated on glass slides as combinations of collagen (Co), laminin (LM), and fibronectin (FN), resulting in three samples: Co, Co/LM, and Co/FN. Surface topography, roughness, and wettability were determined. Human saphenous vein EC were harvested from cardiac patients, cultured on the assemblies and submitted to laminar shear stress (SS) of 12 dyn/cm(2) for 40, 80, and 120 min. Cell retention was assessed and qRT-PCR of adhesion genes (VE-cadherin, vinculin, KDR, CD-31 or PECAM-1, β1-integrins) and metabolic genes (t-PA, NF-κB, eNOS and MMP-1) was performed. Quantitative immunofluorescence of VE cadherin, vinculin, KDR, and vonWillebrand factor was performed after 2 and 6 h of flow. Static samples were excluded from shearing. The cells reached confluence with similar growth curves. The cells on Co/LM and Co/FN were resistant to flow up to 120 min but minor desquamation occurred on Co corresponding with temporary downregulation of VE cadherin and vinculin-mRNA and decreased fluorescence of vinculin. The cells seeded on Co/LM initially more upregulated vinculin-mRNA and also the inflammatory factor NF-κB, and the cells plated on Co/FN changed the expression profile minimally in comparison with the static control. Fluorescence of VE cadherin and vonWillebrand factor was enhanced on Co/FN. The cells cultured on Co/LM and Co/FN increased the vinculin fluorescence and expressed more VE cadherin and KDR-mRNA than the cells on Co. The cells plated on Co/FN upregulated the mRNA of VE cadherin, CD-31, and MMP 1 to a greater extent than the cells on Co/LM and they

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  19. Light and low-frequency pulsatile hydrostatic pressure enhances extracellular matrix formation by bone marrow mesenchymal cells: an in-vitro study with special reference to cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Z-J; Seedhom, B B

    2007-07-01

    Ovine bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMCs) were seeded on to non-woven filamentous plasma-treated polyester scaffolds and cultured in a chondrogenic medium for 4 weeks. Thereafter a pulsatile hydrostatic pressure (PHP) was applied to these cell-scaffolds constructs at an amplitude of 0.1 MPa and frequency of 0.25 Hz, for 30 min a day, over a period of 10 days. Samples (n = 6) were removed 24 h after PHP stimulation at days 1, 4, 7, and 10 for biochemical analysis. Similar analyses were conducted, at the same time points, on control samples that were not subjected to a PHP. The results showed that the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content did not significantly increase until after the application of a PHP for 7 days. The GAG content was 1.5 and 2.7 times higher in the PHP group than in the control group at days 7 and 10 respectively (pPHP group than in the control group at day 10 (psynthesis amounts, expressed as the total GAG contents per microgram of DNA, were 1.6 and 1.8 times higher in the PHP group than in the control group at days 7 and 10 respectively (pPHP application for 10 days, when it was 1.9 times higher than the control (p PHP applied at a low frequency has a cumulative stimulatory effect on the BMMCs' metabolic activities including cell proliferation and synthesis of the extracellular matrix.

  20. Cardiac-Restricted IGF-1Ea Overexpression Reduces the Early Accumulation of Inflammatory Myeloid Cells and Mediates Expression of Extracellular Matrix Remodelling Genes after Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gallego-Colon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to limit damage and improve repair after myocardial infarct remain a major therapeutic goal in cardiology. Our previous studies have shown that constitutive expression of a locally acting insulin-like growth factor-1 Ea (IGF-1Ea propeptide promotes functional restoration after cardiac injury associated with decreased scar formation. In the current study, we investigated the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms behind the enhanced functional recovery. We observed improved cardiac function in mice overexpressing cardiac-specific IGF-1Ea as early as day 7 after myocardial infarction. Analysis of gene transcription revealed that supplemental IGF-1Ea regulated expression of key metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9, their inhibitors (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, and collagen types (Col 1α1 and Col 1α3 in the first week after injury. Infiltration of inflammatory cells, which direct the remodelling process, was also altered; in particular there was a notable reduction in inflammatory Ly6C+ monocytes at day 3 and an increase in anti-inflammatory CD206+ macrophages at day 7. Taken together, these results indicate that the IGF-1Ea transgene shifts the balance of innate immune cell populations early after infarction, favouring a reduction in inflammatory myeloid cells. This correlates with reduced extracellular matrix remodelling and changes in collagen composition that may confer enhanced scar elasticity and improved cardiac function.

  1. Recent advances in the study of zebrafish extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Jason R

    2015-05-01

    The zebrafish extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and pleomorphic structure consisting of numerous proteins that together regulate a variety of cellular and morphogenetic events beginning as early as gastrulation. The zebrafish genome encodes a similar complement of ECM proteins as found in other vertebrate organisms including glycoproteins, fibrous proteins, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and interacting or modifying proteins such as integrins and matrix metalloproteinases. As a genetic model system combined with its amenability to high-resolution microscopic imaging, the zebrafish allows interrogation of ECM protein structure and function in both the embryo and adult. Accumulating data have identified important roles for zebrafish ECM proteins in processes as diverse as cell polarity, migration, tissue mechanics, organ laterality, muscle contraction, and regeneration. In this review, I highlight recently published data on these topics that demonstrate how the ECM proteins fibronectin, laminin, and collagen contribute to zebrafish development and adult homeostasis.

  2. Extracellular matrix assembly and organization during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Andrew; Jessen, Jason R

    2010-03-01

    Zebrafish gastrulation entails morphogenetic cell movements that shape the body plan and give rise to an embryo with defined anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. Regulating these cell movements are diverse signaling pathways and proteins including Wnts, Src-family tyrosine kinases, cadherins, and matrix metalloproteinases. While our knowledge of how these proteins impact cell polarity and migration has advanced considerably in the last decade, almost no data exist regarding the organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) during zebrafish gastrulation. Here, we describe for the first time the assembly of a fibronectin (FN) and laminin containing ECM in the early zebrafish embryo. This matrix was first detected at early gastrulation (65% epiboly) in the form of punctae that localize to tissue boundaries separating germ layers from each other and the underlying yolk cell. Fibrillogenesis increased after mid-gastrulation (80% epiboly) coinciding with the period of planar cell polarity pathway-dependent convergence and extension cell movements. We demonstrate that FN fibrils present beneath deep mesodermal cells are aligned in the direction of membrane protrusion formation. Utilizing antisense morpholino oligonucleotides, we further show that knockdown of FN expression causes a convergence and extension defect. Taken together, our data show that similar to amphibian embryos, the formation of ECM in the zebrafish gastrula is a dynamic process that occurs in parallel to at least a portion of the polarized cell behaviors shaping the embryonic body plan. These results provide a framework for uncovering the interrelationship between ECM structure and cellular processes regulating convergence and extension such as directed migration and mediolateral/radial intercalation. 2009 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Extracellular Matrix and Dermal Fibroblast Function in the Healing Wound

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Minasian, Raquel A.; Caterson, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fibroblasts play a critical role in normal wound healing. Various extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including collagens, fibrin, fibronectin, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and matricellular proteins, can be considered potent protagonists of fibroblast survival, migration, and metabolism.

  4. Process-induced extracellular matrix alterations affect the mechanisms of soft tissue repair and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendell Q Sun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrices derived from animal tissues for human tissue repairs are processed by various methods of physical, chemical, or enzymatic decellularization, viral inactivation, and terminal sterilization. The mechanisms of action in tissue repair vary among bioscaffolds and are suggested to be associated with process-induced extracellular matrix modifications. We compared three non-cross-linked, commercially available extracellular matrix scaffolds (Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix, and correlated extracellular matrix alterations to in vivo biological responses upon implantation in non-human primates. Structural evaluation showed significant differences in retaining native tissue extracellular matrix histology and ultrastructural features among bioscaffolds. Tissue processing may cause both the condensation of collagen fibers and fragmentation or separation of collagen bundles. Calorimetric analysis showed significant differences in the stability of bioscaffolds. The intrinsic denaturation temperature was measured to be 51°C, 38°C, and 44°C for Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix, respectively, demonstrating more extracellular matrix modifications in the Veritas and XenMatrix scaffolds. Consequently, the susceptibility to collagenase degradation was increased in Veritas and XenMatrix when compared to their respective source tissues. Using a non-human primate model, three bioscaffolds were found to elicit different biological responses, have distinct mechanisms of action, and yield various outcomes of tissue repair. Strattice permitted cell repopulation and was remodeled over 6 months. Veritas was unstable at body temperature, resulting in rapid absorption with moderate inflammation. XenMatrix caused severe inflammation and sustained immune reactions. This study demonstrates that extracellular matrix alterations significantly affect biological responses in soft tissue repair and regeneration. The data offer useful insights into the

  5. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustman, Brandon A.; Lind, Jan; Wetherbee, Richard; Gretz, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    Achnanthes longipes is a marine, biofouling diatom that adheres to surfaces via adhesive polymers extruded during motility or organized into structures called stalks that contain three distinct regions: the pad, shaft, and collar. Four monoclonal antibodies (AL.C1–AL.C4) and antibodies from two uncloned hybridomas (AL.E1 and AL.E2) were raised against the extracellular adhesives of A. longipes. Antibodies were screened against a hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble-fraction. The hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble fraction was fractionated to yield polymers in three size ranges: F1, ≥ 20,000,000 Mr; F2, ≅100,000 Mr; and F3, <10,000 Mr relative to dextran standards. The ≅100,000-Mr fraction consisted of highly sulfated (approximately 11%) fucoglucuronogalactans (FGGs) and low-sulfate (approximately 2%) FGGs, whereas F1 was composed of O-linked FGG (F2)-polypeptide (F3) complexes. AL.C1, AL.C2, AL.C4, AL.E1, and AL.E2 recognized carbohydrate complementary regions on FGGs, with antigenicity dependent on fucosyl-containing side chains. AL.C3 was unique in that it had a lower affinity for FGGs and did not label any portion of the shaft. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunocytochemistry indicated that low-sulfate FGGs are expelled from pores surrounding the raphe terminus, creating the cylindrical outer layers of the shaft, and that highly sulfated FGGs are extruded from the raphe, forming the central core. Antibody-labeling patterns and other evidence indicated that the shaft central-core region is related to material exuded from the raphe during cell motility. PMID:9536061

  6. Transplantation of three-dimensional artificial human vascular tissues fabricated using an extracellular matrix nanofilm-based cell-accumulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yoshiya; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Okano, Daisuke; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-04-01

    We have established a novel three-dimensional (3D) tissue-constructing technique, referred to as the 'cell-accumulation method', which is based on the self-assembly of cultured human cells. In this technique, cells are coated with fibronectin and gelatin to construct extracellular matrix (ECM) nanofilms and cultured to form multi-layers in vitro. By using this method, we have successfully fabricated artificial tissues with vascular networks constructed by co-cultivation of human umbilical vein-derived vascular endothelial cells between multi-layers of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In this study, to assess these engineered vascular tissues as therapeutic implants, we transplanted the 3D human tissues with microvascular networks, fabricated based on the cell-accumulation method, onto the back skin of nude mice. After the transplantation, we found vascular networks with perfusion of blood in the transplanted graft. At the boundary between host and implanted tissue, connectivity between murine and human vessels was found. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted artificial vascular tubules demonstrated the ultrastructural features of blood capillaries. Moreover, maturation of the vascular tissues after transplantation was shown by the presence of pericyte-like cells and abundant collagen fibrils in the ECM surrounding the vasculature. These results demonstrated that artificial human vascular tissues constructed by our method were engrafted and matured in animal skin. In addition, the implanted artificial human vascular networks were connected with the host circulatory system by anastomosis. This method is an attractive technique for engineering prevascularized artificial tissues for transplantation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Modulation of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate metabolism by components of the extracellular matrix in cultured cells. Interaction with epidermal growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulida, J; Onetti, R; Bassols, A

    1997-11-24

    The use of NIH3T3 fibroblasts overexpressing different mutations of the EGF receptor shows that regulation of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P2) metabolism by EGF is mediated by the kinase activity of the EGF receptor and suggests a PLCgamma1-mediated mechanism. The effect of several extracellular matrix components on glucose metabolism was assessed by incubating A431 cells and NIH3T3 fibroblasts with heparin, laminin, fibronectin, collagen and PG-I and PG-II proteoglycans and measuring the levels of Fru-2,6-P2. Laminin increased the levels of Fru-2,6-P2 and heparin decreased the levels of the metabolite, whereas the other molecules did not have any effect. No effect of laminin or heparin in glucose uptake by the cell was observed. Laminin was able to modulate the effects of EGF on Fru-2,6-P2 concentration, suggesting cross-talk between these agents.

  8. Erratum: Hayward IP, Bridle KR, Campbell GR, Underwood PA, Campbell JH (1995) Effect of Extracellular Matrix Proteins on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype. Cell Biology International 19: 839-846. doi: 10.1006/cbir.1995.1019.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The above article, published in print in Cell Biology International in September 1995 and online on 2 January 2013 in Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1006/cbir.1995.1019/abstract), is an exact duplicate of the article 'Effect of Extracellular Matrix Proteins on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype' (Hayward et al., ), which was published in the previous issue of Cell Biology International (Hayward et al., ). The duplicate publication is the result of an administrative error. The publisher apologises for any inconvenience.

  9. OASIS/CREB3L1 is induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in human glioma cell lines and contributes to the unfolded protein response, extracellular matrix production and cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi N Vellanki

    Full Text Available OASIS is a transcription factor similar to ATF6 that is activated by endoplasmic reticulum stress. In this study we investigated the expression of OASIS in human glioma cell lines and the effect of OASIS knock-down on the ER stress response and cell migration. OASIS mRNA was detected in three distinct glioma cell lines (U373, A172 and U87 and expression levels were increased upon treatment with ER stress-inducing compounds in the U373 and U87 lines. OASIS protein, which is glycosylated on Asn-513, was detected in the U373 and U87 glioma lines at low levels in control cells and protein expression was induced by ER stress. Knock-down of OASIS in human glioma cell lines resulted in an attenuated unfolded protein response to ER stress (reduced GRP78/BiP and GRP94 induction and decreased expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan extracellular matrix proteins, but induction of the collagen gene Col1a1 was unaffected. Cells in which OASIS was knocked-down exhibited altered cell morphology and reduced cell migration. These results suggest that OASIS is important for the ER stress response and maintenance of some extracellular matrix proteins in human glioma cells.

  10. Extracellular matrix hydrogels from decellularized tissues: Structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, Lindsey T; Cramer, Madeline C; Velankar, Sachin S; White, Lisa J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) bioscaffolds prepared from decellularized tissues have been used to facilitate constructive and functional tissue remodeling in a variety of clinical applications. The discovery that these ECM materials could be solubilized and subsequently manipulated to form hydrogels expanded their potential in vitro and in vivo utility; i.e. as culture substrates comparable to collagen or Matrigel, and as injectable materials that fill irregularly-shaped defects. The mechanisms by which ECM hydrogels direct cell behavior and influence remodeling outcomes are only partially understood, but likely include structural and biological signals retained from the native source tissue. The present review describes the utility, formation, and physical and biological characterization of ECM hydrogels. Two examples of clinical application are presented to demonstrate in vivo utility of ECM hydrogels in different organ systems. Finally, new research directions and clinical translation of ECM hydrogels are discussed. More than 70 papers have been published on extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels created from source tissue in almost every organ system. The present manuscript represents a review of ECM hydrogels and attempts to identify structure-function relationships that influence the tissue remodeling outcomes and gaps in the understanding thereof. There is a Phase 1 clinical trial now in progress for an ECM hydrogel. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Extracellular matrix synthesis and ultrastructural changes of degenerative disc cells transfected by Ad/CMV-hTGF-β1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭延斌; 胡有谷; 谭江威

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the synthesis of proteoglycan, collagen and associated ultrastructure are related to the adenovirus-mediated gene transferred to adult degenerative cells.Methods Adenovirus/cytomegalovirus human transforming growth fector-β1 (Ad/CMV-hTGF-β1) was used to transfect degenerative cells. Antonopulos method, Miamine method and transmission electrion microscopy were conducted to study the synthesis of proteoglycan, collagen, and ultrastructure, respectively. Cell cultures were established from the nucleus pulpous and annulus fibrosus tissues, which were taken from surgery.Results Nucleus pulpous and annulus fibrosus cells were efficiently transduced by the adenoviral vector carrying hTGF-β1 gene. The synthesis of proteoglycan and collagen increased compared with the control group (P<0.05). The metabolism of cells was slightly improved. No significant toxic effects were found.Conclusions Expression of hTGF-β1 gene is efficient to accelerates proteoglycan synthesis and thus accelerates the improvement of collagen. The function and structure of degenerative cells are improved. Ad/CMV-hTGF-β1 may be suitable for treating disc degeneration.

  12. Chitosan microspheres with an extracellular matrix-mimicking nanofibrous structure as cell-carrier building blocks for bottom-up cartilage tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Gao, Huai-Ling; Shen, Li-Li; Pan, Zhao; Mao, Li-Bo; Wu, Tao; He, Jia-Cai; Zou, Duo-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-12-01

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE) which closely mimic the physicochemical properties of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) have been proven to advantageously favor cell attachment, proliferation, migration and new tissue formation. Recently, as a valuable alternative, a bottom-up TE approach utilizing cell-loaded micrometer-scale modular components as building blocks to reconstruct a new tissue in vitro or in vivo has been proved to demonstrate a number of desirable advantages compared with the traditional bulk scaffold based top-down TE approach. Nevertheless, micro-components with an ECM-mimicking nanofibrous structure are still very scarce and highly desirable. Chitosan (CS), an accessible natural polymer, has demonstrated appealing intrinsic properties and promising application potential for TE, especially the cartilage tissue regeneration. According to this background, we report here the fabrication of chitosan microspheres with an ECM-mimicking nanofibrous structure for the first time based on a physical gelation process. By combining this physical fabrication procedure with microfluidic technology, uniform CS microspheres (CMS) with controlled nanofibrous microstructure and tunable sizes can be facilely obtained. Especially, no potentially toxic or denaturizing chemical crosslinking agent was introduced into the products. Notably, in vitro chondrocyte culture tests revealed that enhanced cell attachment and proliferation were realized, and a macroscopic 3D geometrically shaped cartilage-like composite can be easily constructed with the nanofibrous CMS (NCMS) and chondrocytes, which demonstrate significant application potential of NCMS as the bottom-up cell-carrier components for cartilage tissue engineering.Scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE) which closely mimic the physicochemical properties of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) have been proven to advantageously favor cell attachment, proliferation, migration and new tissue formation

  13. Reduced Expression of Cytoskeletal and Extracellular Matrix Genes in Human Adult Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Exposed to Simulated Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Corydon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Microgravity (µg has adverse effects on the eye of humans in space. The risk of visual impairment is therefore one of the leading health concerns for NASA. The impact of µg on human adult retinal epithelium (ARPE-19 cells is unknown. Methods: In this study we investigated the influence of simulated µg (s-µg; 5 and 10 days (d, using a Random Positioning Machine (RPM, on ARPE-19 cells. We performed phase-contrast/fluorescent microscopy, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and pathway analysis. Results: Following RPM-exposure a subset of ARPE-19 cells formed multicellular spheroids (MCS, whereas the majority of the cells remained adherent (AD. After 5d, alterations of F-actin and fibronectin were observed which reverted after 10d-exposure, suggesting a time-dependent adaptation to s-µg. Gene expression analysis of 12 genes involved in cell structure, shape, adhesion, migration, and angiogenesis suggested significant changes after a 10d-RPM-exposure. 11 genes were down-regulated in AD and MCS 10d-RPM-samples compared to 1g, whereas FLK1 was up-regulated in 5d- and 10d-RPM-MCS-samples. Similarly, TIMP1 was up-regulated in 5d-RPM-samples, whereas the remaining genes were down-regulated in 5d-RPM-samples. Western blotting revealed similar changes in VEGF, β-actin, laminin and fibronectin of 5d-RPM-samples compared to 10d, whereas different alterations of β-tubulin and vimentin were observed. The pathway analysis showed complementing effects of VEGF and integrin β-1. Conclusions: These findings clearly show that s-µg induces significant alterations in the F-actin-cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-related proteins of ARPE-19, in addition to changes in cell growth behavior and gene expression patterns involved in cell structure, growth, shape, migration, adhesion and angiogenesis.

  14. Influence of the coating with extracellular matrix and the number of cell passages on the endothelialization of a polystyrene surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, A; Fuhrmann, R; Jung, F; Franke, R P

    2015-01-01

    The proper morphology and function of the vascular endothelium are prerequisites for a sufficient supply of the tissues. Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction can lead to circulatory disorders and the development of cardiovascular diseases. The endothelialization of cardiovascular implants is a sophisticated task since EC miss their natural environment and physiological stimuli in vitro. In addition, different studies revealed that the EC behavior and morphology depended on the substrate and the passage number of the EC. Therefore, the comparison of endothelialization studies is very difficult, when passage and substrate are unknown.The aim of this study was to investigate the growth potential and cell morphology of human venous endothelial cells (HUVEC) as a function of different cell passages and different substrates (pristine polystyrene, tissue-typical ECM-coated polystyrene). The study revealed that HUVEC morphology and growth potential were significantly different on pristine polystyrene compared to the basal lamina-like ECM-coated polystyrene surface. Furthermore, it became obvious that the passage of the cells affected the endothelialization of the polystyrene surface significantly. In conclusion, this study emphasized the need for a critical consideration of EC data whereas a simple comparison of results is not possible if EC age and passage is unknown.

  15. Synthetic osteogenic extracellular matrix formed by coated silicon dioxide nanosprings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hass Jamie L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The design of biomimetic materials that parallel the morphology and biology of extracellular matrixes is key to the ability to grow functional tissues in vitro and to enhance the integration of biomaterial implants into existing tissues in vivo. Special attention has been put into mimicking the nanostructures of the extracellular matrix of bone, as there is a need to find biomaterials that can enhance the bonding between orthopedic devices and this tissue. Methods We have tested the ability of normal human osteoblasts to propagate and differentiate on silicon dioxide nanosprings, which can be easily grown on practically any surface. In addition, we tested different metals and metal alloys as coats for the nanosprings in tissue culture experiments with bone cells. Results Normal human osteoblasts grown on coated nanosprings exhibited an enhanced rate of propagation, differentiation into bone forming cells and mineralization. While osteoblasts did not attach effectively to bare nanowires grown on glass, these cells propagated successfully on nanosprings coated with titanium oxide and gold. We observed a 270 fold increase in the division rate of osteoblasts when grow on titanium/gold coated nanosprings. This effect was shown to be dependent on the nanosprings, as the coating by themselves did not alter the growth rate of osteoblast. We also observed that titanium/zinc/gold coated nanosprings increased the levels of osteoblast production of alkaline phosphatase seven folds. This result indicates that osteoblasts grown on this metal alloy coated nanosprings are differentiating to mature bone making cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, we showed that osteoblasts grown on the same metal alloy coated nanosprings have an enhanced ability to deposit calcium salt. Conclusion We have established that metal/metal alloy coated silicon dioxide nanosprings can be used as a biomimetic material paralleling the morphology and biology of

  16. Influence of radiographic contrast media on the nitric oxide release from human arterial and venous endothelial cells on extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, R P; Fuhrmann, R; Jung, F

    2013-01-01

    Radiographic contrast media (RCM) can vary widely in their physicochemical properties, e.g. the iodine concentration, osmolality, molecule structure, chemotoxicity, hydrophilicity, electric charge and viscosity. Besides the necessary effect of Roentgen ray absorption, which provides contrast-rich images of vessels, RCMs can have varying adverse effects. As one possible cause of microcirculatory disorders, changes in morphology and function of endothelial cells are discussed. Therefore, RCM media-induced release of nitric oxide from arterial as well as from venous endothelial cells in contact with two commercially available RCMs (Iodixanol and Iomeprol) was investigated. NO concentrations started to increase slightly in the HUVEC control cultures after 3 min incubation time, however, NO concentrations in the cultures incubated with Iomeprol 350 and Iodixanol 320 did not change over time (Iomeprol 350: p = 0.4905; Iodixanol 320: p = 0.784). On the whole, the time-dependent NO release differed for the three groups (RCM × time: p = 0.00224). This difference was due to the fact that, after incubation with the two contrast agents (Iodixanol 320: p = 0.0003; Iomeprol 350: p = 0.0168), less NO was released by the exposed HUVEC at 3 minutes and after 12 hours than by the control cells. In the control cultures of arterial endothelial cells as well as in cultures incubated with 30% v/v Iodixanol supplemented culture medium the NO release did not change. In those cultures of arterial endothelial cells supplemented with 30% v/v Iomeprol the NO release was significantly less than in control cultures and in cultures supplemented with Iodixanol (p = 0.021; p = 0.043). Inspite of a missing shear stress in our static plane vessel wall model there was a RCM-dependent difference in NO release from endothelial cells in vitro. The NO release from venous endothelial cells differed significantly from the NO release from arterial endothelial cells. While the administration of Iomeprol

  17. Estrogens increase the expression of fibulin-1, an extracellular matrix protein secreted by human ovarian cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clinton, GM; Rougeot, C; Derancourt, J; Roger, P; Defrenne, A; Godyna, S; Argraves, WS; Rochefort, H

    1996-01-01

    Ovarian cancers have a high ability to invade the peritoneal cavity and some are stimulated by estrogens, In an attempt to understand the mode of action of estrogens on these cancer cells and to develop new markers, we have characterized estrogen-regulated proteins, This study,vas aimed at identifyi

  18. FTIR imaging of the 3D extracellular matrix used to grow colonies of breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolina, Margarita; Goormaghtigh, Erik

    2016-01-21

    Infrared imaging was applied to investigate a reconstituted basement membrane, known as Matrigel, in three-dimensional cell cultures. Matrigel, in the vicinity of the colonies, was examined for four breast cancer cell lines presenting different 3D colony morphologies. MCF-7 and T-47D present mass colonies, SKBR-3 grape-like colonies and MDA-MB-231 stellate colonies associated with a more invasive phenotype. The edge of the cell colonies was found to be significantly depleted in Matrigel. Except in a limited number of cases, Matrigel appeared to be thinner at the edges of the colonies but not completely destroyed or torn off as it would be for a purely mechanical effect. When a PCA was run on the spectra of one or several colonies, the score images on PC#3 and PC#4 presented structures in the Matrigel areas which appeared as fringes, lines, dots or regular patterns. This effect represents a very small fraction of the total variance but is reproducible for all the 4 cell lines. PC#4 presents systematically a maximum near 1624 cm(-1) and a minimum around 1700 cm(-1). When spectra are normalized, the effect is less marked but does not disappear. The nature of the variations that exist in the Matrigel layer is therefore not solely related to thickness but also to the chemical composition. At this stage, the weakness of the effect prevents a thorough investigation.

  19. Reduced Expression of Cytoskeletal and Extracellular Matrix Genes in Human Adult Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Exposed to Simulated Microgravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corydon, Thomas J; Mann, Vivek; Slumstrup, Lasse;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Microgravity (µg) has adverse effects on the eye of humans in space. The risk of visual impairment is therefore one of the leading health concerns for NASA. The impact of µg on human adult retinal epithelium (ARPE-19) cells is unknown. METHODS: In this study we investigated the i...

  20. Micropatterning Extracellular Matrix Proteins on Electrospun Fibrous Substrate Promote Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation Toward Neurogenic Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaqiong; Wen, Feng; Chen, Huizhi; Pal, Mintu; Lai, Yuekun; Zhao, Allan Zijian; Tan, Lay Poh

    2016-01-13

    In this study, hybrid micropatterned grafts constructed via a combination of microcontact printing and electrospinning techniques process were utilized to investigate the influencing of patterning directions on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiation to desired phenotypes. We found that the stem cells could align and elongate along the direction of the micropattern, where they randomly distributed on nonmicropatterned surfaces. Concomitant with patterning effect of component on stem cell alignment, a commensurate increase on the expression of neural lineage commitment markers, such as microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2), Nestin, NeuroD1, and Class III β-Tubulin, were revealed from mRNA expression by quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR) and MAP2 expression by immunostaining. In addition, the effect of electrospun fiber orientation on cell behaviors was further examined. An angle of 45° between the direction of micropatterning and orientation of aligned fibers was verified to greatly prompt the outgrowth of filopodia and neurogenesis of hMSCs. This study demonstrates that the significance of hybrid components and electrospun fiber alignment in modulating cellular behavior and neurogenic lineage commitment of hMSCs, suggesting promising application of porous scaffolds with smart component and topography engineering in clinical regenerative medicine.

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ability to Generate Traction Stress in Response to Substrate Stiffness is Modulated by the Changing Extracellular Matrix Composition of the Heart During Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershlak, Joshua R.; Resnikoff, Joshua IN; Sullivan, Kelly E; Williams, Corin; Wang, Raymond M.; Black, Lauren D.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we present a novel method for studying cellular traction force generation and mechanotransduction in the context of cardiac development. Rat hearts from three distinct stage of development (fetal, neonatal and adult) were isolated, decellularized and characterized via mechanical testing and protein compositional analysis. Stiffness increased ~2 fold between fetal and neonatal time points but not between neonatal and adult. Composition of structural extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins was significantly different between all three developmental ages. ECM that was solubilized via pepsin digestion was cross-linked into polyacrylamide gels of varying stiffness and traction force microscopy was used to assess the ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to generate traction stress against the substrates. The response to increasing stiffness was significantly different depending on the developmental age of the ECM. An investigation into early cardiac differentiation of MSCs demonstrated a dependence of the level of expression of early cardiac transcription factors on the composition of the complex ECM. In summary, this study found that complex ECM composition plays an important role in modulating a cell’s ability to generate traction stress against a substrate, which is a significant component of mechanotransductive signaling. PMID:23994333

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-α and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand augment human macrophage foam-cell destruction of extracellular matrix through protease-mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Barascuk, Natasha; Larsen, Lise;

    2012-01-01

    component of extracellular matrix (ECM) in plaques, and to establish whether the pro-inflammatory molecules, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANK-L) increase this degradation. CD14+ monocytes isolated from peripheral blood were differentiated......% and 72%, respectively. This is, to our knowledge, the first data describing a simple in vitro system in which macrophage foam cells degradation of matrix proteins can be monitored. This degradation can be enhanced by cytokines since TNF-alpha and RANK-L significantly increased the matrix degradation...

  3. Inhibition of vimentin or B1 integrin reverts morphology of prostate tumor cells grown in laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels and reduces tumor growth in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xueping; Fournier, Marcia V; Ware, Joy L; Bissell, Mina J; Yacoub, Adly; Zehner, Zendra E

    2008-06-12

    Prostate epithelial cells grown embedded in laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) undergo morphologic changes that closely resemble their architecture in vivo. In this study, growth characteristics of three human prostate epithelial sublines derived from the same cellular lineage, but displaying different tumorigenic and metastatic properties in vivo, were assessed in three-dimensional lrECM gels. M12, a highly tumorigenic and metastatic subline, was derived from the immortalized, prostate epithelial P69 cell line by selection in athymic, nude mice and found to contain a deletion of 19p-q13.1. The stable reintroduction of an intact human chromosome 19 into M12 resulted in a poorly tumorigenic subline, designated F6. When embedded in lrECM gels, the parental, nontumorigenic P69 line produced acini with clearly defined lumena. Immunostaining with antibodies to {beta}-catenin, E-cadherin, or {alpha}6 and {beta}1 integrins showed polarization typical of glandular epithelium. In contrast, the metastatic M12 subline produced highly disorganized cells with no evidence of polarization. The F6 subline reverted to acini-like structures exhibiting basal polarity marked with integrins. Reducing either vimentin levels via small interfering RNA interference or the expression of {alpha}6 and {beta}1 integrins by the addition of blocking antibodies, reorganized the M12 subline into forming polarized acini. The loss of vimentin significantly reduced M12-Vim tumor growth when assessed by s.c. injection in athymic mice. Thus, tumorigenicity in vivo correlated with disorganized growth in three-dimensional lrECM gels. These studies suggest that the levels of vimentin and {beta}1 integrin play a key role in the homeostasis of the normal acinus in prostate and that their dysregulation may lead to tumorigenesis. [Mol Cancer Ther 2009;8(3):499-508].

  4. Targeting the extracellular matrix to disrupt cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freja Albjerg Venning

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multi-step process, with each step involving intricate cross-talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the extracellular matrix (ECM. Many ECM proteins are significantly de-regulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic cascade. In this review, the influence of several ECM proteins on these multiple steps of cancer spread is summarized. In addition, we highlight the promising (pre-clinical data showing benefits of targeting these ECM macromolecules to prevent cancer progression.

  5. Extracellular Matrix Components Regulate Cellular Polarity and Tissue Structure in the Developing and Mature Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Shweta; Hunter, Dale D; Brunken, William J

    2015-01-01

    While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed.

  6. Extracellular Matrix components regulate cellular polarity and tissue structure in the developing and mature Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed.

  7. Inflammatory Alterations of the Extracellular Matrix in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, Junko [Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Konno, Kenjiro [Department of Animal Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Itano, Naoki, E-mail: itanon@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2011-08-09

    Complex interactions between cancer cells and host stromal cells result in the formation of the “tumor microenvironment”, where inflammatory alterations involve the infiltration of tumor-associated fibroblasts and inflammatory leukocytes that contribute to the acquisition of malignant characteristics, such as increased cancer cell proliferation, invasiveness, metastasis, angiogenesis, and avoidance of adaptive immunity. The microenvironment of a solid tumor is comprised not only of cellular compartments, but also of bioactive substances, including cytokines, growth factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM can act as a scaffold for cell migration, a reservoir for cytokines and growth factors, and a signal through receptor binding. During inflammation, ECM components and their degraded fragments act directly and indirectly as inflammatory stimuli in certain cases and regulate the functions of inflammatory and immune cells. One such ECM component, hyaluronan, has recently been implicated to modulate innate immune cell function through pattern recognition toll-like receptors and accelerate the recruitment and activation of tumor-associated macrophages in inflamed cancers. Here, we will summarize the molecular mechanism linking inflammation with ECM remodeling in the tumor microenvironment, with a particular emphasis on the role of hyaluronan in controlling the inflammatory response.

  8. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ha Hwang

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  9. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jun-Ha; Byun, Mi Ran; Kim, A Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hang Jun; Lee, Yo Han; Kim, Juwon; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM) through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  10. Tailoring material properties of a nanofibrous extracellular matrix derived hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Todd D.; Lin, Stephen Y.; Christman, Karen L.

    2011-12-01

    In the native tissue, the interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, mechanical stability, and signaling. It has been shown that decellularized ECMs can be processed into injectable formulations, thereby allowing for minimally invasive delivery. Upon injection and increase in temperature, these materials self-assemble into porous gels forming a complex network of fibers with nanoscale structure. In this study we aimed to examine and tailor the material properties of a self-assembling ECM hydrogel derived from porcine myocardial tissue, which was developed as a tissue specific injectable scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The impact of gelation parameters on ECM hydrogels has not previously been explored. We examined how modulating pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration affected the nanoscale architecture, mechanical properties, and gelation kinetics. These material characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, rheometry, and spectrophotometry, respectively. Since the main component of the myocardial matrix is collagen, many similarities between the ECM hydrogel and collagen gels were observed in terms of the nanofibrous structure and modulation of properties by altering ionic strength. However, variation from collagen gels was noted for the gelation temperature along with varied times and rates of gelation. These discrepancies when compared to collagen are likely due to the presence of other ECM components in the decellularized ECM based hydrogel. These results demonstrate how the material properties of ECM hydrogels could be tailored for future in vitro and in vivo applications.

  11. Heparin prevents intracellular hyaluronan synthesis and autophagy responses in hyperglycemic dividing mesangial cells and activates synthesis of an extensive extracellular monocyte-adhesive hyaluronan matrix after completing cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aimin; Ren, Juan; Wang, Christina P; Hascall, Vincent C

    2014-03-28

    Growth-arrested rat mesangial cells (RMCs) at a G0/G1 interphase stimulated to divide in hyperglycemic medium initiate intracellular hyaluronan synthesis that induces autophagy/cyclin D3-induced formation of a monocyte-adhesive extracellular hyaluronan matrix after completing cell division. This study shows that heparin inhibits the intracellular hyaluronan synthesis and autophagy responses, but at the end of cell division it induces synthesis of a much larger extracellular monocyte-adhesive hyaluronan matrix. Heparin bound to RMC surfaces by 1 h, internalizes into the Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum region by 2 h, and was nearly gone by 4 h. Treatment by heparin for only the first 4 h was sufficient for its function. Streptozotocin diabetic rats treated daily with heparin showed similar results. Glomeruli in sections of diabetic kidneys showed extensive accumulation of autophagic RMCs, increased hyaluronan matrix, and influx of macrophages over 6 weeks. Hyaluronan staining in the glomeruli of heparin-treated diabetic rats was very high at week 1 and decreased to near control level by 6 weeks without any RMC autophagy. However, the influx of macrophages by 6 weeks was as pronounced as in diabetic glomeruli. The results are as follows: 1) heparin blocks synthesis of hyaluronan in intracellular compartments, which prevents the autophagy and cyclin D3 responses thereby allowing RMCs to complete cell division and sustain function; 2) interaction of heparin with RMCs in early G1 phase is sufficient to induce signaling pathway(s) for its functions; and 3) influxed macrophages effectively remove the hyaluronan matrix without inducing pro-fibrotic responses that lead to nephropathy and proteinurea in diabetic kidneys.

  12. 细胞外基质硬度调控间充质干细胞分化%Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Modulates the Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕洪伟; 李莉莎; 张银; 戎月; 陈志深; 杨子昊; 孙美玉; 李玉林

    2014-01-01

    新近研究表明,细胞外基质(extracellular matrix,ECM)的物理性质,特别是硬度或弹性,能对细胞的黏附、铺展、迁移、增殖、分化和凋亡等多种功能和行为产生重要影响.间充质干细胞(mesenchymal stem cells,MSCs)是组织工程和细胞治疗的理想种子细胞.ECM硬度可诱导MSCs向脂肪、软骨、神经、肌肉和骨等方向分化.该文综合论述了ECM硬度对干细胞分化的影响,涵盖了构建ECM硬度的测量、调控与表征等,不同培养条件下干细胞对硬度的响应和分化以及硬度和其他因素的联合作用;在此基础上,进一步论述了干细胞分化过程中细胞感应ECM硬度并转化为生物学信号的机制和信号通路.该文还总结了在ECM硬度调控干细胞分化行为领域最新的研究进展情况,较为系统地分析了材料学、细胞生物学、分子生物学水平的主要影响因素,并对本领域未来需要重点研究的问题进行了展望.

  13. RAGE and TGF-β1 Cross-Talk Regulate Extracellular Matrix Turnover and Cytokine Synthesis in AGEs Exposed Fibroblast Cells.

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    Andreea Iren Serban

    Full Text Available AGEs accumulation in the skin affects extracellular matrix (ECM turnover and triggers diabetes associated skin conditions and accelerated skin aging. The receptor of AGEs (RAGE has an essential contribution to cellular dysfunction driven by chronic inflammatory responses while TGF-β1 is critical in both dermal homeostasis and inflammation. We investigated the contribution of RAGE and TGF-β1 to the modulation of inflammatory response and ECM turnover in AGEs milieu, using a normal fibroblast cell line. RAGE, TGF-β1, collagen I and III gene and protein expression were upregulated after exposure to AGEs-BSA, and MMP-2 was activated. AGEs-RAGE was pivotal in NF-κB dependent collagen I expression and joined with TGF-β1 to stimulate collagen III expression, probably via ERK1/2 signaling. AGEs-RAGE axis induced upregulation of TGF-β1, TNF-α and IL-8 cytokines. TNF-α and IL-8 were subjected to TGF-β1 negative regulation. RAGE's proinflammatory signaling also antagonized AGEs-TGF-β1 induced fibroblast contraction, suggesting the existence of an inhibitory cross-talk mechanism between TGF-β1 and RAGE signaling. RAGE and TGF-β1 stimulated anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-2 and IL-4 expression. GM-CSF and IL-6 expression appeared to be dependent only on TGF-β1 signaling. Our data also indicated that IFN-γ upregulated in AGEs-BSA milieu in a RAGE and TGF-β1 independent mechanism. Our findings raise the possibility that RAGE and TGF-β1 are both involved in fibrosis development in a complex cross-talk mechanism, while also acting on their own individual targets. This study contributes to the understanding of impaired wound healing associated with diabetes complications.

  14. Urotensin II Induces ER Stress and EMT and Increase Extracellular Matrix Production in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cell in Early Diabetic Mice

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    Xin-Xin Pang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Urotensin II (UII and its receptor are highly expressed in the kidney tissue of patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN. The aim of this study is to examine the roles of UII in the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress and Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in DN in vivo and in vitro. Methods: Kidney tissues were collected from patients with DN. C57BL/6 mice and mice with UII receptor knock out were injected with two consecutive doses of streptozotocin to induce diabetes and were sacrificed at 3th week for in vivo study. HK-2 cells in vitro were cultured and treated with UII. Markers of ER stress and EMT, fibronectin and type IV collagen were detected by immunohistochemistry, real time PCR and western blot. Results: We found that the expressions of protein of UII, GRP78, CHOP, ALPHA-SMA, fibronectin and type IV collagen were upregulated while E-cadherin protein was downregulated as shown by immunohistochemistry or western blot analysis in kidney of diabetic mice in comparison to normal control; moreover expressions of GRP78, CHOP, ALPHA-SMA, fibronectin and type IV collagen were inhibited while E-caherin expression was enhanced in kidney in diabetic mice with UII receptor knock out in comparison to C57BL/6 diabetic mice. In HK-2 cells, UII induced upregulation of GRP78, CHOP, ALPHA-SMA, fibroblast-specifc protein 1(FSP-1, fibronectin and type collagen and downregulation of E-cadherin. UII receptor antagonist can block UII-induced ER stress and EMT; moreover, 4-PBA can inhibit the mRNA expression of ALPHA-SMA and FSP1 induced by UII in HK-2 cells. Conclusions: We are the first to verify UII induces ER stress and EMT and increase extracellular matrix production in renal tubular epithelial cell in early diabetic mice. Moreover, UII may induce renal tubular epithelial EMT via triggering ER stress pathway in vitro, which might be the new pathogenic pathway for the development of renal fibrosis in DN.

  15. C/EBP β Mediates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulated Inflammatory Response and Extracellular Matrix Degradation in LPS-Stimulated Human Periodontal Ligament Cells

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    Yudi Bai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an oral inflammatory disease that not only affects the integrity of local tooth-supporting tissues but also impacts systemic health. A compositional shift in oral microbiota has been considered as the main cause of periodontitis; however, the potential mechanism has not been fully defined. Herein, we investigated the role of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBP β, a member of the C/EBP family of transcription factors, in human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS. RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis showed that the expression of C/EBP β was significantly increased in hPDLCs stimulated with LPS stimuli. Overexpression of C/EBP β by the recombinant adenoviral vector pAd/C/EBP β markedly increased the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-8 and -9 in hPDLCs in response to LPS. Furthermore, the activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress was confirmed in LPS-stimulated hPDLCs by measuring the expression of the ER stress marker molecules protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK, eIF2α, GRP78/Bip, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP. The ER stress inhibitor salubrinal repressed, but inducer tunicamycin enhanced, the production of IL-6, IL-8, MMP-8, and MMP-9 in hPDLCs. Additionally, ER stress inducer tunicamycin significantly increased the expression level of C/EBP β in hPDLCs. Blocking of C/EBP β by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 and expression of MMP-8 and MMP-9 induced by tunicamycin treatment in hPDLCs. Taken together, ER stress appears to play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response and extracellular matrix (ECM degradation in hPDLCs in response to LPS stimuli by activating C/EBP β expression. This enhances our understanding of human periodontitis pathology.

  16. C/EBP β Mediates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulated Inflammatory Response and Extracellular Matrix Degradation in LPS-Stimulated Human Periodontal Ligament Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yudi; Wei, Yi; Wu, Lian; Wei, Jianhua; Wang, Xiaojing; Bai, Yuxiang

    2016-03-22

    Periodontitis is an oral inflammatory disease that not only affects the integrity of local tooth-supporting tissues but also impacts systemic health. A compositional shift in oral microbiota has been considered as the main cause of periodontitis; however, the potential mechanism has not been fully defined. Herein, we investigated the role of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBP β), a member of the C/EBP family of transcription factors, in human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis showed that the expression of C/EBP β was significantly increased in hPDLCs stimulated with LPS stimuli. Overexpression of C/EBP β by the recombinant adenoviral vector pAd/C/EBP β markedly increased the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-8 and -9 in hPDLCs in response to LPS. Furthermore, the activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was confirmed in LPS-stimulated hPDLCs by measuring the expression of the ER stress marker molecules protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK), eIF2α, GRP78/Bip, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). The ER stress inhibitor salubrinal repressed, but inducer tunicamycin enhanced, the production of IL-6, IL-8, MMP-8, and MMP-9 in hPDLCs. Additionally, ER stress inducer tunicamycin significantly increased the expression level of C/EBP β in hPDLCs. Blocking of C/EBP β by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 and expression of MMP-8 and MMP-9 induced by tunicamycin treatment in hPDLCs. Taken together, ER stress appears to play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in hPDLCs in response to LPS stimuli by activating C/EBP β expression. This enhances our understanding of human periodontitis pathology.

  17. Detection of extracellular matrix modification in cancer models with inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Graham L. C.; Azarin, Samira M.; Yi, Ji; Young, Scott T.; Ellis, Ronald; Bauer, Greta M.; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-10-01

    In cancer biology, there has been a recent effort to understand tumor formation in the context of the tissue microenvironment. In particular, recent progress has explored the mechanisms behind how changes in the cell-extracellular matrix ensemble influence progression of the disease. The extensive use of in vitro tissue culture models in simulant matrix has proven effective at studying such interactions, but modalities for non-invasively quantifying aspects of these systems are scant. We present the novel application of an imaging technique, Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography, for the non-destructive measurement of in vitro biological samples during matrix remodeling. Our findings indicate that the nanoscale-sensitive mass density correlation shape factor D of cancer cells increases in response to a more crosslinked matrix. We present a facile technique for the non-invasive, quantitative study of the micro- and nano-scale structure of the extracellular matrix and its host cells.

  18. The regulatory roles of small leucine-rich proteoglycans in extracellular matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shoujun; Birk, David E

    2013-05-01

    Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are involved in a variety of biological and pathological processes. This review focuses on their regulatory roles in matrix assembly. SLRPs have protein cores and hypervariable glycosylation with multivalent binding abilities. During development, differential interactions of SLRPs with other molecules result in tissue-specific spatial and temporal distributions. The changing expression patterns play a critical role in the regulation of tissue-specific matrix assembly and therefore tissue function. SLRPs play significant structural roles within extracellular matrices. In addition, they play regulatory roles in collagen fibril growth, fibril organization and extracellular matrix assembly. Moreover, they are involved in mediating cell-matrix interactions. Abnormal SLRP expression and/or structures result in dysfunctional extracellular matrices and pathophysiology. Altered expression of SLRPs has been found in many disease models, and structural deficiency also causes altered matrix assembly. SLRPs regulate assembly of the extracellular matrix, which defines the microenvironment, modulating both the extracellular matrix and cellular functions, with an impact on tissue function.

  19. Astrocytes as a source for Extracellular matrix molecules and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eWiese

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Research of the past 25 years has shown that astrocytes do more than participating and building up the blood brain barrier and detoxify the active synapse by reuptake of neurotransmitters and ions. Indeed, astrocytes express neurotransmitter receptors and, as a consequence, respond to stimuli. Deeper knowledge of the differentiation processes during development of the central nervous system (CNS might help explaining and even help treating neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and psychiatric disorders in which astrocytes have been shown to play a role. Astrocytes and oligodendrocytes develop from a multipotent stem cell that prior to this has produced primarily neuronal precursor cells. This switch towards the more astroglial differentiation is regulated by a change in receptor composition on the cell surface and responsiveness of the respective trophic factors Fibroblast growth factor (FGF and Epidermal growth factor (EGF. The glial precursor cell is driven into the astroglial direction by signaling molecules like Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs, and EGF. However, the early astrocytes influence their environment not only by releasing and responding to diverse soluble factors but also express a wide range of extracellular matrix (ECM molecules, in particular proteoglycans of the lectican family and tenascins. Lately these ECM molecules have been shown to participate in glial development. In this regard, especially the matrix protein Tenascin C (Tnc proved to be an important regulator of astrocyte precursor cell proliferation and migration during spinal cord development. On the other hand, ECM molecules expressed by reactive astrocytes are also known to act mostly in an inhibitory fashion under pathophysiological conditions. In this regard, we further summarize recent data concerning the role of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and Tnc under pathological

  20. Extracellular matrix stiffness dictates Wnt expression through integrin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jing; Zu, Yan; Li, Jing; Du, Shuyuan; Xu, Yipu; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Li; Wang, Zhao; Chien, Shu; Yang, Chun

    2016-02-08

    It is well established that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes and behaviors of many cell types. However, the mechanism underlying the sensing of mechanical cues and subsequent elasticity-triggered pathways remains largely unknown. We observed that stiff ECM significantly enhanced the expression level of several members of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in both bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and primary chondrocytes. The activation of β-catenin by stiff ECM is not dependent on Wnt signals but is elevated by the activation of integrin/ focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway. The accumulated β-catenin then bound to the wnt1 promoter region to up-regulate the gene transcription, thus constituting a positive feedback of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. With the amplifying effect of positive feedback, this integrin-activated β-catenin/Wnt pathway plays significant roles in mediating the enhancement of Wnt signal on stiff ECM and contributes to the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and primary chondrocyte phenotype maintenance. The present integrin-regulated Wnt1 expression and signaling contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell behaviors by ECM elasticity.

  1. Engineering 3D bio-artificial heart muscle: the acellular ventricular extracellular matrix model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nikita M; Tao, Ze-Wei; Mohamed, Mohamed A; Hogan, Matt K; Gutierrez, Laura; Birla, Ravi K

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies in left ventricular systolic dysfunction and end-stage heart failure include mechanical assist devices or transplant. The development of a tissue-engineered integrative platform would present a therapeutic option that overcomes the limitations associated with current treatment modalities. This study provides a foundation for the fabrication and preliminary viability of the acellular ventricular extracellular matrix (AVEM) model. Acellular ventricular extracellular matrix was fabricated by culturing 4 million rat neonatal cardiac cells around an excised acellular ventricular segment. Acellular ventricular extracellular matrix generated a maximum spontaneous contractile force of 388.3 μN and demonstrated a Frank-Starling relationship at varying pretensions. Histologic assessment displayed cell cohesion and adhesion within the AVEM as a result of passive cell seeding.

  2. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora B. Petropolis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I. This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited “freeze and run” migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular “home”—macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model.

  3. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marlise I; Hwang, Geelsu; Santos, Paulo H S; Campanella, Osvaldo H; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan) synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases.

  4. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise eKlein

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS, eDNA and lipoteichoic acid (LTA. EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases.

  5. Silicon and the plant extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea eGuerriero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si is one of the most abundant elements on earth. Although not considered essential for the growth and development of higher plants, it is nonetheless known to increase vigour and to play protective roles. Its protective effects include for instance alleviation of (abiotic stress damages and heavy metal toxicity. Si was shown to interact with several components of the plant cell walls in the form of silica (SiO2. In plants SiO2 promotes strengthening of the cell walls and provides increased mechanical support to the aerial parts. The relationship SiO2-plant cell wall has been well documented in monocots and pteridophytes, which are known Si accumulators, while much less is known on the interaction of Si with the cell walls of dicots. We here provide a concise up-to-date survey on the interaction between Si and plant cell wall components by focussing on cellulose, hemicelluloses, callose, pectins, lignin and proteins. We also describe the effects of Si on cell wall-related processes by discussing the published results in both monocots and dicots. We conclude our survey with a description of the possible mechanisms by which Si exerts priming in plants.

  6. Angiogenic Type I Collagen Extracellular Matrix Integrated with Recombinant Bacteriophages Displaying Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Junghyo; Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Hyun-Ji; Han, Sewoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Shin, Jisoo; Cho, Seung-Woo; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Seok

    2016-01-21

    Here, a growth-factor-integrated natural extracellular matrix of type I collagen is presented that induces angiogenesis. The developed matrix adapts type I collagen nanofibers integrated with synthetic colloidal particles of recombinant bacteriophages that display vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The integration is achieved during or after gelation of the type I collagen and the matrix enables spatial delivery of VEGF into a desired region. Endothelial cells that contact the VEGF are found to invade into the matrix to form tube-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, proving the angiogenic potential of the matrix.

  7. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

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    Angelo Colagiorgi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s. In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  8. Extracellular matrix proteins: A positive feedback loop in lung fibrosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer, M.E.; Boeijen, F.R.; Emson, C.L.; Turner, S.M.; Zandieh-Doulabi, B.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Smit, T.H.; Stoop, R.; Everts, V.

    2014-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix. This not only affects tissue architecture and function, but it also influences fibroblast behavior and thus disease progression. Here we describe the expression of elastin, type V collagen and tenascin C during the

  9. Printing three-dimensional tissue analogues with decellularized extracellular matrix bioink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Jang, Jinah; Ha, Dong-Heon; Won Kim, Sung; Rhie, Jong-Won; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Deok-Ho; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-06-01

    The ability to print and pattern all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) in three dimensions to generate structures similar to tissues is an exciting prospect of bioprinting. However, the majority of the matrix materials used so far for bioprinting cannot represent the complexity of natural extracellular matrix (ECM) and thus are unable to reconstitute the intrinsic cellular morphologies and functions. Here, we develop a method for the bioprinting of cell-laden constructs with novel decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) bioink capable of providing an optimized microenvironment conducive to the growth of three-dimensional structured tissue. We show the versatility and flexibility of the developed bioprinting process using tissue-specific dECM bioinks, including adipose, cartilage and heart tissues, capable of providing crucial cues for cells engraftment, survival and long-term function. We achieve high cell viability and functionality of the printed dECM structures using our bioprinting method.

  10. Adipose extracellular matrix remodelling in obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, De; Chun, Tae-Hwa; Kang, Li

    2016-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipose tissues undergoes constant remodelling to allow adipocytes and their precursor cells to change cell shape and function in adaptation to nutritional cues. Abnormal accumulation of ECM components and their modifiers in adipose tissues has been recently demonstrated to cause obesity-associated insulin resistance, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Integrins and other ECM receptors (e.g. CD44) that are expressed in adipose tissues have been shown to regulate insulin sensitivity. It is well understood that a hypoxic response is observed in adipose tissue expansion during obesity progression and that hypoxic response accelerates fibrosis and inflammation in white adipose tissues. The expansion of adipose tissues should require angiogenesis; however, the excess deposition of ECM limits the angiogenic response of white adipose tissues in obesity. While recent studies have focused on the metabolic consequences and the mechanisms of adipose tissue expansion and remodelling, little attention has been paid to the role played by the interaction between peri-adipocyte ECM and their cognate cell surface receptors. This review will address what is currently known about the roles played by adipose ECM, their modifiers, and ECM receptors in obesity and insulin resistance. Understanding how excess ECM deposition in the adipose tissue deteriorates insulin sensitivity would provide us hints to develop a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lung protection by inhalation of exogenous solubilized extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinglei; Ravikumar, Priya; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hsia, Connie C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) contains complex tissue-specific components that work in concert to promote tissue repair and constructive remodeling and has been used experimentally and clinically to accelerate epithelial wound repair, leading us to hypothesize that lung-derived ECM could mitigate acute lung injury. To explore the therapeutic potential of ECM for noninvasive delivery to the lung, we decellularized and solubilized porcine lung ECM, then characterized the composition, concentration, particle size and stability of the preparation. The ECM preparation at 3.2 mg/mL with average particle size <3 μm was tested in vitro on human A549 lung epithelial cells exposed to 95% O2 for 24 hours, and in vivo by tracheal instillation or nebulization into the lungs of rats exposed intermittently or continuously to 90% O2 for a cumulative 72 hours. Our results showed that the preparation was enriched in collagen, reduced in glycosaminoglycans, and contained various bioactive molecules. Particle size was concentration-dependent. Compared to the respective controls treated with cell culture medium in vitro or saline in vivo, ECM inhalation normalized cell survival and alveolar morphology, and reduced hyperoxia-induced apoptosis and oxidative damage. This proof-of-concept study established the methodology, feasibility and therapeutic potential of exogenous solubilized ECM for pulmonary cytoprotection, possibly as an adjunct or potentiator of conventional therapy. PMID:28151947

  12. Human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete the extracellular matrix protein, thrombospondin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, N E; Dixit, V M; Frazier, W A; Clark, R A

    1987-02-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP) a glycoprotein originally identified as the endogenous lectin of platelets, is also synthesized by fibroblasts, endothelial cells, pneumocytes, smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. Thrombospondin is subdivided into functional domains which bind specifically to heparin, fibronectin, collagen, and to specific cellular receptors. It is found within the basement membranes of kidney, lung, smooth muscle, and skin. Thus TSP may serve as an important link between cells and matrices. Thrombospondin also has been reported at the epidermal-dermal junction. We wished to determine whether human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete TSP. Pure human keratinocytes were grown in defined medium without fibroblast feeder layers. Immunofluorescent staining with either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal antibodies to human platelet TSP yielded specific granular staining within the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. Culture media and cellular lysates were harvested from cultures metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine. Trichloroacetic acid precipitation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and autoradiography revealed a major labeled band comigrating with purified platelet TSP in both the media and the cellular lysates. Immunoprecipitation with either the polyclonal or the monoclonal anti-TSP antibodies followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography identified this band as TSP. Thus keratinocytes in culture synthesize and secrete TSP. Thrombospondin may play an important role in epidermal interactions with extracellular matrix.

  13. Substrates with patterned extracellular matrix and subcellular stiffness gradients reveal local biomechanical responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-02-26

    A substrate fabrication process is developed to pattern both the extracellular matrix (ECM) and rigidity at sub-cellular spatial resolution. When growing cells on these substrates, it is found that cells respond locally in their cytoskeleton assembly. The presented method allows unique insight into the biological interpretation of mechanical signals, whereas photolithography-based fabrication is amenable to integration with complex microfabricated substructures.

  14. Symposium: Role of the extracellular matrix in mammary development. Regulation of milk protein and basement membrane gene expression: The influence of the extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggeler, J.; Park, C.S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1988-10-01

    Synthesis and secretion of milk proteins ({alpha}-casein, {beta}-casein, {gamma}-casein, and transferrin) by cultured primary mouse mammary epithelial cells is modulated by the extracellular matrix. In cells grown on released or floating type I collagen gels, mRNA for {beta}-casein and transferrin is increased as much as 30-fold over cells grown on plastic. Induction of {beta}-casein expression depends strongly on the presence of lactogenic hormones, especially prolactin, in the culture. When cells are plated onto partially purified reconstituted basement membrane, dramatic changes in morphology and milk protein gene expression are observed. Cells cultured on the matrix for 6 to 8 d in the presence of prolactin, insulin, and hydrocortisone form hollow spheres and duct-like structures that are completely surrounded by matrix. The cells lining these spheres appear actively secretory and are oriented with their apices facing the lumen. Hybridization experiments indicate that mRNA for {beta}-casein can be increased as much as 70-fold in these cultures. Because > 90% of the cultured cells synthesize immunoreactive {beta}-casein, as compared with only 40% of cells in the late pregnant gland, the matrix appears to be able to induce protein expression in previously silent cells. Synthesis of laminin and assembly of a mammary-specific basal lamina by cells cultured on different extracellular matrices also appears to depend on the presence of lactogenic hormones. These studies provide support for the concept of dynamic reciprocity in which complex interactions between extracellular matrix and the cellular cytoskeleton contribute to the induction and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression in the mammary gland.

  15. Basic Components of Connective Tissues and Extracellular Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halper, Jaroslava; Kjær, Michael

    2014-01-01

    of the extracellular matrix in soft tissues. Some of these are reviewed in this chapter. Besides their basic structure, biochemistry and physiology, their roles in disorders of soft tissues are discussed only briefly as most chapters in this volume deal with relevant individual compounds. Fibronectin with its...... network. Laminins contribute to the structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and modulate cellular functions such as adhesion, differentiation, migration, stability of phenotype, and resistance towards apoptosis. Though the primary role of fibrinogen is in clot formation, after conversion to fibrin...... and TGFβ activity was observed in fibrotic skin disorders such as keloids and scleroderma. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) or thrombospondin-5 is primarily present in the cartilage. High levels of COMP are present in fibrotic scars and systemic sclerosis of the skin, and in tendon, especially...

  16. Extracellular matrix in canine mammary tumors with special focus on versican, a versatile extracellular proteoglycan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdélyi, Ildikó

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) research has become fundamental to understand cancer. This thesis focuses on the exploration of ECM composition and organization in canine mammary tumors, with a special interest in the large chondroitin-sulfate proteoglycan (PG), versican. Chapter 1 gives an overvie

  17. Tissue-Specific Effects of Esophageal Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Timothy J; DeWard, Aaron; Londono, Ricardo; Saldin, Lindsey T; Castleton, Arthur A; Carey, Lisa; Nieponice, Alejandro; Lagasse, Eric; Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-09-01

    Biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been used to facilitate repair or remodeling of numerous tissues, including the esophagus. The theoretically ideal scaffold for tissue repair is the ECM derived from the particular tissue to be treated, that is, site-specific or homologous ECM. The preference or potential advantage for the use of site-specific ECM remains unknown in the esophageal location. The objective of the present study was to characterize the in vitro cellular response and in vivo host response to a homologous esophageal ECM (eECM) versus nonhomologous ECMs derived from small intestinal submucosa and urinary bladder. The in vitro response of esophageal stem cells was characterized by migration, proliferation, and three-dimensional (3D) organoid formation assays. The in vivo remodeling response was evaluated in a rat model of esophageal mucosal resection. Results of the study showed that the eECM retains favorable tissue-specific characteristics that enhance the migration of esophageal stem cells and supports the formation of 3D organoids to a greater extent than heterologous ECMs. Implantation of eECM facilitates the remodeling of esophageal mucosa following mucosal resection, but no distinct advantage versus heterologous ECM could be identified.

  18. Extracellular matrix, mechanotransduction and structural hierarchies in heart tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kevin K; Ingber, Donald E

    2007-08-29

    The spatial and temporal scales of cardiac organogenesis and pathogenesis make engineering of artificial heart tissue a daunting challenge. The temporal scales range from nanosecond conformational changes responsible for ion channel opening to fibrillation which occurs over seconds and can lead to death. Spatial scales range from nanometre pore sizes in membrane channels and gap junctions to the metre length scale of the whole cardiovascular system in a living patient. Synchrony over these scales requires a hierarchy of control mechanisms that are governed by a single common principle: integration of structure and function. To ensure that the function of ion channels and contraction of muscle cells lead to changes in heart chamber volume, an elegant choreography of metabolic, electrical and mechanical events are executed by protein networks composed of extracellular matrix, transmembrane integrin receptors and cytoskeleton which are functionally connected across all size scales. These structural control networks are mechanoresponsive, and they process mechanical and chemical signals in a massively parallel fashion, while also serving as a bidirectional circuit for information flow. This review explores how these hierarchical structural networks regulate the form and function of living cells and tissues, as well as how microfabrication techniques can be used to probe this structural control mechanism that maintains metabolic supply, electrical activation and mechanical pumping of heart muscle. Through this process, we delineate various design principles that may be useful for engineering artificial heart tissue in the future.

  19. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M; Kerwin, James; Guerrero, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen, can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24-h biofilms, two were found only in 96-h biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation.

  20. Elastic fiber formation: a dynamic view of extracellular matrix assembly using timer reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A; Rongish, Brenda J; Czirok, Andras; Zach, Julia; Little, Charles D; Davis, Elaine C; Knutsen, Russell H; Wagenseil, Jessica E; Levy, Marilyn A; Mecham, Robert P

    2006-04-01

    To study the dynamics of elastic fiber assembly, mammalian cells were transfected with a cDNA construct encoding bovine tropoelastin in frame with the Timer reporter. Timer is a derivative of the DsRed fluorescent protein that changes from green to red over time and, hence, can be used to distinguish new from old elastin. Using dynamic imaging microscopy, we found that the first step in elastic fiber formation is the appearance of small cell surface-associated elastin globules that increased in size with time (microassembly). The elastin globules are eventually transferred to pre-existing elastic fibers in the extracellular matrix where they coalesce into larger structures (macroassembly). Mechanical forces associated with cell movement help shape the forming, extracellular elastic fiber network. Time-lapse imaging combined with the use of Timer constructs provides unique tools for studying the temporal and spatial aspects of extracellular matrix formation by live cells.

  1. Expression Patterns of Extracellular Matrix Proteins during Posterior Commissure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanic, Karen; Saldivia, Natalia; Förstera, Benjamín; Torrejón, Marcela; Montecinos, Hernán; Caprile, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules are pivotal for central nervous system (CNS) development, facilitating cell migration, axonal growth, myelination, dendritic spine formation, and synaptic plasticity, among other processes. During axon guidance, the ECM not only acts as a permissive or non-permissive substrate for navigating axons, but also modulates the effects of classical guidance cues, such as netrin or Eph/ephrin family members. Despite being highly important, little is known about the expression of ECM molecules during CNS development. Therefore, this study assessed the molecular expression patterns of tenascin, HNK-1, laminin, fibronectin, perlecan, decorin, and osteopontin along chick embryo prosomere 1 during posterior commissure development. The posterior commissure is the first transversal axonal tract of the embryonic vertebrate brain. Located in the dorso-caudal portion of prosomere 1, posterior commissure axons primarily arise from the neurons of basal pretectal nuclei that run dorsally to the roof plate midline, where some turn toward the ipsilateral side. Expressional analysis of ECM molecules in this area these revealed to be highly arranged, and molecule interactions with axon fascicles suggested involvement in processes other than structural support. In particular, tenascin and the HNK-1 epitope extended in ventro-dorsal columns and enclosed axons during navigation to the roof plate. Laminin and osteopontin were expressed in the midline, very close to axons that at this point must decide between extending to the contralateral side or turning to the ipsilateral side. Finally, fibronectin, decorin, and perlecan appeared unrelated to axonal pathfinding in this region and were instead restricted to the external limiting membrane. In summary, the present report provides evidence for an intricate expression of different extracellular molecules that may cooperate in guiding posterior commissure axons. PMID:27733818

  2. Expression Patterns of Extracellular Matrix Proteins during Posterior Commissure Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Stanic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM molecules are pivotal for central nervous system development, facilitating cell migration, axonal growth, myelination, dendritic spine formation, and synaptic plasticity, among other processes. During axonal guidance, the ECM not only acts as a permissive or non-permissive substrate for navigating axons, but also modulates the effects of classical guidance cues, such as netrin or Eph/ephrin family members. Despite being highly important, little is known about the expression of ECM molecules during central nervous system development. Therefore, this study assessed the molecular expression patterns of tenascin, HNK-1, laminin, fibronectin, perlecan, decorin, and osteopontin along chick embryo prosomere 1 during posterior commissure development. The posterior commissure is the first transversal axonal tract of the embryonic vertebrate brain. Located in the dorso-caudal portion of prosomere 1, posterior commissure axons primarily arise from the neurons of basal pretectal nuclei that run dorsally to the roof plate midline, where some turn towards the ipsilateral side. Expressional analysis of ECM molecules in this area these revealed to be highly arranged, and molecule interactions with axon fascicles suggested involvement in processes other than structural support. In particular, tenascin and the HNK-1 epitope extended in ventro-dorsal columns and enclosed axons during navigation to the roof plate. Laminin and osteopontin were expressed in the midline, very close to axons that at this point must decide between extending to the contralateral side or turning to the ipsilateral side. Finally, fibronectin, decorin, and perlecan appeared unrelated to axonal pathfinding in this region and were instead restricted to the external limiting membrane. In summary, the present report provides evidence for an intricate expression of different extracellular molecules that may cooperate in guiding posterior commissure axons.

  3. Matricryptins and matrikines: biologically active fragments of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Salza, Romain

    2014-07-01

    Numerous extracellular proteins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) undergo limited enzymatic cleavage resulting in the release of fragments exerting biological activities, which are usually different from those of the full-length molecules. In this review, we define matrikines and matricryptins, which are bioactive fragments released from the extracellular matrix proteins, proteoglycans and GAGs and report their major biological activities. These fragments regulate a number of physiopathological processes including angiogenesis, cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases and wound healing. The challenges to translate these fragments from molecules biologically active in vitro and in experimental models to potential drugs are discussed in the last part of the review.

  4. Conjugation of extracellular matrix proteins to basal lamina analogs enhances keratinocyte attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Katie A; Downing, Brett R; Walsh, Sarah E; Pins, George D

    2007-02-01

    The dermal-epidermal junction of skin contains extracellular matrix proteins that are involved in initiating and controlling keratinocyte signaling events such as attachment, proliferation, and terminal differentiation. To characterize the relationship between extracellular matrix proteins and keratinocyte attachment, a biomimetic design approach was used to precisely tailor the surface of basal lamina analogs with biochemistries that emulate the native biochemical composition found at the dermal-epidermal junction. A high-throughput screening device was developed by our laboratory that allows for the simultaneous investigation of the conjugation of individual extracellular matrix proteins (e.g. collagen type I, collagen type IV, laminin, or fibronectin) as well as their effect on keratinocyte attachment, on the surface of an implantable collagen membrane. Fluorescence microscopy coupled with quantitative digital image analyses indicated that the extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to the collagen-GAG membranes in a dose-dependent manner. To determine the relationship between extracellular matrix protein signaling cues and keratinocyte attachment, cells were seeded on protein-conjugated collagen-GAG membranes and a tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay was used to quantify viable keratinocyte attachment. Our results indicate that keratinocyte attachment was significantly enhanced on the surfaces of collagen membranes that were conjugated with fibronectin and type IV collagen. These findings define a set of design parameters that will enhance keratinocyte binding efficiency on the surface of collagen membranes and ultimately improve the rate of epithelialization for dermal equivalents.

  5. Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Synergistically Activate Apoptosis in a p21-Dependent Mechanism in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 Cancer Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dzobo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumour microenvironment plays a crucial role in tumour progression and comprises tumour stroma which is made up of different cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are part of the tumour stroma and may have conflicting effects on tumour growth. In this study we investigated the effect of Wharton’s Jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs and a fibroblast-derived ECM (fd-ECM on esophageal (WHCO1 and breast (MDA MB 231 cancer cells in vitro. Both WJ-MSCs and the fd-ECM, alone or in combination, downregulate PCNA, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and MMPs and upregulate p53 and p21. p21 induction resulted in G2 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data suggest that p21 induction is via p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 cells, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor, Akt, and Nodal pathways were downregulated in cancer cells cocultured with WJ-MSCs. We also demonstrate that WJ-MSCs effects on cancer cells appear to be short-lived whilst the fd-ECM effect is long-lived. This study shows the influence of tumour microenvironment on cancer cell behaviour and provides alternative therapeutic targets for potential regulation of tumour cells.

  6. Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Synergistically Activate Apoptosis in a p21-Dependent Mechanism in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzobo, Kevin; Vogelsang, Matjaz; Thomford, Nicholas E; Dandara, Collet; Kallmeyer, Karlien; Pepper, Michael S; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment plays a crucial role in tumour progression and comprises tumour stroma which is made up of different cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are part of the tumour stroma and may have conflicting effects on tumour growth. In this study we investigated the effect of Wharton's Jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs) and a fibroblast-derived ECM (fd-ECM) on esophageal (WHCO1) and breast (MDA MB 231) cancer cells in vitro. Both WJ-MSCs and the fd-ECM, alone or in combination, downregulate PCNA, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and MMPs and upregulate p53 and p21. p21 induction resulted in G2 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data suggest that p21 induction is via p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 cells, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor, Akt, and Nodal pathways were downregulated in cancer cells cocultured with WJ-MSCs. We also demonstrate that WJ-MSCs effects on cancer cells appear to be short-lived whilst the fd-ECM effect is long-lived. This study shows the influence of tumour microenvironment on cancer cell behaviour and provides alternative therapeutic targets for potential regulation of tumour cells.

  7. Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, R K; Bissell, M J

    2000-06-01

    The changes in tissue architecture that accompany the development of breast cancer have been the focus of investigations aimed at developing new cancer therapeutics. As we learn more about the normal mammary gland, we have begun to understand the complex signaling pathways underlying the dramatic shifts in the structure and function of breast tissue. Integrin-, growth factor-, and steroid hormone-signaling pathways all play an important part in maintaining tissue architecture; disruption of the delicate balance of signaling results in dramatic changes in the way cells interact with each other and with the extracellular matrix, leading to breast cancer. The extracellular matrix itself plays a central role in coordinating these signaling processes. In this review, we consider the interrelationships between the extracellular matrix, integrins, growth factors, and steroid hormones in mammary gland development and function.

  8. Adherence of extracellular matrix components to modified surfaces of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, C.; Uhlmann, E.; Meinke, M.; Lademann, J.; Hansen, U.

    2009-04-01

    The adherence of biological materials on metal surfaces is of special importance in biology and medicine. The underlying interactions between surface and biological materials (e.g. extracellular matrix components or cells) are responsible for the application as a medical device. Numerous products are made of pure titanium and titanium alloys. This paper shows the influence of a laser production technology on machined surfaces of TiAl6V4 and the resulting adherence of biological material on the basis of the surface characterisation. In this study, different machined TiAl6V4 surfaces were used for coatings with extracellular matrix components. For this process, different coating with collagen I monomers and a complex mixture of extracellular matrix proteins derived from the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone were analysed. The efficiency of the coating was analysed by different methods and the results are presented in this paper.

  9. Chemical Decellularization Methods and Its Effects on Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Akbari Zahmati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Extracellular matrix (ECM produced by tissue decellularization processes as a biological scaffold due to its unique properties compared to other scaffolds for migration and implantation of stem cells have been used successfully in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in the last years. The objective of this manuscript was to provide an overview of the chemical decellularization methods, evaluation of decellularized ECM and the potential effect of the chemical decellularization agents on the biochemical composition. Methods: We searched in Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct. The literature search was done by using the following keywords: “ECM, biologic scaffold, decellularization, chemical methods, tissue engineering.” We selected articles have been published from 2000 to 2016, and 15 full texts and 97 abstracts were reviewed. Results:Employing an optimization method to minimize damage to the ECM ultrastructure as for a result of the lack of reduction in mechanical properties and also the preservation of essential proteins such as laminin, fibronectin, Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, growth factor is required. Various methods include chemical, physical and enzymatic technics were studied. However, on each of these methods can have undesirable effects on ECM. Conclusion: It is suggested that instead of the Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS which have high strength degradation, we can use zwitterionic separately or in combination with SDS. Tributyl phosphate (TBP due to its unique properties can be used in decellularization process.

  10. Collagens and proteoglycans of the corneal extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.M. Michelacci

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is a curved and transparent structure that provides the initial focusing of a light image into the eye. It consists of a central stroma that constitutes 90% of the corneal depth, covered anteriorly with epithelium and posteriorly with endothelium. Its transparency is the result of the regular spacing of collagen fibers with remarkably uniform diameter and interfibrillar space. Corneal collagen is composed of heterotypic fibrils consisting of type I and type V collagen molecules. The cornea also contains unusually high amounts of type VI collagen, which form microfibrillar structures, FACIT collagens (XII and XIV, and other nonfibrillar collagens (XIII and XVIII. FACIT collagens and other molecules, such as leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, play important roles in modifying the structure and function of collagen fibrils.Proteoglycans are macromolecules composed of a protein core with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan side chains. Four leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans are present in the extracellular matrix of corneal stroma: decorin, lumican, mimecan and keratocan. The first is a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, and the other three are keratan sulfate proteoglycans. Experimental evidence indicates that the keratan sulfate proteoglycans are involved in the regulation of collagen fibril diameter, and dermatan sulfate proteoglycan participates in the control of interfibrillar spacing and in the lamellar adhesion properties of corneal collagens. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are minor components of the cornea, and are synthesized mainly by epithelial cells. The effect of injuries on proteoglycan synthesis is discussed.

  11. Separation Anxiety: Detachment from the Extracellular Matrix Induces Metabolic Changes that Can Stimulate Tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena A. Cichon; Derek C. Radisky

    2010-01-01

    @@ One of the earliest stages of tumor progression involves the ability of cells to survive and proliferate when not attached to the extracellular matrix (ECM). New research using a physiologically relevant breast cancer model reveals how separation from the ECM stimulates metabolic changes characteristic of developing tumors.

  12. Connective tissue growth factor induces extracellular matrix in asthmatic airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Peter R A; Burgess, Janette K; Ge, Qi; Poniris, Maree; Boustany, Sarah; Twigg, Stephen M; Black, Judith L

    2006-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and connective tissue growth factor may be implicated in extracellular matrix protein deposition in asthma. We have recently reported that TGF-beta increased connective tissue growth factor expression in airway smooth muscle cells isolated from patients with ast

  13. Upregulation of ATG3 contributes to autophagy induced by the detachment of intestinal epithelial cells from the extracellular matrix, but promotes autophagy-independent apoptosis of the attached cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byong Hoon; Zagryazhskaya, Anna; Li, Yongling; Koomson, Ananda; Khan, Iman Aftab; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji; Rosen, Kirill V

    2015-01-01

    Detachment of nonmalignant intestinal epithelial cells from the extracellular matrix (ECM) triggers their growth arrest and, ultimately, apoptosis. In contrast, colorectal cancer cells can grow without attachment to the ECM. This ability is critical for their malignant potential. We found previously that detachment-induced growth arrest of nonmalignant intestinal epithelial cells is driven by their detachment-triggered autophagy, and that RAS, a major oncogene, promotes growth of detached cells by blocking such autophagy. In an effort to identify the mechanisms of detachment-induced autophagy and growth arrest of nonmalignant cells we found here that detachment of these cells causes upregulation of ATG3 and that ATG3 upregulation contributes to autophagy and growth arrest of detached cells. We also observed that when ATG3 expression is artificially increased in the attached cells, ATG3 promotes neither autophagy nor growth arrest but triggers their apoptosis. ATG3 upregulation likely promotes autophagy of the detached but not that of the attached cells because detachment-dependent autophagy requires other detachment-induced events, such as the upregulation of ATG7. We further observed that those few adherent cells that do not die by apoptosis induced by ATG3 become resistant to apoptosis caused by cell detachment, a property that is critical for the ability of normal epithelial cells to become malignant. We conclude that cell-ECM adhesion can switch ATG3 functions: when upregulated in detached cells in the context of other autophagy-promoting events, ATG3 contributes to autophagy. However, when overexpressed in the adherent cells, in the circumstances not favoring autophagy, ATG3 triggers apoptosis.

  14. Traction Force Microscopy in 3-Dimensional Extracellular Matrix Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cóndor, M; Steinwachs, J; Mark, C; García-Aznar, J M; Fabry, B

    2017-06-19

    Cell migration through a three-dimensional (3-D) matrix depends strongly on the ability of cells to generate traction forces. To overcome the steric hindrance of the matrix, cells need to generate sufficiently high traction forces but also need to distribute these forces spatially in a migration-promoting way. This unit describes a protocol to measure spatial maps of cell traction forces in 3-D biopolymer networks such as collagen, fibrin, or Matrigel. Traction forces are computed from the relationship between measured force-induced matrix deformations surrounding the cell and the known mechanical properties of the matrix. The method does not rely on knowledge of the cell surface coordinates and takes nonlinear mechanical properties of the matrix into account. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Supercritical carbon dioxide extracted extracellular matrix material from adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun Kit; Luo, Baiwen; Guneta, Vipra; Li, Liang; Foo, Selin Ee Min; Dai, Yun; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Tan, Nguan Soon; Choong, Cleo; Wong, Marcus Thien Chong

    2017-06-01

    Adipose tissue is a rich source of extracellular matrix (ECM) material that can be isolated by delipidating and decellularizing the tissue. However, the current delipidation and decellularization methods either involve tedious and lengthy processes or require toxic chemicals, which may result in the elimination of vital proteins and growth factors found in the ECM. Hence, an alternative delipidation and decellularization method for adipose tissue was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) that eliminates the need of any harsh chemicals and also reduces the amount of processing time required. The resultant SC-CO2-treated ECM material showed an absence of nuclear content but the preservation of key proteins such as collagen Type I, collagen Type III, collagen Type IV, elastin, fibronectin and laminin. In addition, other biological factors such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also retained. Subsequently, the resulting SC-CO2-treated ECM material was used as a bioactive coating on tissue culture plastic (TCP). Four different cell types including adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), immortalized human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1) were used in this study to show that the SC-CO2-treated ECM coating can be potentially used for various biomedical applications. The SC-CO2-treated ECM material showed improved cell-material interactions for all cell types tested. In addition, in vitro scratch wound assay using HaCaT cells showed that the presence of SC-CO2-treated ECM material enhanced keratinocyte migration whilst the in vitro cellular studies using THP-1-derived macrophages showed that the SC-CO2-treated ECM material did not evoke pro-inflammatory responses from the THP-1-derived macrophages. Overall, this study shows the efficacy of SC-CO2

  16. Extracellular matrix proteomics identifies molecular signature of symptomatic carotid plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Sarah R.; Willeit, Karin; Didangelos, Athanasios; Matic, Ljubica Perisic; Skroblin, Philipp; Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Lengquist, Mariette; Rungger, Gregor; Kapustin, Alexander; Kedenko, Ludmilla; Molenaar, Chris; Lu, Ruifang; Barwari, Temo; Suna, Gonca; Iglseder, Bernhard; Paulweber, Bernhard; Willeit, Peter; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Davies, Alun H.; Monaco, Claudia; Hedin, Ulf; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The identification of patients with high-risk atherosclerotic plaques prior to the manifestation of clinical events remains challenging. Recent findings question histology- and imaging-based definitions of the “vulnerable plaque,” necessitating an improved approach for predicting onset of symptoms. METHODS. We performed a proteomics comparison of the vascular extracellular matrix and associated molecules in human carotid endarterectomy specimens from 6 symptomatic versus 6 asymptomatic patients to identify a protein signature for high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Proteomics data were integrated with gene expression profiling of 121 carotid endarterectomies and an analysis of protein secretion by lipid-loaded human vascular smooth muscle cells. Finally, epidemiological validation of candidate biomarkers was performed in two community-based studies. RESULTS. Proteomics and at least one of the other two approaches identified a molecular signature of plaques from symptomatic patients that comprised matrix metalloproteinase 9, chitinase 3-like-1, S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100A8), S100A9, cathepsin B, fibronectin, and galectin-3-binding protein. Biomarker candidates measured in 685 subjects in the Bruneck study were associated with progression to advanced atherosclerosis and incidence of cardiovascular disease over a 10-year follow-up period. A 4-biomarker signature (matrix metalloproteinase 9, S100A8/S100A9, cathepsin D, and galectin-3-binding protein) improved risk prediction and was successfully replicated in an independent cohort, the SAPHIR study. CONCLUSION. The identified 4-biomarker signature may improve risk prediction and diagnostics for the management of cardiovascular disease. Further, our study highlights the strength of tissue-based proteomics for biomarker discovery. FUNDING. UK: British Heart Foundation (BHF); King’s BHF Center; and the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Center based at Guy’s and St

  17. Incorporation of Tenascin-C into the Extracellular Matrix by Periostin Underlies an Extracellular Meshwork Architecture*

    OpenAIRE

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C...

  18. Inhibition of Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cell Migration by Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1-small Hairpin RNA Through Inhibiting Epithelial-mesenchymal Transition,Extracellular Matrix Degradation, and Src Phosphorylation In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Zhang; Ge Cui; Yun-Liang Yao; Yue Guo; Qi-Chun Wang; Xi-Ning Li; Wen-Ming Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background:Protein arginine methyltransferases 1 (PRMT1) is over-expressed in a variety of cancers,including lung cancer,and is correlated with a poor prognosis of tumor development.This study aimed to investigate the role of PRMT1 in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) migration in vitro.Methods:In this study,PRMT1 expression in the NSCLC cell line A549 was silenced using lentiviral vector-mediated short hairpin RNAs.Cell migration was measured using both scratch wound healing and transwell cell migration assays.The mRNA expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitor ofmetalloproteinase 1,2 (TIMP l,2) were measured using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.The expression levels of protein markers for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) (E-cadherin,N-cadherin),focal adhesion kinase (FAK),Src,AKT,and their corresponding phosphorylated states were detected by Western blot.Results:Cell migration was significantly inhibited in the PRMT1 silenced group compared to the control group.The mRNA expression of MMP-2 decreased while TIMP 1 and TIMP2 increased significantly.E-cadherin mRNA expression also increased while N-cadherin decreased.Only phosphorylated Src levels decreased in the silenced group while FAK or AKT remained unchanged.Conclusions:PRMT1-small hairpin RNA inhibits the migration abilities of NSCLC A549 cells by inhibiting EMT,extracellular matrix degradation,and Src phosphorylation in vitro.

  19. Extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trappetti

    Full Text Available During infection, pneumococci exist mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. However, relatively little is known about how biofilms contribute to pneumococcal pathogenesis. Here, we carried out a biofilm assay on opaque and transparent variants of a clinical serotype 19F strain WCH159. After 4 days incubation, scanning electron microscopy revealed that opaque biofilm bacteria produced an extracellular matrix, whereas the transparent variant did not. The opaque biofilm-derived bacteria translocated from the nasopharynx to the lungs and brain of mice, and showed 100-fold greater in vitro adherence to A549 cells than transparent bacteria. Microarray analysis of planktonic and sessile bacteria from transparent and opaque variants showed differential gene expression in two operons: the lic operon, which is involved in choline uptake, and in the two-component system, ciaRH. Mutants of these genes did not form an extracellular matrix, could not translocate from the nasopharynx to the lungs or the brain, and adhered poorly to A549 cells. We conclude that only the opaque phenotype is able to form extracellular matrix, and that the lic operon and ciaRH contribute to this process. We propose that during infection, extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of pneumococci to cause invasive disease.

  20. Biotensegrity of the extracellular matrix: physiology, dynamic mechanical balance and implications in oncology and mechanotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eTadeo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells have the capacity to convert mechanical stimuli into chemical changes. This process is based on the tensegrity principle, a mechanism of tensional integrity. To date, this principle has been demonstrated to act in physiological processes such as mechanotransduction and mechanosensing at different scales (from cell sensing through integrins to molecular mechanical interventions or even localized massage. The process involves intra- and extracellular components, including the participation of extracellular matrix and microtubules that act as compression structures, and actin filaments, which act as tension structures. The nucleus itself has its own tensegrity system which is implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Despite present advances, only the tip of the iceberg has so far been uncovered regarding the role of extracellular matrix compounds in influencing biotensegrity in pathological processes. Groups of cells, together with the surrounding ground substance, are subject to different and specific forces which certainly influence biological processes. In this paper we review the current knowledge on the role of extracellular matrix elements in determining biotensegrity in malignant processes, and describe their implication in therapeutic response, resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and subsequent tumor progression. Original data based on the study of neuroblastic tumors will be provided.

  1. How Osteoblasts Sense their Environment: Integrin-Extracellular Matrix Interactions and Mechanical Loading of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Ruth K.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Osteoblasts are the cells responsible for forming and replacing bone throughout life. We know that mechanical stimulation through weight-bearing at I gravity on Earth is needed to maintain healthy bone, and that osteoblasts play a critical role in that process. Over the last 9 years in my laboratory at NASA ARC, we have studied the regulation of osteoblast function by interactions between the extracellular matrix and die cell. Using a cell culture approach, we defined the repertoire of adhesion receptors, called integrins, which are expressed on the osteoblast surface, as well as specific extracellular matrix proteins, which are needed for cellular differentiation and survival. We are now extending these observations to determine if integrin signaling is involved in the skeletal responses to disuse and recovery from disuse using the rodent model of hindlimb unloading by tail suspension. Together, our cell culture and animal studies are providing new insight into the regulation of osteoblast function in bone.

  2. Extracellular Matrix-Based Biohybrid Materials for Engineering Compliant, Matrix-Dense Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracaglia, Laura G; Fisher, John P

    2015-11-18

    An ideal tissue engineering scaffold should not only promote, but take an active role in, constructive remodeling and formation of site appropriate tissue. Extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived proteins provide unmatched cellular recognition, and therefore influence cellular response towards predicted remodeling behaviors. Materials built with only these proteins, however, can degrade rapidly or begin too weak to substitute for compliant, matrix-dense tissues. The focus of this Progress Report is on biohybrid materials that incorporate polymer components with ECM-derived proteins, to produce a substrate with desired mechanical and degradation properties, as well as actively guide tissue remodeling. Materials are described through four fabrication methods: 1) polymer and ECM-protein fibers woven together, 2) polymer and ECM proteins combined in a bilayer, 3) cell-built ECM on polymer scaffold, and 4) ECM proteins and polymers combined in a single hydrogel. Scaffolds from each fabrication method can achieve characteristics suitable for different types of tissue. In vivo testing has shown progressive remodeling in injury models, and suggests ECM-based biohybrid materials promote a prohealing immune response over single component alternatives. The prohealing immune response is associated with lasting success and long term host maintenance of the implant.

  3. Contribution of the α8 integrin chain to the expression of extracellular matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkert, Gudrun; Jahn, Angelika; Dinkel, Christina; Fahlbusch, Fabian; Zürn, Christina; Hilgers, Karl F; Rascher, Wolfgang; Hartner, Andrea; Marek, Ines

    2014-04-01

    In the kidney, the α8 integrin chain (itga8) is expressed in mesenchymal cells and is upregulated in fibrotic disease. We hypothesized that itga8 mediates a profibrotic phenotype of renal cells by promoting extracellular matrix and cytokine expression. Genetic itga8 deficiency caused complex changes in matrix expression patterns in mesangial and smooth-muscle cells, with the only concordant effect in both cell types being a reduction of collagen III expression. Silencing of itga8 with siRNA led to a decline of matrix turnover with repression of matrix metalloproteinases and reduction of matrix production. In contrast, de novo expression of itga8 in tubular epithelial cells resulted in reduced collagen synthesis. Overexpression of itga8 in fibroblasts did not change the expression of matrix molecules or regulators of matrix turnover. Thus, the influence of itga8 on the expression of matrix components was not uniform and celltype dependent. Itga8 seems unlikely to exert overall profibrotic effects in renal cells.

  4. Biomineralization of a Self-Assembled Extracellular Matrix for Bone Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Yizhi; Qin, Yi-Xian; DiMasi, Elaine; Ba, Xiaolan; Rafailovich, Miriam; Pernodet, Nadine

    2008-01-01

    Understanding how biomineralization occurs in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of bone cells is crucial to the understanding of bone formation and the development of a successfully engineered bone tissue scaffold. It is still unclear how ECM mechanical properties affect protein-mineral interactions in early stages of bone mineralization. We investigated the longitudinal mineralization properties of MC3T3-E1 cells and the elastic modulus of their ECM using shear modulation force microscopy, sync...

  5. Putative functions of extracellular matrix glycoproteins in secondary palate morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Amaro, Rocca; Scheidegger, Rolf; Blumer, Susan; Pazera, Pawel; Katsaros, Christos; Graf, Daniel; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect in humans. Elevation and fusion of paired palatal shelves are coordinated by growth and transcription factors, and mutations in these can cause malformations. Among the effector genes for growth factor signaling are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. These provide substrates for cell adhesion (e.g., fibronectin, tenascins), but also regulate growth factor availability (e.g., fibrillins). Cleft palate in Bmp7 null mouse embryos is caused by a delay in palatal shelf elevation. In contrast, palatal shelves of Tgf-β3 knockout mice elevate normally, but a cleft develops due to their failure to fuse. However, nothing is known about a possible functional interaction between specific ECM proteins and Tgf-β/Bmp family members in palatogenesis. To start addressing this question, we studied the mRNA and protein distribution of relevant ECM components during secondary palate development, and compared it to growth factor expression in wildtypewild type and mutant mice. We found that fibrillin-2 (but not fibrillin-1) mRNA appeared in the mesenchyme of elevated palatal shelves adjacent to the midline epithelial cells, which were positive for Tgf-β3 mRNA. Moreover, midline epithelial cells started expressing fibronectin upon contact of the two palatal shelves. These findings support the hypothesis that fibrillin-2 and fibronectin are involved in regulating the activity of Tgf-β3 at the fusing midline. In addition, we observed that tenascin-W (but not tenascin-C) was misexpressed in palatal shelves of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. In contrast to tenascin-C, tenascin-W secretion was strongly induced by Bmp7 in embryonic cranial fibroblasts in vitro. These results are consistent with a putative function for tenascin-W as a target of Bmp7 signaling during palate elevation. Our results indicate that distinct ECM proteins are important for morphogenesis of the secondary palate, both as downstream effectors and as regulators of Tgf

  6. Biglycan fragmentation in pathologies associated with extracellular matrix remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genovese, Federica; Barascuk, Natasha; Larsen, Lise Skakkebæk;

    2013-01-01

    The proteoglycan biglycan (BGN) is involved in collagen fibril assembly and its fragmentation is likely to be associated with collagen turnover during the pathogenesis of diseases which involve dysregulated extracellular matrix remodeling (ECMR), such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and liver fibrosis...

  7. Extracellular Matrix in Plants and Animals: Hooks and Locks for Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Stavolone

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of animal and plants cells plays important roles in viral diseases. While in animal cells extracellular matrix components can be exploited by viruses for recognition, attachment and entry, the plant cell wall acts as a physical barrier to viral entry and adds a higher level of difficulty to intercellular movement of viruses. Interestingly, both in plant and animal systems, ECM can be strongly remodeled during virus infection, and the understanding of remodeling mechanisms and molecular players offers new perspectives for therapeutic intervention. This review focuses on the different roles played by the ECM in plant and animal hosts during virus infection with special emphasis on the similarities and differences. Possible biotechnological applications aimed at improving viral resistance are discussed.

  8. Attachment of IgG to dermal extracellular matrix in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneström, S; Bengtson, A; Lindström, F; Johan, K

    1990-01-01

    Deposits of IgG localized to collagen bundles/extracellular matrix components occurred in skin biopsies from patients with primary fibromyalgia (PF). None of these patients demonstrated a positive lupus band test. Control skin biopsies from healthy controls were negative but showed intense reactivity for IgG after collagenase treatment. PF-skin attached both homologous and heterologous serum IgG in indirect immunofluorescence, which may point to a qualitative alteration of dermal matrix components in PF. Skin from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis showed a lower dermal fluorescence intensity than in PF patients. The cause of the presence of IgG in dermal tissue from PF patients is unclear. It may be caused by a non-specific attachment of IgG to the extracellular matrix related, for example, to tissue hypoxia and/or increased capillary leakage due to an increased number of mast cells in the PF-skin.

  9. Extracellular matrix molecules as targets for brown spider venom toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veiga S.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Loxoscelism, the term used to describe lesions and clinical manifestations induced by brown spider's venom (Loxosceles genus, has attracted much attention over the last years. Brown spider bites have been reported to cause a local and acute inflammatory reaction that may evolve to dermonecrosis (a hallmark of envenomation and hemorrhage at the bite site, besides systemic manifestations such as thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hemolysis, and renal failure. The molecular mechanisms by which Loxosceles venoms induce injury are currently under investigation. In this review, we focused on the latest reports describing the biological and physiopathological aspects of loxoscelism, with reference mainly to the proteases recently described as metalloproteases and serine proteases, as well as on the proteolytic effects triggered by L. intermedia venom upon extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, entactin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, besides the disruptive activity of the venom on Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm basement membranes. Degradation of these extracellular matrix molecules and the observed disruption of basement membranes could be related to deleterious activities of the venom such as loss of vessel and glomerular integrity and spreading of the venom toxins to underlying tissues.

  10. Mechanical model for a collagen fibril pair in extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yue; Cox, Grant M; Haverkamp, Richard G; Hill, James M

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we model the mechanics of a collagen pair in the connective tissue extracellular matrix that exists in abundance throughout animals, including the human body. This connective tissue comprises repeated units of two main structures, namely collagens as well as axial, parallel and regular anionic glycosaminoglycan between collagens. The collagen fibril can be modeled by Hooke's law whereas anionic glycosaminoglycan behaves more like a rubber-band rod and as such can be better modeled by the worm-like chain model. While both computer simulations and continuum mechanics models have been investigated for the behavior of this connective tissue typically, authors either assume a simple form of the molecular potential energy or entirely ignore the microscopic structure of the connective tissue. Here, we apply basic physical methodologies and simple applied mathematical modeling techniques to describe the collagen pair quantitatively. We found that the growth of fibrils was intimately related to the maximum length of the anionic glycosaminoglycan and the relative displacement of two adjacent fibrils, which in return was closely related to the effectiveness of anionic glycosaminoglycan in transmitting forces between fibrils. These reveal the importance of the anionic glycosaminoglycan in maintaining the structural shape of the connective tissue extracellular matrix and eventually the shape modulus of human tissues. We also found that some macroscopic properties, like the maximum molecular energy and the breaking fraction of the collagen, were also related to the microscopic characteristics of the anionic glycosaminoglycan.

  11. Preparation of Extracellular Matrix Protein Fibers for Brillouin Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edginton, Ryan S; Mattana, Sara; Caponi, Silvia; Fioretto, Daniele; Green, Ellen; Winlove, C Peter; Palombo, Francesca

    2016-09-15

    Brillouin spectroscopy is an emerging technique in the biomedical field. It probes the mechanical properties of a sample through the interaction of visible light with thermally induced acoustic waves or phonons propagating at a speed of a few km/sec. Information on the elasticity and structure of the material is obtained in a nondestructive contactless manner, hence opening the way to in vivo applications and potential diagnosis of pathology. This work describes the application of Brillouin spectroscopy to the study of biomechanics in elastin and trypsin-digested type I collagen fibers of the extracellular matrix. Fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix are the building blocks of biological tissues and investigating their mechanical and physical behavior is key to establishing structure-function relationships in normal tissues and the changes which occur in disease. The procedures of sample preparation followed by measurement of Brillouin spectra using a reflective substrate are presented together with details of the optical system and methods of spectral data analysis.

  12. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms of th...

  13. The Extracellular Matrix in Photosynthetic Mats: A Cyanobacterial Gingerbread House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, R.; Stannard, W.; Bebout, B.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Mayali, X.; Weber, P. K.; Lipton, M. S.; Lee, J.; Everroad, R. C.; Thelen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Hypersaline laminated cyanobacterial mats are excellent model systems for investigating photoautotrophic contributions to biogeochemical cycling on a millimeter scale. These self-sustaining ecosystems are characterized by steep physiochemical gradients that fluctuate dramatically on hour timescales, providing a dynamic environment to study microbial response. However, elucidating the distribution of energy from light absorption into biomass requires a complete understanding of the various constituents of the mat. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which can be composed of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and DNA are a major component of these mats and may function in the redistribution of nutrients and metabolites within the community. To test this notion, we established a model mat-building culture for comparison with the phylogenetically diverse natural mat communities. In these two systems we determined how proteins and glycans in the matrix changed as a function of light and tracked nutrient flow from the matrix. Using mass spectrometry metaproteomics analysis, we found homologous proteins in both field and culture extracellular matrix that point to cyanobacterial turnover of amino acids, inorganic nutrients, carbohydrates and nucleic acids from the EPS. Other abundant functions identified included oxidative stress response from both the cyanobacteria and heterotrophs and cyanobacterial structural proteins that may play a role in mat cohesion. Several degradative enzymes also varied in abundance in the EPS in response to light availability, suggesting active secretion. To further test cyanobacterial EPS turnover, we generated isotopically-labeled EPS and used NanoSIMS to trace uptake of this labeled EPS. Our findings suggest Cyanobacteria may facilitate nutrient transfer to other groups, as well as uptake of their own products through degradation of EPS components. This work provides evidence for the essential roles of EPS for storage, structural

  14. Activation of phagocytic cells by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms: effects of extracellular matrix proteins and the bacterial stress protein GroEL on netosis and MRP-14 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Gaida, Matthias M; Meyle, Eva; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, Gertrud M

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and phagocytosis of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria by polymorphonuclear neutrophils have been investigated in depth. However, less is known about the neutrophil response towards bacterial biofilms. Our previous work demonstrated that neutrophils recognize activating entities within the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of biofilms (the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL) and that this process does not require opsonization. Aim of this study was to evaluate the release of DNA by neutrophils in response to biofilms, as well as the release of the inflammatory cytokine MRP-14. Neutrophils were stimulated with Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, planktonic bacteria, extracted EPS and GroEL. Release of DNA and of MRP-14 was evaluated. Furthermore, tissue samples from patients suffering from biofilm infections were collected and evaluated by histology. MRP-14 concentration in blood samples was measured. We were able to show that biofilms, the EPS and GroEL induce DNA release. MRP-14 was only released after stimulation with EPS, not GroEL. Histology of tissue samples revealed MRP-14 positive cells in association with neutrophil infiltration and MRP-14 concentration was elevated in blood samples of patients suffering from biofilm infections. Our data demonstrate that neutrophil-activating entities are present in the EPS and that GroEL induces DNA release by neutrophils.

  15. Scanning Electron Microscopy of Macerated Tissue to Visualize the Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Matthew K; Lenihan, Sean; Covarrubias, Roman; Huttinger, Ryan M; Gumina, Richard J; Sawyer, Douglas B; Galindo, Cristi L

    2016-06-14

    Fibrosis is a component of all forms of heart disease regardless of etiology, and while much progress has been made in the field of cardiac matrix biology, there are still major gaps related to how the matrix is formed, how physiological and pathological remodeling differ, and most importantly how matrix dynamics might be manipulated to promote healing and inhibit fibrosis. There is currently no treatment option for controlling, preventing, or reversing cardiac fibrosis. Part of the reason is likely the sheer complexity of cardiac scar formation, such as occurs after myocardial infarction to immediately replace dead or dying cardiomyocytes. The extracellular matrix itself participates in remodeling by activating resident cells and also by helping to guide infiltrating cells to the defunct lesion. The matrix is also a storage locker of sorts for matricellular proteins that are crucial to normal matrix turnover, as well as fibrotic signaling. The matrix has additionally been demonstrated to play an electromechanical role in cardiac tissue. Most techniques for assessing fibrosis are not qualitative in nature, but rather provide quantitative results that are useful for comparing two groups but that do not provide information related to the underlying matrix structure. Highlighted here is a technique for visualizing cardiac matrix ultrastructure. Scanning electron microscopy of decellularized heart tissue reveals striking differences in structure that might otherwise be missed using traditional quantitative research methods.

  16. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  17. Regulation of Non-Infectious Lung Injury, Inflammation, and Repair by the Extracellular Matrix Glycosaminoglycan Hyaluronan

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Dianhua; Liang, Jiurong; Noble, Paul W

    2010-01-01

    An important hallmark of tissue remodeling is the dynamic turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM performs a variety of functions in tissue repair including scaffold formation, modulation of fluid dynamics, and regulating cell behavior. During non-infectious tissue injury ECM degradation products are generated that acquire signaling functions not attributable to the native precursor molecules. Hyaluronan (HA) is a non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan which is produced in great abundance followi...

  18. ADAM12 induces actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix reorganization during early adipocyte differentiation by regulating beta1 integrin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Sundberg, Christina; Kveiborg, Marie

    2003-01-01

    -100 from cells overexpressing ADAM12 than from control cells. Collectively, these results show that surface expression of ADAM12 impairs the function of beta1 integrins and, consequently, alters the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. These events may be necessary....... Moreover, ADAM12-expressing cells were more prone to apoptosis, which could be prevented by treating the cells with beta1-activating antibodies. A reduced and re-organized fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix accompanied these changes. In addition, beta1 integrin was more readily extracted with Triton X...

  19. Fractional Excretion of Survivin, Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer, and Matrix Metalloproteinase 7 in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bargenda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT is defined as a transformation of tubular epithelial cells into mesenchymal ones. These cells migrate through the extracellular matrix and change into active myofibroblasts, which are responsible for excessive matrix deposition. Such changes may lead to tubular dysfunction and fibrosis of the renal parenchyma, characteristic of chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, there are no data on potential EMT markers in children with CKD. The aim of our study was to assess the usefulness of fractional excretion (FE of survivin, E-cadherin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP7, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 as potential markers of CKD-related complications such as tubular damage and fibrosis. Methods: Forty-one pre-dialysis children with CKD Stages 3–5 and 23 age-matched controls were enrolled in the study. The serum and urine concentrations of analysed parameters were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. Results: Tubular reabsorption of all analysed parameters was >99% in the control group. All FE values rose significantly in children with CKD, yet they remained 1%. Conclusions: FE of the examined markers may become a useful tool in the assessment of tubular dysfunction during the course of CKD. The FE of survivin, EMMPRIN, and MMP7 warrant further research as potential independent markers of kidney-specific EMT.

  20. Preoperative radiotherapy and extracellular matrix remodeling in rectal mucosa and tumour matrix metalloproteinases and plasminogen components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angenete, Eva; Oeresland, Tom; Falk, Peter; Breimer, Michael; Ivarsson, Marie-Louise (Dept. of Surgery, Inst. of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Univ. of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Hultborn, Ragnar (Dept. of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital/Sahlgrenska, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-11-15

    Background. Preoperative radiotherapy reduces recurrence but increases postoperative morbidity. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of radiotherapy in rectal mucosa and rectal tumour extracellular matrix (ECM) by studying enzymes and growth factors involved in ECM remodeling. Materials and methods. Twenty patients with short-term preoperative radiotherapy and 12 control patients without radiotherapy were studied. Biopsies from rectal mucosa and tumour were collected prior to radiotherapy and at surgery. Tissue MMP-1, -2, -9, TIMP-1, uPA, PAI-1, TGF-beta1 and calprotectin were determined by ELISA. Biopsies from irradiated and non-irradiated peritoneal areas were also analysed. Results. Radiotherapy increased the tissue levels of MMP-2 and PAI-1 in both the rectal mucosa and tumours while calprotectin and uPA showed an increase only in the mucosa after irradiation. The increase of calprotectin was due to an influx of inflammatory cells as revealed by immunohistochemistry. Prior to irradiation, the tumour tissues had increased levels of MMP-1, -2, -9, total TGF-beta1, uPA, PAI-1 and calprotectin compared to mucosa, while TIMP-1 and the active TGF-beta1 fraction showed no statistical difference. Conclusions. This study indicates a radiation-induced effect on selected ECM remodeling proteases. This reaction may be responsible for early and late morbidity. Interference of this response might reduce these consequences.

  1. Accelerated extracellular matrix turnover during exacerbations of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Jannie M B; Knox, Alan J; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) contribute significantly to disease progression. However, the effect on tissue structure and turnover is not well described. There is an urgent clinical need for biomarkers of disease activity associated with disease...... progression. Extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover reflects activity in tissues and consequently assessment of ECM turnover may serve as biomarkers of disease activity. We hypothesized that the turnover of lung ECM proteins were altered during exacerbations of COPD. METHODS: 69 patients with COPD hospitalised......, respectively), and degradation of elastin (ELM7 and EL-NE) and versican (VCANM). RESULTS: Circulating levels of C3M, C4M, C6M, ELM7, and EL-NE were elevated during an exacerbation of COPD as compared to follow-up (all P

  2. Extracellular matrix adaptation of tendon and skeletal muscle to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, Peter; Krogsgaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues enables linking to other tissues, and plays a key role in force transmission and tissue structure maintenance in tendons, ligaments, bone and muscle. ECM turnover is influenced by physical activity, and both collagen synthesis and metalloprotease......-beta and IL-6 is enhanced following exercise. For tendons, metabolic activity (e.g. detected by positron emission tomography scanning), circulatory responses (e.g. as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy and dye dilution) and collagen turnover are markedly increased after exercise. Tendon blood flow...... is supported by findings of gender-related differences in the activation of collagen synthesis with exercise. These findings may provide the basis for understanding tissue overloading and injury in both tendons and skeletal muscle....

  3. Characterization of canine platelet adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagalli, Alessandra; Pero, Maria Elena; Mastellone, Vincenzo; Cestaro, Anna; Signoriello, Simona; Lombardi, Pietro; Avallone, Luigi

    2011-07-01

    Canine platelets have been extensively studied but little is known about specific aspects such as adhesion. Platelet adhesion is a critical step during haemostasis and thrombosis as well as during inflammatory and immunopathogenic responses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesive properties of canine platelets using fibrinogen and collagen as substrates immobilized on plates. Adhesion was monitored for 120 min and the effect of adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) was assayed. The results showed that canine platelets displayed good adhesion activity that was significantly time-dependent. Moreover, ADP was able to enhance platelet adhesion in a dose-dependent manner. The findings aid knowledge of the adhesion process and suggest a specific role of surface platelet receptors in mediating the interaction with extracellular matrix proteins.

  4. Rat hair follicle dermal papillae have an extracellular matrix containing basement membrane components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R

    1986-01-01

    Dermal papillae are small mesenchymally derived zones at the bases of hair follicles which have an important role in hair morphogenesis in the embryo and control of the hair growth cycle in postnatal mammals. The cells of the papilla are enmeshed in a dense extracellular matrix which undergoes...... extensive changes in concert with the hair cycle. Here it is shown that this matrix in anagen pelage follicles of postnatal rats contains an abundance of basement membrane components rather than dermal components such as interstitial collagens. In particular, type IV collagen, laminin, and basement membrane...

  5. Moderate cyclic tensile strain alters the assembly of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuel, Judith; Zaucke, Frank; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Heilig, Juliane; Wolter, Marie-Louise; Hamann, Nina; Firner, Sara; Niehoff, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical loading influences the structural and mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The cartilage matrix protein collagen II essentially determines the tensile properties of the tissue and is adapted in response to loading. The collagen II network is stabilized by the collagen II-binding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen IX, and matrilin-3. However, the effect of mechanical loading on these extracellular matrix proteins is not yet understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if and how chondrocytes assemble the extracellular matrix proteins collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in response to mechanical loading. Primary murine chondrocytes were applied to cyclic tensile strain (6%, 0.5 Hz, 30 min per day at three consecutive days). The localization of collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in loaded and unloaded cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The messenger ribo nucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels and synthesis of the proteins were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blots. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the pattern of collagen II distribution was altered by loading. In loaded chondrocytes, collagen II containing fibrils appeared thicker and strongly co-stained for COMP and collagen IX, whereas the collagen network from unloaded cells was more diffuse and showed minor costaining. Further, the applied load led to a higher amount of COMP in the matrix, determined by western blot analysis. Our results show that moderate cyclic tensile strain altered the assembly of the extracellular collagen network. However, changes in protein amount were only observed for COMP, but not for collagen II, collagen IX, or matrilin-3. The data suggest that the adaptation to mechanical loading is not always the result of changes in RNA and/or protein expression but might also be the result of changes in matrix assembly and structure.

  6. Targeting extracellular matrix remodeling in disease: Could resveratrol be a potential candidate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Renu; Agarwal, Puneet

    2017-02-01

    Disturbances of extracellular matrix homeostasis are associated with a number of pathological conditions. The ability of extracellular matrix to provide contextual information and hence control the individual or collective cellular behavior is increasingly being recognized. Hence, newer therapeutic approaches targeting extracellular matrix remodeling are widely investigated. We reviewed the current literature showing the effects of resveratrol on various aspects of extracellular matrix remodeling. This review presents a summary of the effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix deposition and breakdown. Mechanisms of action of resveratrol in extracellular matrix deposition involving growth factors and their signaling pathways are discussed. Involvement of phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and role of transcription factors and sirtuins on the effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix homeostasis are summarized. It is evident from the literature presented in this review that resveratrol has significant effects on both the synthesis and breakdown of extracellular matrix. The major molecular targets of the action of resveratrol are growth factors and their signaling pathways, phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, transcription factors, and SIRT-1. The effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix and the molecular targets appear to be related to experimental models, experimental environment as well as the doses.

  7. The extracellular matrix of the lung and its role in edema formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Pelosi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is composed of a three-dimensional fiber mesh filled with different macromolecules such as: collagen (mainly type I and III, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, and proteoglycans. In the lung, the extracellular matrix has several functions which provide: 1 mechanical tensile and compressive strength and elasticity, 2 low mechanical tissue compliance contributing to the maintenance of normal interstitial fluid dynamics, 3 low resistive pathway for an effective gas exchange, d control of cell behavior by the binding of growth factors, chemokines, cytokines and the interaction with cell-surface receptors, and e tissue repair and remodeling. Fragmentation and disorganization of extracellular matrix components comprises the protective role of the extracellular matrix, leading to interstitial and eventually severe lung edema. Thus, once conditions of increased microvascular filtration are established, matrix remodeling proceeds fairly rapidly due to the activation of proteases. Conversely, a massive matrix deposition of collagen fiber decreases interstitial compliance and therefore makes the tissue safety factor stronger. As a result, changes in lung extracellular matrix significantly affect edema formation and distribution in the lung.A matriz extracelular é um aglomerado tridimensional demacromoléculas composta por: fibras colágenas (principalmente, tipos I e III, elastina, glicosaminoglicanos e proteoglicanos. No pulmão, a matriz extracelular tem várias funções, tais como: 1 promover estresse tensil e elasticidade tecidual, 2 contribuir para a manutenção da dinâmica de fluidos no interstício, 3 propiciar efetiva troca gasosa, 4 controlar a função celular através de sua ligação com fatores de crescimento, quimiocinas, citocinas e interação com receptores de superfície, e 5 remodelamento e reparo tecidual. A fragmentação e a desorganização da matriz extracelular pode acarretar edema intersticial e

  8. Factors Involved in Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Human Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregori Casals

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The molecular mechanisms by which myocardial ischemia translates into ventricular remodeling remain unclear. Methods: We investigated whether hypoxia and proinflammatory cytokines are specific inducers of remodeling signals in an in vitro model of cultured adult human ventricular myocytes (AC16 cells. Results:Hypoxia modified the ratio of matrix remodeling factors by increasing the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP and reducing tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase type 1 (TIMP-1 secretion in AC16 cells. These effects, however, were not associated with either modifications in expression of matrix metalloproteinase type 2, collagen-I or metalloproteinase activity. Hypoxia does, actually increase the production of the cardiac antifibrogenic growth factors, Apelin and VEGF, through an Hypoxia Inducible Factor type 1-dependent mechanism. Concerning proinflammatory signaling pathways, IL1β emerged as a powerful inducer of matrix turnover, since it significantly enhanced PIIINP, TIMP-1 and hyaluronic acid production and increased metalloproteinase activity. In contrast, TNFα did not modify matrix turnover but markedly induced the production of Apelin and VEGF. Conclusion: Hypoxia and increased TNFα activity likely exert cardioprotective actions by activating the cardiac antifibrogenic factors Apelin and VEGF. In contrast, IL1β is a strong promoter of interstitial collagen remodeling that may contribute to ventricular dilation and heart failure in the ischemic myocardium.

  9. Of extracellular matrix, scaffolds, and signaling: Tissuearchitectureregulates development, homeostasis, and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-03-09

    The microenvironment surrounding cells influences gene expression, such that a cell's behavior is largely determined by its interactions with the extracellular matrix, neighboring cells, and soluble cues released locally or by distant tissues. We describe the essential role of context and organ structure in directing mammary gland development and differentiated function, and in determining response to oncogenic insults including mutations. We expand on the concept of 'dynamic reciprocity' to present an integrated view of development, cancer, and aging, and posit that genes are like piano keys: while essential, it is the context that makes the music.

  10. Incorporation of tenascin-C into the extracellular matrix by periostin underlies an extracellular meshwork architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2010-01-15

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C null mice exhibited a similar phenotype, confined tibial periostitis, which possibly corresponds to medial tibial stress syndrome in human sports injuries. Periostin possessed adjacent domains that bind to tenascin-C and the other ECM protein: fibronectin and type I collagen, respectively. These adjacent domains functioned as a bridge between tenascin-C and the ECM, which increased deposition of tenascin-C on the ECM. The deposition of hexabrachions of tenascin-C may stabilize bifurcations of the ECM fibrils, which is integrated into the extracellular meshwork architecture. This study suggests a role for periostin in adaptation of the ECM architecture in the mechanical environment.

  11. A novel assay for extracellular matrix remodeling associated with liver fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, N; Veidal, S S; Larsen, L

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and increased matrix-metalloprotease (MMPs) activity are hallmarks of fibrosis. We developed an ELISA for quantification of MMP-9 derived collagen type III (CO3) degradation....

  12. Induction of Extracellular Matrix-Remodeling Genes by the Senescence-Associated Protein APA-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benanti, Jennifer A.; Williams, Dawnnica K.; Robinson, Kristin L.; Ozer, Harvey L.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2002-01-01

    Human fibroblasts undergo cellular senescence after a finite number of divisions, in response to the erosion of telomeres. In addition to being terminally arrested in the cell cycle, senescent fibroblasts express genes that are normally induced upon wounding, including genes that remodel the extracellular matrix. We have identified the novel zinc finger protein APA-1, whose expression increased in senescent human fibroblasts independent of telomere shortening. Extended passage, telomerase-immortalized fibroblasts had increased levels of APA-1 as well as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16. In fibroblasts, APA-1 was modified by the ubiquitin-like protein SUMO-1, which increased APA-1 half-life, possibly by blocking ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Overexpression of APA-1 did not cause cell cycle arrest; but, it induced transcription of the extracellular matrix-remodeling genes MMP1 and PAI2, which are associated with fibroblast senescence. MMP1 and PAI2 transcript levels also increased in telomerase-immortalized fibroblasts that had high levels of APA-1, demonstrating that the matrix-remodeling phenotype of senescent fibroblasts was not induced by telomere attrition alone. APA-1 was able to transactivate and bind to the MMP1 promoter, suggesting that APA-1 is a transcription factor that regulates expression of matrix-remodeling genes during fibroblast senescence. PMID:12370286

  13. Relationships between melanocytes, mechanical properties and extracellular matrix composition in mouse heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Flavia; Kruithof, Boudewijn Pt; Balani, Kanthesh; Agarwal, Arvind; Gaussin, Vinciane; Kos, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Heart valves are complex structures composed of organized layers of extracellular matrix, and interstitial and overlying endothelial cells. In this article, we present the specific localization of a population of melanocytes within the murine heart valves at ages important for their post-natal development. In all stages analyzed in our study, melanocytes were found in high numbers populating the atrial aspect of the tricuspid and mitral leaflets. The pulmonary valve did not present melanocytes. To characterize a putative role for the valve melanocytes, the dynamic nanomechanical properties of tricuspid leaftets containing large numbers or no melanocytes were measured. The stiffness coefficient of hyperpigmented leaflets was higher (11.5 GPa) than the ones from wild-type (7.5 GPa) and hypopigmented (5.5 GPa) leaflets. These results suggest that melanocytes may contribute to the mechanical properties of the heart valves. The arrangement of extracellular matrix molecules such as Collagen I and Versican B is responsible for the mechanical characteristics of the leaflets. Melanocytes were found to reside primarily in areas of Versican B expression. The patterns of expression of Collagen I and Versican B were not, however, disrupted in hyper or hypopigmented leaflets. Melanocytes may affect other extracellular matrix molecules to alter the valves' microenvironment.

  14. Mouse basophils reside in extracellular matrix-enriched bone marrow niches which control their motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaniotto, Salete; Schneider, Elke; Goudin, Nicolas; Bricard-Rignault, Rachel; Machavoine, François; Dardenne, Mireille; Dy, Michel; Savino, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Basophils co-express FcεRIα and CD49b, the α-2 chain of integrin-type receptor VLA-2 (α2β1), which recognizes type-1 collagen as a major natural ligand. The physiological relevance of this integrin for interactions with extracellular bone marrow matrix remains unknown. Herein, we examined the expression of several receptors of this family by bone marrow-derived basophils sorted either ex-vivo or after culture with IL-3. Having established that both populations display CD49d, CD49e and CD49f (α-4, α-5 and α-6 integrins subunits, respectively), we addressed receptor functions by measuring migration, adhesion, proliferation and survival after interacting with matched natural ligands. Type I collagen, laminin and fibronectin promoted basophil migration/adhesion, the former being the most effective. None of these ligands affected basophil viability and expansion. Interactions between basophils and extracellular matrix are likely to play a role in situ, as supported by confocal 3D cell imaging of femoral bone marrow sections, which revealed basophils exclusively in type-1 collagen-enriched niches that contained likewise laminin and fibronectin. This is the first evidence for a structure/function relationship between basophils and extracellular matrix proteins inside the mouse bone marrow.

  15. Mouse basophils reside in extracellular matrix-enriched bone marrow niches which control their motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Smaniotto

    Full Text Available Basophils co-express FcεRIα and CD49b, the α-2 chain of integrin-type receptor VLA-2 (α2β1, which recognizes type-1 collagen as a major natural ligand. The physiological relevance of this integrin for interactions with extracellular bone marrow matrix remains unknown. Herein, we examined the expression of several receptors of this family by bone marrow-derived basophils sorted either ex-vivo or after culture with IL-3. Having established that both populations display CD49d, CD49e and CD49f (α-4, α-5 and α-6 integrins subunits, respectively, we addressed receptor functions by measuring migration, adhesion, proliferation and survival after interacting with matched natural ligands. Type I collagen, laminin and fibronectin promoted basophil migration/adhesion, the former being the most effective. None of these ligands affected basophil viability and expansion. Interactions between basophils and extracellular matrix are likely to play a role in situ, as supported by confocal 3D cell imaging of femoral bone marrow sections, which revealed basophils exclusively in type-1 collagen-enriched niches that contained likewise laminin and fibronectin. This is the first evidence for a structure/function relationship between basophils and extracellular matrix proteins inside the mouse bone marrow.

  16. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  17. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhart, E.J.; Gillette, E.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Barcellos-Hoff, M.H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by {gamma} irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin inummoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical detection of keratins and extracellular matrix proteins in lizard skin cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Polazzi, Elisabetta

    2012-04-01

    The present study shows the localization of epidermal and dermal proteins produced in lizard skin cultivated in vitro. Cells from the skin have been cultured for up to one month to detect the expression of keratins, actin, vimentin and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, elastin and collagen I). Keratinocytes and dermal cells weakly immunoreact for Pan-Cytokeratin but not with the K17-antibody at the beginning of the cell culture when numerous keratin bundles are present in keratinocyte cytoplasm. The dense keratin network disappears after 7-12 days in culture, and K17 becomes detectable in both keratinocytes and mesenchymal cells isolated from the dermis. While most epidermal cells are lost after 2 weeks of in vitro cultivation dermal cells proliferate and form a pellicle of variable thickness made of 3-8 cell layers. The fibroblasts of this dermal equivalent produces an extracellular matrix containing chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, collagen I, elastic fibers and fibronectin, explaining the attachment of the pellicle to the substratum. The study indicates that after improving keratinocyte survival a skin equivalent for lizard epidermis would be feasible as a useful tool to analyze the influence of the dermis on the process of epidermal differentiation and the control of the shedding cycle in squamates.

  19. Investigation on the Mechanics of Adhesion to the Selective Extracellular Matrix Coated Surfaces of Lung Cancer Cells%肺癌细胞与胞外基质选择裱衬表面粘附力学的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婷; 屈谦; 薛亚梅; 吴泽志; 宋关斌; 蔡绍皙

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion properties of tumor cells with extracellular matrix(ECM) are closely associated with their invasion and metastasis.Our work reported here was intended reveal the relevant biomechanical and biorheological manifestations of human lung cancer. Using micropipette aspiration technique, we investigated quantitatively the adhesive mechanics properties of high metastatic human giant cell carcinoma(PG) cells as well as low metastatic adenocarcinoma(PAa) cells of lung based on cell culture in vitro. The results showed that the adhesion forces of PAa and PG cells to collagen Ⅳ were significantly higher than those to glass surfaces, but at the lower concentrations(1.00μg/ml and 2.00μg/ml) of collagen Ⅳ, the amplitude for the increase of adhesion forces of PG cells were less than the amplitude for that of PAa cells, and most of the adhesion force values of PAa cells to the coated surfaces of incorporation of laminin along with 2 μg/ml collagen Ⅳ were significantly greater than those of PG cells. At the lower concentrations(0.625μg/ml for PAa cells,and 0.625 μg/ml, 1. 25 μg/ml for PG cells) of laminin tested,the adhesion force values of PAa and PG cells all decreased, but the amplitude and level for the decreased values of adhesion forces of PG cells were greater than those for the PAa cells. In conclusion, the adhesive and proteolytic behaviour of cancer cells to extracellular matrix might be mediated mainly by tumor cell membrane receptors such as integrin receptors and laminin receptors, it might affect the biological characteristics and the metastasis of the tumor cells. The results may benefit to explain some questions in biomechanical views about how the highly metastatic PG cells are prone to migration and invasion.%肿瘤细胞与细胞外基质的粘附特性与肿瘤的侵袭转移密切相关,作者力图揭示人肺癌细胞相应的生物力学和生物流变学特征。采用微管吸吮技术定量测定体外培

  20. Right ventricular function after repair of tetralogy of Fallot: a comparison between bovine pericardium and porcine small intestinal extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ronak; Johnson, Jason; Kumar, T K S; Philip, Ranjit; Boston, Umar; Knott-Craig, Christopher J

    2017-05-29

    The porcine small intestinal extracellular matrix reportedly has the potential to differentiate into viable myocardial cells. When used in tetralogy of Fallot repair, it may improve right ventricular function. We evaluated right ventricular function after repair of tetralogy of Fallot with extracellular matrix versus bovine pericardium. Subjects with non-transannular repair of tetralogy of Fallot with at least 1 year of follow-up were selected. The extracellular matrix and bovine pericardium groups were compared. We used three-dimensional right ventricular ejection fraction, right ventricle global longitudinal strain, and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion to assess right ventricular function. The extracellular matrix group had 11 patients, whereas the bovine pericardium group had 10 patients. No differences between the groups were found regarding sex ratio, age at surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass time. The follow-up period was 28±12.6 months in the extracellular matrix group and 50.05±17.6 months in the bovine pericardium group (p=0.001). The mean three-dimensional right ventricular ejection fraction (55.7±5.0% versus 55.3±5.2%, p=0.73), right ventricular global longitudinal strain (-18.5±3.0% versus -18.0±2.2%, p=0.44), and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursions (1.59±0.16 versus 1.59±0.2, p=0.93) were similar in the extracellular matrix group and in the bovine pericardium group, respectively. Right ventricular global longitudinal strain in healthy children is reported at -29±3% in literature. In a small cohort of the patients undergoing non-transannular repair of tetralogy of Fallot, there was no significant difference in right ventricular function between groups having extracellular matrix versus bovine pericardium patches followed-up for more than 1 year. Lower right ventricular longitudinal strain noted in both the groups compared to healthy children.

  1. Platelets and plasma stimulate sheep rotator cuff tendon tenocytes when cultured in an extracellular matrix scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian A; Proffen, Benedikt L; Haslauer, Carla M; Murray, Martha M

    2016-04-01

    The addition of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to rotator cuff repair has not translated into improved outcomes after surgery. However, recent work stimulating ligament healing has demonstrated improved outcomes when PRP or whole blood is combined with an extracellular matrix carrier. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three components of blood (plasma, platelets, and macrophages) on the in vitro activity of ovine rotator cuff cells cultured in an extracellular matrix environment. Tenocytes were obtained from six ovine infraspinatus tendons and cultured over 14 days in an extracellular matrix scaffold with the following additives: (1) plasma (PPP), (2) plasma and platelets (PAP), (3) plasma and macrophages (PPPM), (4) plasma, platelets and macrophages (PAPM), (5) phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and (6) PBS with macrophages (PBSM). Assays measuring cellular metabolism (AlamarBlue), proliferation (Quantitative DNA assay), synthesis of collagen and cytokines (SIRCOL, TNF-α and IL-10 ELISA, and MMP assay), and collagen gene expression (qPCR) were performed over the duration of the experiment, as well as histology at the conclusion. Plasma was found to stimulate cell attachment and spreading on the scaffold, as well as cellular proliferation. Platelets also stimulated cell proliferation, cellular metabolism, transition of cells to a myofibroblast phenotype, and contraction of the scaffolds. The addition of macrophages did not have any significant effect on the sheep rotator cuff cells in vitro. In vivo studies are needed to determine whether these changes in cellular function will translate into improved tendon healing. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins and its role in atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzan, Aleksandra; Chwiłkowska, Agnieszka; Kobielarz, Magdalena; Pezowicz, Celina; Gamian, Andrzej

    2012-10-29

    Glycation consists in formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) during non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. This review is focused mainly on glycation of collagen and its role in acceleration of vascular disease. Collagen is an extracellular matrix protein characterized by unique structure forming fibrils with great anti-tensile and anti-breaking strength. The protein builds the connective tissue and is responsible for biomechanical properties of blood vessels. It is reported that higher content of glycated collagen correlates with lower elasticity and greater toughness of the vessel walls and, as a consequence, a faster rate of atherosclerosis development. Numerous mechanisms connected with AGE formation are involved in atherogenesis, among others: receptor-mediated production of free radicals, triggering an inflammatory process, activation of leukocytes and thrombocytes, facilitation of LDL binding, change in level of growth factors, adhesion molecules, MMP and some other proteins' expression. The coverages allow the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or slow down the pathological processes connected with glycation of collagen and other proteins in the artery wall. The main strategies are based on limitation of exogenous AGE, consumption of products which contain rutin, treatment with drugs which inhibit AGE formation, such as pyridoxamine, and chemicals which are able to cleave already formed AGE protein-protein crosslinks, such as ALT-711.

  3. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: a macroarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Różyńska, Krystyna; Zdunek, Małgorzata; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Wojcierowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs.

  4. Brain extracellular matrix retains connectivity in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbaev, Arthur; Frischknecht, Renato; Heine, Martin

    2015-09-29

    The formation and maintenance of connectivity are critically important for the processing and storage of information in neuronal networks. The brain extracellular matrix (ECM) appears during postnatal development and surrounds most neurons in the adult mammalian brain. Importantly, the removal of the ECM was shown to improve plasticity and post-traumatic recovery in the CNS, but little is known about the mechanisms. Here, we investigated the role of the ECM in the regulation of the network activity in dissociated hippocampal cultures grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs). We found that enzymatic removal of the ECM in mature cultures led to transient enhancement of neuronal activity, but prevented disinhibition-induced hyperexcitability that was evident in age-matched control cultures with intact ECM. Furthermore, the ECM degradation followed by disinhibition strongly affected the network interaction so that it strongly resembled the juvenile pattern seen in naïve developing cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the ECM plays an important role in retention of existing connectivity in mature neuronal networks that can be exerted through synaptic confinement of glutamate. On the other hand, removal of the ECM can play a permissive role in modification of connectivity and adaptive exploration of novel network architecture.

  5. In the presence of danger:the extracellular matrix defensive response to central nervous system injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lyn B. Jakeman; Kent E. Williams; Bryan Brautigam

    2014-01-01

    Glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) contribute to formation of the extracellular matrix, which provides adhesive sites, signaling molecules, and a diffusion barrier to enhance efifcient neurotransmission and axon potential propagation. In the normal adult CNS, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is relatively stable except in selected regions characterized by dynamic remodel-ing. However, after trauma such as a spinal cord injury or cortical contusion, the lesion epicenter becomes a focus of acute neuroinlfammation. The activation of the surrounding glial cells leads to a dramatic change in the composition of the ECM at the edges of the lesion, creating a perile-sion environment dominated by growth inhibitory molecules and restoration of the peripheral/central nervous system border. An advantage of this response is to limit the invasion of damaging cells and diffusion of toxic molecules into the spared tissue regions, but this occurs at the cost of inhibiting migration of endogenous repair cells and preventing axonal regrowth. The following review was prepared by reading and discussing over 200 research articles in the ifeld published in PubMed and selecting those with signiifcant impact and/or controversial points. This article highlights structural and functional features of the normal adult CNS ECM and then focuses on the reactions of glial cells and changes in the perilesion border that occur following spinal cord or contusive brain injury. Current research strategies directed at modifying the inhibitory perile-sion microenvironment without eliminating the protective functions of glial cell activation are discussed.

  6. Host-Parasite Interaction: Parasite-Derived and -Induced Proteases That Degrade Human Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Piña-Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic protozoa are among the most important pathogens worldwide. Diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichomoniasis, and trypanosomiasis affect millions of people. Humans are constantly threatened by infections caused by these pathogens. Parasites engage a plethora of surface and secreted molecules to attach to and enter mammalian cells. The secretion of lytic enzymes by parasites into host organs mediates critical interactions because of the invasion and destruction of interstitial tissues, enabling parasite migration to other sites within the hosts. Extracellular matrix is a complex, cross-linked structure that holds cells together in an organized assembly and that forms the basement membrane lining (basal lamina. The extracellular matrix represents a major barrier to parasites. Therefore, the evolution of mechanisms for connective-tissue degradation may be of great importance for parasite survival. Recent advances have been achieved in our understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of proteases from parasitic protozoa. The focus of this paper is to discuss the role of protozoan parasitic proteases in the degradation of host ECM proteins and the participation of these molecules as virulence factors. We divide the paper into two sections, extracellular and intracellular protozoa.

  7. Aggrecan-based extracellular matrix is an integral part of the human basal ganglia circuit.

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    Brückner, G; Morawski, M; Arendt, T

    2008-01-24

    The extracellular matrix is known to be involved in neuronal communication and the regulation of plastic changes, and also considered to protect neurons and synapses against damage. The goal of this study was to investigate how major extracellular matrix components (aggrecan, link protein, hyaluronan) constitute the pathways of the nigral system in the human basal ganglia circuit affected by neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. Here we show that aggrecan- and link protein-related components form clear regional distribution patterns, whereas hyaluronan is widely distributed in gray and white matter. Two predominant phenotypes of the aggrecan-based matrix can be discriminated: (1) perineuronal nets (PNs) and (2) axonal coats (ACs) encapsulating preterminal fibers and synaptic boutons. Clearly contoured PNs are associated with GABAergic projection neurons in the external and internal division of the globus pallidus, the lateral and reticular part of the substantia nigra, as well as subpopulations of striatal and thalamic inhibitory interneurons. Dopaminergic nigral neurons are devoid of PNs but are contacted to a different extent by matrix-coated boutons forming subnucleus-specific patterns. A very dense network of ACs is characteristic especially of the posterior lateral cell groups of the compact substantia nigra (nigrosome 1). In the subthalamic nucleus and the lateral thalamic nuclei numerous AC-associated axons were attached to principal neurons devoid of PNs. We conclude from the region-specific patterns that the aggrecan-based extracellular matrix is adapted to the fast processing of sensorimotor activities which are the therapeutic target of surgery and deep brain stimulation in the treatment of advanced stages of Parkinson's disease.

  8. Brain extracellular matrix meets COST--matrix for European research networks.

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    Gajović, Srećko; Pochet, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Today's researchers are faced with a change from curiosity-driven to mandate-driven research. These two approaches are well combined within scientific networks (Actions) supported by the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) program. The functioning of COST Actions, although directed only to networking, has a substantial impact on European science and can be compared to the functioning of the extracellular matrix in the brain, which although scarce plays a key role in initiation, maintenance, and plasticity of intercellular interactions in the nervous system. COST networks enable interdisciplinary approach and support early-stage researchers, which is a vital asset for the advancement of science.

  9. [Findings in myocardial extracellular matrix in fatal poisoning with addictive substances].

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    Vajtr, D; Kukacka, J; Adámek, T

    2002-10-01

    It have been reported that chronic drug abuse induces changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of myocardium. Matrix metaloproteinases (MMP) play important role in ECM remodelling and alteration in the ECM of myocardium. They are able to cleave ECM components and may contribute to progression of heart damage. Remodelling implies an alteration in the ECM and in the spatial orientation of cells and intercellular components. In this report we evaluated the extracellular matrix of myocardium of deceased drug abusers and controls. The myocardium of 5 toxicologically positive cases and 4 control cases were analysed by zymography of MMP, electrophoresis of collagens and histologicaly. Gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and collagenase (MMP-1) activities were increased in drug abusers compare to the controls. In contrast, alpha chain of collagen type I after 160 hours collagen extraction, were not observed in control specimens. The activation of MMP proenzymes is one of the critical steps that lead to ECM breakdown. Our findings suggest that the myocardial collagen matrix is damaged in drug abusers.

  10. Characterization of extracellular matrix macromolecules in primary cultures of equine keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollitt Christopher C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most research to date involving laminins and extracellular matrix protein function in both normal and pathological conditions involves in vitro culture of keratinocytes. Few methods are established to allow for prolonged propagation of keratinocytes from equine tissues, including the hoof lamellae. In this study we modified cell isolation and culture techniques to allow for proliferation and sub-culturing of equine lamellar keratinocytes. Additionally, the production and processing of extracellular matrix molecules by skin and lamellar keratinocytes were studied. Results Physical and proteolytic tissue separation in combination with media containing a calcium concentration of 0.6 mM in combination with additional media supplements proved optimal for proliferation and subculture of equine lamellar keratinocytes on collagen coated substratum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting studies confirmed that equine skin and lamellar keratinocytes produce Ln-332 in vitro and processing of this molecule follows that of other species. As well, matrix components including integrin alpha-6 (α6 and the hemidesmsome proteins, bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (BP180 bullous pemphigoid antigen 2 (BP230 and plectin are also expressed. Conclusions Isolation of equine keratinocytes and study of the matrix and adhesion related molecules produced by them provides a valuable tool for future work in the veterinary field.

  11. Engineering the extracellular matrix for clinical applications: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm.

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    Williams, Miguel L; Bhatia, Sujata K

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering is rapidly progressing from a research-based discipline to clinical applications. Emerging technologies could be utilized to develop therapeutics for a wide range of diseases, but many are contingent on a cell scaffold that can produce proper tissue ultrastructure. The extracellular matrix, which a cell scaffold simulates, is not merely a foundation for tissue growth but a dynamic participant in cellular crosstalk and organ homeostasis. Cells change their growth rates, recruitment, and differentiation in response to the composition, modulus, and patterning of the substrate on which they reside. Cell scaffolds can regulate these factors through precision design, functionalization, and application. The ideal therapy would utilize highly specialized cell scaffolds to best mimic the tissue of interest. This paper discusses advantages and challenges of optimized cell scaffold design in the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm for clinical applications in tracheal transplant, cardiac regeneration, and skin grafts, respectively. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Effects of various extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of HL-1 cardiomyocytes.

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    Choi, Seongkyun; Hong, Yoonmi; Lee, Insu; Huh, Dongeun; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Kim, Sun Min

    2013-01-01

    We present the physical and biochemical effects of extracellular matrixes (ECMs) on HL-1 cardiomyocytes. ECMs play major roles in cell growth, adhesion and the maintenance of native cell functions. We investigated the effects of 6 different cell culture systems: 5 different ECM-treated surfaces (fibronectin, laminin, collagen I, gelatin and a gelatin/fibronectin mixture) and 1 nontreated surface. Surface morphology was scanned and analyzed using atomic force microscopy in order to investigate the physical effects of ECMs. The attachment, growth, viability, proliferation and phenotype of the cells were analyzed using phase-contrast microscopy and immunocytochemistry to elucidate the biochemical effects of ECMs. Our study provides basic information for understanding cell-ECM interactions and should be utilized in future cardiac cell research and tissue engineering.

  13. Lib, transcriptionally induced in senile plaque-associated astrocytes, promotes glial migration through extracellular matrix.

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    Satoh, Kazuki; Hata, Mitsumi; Shimizu, Tomoko; Yokota, Hiroshi; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Kosaka, Kenji; Yamada, Tatsuo

    2005-09-23

    In an effort to identify astrocyte-derived molecules that may be intimately associated with progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lib, a type I transmembrane protein belonging to leucine-rich repeat superfamily, has been identified as a distinctly inducible gene, responsive to beta-amyloid as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines in astrocytes. To evaluate the roles of Lib in AD, we investigated Lib expression in AD brain. In non-AD brain, Lib mRNA has been detected in neurons but not in quiescent astrocytes. On the contrary, in AD brain, Lib mRNA is expressed in activated astrocytes associated with senile plaques, but not expressed in neurons around lesions. Lib-expressing glioma cells displayed promotion of migration ability through reconstituted extracellular matrix and recombinant Lib protein bound to constituents of extracellular matrix. These observations suggest that Lib may contribute to regulation of cell-matrix adhesion interactions with respect to astrocyte recruitment around senile plaques in AD brain.

  14. Abnormal recruitment of extracellular matrix proteins by excess Notch3 ECD: a new pathomechanism in CADASIL.

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    Monet-Leprêtre, Marie; Haddad, Iman; Baron-Menguy, Céline; Fouillot-Panchal, Maï; Riani, Meriem; Domenga-Denier, Valérie; Dussaule, Claire; Cognat, Emmanuel; Vinh, Joelle; Joutel, Anne

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, or CADASIL, one of the most common inherited small vessel diseases of the brain, is characterized by a progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells and extracellular matrix accumulation. The disease is caused by highly stereotyped mutations within the extracellular domain of the NOTCH3 receptor (Notch3(ECD)) that result in an odd number of cysteine residues. While CADASIL-associated NOTCH3 mutations differentially affect NOTCH3 receptor function and activity, they all are associated with early accumulation of Notch3(ECD)-containing aggregates in small vessels. We still lack mechanistic explanation to link NOTCH3 mutations with small vessel pathology. Herein, we hypothesized that excess Notch3(ECD) could recruit and sequester functionally important proteins within small vessels of the brain. We performed biochemical, nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and immunohistochemical analyses, using cerebral and arterial tissue derived from patients with CADASIL and mouse models of CADASIL that exhibit vascular lesions in the end- and early-stage of the disease, respectively. Biochemical fractionation of brain and artery samples demonstrated that mutant Notch3(ECD) accumulates in disulphide cross-linked detergent-insoluble aggregates in mice and patients with CADASIL. Further proteomic and immunohistochemical analyses identified two functionally important extracellular matrix proteins, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) and vitronectin (VTN) that are sequestered into Notch3(ECD)-containing aggregates. Using cultured cells, we show that increased levels or aggregation of Notch3 enhances the formation of Notch3(ECD)-TIMP3 complex, promoting TIMP3 recruitment and accumulation. In turn, TIMP3 promotes complex formation including NOTCH3 and VTN. In vivo, brain vessels from mice and patients with CADASIL exhibit elevated levels of both insoluble cross

  15. MatrixDB, the extracellular matrix interaction database: updated content, a new navigator and expanded functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, G; Salza, R; Multedo, D; Thierry-Mieg, N; Ricard-Blum, S

    2015-01-01

    MatrixDB (http://matrixdb.ibcp.fr) is a freely available database focused on interactions established by extracellular proteins and polysaccharides. It is an active member of the International Molecular Exchange (IMEx) consortium and has adopted the PSI-MI standards for annotating and exchanging interaction data, either at the MIMIx or IMEx level. MatrixDB content has been updated by curation and by importing extracellular interaction data from other IMEx databases. Other major changes include the creation of a new w