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Sample records for extra-familial partner support

  1. Parental Support, Partner Support, and the Trajectories of Mastery from Adolescence to Early Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjadi, Florensia F.; Lorenz, Frederick O.; Wickrama, K. A. S.; Conger, Rand D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the long-term associations among parental support, extra-familial partner support, and the trajectories of sense of mastery from adolescence to the early adulthood years. Ten waves of panel data collected over a 16-year period from the Iowa Family Transitions Project (N = 527) were used to test the hypotheses. Results indicated…

  2. Partner Status, Social Support, and Psychological Adjustment during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Lawrence H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied partner status, social support, and psychological adjustment of pregnant women. Administered Brief Symptom Inventory to predominantly minority and lower-income pregnant women (N=157) categorized as married, single/partnered, or single/unpartnered. Found single/partnered women were at least risk for emotional disequilibrium and suggested…

  3. The moderating role of partner support among smokers and abstainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Graça Pereira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the moderating effect of partner support in the relationship between psychological morbidity and quality of life among smokers and abstainers. Methods: This observational cross-sectional study assessed “partner support”, “psychological morbidity” (depression, anxiety and stress and “quality of life” in a convenience sample of 224 smokers and 169 abstainers through questionnaires that were validated and analyzed using regression and simple slopes. Results: Partner support (positive and negative among smokers appeared as a moderator in the relationship between psychological morbidity and physical quality of life. As for mental quality of life, the partner support did not have a moderating effect. The results among abstainers are similar to those found among smokers. When positive partner support is strong, there is an opposite relationship between psychological morbidity and quality of life. However, this relationship is stronger when negative partner support is strong and, in this case, the relationship between psychological morbidity and quality of life is negative. Conclusion: Partner support, whether positive or negative, was an important moderator concerning quality of life and psychological morbidity of smokers and abstainers. doi:10.5020/18061230.2013.p349

  4. Parents as partners: building collaborations to support the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents as partners: building collaborations to support the development of school ... South African Journal of Education ... children to develop the abilities underlying vital school-readiness skills during whole-class, therapeutic group sessions.

  5. How a Supportive Partner May Increase Relationship Satisfaction

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    Cramer, Duncan

    2006-01-01

    The way in which satisfaction with a romantic relationship may be affected by how supportive a partner is and how constructively they deal with conflict in that relationship was examined in young adults. Both greater support and less conflict were found to be independently associated with relationship satisfaction, implying that both are necessary…

  6. Intra- and Extra-Familial Child Molestation as Pathways Building on Parental and Relational Deficits and Personality Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaerts, Stefan; Buschman, J.; Kunst, M. J. J.; Winkel, F. W.

    This article addresses the intra- and extra-familial pathways of child molestation. The data presented show preliminary evidence that the difference between the intra- and extra-familial routes can be explained by schizoid and avoidant (intra-familial) and antisocial and passive-aggressive

  7. Intra- and Extra-Familial Child Molestation as Pathways Building on Parental and Relational Deficits and Personality Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaerts, Stefan; Buschman, J.; Kunst, M. J. J.; Winkel, F. W.

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the intra- and extra-familial pathways of child molestation. The data presented show preliminary evidence that the difference between the intra- and extra-familial routes can be explained by schizoid and avoidant (intra-familial) and antisocial and passive-aggressive (extra-fa

  8. Changes in reciprocal support provision and need-based support from partners of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Nina; Burkert, Silke; Roigas, Jan; Gralla, Oliver

    2011-07-01

    We examined need-related and reciprocal provision of support in couples facing radical prostatectomy and its sequelae, including patients' urinary incontinence. Partners' reciprocal support provision to patients was assumed to drop from prior to until after patients' surgeries and increase again in the following months, while need-related indicators were assumed to remain unique correlates throughout. In this study of German prostatectomy patients and their partners, N = 141 couples provided data on 4 measurement occasions from presurgery to 1-year postsurgery. Need-based predictors of partners' support provision were patients' mobilized support, such as efforts to obtain advice or comfort, and degree of postsurgery incontinence. Strength of association between partner-received and provided supports served as an indicator of reciprocal support provision. Data suggested that partners' reciprocal support provision dropped significantly postsurgery and then increased again in the following months. This was true for emotional as well as instrumental reciprocal support provision. Findings also indicated that one need-based predictor of partners' support provision, patients' mobilization of support from their partners, remained a unique correlate of partners' support provision to patients. Reciprocal support provision in couples may vary during the adaptation to illness-related functional impairment and coexist with need-oriented support provision.

  9. Quality of life in cancer patients: The role of optimism, hopelessness, and partner support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson-Lilius, Mila; Julkunen, Juhani; Hietanen, Päivi

    2007-02-01

    The interaction of optimism, hopelessness and social support as predictors of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) among seriously ill people is not well understood. Also, the impact of partner characteristics on patient quality of life has often been overlooked. In this study the relationships between optimism, hopelessness, partner support and HRQL were investigated in 155 cancer patients and their partners. Special attention was given to the effects of optimism and hopelessness as mediators and moderators in the partner support-HRQL relationship. The impact of partner optimism and hopelessness on perceived partner support and patient HRQL was also studied. The results indicated substantial gender differences in the relationships between the study variables. High levels of partner support were associated with female patients' optimistic appraisals, and together they predicted better HRQL at 8 months follow-up. Partial support was found for the effect of optimism as a mediator. For male patients, low hopelessness was the key variable predicting good HRQL. Clear evidence for the moderator effects of optimism/hopelessness was not found, and the expected impact of partner's characteristics on partner support or patient HRQL could not be confirmed. Although partner support, patient optimism and hopelessness all appeared to be important determinants of HRQL in cancer patients, the relationships between these variables differed by gender. The proposed mediation and moderation models needs to be confirmed in future studies.

  10. Communication Partners Supporting Children with Complex Communication Needs Who Use AAC: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Stephanie Y.; Jones, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Communication partners who efficiently use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) are essential interaction partners for children learning to communicate using AAC. This systematic review examines studies targeting interventions designed to help communication partners support children with complex communication needs who use AAC.…

  11. Communication Partners Supporting Children with Complex Communication Needs Who Use AAC: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Stephanie Y.; Jones, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Communication partners who efficiently use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) are essential interaction partners for children learning to communicate using AAC. This systematic review examines studies targeting interventions designed to help communication partners support children with complex communication needs who use AAC.…

  12. Partner support and maternal depression in the context of the Iowa floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Rebecca L; O'Hara, Michael W; Hart, Kimberly J; McCabe, Jennifer E; Williamson, J Austin; Laplante, David P; Yu, Chunbo; King, Suzanne

    2014-12-01

    A systematic investigation of the role of prenatal partner support in perinatal maternal depression was conducted. Separate facets of partner support were examined (i.e., received support and support adequacy) and a multidimensional model of support was applied to investigate the effects of distinct types of support (i.e., informational, physical comfort, emotional/esteem, and tangible support). Both main and stress-buffering models of partner support were tested in the context of prenatal maternal stress resulting from exposure to a natural disaster. Questionnaire data were analyzed from 145 partnered women using growth curve analytic techniques. Results indicate that received support interacts with maternal flood stress during pregnancy to weaken the association between stress and trajectories of maternal depression from pregnancy to 30 months postpartum. Support adequacy did not interact with stress, but was associated with levels of depressive symptoms controlling for maternal stress and received support. Results demonstrate the distinct roles of various facets and types of support for a more refined explanatory model of prenatal partner support and perinatal maternal depression. Results inform both main effect and stress buffering models of partner support as they apply to the etiology of perinatal maternal depression, and highlight the importance of promoting partner support during pregnancy that matches support preferences.

  13. Partnering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    to meet the de- successful despite the site challenges and sign intent, business changes during the project. (Groves was acquired by the Torno ...34 Complete the contract without need for America company during construction- litigation. Torno embraced Partnering and continued the process which was

  14. Perceived partner support in pregnancy predicts lower maternal and infant distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Lynlee R Tanner; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Westling, Erika; Rini, Christine; Glynn, Laura M; Hobel, Calvin J; Sandman, Curt A

    2012-06-01

    Maternal postpartum emotional distress is quite common and can pose significant risk to mothers and infants. The current study investigated mothers' relationships with their partners during pregnancy and tested the hypotheses that perception of prenatal partner support is a significant predictor of changes in maternal emotional distress from midpregnancy to postpartum, and contributes to maternal ratings of infant distress to novelty. Using a prospective longitudinal design, 272 adult pregnant women were interviewed regarding their partner support, relationship satisfaction, and interpersonal security (attachment style and willingness to seek out support), and they completed standardized measures of prenatal symptoms of depression and anxiety (distress). At 6 to 8 weeks' postpartum, mothers reported these symptoms again and completed measures of their infants' temperament. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test direct and indirect contributions of partner support, relationship satisfaction, and interpersonal security to maternal and infant postpartum distress. Mothers who perceived stronger social support from their partners midpregnancy had lower emotional distress postpartum after controlling for their distress in early pregnancy, and their infants were reported to be less distressed in response to novelty. Partner support mediated the effects of mothers' interpersonal security and relationship satisfaction on maternal and infant outcomes. A high-quality, supportive partner relationship during pregnancy may contribute to improved maternal and infant well-being postpartum, indicating a potential role for partner relationships in mental health interventions, with possible benefits for infants as well. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Partnered Development of Cryogenic Life Support Technologies Project

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    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Partnering with National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to develop several cryogenically based life support technologies to be used in mine...

  16. Intra- and extra-familial adverse childhood experiences and a history of childhood psychosomatic disorders among Japanese university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munemoto Takao

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japan has been witnessing a considerable increase in the number of children with psychosomatic disorders. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the risk of psychosomatic disorder in adolescents and intra- and extra-familial adverse childhood experiences (ACEs. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 1592 Japanese university students (52% male, mean age 19.9 years who completed a survey about intra- and extra-familial ACEs and the incidence of childhood psychosomatic disorders. Intra-familial ACEs included domestic violence, physical violence, emotional abuse, illness in household, parental divorce, no parental affection, and dysfunctional family. Extra-familial ACEs included physical violence or negative recognition by teachers, being bullied in elementary or junior high school, or sexual violence. Results The frequency of psychosomatic disorders among the respondents was 14.8%. Among the 7 intra-familial ACEs, emotional abuse (relative risk, RR = 1.9 and illness in household (RR = 1.7 increased the risk of psychosomatic disorders. Estimates of the relative risk for the 5 extra-familial ACEs were statistically significant and ranged from 1.5 for being bullied in elementary school or physical violence from teachers to 2.4. Students who had 3 or more intra-familial ACEs and 2 or more extra-familial ACEs had a 3.0 relative risk for psychosomatic disorder. Conclusion These results suggest that intra- and extra-familial ACEs are associated with the development of psychosomatic disorders. Therefore, sufficient evaluation of ACEs should be performed in adolescent patients with psychosomatic disorder.

  17. Intra- and extra-familial adverse childhood experiences and a history of childhood psychosomatic disorders among Japanese university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akinori; Yamanaka, Takao; Hirakawa, Tadatoshi; Koga, Yasuyuki; Minomo, Ryosuke; Munemoto, Takao; Tei, Chuwa

    2007-01-01

    Background Japan has been witnessing a considerable increase in the number of children with psychosomatic disorders. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the risk of psychosomatic disorder in adolescents and intra- and extra-familial adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). Methods A retrospective cohort study of 1592 Japanese university students (52% male, mean age 19.9 years) who completed a survey about intra- and extra-familial ACEs and the incidence of childhood psychosomatic disorders. Intra-familial ACEs included domestic violence, physical violence, emotional abuse, illness in household, parental divorce, no parental affection, and dysfunctional family. Extra-familial ACEs included physical violence or negative recognition by teachers, being bullied in elementary or junior high school, or sexual violence. Results The frequency of psychosomatic disorders among the respondents was 14.8%. Among the 7 intra-familial ACEs, emotional abuse (relative risk, RR = 1.9) and illness in household (RR = 1.7) increased the risk of psychosomatic disorders. Estimates of the relative risk for the 5 extra-familial ACEs were statistically significant and ranged from 1.5 for being bullied in elementary school or physical violence from teachers to 2.4. Students who had 3 or more intra-familial ACEs and 2 or more extra-familial ACEs had a 3.0 relative risk for psychosomatic disorder. Conclusion These results suggest that intra- and extra-familial ACEs are associated with the development of psychosomatic disorders. Therefore, sufficient evaluation of ACEs should be performed in adolescent patients with psychosomatic disorder. PMID:17407551

  18. Helping each other grow: romantic partner support, self-improvement, and relationship quality.

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    Overall, Nickola C; Fletcher, Garth J O; Simpson, Jeffry A

    2010-11-01

    This research tested whether and how partners' support of self-improvement efforts influences recipients' relationship evaluations and self-improvement success. Study 1 provided an initial test of predictions using self-reports (N = 150). Study 2 assessed support behavior exhibited in couples' (N = 47) discussions of self-improvement desires, and tracked relationship quality and self-improvement every 3 months for 1 year. More nurturing and action-facilitating partner support was more helpful to recipients, whereas partners who criticized and invalidated recipients were less helpful. Receiving more help from the partner, in turn, predicted greater relationship quality and more self-improvement. More negative support seeking also predicted lower self-improvement because recipients' behavior elicited less partner help. These effects were not attributable to partners' general warmth and understanding, global self or relationship evaluations, how much recipients desired or tried to change, or whether targeted attributes posed relationship problems. This research documents the powerful influence that partners' help has on recipients' personal growth.

  19. Benevolent Sexism and Support of Romantic Partner's Goals: Undermining Women's Competence While Fulfilling Men's Intimacy Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Matthew D; Overall, Nickola C

    2015-09-01

    The current research demonstrates how benevolent sexism functions to undermine women's competence while facilitating men's access to heterosexual intimacy by prompting different support behaviors by men and women. Objective coders rated the support provision exhibited during heterosexual couples' (N = 100) video-recorded discussions of each other's personal goals. Men who endorsed benevolent sexism provided more dependency-oriented support, including directly providing plans and solutions and neglecting the recipient's own abilities, which led to their female partners feeling less competent and less positively regarded. In contrast, women who endorsed benevolent sexism provided greater relationship-oriented support, characterized by affection and emphasizing the positive relationship outcomes associated with their partner's goals, which led their male partners to perceive greater regard and intimacy in their relationship. This study is the first to investigate how benevolent sexism prompts naturalistic support behaviors that can impede women's capacity for independent success while supporting the fulfillment of men's intimacy needs.

  20. Partner selection supported by opaque reputation promotes cooperative behavior

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    Capraro, Valerio; Vilone, Daniele; Paolucci, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Reputation plays a major role in human societies, and it has been proposed as an explanation for the evolution of cooperation. While the majority of previous studies equate reputation with a transparent and complete history of players' past decisions, in real life, reputations are often based on personal evaluations, and so they are often ambiguous and opaque. For example, reputation has become central in online systems, in which history of others' past actions is not available, and sources are unknown, as well as the metrics used for the evaluation. Using web-based experiments, we explore the extent to which obscure reputation works in isolating defectors, and whether it can promote cooperative behaviors. Our results show that subjects cooperate much less with low-reputation partners than with medium- or high-reputation ones, even if they know nothing about the way in which that reputation was gained. Next, we explore whether the mere awareness of being evaluated leads people to change their behavior. We fin...

  1. How online counselling can support partners of individuals with problem alcohol or other drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Samara R; Rodda, Simone; Lubman, Dan I; Manning, Victoria; Yap, Marie B H

    2017-07-01

    Problematic alcohol and other drug (AOD) use impacts partners heavily, with an increased risk of experiencing domestic violence, financial stressors, health problems and relationship challenges. However, partners often do not seek help or support due to a range of barriers (e.g., shame, stigma, practical constraints). Online counselling may facilitate help-seeking by overcoming many of these barriers, however research is needed to explore what motivates partners to contact online counselling services, their experiences and needs, and how partners can be best supported online. One hundred transcripts of partners of individuals with problem AOD use were sampled from a 24-hour national AOD synchronous online chat counselling service. Descriptive content analysis was used to investigate themes related to help-seeking. Three broad themes, with seven sub-themes, were identified: (i) the reason for accessing online counselling (seeking advice, wanting to talk), (ii) discussing help-seeking and coping processes (past/present help-seeking or coping strategies, barriers and facilitators to seeking help and change), and (iii) planning for future assistance (future planning, treatment preferences). Partners wanted to talk about their concerns with a non-judgemental professional. However, the majority of help-seekers wanted advice and assistance in problem-solving, coping and the process of seeking further help. Future studies need to examine the impact of online help-seeking by partners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Couples and breast cancer: women's mood and partners' marital satisfaction predicting support perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeding, Sara E; Pukay-Martin, Nicole D; Baucom, Donald H; Porter, Laura S; Kirby, Jennifer S; Gremore, Tina M; Keefe, Francis J

    2014-10-01

    Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer can experience an array of psychosocial difficulties; however, social support, particularly from a spouse, has been shown to have a protective function during this time. This study examined the ways in which a woman's daily mood, pain, and fatigue, and her spouse's marital satisfaction predict the woman's report of partner support in the context of breast cancer. Pretest data from a larger intervention study and multilevel modeling were used to examine the effects of women's daily mood, pain, and fatigue and average levels of mood, pain, and fatigue on women's report of social support received from her partner, as well as how the effects of mood interacted with partners' marital satisfaction. Results show that on days in which women reported higher levels of negative or positive mood, as well as on days they reported more pain and fatigue, they reported receiving more support. Women who, on average, reported higher levels of positive mood tended to report receiving more support than those who, on average, reported lower positive mood. However, average levels of negative mood were not associated with support. Higher average levels of fatigue but not pain were associated with higher support. Finally, women whose husbands reported higher levels of marital satisfaction reported receiving more partner support, but husbands' marital satisfaction did not moderate the effect of women's mood on support. Implications of these findings are discussed relative to assisting couples during this difficult time in their lives.

  3. Support for Emergency Department Screening for Intimate Partner Violence Depends on Perceived Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witting, Michael D.; Furuno, Jon P.; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Krugman, Scott D.; Perisse, Andre R. S.; Limcangco, Rhona

    2006-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) screening for intimate partner violence (IPV) faces logistic difficulties and has uncertain efficacy. We surveyed 146 ED visitors and 108 ED care providers to compare their support for ED IPV screening in three hypothetical scenarios of varying IPV risk. Visitor support for screening was 5 times higher for the high-risk…

  4. Community Violence, Social Support Networks, Ethnic Group Differences, and Male Perpetration of Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Chitra; Rajah, Valli; Gentile, Katie; Collado, Lillian; Kavanagh, Ann Marie

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined how witnessing community violence influenced social support networks and how these networks were associated with male-to-female intimate partner violence (IPV) in ethnically diverse male college students. The authors assessed whether male social support members themselves had perpetrated IPV (male network violence) and whether…

  5. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Partnered Development of Cryogenic Life Support Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Partnering with National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to develop several cyrogenically based life support technologies to be used in mine escape and rescue scenarios. Technologies developed for mine rescue directly benefit future NASA rescue and ground operation missions.

  6. Hold on, for each other: supporting partners of cancer patients via eHealth and positive psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köhle, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Partners of cancer patients are an essential pillar in the cancer trajectory. The patient’s cancer can have an enormous impact on the partner’s life and (mental) health. To support them, psychological interventions are needed. However, partners of cancer patients are often extremely busy and support

  7. Rural Australian Women's Legal Help Seeking for Intimate Partner Violence: Women Intimate Partner Violence Victim Survivors' Perceptions of Criminal Justice Support Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragusa, Angela T.

    2013-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a widespread, ongoing, and complex global social problem, whose victims continue to be largely women. Women often prefer to rely on friends and family for IPV help, yet when informal support is unavailable they remain hesitant to contact formal services, particularly legal support for many reasons. This study…

  8. Partner relationship, social support and perinatal distress among pregnant Icelandic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Sigridur Sia; Thome, Marga; Steingrimsdottir, Thora; Lydsdottir, Linda Bara; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik; Olafsdottir, Halldora; Swahnberg, Katarina

    2017-02-01

    It is inferred that perinatal distress has adverse effects on the prospective mother and the health of the foetus/infant. More knowledge is needed to identify which symptoms of perinatal distress should be assessed during pregnancy and to shed light on the impact of women's satisfaction with their partner relationship on perinatal distress. The current study aimed to generate knowledge about the association of the partner relationship and social support when women are dealing with perinatal distress expressed by symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress. A structured interview was conducted with 562 Icelandic women who were screened three times during pregnancy with the Edinburgh Depression Scale and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale. Of these, 360 had symptoms of distress and 202 belonged to a non-distress group. The women answered the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. The study had a multicentre prospective design allowing for exploration of association with perinatal distress. Women who were dissatisfied in their partner relationship were four times more likely to experience perinatal distress. Women with perinatal distress scored highest on the DASS Stress Subscale and the second highest scores were found on the Anxiety Subscale. Satisfaction in partner relationship is related to perinatal distress and needs to be assessed when health care professionals take care of distressed pregnant women, her partner and her family. Assessment of stress and anxiety should be included in the evaluation of perinatal distress, along with symptoms of depression. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Trial of Telephone Support Services to Prevent Further Intimate Partner Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jack; Scribano, Philip V; Marshall, Jessica; Nadkarni, Radha; Hayes, John; Kelleher, Kelly J

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a randomized-controlled trial of telephone support services (TSS) versus enhanced usual care (EUC) for women who had reported intimate partner violence (IPV) within the past year during a visit to a pediatric emergency department. TSS nurse interventionists identified appropriate referrals to community programs, helped participants by problem-solving barriers to obtaining these local services, and provided social support. Three hundred women, ages 18 years and above were recruited. The TSS and EUC groups did not differ on any outcome variable, including IPV victimization, feelings of chronic vulnerability to a perpetrator, depressive symptoms, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms.

  10. Psychometric evaluation of novel measures of partner interfering and supportive behaviors among women with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follingstad, Diane R; Coker, Ann L; Garcia, Lisandra S; Bush, Heather M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of complementary and novel measures of partner interfering and partner supportive behaviors in cancer care (PIB-C and PSB-C). Structured telephone interviews were conducted with 378 women (aged 18-79) in partnered relationships and recruited from the Kentucky Cancer Registry. Psychometric analyses of PIB-C and PSB-C were used to determine scale reliability, and scale construct and predictive validity (correlations with indicators of partner abuse, symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress after cancer). Cronbach's alpha and split-half calculations indicated excellent internal consistency of the 20-item PIB-C (0.936 and 0.87, respectively) and 12-item PSB-C (0.930 and 0.89). Three thematic clusters for the PIB-C and two for the PSB-C were identified through factor analyses. Regarding construct validity, higher PIB-C and lower PSB-C scores were associated with a measure of psychological impacts from abuse. Predictive validity was suggested through (1) lower PSB-C associated with depression, (2) higher PIB-C associated with anxiety, and (3) higher perceived stress associated with higher PIB-C/lower PSB-C scores. Both PIB-C and PSB-C have strong psychometric properties and distinguish partner behaviors more likely to negatively impact women's depression, anxiety, and stress during cancer care/recovery. Use of these measures may assist clinical teams in comprehensively assessing women patients' home environment to best ensure cancer care/recovery. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The Yin and Yang of support from significant others: Influence of general social support and partner support of avoidance in the context of treatment for social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapee, Ronald M; Peters, Lorna; Carpenter, Leigh; Gaston, Jonathan E

    2015-06-01

    Support from social networks is generally considered to protect against mental disorder but in some circumstances support for negative behaviours (such as avoidance) may be counterproductive. Given the critical interplay between social anxiety disorder and social interactions, it is surprising that the relationship of support from significant others to this disorder has received so little attention. The current study evaluated the reciprocal relationships between perceived social support and perceived partner support for avoidance behaviours (avoidance support) among a sample of 131 participants with social anxiety disorder who were assessed three times within the context of a treatment outcome study. A new measure of partner support for avoidance behaviours was developed, called the Avoidance Support Measure, and showed adequate internal consistency and construct validity. Correlations at baseline showed significant negative relationships between perceived social support and social anxiety and significant positive relationships between avoidance support and social anxiety. Path analysis showed that perceived social support at Times 1 and 2 negatively predicted future social anxiety at Times 2 and 3. On the other hand, only a single predictive relationship involving avoidance support was significant and showed that social anxiety at Time 1 positively predicted avoidance support at Time 2. These early results point to the different ways that support from significant others might relate to social anxiety and suggest that further work in this area may be fruitful.

  12. Hold on, for each other: supporting partners of cancer patients via eHealth and positive psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köhle, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Partners of cancer patients are an essential pillar in the cancer trajectory. The patient’s cancer can have an enormous impact on the partner’s life and (mental) health. To support them, psychological interventions are needed. However, partners of cancer patients are often extremely busy and

  13. The experience of black fathers concerning support for their wives/partners during labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Sengane

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article was to describe the experience of black fathers concerning support for their wives/partners during labour. The research design entailed an exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study that was contextual to clinical nursing. A phenomenological approach to nursing research was utilized, whereby unstructured interviews were conducted with ten black fathers. Two groups of black fathers were purposively selected for the study. Group 1 consisted of fathers who provided support to their wives/partners during labour and Group 2 consisted of fathers who did not provide support during labour. A literature control was undertaken to verify and recontextualize data. The results indicate that most of the fathers in Group 1 experienced negative feelings of nervousness, helplessness and anxiety due to lack of information concerning childbirth. These were coupled with positive feelings such as excitement, overwhelming delight and a sense of miracle. Most of the fathers in Group 2 expressed a feeling of wanting to be there. Lack of information, fear and cultural factors were identified as stumbling blocks. Conclusions drawn from the study included positive attitudes that needed to be enhanced as well as negative attitudes that needed counteracting. The guidelines were based on overcoming the following: cultural taboos; lack of knowledge and fears concerning childbirth; lack of interest in childbirth; and childbirth being regarded as a woman’s department.

  14. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Vermetten

    2014-08-01

    members. Conclusion: This analysis demonstrated that in all five partners state-of-the-art preventative mental healthcare was included in the last deployment in Afghanistan, including a positive approach towards strengthening the mental resilience, a focus on self-regulatory skills and self-empowerment, and several initiatives that were well-integrated in a military context. These initiatives were partly/completely implemented by the military/colleagues/supervisors and applicable during several phases of the deployment cycle. Important new developments in operational mental health support are recognition of the role of social leadership and enhancement of operational peer support. This requires awareness of mental problems that will contribute to reduction of the barriers to care in case of problems. Finally, comparing mental health support services across countries can contribute to optimal preparation for the challenges of military deployment.

  15. Longitudinal Investigation of Depression, Intimate Partner Violence, and Supports Among Vulnerable Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridings, Leigh E; Beasley, Lana O; Bohora, Som B; Daer, Jennifer L; Owora, Arthur; Silovsky, Jane

    2016-03-27

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) affects nearly 12 million individuals and their families each year in the United States. Many negative outcomes are associated with IPV, with depression being one of the most prevalent mental health problems. Most previous studies on IPV have used cross-sectional designs to examine the potential protective effects of support on depression. The current study fills this gap by conducting a longitudinal investigation of the roles of social support and family resources on depression among caregivers of young children. The study sample consisted of 548 female caregivers. Findings suggest that among those with an IPV history, those with higher social support reported lower depressive symptoms than those with less social support. No significant interaction was found for family resources and IPV. Rather, family resources had a main effect on depressive symptoms with no differential impact based on IPV status. Findings suggest the importance of connecting vulnerable families to supports such as social support and family resources to help mitigate depressive symptoms. Future research should consider the underlying mechanisms of social support as a protective factor among IPV victims with depression.

  16. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermetten, Eric; Greenberg, Neil; Boeschoten, Manon A.; Delahaije, Roos; Jetly, Rakesh; Castro, Carl A.; McFarlane, Alexander C.

    2014-01-01

    Background For years there has been a tremendous gap in our understanding of the mental health effects of deployment and the efforts by military forces at trying to minimize or mitigate these. Many military forces have recently systematized the mental support that is provided to support operational deployments. However, the rationale for doing so and the consequential allocation of resources are felt to vary considerably across North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) International Security Assistance (ISAF) partners. This review aims to compare the organization and practice of mental support by five partnering countries in the recent deployment in Afghanistan in order to identify and compare the key methods and structures for delivering mental health support, describe bottlenecks and illustrate new developments. Method Information was collected through document analysis and semi-structured interviews with key military mental healthcare stakeholders. The review resulted from close collaboration between key military mental healthcare professionals within the Australian Defense Forces (ADF), Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), United Kingdom Armed Forces (UK), Netherlands Armed Forces (NLD), and the United States Army (US). Key stakeholders were interviewed about the mental health support provided during a serviceperson's military career. The main items discussed were training, prevention, early identification, intervention, and aftercare in the field of mental health. Results All forces reported that much attention was paid to mental health during the individual's military career, including deployment. In doing so there was much overlap between the rationale and applied methods. The main method of providing support was through training and education. The educative focus was to strengthen the mental resilience of individual soldiers while providing a range of mental healthcare services. All forces had abandoned standard psychological debriefing after critical incidents

  17. The Role of Health Care Provider and Partner Decisional Support in Patients' Cancer Treatment Decision-Making Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer-Wackerly, Angela L; Krieger, Janice L; Rhodes, Nancy D

    2017-01-01

    Cancer patients rely on multiple sources of support when making treatment decisions; however, most research studies examine the influence of health care provider support while the influence of family member support is understudied. The current study fills this gap by examining the influence of health care providers and partners on decision-making satisfaction. In a cross-sectional study via an online Qualtrics panel, we surveyed cancer patients who reported that they had a spouse or romantic partner when making cancer treatment decisions (n = 479). Decisional support was measured using 5-point, single-item scales for emotional support, informational support, informational-advice support, and appraisal support. Decision-making satisfaction was measured using Holmes-Rovner and colleagues' (1996) Satisfaction With Decision Scale. We conducted a mediated regression analysis to examine treatment decision-making satisfaction for all participants and a moderated mediation analysis to examine treatment satisfaction among those patients offered a clinical trial. Results indicated that partner support significantly and partially mediated the relationship between health care provider support and patients' decision-making satisfaction but that results did not vary by enrollment in a clinical trial. This study shows how and why decisional support from partners affects communication between health care providers and cancer patients.

  18. Impact of help-seeking behavior and partner support on postpartum depression among Saudi women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almutairi AF

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Adel F Almutairi,1,2 Mahmoud Salam,1,2 Samiyah Alanazi,1 Manal Alweldawi,1 Najad Alsomali,1 Najla Alotaibi1 1King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences, 2Science and Technology Unit, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: Many studies have discovered a number of factors that can contribute to the risk of developing postpartum depression (PPD, including, but not limited to, life stressors, lack of social support, low economic status, and quality of the marital relationship. However, these studies were conducted in various countries with participants from different cultural backgrounds.Purpose: This study aimed to examine the impact of general help-seeking behavior (GHSB and partner support (PS on PPD among Saudi women in primary health care clinics in Riyadh city.Methods: Data were collected by using self-administered measures of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS, General Help-Seeking Questionnaire (GHSQ, and Partner Support Scale (PSS. Frequency distribution was used to analyze the categorical data, and Student’s t-test and one-way analysis of variance were employed to compare the numerical data. Linear regression analysis was used to control for all confounders.Results: The findings showed that 9% and 28% of women had good and poor GHSB, respectively, 16% had poor PS, and 25.7% could be classified as probably depressed. Negative relationships between GHSB versus PPD and PS versus PPD were observed. Adjusting by mode of delivery and controlling for confounders in linear regression showed that women who underwent normal vaginal delivery, with higher para rates (β=0.250, t=2.063 and lower PS scores (β=-0.238, t=-2.038, were more likely to suffer higher depression scores (adj P=0.043 and adj P=0.045, respectively. Women who underwent cesarean-section, with postpartum duration ≥6 weeks (β=0.374, t=2.082, were more likely to

  19. Informal support for women and intimate partner violence: the crucial yet ambivalent role of neighbours in urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell-Rood, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Women who experience intimate partner violence often rely on informal support to mitigate intimate partner violence's health effects. Yet there is little known about who gives the support and how it is provided. This paper explores from whom and how low-income women experiencing domestic violence in urban India seek informal support. In South Asia, women's reliance on kin for support is culturally valued, yet the urban social context makes it more likely that they will access such support from non-kin when they experience intimate partner violence. The paper draws on observations and interviews with 10 families collected over 14 months of in-depth ethnographic research in one Delhi slum community. Using a case study approach to explore women's responses to violence longitudinally, it was possible to track how women drew on support. Results show that even as women sought emotional support and direct intervention from their neighbours to deal with their domestic violence, they restricted these relationships, faced stigma, and emphasised the need to protect their families. Understanding the informal, but deeply ambivalent, systems of social support that women engage to deal with intimate partner violence is a first step toward strengthening such networks, a key recommendation to stem the health impacts of domestic violence.

  20. Disclosure of intimate partner violence to informal social support network members: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylaska, Kateryna M; Edwards, Katie M

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a review of the published literature to date on rates, experiences, and correlates of victims' disclosure of or help seeking for intimate partner violence to informal social support network members (e.g., friends, family, classmates, and coworkers). Research indicates that the majority of individuals disclose to at least one informal support and that victims' disclosure is associated with a number of demographic (e.g., victims' sex, age, race), intrapersonal (e.g., victims' feelings of shame/embarrassment, perception of control over abuse), and situational (e.g., violence frequency and severity, if abuse is witnessed) factors. Following disclosure, victims experience a wide range of positive (e.g., believing the victim's reports, validating the victim's experiences) and negative (e.g. disbelieving, blaming the victim) social reactions, with positive reactions rated as the most common and most helpful forms of support by victims. Finally, a review of psychological correlates associated with reactions to disclosure indicates that positive social reactions are associated with more psychological health benefits and fewer negative health symptoms, whereas negative social reactions were associated with increased negative psychological health symptoms. Future research methodologies and implications for violence prevention, intervention, and policy are discussed.

  1. Hypermasculinity, intimate partner violence, sexual aggression, social support, and child maltreatment risk in urban, heterosexual fathers taking parenting classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez Guerrero, Desi Alonzo

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between hypermasculinity, sexual aggression, intimate partner violence, social support, and child maltreatment risk among heterosexual fathers completing parenting classes. Hypermasculinity scores were found to be significant predictors of study participants' reported verbal, physical, and sexual aggression toward their intimate partners. Only lack of social support, operationalized as the reported frequency of participants' conversations with friends, relatives, or neighbors about their problems, was found to be a significant predictor of child maltreatment risk. Alcohol frequency, education, and monthly income were not found to be unique, significant predictors of any dependent variables. Implications for clinical practice and research as well as limitations to the current study are discussed.

  2. The moderating effect of social support from a dating partner on the association between dating violence victimization and adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C; Seavey, Amanda E; Brasfield, Hope; Febres, Jeniimarie; Fite, Paula J; Stuart, Gregory L

    2015-04-01

    Dating violence victimization is associated with decreased relationship satisfaction and increased mental health symptomatology. Yet, violent dating relationships often remain intact across time, even when the aggression fails to cease. Thus, research is needed to determine the factors that reduce the negative impact of victimization. One factor may be that abusive dating partners are perceived as supportive by their partners, serving to reduce the negative impact of victimization. The current study sought to examine whether perceived support (i.e., perceptions of support) and capitalization support (i.e., perceptions of support for positive events) moderated and reduced the impact of dating violence victimization on decreased relationship satisfaction and increased depressive symptoms. Using a sample of females in dating relationships (N = 253), results provided partial support for our hypotheses. Implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  3. Psychological adjustment and victim-blaming among intimate partner violence offenders: The role of social support and stressful life events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Murgui

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Intimate partner violence offenders often use victim-blaming attributions to explain their own violentbehavior. These attributions represent an important challenge for intervention programs for intimatepartnerviolence offenders. The main objectives of this study were to analyze both the influence of socialsupport and stressful life events on the psychological adjustment (self-esteem and depressivesymptomatology of intimate partner violence offenders and the relationship between offenders’psychological adjustment and their victim-blaming attributions. The sample consists of 314 men convictedof intimate partner violence who were referred to a community-based intervention program. Results froma structural equation model showed that social support and stressful life events were related topsychological adjustment. Psychological adjustment also was related to victim-blaming attributions amongintimate partner violence offenders. A better understanding of the relationships between psychologicaladjustment of intimate partner violence offenders and its determinants, as well as its impact on victimblamingattributions, may provide support to new intervention strategies. Implications of these results forimproving the effectiveness of intervention programs are discussed.

  4. Contribution of partner support in self-management of rheumatoid arthritis patients : An application of the theory of planned behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strating, Mathilde M.H.; van Schuur, Wijbrandt H.; Suurmeijer, Theo P.B.M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to test the applicability of a model derived from the Theory of Planned Behavior on self-management. In this model social support from the partner, attitude and self-efficacy are determinants of intention, and intention and self-efficacy are determinants of self

  5. Contribution of partner support in self-management of rheumatoid arthritis patients : An application of the theory of planned behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strating, Mathilde M.H.; van Schuur, Wijbrandt H.; Suurmeijer, Theo P.B.M.

    The aim of this exploratory study was to test the applicability of a model derived from the Theory of Planned Behavior on self-management. In this model social support from the partner, attitude and self-efficacy are determinants of intention, and intention and self-efficacy are determinants of

  6. The association between regulatory focus and distress in patients with a chronic disease : The moderating role of partner support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, Marike C.; Links, Thera P.; Luttik, Marie Louise; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the association between two regulatory foci (i.e. promotion and prevention focus) and distress in patients with chronic disease requiring self-management, and to determine whether these associations were moderated by partner support. Design and method. Four hundred and seven

  7. The relationship between postnatal depression, sociodemographic factors, levels of partner support, and levels of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam eSaligeh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: postnatal depression (PND is defined as a psychological mood disorder that occurs in a mother within six weeks of her giving birth. It refers to an episode that causes mood disturbance and it could begin in, or extend into, the postpartum period. It is thought to have a high impact upon the mother’s health as well as the family’s functioning and the child’s development. Socio-demographic, psych-social, and physical activity factors may all contribute to postpartum mood and ability to cope with responsibilities. The primary aim of this study was to determine which of these factors predicted PND in postpartum women. A secondary aim was to identify the socio-demographic and psycho-social predictors of physical activity in postpartum women . Methods: The study used a cross-sectional correlational design. A sample of 150 postpartum women was sent a package of six standardised questionnaires. Results: There was no association between physical activity and PND; however, older mothers, mothers of younger children, mothers who are less reluctant to ask for help, and mothers who are more satisfied with the help they get experience lower levels of PND. Mothers of older babies, mothers with more children, and less educated mothers are more likely to engage in caregiving activities, whereas mothers with fewer children and higher levels of partner support are more likely to engage in occupational activities. None of the socio-demographic factors or any of the parenting factors predicted levels of sporting activity.

  8. Dependent, but not perfectionistic, dysfunctional attitudes predict worsened mood and appraisals after emotional support from a romantic partner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Felix

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Receiving emotional support from a romantic partner often leads to emotional costs via negative appraisals about the self and one’s relationship, but it is unclear whether certain individuals are more susceptible to these costs. We evaluate whether the presence of perfectionistic and dependent dysfunctional attitudes leads to more negative effects of receiving emotional support from a romantic partner.Methods: Twenty-nine couples (27 men, 31 women; mean age 24.5 completed the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale and then a daily online questionnaire by recording their mood, appraisals, and received emotional support. Mixed-effects regressions were used to evaluate whether perfectionistic and dependent dysfunctional attitudes moderated the relationship between emotional support receipt and subsequent mood and appraisals.Results: Perfectionism did not interact with emotional support but exerted a main effect of increasing negative moods and appraisals. Dependency interacted with emotional support such that those with more dependent attitudes, reported greater negative next-day moods and appraisals as a function of emotional support.Conclusions: Individuals with dependent, but not perfectionistic, dysfunctional attitudes are more likely to experience emotional and cognitive costs after receiving emotional support. These costs may stem from activation or exacerbation of the attitudes specific to dependency, including need for acceptance, support, and approval of others.

  9. Social Support as a Moderator for Alcohol-Related Partner Aggression during the Transition to Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Valerie; Woodin, Erica M.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol-related partnAer aggression is a pervasive social problem throughout various life stages, including the transition to parenthood. Previous research shows that alcohol use is associated with partner aggression perpetration for both men and women; however, not all individuals who consume alcohol act aggressively. In this study, the…

  10. Social support and intimate partner violence during pregnancy among women attending antenatal care in Moshi Municipality, Northern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigalla, Geofrey Nimrod; Rasch, Vibeke; Gammeltoft, Tine

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a significant public health problem with negative health consequences for women and their pregnancies. While social support has a protective effect against IPV and reduces health consequences of violence, its association with experiencing IPV during...... pregnancy remain less explored. In our study we aimed to determine the effect of social support on IPV during pregnancy among women attending antenatal care in Moshi, Tanzania METHODS: The study was part of a prospective cohort study that assessed the impact of violence on reproductive health of 1...... in mitigating the impact of violence in the African setting needs further research....

  11. Clean Energy Solutions Center and SE4All: Partnering to Support Country Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-05-01

    Since 2012, the Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) and Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All) have partnered to deliver information, knowledge and expert assistance to policymakers and practitioners in countries actively working to achieve SE4All objectives. Through SE4All efforts, national governments are implementing integrated country actions to strategically transform their energy markets. This fact sheet details the Solutions Center and SE4All partnership and available areas of technical assistance.

  12. Partnering with those we serve: using experiential learning activities to support community nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Kathleen; Stewart, Julie G

    2012-01-01

    The concept of community is multidimensional and may include geographical boundaries and/or the shared interests of its members. Community nursing practice involves nurses, patients, and families who collaborate to address health issues and to promote positive health initiatives. Informed by community health theorists, experiential learning activities provide the structure to promote partnering in community nursing practice to achieve outcomes that benefit those who serve and those who are served.

  13. What's in a Friendship? Partner Visibility Supports Cognitive Collaboration between Friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Allison A; Enns, James T

    2015-01-01

    Not all cognitive collaborations are equally effective. We tested whether friendship and communication influenced collaborative efficiency by randomly assigning participants to complete a cognitive task with a friend or non-friend, while visible to their partner or separated by a partition. Collaborative efficiency was indexed by comparing each pair's performance to an optimal individual performance model of the same two people. The outcome was a strong interaction between friendship and partner visibility. Friends collaborated more efficiently than non-friends when visible to one another, but a partition that prevented pair members from seeing one another reduced the collaborative efficiency of friends and non-friends to a similar lower level. Secondary measures suggested that verbal communication differences, but not psychophysiological arousal, contributed to these effects. Analysis of covariance indicated that females contributed more than males to overall levels of collaboration, but that the interaction of friendship and visibility was independent of that effect. These findings highlight the critical role of partner visibility in the collaborative success of friends.

  14. Rethinking Social Support and Conflict: Lessons from a Study of Women Who Have Separated from Abusive Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepali Guruge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationships have both positive and negative dimensions, yet most research in the area of intimate partner violence (IPV has focused on social support, and not on social conflict. Based on the data from 309 English-speaking Canadian women who experienced IPV in the past 3 years and were no longer living with the abuser, we tested four hypotheses examining the relationships among severity of past IPV and women’s social support, social conflict, and health. We found that the severity of past IPV exerted direct negative effects on women’s health. Similarly, both social support and social conflict directly influenced women’s health. Social conflict, but not social support, mediated the relationships between IPV severity and health. Finally, social conflict moderated the relationships between social support and women’s health, such that the positive effects of social support were attenuated in the presence of high levels of social conflict. These findings highlight that routine assessments of social support and social conflict and the use of strategies to help women enhance support and reduce conflict in their relationships are essential aspects of nursing care.

  15. Poor perceived social support in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients and their partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Spinder, Helle; Erdman, Ruud A M;

    2009-01-01

    Social support is a known buffer of psychological distress and has also been shown to influence adverse medical outcomes.......Social support is a known buffer of psychological distress and has also been shown to influence adverse medical outcomes....

  16. Family stressors and postdeployment mental health in single versus partnered parents deployed in support of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn-Coaxum, Rachel; Smith, Brian N; Iverson, Katherine M; Vogt, Dawne

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the family-related stress and postdeployment adjustment of single versus partnered parents deployed in support of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This study examined exposure to family-related stressors during and after deployment, as well as postdeployment psychological symptoms in a national sample of 318 single (n = 74) and partnered (n = 244) parent veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Results demonstrated that single parents experienced higher levels of concern about life and family disruptions during deployment, lower levels of social support during and after deployment, and poorer postdeployment family functioning than partnered parents. Single parents also reported higher posttraumatic stress symptom severity, but not depression or anxiety symptom severity, compared with partnered parents. Family-related stressors demonstrated different associations with mental health for single and partnered parents, suggesting that some stressor-symptom relations may be more salient for single parents, and others may be more salient for partnered parents. Findings suggest that the deployment and postdeployment experiences of parents differ based on their partnered status, which has implications for the design and provision of services to single and partnered parents.

  17. Mentor mother support for mothers experiencing intimate partner violence in family practice: A qualitative study of three different perspectives on the facilitators and barriers of implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, M.J.W.; Daemen, J.; Wester, F.P.J.; Laurant, M.G.H.; Lo Fo Wong, S.H.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is highly prevalent and associated with physical and mental health problems. Mentor mother support is a low threshold intervention in family practice consisting of support by non-professionals trained to support mothers experiencing IPV. A mentor mother

  18. Mentor mother support for mothers experiencing intimate partner violence in family practice: A qualitative study of three different perspectives on the facilitators and barriers of implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, M.J.W.; Daemen, J.; Wester, F.P.J.; Laurant, M.G.H.; Lo Fo Wong, S.H.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is highly prevalent and associated with physical and mental health problems. Mentor mother support is a low threshold intervention in family practice consisting of support by non-professionals trained to support mothers experiencing IPV. A mentor mother su

  19. Intrapersonal, interpersonal, and contextual risk factors for overprovision of partner support in marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Rebecca L; Lawrence, Erika

    2014-02-01

    Recent research indicates that receiving too much support from one's spouse (i.e., overprovision of support) is actually more detrimental to marriage than not receiving enough support. The principal goal of the present study was to develop a novel framework for explaining the pathways through which couples experience overprovision of support in their marriages. Intrapersonal factors (anxious and avoidant attachment), interpersonal factors (conflict management and emotional intimacy), and contextual factors (stress originating outside of the marriage) were assessed during the transition into marriage as potential risk factors for experiencing higher levels of support overprovision during the first 5 years of marriage in a sample of 103 couples using growth curve analytic techniques. To the extent that (a) husbands were higher in avoidant attachment, (b) husbands reported greater chronic role strain, and (c) couples had lower levels of emotional intimacy, support overprovision was greater for both husbands and wives. In addition, emotional intimacy (lower levels) was a partial pathway through which husband avoidant attachment contributed to support overprovision. Finally, factors placing couples at risk for support overprovision in their marriages appear to be distinct from those increasing the risk for support underprovision. The potential for results to inform contemporary marital theories and marital preparation programs is discussed.

  20. A Partner's Guide to Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Patients About ACOG A Partner's Guide to Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs A Partner's Guide ... May 2016 PDF Format A Partner's Guide to Pregnancy Pregnancy Why is it important to be supportive ...

  1. Relational quality, illness interference, and partner support in Ménière's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyykkö, Ilmari; Manchaiah, Vinaya; Zou, Jing; Levo, Hilla; Kentala, Erna

    2017-08-24

    The current study aimed to better understand how patients and their significant others (SOs) cope with Menière's disease (MD). The study used a cross-sectional design and the data were collected using questionnaires. Seventy-five dyads in which one person had MD. SOs of patients with MD not only experienced activity and participation restrictions but also had positive experiences. In relational quality, the SOs reported uncertainty of their future, limited visits in noisy places, limited activities as walking, watching TV, and participating in social life. The illness interference correlated with the patients' complaints, and most significant was the problem of imbalance. The quality of life was significantly reduced in patients with MD, and the illness interference in terms of quality of life was correlated with the SOs in items related to mood and anxiety. The stress related conditions of the SOs were correlated with two positive items (e.g. alleviating the stress factor). The SOs could also identify one positive item (i.e., improved relationship). Perceptions of MD as interfering in couples' lives influence dyadic coping in unique ways. The current study identified that dyadic coping has both positive aspects and limitations as a consequence of their partner's MD.

  2. Features of functional support of competitive activity in sports dance given the differences prepared by partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soronovich I.M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - to determine the specifics of the functionality of the dancers with the differences of partners. The study involved 24 dancers. They were 12 couples - men aged 22.8 +- 5 years and women aged 21.3 +- 4.2 years. We measured the performance VO2, pulmonary ventilation and lactate concentrations. The evaluation was conducted on the basis of the maximum levels of VO2, pulmonary ventilation, HR, and blood lactate concentrations. In the simulation of competitive activity in the majority of dancers reported high rates of reaction of the cardiorespiratory system, the aerobic and anaerobic energy supply. The rate of accumulation of acidemia shifts remained stable and high in all athletes. This leads to reduced efficiency and accumulation of fatigue. Differences dynamics of functional maintenance of the increase in the integrated assessment of preparedness in pairs. In most pairs of marked differences in their dynamics and consequently differences in the structure of reactive properties. It is shown that this affects the implementation of the existing operational capacity and efficiency of competitive activity in general.

  3. Disrupting intergenerational continuity in harsh parenting: Self-control and a supportive partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Thomas J; Conger, Rand D; Conger, Kathi J

    2016-12-22

    Harsh, abusive, and rejecting behavior by parents toward their children is associated with increased risk for many developmental problems for youth. Children raised by harsh parents are also more likely to treat their own children harshly. The present study addresses conditions that would break this intergenerational cycle of harsh parenting. Data come from a three-generation study of a cohort of 290 adolescents (Generation 2 [G2], 52% female) grown to adulthood and their parents (Generation 1 [G1]). During adolescence, observers rated G1 harsh parenting to G2. Several years later observers rated G2 harsh parenting toward their oldest child (Generation 3 [G3]). Several adaptive systems fundamental to human resilience attenuate intergenerational continuity in harshness. G2 parents were relatively less harsh to G3 children (notwithstanding a history of harshness from G1) when G2's romantic partner (a) communicated positively with G2 and (b) had a good relationship with G3, and (c) when G2 was high on self-control. Interventions that target all of these protective factors may not only break but also reverse the intergenerational cycle of child maltreatment.

  4. Effects of a strengths-based perspective support group among Taiwanese women who left a violent intimate partner relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Li; Ko, Nai-Ying; Shu, Bih-Ching

    2016-02-01

    To examine the effects of an 8-week strengths-based perspective group intervention on hope, resilience and depression in Taiwanese women who left a violent intimate partner relationship. Studies on interventions for abused women have primarily focused on psychological problems. However, the effect of group intervention on the psychological strengths of abused women is still unknown. A two-group, quasi-experimental design using repeated measures was used in this study. Twenty-nine Taiwanese women who left violent intimate partner relationships were assigned to two groups and five participants did not complete the study. The experimental group (n = 8) underwent an 8-week strengths-based perspective group intervention developed by the investigators; the control group (n = 16) received no intervention. The effects of the intervention on the participants' hope, resilience and depression levels were evaluated as a pretest, post-test 1 (8th week) and post-test 2 (12th week) and were compared. The Chinese version of the State Hope Scale, the 25-item Resilience Scale, and the Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire were used in this study. On the eighth and twelfth weeks after the strengths-based perspective group intervention, we found significantly lower scores on the depression scale in the experimental group. In the eighth week, participants in the experimental group had significantly lower scores on the pathway of hope subscales than those in the control group. A strengths-based perspective support group intervention designed specifically for women who left a violent intimate partner relationship significantly reduced the participants' level of depressive symptoms and improved the pathway component of hope. This research highlights the importance of nurses not only focused on problems but also on the psychological strengths in practice of abused women survivors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Launch and Landing of Russian Soyuz - Medical Support for US and Partner Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Launching, landing, flight route, expeditions, Soyuz, near Kazakhstan USOS Crew Surgeon -Quarantine and direct care to crew before launch, then present in close proximity to launch for abort. IP Crew Surgeon -same Deputy Crew Surgeon -Back up for crew surgeon, care for immediate family, stationed at airport for helicopter abort response Russian based US doctor -Coordinate with SOS staff USOS Crew Surgeon -Nominal helicopter response and initial medical care and support during return on gulfstreamIPcenter dotP Crew Surgeon -same Deputy Crew Surgeon -Ballistic helicopter support Russian based US doctor -Coordinate with SOS staff Direct return doctor -Direct medical care on return flight

  6. Decision Support Model for User Submission Approval Energy Partners Candidate Using Profile Matching Method and Analytical Hierarchy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moedjiono Moedjiono

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the field of services, customer satisfaction is a very important factor and determine the success of an enterprise. In the field of outsourcing, customer satisfaction indicator is the labor required delivery in a timely manner and has a level of quality in accordance with the terms proposed by the customer. To provide the best talent to customers, team recruitment and selection must perform a series of tests with a variety of methods to match the criteria of office given by the user with the criteria owned candidates and in order to support growth in graduation rates force a partner at the stage of user approval. For this purpose, the authors conducted a study with the method of observation, interviews, document reviews the candidate recruitment process, so as to provide recommendations for candidates with the highest quality delivery to the user at the stage of approval. The author put forward a model of decision support that is supported by the method of profile matching and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP in problem solving. The final results of this study can be used to support a decision in order to improve the effectiveness of the delivery of quality candidates, increase customer satisfaction, lower costs and improve gross operational margin of the company.

  7. Decision Support Model for User Submission Approval Energy Partners Candidate Using Profile Matching Method and Analytical Hierarchy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moedjiono Moedjiono

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the field of services, customer satisfaction is a very important factor and determine the success of an enterprise. In the field of outsourcing, customer satisfaction indicator is the labor required delivery in a timely manner and has a level of quality in accordance with the terms proposed by the customer. To provide the best talent to customers, team recruitment and selection must perform a series of tests with a variety of methods to match the criteria of office given by the user with the criteria owned candidates and in order to support growth in graduation rates force a partner at the stage of user approval. For this purpose, the authors conducted a study with the method of observation, interviews, document reviews the candidate recruitment process, so as to provide recommendations for candidates with the highest quality delivery to the user at the stage of approval. The author put forward a model of decision support that is supported by the method of profile matching and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP in problem solving. The final results of this study can be used to support a decision in order to improve the effectiveness of the delivery of quality candidates, increase customer satisfaction, lower costs and improve gross operational margin of the company.

  8. The influence of in-pregnancy smoking cessation programmes on partner quitting and women's social support mobilization: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN89131885

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Olga

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking cessation interventions in pregnancy could influence a woman's social behaviour and her partner's smoking behaviour, but this has not been examined in any published randomized trials. Method 918 women smoking at booking for antenatal care were enrolled in a cluster-randomized trial of three interventions: standard care, self-help manual and enhanced stage-based counselling, or self-help manual, enhanced stage-based counselling and use of an interactive computer program. The outcomes were change in social support received by women between booking for maternity care and 30 weeks gestation and 10 days postpartum and reported cessation in the woman's partner at these times. Results Few pregnant women's partners stopped smoking (4.1% at 30 weeks of gestation and 5.8% at 10 days postpartum and the probability of quitting did not differ significantly by trial arm. Women's scores on the Inventory of Socially Supportive Behaviors showed a slight decline from booking to 30 weeks gestation, and a slight increase to 10 days postpartum, but these changes did not differ significantly by trial arm. Conclusion The stage-based interventions tested in this trial aimed partly to influence women's mobilization of support and might have influenced partners' quitting, but there was no evidence that they did so. Given that women and their partners often stopped smoking together, future interventions to prevent smoking in pregnant women could encourage both partners to quit together.

  9. Partners in adversity. V: Support, personality and coping behaviour at the time of crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P M; Surtees, P G

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents further results from a study of married women in Edinburgh who had just suffered an adverse experience: either their husband's non-fatal myocardial infarction, their husband's death or their own arrival in a Women's Aid refuge for battered women. Interviews were carried out 4-6 weeks following the adverse experience and, where possible, again approximately 3 months later. Symptoms were assessed using the 30-item General Health Questionnaire and criterion-based measures of depression and anxiety derived from it. The extent and nature of crisis support from household members and from groups of people outside the household, and also of failures in expected support, was measured at first interview. A modified version of Tyrer and Alexander's (1979) personality schedule was administered at the follow-up interview, and the resulting personality data were then reduced to six factors using principal components analysis. An interviewer assessment of how well the subject was coping was made at both interviews. The vast majority of the sample received extensive practical and emotional support from family and friends, and perhaps because such positive support was so prevalent, variations in it seemed to have little effect on symptoms. However, subjects who were unexpectedly 'let down' or criticised by friends or family tended to show higher symptom levels, although, surprisingly, this was less true for the bereaved wives than for the others. The six personality factors that emerged were labelled nervousness (similar to neuroticism) impulsivity, social withdrawal, helplessness, inferiority and aggressiveness. There was evidence that subjects high on nervousness remained symptomatic longer following the adverse experience. The aggressiveness factor showed a curvilinear trend with high and low aggressives showing higher symptom levels than middle aggressives. However, for the coronary wives the trend was linear with low aggressives having high symptoms

  10. Intimate Partner Violence and Subsequent Depression: Examining the Roles of Neighborhood Supportive Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Emily M; Pinchevsky, Gillian M; Benson, Michael L; Radatz, Dana L

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the direct effects of neighborhood supportive mechanisms (e.g., collective efficacy, social cohesion, social networks) on depressive symptoms among females as well as their moderating effects on the impact of IPV on subsequent depressive symptoms. A multilevel, multivariate Rasch model was used with data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to assess the existence of IPV and later susceptibility of depressive symptoms among 2959 adult females in 80 neighborhoods. Results indicate that neighborhood collective efficacy, social cohesion, social interactions, and the number of friends and family in the neighborhood reduce the likelihood that females experience depressive symptoms. However, living in areas with high proportions of friends and relatives exacerbates the impact of IPV on females' subsequent depressive symptoms. The findings indicate that neighborhood supportive mechanisms impact interpersonal outcomes in both direct and moderating ways, although direct effects were more pronounced for depression than moderating effects. Future research should continue to examine the positive and potentially mitigating influences of neighborhoods in order to better understand for whom and under which circumstances violent relationships and mental health are influenced by contextual factors.

  11. Effects of an intervention program for female victims of intimate partner violence on psychological symptoms and perceived social support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina B. Hansen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research has documented severe mental health problems in female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV. Therefore, providing effective treatment is pivotal. Few studies have investigated the effects of intervention programs on reducing the harmful consequences of IPV. Objective: The present study examined the effects of a specific three-phase intervention program for female victims of IPV on psychological symptoms (PTSD, anxiety, and depression and perceived social support. Given that many of the women dropped out before and during the intervention program, potential differences in initial levels of psychological symptoms, perceived social support, as well as descriptive variables were explored between the women who completed the whole program and the groups of women who dropped out prematurely. Method: The initial sample consisted of 212 female victims of IPV. Symptoms of PTSD, depression, anxiety, and level of perceived social support were measured with validated scales before the start of the intervention and after completion of each treatment phase. Results: Results showed a significant effect of the intervention program on reducing psychological symptoms and increasing levels of perceived social support. Effect sizes ranged from medium to very high. Significant positive effects were found for each of the treatment phases. There were no significant differences between the women who completed the whole program and those women who dropped out prematurely in terms of initial level of symptoms and perceived social support as well as descriptive characteristics. Conclusions: Specifically developed intervention programs for female victims of IPV are effective in reducing the harmful personal consequences of IPV. Future studies should consider employing controlled study designs and address the issue of high drop out rates found in intervention studies.

  12. Partnering With Your Health System to Select and Implement Clinical Decision Support for Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jeff D; Durand, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Recent legislation mandates the documentation of appropriateness criteria consultation when ordering advanced imaging for Medicare patients to remain eligible for reimbursement. Implementation of imaging clinical decision support (CDS) is a solution adopted by many systems to automate compliance with the new requirements. This article is intended to help radiologists who are employed by, contracted with, or otherwise affiliated with systems planning to implement CDS in the near future and ensure that they are able to understand and contribute to the process wherever possible. It includes an in-depth discussion of the legislation, evidence for and against the efficacy of imaging CDS, considerations for selecting a CDS vendor, tips for configuring CDS in a fashion consistent with departmental goals, and pointers for implementation and change management.

  13. Social support and intimate partner violence during pregnancy among women attending antenatal care in Moshi Municipality, Northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalla, Geofrey Nimrod; Rasch, Vibeke; Gammeltoft, Tine; Meyrowitsch, Dan Wolf; Rogathi, Jane; Manongi, Rachel; Mushi, Declare

    2017-03-09

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a significant public health problem with negative health consequences for women and their pregnancies. While social support has a protective effect against IPV and reduces health consequences of violence, its association with experiencing IPV during pregnancy remain less explored. In our study we aimed to determine the effect of social support on IPV during pregnancy among women attending antenatal care in Moshi, Tanzania METHODS: The study was part of a prospective cohort study that assessed the impact of violence on reproductive health of 1,116 participants. Pregnant women were enrolled below 24 weeks of gestation and followed until delivery. The experiences of social support and IPV during pregnancy were assessed at the 34(th) week of gestation. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between social support and IPV, with adjustment for potential confounders. The prevalence of IPV during pregnancy was 30.3% where the majority (29.0%) experienced repeated episodes of abuse. Regarding practical social support, having no one to help financially was associated with increased odds of IPV and repeated episodes of abuse during pregnancy, AOR 3.57, (95% CI 1.85 - 6.90) and AOR 3.21, (95% CI 1.69 - 6.11) respectively. For social support in terms of communication, talking to a member of the family of origin at least monthly was associated with decreased odds of IPV and repeated episodes of IPV during pregnancy, AOR 0.46 (95% CI 0.26 - 0.82) and AOR 0.41 (95% CI 0.23 - 0.73) respectively. Perceiving that family of origin will not offer support was associated with a increased odds of IPV and repeated episodes of IPV, AOR 2.29, (95% CI 1.31 - 3.99) and AOR 2.14, (95% CI 1.23 - 3.74) respectively. Nearly one third of women experienced IPV during pregnancy. Social support to women is associated with decreased odds of experiencing IPV during pregnancy. The family of origin plays an important role in providing

  14. EDP Sciences and A&A: partnering to providing services to support the scientific community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, Agnes

    2015-08-01

    Scholarly publishing is no longer about simply producing and packaging articles and sending out to subscribers. To be successful, as well as being global and digital, Publishers and their journals need to be fully engaged with their stakeholders (authors, readers, funders, libraries etc), and constantly developing new products and services to support their needs in the ever-changing environment that we work in.Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) is a high quality, major international Journal that belongs to the astronomical communities of a consortium of European and South American countries supported by ESO who sponsor the journal. EDP Sciences is a non-profit publisher belonging to several learned societies and is appointed by ESO to publish the journal.Over the last decade, as well as publishing the results of worldwide astronomical and astrophysical research, A&A and EDP Sciences have worked in partnership to develop a wide range of services for the authors and readers of A&A:- A specialist language editing service: to provide a clear and excellent level of English ensuring full understanding of the high-quality science.- A flexible and progressive Open Access Policy including Gold and Green options and strong links with arXiv.- Enriched articles: authors are able to enhance their articles using a wide range of rich media such as 3D models, videos and animations.Multiple publishing formats: allowing readers to browse articles on multiple devices including eReaders and Kindles.- “Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers”: In 2008 EDP Sciences and A&A set up the Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers (SWYA) School with the objective to teach early PhD Students how write correct and efficient scientific papers for different mediums (journals, proceedings, thesis manuscripts, etc.).

  15. I like it when my partner holds my hand: Development of the Responses and Attitudes to Support during Pain questionnaire (RASP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte eKrahé

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Social support can have beneficial effects on psychological and physiological well-being. During acute bodily pain, however, the effects of social support on pain are mixed. This variability may be due to the multifaceted nature of both pain and social support, as well as individual differences. In this paper, we present the development, psychometric assessment, and initial validation of the first self-report measure designed to address this variability in the general population; the Responses and Attitudes to Support during Pain questionnaire (RASP. The RASP includes questions on social support from the romantic partner as well as healthcare professionals (HCPs and addresses different types of social support and pain responses. The development and validation of the RASP comprised four studies. In Study 1, a preliminary RASP version was completed by 179 healthy individuals regarding any type of acute pain. In Study 2, the reduced RASP was completed by 256 women with experiences of menstrual pain. Principal component analysis indicated a 22-item solution with five underlying dimensions reflecting general partner support, emotional support from HCPs, anxiety in the context of HCPs, pain behaviors during partner support, and distraction by the partner. Construct validity was assessed using a measure of adult attachment style. The RASP showed good validity and test-retest reliability. In Study 3, the 5-factor model received initial support through confirmatory factor analysis in a new sample of 120 individuals with recent musculoskeletal pain. Study 4 provided additional validation of the RASP in a sample of 180 individuals responding in reference to acute back pain. Overall, the RASP is a valid and reliable measure for assessing individual differences in attitudes and responses to social support in relation to acute pain.

  16. Do support groups members disclose less to their partners? The dynamics of HIV disclosure in four African countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hardon; G.B. Gomez; E. Vernooij; A. Desclaux; R.K. Wanyenze; O. Ky-Zerbo; E. Kageha; I. Namakhoma; J. Kinsman; C. Spronk; E. Meij; M. Neuman; C.M. Obermeyer

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent efforts to curtail the HIV epidemic in Africa have emphasised preventing sexual transmission to partners through antiretroviral therapy. A component of current strategies is disclosure to partners, thus understanding its motivations will help maximise results. This study examines t

  17. Gender differences in the relationship of partner's social class to behavioural risk factors and social support in the Whitehall II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, M; Martikainen, P; Shipley, M; Marmot, M

    2004-11-01

    In most countries health inequality in women appears to be greater when their socio-economic position is measured according to the occupation of male partners or spouses than the women's own occupations. Very few studies show social gradients in men's health according to the occupation of their female partners. This paper aims to explore the reasons for the differences in social inequality in cardiovascular disease between men and women by analysing the associations between own or spouses (or partners) socio-economic position and a set of risk factors for prevalent chronic diseases. Study participants were married or cohabiting London based civil servants included in the Whitehall II study. Socio-economic position of study participants was measured according to civil service grade; socio-economic position of the spouses and partners according to the Registrar General's social class schema. Risk factors were smoking, diet, exercise, alcohol consumption, and measures of social support. In no case was risk factor exposure more affected by the socio-economic position of a female partner than that of a male study participant. Wives' social class membership made no difference at all to the likelihood that male Whitehall participants were smokers, or took little exercise. Female participants' exercise and particularly smoking habit was, in contrast, related to their spouse's social class independently of their own grade of employment. Diet quality was affected equally by the socio-economic position of both male and female partners. Unlike the behavioural risk factors, the degree of social support reported by women participants was in general not strongly negatively affected by their husband or partner being in a less advantaged social class. However, non-employment in the husband or partner was associated with relatively lower levels of positive, and higher negative social support, while men with non-working wives or partners were unaffected. Studying gender differences

  18. A Process Review of the Indashyikirwa Couples Curriculum to Prevent Intimate Partner Violence and Support Healthy, Equitable Relationships in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Stern

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Indashyikirwa is a Rwandan intimate partner violence (IPV prevention program being implemented by CARE International Rwanda, Rwanda Women’s Network (RWN, and Rwanda Men’s Resource Centre (RWAMREC. A central aspect of the programme is a 20-session curriculum for heterosexual couples designed to support healthy, non-violent relationships. This paper draws on qualitative interviews with 15 couples (before and after the curriculum and 9 field staff to assess couples’ impressions, comprehension of, and engagement with this innovative training. Thematic analysis was conducted to compare key findings from both data sources. Couples and staff offered positive assessments of the curriculum including the contextual relevance, the participatory approach, and a high level of dedication to the training was shown by the majority of couples. Many couples appreciated being trained together, and although some men dominated the first few sessions, participation gradually became more gender-balanced, and facilitators emphasized creating a safe environment for equal participation. Curriculum content that was initially resisted or difficult reportedly became easier through couples learning and trying new skills and experiencing relationship benefits first-hand, which emphasizes the value of the skills building component and take home exercises. Important insights for couples-based, educational approaches to IPV prevention are identified from this process review.

  19. The impact of social support on the risk of eating disorders in women exposed to intimate partner violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schirk DK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dana K Schirk,1 Erik B Lehman,2 Amanda N Perry,3 Rollyn M Ornstein,4 Jennifer S McCall-Hosenfeld2,5 1The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 2Department of Public Health Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, 3Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education, Division of Rural Sociology, College of Agriculture, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, 4Department of Pediatrics, 5Department of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA Background: Eating disorders (EDs are often found among women exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV. The role of social support (SS as a protective factor against ED among IPV-exposed women is not firmly established.Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of risk of EDs among women exposed to IPV and to examine the impact of SS on risk of ED among IPV-exposed women.Methods: Women (aged 18–64 years exposed to IPV during their lifetimes (defined by the Humiliation–Afraid–Rape–Kick instrument were recruited from primary care and domestic violence service agencies and surveyed on demographics, mood/anxiety disorders, psychosocial/community factors, and strategies used in response to IPV. The Eating Disorder Screen for Primary Care assessed the risk of ED. A modified Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey assessed overall functional support (scale range: 0–32; categorized into quartiles. Ordinal logistic regression examined the risk of ED based on SS, controlling for prespecified demographics (age, race/ethnicity, marital status, near-poverty level, and health-related factors significant in bivariate analyses (risky alcohol use.Results: Among 302 women with lifetime IPV, 41 (14% were at high risk, 127 (42% were at moderate risk, and 134 (44% were at low risk of an ED. In bivariate analyses, high risk of an ED was significantly more frequent among women with a

  20. Partners and close family members of long-term cancer survivors: health status, psychosocial well-being and unmet supportive care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Daniel; Adams, Eike; Boulton, Mary; Harrison, Sian; Khan, Nada; Rose, Peter; Ward, Alison; Watson, Eila K

    2013-01-01

    A cancer diagnosis can have a profound impact on partners and close family members of patients. Little is currently known about the long-term impact. The objective of this study is to describe health status, levels of anxiety and depression, unmet supportive care needs and positive outcomes in the partners/family members of breast, prostate and colorectal cancer survivors 5-16 years post-diagnosis. Patients in a linked study were asked to invite a partner or other close family member to complete a self-administered postal questionnaire. Data were analysed by cancer site and time since diagnosis. Matched comparisons were made between cancer patients in the linked study and their partners. An expression of interest was received from 330 partners/family members, and 257 questionnaires (77.9%) were returned. Health status and levels of anxiety and depression were comparable with population norms. Respondents reported an average of 2.7 unmet needs from 34 possible options. Hospital parking, information about familial risk, help managing fear of recurrence and coordination of care were the most cited unmet needs. There was little variation in health status, psychological morbidity and unmet needs by cancer site or time since diagnosis. Concordance between patients and partners was low for anxiety but higher with respect to positive outcomes and some unmet needs. Most partners/family members of long-term cancer survivors report few ongoing issues. However, a small proportion (<10%) have high levels of anxiety and/or moderate or strong unmet needs. Strategies for identifying this group and addressing their needs are required, while allowing the majority to resume normal life. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Mentor mother support for mothers experiencing intimate partner violence in family practice: A qualitative study of three different perspectives on the facilitators and barriers of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, Maartje J W; Daemen, Jasper; Wester, Fred P J F; Laurant, Miranda G H; Lo Fo Wong, Sylvie H; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L M

    2017-12-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is highly prevalent and associated with physical and mental health problems. Mentor mother support is a low threshold intervention in family practice consisting of support by non-professionals trained to support mothers experiencing IPV. A mentor mother support study showed reduced exposure to IPV and decreased symptoms of depression. Identify factors determining implementation success of mentor mother support in family practice. Individual interviews were conducted with 12 family physicians, 16 abused mothers and three mentor mothers. Four mentor mothers participated in a focus group. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The identification and discussion of abuse is hindered by family physicians' attitudes because they considered mothers experiencing IPV as a difficult target group with a responsibility of their own to break out of their violent situation. Some family physicians doubted the partner's violence because he was known as a patient as well. Acceptance of mentor mother support is related to the readiness for change of mothers experiencing IPV. Mentor mothers facilitate acceptance and completion of their support by connecting as a friend who is equal and less threatening than professionals. To improve successful implementation of mentor mother support in primary care, we should focus on family physicians' attitudes towards IPV. To change these attitudes, we recommend continuous training of family physicians. By being paraprofessional friends, mentor mothers offer low threshold support that is complementary to professional support and should be embedded more widely in primary care. [Box: see text].

  2. The role of satisfaction with social support in perceived burden and stress of parents of six-month-old infants with a congenital anomaly: Actor and partner effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Ana; Nazaré, Bárbara; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2014-06-01

    This exploratory study examined the role of satisfaction with support from family and friends on the burden and stress of parents of infants with a congenital anomaly (CA). The effects of social support were examined within the couple (actor and partner effects). A total of 36 couples whose six-month-old infant has a CA participated in this study. The parents completed questionnaires regarding satisfaction with support, burden (Impact on Family Scale - Revised), and parenting stress (Parenting Stress Index). The results showed that fathers directly benefited from the support they received from friends in reducing their burden, while mothers only indirectly benefited from it through the father's adjustment. The pattern was different for stress: mothers directly benefited from the support they received from their family in reducing their stress levels, while fathers benefited both directly from the support they received from friends and indirectly from the support that their partners received from family. These results highlight that (1) the different support needs of mothers and fathers (due to their different roles during transition to parenthood) and (2) the diffusion of benefits of social support within the couple should be taken into account when developing strategies to promote support to families of six-month-old infants with a CA.

  3. Apoyo social como factor protector frente a la violencia contra la mujer en la pareja The protective role of social support and intimate partner violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juncal Plazaola-Castaño

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir la relación entre la presencia de apoyo social global y de diferentes fuentes y la violencia de pareja en mujeres que acuden a centros de atención primaria por cualquier motivo de consulta. Método: Estudio transversal en 1.402 mujeres de entre 18 y 65 años elegidas aleatoriamente en 23 consultas de atención primaria de las comunidades autónomas de Andalucía, Madrid y Valencia en el año 2003. La información sobre características sociodemográficas, maltrato físico, psicológico y sexual, y apoyo social, fue recogida mediante un cuestionario anónimo y autoadministrado. Resultados: El 32% de las mujeres refirió haber sufrido algún tipo de maltrato (físico, psicológico o sexual por su pareja en algún momento de la vida. Las mujeres que refirieron tener apoyo social tenían una probabilidad un 89% menor de haber sido maltratadas que las que refirieron no tenerlo (odds ratio [OR] = 0,11; intervalo de confianza del 95% [IC95%]: 0,06-0,20. Entre quienes refirieron haber sido maltratadas en el pasado, las que afirmaron tener apoyo tenían una probabilidad menor de volver a ser maltratadas por una pareja distinta que las mujeres sin apoyo (OR = 0,14; IC95%: 0,05-0,37. Conclusiones: Dada la naturaleza transversal del trabajo, no podemos afirmar si la falta de apoyo aumenta la vulnerabilidad de las mujeres para sufrir maltrato, o si el maltrato deriva en el aislamiento social. No obstante, una estrategia de intervención esencial con las mujeres maltratadas debería ser restablecer sus redes sociales.Objective: To describe the relationship between the presence of social support and overall support from different sources and intimate partner violence in women attending primary care centers irrespective of reason. Method: We performed a cross-sectional survey in 1,402 women aged 18 to 65 years old, randomly selected from 23 primary health practices in the autonomous communities of Andalusia, Madrid and Valencia (Spain in

  4. Family-supportive organization perceptions and organizational commitment: the mediating role of work-family conflict and enrichment and partner attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Julie Holliday; Casper, Wendy J; Matthews, Russell A; Allen, Tammy D

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims to explain the processes through which family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP) relate to employee affective commitment. We suggest multiple mechanisms through which this relationship transpires-(a) the focal employee's experience of work-to-family conflict and enrichment and (b) the attitudes of the employee's spouse/partner. Hypotheses are tested with data from 408 couples. Results suggest that employee FSOP is positively associated with employee commitment through both employee work-to-family experiences and partner attitudes. FSOP was positively related to employee work-to-family enrichment, which was positively associated with employee affective commitment. FSOP was negatively associated with employee work-to-family conflict, which related to a partner's more positive attitude toward the employee's work schedule and higher commitment to the employee's firm. Partner commitment was positively and reciprocally related to employee affective commitment. These relationships partially mediated the FSOP-employee affective commitment relationship and varied as a function of parental status and single- versus dual-earner couple status but not as a function of employee gender. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  5. Trauma symptoms, internalized stigma, social support, and sexual risk behavior among HIV-positive gay and bisexual MSM who have sought sex partners online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Kaylee E; Cruess, Dean G; Kalichman, Moira O; Grebler, Tamar; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Seth C

    2016-01-01

    Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) remain the highest risk group for HIV infection. One reason is the increased use of the Internet to meet potential sex partners, which is associated with greater sexual risk behavior. To date, few studies have investigated psychosocial predictors of sexual risk behavior among gay and bisexual men seeking sex partners online. The purpose of the current study was to test a conceptual model of the relationships between trauma symptoms indexed on the event of HIV diagnosis, internalized HIV stigma, and social support on sexual risk behavior among gay and bisexual MSM who seek sex partners online. A sample of 142 gay and bisexual MSM recruited on- and offline completed a comprehensive online assessment battery assessing the factors noted above. A number of associations emerged; most notably internalized HIV stigma mediated the relationship between trauma-related symptoms indexed on the event of HIV diagnosis and sexual risk behavior with HIV-negative and unknown serostatus sex partners. This suggests that gay and bisexual MSM who are in greater distress over their HIV diagnosis and who are more sensitive to HIV stigma engage in more HIV transmission risk behavior. As sexual risk environments expand with the increasing use of the Internet to connect with others for sex, it is important to understand the predictors of sexual risk behavior so that tailored interventions can promote sexual health for gay and bisexual MSM seeking sex online.

  6. Daily negative interactions and mood among patients and partners dealing with multiple sclerosis (MS): the moderating effects of emotional support.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleiboer, A.M.; Kuijer, R.G.; Hox, J.J.; Jongen, P.J.H.; Frequin, S.T.F.M.; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Negative interactions with intimate partners may have adverse consequences for well-being, especially for individuals dealing with chronic illness. However, it is not clear whether negative interactions affect both dimensions of positive and negative well-being and factors that may moderate this eff

  7. Social Partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Leif Emil

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present findings from a new Nordic survey on social partners’ policy and practice in regards older workers. The goal of the survey was to find out to what extent the social partners have developed policies and outlined strategies, which explicitly address...... the demographic change and promote opportunities for lifelong learning and career development among their senior members (45+). Workforce in the Nordic countries tend to be highly organised – especially the older workers. The social partners’ involvement in the discussion of sustainable society...... difficult position” regarding this matter, but also that they should develop clearer strategy in response to demographic change, and communicate it to their members. The OWNsurvey was carried out as a part of the work in the network Older workers in the Nordic countries (OWN) supported by the Nordic Council...

  8. Development of an interinstitutional collaboration to support community-partnered research addressing the health of emerging Latino populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Yaggy, Susan D; Lyn, Michelle; Green, Melissa; Ornelas, India J; Simmons, Tia; Perez, Georgina; Blumenthal, Connie

    2010-04-01

    Collaborative and participatory research approaches have received considerable attention as means to understanding and addressing disparities in health and health care. In this article, the authors describe the process of building a three-way partnership among two academic health centers-Duke University and the University of North Carolina-and members of the Latino community in North Carolina to develop and pilot test a lay health advisor program to improve Latina immigrants' mental health and coping skills. The authors applied the principles of participatory research to engage community and academic partners, to select the health topic and population, and to develop program goals and objectives. Key challenges were negotiating administrative structures and learning institutional cultures, as well as dealing with contextual issues such as mental health reform and antiimmigrant sentiment in the state.Some important lessons learned are to seek opportunities for taking advantage of existing relationships and expertise at each academic institution, to be respectful of the burden of research on vulnerable communities, and to involve community partners at all stages of the process.

  9. A cross-sectional study of associations between casual partner, friend discrimination, social support and anxiety symptoms among Chinese transgender women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Lie; Gu, Yuan; Song, Wei; Hao, Chun; Zhou, Jinling; Zhang, Qun; Zhao, Qun

    2016-10-01

    Anxiety symptoms are the prevalent mental disorders for transgender women. However, only a few studies are available pertaining to this problem among Chinese Transgender women. Chinese Transgender women are a vulnerable population which is exposed to discrimination and loss of social support due to their gender identity and transition. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and factors associated with anxiety symptoms among Chinese transgender women. A cross-sectional study was performed by convenience sampling. This comprised of 209 Chinese transgender women in Shenyang, China. The Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) was used to assess anxiety symptoms for these transgender women. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to explore the associated factors of SAS. The prevalence of anxiety symptoms in Chinese transgender women was found to be 34.5%. Regression analyses indicated that SAS was associated with casual partnership, friend discrimination and social support in the final model. Sexual partnership and discrimination contributed the most to the model, R-square, accounting for 19.2% and 15.5% of the total variance respectively. Chinese transgender women showed considerably high level of anxiety symptoms. It was also found that they were exposed to significant transition challenges, such as high risk sexual partnership, excessive discrimination and a reduction in social support. Furthermore, anxiety symptoms was best predicted by the absence or presence of a casual partner, friend discrimination and social support rather than the disclosure of their gender identity, knowledge of HIV prevention and health service. Improvement of social support, reduction of friend discrimination and determination of the characteristics of risky sexual partnerships especially for the casual partner can help to attenuate anxiety symptoms and increase mental well-being for transgender women.

  10. Intimate-Partner and Client-Initiated Violence among Female Street-Based Sex Workers in China: Does a Support Network Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hail-Jares, Katie; Chang, Ruth C. F.; Choi, Sugy; Zheng, Huang; He, Na; Huang, Z. Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Background Globally, female street-based sex workers are vulnerable to gender-based violence. Previous research has shown having a peer social network can reduce sex workers’ risks of victimization. However, mechanisms of how social network impacts violence among female street-based sex workers are still far from clear. Methods Our study was based on data abstracted from a paper-and-pencil survey administered among 218 female street-based sex workers in Shanghai, China. We focused on self-reported client-initiated violence and intimate-partner violence in emotional, physical, and sexual forms. Social networks were characterized by the size and sources of financial and psychosocial support (e.g. family, friends, and peers). Multi-variable logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) of each type of violence exposure by social network structure after the adjustment of age, education, and years in Shanghai. Results The street-based female sex workers in our study were primarily rural-to-urban migrants (95.7%) with an average age of 41 years old. 24.3% and 62.8% of the sex workers reported intimate-partner violence and client-initiated violence respectively. Lack of financial support, as defined by having only one individual or none in her peer support system to help financially, was significantly associated with self-reported intimate-partner violence (AOR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.1–5.9). Respondents who reported client-initiated violence, by contrast, were more likely to report lacked psychosocial support from family (AOR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.0–4.6) and peers (AOR: 5.1, 95% CI: 2.2–11). Conclusion This study is one of the first to systematically analyze the associations between social network and gender-based violence among street-based female sex worker. We reported a high prevalence of both types of gender-based violence and their complex associations with family, friends, and peer support network. Policies with goals to reduce violence against

  11. Intimate-Partner and Client-Initiated Violence among Female Street-Based Sex Workers in China: Does a Support Network Help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Hail-Jares

    Full Text Available Globally, female street-based sex workers are vulnerable to gender-based violence. Previous research has shown having a peer social network can reduce sex workers' risks of victimization. However, mechanisms of how social network impacts violence among female street-based sex workers are still far from clear.Our study was based on data abstracted from a paper-and-pencil survey administered among 218 female street-based sex workers in Shanghai, China. We focused on self-reported client-initiated violence and intimate-partner violence in emotional, physical, and sexual forms. Social networks were characterized by the size and sources of financial and psychosocial support (e.g. family, friends, and peers. Multi-variable logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AOR of each type of violence exposure by social network structure after the adjustment of age, education, and years in Shanghai.The street-based female sex workers in our study were primarily rural-to-urban migrants (95.7% with an average age of 41 years old. 24.3% and 62.8% of the sex workers reported intimate-partner violence and client-initiated violence respectively. Lack of financial support, as defined by having only one individual or none in her peer support system to help financially, was significantly associated with self-reported intimate-partner violence (AOR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.1-5.9. Respondents who reported client-initiated violence, by contrast, were more likely to report lacked psychosocial support from family (AOR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.0-4.6 and peers (AOR: 5.1, 95% CI: 2.2-11.This study is one of the first to systematically analyze the associations between social network and gender-based violence among street-based female sex worker. We reported a high prevalence of both types of gender-based violence and their complex associations with family, friends, and peer support network. Policies with goals to reduce violence against women may apply these findings to

  12. Support networks of women victims of partner violence in Jalisco (Mexico [La red de apoyo en mujeres víctimas de violencia contra la pareja en el estado de Jalisco (México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Estrada Pineda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the present research is to identify the support networks of women victims of partner violence paying attention to both sources and type of support provided. Information about network support from 204 participants living in Guadalajara (Jalisco, México was obtained using the Relationship-specific Perceived Social Support (Gracia & Herrero, 2004. Cluster analysis revealed that the most frequent type of support network included friends as the main source of social support. Two other types of network support were found in this study: family of origin support (mother and sisters, mainly and partner and offspring’s support (in some cases the batterer was also included in this support network.

  13. Social Partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tikkanen, Tarja; Hansen, Leif Emil; Guðmundsson, Bernharður

    2012-01-01

    based on a survey carried out in the Nordic countries in the regie of Nordic Council of Ministries the article deals with the role of social partners in senior and older workers policies and practises...

  14. Unplanned pregnancy and subsequent psychological distress in partnered women: a cross-sectional study of the role of relationship quality and wider social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Katherine; Redshaw, Maggie; Quigley, Maria A; Carson, Claire

    2017-01-26

    Research into the impact of unintended pregnancy on the wellbeing of women tends to focus on pregnancies ending in either termination or lone motherhood. Unintended pregnancy is common in partnered women, but little is known about the association between unintended pregnancy and postpartum affective disorders, such as depression and anxiety in this group. Poor relationship quality and lack of social support are considered risk factors for psychological distress (PD). We examined the association between unplanned motherhood and subsequent PD in partnered women, for whom evidence is sparse, accounting for the role of relationship quality and social support. Data for 12,462 partnered mothers were drawn from the first survey of Millennium Cohort Study, completed at 9 months postpartum. Women reported whether their baby was planned, and how they felt when they discovered that they were pregnant. Pregnancy intention is categorised as "planned", "unplanned/happy", "unplanned/ambivalent" and "unplanned/unhappy". PD was assessed using the modified 9-item Rutter Malaise Inventory. Social support was measured by a composite score for perceived support, and a measure of actual support from friends and family. Relationship quality was assessed using a modified Golombok-Rust Inventory of Marital State. The effect of pregnancy intention on the odds of PD at 9 months was estimated, adjusting for potential confounding factors. All analyses were weighted for response and design effects. In total 32.8%(weighted) (4343/12462) of mothers reported an unplanned pregnancy: 23.3 wt% (3087) of mothers felt happy, 3.5 wt% (475) ambivalent, and 6.0 wt% (781) unhappy upon discovery. Unplanned pregnancy was associated with a significantly increased odds of PD compared to planned (OR 1.73 (95%CI: 1.53, 1.95)). This was more pronounced among women who reported negative or ambivalent feelings in early pregnancy (OR 2.72 (95%CI:2.17, 3.41) and 2.56 (95%CI:1.95, 3.34), respectively), than those

  15. A Partner's Guide to Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth problems. Women who are well supported during pregnancy may be less anxious and have less stress in the weeks after childbirth. You can be supportive by educating yourself about pregnancy, going with your partner to prenatal care appointments, ...

  16. Marital satisfaction in patients with cancer : Does support from intimate partners benefit those who need it the most?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagedoorn, M.; Kuijer, Roeline; Buunk, B.; DeJong, G.Majella; Wobbes, T.; Sanderman, R.

    2000-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed 3 ways of providing spousal support. Active engagement means involving the patient in discussions and using constructive problem-solving methods; protective buffering means hiding one's concerns; and overprotection refers to underestimation of the patient's capabi

  17. PARTNER Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Ballantine, A; Dixon-Altaber, H; Dosanjh, M; Kuchina, L

    2011-01-01

    Hadrontherapy uses particle beams to treat tumours located near critical organs and tumours that respond poorly to conventional radiation therapy. It has become evident that there is an emerging need for reinforcing research in hadrontherapy and it is essential to train professionals in this rapidly developing field. PARTNER is a 4-year Marie Curie Training project funded by the European Commission with 5.6 million Euros aimed at the creation of the next generation of experts. Ten academic institutes and research centres and two leading companies are participating in PARTNER, that is coordinated by CERN, forming a unique multidisciplinary and multinational European network. The project offers research and training opportunities to 25 young biologists, engineers, physicians and physicists and is allowing them to actively develop modern techniques for treating cancer in close collaboration with leading European Institutions. For this purpose PARTNER relies on cutting edge research and technology development, ef...

  18. Parents as partners: Building collaborations to support the development of school readiness skills in under-resourced communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Pitt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary, qualitative review of a therapeutic programme for preschool children and their parents in severely under-resourced contexts to aid the development of the underlying skills required to be ready for formal school. A team of two pairs, each comprising an occupational therapist and a community worker, responded to teachers' requests to assist struggling children in their classes. This led to the development of a programme focusing on Grade R classes, by firstly helping teachers to develop their capability and confidence in assessing and assisting children to develop the abilities underlying vital school-readiness skills during whole-class, therapeutic group sessions. Secondly, parent group sessions were added to empower parents to understand and support their children's development needs at home and so to complement the work done by teachers in the classroom. This second aspect, of working with the parents, developed owing to observations of the children's irregular school attendance, scant parent-school contact, and teachers' reports indicating that parents were not aware of, nor equipped to deal with, the challenges faced by their children. Implications for practice, for planning and for further research are discussed.

  19. Differentiating between child protection and family support in the Canadian child welfare system's response to intimate partner violence, corporal punishment, and child neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trocmé, Nico; Fallon, Barbara; Sinha, Vandna; Van Wert, Melissa; Kozlowski, Anna; Maclaurin, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Rates of reported child maltreatment nearly doubled in Canada over the period 1998-2003, an increase that reflects growing awareness of the harmful effects of an expanding array of parental behaviors, including corporal punishment, lack of supervision, and exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV). Some of these situations may benefit from voluntary family support programs outside of the child welfare system. Analyzing a sample of 11,807 investigations, this paper compares cases where the sole concern is exposure to IPV, or hitting a child, or neglect, or other forms of investigated maltreatment. Situations where exposure to IPV or potentially abusive hitting were the sole reason for investigation presented with fewer risk factors and were less likely to lead to ongoing child welfare interventions compared to other maltreatment investigations. While situations involving alleged neglect presented a higher risk profile and elicited a more intensive child welfare response than did exposure to IPV or hitting, opportunities for alternative services were nevertheless identified. The study also found that visible minority families were overrepresented in cases involving hitting and that Aboriginal families were overrepresented in cases involving neglect. Overall the findings support the development of alternative response programs in Canada.

  20. UNDERCOVER PARTNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru MARIAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The undercover partner takes part in the process of providing the investigating bodies with information. This institution carries out activities similar to undercover investigator. These both represent a proactive investigating instrument used by criminal authorities to obtain better results concerning the fight against criminality. Under the cover another identity, they carefully search for crimes or favorable circumstances for commitment of others new.

  1. UNDERCOVER PARTNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian ALEXANDRU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The undercover partner takes part in the process of providing the investigating bodies with information. This institution carries out activities similar to undercover investigator. These both represent a proactive investigating instrument used by criminal authorities to obtain better results concerning the fight against criminality. Under the cover another identity, they carefully search for crimes or favorable circumstances for commitment of others new.

  2. Living with diabetes: a group-based self-management support programme for T2DM patients in the early phases of illness and their partners, study protocol of a randomised comtrolled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puffelen, A.L. van; Rijken, M.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Nijpels, G.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present article presents the protocol for a randomised controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a group-based self-management support programme for recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients (one to three years post-diagnosis) and their partners. The course aims

  3. Living with heart failure : Partner perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik, Marie Louise; Blaauwbroek, Arnarins; Dijker, Anton; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2007-01-01

    To preserve the supportive capabilities of partners of heart failure (HF) patients, it is necessary to gain insight in the experiences and potential needs of these partners. Thirteen partners of HF patients participated in semistructured interviews specifically focused on their experiences as a

  4. Search for supersymmetric top-quark partners using support vector machines and upgrade of the hadron calorimeter front-end readout control system at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Mehmet Oezguer

    2017-04-15

    In this thesis a search for direct pair production of supersymmetric top-quark partners as well as work on the upgrade of the front-end readout controller of the Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment are presented. The most appealing extension of the Standard Model (SM) is supersymmetry (SUSY), relating the integer spin (bosons) and half-integer spin elementary particles (fermions). Supersymmetric top-quark partners (t) around and below the TeV energy scale offer a solution to the hierarchy problem. Furthermore, R-parity conserving SUSY models propose a cold dark matter candidate in the form of stable lightest supersymmetric particles, e.g. lightest neutralinos (χ{sup 0}). The analysis performed in this thesis is a search for top-squark pair production in a final state consisting of a single isolated lepton, jets, among which at least one is tagged as bottom-quark jet, and large missing transverse energy at the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with 8 TeV center-of-mass energy. A new Support Vector Machines (SVM) High-Energy Physics interface (SVM-HINT) software is introduced to classify signal events originating from new physics processes and the SM background. SVM-HINT is enhanced with a novel statistical significance based optimization algorithm providing a state-of-the-art classification power. Monte Carlo simulations are used in the training and optimization procedure, and high signal purity search regions are determined in the search for top-squark pair production. The background event yields in each search region are predicted using a data-driven background estimation method. The results are interpreted within a simplified model assuming a branching ratio of 100% to t → tχ{sup 0}. No significant discrepancy between the data and the SM predictions has been observed. Exclusion limits were derived to constrain the m{sub t} and m{sub χ{sup 0}} of the investigated simplified model. The sensitivity of the

  5. To punish or to leave: distinct cognitive processes underlie partner control and partner choice behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Martin

    Full Text Available When a cooperative partner defects, at least two types of response are available: Punishment, aimed at modifying behavior, and ostracism, aimed at avoiding further social interaction with the partner. These options, termed partner control and partner choice, have been distinguished at behavioral and evolutionary levels. However, little work has compared their cognitive bases. Do these disparate behaviors depend on common processes of moral evaluation? Specifically, we assess whether they show identical patterns of dependence on two key dimensions of moral evaluation: A person's intentions, and the outcomes that they cause. We address this issue in a "trembling hand" economic game. In this game, an allocator divides a monetary stake between themselves and a responder based on a stochastic mechanism. This allows for dissociations between the allocator's intent and the actual outcome. Responders were either given the opportunity to punish or reward the allocator (partner control or to switch to a different partner for a subsequent round of play (partner choice. Our results suggest that partner control and partner choice behaviors are supported by distinct underlying cognitive processes: Partner control exhibits greater sensitivity to the outcomes a partner causes, while partner choice is influenced almost exclusively by a partner's intentions. This cognitive dissociation can be understood in light of the unique adaptive functions of partner control and partner choice.

  6. To punish or to leave: distinct cognitive processes underlie partner control and partner choice behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Justin W; Cushman, Fiery

    2015-01-01

    When a cooperative partner defects, at least two types of response are available: Punishment, aimed at modifying behavior, and ostracism, aimed at avoiding further social interaction with the partner. These options, termed partner control and partner choice, have been distinguished at behavioral and evolutionary levels. However, little work has compared their cognitive bases. Do these disparate behaviors depend on common processes of moral evaluation? Specifically, we assess whether they show identical patterns of dependence on two key dimensions of moral evaluation: A person's intentions, and the outcomes that they cause. We address this issue in a "trembling hand" economic game. In this game, an allocator divides a monetary stake between themselves and a responder based on a stochastic mechanism. This allows for dissociations between the allocator's intent and the actual outcome. Responders were either given the opportunity to punish or reward the allocator (partner control) or to switch to a different partner for a subsequent round of play (partner choice). Our results suggest that partner control and partner choice behaviors are supported by distinct underlying cognitive processes: Partner control exhibits greater sensitivity to the outcomes a partner causes, while partner choice is influenced almost exclusively by a partner's intentions. This cognitive dissociation can be understood in light of the unique adaptive functions of partner control and partner choice.

  7. MOSAIC (MOthers' Advocates In the Community): protocol and sample description of a cluster randomised trial of mentor mother support to reduce intimate partner violence among pregnant or recent mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Taft Angela J; Small Rhonda; Hegarty Kelsey L; Lumley Judith; Watson Lyndsey F; Gold Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) is prevalent globally, experienced by a significant minority of women in the early childbearing years and is harmful to the mental and physical health of women and children. There are very few studies with rigorous designs which have tested the effectiveness of IPV interventions to improve the health and wellbeing of abused women. Evidence for the separate benefit to victims of social support, advocacy and non-professional mentoring suggeste...

  8. Creating a Supportive Teaching Culture in the Research University Context: Strategic Partnering and Interdisciplinary Collaboration between a Teaching Center and Academic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Marie Kendall; Ralston, Patricia A. S.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Schreck, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes 2 "strategic partnering" and "interdisciplinary collaboration" case studies between a Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) and an academic unit at a mid-sized metropolitan research university in the American Midwest. These faculty development partnerships were developed to meet the unique needs of faculty…

  9. Search for Supersymmetric Top-Quark Partners Using Support Vector Machines and Upgrade of the Hadron Calorimeter Front-End Readout Control System at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Sahin, Mehmet Ozgur; Schleper, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis a search for direct pair production of supersymmetric top-quark partners aswell as work on the upgrade of the front-end readout controller of the Hadron Calorimeter(HCAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment are presented.The most appealing extension of the Standard Model (SM) is supersymmetry (SUSY), relating the integer spin (bosons) and half-integer spin elementary particles (fermions). Supersymmetric top-quark partners (t) around and below the TeV energy scale offer a solution to thehierarchy problem. Furthermore, R-parity conserving SUSY models propose a cold dark matter candidate in the form of stable lightest supersymmetric particles, e.g. lightest neutralinos(χ0 ).The analysis performed in this thesis is a search for top-squark pair production in a final state consisting of a single isolated lepton, jets, among which at least one is tagged asbottom-quark jet, and large missing transverse energy at the CMS experiment at the CERNLarge Hadron Collider (LHC) with 8 TeV center-of-...

  10. MOSAIC (MOthers' Advocates In the Community: protocol and sample description of a cluster randomised trial of mentor mother support to reduce intimate partner violence among pregnant or recent mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taft Angela J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV is prevalent globally, experienced by a significant minority of women in the early childbearing years and is harmful to the mental and physical health of women and children. There are very few studies with rigorous designs which have tested the effectiveness of IPV interventions to improve the health and wellbeing of abused women. Evidence for the separate benefit to victims of social support, advocacy and non-professional mentoring suggested that a combined model may reduce the levels of violence, the associated mental health damage and may increase a woman's health, safety and connection with her children. This paper describes the development, design and implementation of a trial of mentor mother support set in primary care, including baseline characteristics of participating women. Methods/Design MOSAIC (MOtherS' Advocates In the Community was a cluster randomised trial embedded in general practice and maternal and child health (MCH nursing services in disadvantaged suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. Women who were pregnant or with infants, identified as abused or symptomatic of abuse, were referred by IPV-trained GPs and MCH nurses from 24 general practices and eight nurse teams from January 2006 to December 2007. Women in the intervention arm received up to 12 months support from trained and supported non-professional mentor mothers. Vietnamese health professionals also referred Vietnamese women to bilingual mentors in a sub-study. Baseline and follow-up surveys at 12 months measured IPV (CAS, depression (EPDS, general health (SF-36, social support (MOS-SF and attachment to children (PSI-SF. Significant development and piloting occurred prior to trial commencement. Implementation interviews with MCH nurses, GPs and mentors assisted further refinement of the intervention. In-depth interviews with participants and mentors, and follow-up surveys of MCH nurses and GPs at trial conclusion will

  11. Non-verbal behavioral interactions of depressed patients with partners and strangers : The role of behavioral social support and involvement in depression persistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hale, WW; Jansen, JHC; Bouhuys, AL; Jenner, JA; vandenHoofdakker, RH

    1997-01-01

    Excessive support seeking and lack of receiving social support have been associated with depression onset and unfavorable course of depression. It has been assumed that social support is effected by observable behaviors that express involvement. Twenty-five patients with major depression were studie

  12. Prevalence and risk factors for intimate partner violence among Grade 8 learners in urban South Africa: baseline analysis from the Skhokho Supporting Success cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamu, Simukai; Gevers, Anik; Mahlangu, B Pinky; Jama Shai, P Nwabisa; Chirwa, Esnat D; Jewkes, Rachel K

    2016-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious public health problem among adolescents. This study investigated the prevalence of and factors associated with Grade 8 girls' experience and boys' perpetration of IPV in South Africa. Participants were interviewed using interviewer-administered questionnaires about IPV, childhood violence, bullying, gender attitudes, alcohol use and risky sexual behaviours. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess factors associated with girls' experience and boys' perpetration of IPV. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was conducted to assess the pathways to IPV experience and perpetration. Results show dating relationships are common among girls (52.5%) and boys (70.7%) and high prevalence of sexual or physical IPV experience by girls (30.9%; 95% CI: 28.2-33.7) and perpetration by boys (39.5%; 95% CI: 36.6-42.3). The logistic regression model showed factors associated with girls' experience of IPV include childhood experience of violence, individual gender inequitable attitudes, corporal punishment at home and in school, alcohol use, wider communication with one's partner and being more negative about school. We found three pathways from childhood trauma to IPV experience and perpetration in both models and these are through inequitable gender attitudes and risky sex, bullying and alcohol use. Prevention of IPV in children needs to encompass prevention of exposure to trauma in childhood and addressing gender attitudes and social norms to encourage positive disciplining approaches. : The trial is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT02349321. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Partnering and contracting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohnstedt, Kristian Ditlev

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - Partnering is often, by economists, and construction managerial literature related to more incomplete contracts. This can be explained by seeing partnering as something that neutralizes opportunism. The aim is to uncover whether partnering neutralizes opportunism when there is an incomp......Purpose - Partnering is often, by economists, and construction managerial literature related to more incomplete contracts. This can be explained by seeing partnering as something that neutralizes opportunism. The aim is to uncover whether partnering neutralizes opportunism when...... outcomes with the conception of being repaid later in accordance to reciprocity. Value - Seeing partnering as the willingness to renegotiate complete contracts can reduce the risk for the contractor and lead to lower prices for a given service. Keywords Partnering, Contracting, Pareto efficiency...

  14. Olympic Partner Programme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The Olympic Partner Programme (TOP) is an international Olympic marketing programme created by the International Olympic Committee (IOC),which includes the Organising Committees of the Games,the National Olympic Committees and the TOP Partners.

  15. Partnering and integrated supply management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnø, Ole-Christian; Olsen, Anders; Thyssen, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    are common among the actors in the building industry. Partnering is still in its early stages, and a strategic development of the concept to include long-term collaborative relationships appears to be able to offer considerable potential, while there is a pressing need for the development of methods...... for strategic management of collaborative relationships on a line with the purchasing perspectives offered by Supply Chain Management. Based on a study of the literature and an in-depth case study carried out within a large Scandinavian contractor, this article gives a proposal for how Partnering can...... be supported by strategic purchasing, with the aim of achieving strategic Partnering. The contribution of this article is thus the development of a new purchasing perspective within Construction Supply Chain Management....

  16. The Constitution of Partnering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer

    The constitution of partnering. Afhandlingen behandler konstitueringen af ledelseskonceptet partnering og dets anvendelse i dansk byggeri. Partnering er et udbredt koncept i byggeriet som betoner samarbejde, tillid og gensidighed mellem de deltagende parter, og konceptet har de senere år har været...

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Intimate partner violence, health behaviours ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    country study on IPV and women's physical and mental health found a significant association ... heart attack and high blood pressure reached near-significance. Conclusions. Partner ..... These activities were supported by the. United States ...

  18. Perceived neighborhood partner availability, partner selection, and risk for sexually transmitted infections within a cohort of adolescent females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Pamela A; Chung, Shang-En; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2014-07-01

    This research examined the association between a novel measure of perceived partner availability and discordance between ideal and actual partner characteristics as well as trajectories of ideal partner preferences and perceptions of partner availability over time. A clinic-recruited cohort of adolescent females (N = 92), aged 1619 years, were interviewed quarterly for 12 months using audio computer-assisted self-interview. Participants ranked the importance of characteristics for their ideal main sex partner and then reported on these characteristics for their current main partner. Participants reported on perceptions of availability of ideal sex partners in their neighborhood. Paired t-tests examined discordance between ideal and actual partner characteristics. Random-intercept regression models examined repeated measures. Actual partner ratings were lower than ideal partner preferences for fidelity, equaled ideal preferences for emotional support and exceeded ideal preferences for social/economic status and physical attractiveness. Discordance on emotional support and social/economic status was associated with sex partner concurrency. Participants perceived low availability of ideal sex partners. Those who perceived more availability were less likely to be ideal/actual discordant on fidelity [OR = .88, 95% CI: .78, 1.0]. Neither ideal partner preferences nor perceptions of partner availability changed over 12 months. Current main sex partners met or exceeded ideal partner preferences in all domains except fidelity. If emotional needs are met, adolescents may tolerate partner concurrency in areas of limited partner pools. Urban adolescent females who perceive low availability may be at increased risk for sexually transmitted infection (STI) because they may be more likely to have nonmonogamous partners. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Partnering with consumers to develop and evaluate a Vietnamese Dementia Talking-Book to support low health literacy: a qualitative study incorporating codesign and participatory action research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeman, Dianne; Michael, J; King, J; Luu, Huy; Emmanuel, Claire; Koch, S

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the Vietnamese Dementia talking-book was to address low health literacy in older people of Vietnamese background living with dementia through the provision of an online resource to help individuals, their families and carers better understand and manage this condition and provide information about available dementia services. Design This qualitative study used codesign and participatory action research to develop and refine the talking-book in consultation with expert stakeholders, a consumer advocacy group and the Vietnamese community to assess its utility and ensure cultural and linguistic appropriateness and relevance. Participants 59 members of the Vietnamese community, 11 stakeholders from community health services and ethnic agencies, consumer advocacy groups and the research team participated in the codesign and refinement of the talking-book. 22 members of the Vietnamese community appraised the final product. Setting Vietnamese community planned activity groups in the Western, Northern and Southern suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. Results Our codesign study outlines the process required to develop a Vietnamese Dementia Talking-Book resource partnering with consumers and expert stakeholders to identify consumer need, selection of the content and appropriate language level, construction of the book, measuring acceptability of the talking-book, modification based on feedback and production and dissemination. Feedback on the final version of the talking-book revealed widespread consensus that the book enhanced the knowledge of members of the Vietnamese community in regard to understanding dementia and navigation and accessing of available services. Conclusions This free internationally available online Vietnamese Dementia Talking-Book facilitates improved dementia-related health literacy in the Vietnamese community. The book also serves as a tool to facilitate the provision of care to Vietnamese people living with memory loss by assisting

  20. Catastrophizing and perceived partner responses to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothby, Jennifer L; Thorn, Beverly E; Overduin, Lorraine Y; Ward, L Charles

    2004-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between catastrophizing and patient-perceived partner responses to pain behaviors. The Catastrophizing subscale of the Cognitive Coping Strategy Inventory and the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory were completed by 62 adult chronic pain patients. Consistent with past research, catastrophizing and patient-perceived solicitous partner behaviors were positively correlated with negative pain outcomes. The communal coping theory of catastrophizing suggests that catastrophizing might be undertaken to solicit support and empathy from others. However, catastrophizing was not related to perceived solicitous partner behavior in this study. Rather, catastrophizing was associated with perceived punishing partner responses. Implications are that catastrophizing and perceived solicitous partner behaviors are independently associated with pain and that catastrophizing may not be reinforced by empathy from significant others.

  1. Virtual simulation training using the Storz C-HUB to support distance airway training for the Spanish Medical Corps and NATO partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadia de Barbara, Alberto H; Nicholas Iv, Thomas A; Del Real Colomo, Antonio; Boedeker, David; Bernhagen, Mary A; Hillan Garcia, Laura; Setién, Fernando; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    In medicine, the advancement of new technologies creates challenges to providers both in learning and in maintaining competency in required skills. For those medical providers located in remote environments, access to learning can be even more formidable. This work describes a collaboration created to facilitate the use of new communication technologies in providing distance training and support to health care personnel deployed in remote areas.

  2. Mothers' AdvocateS In the Community (MOSAIC- non-professional mentor support to reduce intimate partner violence and depression in mothers: a cluster randomised trial in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gold Lisa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective interventions to increase safety and wellbeing of mothers experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV are scarce. As much attention is focussed on professional intervention, this study aimed to determine the effectiveness of non-professional mentor support in reducing IPV and depression among pregnant and recent mothers experiencing, or at risk of IPV. Methods MOSAIC was a cluster randomised trial in 106 primary care (maternal and child health nurse and general practitioner clinics in Melbourne, Australia. 63/106 clinics referred 215 eligible culturally and linguistically diverse women between January 2006 and December 2007. 167 in the intervention (I arm, and 91 in the comparison (C arm. 174 (80.9% were recruited. 133 (76.4% women (90 I and 43 C completed follow-up at 12 months. Intervention: 12 months of weekly home visiting from trained and supervised local mothers, (English & Vietnamese speaking offering non-professional befriending, advocacy, parenting support and referrals. Main outcome measures: Primary outcomes; IPV (Composite Abuse Scale CAS and depression (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale EPDS; secondary measures included wellbeing (SF-36, parenting stress (PSI-SF and social support (MOS-SF at baseline and follow-up. Analysis: Intention-to-treat using multivariable logistic regression and propensity scoring. Results There was evidence of a true difference in mean abuse scores at follow-up in the intervention compared with the comparison arm (15.9 vs 21.8, AdjDiff -8.67, CI -16.2 to -1.15. There was weak evidence for other outcomes, but a trend was evident favouring the intervention: proportions of women with CAS scores ≥7, 51/88 (58.4% vs 27/42 (64.3% AdjOR 0.47, CI 0.21 to 1.05; depression (EPDS score ≥13 (19/85, 22% (I vs 14/43, 33% (C; AdjOR 0.42, CI 0.17 to 1.06; physical wellbeing mean scores (PCS-SF36: AdjDiff 2.79; CI -0.40 to 5.99; mental wellbeing mean scores (MCS-SF36: AdjDiff 2.26; CI -1

  3. PublisherPartners webshop

    OpenAIRE

    Piferrer Torres, Enric

    2013-01-01

    Projecte realitzat en col·laboració amb Fontys University of Applied Sciences i l'empresa PublisherPartners. The main goal in the project was to build a website where the company PublisherPartners could sell and offer its products online to the customer

  4. Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among low-income, African American women with a history of intimate partner violence and suicidal behaviors: self-esteem, social support, and religious coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Rebekah; Schwartz, Ann C; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2005-12-01

    There is a dearth of research on risk/protective factors for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among low-income African American women with a history of intimate partner violence (IPV), presenting for suicidal behavior or routine medical care in a large, urban hospital. We examined self-esteem, social support, and religious coping as mediators between experiences of child maltreatment (CM) and IPV and symptoms of PTSD in a sample (N = 134) of low-income African American women. Instruments used included the Index of Spouse Abuse, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Taylor Self-Esteem Inventory, the Multidimensional Profile of Social Support, the Brief Religious Coping Activities Scale, and the Davidson Trauma Scale. Both CM and IPV related positively to PTSD symptoms. Risk and resilience individual difference factors accounted for 18% of the variance in PTSD symptoms over and above IPV and CM, with self-esteem and negative religious coping making unique contributions. Both variables mediated the abuse-PTSD symptom link. In addition, we tested an alternate model in which PTSD symptoms mediated the relationship between abuse and both self-esteem and negative religious coping.

  5. Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence: Conduct Problems, Interventions, and Partner Contact With the Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N; Rosenfield, David; McDonald, Renee; Vu, Nicole L; Rancher, Caitlin; Mueller, Victoria

    2016-06-30

    Children's contact with their mother's violent partner is a potentially important variable for understanding conduct problems among children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). Within the context of a treatment study evaluating a parenting intervention (Project Support) for families exiting a domestic violence shelter, this study tested four hypotheses regarding children's postshelter contact with their mother's violent partner: (1) participation in Project Support decreases the frequency of children's contact with their mother's violent partner; (2) postshelter contact is positively associated with children's conduct problems and is associated more strongly for girls than boys; (3) frequency of contact mediates Project Support's effects on children's conduct problems; and (4) frequency of contact is positively associated with IPV and partner-child aggression, and these latter associations help explain effects of contact on children's conduct problems. Participants were 66 women (26 White) with a child (32 girls) between 4 and 9 years. Families were assessed every 4 months for 20 months after departure from a domestic violence shelter. Project Support reduced the extent of partner-child contact. In addition, within-subject changes in contact over time were associated with girls', but not boys', conduct problems, and it partially mediated effects of Project Support on girls' conduct problems. Higher average levels of contact over time were also positively associated with further incidents of IPV and partner-child aggression, and partner-child aggression helped explain effects of contact on children's conduct problems. Children's postshelter contact with the mother's violent partner relates positively to several negative family outcomes.

  6. Making the Most of a Teaching Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Boni

    2009-01-01

    Teachers often miss opportunities to use their classroom computers as teaching partners because of a lack of knowledge or confidence about how the computers can support learning. Internet-connected computers can enable teachers to access well-designed websites that support literacy instruction and involve students in interactive responses to…

  7. Collateral Intimate Partner Homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Meyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Collateral intimate partner homicide (CIPH is an underinvestigated genre of intimate partner violence (IPV where an individual(s connected to the IPV victim is murdered. We conducted a content analysis of a statewide database of CIPH newspaper articles (1990-2007. Out of 111 collateral murder victims, there were 84 IPV female focal victims and 84 male perpetrators. The most frequently reported CIPH decedent was the focal victim’s new partner (30%; 45% of focal victims were themselves killed. News reports framed CIPH as the unexpected result of interpersonal conflict, despite evidence of a systematic pattern of coercion and violence that capitulated in murder.

  8. CHP Partnership Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partners of EPA's Combined Heat and Power Partnership include federal, state, and local government agencies and private organizations such as energy users, energy service companies, CHP project developers and consultants, and equipment manufacturers.

  9. The Constitution of Partnering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer

    promoveret af branchen og af staten som et væsentligt led i udviklingen af byggeriets arbejdsformer. Med et udgangspunkt i en Foucauldiansk analyse af dispositiver, rum og orden bidrager afhandlingen med en ny differentieret forståelse af mulighederne for at håndtere branchens modsætningsfyldte fornyelse...... om, hvordan partnering som koncept er fremkommet og har udviklet sig og hvilke konstitutive effekter partnering har på byggeriets praksis. Det teoretiske udgangspunkt i Foucault begrundes i behovet for at fastholde en mangefacetteret og historisk analyse af partnering i modsætning til de...... fremherskende endimensionelle og rationelle forståelser, som ikke svarer til den oplevede og observerede praksis i byggebranchen. I afhandlingens første del diskuteres den analytiske anvendelse af et teoretisk nøglebegreb fra Foucault i analysen af partnering; dispositivet. Hermed forstås de bagvedliggende...

  10. Pacific Partners Wargame Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    such as medical qualifications and malpractice considerations, can be explored as part of interoperability. Partner nations are motivated to...specialized problems. Intellectual exchanges and fora involving experts from government, industry, academic and other institutions could be employed in

  11. Green Power Partner List

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. There are thousands of Green Power Partners, all listed on this page.

  12. Collateral Intimate Partner Homicide

    OpenAIRE

    Emily Meyer; Lori Post

    2013-01-01

    Collateral intimate partner homicide (CIPH) is an underinvestigated genre of intimate partner violence (IPV) where an individual(s) connected to the IPV victim is murdered. We conducted a content analysis of a statewide database of CIPH newspaper articles (1990-2007). Out of 111 collateral murder victims, there were 84 IPV female focal victims and 84 male perpetrators. The most frequently reported CIPH decedent was the...

  13. A Community-Academic Partnered Grant Writing Series to Build Infrastructure for Partnered Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keyonna M; Pardo, Yvette-Janine; Norris, Keith C; Diaz-Romero, Maria; Morris, D'Ann; Vassar, Stefanie D; Brown, Arleen F

    2015-10-01

    Grant writing is an essential skill necessary to secure financial support for community programs and research projects. Increasingly, funding opportunities for translational biomedical research require studies to engage community partners, patients, or other stakeholders in the research process to address their concerns. However, there is little evidence on strategies to prepare teams of academic and community partners to collaborate on grants. This paper presents the description and formative evaluation of a two-part community-academic partnered grant writing series designed to help community organizations and academic institutions build infrastructure for collaborative research projects using a partnered approach. The first phase of the series was a half-day workshop on grant readiness, which was open to all interested community partners. The second phase, open only to community-academic teams that met eligibility criteria, was a 12-week session that covered partnered grant writing for foundation grants and National Institutes of Health grants. Participants in both phases reported an increase in knowledge and self-efficacy for writing partnered proposals. At 1-year follow-up, participants in Phase 2 had secured approximately $1.87 million in funding. This community-academic partnered grant writing series helped participants obtain proposal development skills and helped community-academic teams successfully compete for funding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A Community–Academic Partnered Grant Writing Series to Build Infrastructure for Partnered Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Yvette‐Janine; Norris, Keith C.; Diaz‐Romero, Maria; Morris, D'Ann; Vassar, Stefanie D.; Brown, Arleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Grant writing is an essential skill necessary to secure financial support for community programs and research projects. Increasingly, funding opportunities for translational biomedical research require studies to engage community partners, patients, or other stakeholders in the research process to address their concerns. However, there is little evidence on strategies to prepare teams of academic and community partners to collaborate on grants. This paper presents the description and formative evaluation of a two‐part community–academic partnered grant writing series designed to help community organizations and academic institutions build infrastructure for collaborative research projects using a partnered approach. The first phase of the series was a half‐day workshop on grant readiness, which was open to all interested community partners. The second phase, open only to community–academic teams that met eligibility criteria, was a 12‐week session that covered partnered grant writing for foundation grants and National Institutes of Health grants. Participants in both phases reported an increase in knowledge and self‐efficacy for writing partnered proposals. At 1‐year follow‐up, participants in Phase 2 had secured approximately $1.87 million in funding. This community–academic partnered grant writing series helped participants obtain proposal development skills and helped community–academic teams successfully compete for funding. PMID:26365589

  15. 城市新婚夫妻求助表达、伴侣支持应对和婚姻满意度的关系%Relationships Between Help-seeking Expression,Partners' Support Coping and Marital Satisfaction Among Chinese Urban Newlyweds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耀方; 方晓义

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore whether help-seeking expression influences couples' marital satisfaction through partners' support coping among Chinese urban newly-weds.Methods: 88 urban newly-weds were recruited to complete a questionnaire including scales of help-seeking expression, partners' support coping and marital satisfaction.Results:Wives' help-seeking expression was significantly higher than husbands'.Husbands and wives' support coping towards partners were significantly related.Help-seeking expression could positively predict the couples' marital satisfaction total-ly through partners' support coping.Conclusion: Partners' support coping is a mediator between help-seeking expression and couples' marital satisfaction among Chinese urban newly-weds.%目的:探讨城市新婚夫妻对伴侣的求助表达是否通过伴侣的支持应对影响双方婚姻满意度.方法:选取88对城市新婚夫妻,完成压力情境下的求助表达与伴侣支持应对问卷,以及婚姻满意度问卷.结果:妻子求助表达显著高于丈夫;丈夫和妻子对伴侣的支持应对存在显著正相关;丈夫和妻子的求助表达只能通过伴侣的支持应对正向预测双方婚姻满意度.结论:伴侣支持应对在求助表达与双方婚姻满意度间起完全中介作用.

  16. Predictability of conversation partners

    CERN Document Server

    Takaguchi, Taro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, Song et al. (2010) found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one's conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one's next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between close sensor nodes. We find t...

  17. Partner choice creates fairness in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debove, Stéphane; André, Jean-Baptiste; Baumard, Nicolas

    2015-06-07

    Many studies demonstrate that partner choice has played an important role in the evolution of human cooperation, but little work has tested its impact on the evolution of human fairness. In experiments involving divisions of money, people become either over-generous or over-selfish when they are in competition to be chosen as cooperative partners. Hence, it is difficult to see how partner choice could result in the evolution of fair, equal divisions. Here, we show that this puzzle can be solved if we consider the outside options on which partner choice operates. We conduct a behavioural experiment, run agent-based simulations and analyse a game-theoretic model to understand how outside options affect partner choice and fairness. All support the conclusion that partner choice leads to fairness only when individuals have equal outside options. We discuss how this condition has been met in our evolutionary history, and the implications of these findings for our understanding of other aspects of fairness less specific than preferences for equal divisions of resources. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Partner switching can favour cooperation in a biological market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwagmeyer, P L

    2014-09-01

    Intraspecific cooperation and interspecific mutualisms can be promoted by mechanisms that reduce the frequency with which cooperative organisms are exploited by unhelpful partners. One such mechanism consists of changing partners after interacting with an uncooperative individual. I used McNamara et al.'s (Nature, 451, 2008, 189) partner switching model as a framework to examine whether this mechanism can select for increased cooperative investment by house sparrows (Passer domesticus) collaborating to rear offspring; previous research on this species has shown that substantial cooperative investments by both pair members are required to achieve high pay-offs from collaborating. I found that the poorer the outcome of a breeding attempt relative to the number of eggs the female invested, the greater the likelihood of partner switching. The incidence of partner switching changed seasonally, with peak switching coinciding with an increase in the number of alternative partners available to females. After females switched partners, their breeding outcomes rose to match those of females that remained with the same partner; this was not the case for males that switched partners. Consistent with the model's prediction, males in stable partnerships achieved over 25% higher than average reproductive success, which was attributable to both persistently good breeding outcomes and their older partners' high fecundity. These results provide empirical support for the hypothesis that partner switching favours increased cooperative investment levels, and they demonstrate that variation in the relative value of by-product benefits can enhance that process.

  19. Collaborative vaccine development: partnering pays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Rangappa

    2008-01-01

    Vaccine development, supported by infusions of public and private venture capital, is re-entering a golden age as one of the fastest growing sectors in the life-sciences industry. Demand is driven by great unmet need in underdeveloped countries, increased resistance to current treatments, bioterrorism, and for prevention indications in travelers, pediatric, and adult diseases. Production systems are becoming less reliant on processes such as egg-based manufacturing, while new processes can help to optimize vaccines. Expeditious development hinges on efficient study conduct, which is greatly enhanced through research partnerships with specialized contract research organizations (CROs) that are licensed and knowledgeable in the intricacies of immunology and with the technologic and scientific foundation to support changing timelines and strategies inherent to vaccine development. The CRO often brings a more objective assessment for probability of success and may offer alternative development pathways. Vaccine developers are afforded more flexibility and are free to focus on innovation and internal core competencies. Functions readily outsourced to a competent partner include animal model development, safety and efficacy studies, immunotoxicity and immunogenicity, dose response studies, and stability and potency testing. These functions capitalize on the CRO partner's regulatory and scientific talent and expertise, and reduce infrastructure expenses for the vaccine developer. Successful partnerships result in development efficiencies, elimination or reduced redundancies, and improved time to market. Keys to success include honest communications, transparency, and flexibility.

  20. Partners in Accomplished Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, Arlington, VA.

    This report describes Partners in Accomplished Teaching, a project of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) designed to help increase the number of teachers achieving National Board Certification. It focuses on efforts in St. Paul, Minnesota; Mississippi; North Carolina; and San Antonio, Texas. The St. Paul program is a…

  1. Content for Conversation Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that a good strategy for helping English language learners to develop communicative competence in English is by pairing them with native English speakers. In such conversation programs, conversation partners should be provided with topics and activities that incorporate the goals, interests, and experiences of the learners. Recommends…

  2. Partners and Competitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The United States and China are entering an entirely new and complex era in their economic relationship. In a nutshell, China is both partner and competitor, and simplistic efforts to cast the complexity of U.S.-China economic relations as either one of partnership or competition are unhelpful to the development of effective policy.

  3. Partnering i praksis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer; Bang, Henrik L.; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    Publikationen sammenfatter resultater og erfaringer vedrørende brug af partnering i realiseringen af LO's hovedsæde i Havnestaden, København. Forløbet i byggesagen adskiller sig fra traditionelle byggesager på en række områder. Vigtigst af disse er anvendelsen af en række partneringstiltag, der u...

  4. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-08-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song , ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 327, 1018 (2010)] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  5. Female Intimate Partner Violence Survivors' Experiences with Accessing Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Amy L.; Hays, Danica G.; Chang, Catherine Y.

    2010-01-01

    This phenomenological study investigates the types of personal and community resources that female intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors used when leaving an abusive male partner. Three African American and 2 European American IPV survivors, ages 24 to 38 years, described positive and negative experiences with social support, personal…

  6. Examining the Interface Between Substance Misuse and Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Monti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable theoretical and empirical support for a link between substance misuse and perpetration and victimization of intimate partner violence. This review briefly summarizes this literature and highlights current research that addresses the interface between treatment for substance abuse and intimate partner violence. Suggestions for future research and clinical implications are provided.

  7. Care Partner Responses to the Onset of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blieszner, Rosemary; Roberto, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We examined characteristics, responses, and psychological well-being of care partners who support and assist older adults recently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Design and Methods: Based on a sample of 106 care partners of community residents diagnosed with MCI at memory clinics, we conducted face-to-face interviews…

  8. Are human resource professionals strategic business partners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiu, Randy; Selmer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    place has been less pervasive. Based on a sample of CEOs, line managers and HR executives, this study applies both a quantitative and a qualitative approach to examine the research question whether HR professionals are strategic business partners. Although the overall quantitative results provided...... a weak support for an affirmative answer to the research question, quantitative analyses and the qualitative findings revealed that while HR executives regarded themselves as strategic business partners, CEOs and line managers were not sure that they played this strategic business role. Plausible...

  9. Partner Selection in Technological Licensing Agreements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Trombini, Giulia

    as attractors, and market competition and potential involuntary spillovers act as repellants. Firms seek potential licensing partners by trying to maximize technological synergies while attempting to minimize the competitive downsides. We hypothesize that when licensees engage in matches involving a partner...... that is technologically unrelated, ex ante familiarity with the licensors’ technology is required. We contend also that there is interdependence between technological learning and market competition: if partners are in the same product markets, the likelihood of technology license contractual partnerships decreases...... with partners’ technological relatedness. We use data on the formation of license partnerships in the global biopharmaceutical industry over the period 1994-2004 and find that, on the whole, there is empirical support for our theoretical predictions....

  10. Nothing is more important than my partner's health: Turkish men's perspectives on partner's appearance after mastectomy and alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Ayla; Koçan, Sema; Aktuğ, Cemile

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to acquire a deeper understanding of male experiences on the emotional and social impact of their partners' mastectomy and chemotherapy-induced alopecia. A purposive sample of 16 males whose partners had undergone mastectomy and alopecia due to chemotherapy was chosen. The data were collected through a semi-structured interview method. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of tape-recorded interviews was employed. Two main themes emerged from the data: facing the changes and my wife and I at present. Male partners were affected differently by the change in the physical appearance of their female partners. Our study participants said it was a difficult experience to see their partners for the first time after the surgery, but they emphasized that it was more important that their partners were healthy than the fact that they did not have a breast and hair. They also said they did not know how to behave towards their partners after surgery and/or chemotherapy. Nevertheless, they felt that the disease process of their partners had strengthened their bond and had not negatively influenced their relationship with others. The changes in the partners' physical appearance after mastectomy and chemotherapy affected males differently in psychological, emotional and social terms. Since nurses working in this field are in contact with patients during all phases of treatment and care, it would be positive and beneficial to plan nursing interventions that give emotional support for male partners of patients with breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Parents as Writing Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenworth, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Parents know that writing is essential to their children's success, and they're eager to help their children become good writers. But often, they're at a loss about how to help. Instead of leaving them in the dark, schools can make parents into valuable writing partners by giving them a toolkit of guidelines for coaching writers.…

  12. Feedback from European Social Partners as Part of the Consultation on the Commission's Memorandum on Lifelong Learning. Supporting Document to the Communication from the Commission Making a European Area of Lifelong Learning a Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document provides European social partners' responses to the Commission's memorandum on lifelong learning. Part 1, Opinion of the European Center of Enterprises, makes comments and proposals related to the memorandum's six key messages, which are new basic skills for all; more investment in human resources; innovation in teaching and…

  13. Engaging as Equal Partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    TRADE volume between China and Africa hit a record last year, sending out positive signals about economic and trade cooperation. China’s robust economic activities,and enhanced cooperation between the two sides,have dragged bilateral trade out of the shadows of the global economic crisis,and helped China emerge as Africa’s largest trading partner in 2009.Professor Mthuli Ncube,Chief Economist and Vice President of the African Development Bank,spoke with ChinAfrica reporter Yu Nan to share his views about the role China has had in Africa’s economic development in recent years. Edited excerpts follow:

  14. New partner - Forestland

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      New partner   Do you need a moment of relaxation and adventure?  Come to Divonne-les-bains and benefit of an immediate discount of 20% on all ropes courses of Forestland http://www.forestland.fr/ upon presentation of your Staff Association membership card. The park is open from 10h00 to 19h00 on Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday during the school period and public holidays (France and Switzerland) or every day during school holidays (France and Switzerland). Different levels of difficulty are available: children, juniors, adults, athletes.

  15. From Neighbors To Partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    China and Central Asian nations are both benefiting from closer economic,political and social ties This year marks the 15th anniversary of China’s establishment of diplomatic relations with five Central Asian countries—Uzbekistan,Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Turkmenistan. After becoming independent upon the breakup of the Soviet Union, they established and developed stable and sustainable ties with China on a brand new basis. Now, with close cooperation in various fields, China and Central Asian countries have become friendly and cooperative partners.

  16. Close partner relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović-Stanojević Tatjana Z.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of emotional attachment, specific emotional relationships are being established at an early age between a child and its parents. On the basis of the quality of these relationships the child creates the so-called internal working model ie the image of itself as well as others. The working model persists throughout one's lifetime, shaping in part the quality of adult relationships. Thus, a dominant adult relationship is a close, partner or love one. Within the indicated theoretical context, we were interested in finding out whether there is a statistically significant link between the emotional ties of parents and their children formed in early childhood. The investigation included 180 grown-ups of the same sex and age. For investigating close partner relationships the test Experience in Close Relationship by the American authors (Brenan K.A., Clark C.L., & Shaver P.R. 1998. was used, while the early emotional relationships were investigated using a test which has been the only one so far to measure this quality in adults - Adult Attachment Interview, (Main M., Casidy J., & Kaplan N., 1985. The results show there is a statistically significant link between the observed variables.

  17. HPV genotypes concordance between sex partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, M; Mottolese, M; Marandino, F; Carosi, M; Diodoro, M G; Sentinelli, S; Visca, P; Rollo, F; Mariani, L; Vocaturo, G; Sindico, R; Di Giannuario, D; Perrone Donnorso, R; Pellicciotta, M; Vocaturo, A

    2007-12-01

    The HPV genotype concordance in the sexual couples could support the sexual viral transmission of HPV infection. The present study contains a case-report of a stable Italian sex couple harbouring the same five HPV genotypes in their genital samples. The female partner, affected by vulvar condilomatosis, evidenced positivity in her cervicovaginal scraping with high risk HPV DNA Hybrid Capture 2 test and was negative at liquid-based performed Pap Test and at colposcopic examination. The male partner was clinically healthy regarding his external genitalia. In both male and female genital scrapings, the following HPV genotypes were detected by means of a PCR-based assay: 6, 16, 53, 73 and 84. This considerably high genotype concordance does not appear to be casual and supports, in our opinion, the hypothesis that genital HPV types are sexually transmitted agents

  18. Partners Vetting System (PVS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — PVS 2.0 is a database that supports vetting of NGOs and individuals to ensure that USAID-funded assistance does not inadvertently provide support to entities or...

  19. Strategy Guideline: Partnering for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, D.

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. In an environment where the builder is the only source of communication between trades and consultants and where relationships are, in general, adversarial as opposed to cooperative, the chances of any one building system to fail are greater. Furthermore, it is much harder for the builder to identify and capitalize on synergistic opportunities. Partnering can help bridge the cross-functional aspects of the systems approach and achieve performance-based criteria. Critical success factors for partnering include support from top management, mutual trust, effective and open communication, effective coordination around common goals, team building, appropriate use of an outside facilitator, a partnering charter progress toward common goals, an effective problem-solving process, long-term commitment, continuous improvement, and a positive experience for all involved.

  20. Partnering with NASA: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Partnerships is an important part of doing business at NASA. NASA partners with external organizations to access capabilities under collaborative agreements; enters into agreements for partner access to NASA capabilities; expand overall landscape of space activity; and spurring innovation. NASA partnerships consist of Reimbursable and Non-Reimbursable Space Act Agreements. Partnerships at Ames aligns with Ames' core competencies, and Partners often office in the NASA Research Park, which is an established regional innovation cluster that facilitates commercialization and services as a technology accelerator via onsite collaborations between NASA and its partners.

  1. KNOWLEDGE SHARING IN PARTNERING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Thuesen, Christian Langhoff

    This paper adopts practicebased theory for understanding interorganisational knowledge work and extents it with a discussion of the role of redundancy. The paper presents a case study of a project partnership in construction using the partnering concept. The project group responsible...... on arenas (e.g. meetings), brokers (e.g. design manager), and boundary objects (e.g. drawings) . The constellation of firms is interpreted as a multiple configuration of communities of practices, characterised by overlapping practises, multiple memberships and different levels of participation....... The diversity and disjunct feature of the practices is a condition of possibility of knowledge handling as it is a prerequisite for the synthesis of various forms of knowledge in the building construct. Here an orchestrated combination of relationbased interaction with boundary objects and brokers, requisite...

  2. Self-Efficacy and Comfort with Partner-Assisted Skin Examination in Patients Receiving Follow-Up Care for Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMillo, J.; Brosseau, D. C.; Gomez-Garibello, C.; Hall, N. C.; Ezer, H.; Wang, B.; Körner, A.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the role of interpersonal variables on melanoma survivors' self-efficacy for performing skin self-examinations (SSEs) during melanoma follow-up care. Specifically, the impact of comfort with partner assistance for SSE, SSE support received from one's partner, general partner support, relationship…

  3. With or without you: does partner satisfaction and partner-directed violence influence the presence of a partner on women's Facebook cover profile photographs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Prokop

    Full Text Available Social network sites (SNSs provide new opportunities for online self-presentation of millions of users. The cover profile photograph (CPP along with written information regarding relationship status is a central component of online self-presentation, although their associations with actual romantic relationships are not clear. We investigated relationships between the presence of a current romantic partner on the CPP and the displayed relationship status and partner satisfaction, partner-directed violence and women's intrasexual competition with peers. A total of 28 % of the 158 women with a Facebook profile and being involved in a romantic relationship had their romantic partners on their CPP. As predicted, women with their partners on the CPP were more satisfied with their romantic relationship than others. Furthermore, women who did not have their partner on the CPP tended to conceal or lie in their displayed mating status suggesting that this may be a strategy how to attract another potential mate. The partner-directed violence and intrasexual competition hypotheses were not supported. Overall, the CPP and an honestly displayed relationship status is an expression of relationship satisfaction amongst women.

  4. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity and Relationship Functioning Among Partnered Heterosexual and Lesbian Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caska-Wallace, Catherine M; Katon, Jodie G; Lehavot, Keren; McGinn, Meghan M; Simpson, Tracy L

    2016-06-01

    Few studies have examined associations of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and relationship satisfaction among women Veterans, and no research has explored these factors in lesbian women Veterans, a large subgroup that may have unique concerns. This study examined the link between PTSD and relationship satisfaction in partnered heterosexual and lesbian women Veterans and evaluated potential moderation by sexual orientation, partner support, and conflict. Women Veterans (heterosexual n = 260; lesbian n = 128) were recruited nationally to complete a cross-sectional online survey. Multiple linear regression models were used to evaluate moderation, using two- and three-way interactions. Partner support moderated the association between PTSD symptoms and relationship satisfaction to a different degree for heterosexual and lesbian women Veterans, playing a more prominent role in this association for lesbian women. Specifically, for lesbians with low partner support, as PTSD symptoms worsened, relationship satisfaction decreased at a steeper rate than for heterosexual women with low partner support. On the other hand, for lesbians with high partner support, as PTSD symptoms worsened, relationship satisfaction decreased less sharply than for heterosexual women with high partner support. Degree of conflict was highly correlated with relationship satisfaction and also appeared to moderate these relations differently by sexual orientation. These findings suggest that women Veterans with PTSD experience impairments in their romantic relationships, which vary by sexual orientation, partner support, and conflict. Partner support and conflict may be important targets in assessment and therapy for women Veterans with PTSD, and especially so for sexual minorities.

  5. Partner Services in STD Prevention Programs: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogben, Matthew; Collins, Dayne; Hoots, Brooke; O’Connor, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background Partner services have been a mainstay of public health sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention programs for decades. The principal goals are to interrupt transmission and reduce STD morbidity and sequelae. In this paper, we review current literature with the goal of informing STD prevention programs. Methods We searched the literature for systematic reviews. We found nine reviews published between 2005 and 2014 (covering 108 studies). The reviews varied by study inclusion criteria (e.g., study methods, geographic location, infections). We abstracted major conclusions and recommendations from the reviews. Results Conclusions and recommendations were divided into patient referral interventions and provider referral interventions. For patient referral, there was evidence supporting the use of expedited partner therapy and interactive counseling, but not purely didactic instruction. Provider referral through Disease Intervention Specialists was efficacious and particularly well-supported for HIV. For other studies, modeling data and testing outcomes showed that partner notification in general reached high-prevalence populations. Reviews also suggested more focus on using technology and population-level implementation strategies. However, partner services may not be the most efficient means to reach infected persons. Conclusions Partner services programs constitute a large proportion of program STD prevention activities. Value is maximized by balancing a portfolio of patient and provider referral interventions and by blending partner notification interventions with other STD prevention interventions in overall partner services program structure. STD prevention needs program-level research and development to generate this portfolio. PMID:26779688

  6. Better than nothing? Patient-delivered partner therapy and partner notification for chlamydia: the views of Australian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowden Francis J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genital chlamydia is the most commonly notified sexually transmissible infection (STI in Australia and worldwide and can have serious reproductive health outcomes. Partner notification, testing and treatment are important facets of chlamydia control. Traditional methods of partner notification are not reaching enough partners to effectively control transmission of chlamydia. Patient-delivered partner therapy (PDPT has been shown to improve the treatment of sexual partners. In Australia, General Practitioners (GPs are responsible for the bulk of chlamydia testing, diagnosis, treatment and follow up. This study aimed to determine the views and practices of Australian general practitioners (GPs in relation to partner notification and PDPT for chlamydia and explored GPs' perceptions of their patients' barriers to notifying partners of a chlamydia diagnosis. Methods In-depth, semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 40 general practitioners (GPs from rural, regional and urban Australia from November 2006 to March 2007. Topics covered: GPs' current practice and views about partner notification, perceived barriers and useful supports, previous use of and views regarding PDPT. Transcripts were imported into NVivo7 and subjected to thematic analysis. Data saturation was reached after 32 interviews had been completed. Results Perceived barriers to patients telling partners (patient referral included: stigma; age and cultural background; casual or long-term relationship, ongoing relationship or not. Barriers to GPs undertaking partner notification (provider referral included: lack of time and staff; lack of contact details; uncertainty about the legality of contacting partners and whether this constitutes breach of patient confidentiality; and feeling both personally uncomfortable and inadequately trained to contact someone who is not their patient. GPs were divided on the use of PDPT - many felt concerned that it is not

  7. Spinal-Cord-Injured Individual's Experiences of Having a Partner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Having a partner is a strong factor in adaptation to the new life situation with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Still, more knowledge in detail about the partner's influences according to the experiences of individuals with SCI could contribute to the understanding of the situation after an injury...... and allowed SCI individuals the ability to self-realize. This promoted feelings of profound gratitude but also dependency. Thus, the SCI individual benefitted from the partner's support mentally and physically, which enabled a life that would not otherwise be possible....

  8. When One Partner Is HIV+

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Translate Text Size Print When One Partner Is HIV+ What is a “mixed-status” Relationship? A " ... but you can minimize it. Tips for the HIV-negative Partner If you are the HIV-negative ...

  9. Intimate Partner Violence. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines intimate partner violence (IPV) as violence between two people in a close relationship, including current and former spouses and dating partners. IPV occurs on a continuum from a single episode to ongoing battering and can include physical violence, sexual violence, threats, emotional…

  10. Partner selection and Hollywood Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh; Kramer, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Based on cognitive, neurological and evolutionary based film theory the article describes the representation of partner selection in Hollywood films. It analyses paradigm scenarios of partner selection and love, It further describes some of those mechanisms that regulate the relation between auto...

  11. Partnering with the NCPV (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-06-01

    Brochure that explains the basic partnering opportunities that exist within the National Center for Photovoltaics for industry and university groups: non-proprietary partnering opportunities, competitive solicitations, Technology Partnership Agreements, seed fund to develop Technology Partnership Agreements, Hands-On PV Experience Workshop, and NCPV Fellowship Program.

  12. RESEARCH ON NEGOTIATION-BASED PARTNER SELECTION APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The key problem in the construction of virtual enterprises (VEs) is how to select appropriate partners. The negotiation-based approach is proposed to support partner selection in the construction of VEs . The negotiation model is discussed from three main aspects respectively, i.e., negotiation protocol, negotiation goal and negotiation decision-making model. And the generic mathematical description of the negotiation model is formally presented. Finally, a simple example is used to validate the approach's availability.

  13. Are human resource professionals strategic business partners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiu, Randy; Selmer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical speculations and prescriptive discussions abound in the literature regarding the strategic importance of human resource management. However, evidence based on rigorous empirical studies that the transformation from an administrative service function to strategic partnership has taken...... place has been less pervasive. Based on a sample of CEOs, line managers and HR executives, this study applies both a quantitative and a qualitative approach to examine the research question whether HR professionals are strategic business partners. Although the overall quantitative results provided...... a weak support for an affirmative answer to the research question, quantitative analyses and the qualitative findings revealed that while HR executives regarded themselves as strategic business partners, CEOs and line managers were not sure that they played this strategic business role. Plausible...

  14. Partners' session spurs progress for Latin women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-18

    A workshop sponsored by Partners of the Americas with support from the US Agency for International Development's Women in Development Office held in Christiana, Jamaica, October 1981 was designed to expand the involvement of women in the development process by strengthening leadership capabilities of women in the Caribbean. Sessions were held on project planning, goal identification, and resource evaluation. By the end of the workshop women representing 11 US states and their partners in 17 Latin American and Caribbean countries had initiated several projects. Some projects are: 1) Colombia-Florida: developing literacy training aids about nutrition information, 2) Guatemala-Alabama: home gardening and nutrition education, and 3) Jamaica-western New York: skills training programs for young mothers.

  15. Partnering in the Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlev Bohnstedt, Kristian; Bejder, Erik; Haugbølle, Kim

    2013-01-01

    publications change across this period. It is concluded that trends such as research on developing trust among construction partners to facilitate project success, feasibility of and the barriers to adopting a partnering approach and strategic propositions for overcoming barriers are highly emerging. Finally...... gaps in existing body of knowledge. The objective of this literature-based paper is to explore the current literature by systematically reviewing and summarizing research trends in leading top-tier construction management journals between 2002 and 2012, addressing how the themes in partnering related...

  16. Partnering in the Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlev Bohnstedt, Kristian; Haugbølle, Kim; Bejder, Erik

    2013-01-01

    gaps in existing body of knowledge. The objective of this literature-based paper is to explore the current literature by systematically reviewing and summarizing research trends in leading top-tier construction management journals between 2002 and 2012, addressing how the themes in partnering related...... publications change across this period. It is concluded that trends such as research on developing trust among construction partners to facilitate project success, feasibility of and the barriers to adopting a partnering approach and strategic propositions for overcoming barriers are highly emerging. Finally...

  17. Same-Sex Partner Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlamazoglou, Lefteris; Simmonds, Janette G; Snell, Tristan L

    2017-01-01

    The experience of same-sex-attracted people who have lost a partner is neglected in the existing literature on bereavement. Previous research on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer and questioning (LGBTIQ) populations tends to focus on the loss of a partner to HIV-related causes, and there is scant research concerning non-HIV-related bereavement. The purpose of this article is to investigate the non-HIV-related bereavement experiences of same-sex partners and to address the potential complications of disenfranchised grief. Coping with the loss of a same-sex partner and the impact of bereavement on subsequent relationships are also discussed. Implications for counseling of bereaved same-sex-attracted individuals are drawn, and recommendations for future psychological research on the experience of bereavement are made.

  18. 2015 NAIP Partner Availability Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — Shows the available NAIP imagery which NAIP Partners can access. Either Quarter Quads (QQs), Compressed County Mosaics (CCMs) or data that has been physically mailed...

  19. Partners Against Crime (PAC) Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The Partners Against Crime (PAC) program promotes collaboration among police officers, Durham residents, and city and county government officials to find...

  20. Managing Your China JV Partner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    Having critical management tools gives foreign investors the chance to maximize their investment, minimize their risk and develop a mutually profitable business with a Chinese partner. This concludes our series on this topic.

  1. Managing Your China JV Partner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    Joint ventures (JVs) are a marriage between businesses, and as in any marriage,both partners need to put time and effort intoit. Having conducted your due diligence,negotiated your investments, and agreed to

  2. Partner Ballroom Dance Robot -PBDR-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Takahiro; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Endo, Mitsuru; Nomura, Minoru; Sakai, Kazuhisa; Koizumi, Mizuo; Oconogi, Tatsuya

    In this research, we have developed a dance partner robot, which has been developed as a platform for realizing the effective human-robot coordination with physical interaction. The robot could estimate the next dance step intended by a human and dance the step with the human. This paper introduce the robot referred to as PBDR (Partner Ballroom Dance Robot), which has performed graceful dancing with the human in EXPO 2005, Aichi, Japan.

  3. Intimate partner violence - identification and response in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Kelsey; O'Doherty, Lorna

    2011-11-01

    Intimate partner violence is a common problem among women attending general practice, with around one in 10 women currently experiencing physical, sexual or emotional abuse by a partner. Abused women frequently present with physical and psychosocial issues. Yet intimate partner violence often remains concealed and addressing it poses challenges for the clinician and patient alike. Although some of the general recommendations in this review may also apply to same-sex relationships and to women who abuse men, this article discusses identifying intimate partner violence in women who present to general practice. Identifying intimate partner violence is important in clinical practice as it underlies many common physical and mental health presentations. Facilitating disclosure and responding effectively requires good communication skills. Safety assessment of women and their families, pinpointing level of readiness to contemplate action, and providing appropriate referral options and ongoing nonjudgmental support are elements of an effective response. General practitioners have the potential to identify women and support them safely on a pathway to recovery, thereby avoiding the long term impacts of intimate partner violence.

  4. THE INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE RESPONSIBILITY ATTRIBUTION SCALE (IPVRAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Lila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present a psychometrically sound instrument to assess intimate partner violence offenders’ responsibility attributions: the Intimate Partner Violence Responsibility Attribution Scale. The scale was administrated to 423 adult male intimate partner violence offenders court-mandated to a community-based intervention program. A three factor structure (responsibility attribution to the legal system, responsibility attribution to the victim, and responsibility attribution to the offender personal context was supported using confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability of the scales in this study was estimated using Cronbach’s alpha, ρ and greatest lower bound. The Intimate Partner Violence Responsibility Attribution Scale correlated in theoretically expected ways with variables used to assess construct validity (system blaming, problems with partner, and responsibility assumption and with variables used to assess criterion-related validity (satisfaction with legal system, victim-blaming attitudes, alcohol consumption, hostile sexism, stressful life events, social desirability, impulsivity and household income. Results support the validity and reliability of the Intimate Partner Violence Responsibility Attribution Scale

  5. The impact of adolescent risk behavior on partner relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberry, Terence P.; Krohn, Marvin D.; Augustyn, Megan Bears; Buchanan, Molly; Greenman, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Prior literature suggests that involvement in adolescent risk behaviors will have short- and long-term consequences that disrupt the orderly flow of later development, including impacts on patterns of partner relationships. In this study, we explore how adolescent involvement in delinquency, drug use, and sexual behavior at an early age affects the likelihood and timing of both marriage and cohabitation using a sample from the Rochester Youth Development Study. We also examine the direct effects of dropping out of high school, teenage parenthood, and financial stress during emerging adulthood as well as their potential role as mediators of the relationships between adolescent risk behaviors and partnering for both males and females. Overall, there is not very strong support for a direct relationship between adolescent delinquency, drug use, or early sexual behavior and patterns of partner formation. In contrast, the more proximal relationships, indicated by precocious transitions to adulthood and financial instability, are more consistently related to partner formation. These findings support models of cumulative disadvantage: early adolescent problem behaviors are weakly related to partner formation, but appear to set in motion cascading consequences that influence the transition to adulthood and, in turn, these more proximal variables are more consistently related to partner formation. PMID:27429604

  6. Suporte social na reabilitação da mulher mastectomizada: o papel do parceiro sexual Soporte social en la rehabilitación de la mujer mastectomizada: el rol del compañero sexual Social support in the rehabilitation of mastectomized women: the role of the sexual partner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Gabrielli Biffi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available O estudo identificou os tipos de suporte social oferecido pelo parceiro sexual da mulher com câncer de mama e verificou como este apoio é percebido por eles. Participaram do estudo nove parceiros de mulheres nessa condição. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevistas e submetidos à análise de conteúdo. Os parceiros se perceberam como importantes elementos de suporte social para as suas esposas oferecendo afeto, estímulo ao auto cuidado e auxílio nos afazeres domésticos. Revelaram dificuldades enfrentadas ao oferecer suporte social as quais estavam relacionadas à esfera sexual, aos canais de comunicação, à sensação de impotência e insegurança para lidar com as implicações do diagnóstico e reorganizar as atividades domésticas.El estudo identificó los tipos de soporte social ofrecido por el compañero sexual de la mujer con cáncer de mama y verificó cómo este apoyo es percibido por ellos. Participaron del estudio nueve compañeros de mujeres en esa condición. Los datos fueron recolectados por medio de entrevistas y sometidos a análisis de contenido. Los compañeros se percibieron como importantes elementos de soporte social para sus esposas ofreciendo afecto, estímulo al auto cuidado y auxilio en los quehaceres domésticos. Revelaron dificultades enfrentadas al ofrecer soporte social las cuales estaban relacionadas a la esfera sexual, a los canales de comunicación, a la sensación de impotencia e inseguridad para lidiar con las implicancias del diagnóstico y reorganizar las actividades domésticas.This study identified the types of social support offered by the sexual partners of women with breast cancer and their perceptions about this support. Nine partners of women in this condition participated in the study. Data was collected through interviews and submitted to content analysis. Partners perceived themselves as important elements of social support to their wives, offering affection, stimulus to self-care and

  7. Adversarial growth in patients with multiple sclerosis and their partners: relationships with illness perceptions, disability and distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackroyd, Katie; Fortune, Dónal G; Price, Siân; Howell, Stephen; Sharrack, Basil; Isaac, Claire L

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their partners show adversarial growth and to examine which psychological and disability variables contribute to this in patients and their partners. The study also investigated the relationship between growth and distress. Seventy-two patients with MS and their partners provided demographic information and completed measures of posttraumatic growth, illness perceptions, depression, cognitive function and disability. Both patients and partners showed adversarial growth, with patients reporting significantly higher growth than partners. The only significant predictor for patient growth was partner growth, and vice versa. Dissimilarity in illness representations between patients and their partners on the consequences of MS dimension, patient mood and patient growth accounted for significant variance in partner growth. The findings support the idea of a 'communal search for meaning' where patients and their partners experience the trauma of having a chronic illness and subsequently find positive aspects together.

  8. Between tradition and change: condom use with primary sexual partners among Mexican migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Hoyos, Ramiro; Torres-Lopez, Teresa; Pineda-Lucatero, Alicia; Navarro-Nuñez, Carlos; Fosados, Raquel; Valente, Thomas W

    2008-07-01

    The frequency of male Mexico-US migration has been associated with increased HIV risk for sexual partners awaiting their return in Mexico. This study examined the association between sexual partner characteristics and condom use among a sample of 354 male migrants from two Mexican municipalities. Migrants were interviewed about their past year's sex practices. Results indicated that migrants were more likely to use condoms with their non-spousal partners, partners with less education than the migrant, and partners with higher employment status. Condom use was greater among younger migrants and residents of the more densely populated municipality. Findings suggest the coexistence of a traditional cultural orientation that does not support condom use and another one that does provided the sex partner is formally employed. Prevention programs must strengthen the structural conditions fostering greater equality between the sexes and adapt their approaches for different population density, age and partner types.

  9. Mediating effect of social support on relationship between romantic partner attachment and life satisfaction in undergraduate students%社会支持在情侣依恋与生活满意度关系中的中介作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵思萌; 王晓玲; 陆爱桃; 金淼; CHAN China; 许艺青; 黎焕枝

    2011-01-01

    目的:考察香港大学生情侣依恋和生活满意度的关系,及社会支持对情侣依恋与生活满意度的中介效应.方法:采用方便取样,选取香港某大学生153名.用亲密关系经历量表、生活满意度量表(SWLS)和社会支持量表(SSQ)测查.结果:女生SSQ得分高于男生,而亲密关系经历量表的依恋回避维度得分低于男生.依恋回避、依恋焦虑得分均与SSQ,SWLS得分呈负相关(r=-0.69,-0.22,-0.24,-0.29;P<0.05),SSQ得分与SWLS得分呈正相关(r=0.28;P<0.05).社会支持对情侣依恋和生活满意度有部分中介效应(△R2=0.15,P<0.01).结论:大学生的情侣依恋与其生活满意度直接相关,并通过所获得的社会支持间接与生活满意度相关.%Objective: To investigate the relationship between romantic partner attachment and life satisfaction, and the mediating effect of social support on this relationship in college students. Methods: Totally 153 Hong Kong undergraduates were recruited by convenient sampling. They were assessed with the Experiences in Close Relationships ( ECR) , Social Support Questionnaire ( SSQ) , and Satisfaction with Life Scale ( SWLS) used. Results:The females obtained higher scores in SSQ, but lower score in avoidance attachment than males ( Ps < 0. 05) . Each of avoidance attachment and anxiety attachment was negatively associated with SSQ and SWLS, respectively ( r = -0. 69, - 0. 22, - 0. 24, - 0. 29; P < 0. 05). however, SSQ and SWLS were positively correlated with each other ( r = 0. 28. P < 0. 05). The romantic partner attachment had an effect on life satisfaction with social support as the mediator( ΔR2 = 0. 15. P < 0. 01). Conclusion: Romantic partner attachment is not only directly but also indirectly associated with life satisfaction.

  10. Pharma partnering: other people's science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Partnering is an ideal field if someone is seeking to move from a scientific to a more business-oriented discipline. Partnering's goal is to identify and acquire external innovation. These discoveries are then included in a company's pipeline and help bring novel treatments to patients. Advanced scientific training is essential in the identification and evaluation of these external assets. Here I describe how partnering works in a pharmaceutical company and offer advice on how to make a successful transition from a PhD program to a business career. © 2017 Hofmann. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Ovulatory shifts in women's attractions to primary partners and other men: further evidence of the importance of primary partner sexual attractiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Larson

    Full Text Available Previous research has documented shifts in women's attractions to their romantic partner and to men other than their partner across the ovulation cycle, contingent on the degree to which her partner displays hypothesized indicators of high-fitness genes. The current study set out to replicate and extend this finding. Forty-one couples in which the woman was naturally cycling participated. Female partners reported their feelings of in-pair attraction and extra-pair attraction on two occasions, once on a low-fertility day of the cycle and once on a high-fertility day of the cycle just prior to ovulation. Ovulation was confirmed using luteinizing hormone tests. We collected two measures of male partner sexual attractiveness. First, the women in the study rated their partner's sexual attractiveness. Second, we photographed the partners and had the photos independently rated for attractiveness. Shifts in women's in-pair attractions across the cycle were significantly moderated by women's ratings of partner sexual attractiveness, such that the less sexually attractive women rated their partner, the less in-pair attraction they reported at high fertility compared with low fertility (partial r = .37, p(dir = .01. Shifts in women's extra-pair attractions across the cycle were significantly moderated by third-party ratings of partner attractiveness, such that the less attractive the partner was, the more extra-pair attraction women reported at high relative to low fertility (partial r = -.33, p(dir = .03. In line with previous findings, we found support for the hypothesis that the degree to which a woman's romantic partner displays indicators of high-fitness genes affects women's attractions to their own partner and other men at high fertility.

  12. Relationship quality of partners in heterosexual married, heterosexual cohabiting, and gay and lesbian relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, L A; Schmitt, J P

    1986-10-01

    The relationship quality of partners in 44 married, 35 heterosexual cohabiting, 50 gay, and 56 lesbian monogamous couples was studied. Each couple lived together and did not have children living with them. Relationship quality was dimensionalized as love for partner, liking of partner, and relationship satisfaction. Cohabiting partners had the lowest Love for Partner and Relationship Satisfaction scores. Differences were also found among partner types on: barriers to leaving the relationship, alternatives to the relationship, a belief that mindreading is expected in the relationship, masculinity, femininity, androgyny, dyadic attachment, shared decision making, and perceived social support from family. The four partner groups did not differ in psychological adjustment. For each type of partner, love for partner was related to many barriers to leaving the relationship and high dyadic attachment; liking of partner was related to few alternatives to the relationship, high dyadic attachment, and high shared decision making; and relationship satisfaction was related to many attractions, few alternatives, few beliefs regarding disagreement is destructive to the relationship, high dyadic attachment, and high shared decision making. Stepwise multiple regression procedures were used to identify the best set of predictors for each partner type. Results are discussed in the context of existing models of relationship quality.

  13. Touch increases autonomic coupling between romantic partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas eChatel-Goldman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal touch is of paramount importance in human social bonding and close relationships, allowing a unique channel for affect communication. So far the effect of touch on human physiology has been studied at an individual level. The present study aims at extending the study of affective touch from isolated individuals to truly interacting dyads. We have designed an ecological paradigm where romantic partners interact only via touch and we manipulate their empathic states. Simultaneously, we collected their autonomic activity (skin conductance, pulse, respiration. 14 couples participated to the experiment. We found that interpersonal touch increased coupling of electrodermal activity between the interacting partners, regardless the intensity and valence of the emotion felt. In addition, physical touch induced strong and reliable changes in physiological states within individuals. These results support an instrumental role of interpersonal touch for affective support in close relationships. Furthermore, they suggest that touch alone allows the emergence of a somatovisceral resonance between interacting individuals, which in turn is likely to form the prerequisites for emotional contagion and empathy.

  14. Work-family conflict and suicidal ideation in professional women:Moderating role of partners' support%职业女性工作-家庭冲突与自杀意念:伴侣支持的调节作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁艳萍; 田丽丽; 谈继红; 马孟阳; 汤达华

    2012-01-01

    目的:考察工作-家庭冲突与职业女性自杀意念的关系,以及伴侣支持在二者关系中的调节作用,为职业女性自杀的干预提供一定借鉴.方法:从西安市某民营企业抽取242名职业女性,用自编一般情况调查表(考察人口统计学特征及伴侣支持情况)、自杀意念自评量表(SIOSS)和工作-家庭冲突量表( WFCS)进行测查.结果:职业女性自杀意念的检出率为6.6%;除“基于时间的工作干涉家庭”维度外,WFCS各维度与SIOSS总分均呈正相关(r=0.18~0.44,均P<0.01);除“基于时间的工作干涉家庭”维度外,WFCS各维度对职业女性自杀意念均有正向预测作用(β=0.20 ~0.40,均P<0.01),其中“基于压力的家庭干涉工作”作用更为突出(β=0.33,P<0.01);伴侣支持在“基于压力的家庭干涉工作”与自杀意念的关系中起调节作用(β=0.12,P<0.05).结论:职业女性自杀意念的检出率较高,其工作-家庭冲突越高,自杀意念越强,伴侣支持在二者关系中起调节作用.%Objective: To explore the effects of work-family conflict on suicidal ideation in professional women and the moderating role of partners'support between the two and to offer guidance for suicide interventions in professional women. Methods: A convenient sample of 242 professional women from a private enterprise were selected and assessed with a self-made questionnaire concerning demographic factors and partners'support, the Self-Rating Ideation of Suicide Scale (SIOSS) and Work-Family Conflict Scale (WFCS). Results: In this sample, 6. 6% of the subjects had suicidal ideation. All the dimensions of work-family conflict (except for time-based WIF) were positively correlated with suicidal ideation (r = 0. 18 -0. 44, Ps <0. 01). All the dimensions of work-family conflict (except for time-based WIF) had significant positive effects on professional women's suicidal ideation (/3 =0. 20 -0. 40, P < 0. 01) , in which strain-based FTW

  15. Validation of Fear of Partner Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, K Daniel; Foran, Heather; Cohen, Shiri

    2013-10-01

    Therapists have a responsibility to ascertain if psychological aggression, physical aggression, sexual aggression exist, and if there is fear of the partner. A fear of partner measure was evaluated in 100 couples who sought relationship feedback. Fear of partner's psychological, physical, and sexual aggression was related to actual reports of such behavior. For both men and women, fear of speaking in front of partner and fear of being in therapy with partner were related to reports of psychological aggression perpetrated by the partner, dominance, and isolation by the partner, and one's own marital dissatisfaction. Among respondents who were aggressed against, more men than women reported fear of participating in therapy with their partner. The measure herein can be used to determine the extent of fear of aggression by partners and to assist in the decision-making about the appropriateness of marital therapy and divorce mediation.

  16. prevalence of serostatus disclosure to sexual partners among hiv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-03

    Mar 3, 2011 ... AMONG HIV INFECTED WOMEN IN KISII DISTRICT, WESTERN KENYA. P. W. NGIGI, M. D. ..... and social support and the sexual partner happened to be in their ... of taking HIV drugs or attending medical treatment. They may have also .... among HIV-infected pregnant women in Dar es Salaam,. Tanzania.

  17. The Symmetry of Partner Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenbourg, Pierre; Lemaignan, Séverin; Sangin, Mirweis; Nova, Nicolas; Molinari, Gaëlle

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative learning has often been associated with the construction of a shared understanding of the situation at hand. The psycholinguistics mechanisms at work while establishing common grounds are the object of scientific controversy. We postulate that collaborative tasks require some level of mutual modelling, i.e. that each partner needs…

  18. Top couplings and top partners

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We review the model-independent description of the couplings of the top quark to the Higgs and gauge bosons in theories beyond the Standard Model. Then we examine these couplings in the case of arbitrary heavy vector-like quarks mixing with the third family. We also discuss the couplings of these top partners, and comment on implications for LHC searches.

  19. CHINA-JANAICA'S VALUABLE PARTNER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan; Yang Wei

    2010-01-01

    @@ Jamaica is China's largest trading partner in the English-speaking Caribbean and bilateral trade has developed rapidly,although last year bilateral trade has been greatly affected because of the economic crisis.However,with continuous development of the two economies,bilateral economic development and trade has great potential.

  20. Beijing 2008 Olympic Games Partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ At Olympic times, many business giants try to expand their influence by sponsoring the Games. The Games is an opportunity for them to turn from a national to an international brand. Here are brief introductions to some of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games partners.

  1. Partnering into the New Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sharon; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Suggests the need to develop partnerships in this time of rapidly changing technology. Describes the successful partnership between the John Deere Company and Madison (WI) Area Technical College (MATC) that arose because of needs of both partners: John Deere needed well-trained technicians, and MATC was having difficulty attracting students to its…

  2. Development of a practice framework for improving nurses' responses to intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Clark, Maria T; Parry, Jayne; Taylor, Julie

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss critically the theoretical concepts of awareness, recognition and empowerment as manifested in intimate partner violence and to show how these can be translated into a practice framework for improving nurses' response. Intimate partner violence is a universal problem and is considered a significant public health issue. Nurses are in an ideal position to recognise and respond to intimate partner violence, but many lack confidence in this area of practice. In our previous empirical work, we identified three concepts through which nurses' responses to intimate partner violence can be understood: awareness, recognition and empowerment. In this article, we advance nursing knowledge by showing how these concepts can form a practice framework to improve nurses' responses to intimate partner violence. A discussion paper and development of a practice framework to improve nurses' responses to intimate partner violence. The framework comprises three principal needs of women and three related key requirements for nurses to meet these needs. Arising from these are a range of practice outcomes: enhanced understanding of intimate partner violence, increased confidence in recognising intimate partner violence, establishment of trusting relationships, increased likelihood of disclosure and optimised safety. Nurses sometimes lack confidence in recognising and responding to intimate partner violence. Awareness, recognition and empowerment are important concepts that can form the basis of a framework to support them. When nurses feel empowered to respond to intimate partner violence, they can work together with women to optimise their safety. Access to adequate and timely intimate partner violence education and training is important in improving nurses' responses to intimate partner violence. Getting this right can lead to enhanced safety planning and better health outcomes for women who experience intimate partner violence. Although difficult to

  3. Promoting Distributive Justice for Intimate Partner Violence Survivors with Group Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronister, Krista M.; Davidson, M. Meghan

    2010-01-01

    Advancing Career Counseling and Employment Support for Survivors (ACCESS; Chronister, 2006) is a group intervention designed to foster the career development of women who have experienced intimate partner violence. The ACCESS curriculum is based on theory and research from multiple disciplines including intimate partner violence, counseling, and…

  4. The experience of being a partner to a spinal cord injured person:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Sanne; Buus, Niels

    2011-01-01

    was experienced from the partners’ perspective through the aftermath. In the acute phase after the injury, partners also felt harmed, and support was needed in relation to their own daily activities, eating, resting, and managing distress. During the institutionalized rehabilitation, partners felt torn between...

  5. Increased anxiety in partners of patients with a cardioverter-defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; VAN DEN Berg, Martha; Erdman, Ruud A M

    2009-01-01

    The partner of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) patient serves as an important source of support for the patient, which may be hampered if the partner experiences increased distress. We examined (1) potential differences in anxiety and depressive symptoms in ICD patients compared...

  6. What do Australian Women Experiencing Intimate Partner Abuse Want From Family and Friends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taket, Ann; O'Doherty, Lorna; Valpied, Jodie; Hegarty, Kelsey

    2014-07-01

    We analyzed the views of a diverse sample of women (N = 254) living in the state of Victoria, Australia, who were experiencing fear of an intimate partner. We explored the women's views about their interactions with their family and friends to examine what women who have experienced fear of a partner or ex-partner want from their family and friends. The themes identified provide potentially useful guidance for what might be helpful and unhelpful communication strategies and behaviors for families and friends. Women experiencing intimate partner abuse find informal support invaluable, provided it is delivered in a helpful fashion. Helpful support is affirming, encouraging, validating, and understanding, and delivered with positive regard, empathy, and respect. Social contact and interaction are particularly appreciated, as is instrumental support such as financial help, housing, and child care. Women value both support that is directly related to abuse and support related to other areas of life. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. HPV prevalence among healthy Italian male sexual partners of women with cervical HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, Maria; Mottolese, Marcella; Marandino, Ferdinando; Carosi, Mariantonia; Diodoro, Maria Grazia; Sentinelli, Steno; Visca, Paolo; Rollo, Francesca; Mariani, Luciano; Vocaturo, Giuseppe; Sindico, Roberto; Terrenato, Irene; Donnorso, Raffaele Perrone; Vocaturo, Amina

    2008-07-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical cancer and is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Only limited and controversial data are available regarding HPV transmission in male sexual partners of women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and the genotype distribution of HPV in penile scrapings of a series of Italian men, who had no visible penile lesions and were partners of women who were affected, or had been affected previously by cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or who were infected with HPV. The concordance of the viral group in the infected partners was determined. A total of 77 penile scrapings were screened for HPV infection by the polymerase chain reaction, while 59 cervicovaginal brushings of their female partners were tested. 35% of evaluable male samples and 64% of female sexual partners were found to be HPV positive. In the 55 simultaneously evaluable couples, a concordance of 45% was found, 11 couples (20%) with both partners being HPV negative and 14 couples (25%) with both partners HPV positive (P=0.001). Six out of the 14 couples (43%), where both partners were HPV positive, harbored the same HPV genotype group. These data, although preliminary, could support further the hypothesis that male HPV infection is more frequent in sexual partners of HPV positive or women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia indicating that men could represent an important source of HPV transmission between sex partners.

  8. How do partners find out about the risk of Huntington's disease in couple relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest Keenan, Karen; Simpson, Sheila A; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Alexander, David A; Semper, June

    2013-06-01

    Whilst a growing body of work has explored family communication about Huntington's disease and how at-risk individuals learn about their risk, the experience of telling a partner and partners' experiences of finding out about this potentially devastating hereditary illness have received little attention. This study describes the experiences of partners in finding out about Huntington's disease and any impact on couple's relationships/marriages. We undertook a thematic analysis of qualitative interviews which explored the dynamics of partners' marriages after predictive testing and partners' views of genetic counseling. A main theme from partners' accounts was how they found out about their spouse's risk of Huntington's disease and the impact this had on marital relations. The analysis revealed four types of disclosure experiences: (1) marital secrets; (2) alerting, but not telling; (3) knowing and seeing; (4) marital ignorance. Our findings demonstrate that partners' experiences of (non)disclosure about the risk of HD within marriages is an important factor which contributes to couples' coping or marital problems. Exploring how spouses found out about their partner's risk of HD will illuminate issues about a couple's past and future patterns of communication and their coping strategies. A practical and ethical implication is the extent to which genetic counselors should inform partners about the course and nature of Huntington's disease when a partner is the support person for the individual being tested.

  9. Condom use with various types of sex partners by money boys in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shusen; Chen, Lin; Li, Li; Zhao, Jin; Cai, Wende; Rou, Keming; Wu, Zunyou; Detels, Roger

    2012-04-01

    Money boys (MBs) who typically sell sex to males have not yet been extensively studied in China. In this 2009 study, 28 venue-based MBs were interviewed. We analyzed their condom use behaviors with various partners, including male and female clients, male and female casual partners, other MBs and female sex workers, and boyfriends and girlfriends. All participants were aware of the need for using condoms; however, usage with different partner types varied. The longer a relationship with a partner, the less frequent was condom use. A major reason for not using condoms was that they or their partners did not like the loss of sensation due to condom use. Other factors included sexual orientation, age, duration in commercial sex, concerns about HIV/AIDS, attractiveness of partners, and support of "mommies" (brothel supervisors). Both individual- and venue-level interventions are needed to promote condom use, and mommies need to be included in intervention strategies.

  10. Attachment, love styles and spirituality as predictors for changing partners in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Tisovec

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to determine whether partners in an adult relationship who report less secure style of parental attachment in childhood more often change partners than those who report a secure attachment style, and whether those who change their partners correlate in the romantic style, and whether the features of the spiritual dimensions of personality will distinguish from those who change partners less frequently. The sample included 353 participants, aged from 15 to 66 years. On the basis of the research we came to the conclusion that parental attachment is associated with changing partners. Individuals whose parents were available to their children, provided them with support and attention, were changing partners less often than those, who did not have that much support and attention. The study showed that individuals who were frequently changing their partners showed two distinctive love styles - play and friendship. Those who do not agree with changing partners or had less partnerships, showed a distinctive trend of erotic, pragmatic and selfless love styles.The study also showed significant correlation between spirituality and changing partners - those who were more spiritual (particularly in the sense that they are more committed to find emotional satisfaction in prayer or meditation, had more partnerships and sexual intercourses.

  11. Characteristics of African American Women and their Partners with Perceived Concurrent Partnerships in Four Rural Counties in the Southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludema, Christina; Doherty, Irene A.; White, Becky L.; Simpson, Cathy; Villar-Loubet, Olga; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; O'Daniels, Christine M.; Adimora, Adaora A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Among African American women from four rural Southeastern counties, partner's concurrency was associated with intimate partner violence, and forced sex, but not economic benefit. Background To the individual with concurrent partners, it is thought that having concurrent partnerships confers no greater risk of acquiring HIV than having multiple consecutive partnerships. However, an individual whose partner has concurrent partnerships (partner's concurrency) is at increased risk of incident HIV infection. We sought to better understand relationships characterized by partner's concurrency among African American women. Methods A total of 1,013 African American women participated in a cross-sectional survey from four rural Southeastern counties. Results Older age at first sex was associated with lower prevalence of partner's concurrency (PR, 95% CI: 0.70, 0.57-0.87), but the participant's age was not associated with partner's concurrency. After adjusting for covariates, ever having experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) or forced sex were most strongly associated with partner's concurrency (PRs, 95% CIs: 1.61, 1.23-2.11; 1.65, 1.20-2.26, respectively). Women in mutually monogamous partnerships were the most likely to receive economic support from their partners; women whose partners had concurrent partnerships did not report more economic benefit than those whose partners were monogamous. Conclusions Associations between history of IPV and forced sex with partner's concurrency suggest that women with these experiences may particularly benefit from interventions to reduce partner's concurrency in addition to support for reducing IPV and other sexual risks. To inform these interventions, further research to understand partnerships characterized by partner's concurrency is warranted. PMID:26267876

  12. 供应链管理决策支持系统及其在伙伴企业选择中的应用%Supply Chain Management Decision Support System and Its Application in Partner Enterprise Selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁浩; 吴洲; 吴启迪

    2001-01-01

    Supply chain management decision support system (SCM-DSS) is presented. Firstly, supply chain management technology is introduced. Secondly SCM-DSS based on web technology is developed.Then, the implementation of SCM-DSS in enterprises is presented. Finally, a fuzzy intelligence decision -making process in manufacturing enterprise is described in detail.%介绍了供应链管理技术,提出了一种支持供应链管理的决策支持系统,最后以企业为背景,给出了该决策支持系统的应用,并介绍了系统中模糊智能决策过程。

  13. Women's perception of partner violence in a rural Igbo community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilika, Amobi Linus

    2005-12-01

    Partner violence is a serious public health problem affecting mostly women. This qualitative study assessed the perceptions of rural Igbo women of Nigeria of intimate partner violence. Information was elicited using in-depth interviews and focus group discussion. Women of childbearing age were selected from the various women age grades in Ozubulu, Anambra State, Nigeria. Findings revealed that the women generally condone and are complacent with intimate partner violence, perceiving it as cultural and religious norms. The women felt that reprimands, beating and forced sex affecting their physical, mental and reproductive wellbeing are normal in marriage. They did not support reporting such cases to the police or divorcing the man, they would rather prefer reporting to family members. They felt that exiting the marriage would not gain the support of family members. They also expressed fear for the uncertainty in re-marrying, means of livelihood after re-marriage, social stigmatisation, and concern for their children. Socio-cultural norms and structures favour partner violence in Anambra State of Nigeria. There is a need for advocacy and concerted action that will involve the educational, health, civil and religious sectors of the society to evolve sustainable structures that will empower women and provide support to enable victims to react appropriately to violence.

  14. Integrated treatment options for male perpetrators of intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Cory A; Easton, Caroline J

    2017-01-01

    Male-to-female intimate partner violence remains a worldwide public health issue with adverse physical and psychological consequences for victims, perpetrators and children. Personality disorders, addiction, trauma and mood symptoms are established risk factors for intimate partner violence perpetration and factor prominently into a recovery-oriented treatment approach. We reviewed the partner violence literature for detailed reports of traditional as well as innovative, integrated treatment approaches. Empirically based recommendations for intervention programs and the policies that guide intervention efforts are offered. Nascent research suggests that integrated treatment models utilising a holistic approach to account for psychological comorbidity and interventions that involve a motivational interviewing component appear promising in terms of significantly improving intimate partner violence treatment compliance and reducing subsequent acts of physical partner violence. Further, methodologically rigorous research is required to fully assess the benefits of traditional and integrated treatment options. We have advanced several recommendations, including the development of and exclusive reliance upon empirically supported treatments, conducting a thorough risk and needs assessment of the offender and the immediate family to facilitate appropriate treatment referrals, integrating content to foster the offender's internal motivation to change maladaptive behaviours, and attempting to minimise offender treatment burdens through the strategic use of integrated treatment models. Intimate partner violence is a complicated and nuanced problem that is perpetrated by a heterogeneous population and requires greater variability in integrated treatment options. [Crane CA, Easton CJ. Integrated treatment options for male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:24-33]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  15. 77 FR 76380 - Partner's Distributive Share

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... the type of partner (for example, if the partner is a nonresident alien) and the type of income the partnership earns (for example, if the partnership earns effectively connected income). d. Deemed...

  16. MPS/CAS Partner Group on Nanostructured Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Ke; Manfred Rühle

    2004-01-01

    @@ As one of the first Partner Groups which were initiated to foster scientific exchange and interaction between the Max Pianck Society (MPS) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the Partner Group led by Lu Ke was established on April 1, 1999.During the past five years, the group has received substantial support from the CAS for equipment and from the MPS for personnel and travel expenses. Extensive and productive collaborations between the research staff and students of the Partner Group with several professors (departments) in the Max Planck Institute for Metals Research (MPI-MF) have led to significant advances in synthesis,mechanical properties, melting and superheating of nanostructured metals. The research is well recognized internationally and a substantial number of publications in high quality, peer-reviewed journals (including Science and Physical Review Letters) have resulted.

  17. Light 't Hooft Top Partners

    CERN Document Server

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Vector-like quarks, usually dubbed top partners, are a common presence in composite Higgs models. Being composite objects, their mass is expected to be of the order of their inverse size, that is the condensation scale of the new strong interactions. Light top partners, while not being a generic prediction, are however often considered in phenomenological models. We suggest that their lightness may be due to the matching of global 't Hooft anomalies of the underlying theory. We check this mechanism in explicit models showing that, in one case, composite fermions with the quantum numbers of the top quark obtain a mass which is controlled by a soft breaking term and can be made parametrically small.

  18. Actors', partners', and observers' perceptions of sarcasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, P

    2000-10-01

    This study compared actors', partners', and observers' perceptions of the amount of sarcasm used by participants (n = 80) in videotaped conversations. Significant differences were found among perceptions of actors, partners, and observers. Of the three perspectives, actors perceived themselves as using the greatest amount of sarcasm, followed by partners' perceptions of actors. Observers perceived actors as using the least amount of sarcasm. Correlations conducted to assess whether partners and observers recognized actors' individual attempts at sarcasm during the conversations were generally low.

  19. Privacy against the business partner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Meiko; Gruschka, Nils

    2009-01-01

    For service-oriented business processes, an important security requirement is confidentiality of transmitted data. Here, existing Web Services security standards provide suitable solutions for single invocations, but fail to cover service composition scenarios properly, especially for securing...... business process data against partners. In this paper, we investigate the issues regarding the realization of process level confidentiality in WS-BPEL-based Web Service compositions....

  20. The mechanism of building competitiveness through strategic partnering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamik Anna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper assumes that strategic partnering, as one of the more mature forms of inter-organisational cooperation, is also an effective method of support for strategic activities of enterprises. In the light of the above, the use of strategic partnering in processes aimed at enhancing their competitiveness was proposed. The aim of the analyses is to identify and systematise the key actions in the mechanism of building competitiveness through strategic partnering of enterprises. For its implementation, a review of literature in the field of theory of organisation, theory of cooperation and partnering as well as theory of competitiveness was carried out. Empirical research to verify the initial theoretical assumptions was also conducted. Quantitative research (surveys and qualitative research (extended case studies was carried out. The study was based on the research procedure modelled on forecasting methods of searching for solutions to organisational problems, i.e. on creative (lateral thinking. As a result, the algorithm of building competitiveness through mature strategic partnering was formulated and recommendations were made as to the possibility of its practical use.

  1. Positive illusions about one's partner's physical attractiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds-Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined couples' ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. On the basis of the theory of positive illusions, it was expected that individuals would rate their partners as more attractive than their partners would rate themselves. Both members of 93 heterosexual couples, with a

  2. Positive illusions about one's partner's physical attractiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds-Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined couples' ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. On the basis of the theory of positive illusions, it was expected that individuals would rate their partners as more attractive than their partners would rate themselves. Both members of 93 heterosexual couples, with a

  3. Positive illusions about one's partner's physical attractiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds-Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    This study examined couples' ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. On the basis of the theory of positive illusions, it was expected that individuals would rate their partners as more attractive than their partners would rate themselves. Both members of 93 heterosexual couples, with a

  4. Partner Knowledge Awareness in Knowledge Communication: Learning by Adapting to the Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehler Zufferey, Jessica; Bodemer, Daniel; Buder, Jurgen; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2011-01-01

    Awareness of the knowledge of learning partners is not always sufficiently available in collaborative learning scenarios. To compensate, the authors propose to provide collaborators with partner knowledge awareness by means of a visualization tool. Partner knowledge awareness can be used to adapt messages toward the partner. This study…

  5. Adult Attachment as a Risk Factor for Intimate Partner Violence : The "Mispairing" of Partners' Attachment Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Diana M.; Pearson, Christine L.; Elgin, Jenna E.; McKinley, Lisa L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between intimate partner violence and adult attachment in a sample of 70 couples. The attachment style of each partner and the interaction of the partners' attachment styles were examined as predictors of intimate partner violence. Additional analyses were conducted to examine violence reciprocity and to…

  6. Effectiveness and tolerability of treatment intensification to basal–bolus therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes on previous basal insulin-supported oral therapy with insulin glargine or supplementary insulin therapy with insulin glulisine: the PARTNER observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfohl M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Martin Pfohl,1 Thorsten Siegmund,2 Stefan Pscherer,3 Katrin Pegelow,4 Jochen Seufert5 1Medizinische Klinik I, Evangelisches Bethesda-Klinikum GmbH, Duisburg, Germany; 2Städtisches Klinikum München GmbH, Klinikum Bogenhausen, III. Medizinische Abteilung, München, Germany; 3Klinisches Diabeteszentrum Südostbayern, Innere Medizin – Diabetologie, Traunstein, Germany; 4Sanofi-Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Berlin, Germany; 5Medizinische Universitätsklinik, Klinik für Innere Medizin II, Abteilung für Endokrinologie und Diabetologie, Freiburg, Germany Background: Due to the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, antidiabetic treatment needs to be continuously intensified to avoid long-term complications. In T2DM patients on either basal insulin-supported oral therapy (BOT or supplementary insulin therapy (SIT presenting with HbA1c values above individual targets for 3–6 months, therapy should be intensified. This study investigated effectiveness and tolerability of an intensification of BOT or SIT to a basal–bolus therapy (BBT regimen in T2DM patients in daily clinical practice. Methods: This noninterventional, 8-month, prospective, multicenter study evaluated parameters of glucose control, occurrence of adverse events (eg, hypoglycemia, and acceptance of devices in daily clinical practice routine after 12 and 24 weeks of intensifying insulin therapy to a BBT regimen starting from either preexisting BOT with insulin glargine (pre-BOT or preexisting SIT with ≥3 daily injections of insulin glulisine (pre-SIT. Results: A total of 1,530 patients were documented in 258 German medical practices. A total of 1,301 patients were included in the full analysis set (55% male, 45% female; age median 64 years; body mass index median 30.8 kg/m2; pre-BOT: n=1,072; pre-SIT: n=229, and 1,515 patients were evaluated for safety. After 12 weeks, HbA1c decreased versus baseline (pre-BOT 8.67%; pre-SIT 8.46% to 7.73% and 7.66%, respectively (Δ mean

  7. Providing undergraduate science partners for elementary teachers: benefits and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Camille A; Umoja, Aminata; DeHaan, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate college "science partners" provided content knowledge and a supportive atmosphere for K-5 teachers in a university-school professional development partnership program in science instruction. The Elementary Science Education Partners program, a Local Systemic Change initiative supported by the National Science Foundation, was composed of four major elements: 1) a cadre of mentor teachers trained to provide district-wide teacher professional development; 2) a recruitment and training effort to place college students in classrooms as science partners in semester-long partnerships with teachers; 3) a teacher empowerment effort termed "participatory reform"; and 4) an inquiry-based curriculum with a kit distribution and refurbishment center. The main goals of the program were to provide college science students with an intensive teaching experience and to enhance teachers' skills in inquiry-based science instruction. Here, we describe some of the program's successes and challenges, focusing primarily on the impact on the classroom teachers and their science partners. Qualitative analyses of data collected from participants indicate that 1) teachers expressed greater self-confidence about teaching science than before the program and they spent more class time on the subject; and 2) the college students modified deficit-model negative assumptions about the children's science learning abilities to express more mature, positive views.

  8. Uso de servicios de planificación familiar de la Secretaría de Salud, poder de decisión de la mujer y apoyo de la pareja Use of family planning services and its relationship with women's decision-makingand support from their partner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Estrada

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar la influencia de las características reproductivas y el empoderamiento femenino en el uso de servicios de planificación familiar (PF. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Diseño de casos y no casos pareado por controles vecindarios (147 usuarias y 146 no usuarias de servicios de PF de la Secretaría de Salud durante 2003, en dos municipios del estado de Guanajuato, México. Análisis logístico multivariado para identificar diferencias entre usuarias y no usuarias. RESULTADOS: El uso de servicios de PF se asoció positiva y significativamente con poder de decisión de la mujer (alto: RM=3.2; IC95% 1.4-7.4; comunicación con la pareja para el uso de métodos de PF (RM =3.5; IC95% 1.4-9.3, y número de embarazos en su vida (> 6 hijos: RM =4.4; IC95% 1.4-13.8. CONCLUSIONES: El desarrollo de estrategias que involucren a los hombres y que, por otra parte, fomenten y fortalezcan el empoderamiento femenino, puede contribuir a una mayor utilización de servicios de PF.OBJECTIVE: To identify the influence of reproductive characteristics and women empowerment with the use of family planning services. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cases and non-cases design with neighborhood controls (147 users and 146 non-users of family planning services during 2003, in Guanajuato State, Mexico. Various indexes were constructed to evaluate women's empowerment and its relationship with family planning use. RESULTS: The use of family planning services was positively and significantly associated with the woman's power to make decisions (High: OR 3.2, CI95% 1.4-7.4, a high level of communication with her partner on contraceptive use (OR 3.5, CI95% 1.4-9.3; and a greater number of pregnancies (> 6 children: OR 4.4, CI95% 1.4-13.8. CONCLUSION: Factors such as a high level of female decision-making and more partner support for contraceptive use are related to the use of family planning services. Therefore, developing strategies that involve men and support female empowerment

  9. Privacy against the business partner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Meiko; Gruschka, Nils

    2009-01-01

    For service-oriented business processes, an important security requirement is confidentiality of transmitted data. Here, existing Web Services security standards provide suitable solutions for single invocations, but fail to cover service composition scenarios properly, especially for securing bu...... business process data against partners. In this paper, we investigate the issues regarding the realization of process level confidentiality in WS-BPEL-based Web Service compositions. © 2009 IEEE.......For service-oriented business processes, an important security requirement is confidentiality of transmitted data. Here, existing Web Services security standards provide suitable solutions for single invocations, but fail to cover service composition scenarios properly, especially for securing...

  10. Women's expectations of healthcare professionals in case of intimate partner violence in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djikanovic, Bosiljka; Lo Fo Wong, Sylvie; Stevanovic, Snezana; Celik, Halime; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine

    2011-11-01

    Women who have experienced intimate partner violence use health care services more often than non-abused women, but it is unclear what they expect from physicians in relation to their intimate partner violence experience. In this study the authors explored whether women in Serbia expect physicians to help them after having experienced intimate partner violence, what kind of help the women expected, and if none, why none is expected. The authors of this study conducted structured interviews with 120 women who visited six primary healthcare centres. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, while qualitative data were analyzed applying content analyses. The majority of women (81.7%) expected healthcare professionals to help them in the event of intimate partner violence, mainly through giving advice, information, contacting other institutions, services, and providing understanding and support. Fewer women expected help in the form of documenting violence and contacting police. Only a minority (8.3%) did not expect help, noting that intimate partner violence is beyond the scope of healthcare professionals' interest or competencies, and/or that violence was a private problem, while 10% were unsure about the role of physicians in the case of intimate partner violence. The majority of women in this study expected help with intimate partner violence. Physicians should be aware of these expectations and how to provide support to women experiencing intimate partner violence.

  11. The Development of Attitudes Toward Intimate Partner Violence: An Examination of Key Correlates Among a Sample of Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Jennifer E; Giordano, Peggy C; Longmore, Monica A; Manning, Wendy D

    2016-05-25

    Social learning theory remains one of the leading explanations of intimate partner violence (IPV). Research on attitudes toward IPV represents a logical extension of the social learning tradition, as it is intuitive to expect that individuals exposed to violence in the family of origin may internalize behavioral scripts for violence and adopt attitudes accepting of IPV. Yet despite this assumed link between family violence and attitudes toward IPV, few studies have empirically examined factors associated with the development of such attitudes. Using data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationship Study (TARS), we examine the role of family violence on the adoption of attitudes accepting of IPV among a sample of young adults (n = 928). The current investigation contributes to existing literature on attitudes toward IPV by (a) providing an empirical examination of factors associated with attitudes toward IPV in predictive models; (b) relying on a multifaceted index, describing specific conditions under which IPV may be deemed justifiable; (c) examining extra-familial factors, in addition to family violence exposure, to provide a more comprehensive account of factors associated with attitudes toward IPV; and (d) focusing particular attention on the role of gender, including whether the factors associated with attitudinal acceptance of IPV are similar for men and women. Findings indicated considerable variation in overall endorsement of attitudes regarding the use of violence across conditions, with greater endorsement among women. Consistent with social learning approaches to IPV, exposure to violence in the family of origin was associated with attitudes toward IPV. Yet findings also signaled the salience of factors beyond the family, including a range of sociodemographic, relationship, and adult status characteristics. We discuss the relevance of our findings for future theorizing and research in the area of attitudes toward IPV.

  12. Semiconductor foundry, lithography, and partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Burn J.

    2002-07-01

    The semiconductor foundry took off in 1990 with an annual capacity of less than 0.1M 8-inch-equivalent wafers at the 2-mm node. In 2000, the annual capacity rose to more than 10M. Initially, the technology practiced at foundries was 1 to 2 generations behind that at integrated device manufacturers (IDMs). Presently, the progress in 0.13-mm manufacturing goes hand-in-hand with any of the IDMs. There is a two-order of magnitude rise in output and the progress of technology development outpaces IDMs. What are the reasons of the success? Is it possible to sustain the pace? This paper shows the quick rise of foundries in capacity, sales, and market share. It discusses the their uniqueness which gives rise to advantages in conjunction with challenges. It also shows the role foundries take with their customer partners and supplier partners, their mutual dependencies, as well as expectations. What role then does lithography play in the foundries? What are the lithographic challenges to sustain the pace of technology? The experience of technology development and transfer, at one of the major foundries, is used to illustrate the difficulties and progresses made. Looking into the future, as semiconductor manufacturing will become even more expensive and capital investment more prohibitive, we will make an attempt to suggest possible solutions.

  13. Network Insights for Partner Selection in Inter-Organisational New Product Development Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pedro Parraguez; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Selecting partners for new product development (NPD) is an important yet under-supported task. Thispaper focuses on decision-making support for the NPD collaboration stages of partner exploration andsearch. We provide a conceptual framework for a network-based platform to identify potential......: technologicalcloseness, relational closeness, geographical closeness and a set of organisational variables. In order toidentify a subset of new product development partners and aid the selection process, three characteristicsof NPD projects are considered as mediators of those success factors: the desired degree...... and illustrate with examples the networkbasedplatform to explore NPD partners. The developed framework and platform are part of Net-Sights,an ongoing research project to develop open-source decision-support tools for network insights. Thefirst version of this tool will soon be available as an online platform...

  14. The partner as a caregiver in the birth process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Fernandes da Silva Carvalho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the scientific production about the role of the man as a caregiver during the birth process of his partner. Methods: integrative review held in electronic databases Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Latin American and Caribbean in Health Sciences. Results: there were 389 scientific articles located, of which 26 studies were selected that showed active roles - physical and emotional support - and passive roles – spectator or total lack of viewer participation – of the partner during the birth process. The monitoring of this event by the father is considered positive experience. However, the lack of incentive limits their active participation. Conclusion: despite the historical, religious, cultural, institutional or individual barriers, there is a desire to actively participating in the child´s birth, even though sometimes parents are unprepared to provide the support they would like.

  15. Factors Related to Willingness to Help Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeble, Marisa L.; Post, Lori A.; Bybee, Deborah; Sullivan, Cris M.

    2008-01-01

    Although researchers have found that survivors of intimate partner violence seek support from a multitude of sources, ranging from professionals to informal support networks, little is known about the extent to which community members reach out to help survivors. This study explored the type of support provided to survivors and various factors…

  16. Partner Support for Family Planning and Modern Contraceptive Use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    factors, couple communication about family planning, and fertility preferences are ... between the meaning of approval and encouragement should be explored. ... pour étudier la relation entre l'approbation perçue du mari /du partenaire et ...

  17. Parents as partners: building collaborations to support the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vital school-readiness skills during whole-class, therapeutic group sessions. ... Provincial Government of the Western Cape province has confirmed what had been .... right to be involved in the decisions shaping their children's education; .... slip your hand into the box without peeking, and find two eyes, (same size)…a.

  18. Perceived Partner Responsiveness Predicts Decreases in Smoking During the First Nine Years of Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Support for quitting is associated with smoking cessation, but few studies have examined the influence of more general social support on smoking outcomes. The current research examines perceptions of the partner’s willingness and ability to provide general social support (i.e., perceived partner responsiveness) as a longitudinal predictor of smoking trajectories. Methods: Data are from a sample of newlywed couples assessed at six timepoints over 9 years. The current analyses focus on both partners in 333 “ever-smoker” couples. Participants completed measures of partner responsiveness, smoking, and demographics through the mail at each timepoint. Results: Both husbands and wives who initially reported greater partner responsiveness showed a decrease over the following 9 years in the likelihood of being a smoker and in cigarette quantity. This decrease was not apparent for husbands and wives who initially reported lower partner responsiveness. These effects were mediated by several time-varying characteristics. Conclusions: Previous research has shown that support for quitting is an important predictor of smoking cessation. The current research demonstrates that more general perceived social support, unrelated to smoking behavior, also predicts decreases in smoking over time in both men and women. In fact, reports of partner responsiveness at baseline predicted smoking over 9 years, demonstrating the potency of this particular relationship perception for smoking outcomes. PMID:23420901

  19. PARENTING IN ADOLESCENCE AND YOUNG ADULT INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano, Peggy C.; Johnson, Wendi L.; Manning, Wendy D.; Longmore, Monica A.

    2014-01-01

    Most prior studies of intimate partner violence (IPV) have relied on traditional indices of parental support, control or coercion to examine the nature and extent of parental influences. We explore whether parents? more general attitudes toward their child?s dating and associated parenting practices are related to the young adult child?s report of IPV, once traditional parent factors and other covariates are introduced. Using data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (n = 625), resu...

  20. Partners in quality: managing your suppliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, B A

    1991-05-01

    Just expecting more from your supplier is not what partnership is about. We have had the experience where the quality improvement and partnership banner has been waved but the tone and spirit of the meeting did not encourage or support a joint quality improvement effort. Benefits will not be achieved until the wall truly begins to come apart and the relationship is built on mutual respect and trust. Data collection and open answers to questions often reveal embarrassing errors and obvious needs for improvements. As stated before, blame and finger-pointing must be replaced with a mutual commitment to asking and answering the question, "How can we improve?" As Dr. W. Edwards Deming has stated, "End the practice of awarding business on the basis of price tag. Instead, minimize total cost. Move toward a single supplier for any one item on a long-term relationship of loyalty and trust." The structured approach of a quality improvement process and the application of quality methods and techniques has proven useful in removing emotion and helping the team focus on the process rather than the people and the issues involved. Quality improvement methods are focused on achieving both customer and supplier goals--customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, and operational efficiency and effectiveness. Our experience with Partners in Quality as well as our experience with the quality leadership process supports a recent quote in the Harvard Business Review: "Quality is not just a slogan...(it is) the most profitable way to run a business."

  1. Chemical recognition of partner plant species by foundress ant queens in Macaranga-Crematogaster myrmecophytism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Y; Itioka, T; Murase, K; Yamaoka, R; Itino, T

    2001-10-01

    The partnership in the Crematogaster-Macaranga ant-plant interaction is highly species-specific. Because a mutualistic relationship on a Macaranga plant starts with colonization by a foundress queen of a partner Crematogaster species, we hypothesized that the foundress queens select their partner plant species by chemical recognition. We tested this hypothesis with four sympatric Macaranga species and their Crematogaster plant-ant species. We demonstrated that foundress Crematogaster queens can recognize their partner Macaranga species by contact with the surface of the seedlings, that they can recognize compounds from the stem surface of seedlings of their partner plant species, and that the gas chromatographic profiles are characteristic of the plant species. These findings support the hypothesis that foundress queens of the Crematogaster plant-ant species select their partner Macaranga species by recognizing nonvolatile chemical characteristics of the stem surfaces of seedlings.

  2. Patient and Partner Experiences With Obstructive Sleep Apnea and CPAP Treatment: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyster, Faith S; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Aloia, Mark S; Martire, Lynn M; Buysse, Daniel J; Strollo, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated factors associated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for sleep apnea from the patients' and their partners' perspective. This qualitative research study explored patients' and partners' experiences of CPAP and facilitators and barriers to CPAP use, and elicited suggestions for a first-time CPAP user program. Data from 27 participants were collected via four sleep apnea patient and four partner focus groups. Qualitative content analysis identified five themes: knowledge of sleep apnea, effects of sleep apnea, effects of CPAP, barriers and facilitators of CPAP, and ideas for a new user support program. Patients and partners emphasized the importance of partner involvement in the early CPAP treatment period. These data suggest consideration of a couple-oriented approach to improving CPAP adherence.

  3. Fostering partner dependence as trust insurance: the implicit contingencies of the exchange script in close relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Sandra L; Aloni, Maya; Holmes, John G; Derrick, Jaye L; Stinson, Danu Anthony; Leder, Sadie

    2009-02-01

    A model of the trust-insurance system is proposed to examine how people with low and high self-esteem cope with the interdependence dilemma posed by feeling inferior to a romantic partner. Feeling inferior automatically activates "if-then" contingencies that link inferiority to the exchange script (i.e., partner qualities are evenly traded) and exchange script anxieties to reparative efforts to secure a partner's dependence. A daily diary study of newlyweds and 5 experiments supported the model. Induced upward social comparisons to the partner activated exchange anxieties for low, but not high, self-esteem people. When implicitly primed, the exchange script heightened worries about being inferior and motivated behavioral efforts to increase the partner's dependence regardless of self-esteem. When consciously deliberated, the exchange script elicited dependence promotion only for low self-esteem people.

  4. Online Partner Seeking and Sexual Risk Among HIV+ Gay and Bisexual Men: A Dialectical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruess, Dean G; Burnham, Kaylee E; Finitsis, David J; Cherry, Chauncey; Grebler, Tamar; Goshe, Brett M; Strainge, Lauren; Kalichman, Moira O; Kalichman, Seth C

    2016-09-26

    For almost two decades, researchers have explored the relationship between online partner seeking (OPS) and HIV/STI transmission risk behavior among men who have sex with men (MSM), including gay- and bisexual-identified men. A dichotomy has emerged with some findings that OPS is associated with greater sexual risk behavior, and a sparser but emerging literature that men may use OPS for sexual risk reduction. This study examined the association between proportion of partners met online and sexual risk behavior in a sample of 170 HIV-positive gay- and bisexual-identified men. Participants completed assessments including psychosocial factors and a comprehensive assessment of sexual behavior, including total number of male partners, and condomless insertive and receptive anal sex with HIV-negative/unknown serostatus partners or HIV-positive male partners. Our findings support taking a dialectical stance and indicate that OPS may impact risk differently given different individual and contextual circumstances.

  5. Young parents' relationship characteristics, shared sexual behaviors, perception of partner risks, and dyadic influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Huang, Rong; Lesser, Janna; Gonzalez-Figueroa, Evelyn; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Cumberland, William G

    2009-01-01

    Rising rates of heterosexually transmitted HIV among youth and young adults, particularly from ethnic minorities, create an urgent need to understand risk factors and perceptions of risk within the context of couple relationships. This study examined reports of young mothers and fathers (predominantly Latino) about background characteristics, relationship quality and length, HIV-related risk factors, and perceptions of partners' behaviors and personal history. Higher concordance was found for relationship characteristics and partners' personal history (e.g., incarceration) than on shared sexual behaviors. Most males and females stated that they were monogamous; however, those whose partners reported concurrency were unaware of this. Many were unaware of their partners' HIV testing status. Relationship quality was higher when females accurately perceived their partners' self-reported HIV-related risk behaviors. Length of the relationship did not influence concordance. Findings support the need for HIV prevention programs to promote open discussion about condom use and HIV testing within sexual partnerships.

  6. RISK FACTORS FOR INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Ceren Atakay

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence has kept being one of the major societal issues in our country over the past year. It is absolutely necessary to intervene in this substantially psychological issue multi-directionally. In order to intervene in the problem from psychological aspect, it is important to estimate and interpret the risk factors for intimate partner violence. Therefore in the current study, ‘I-cube theory’ which is about the risk factors for intimate partner violence has been explained fi...

  7. AIDS impact special issue 2015: interpersonal factors associated with HIV partner disclosure among HIV-infected people in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu

    2016-01-01

    HIV partner disclosure may facilitate social support, improve psychological well-being among HIV-infected individuals, and promote HIV testing and HIV prevention among their sexual partners. A growing literature emphasizes the critical role of interpersonal factors may play in decision-making and practice regarding HIV partner disclosure. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies that investigate how interpersonal factors may be associated with HIV partner disclosure. Using cross-sectional data collected from 791 HIV-infected people in Guangxi China, we examined the associations between these two interpersonal factors (quality of relationship with partner and family communication) and HIV partner disclosure. Descriptive analysis, t-test analysis, and gender stratified GLM analysis were conducted. We find that disclosing HIV status to partners was significantly related to better quality of relationship with partners and open and effective family communication. Gender and partner HIV status might moderate the associations between interpersonal factors and HIV partner disclosure. Our findings suggest the importance of considering relationship quality and enhancing open and comfortable family communication in HIV disclosure interventions. Gender difference and partner HIV status should be also considered in HIV disclosure intervention to address the diverse needs of HIV-infected people.

  8. Concordance of vitamin D peripheral levels in infertile couples' partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffoni, Alessio; Ferrari, Stefania; Mangiarini, Alice; Noli, Stefania; Bulfoni, Alessandro; Vigano, Paola; Parazzini, Fabio; Somigliana, Edgardo

    2017-08-01

    A large number of evidence supports the role of vitamin D insufficiency in both women and men infertility. However, no studies have evaluated the rate of concordance of vitamin D status between the partners. This finding might open new scenarios in the interpretation of the available data linking vitamin D insufficiency and infertility. In the present cross-sectional study, 103 consecutive infertile couples were recruited between April and May 2014. Both partners concomitantly provided a serum sample for the assessment of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25-(OH)-D]. Vitamin D insufficiency was defined as serum 25-(OH)-D D insufficient, corresponding to a rate of 73%. Overall, concordance was observed in 73 couples (71%), thus higher than the expected 61% (0.732 + 0.272) based on chance (p = 0.007). The Pearson coefficient of correlation R2 between the partners of the couples was 0.52 (p D insufficiency according to the causes of infertility. Serum 25-(OH)-D correlates within the partners of infertile couples. Further evidence is warranted to determine the clinical relevance and possible clinical applications of this finding.

  9. Self, partner, and relationship motivations for healthy and unhealthy behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie J. Young

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background This study merges two theoretical paradigms: self-determination theory and interdependence theory. The primary objective was to examine whether people in relationships are motivated to enact healthy or unhealthy behaviors based on personal (i.e., autonomous or interpersonal (controlled motives. Participants and procedure We tested the sources of healthy and unhealthy motivation in a cross-sectional, dyadic survey, collecting data from 243 couples in romantic relationships. Survey items assessed sources of healthy and unhealthy motivational influence, including the self, partner, and relationship, in conjunction with relationship satisfaction and well-being. Data were analyzed according to the Actor Partner Interdependence Model to examine intrapersonal and interpersonal associations between variables. Results Healthy and unhealthy behavior motivation appears to be a relational, rather than individual construct. Partner healthy motivation was positively associated with individuals’ relationship satisfaction. For individuals who reported more unhealthy relationship motivations, relationship satisfaction and well-being were lower. There were no significant associations for self motivations. Conclusions The findings suggest that relational partners and the romantic relationship itself are important in understanding the dimensions of health motivation for people in relationships. We conclude that the romantic relationship context impacts health maintenance, supporting the merging of personal and interpersonal motivations for health behaviors.

  10. Partner choice, relationship satisfaction, and oral contraception: the congruency hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S Craig; Little, Anthony C; Burriss, Robert P; Cobey, Kelly D; Klapilová, Kateřina; Havlíček, Jan; Jones, Benedict C; DeBruine, Lisa; Petrie, Marion

    2014-07-01

    Hormonal fluctuation across the menstrual cycle explains temporal variation in women's judgment of the attractiveness of members of the opposite sex. Use of hormonal contraceptives could therefore influence both initial partner choice and, if contraceptive use subsequently changes, intrapair dynamics. Associations between hormonal contraceptive use and relationship satisfaction may thus be best understood by considering whether current use is congruent with use when relationships formed, rather than by considering current use alone. In the study reported here, we tested this congruency hypothesis in a survey of 365 couples. Controlling for potential confounds (including relationship duration, age, parenthood, and income), we found that congruency in current and previous hormonal contraceptive use, but not current use alone, predicted women's sexual satisfaction with their partners. Congruency was not associated with women's nonsexual satisfaction or with the satisfaction of their male partners. Our results provide empirical support for the congruency hypothesis and suggest that women's sexual satisfaction is influenced by changes in partner preference associated with change in hormonal contraceptive use.

  11. Optimally matching support and perceived spousal sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrona, Carolyn E; Shaffer, Philip A; Wesner, Kristin A; Gardner, Kelli A

    2007-12-01

    Partner sensitivity is an important antecedent of both intimacy (H. T. Reis & P. Shaver, 1988) and attachment (M. D. S. Ainsworth, 1989). On the basis of the optimal matching model of social support (C. E. Cutrona & D. Russell, 1990), support behaviors that "matched" the support goals of the stressed individual were predicted to lead to the perception of partner sensitivity. Predictions were tested with 59 married couples, who engaged in a videotaped self-disclosure task. Matching support was defined as the disclosure of emotions followed by emotional support or a request for information followed by informational support. Partial evidence was found for the predictions. Matching support following the disclosure of emotions was predictive of perceived partner sensitivity. Mismatched support following the disclosure of emotions predicted lower marital satisfaction, through the mediation of partner sensitivity. Matching support following a request for information was not predictive of perceived partner sensitivity, but negative partner responses (e.g., criticism or sarcasm) following a request for information negatively predicted perceptions of partner sensitivity. The importance of considering the context of support transactions is discussed.

  12. Effects of potential partners' physical attractiveness and socioeconomic status on sexuality and partner selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J M; Levy, G D

    1990-04-01

    Male (n = 170) and female (n = 212) college students viewed photographs, which had been prerated for physical attractiveness, of three opposite-sex individuals. These photographs were paired with three levels of occupational status and income. Subjects indicated their willingness to engage in relationships of varying levels of sexual intimacy and marital potential with the portrayed individuals. Analyses of variance, correlations, and trend analyses supported the hypotheses. Compared to men, women are more likely to prefer or insist that sexual intercourse occur in relationships that involve affection and marital potential, and women place more emphasis than men do on partners' SES in such relationships. Consequently, men's SES and their willingness and ability to invest affection and resources in relationships may often outweigh the effects of their physical attractiveness in women's actual selection of partners. These results and the literature reviewed are more consistent with parental investment theory than with the view that these sex differences are solely the result of differential access to resources and differential socialization.

  13. Improving detection and quality of assessment of child abuse and partner abuse is achievable with a formal organisational change approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Russell; Ritchie, Miranda; Wilson, Mollie

    2008-03-01

    To improve detection and quality of assessment of child and partner abuse within a health service. A formal organisational change approach was used to implement the New Zealand Family Violence Intervention Guidelines in a mid-sized regional health service. The approach includes obtaining senior management support, community collaboration, developing resources to support practice, research, evaluation and training. Formal pre-post evaluations were conducted of the training. Barriers and enablers of practice change were assessed through 85 interviews with 60 staff. More than 6000 clinical records were audited to assess rates of questioning for partner abuse. Identifications of partner abuse and referrals made were counted through the Family Violence Accessory File. Referrals to the Department of Child, Youth and Family Services (CYFS) were recorded routinely by the CYFS. Audits assessed quality of assessment of child and partner abuse, when identified. More than 700 staff were trained in dual assessment for child and partner abuse. Evaluations demonstrate improved confidence following training, though staff still need support. Barriers and enablers to asking about partner abuse were identified. Referrals from the health service to the CYFS increased from 10 per quarter to 70 per quarter. Identification of partner abuse increased from 30 to 80 per 6-month period. Routine questioning rates for partner abuse vary between services. Achieving and sustaining improved rates of identification and quality of assessment of child and partner abuse is possible with a formal organisational change approach.

  14. Social Support and Psychological Well-Being in Lesbian and Heterosexual Preadoptive Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines predictors of social support and mental health among 36 lesbian and 39 heterosexual couples who were waiting to adopt. Lesbian preadoptive partners perceived less support from family than heterosexual partners but similar levels of support from friends. Lesbian and heterosexual partners reported similar levels of well-being.…

  15. People Are More Generous to a Partner Who Pays Attention to Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsubo, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Chiaki

    2017-01-01

    People use relatively low-cost signals to maintain close relationships, in which they engage in costlier exchanges of tangible support. Paying attention to a partner allows an individual to communicate his or her interest in the relationship with the partner. Previous studies have revealed that when Person A pays attention to Person B, B's feeling of intimacy toward A increases. If social attention strengthens the bond between A and B, it is predicted that A's attention will also increase B's generous behavior toward A. This study tested this prediction. Participants first engaged in a collaborative task using computers. In the task, the putative partner (a computer program) either paid or did not pay attention to participants (high attention condition vs. low attention condition). In the control condition, the partner could not choose when to pay attention to participants. They then played three rounds of the dictator game with the partner. Confirming the previous finding, perceived intimacy was highest in the high attention condition, in the middle in the control condition, and lowest in the low attention condition. More importantly, participants in the high attention condition decided to give more resources to their partner than those in the low attention condition (but the difference between the high attention condition and the control condition was not significant). In addition, self-reported intimacy was positively correlated with the resource allocated to the partner. The results of this study demonstrated that social attention fosters a partner's generosity.

  16. The female partners' experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenhall, Eva; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Fridlund, Bengt; Nilsson, Ulrica

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to explore and describe women's experience of intimate relationships in connection to and after their partner's first myocardial infarction. Support from partners is important for recovery, but little is known about partners' experience of intimate relationships after myocardial infarction. The study used an explorative, qualitative design. The first author interviewed 20 women having a partner who had suffered a first myocardial infarction during the preceding year. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. Three themes emerged: 'limited life space', 'sense of life lost' and 'another dimension of life'. The women described how their self-assumed responsibility led to a more stifling and limited life. Their sense of life lost was described in terms of deficits and feeling the loss. The women also described experiencing another dimension of life characterised by three subthemes: 'uncertainty of life', 'certain of relationship' and 'share life more'. The partners' myocardial infarction had an impact on the interviewees' intimate relationships; they suffered a major loss and missed their 'former' partner, both emotionally and sexually. They struggled with the new asymmetry in their intimate relationship and felt compelled to adapt to their partners' lack of sexual desire or function. Also, their partner controlled them, which lead towards a stifling, more limited life space. Caregivers in hospital and primary care settings could apply the findings in their efforts to help couples recover or maintain intimate relationships following myocardial infarction. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Partner approval and intention to use contraception among Zanzibari women presenting for post-abortion care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esber, Allahna; Foraker, Randi E; Hemed, Maryam; Norris, Alison

    2014-07-01

    We examined the effect of partner approval of contraception on intention to use contraception among women obtaining post-abortion care in Zanzibar. Our data source was a 2010 survey of 193 women obtaining post-abortion care at a large public hospital in Zanzibar. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to assess associations between partner approval and intention to use contraception. Overall, 23% of participants had used a contraceptive method in the past, and 66% reported intending to use contraception in the future. We found that partner approval of contraception and ever having used contraception in the past were each associated with intending to use contraception in the future. In the multivariable model, adjusting for past contraception use, partner approval of contraception was associated with 20 times the odds of intending to use contraception (odds ratio, 20.25; 95% confidence interval, 8.45-48.56). We found a strong association between partner approval and intention to use contraception. Efforts to support contraceptive use must include both male and female partners. Public health and educational efforts to increase contraceptive use must include men and be targeted to both male and female partners. Given that male partners are often not present when women obtain health care, creative efforts will be required to meet men in community settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Partner involvement in perinatal care and PMTCT services in Mbeya Region, Tanzania: the providers' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuring, Stefanie; Nchimbi, Philo; Jordan-Harder, Brigitte; Harms, Gundel

    2010-12-01

    Partner involvement is considered to increase the effectiveness of female-oriented services for sexual and reproductive health (SRH), like those for antenatal care (ANC) or the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). However, male participation rates remain mostly low, and previous research has identified restrictive provider attitudes among barriers for partner participation in such services. Individual perspectives and experiences of healthcare providers are assumed to significantly influence the quality of delivered services. This study aimed at exploring providers' attitudes regarding partner involvement in ANC/PMTCT and other SRH services. A hundred interviews based on a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted among healthcare providers employed in an ANC-based PMTCT program in Mbeya Region, Tanzania. Interviewees expressed overall approval of male partner integration into the services, but this approval decreased when specifying for different service types, especially in those related to perinatal examinations or labor and delivery. Divergence between general attitudes and self-reported individual behavior was observed, querying the reliability of expressed attitudes. Among providers having at least one child, personally experienced partner attendance and approval of partner involvement were significantly associated for most service types. Although general views on partner involvement in SRH services seem to be mostly supportive, there is a need for health services to strengthen providers' positions toward male involvement, for example by communicating clear policies and job guidelines, and by encouraging partner service attendance among providers themselves.

  19. The measurement of response shift in patients with advanced prostate cancer and their partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Boyle Ciaran

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence to support the phenomenon of response shift (RS in quality of life (QoL studies, with many current QoL measures failing to allow for this. If significant response shift occurs amongst prostate cancer patients, it will be necessary to allow for this in the design of future clinical research and to reassess the conclusions of previous studies that have not allowed for this source of bias. This study therefore aimed to assess the presence of RS and psychosocial morbidity in patients with advanced prostate cancer and their partners. Methods 55 consecutive advanced prostate cancer patients and their partners completed the Prostate Cancer Patient & Partner questionnaire (PPP, shortly after diagnosis and again at 3 months and 6 months. At the follow-up visits, both patients and partners also completed a then-test in order to assess RS. Results Partners consistently showed greater psychological morbidity than patients in relation to the prostate cancer. This was most marked on the General Cancer Distress (GCD subscale (p Conclusion These results suggest the presence of RS in patients with advanced prostate cancer and their partners, with higher levels of psychosocial morbidity noted amongst partners. This is the first study to identify RS in partners and calls into question the interpretation of all studies assessing changes in QoL that fail to allow for this phenomenon.

  20. Telling Your Partner You Have an STD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... offer information about the STD and its symptoms. Give your partner time to take in the information. If you and your partner ... your doctor prescribes. You also might need to take medicine if you have an ... A doctor or a health clinic can give advice on how to lower the chance of ...

  1. Increasing HIV testing among male partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Balestre, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Miric, Marija; Darak, Shrinivas; Butsashvili, Maia; Perez-Then, Eddy; Eboko, Fred; Plazy, Melanie; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; du Lou, Annabel Desgrees; Dabis, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Couple-oriented posttest HIV counselling (COC) provides pregnant women with tools and strategies to invite her partner to HIV counselling and testing. We conducted a randomized trial of the efficacy of COC on partner HIV testing in low/medium HIV prevalence settings (Cameroon, Dominican

  2. Increasing HIV testing among male partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Balestre, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Miric, Marija; Darak, Shrinivas; Butsashvili, Maia; Perez-Then, Eddy; Eboko, Fred; Plazy, Melanie; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; du Lou, Annabel Desgrees; Dabis, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Couple-oriented posttest HIV counselling (COC) provides pregnant women with tools and strategies to invite her partner to HIV counselling and testing. We conducted a randomized trial of the efficacy of COC on partner HIV testing in low/medium HIV prevalence settings (Cameroon, Dominican R

  3. Intimate Partner Violence in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Amy E.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Reid, Robert J.; Carrell, David; Fishman, Paul A.; Rivara, Frederick P.; Thompson, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the prevalence, types, duration, frequency, and severity of intimate partner violence ("partner violence") in older women. Design and Methods: We randomly sampled a total of 370 English-speaking women (65 years of age and older) from a health care system to participate in a cross-sectional telephone interview. Using 5…

  4. Sexual Experiences of Men with Incontinent Partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Milou D.; Beck, Jacky J. H.; Putter, Hein; van Driel, Mels F.; Pelger, Rob C. M.; Weijmar Schultz, Willibrordus; Nijeholt, Guus A. B. Lycklama A.; Elzevier, Henk W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Several studies show that urinary incontinence (UI) impairs women's sexual functioning and sexual satisfaction. However, there is no scientific knowledge about the effects of UI on sexual functioning of the male partners. Aim. To analyze sexual functioning of the male partners of femal

  5. Facing the partner influences exchanges in force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Atsushi; Bagnato, Carlo; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Many studies in psychology have documented how the behaviour of verbally communicating pairs is affected by social factors such as the partner’s gaze. However, few studies have examined whether physically interacting pairs are influenced by social factors. Here, we asked two partners to exchange forces with one another, where the goal was to accurately replicate the force back onto the other. We first measured an individual’s accuracy in reproducing a force from a robot. We then tested pairs who knowingly exchanged forces whilst separated by a curtain. These separated pairs exchanged forces as two independent individuals would, hence the force reproduction accuracy of partners is not affected by knowingly reproducing a force onto a nonvisible partner. On the other hand, pairs who exchanged forces whilst facing one another consistently under-reproduced the partner’s force in comparison to separated partners. Thus, the force reproduction accuracy of subjects is strongly biased by facing a partner. PMID:27739492

  6. Advice from working women with retired partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Eileen L; Adorno, Gail

    2016-01-01

    in the 21st century, as more women are employed full-time and couples increasingly share egalitarian values, more women continue employment after their partners have voluntarily retired. However, we know very little about the experiences of this growing population of women. We asked working women with retired partners to share their advice for other women who may face this developmental transition. Open-ended responses from 97 women were analyzed to identify pertinent issues and themes. Four primary content areas were identified: time management, division of household labor, financial planning, and communication. Communication between partners was both a topic of concern as well as the solution suggested to resolve conflicts or differences that may arise when women live with a retired partner. It is expected that future changes in the workforce and improvements in the gender balance within relationships will continue to impact experiences for working women with retired partners.

  7. Volunteered Volunteers: Role Expectations and Performance of the US University President and Chancellor's Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Juanita Gamez

    2014-01-01

    The paper reports on a study of partners of USA university president/chancellors, a rarely researched population in scholarly literature. Interviews with 24 male and female presidential partners of state supported colleges and universities provided insight into a privileged yet perplexing position, rarely seen by the public. The study draws on the…

  8. Overview of the Higher Education Systems in the Tempus Partner Countries: Central Asia. A Tempus Study. Issue 05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffio, Philippe; Heinamaki, Piia; Tchoukaline, Claire Chastang; Manthey, Anja; Reichboth, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of the Tempus programme is to support the modernisation of higher education in Partner Countries outside the European Union. The targeted regions include Eastern Europe, Central Asia, Western Balkans and the Southern Mediterranean, with a total of 29 Partner Countries participating in the programme. In the field of cooperation in…

  9. HMO partnering: the provider dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, J; Benson, L; Bonhag, R

    1996-10-01

    While the growth of HMOs has slowed patient visits to doctors, it also has created a deluge of press clippings. On July 16, 1996, three articles on the subject appeared in the Wall Street Journal, front section. The headlines painted a vivid picture of the forces acting on HMOs and providers alike (Figure 1). The articles portended more change for healthcare. The "shake-out," a term applied to industries in serious transformation, brings shedding of excess capacity and loss of jobs and income. Providers, in particular, find themselves in a difficult dilemma. They must not only cut costs as reimbursement drops, but also retain patients with good outcomes and high quality service. Patient retention means keeping the individual patient from switching to another provider and keeping the insurer's group of patients as an authorized provider for that insurer. The relationship between provider and HMO lies at the heart of the provider dilemma. The HMO structure, which shifts financial risk for care, is quickly setting the standard, for healthcare pricing, medical standards, and management practices. Understanding and responding to HMO needs are vital to competitive advantage and survival. The article discusses the inherent dilemma of HMO and provider partnering and suggests provider responses.

  10. Husband/Partner Intoxication and Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, Bradley T; Tran, Phu

    2016-09-01

    This study examined husband/partner intoxication and experience with physical, sexual, and emotional intimate partner violence against women (IPVAW) using data derived from a nationally representative survey conducted in the Philippines in 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between intoxication and 3 different types of intimate partner violence against women. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine intoxication and severity of violence. In this sample, 28.8% of women reported experiencing any form of intimate partner violence and 92.9% of women reported their partner being intoxicated at least sometimes. Intoxication was significantly associated with all 3 types of intimate partner violence, while the odds of experiencing one form of IPVAW versus no form of IPVAW and 2 forms of IPVAW versus 1 form of IPVAW was greater among women reporting frequency of husband/partner intoxication as often.

  11. A dyadic analysis of relationships and health: does couple-level context condition partner effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ashley B; Simons, Ronald L

    2014-08-01

    Adding to the growing literature explicating the links between romantic relationships and health, this study examined how both couple-level characteristics, particularly union type (e.g., dating, cohabiting, or marriage) and interracial pairing, and interpersonal characteristics (e.g., partner strain and support), predicted young adults' physical and mental health. Using dyadic data from a sample of 249 young, primarily Black couples, we hypothesized and found support for the importance of couple-level context, partner behavior, and their interaction in predicting health. Interracial couples (all Black/non-Black pairings) reported worse health than monoracial Black couples. Union type, however, did not directly predict health but was a significant moderator of partner strain. That is, the negative association between partner strain and self-reported health was stronger for cohabiting and married couples versus their dating counterparts, suggesting that coresidence, more so than marital status, may be important for understanding partner effects on physical health. For psychological distress, however, partner support proved equally beneficial across union types.

  12. Sexual risk behavior and type of sexual partners in transnational indigenous migrant workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Hoyos, Ramiro; Villaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Millán-Guerrero, Rebeca; Trujillo-Hernández, Benjamín; Monárrez-Espino, Joel

    2013-06-01

    Indigenous migrant workers (IMWs) have a high vulnerability to HIV and STDs due to poverty and marginalization. This study examined factors associated with sexual risk behavior (SRB) according to type of partner in transnational young male IMWs at a sugar cane agro-industrial complex in western Mexico. A total of 192 sexually active IMWs were recruited from four laborer shelters to participate in a sexual partner survey. The IMWs were interviewed about their sexual partners and practices over the last 12 months during which it emerged that they had had a total of 360 sexual partners. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to identify factors related to SRB in 222 main (spouse, mistress and girlfriend) and 138 casual partners (colleague, friend, casual encounter and sex worker). Results showed a significantly higher SRB score with casual partners. For the main partner regression model, prior exposure to HIV- and STD-preventive information and sexual intercourse with higher employment status partners (formal workers vs. self-employed in informal activities and unemployed) were associated with lower SRB scores, but if the sexual relations occurred in Mexico (vs. the U.S.), the SRB scores increased. For the casual partner model, the practice of survival sex (sex in exchange for basic needs), sexual relations in Mexico (vs. the U.S.), and being a circular migrant (person traveling for temporary work to return home when the contract is over) were related to higher SRB scores. Findings support the implementation of preventive interventions using different messages depending on the type of partners, main or casual, within the labor migrant context.

  13. Where do you end and I begin? Evidence for anticipatory, motivated self-other integration between relationship partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotter, Erica B; Gardner, Wendi L

    2009-06-01

    Perceiving similarity between oneself and one's romantic partner benefits both the individual and the relationship and can arise from multiple pathways that draw either the partner closer to the self or the self closer to the partner. The current research focuses on the latter. The authors investigate novel circumstances under which the self-concepts of individuals in romantic relationships may intertwine. Although self-other integration typically grows from the depth of shared experiences between relationship partners, the current research proposes a secondary pathway through which self-other integration may occur: Specifically, motivation to draw close to a romantic partner may be sufficient to evoke self-other integration even in the absence of shared experience. In 6 studies, the authors explored this anticipatory self-other integration pathway, using both current and potential romantic partners. The results supported the hypotheses by demonstrating that self-other integration can occur in an anticipatory fashion with the appropriate motivation.

  14. Understanding intimate partner violence and its correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikumar Ramadugu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study assessed intimate partner violence (IPV and alcohol use in an urban population in Pune, India. The prevalence of IPV and alcohol use was assessed along with the correlation of IPV with alcohol and other variables. Materials and Methods: The study was cross-sectional, questionnaire-based. The materials used were the hurt insult threaten scream (HITS scale, the alcohol use disorders identification test, and a brief psychosocial questionnaire. Systematic random sampling was done on the target population. Regression analysis of various factors in relation to HITS score was done. Results: Sample size (n was 318 individuals. Prevalence of IPV was found to be 16% and the victims were mostly women. Prevalence of alcohol use was 44%, of which 8.9% were harmful users. No female subjects consumed alcohol, but 94% were aware of their husband's alcohol consumption. No significant correlation was found between IPV and education (P = 0.220 or income of women (P = 0.250. Alcohol consumption by males was a significant risk factor for women experiencing IPV (σ = +0.524; P< 0.001. Regression analysis also revealed that increasing marital age (P = 0.019 and financial support from in-laws (P = 0.040 were significantly protective. Conclusion: IPV prevalence was less than the national average for India, but the majority of victims was women. The most common type of IPV was verbal. Alcohol use prevalence was higher than the national average, but harmful use was lower. Alcohol use is a significant risk factor for IPV. Education and income of women were not significantly protective against IPV but increased age at marriage and support from in-laws were.

  15. [Health status and intimate partner violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Rey, Lourdes; Otero-García, Laura

    2014-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) in Spain in the last year and at some point during the lifetime, to determine health status in women according to whether they had experienced IPV or not, and to analyze the individual variables associated with IPV in Spain. A cross-sectional study was performed of the database, Macrosurvey on Gender Violence in Spain 2011. This database includes data on 7,898 women older than 18 years old. The dependent variables were IPV-last year, IPV-ever in life. Covariates consisted of sociodemographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, maternal experience of IPV, social support, and self-care. The measure of association used was the OR with its 95% confidence interval (95% CI). A total of 3.6% of women had experienced IPV-last year and 12.2% ever in life. Female victims of IPV had poorer health than women who had not experienced IPV. Immigrant women living in Spain for 6 years or more were more likely to experience IPV-ever in life than Spanish women [OR (95% CI): 1.95 (1.50, 2.53)]. An interaction was found between nationality and the existence of children under 18 years old. Among women with children under 18 years old, immigrant women were more likely to experience IPV-last year than Spanish women [OR (95% CI): 1.99 (1.25, 3.17)]. Other variables associated with IPV were age, low socioeconomic status, low social support and having a mother who had experienced IPV. In Spain, some women have a higher probability of experiencing IPV. The variables associated with greater vulnerability to IPV should be taken into account when implementing measures to prevent or alleviate IPV. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Partnering with Your Transplant Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... members you can turn to for help and moral support. • When making decisions about your transplant, try ... conditions such as senility. human leukocyte antigens (HLA) - Molecules found on the surface of white blood cells ...

  17. Alignment of Partnering with Construction IT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Papadonikolaki

    2016-10-01

    synthesis, i.e. generate theory. Three consecutive steps of ‘construct’, ‘internal’, and ‘external’ validity took place after the synthesis, to define the transferability of findings. The systematic combination of findings deduced two routes to achieve SC integration in construction: (a product-related (emphasis on BIM tools, and (b actor-related (emphasis on SCM philosophy.The two observed routes to SC integration emerged from the data of the polar cases. Two complementary sets of strategies for SC integration were derived afterwards. These strategies could ease the identification of which route is the ‘closest fit’ to SC integration, and then support the decision-making of how to pursue it. As the concept of BIM is currently a hot topic, it might be wise to undertake a ‘product-related’ route to integration and gradually introduce strategies from the ‘actor-related’ route. However, the ‘actor-related’ route could attain long-term integration and thus, long-lasting relations among the multi-actor networks. The key aspects of the alignment of partnering with construction IT for BIM-enabled SC partnerships are: - The identification of whether the SC complexity is of process-, product- or actor-related nature; - The deployed BIM collaboration patterns, i.e. ad-hoc, linear or distributed; - The SC coordination mechanisms, e.g. centralised or decentralised; - The relation between formal and informal aspects, e.g. symmetric or asymmetric; - The emerging intra-organisational relations due to BIM and SCM implementation; - The hierarchical level that BIM-enabled SC partnership decision-making pertains. As the construction industry evolves into an information-driven sector, the alignment of construction IT with inter-organisational management is preeminent for managing the inherent complexities of the industry. In parallel, embracing inter-organisational approaches for information management such as BIM is a promisingway forward for SCM and

  18. Intimate Partner Violence in Interracial Couples: A Comparison to White and Ethnic Minority Monoracial Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Rachel A.

    2010-01-01

    The number of interracial couples in the U.S. is growing, but they often receive little support. Although previous studies have explored the relationship between low social support and decreased relationship satisfaction in interracial couples, there are few studies on intimate partner violence (IPV) in these couples. To better understand IPV in…

  19. Scientific-technical cooperation with foreign (esp. Europe and INSC partner countries) nuclear regulatory authorities and their technical support organizations in the fields of nuclear safety of operating nuclear power plants and on the concept evaluation of generation 3+ plants. Final report; Wissenschaftlich-Technische Zusammenarbeit (WTZ) mit auslaendischen (insbesondere in Europa und INSC-Partnerstaaten) atomrechtlichen Behoerden und deren Sachverstaendigenorganisationen zur nuklearen Sicherheit in Betrieb befindlicher Kernkraftwerke und zur Konzeptbewertung von Generation-3+-Anlagen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Holger

    2016-09-15

    The BMUB/BfS-Project 3614I01512 forms the frame of the GRS for the scientific-technical cooperation with Technical Support Organisations and Nuclear Regulatory Authorities in the field of nuclear safety in operating NPPs and for the concept evaluation of generation 3{sup +} plants in Europe and INSC Partner Countries. In the present final project report results are described which were gained within the project duration 15.10.2014 up to the 30.09.2016 in the following working packages: Investigations following the catastrophe of Fukushima Daiichi, Evaluation of selected National Action Plans, DBA and severe accident analyses for NPP with PWR (WWER-440, WWER-1000), cooperation with INSC partner countries on DBA, BDBA and severe accident analyses for WWER plants of generation 3{sup +} and building NRA and safety evaluation capacities and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and disposal of radioactive waste. The results are preceded by an outline on the activities related to the project management and to the planning of the bilateral work.

  20. Partners in Leadership for Pearl River

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Members of the 2007 class of Partners in Leadership toured NASA Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., on Jan. 11. They visited the center's B Test Stand, part of the center's rocket engine test complex. The Partners in Leadership training program is designed to teach Pearl River County leaders about their county's government, economic development, health and human services, history and arts, environment and education during a 10-month period. The program, sponsored by the Partners for Pearl River County, helps fulfill the mission of the economic and community development agency.

  1. Sexual Networking and Partner Characteristics Among Single, African, Caribbean, and Black Youth in Windsor, Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jelani; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Bynum, Shalanda; Mihan, Robert

    2017-10-01

    The disproportionate HIV burden shared by African, Caribbean, and Black (ACB) populations in Canada has not been explained by unique sexual behaviors in this population. This study investigates partner selection and sexual networking as potential contributors to HIV vulnerability. The study examines variations in the characteristics of sexual partners and sexual networking across groups based on differences in ethno-religious identity, gender, and length of Canadian residency among single, 16- to 27-year old, heterosexual-identified, ACB individuals living in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Respondent-driven sampling maximized the representativeness of the sample of 250 (45 % male; 55 % female) youth with penile-vaginal intercourse experience who completed surveys. Logistic regression and analysis of variance compared groups with respect to number of lifetime partners, concurrency of sexual relationships, non-relational and age disparate partnering, and intra-ethnic sexual networking. For vulnerability associated with number of partners, concurrency and non-relational sex, women, newcomers to Canada, and African-Muslim participants were at lower vulnerability for HIV infection than their comparator groups. For vulnerability associated with sexual networking within a group with higher HIV prevalence, women and newcomers to Canada were at higher vulnerability to HIV infection than their comparator groups. There were insufficient data on age disparate partnering to support analysis. These results point to the importance of considering characteristics of partners and sexual networking both in further research and in developing policies and programs to curtail the spread of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

  2. Partner Influence in Diet and Exercise Behaviors: Testing Behavior Modeling, Social Control, and Normative Body Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Brea; Ciciurkaite, Gabriele; Brady, Christy Freadreacea; Garcia, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has documented social contagion in obesity and related health behaviors, but less is known about the social processes underlying these patterns. Focusing on married or cohabitating couples, we simultaneously explore three potential social mechanisms influencing obesity: normative body size, social control, and behavior modeling. We analyze the association between partner characteristics and the obesity-related health behaviors of focal respondents, comparing the effects of partners' body type, partners' attempts to manage respondents' eating behaviors, and partners' own health behaviors on respondents' health behaviors (physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fast food consumption). Data on 215 partners are extracted from a larger study of social mechanisms of obesity in family and community contexts conducted in 2011 in the United States. Negative binomial regression models indicate that partner behavior is significantly related to respondent behavior (p behavior modeling mechanism in obesity-related patterns of consumption and physical activity. In contrast, we find little support for the influence of normative body size or partner social control in this sample, though generalizations about the relevance of these processes may be inappropriate. These results underscore the importance of policies and interventions that target dyads and social groups, suggesting that adoption of exercise or diet modifications in one individual is likely to spread to others, creating a social environment characterized by mutual reinforcement of healthy behavior.

  3. Attachment style moderates partner presence effects on pain: a laser-evoked potentials study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahé, Charlotte; Paloyelis, Yannis; Condon, Heather; Jenkinson, Paul M; Williams, Steven C R; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2015-08-01

    Social support is crucial for psychological and physical well-being. Yet, in experimental and clinical pain research, the presence of others has been found to both attenuate and intensify pain. To investigate the factors underlying these mixed effects, we administered noxious laser stimuli to 39 healthy women while their romantic partner was present or absent, and measured pain ratings and laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) to assess the effects of partner presence on subjective pain experience and underlying neural processes. Further, we examined whether individual differences in adult attachment style (AAS), alone or in interaction with the partner's level of attentional focus (manipulated to be either on or away from the participant) might modulate these effects. We found that the effects of partner presence vs absence on pain-related measures depended on AAS but not partner attentional focus. The higher participants' attachment avoidance, the higher pain ratings and N2 and P2 local peak amplitudes were in the presence compared with the absence of the romantic partner. As LEPs are thought to reflect activity relating to the salience of events, our data suggest that partner presence may influence the perceived salience of events threatening the body, particularly in individuals who tend to mistrust others.

  4. A Mixed-Methods Inquiry into the Intimate Practices of Partnered Mature Students and Influences on Relationship, Sexual, and School Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhijn, Tricia M.; Murray, Sarah H.; Mizzi, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Through the use of mixed qualitative and quantitative methods, the current study explored the impact of postsecondary study on the intimate relationships and school experiences of partnered mature students. Quantitative regression analyses indicated that parental status, family support, partner support, and sexual desire significantly predicted…

  5. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Colwell, Lucy J; Wingreen, Ned S

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein-protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multi-protein complexes, and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners. Hence, the sequences of interacting partners are correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify which proteins are specific interaction partners from sequence data alone. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer direct couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the three-dimensional structures of proteins from sequences. Building on this approach, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from among the members of two protein families. We assess the algorithm's performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. The algorithm proves successful without any a pri...

  6. Gender symmetry, sexism, and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher T; Swan, Suzanne C; Raghavan, Chitra

    2009-11-01

    This study of a predominantly Hispanic sample of 92 male and 140 female college students examines both gender symmetry in intimate partner violence (IPV) and inconsistent relationships found in previous studies between sexist attitudes and IPV. Results indicate that although comparable numbers of men and women perpetrate and are victimized in their relationships with intimate partners, the path models suggest that women's violence tends to be in reaction to male violence, whereas men tend to initiate violence and then their partners respond with violence. Benevolent sexism was shown to have a protective effect against men's violence toward partners. Findings highlight the importance of studying women's violence not only in the context of men's violence but also within a broader sociocultural context.

  7. Whom to Choose as License Partner?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Reichstein, Toke; Trombini, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    between technology and market forces: if partners are market distant, the likelihood of technology license contractual partnership decreases with partners’ technological distance. Using data on the formation of license partnerships in the global biopharmaceutical industry over the period 1994...

  8. Featured Partner: Saddle Creek Logistics Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EPA fact sheet spotlights Saddle Creek Logistics as a SmartWay partner committed to sustainability in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution caused by freight transportation, partly by growing its compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles for

  9. MPS/CAS Partner Group on Cosmology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yipeng; Gerhard B(o)rner

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Partner Group does research in cosmology, focussing on the quantitative modeling of the structure and evolution of galaxies and galaxy clusters, the pattern of galaxies and of larger structures.

  10. Inter-ethnic Marriage and Partner Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Sinning, Mathias; Worner, Shane

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates immigrant assortative mating and relationship satisfaction. Using a modified random effects ordered probit model, the paper demonstrates that spouses of mixed couples are significantly less satisfied with their partner than nativeonly and foreign-only couples. Dieses Papier untersucht die Wahl des Ehepartners und die Zufriedenheit mit dem Partner. Unter Verwendung eines modifizierten Random Effects Ordered Probit-Modells zeigt das Papier, dass Ehepartner gemischter ...

  11. Women Like Being Valued for Sex, as Long as it is by a Committed Partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Andrea L; McNulty, James K; Maner, Jon K

    2017-02-01

    How do women respond to being valued for sex by their partners? Although research supporting objectification theory suggests that women's reactions to sexual valuation are primarily negative, a separate body of research indicates that women expend significant effort to enhance their sexual appeal. Evolutionary perspectives suggest that whether women are more or less satisfied with partners who value them for sex may depend on how committed those partners are. Being sexually valued by a relatively uncommitted partner may violate women's desire to avoid short-term sexual relationships and thus may be negatively associated with relationship satisfaction. In contrast, being sexually valued by a highly committed partner may positively influence women's relationship satisfaction because it signals to them that they have successfully attracted a long-term relationship partner. Two studies of newly married couples supported these predictions. In Study 1 (N = 109), husbands' sexual valuation was positively associated with marital satisfaction among wives who perceived that those husbands were highly committed, but negatively associated with marital satisfaction among wives who perceived that those husbands were relatively less committed. Study 2 (N = 99) revealed the same pattern for wives (but not husbands) using a likely manifestation of sexual valuation-engaging in frequent sex. These findings join others to demonstrate that interpersonal processes do not have universally positive or negative implications for relationships; rather, their implications depend on the context in which they occur, including contexts that were reproductively beneficial or costly throughout evolutionary history.

  12. Iranian Women's Experiences with Intimate Partner Violence: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherkhani, Sakineh; Negarandeh, Reza; Simbar, Masomeh; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Violence against women has been identified as a public health problem, which has fundamental consequences on women's physical, mental, and reproductive health. To understand abused women and provide support for them, it is necessary to enter the world in which the victims of intimate partner violence live. This study was designed to investigate experiences of abused Iranian women of intimate partner violence. Content analysis approach was used to design this qualitative study. Participants were 11 married women, selected from two health centers and one park located in the south of Tehran, Iran. Purposive sampling method was applied to recruit the study participants and continued until data saturation was reached. Semi-structured interviews were employed to collect data. During the data analysis, 650 initial codes were clustered in six subcategories and two categories. "Neglect or covert violence" and "overt violence" were two categories emerged through data analysis, both having physical, sexual, and emotional dimensions. Emotional violence was the most prevalent in both cases and had more significance for the women. Neglect was much more common than overt violence. It was the precursor for overt violence. Although participants had experienced both neglect and overt violence, the major part of experienced violence was neglect. This type of violence usually is not addressed or recognized and is difficult to identify, but it is damaging to women. Knowledge of women‟s experiences of intimate partner violence makes the health staff provide better care for abused women.

  13. Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternullo, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal; Lane, Susan; Myint-U, Khinlei; Havasy, Robert; Carter, Michael; Kvedar, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    This article reviews the history, current status, and future plans of the Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health (the Center). Established in 1995 by Harvard Medical School teaching hospitals, the Center develops strategies to move healthcare from the hospital and doctor's office into the day-to-day lives of patients. It leverages information technology to help manage chronic conditions, maintain health and wellness, and improve adherence to prescribed regimen, patient engagement, and clinical outcomes. Since inception, it has served over 30,000 patients. The Center's core functions include videoconference-based real-time virtual visits, home vital sign monitoring, store-and-forward online consultations, social media, mobile technology, and other novel methods of providing care and enabling health and wellness remotely and independently of traditional time and geographic constraints. It offers a wide range of services, programs, and research activities. The Center comprises over 40 professionals with various technical and professional skills. Internally within Partners HealthCare, the role of the Center is to collaborate, guide, advise, and support the experimentation with and the deployment and growth of connected health technologies, programs, and services. Annually, the Center engages in a deliberative planning process to guide its annual research and operational agenda. The Center enjoys a diversified revenue stream. Funding sources include institutional operating budget/research funds from Partners HealthCare, public and private competitive grants and contracts, philanthropic contributions, ad hoc funding arrangements, and longer-term contractual arrangements with third parties.

  14. New ways of working with partners. Women's forum in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    In May 1997, Oxfam initiated an effort to help partner organizations in Bangladesh integrate gender issues into their management structures and programs. Oxfam's strategy involved inviting all 20 of its partners to send two women in management or staff positions to create a forum on gender. Oxfam kept the agenda open and included recreational activities. Within the first 24 hours, the group had produced an action plan and asked Oxfam to facilitate continuation of the forum. At first the women wanted Oxfam representatives to meet with their directors to discuss problems; after two meetings, the women only wanted Oxfam to witness the discussions and deflect objections about donor intent. Priority issues were maternity leave, equity with men in receiving resources for communication and transportation, and sexual harassment that occurred when directors extended the household roles of the women into the workplace. Lessons learned from this strategy are that 1) there is no quick fix, but this intervention is relatively inexpensive; 2) long-term support is needed; 3) involving middle managers is a concrete way to place gender issues on the agendas of partner organizations; and 4) a gender policy is important, but an action plan is even more important.

  15. Perceptions of the physical attractiveness of the self, current romantic partners, and former partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Allum, Lucy

    2012-02-01

    This study examined ratings of physical attractiveness of the self and former and current partners. A total of 304 participants completed measures of attractiveness, relationship satisfaction, love dimensions, self-esteem and sociosexual orientation. Consistent with previous work, results showed that participants rated their current partners as more attractive than themselves and their former partners. However, results also showed that former partners were rated as more attractive than the self on a number of bodily characteristics. Finally, results showed that ratings of former partner physical attractiveness were associated with passion for the former partner, self-esteem, sociosexual orientation, and attributions of relationship termination. These results are discussed in relation to the available literature on positive illusions in intimate relationships.

  16. Game-based versus storyboard-based evaluations of crew support prototypes for long duration missions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, N.J.J.M.; Abbing, M.S.; Neerincx, M.A.; Lindenberg, J.; Oostendorp, H. van

    2010-01-01

    The Mission Execution Crew Assistant (MECA) is developing a distributed system of electronic partners (ePartners) to support astronauts performing nominal and off- nominal actions in long duration missions. The ePartners' support should adequately deal with the dynamics of the context, operations, t

  17. Relationship satisfaction in couples confronted with colorectal cancer : the interplay of past and current spousal support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagedoorn, Mariet; Dagan, Meirav; Puterman, Eli; Hoff, Christiaan; Meijerink, W. J. H. Jeroen; DeLongis, Anita; Sanderman, Robbert

    2011-01-01

    Based on attribution theory, this study hypthesized that past spousal supportiveness may act as a moderator of the link between one partner's current support behavior and the other partner's relationship satisfaction. A sample of 88 patients with colorectal cancer and their partners completed questi

  18. Intimate partner violence among women of childbearing age in a primary health care centre in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilika, Amobi L; Okonkwo, Prosper I; Adogu, Prosper

    2002-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence and characteristics of intimate partner violence among women of childbearing age in a primary health centre. With interviewer-administered questionnaire, information on partner violence was elicited from three hundred women of childbearing age selected by systematic sampling in a primary health care (PHC) centre. Over 40% had experienced violence within the last 12 months. Type of marriage and partner's education had effect on violence. Perceived reasons for violence were economic demand (56.1%), reproductive issues (42.5%), alcohol and drugs (61.2%). Forty eight per cent reported to family members. Only 1% reported to the Police. Intimate partner violence is a prevalent public health problem in eastern Nigeria. Health workers and social organisations should recognise the problem and offer necessary support, and women should be empowered to navigate through the problem.

  19. Children's use of communicative intent in the selection of cooperative partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen A Dunfield

    Full Text Available Within the animal kingdom, human cooperation represents an outlier. As such, there has been great interest across a number of fields in identifying the factors that support the complex and flexible variety of cooperation that is uniquely human. The ability to identify and preferentially interact with better social partners (partner choice is proposed to be a major factor in maintaining costly cooperation between individuals. Here we show that the ability to engage in flexible and effective partner choice behavior can be traced back to early childhood. Specifically, across two studies, we demonstrate that by 3 years of age, children identify effective communication as "helpful" (Experiments 1 & 2, reward good communicators with information (Experiment 1, and selectively reciprocate communication with diverse cooperative acts (Experiment 2. Taken together, these results suggest that even in early childhood, humans take advantage of cooperative benefits, while mitigating free-rider risks, through appropriate partner choice behavior.

  20. Older partner selection in young African-American men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrington-Sanders, Renata; Leonard, Lori; Brooks, Durryle; Celentano, David; Ellen, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    Young African-American (AA) men who have sex with men (YAAMSM) have experienced the greatest proportional increase in new HIV cases compared with other groups. Bridging sexual partnerships between YAAMSM and older aged cohorts with higher rates of primary HIV infection has emerged as an important independent risk factor for the development of HIV. We explored reasons young AAMSM cite for being attracted to and seeking an older partner and the interpersonal needs met within older sexual partnerships. Seventeen in-depth semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted in YAAMSM residing in a midsized urban city with high HIV prevalence. Two coders independently evaluated transcribed data to identify/collapse codes that emerged. We analyzed data using categorical and contextualizing analytic methods. Two themes emerged from the text for seeking an older sexual partner: the emotional maturity the older partner represented and the ability of the older partner to expose the younger partner to more life experiences. In addition, two themes emerged around attraction: support and physical attractiveness of the older partner. Few men described seeking age-discordant relationships for the sole purpose of exchange sex. Older partners during first same-sex experience helped younger partners sort through sexual position and how to perform in relationships. These interviews suggest that YAAMSM may be seeking older partners to fulfill desires to be in a stable, emotionally mature relationship and for exposure in the larger community. Prevention strategies aimed at targeting adolescent MSM age-discordant relationships will need to address the interpersonal needs met within older sexual partnerships. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisu, Maria; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Kenzik, Kelly M; Oster, Robert A; Lin, Chee Paul; Manne, Sharon; Alvarez, Ronald; Martin, Michelle Y

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of a ballroom dance intervention on improving quality of life (QOL) and relationship outcomes in cancer survivors and their partners. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial with two arms (Restoring Health in You (and Your Partner) through Movement, RHYTHM): (1) immediate dance intervention and (2) delayed intervention (wait-list control). The intervention consisted of 10 private weekly dance lessons and 2 practice parties over 12 weeks. Main outcomes were physical activity (Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire), functional capacity (6 Minute Walk Test), QOL (SF-36), Couples' trust (Dyadic Trust Scale), and other dyadic outcomes. Exit interviews were completed by all participating couples. Thirty-one women survivors (68% breast cancer) and their partners participated. Survivors were 57.9 years old on average and 22.6% African American. Partners had similar characteristics. RHYTHM had significant positive effects on physical activity (p = 0.05), on the mental component of QOL (p = 0.04), on vitality (p = 0.03), and on the dyadic trust scale (p = 0.04). Couples expressed satisfaction with the intervention including appreciating the opportunity to spend time and exercise together. Survivors saw this light-intensity physical activity as easing them into becoming more physically active. Light intensity ballroom dancing has the potential to improve cancer survivors' QOL. Larger trials are needed to build strong support for this ubiquitous and acceptable activity. Ballroom dance may be an important tool for cancer survivors to return to a physically active life and improve QOL and other aspects of their intimate life.

  2. What patients with pulmonary fibrosis and their partners think: a live, educative survey in the Netherlands and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Mirjam J.G.; Kreuter, Michael; van den Blink, Bernt; Oltmanns, Ute; Palmowski, Karin; Brunnemer, Eva; Hummler, Simone; Tak, Nelleke C.; van den Toorn, Leon; Miedema, Jelle; Hoogsteden, Henk C.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis greatly impacts patients and their partners. Unmet needs of patients are increasingly acknowledged; the needs of partners often remain unnoticed. Little is known about the best way to educate patients and partners. We investigated pulmonary fibrosis patients' and partners' perspectives and preferences in care, and the differences in these between the Netherlands and Germany. Additionally, we evaluated whether interactive interviewing could be a novel education method in this population. Patients and partners were interviewed during pulmonary fibrosis patient information meetings. In the Netherlands, voting boxes were used and results were projected directly. In Germany, questionnaires were used. In the Netherlands, 278 patients and partners participated; in Germany, 51. Many participants experienced anxiety. Almost all experienced misunderstanding, because people do not know what pulmonary fibrosis is. All expressed a need for information, psychological support and care for partners. Use of the interactive voting system was found to be pleasant (70%) and informative (94%). This study improves the knowledge of care needs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis and their partners. There were no major differences between the Netherlands and Germany. Interactive interviewing could be an attractive method to acquire insights into the needs and preferences of patients and partners, while providing them with information at the same time. PMID:28229083

  3. What patients with pulmonary fibrosis and their partners think: a live, educative survey in the Netherlands and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam J.G. van Manen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis greatly impacts patients and their partners. Unmet needs of patients are increasingly acknowledged; the needs of partners often remain unnoticed. Little is known about the best way to educate patients and partners. We investigated pulmonary fibrosis patients' and partners' perspectives and preferences in care, and the differences in these between the Netherlands and Germany. Additionally, we evaluated whether interactive interviewing could be a novel education method in this population. Patients and partners were interviewed during pulmonary fibrosis patient information meetings. In the Netherlands, voting boxes were used and results were projected directly. In Germany, questionnaires were used. In the Netherlands, 278 patients and partners participated; in Germany, 51. Many participants experienced anxiety. Almost all experienced misunderstanding, because people do not know what pulmonary fibrosis is. All expressed a need for information, psychological support and care for partners. Use of the interactive voting system was found to be pleasant (70% and informative (94%. This study improves the knowledge of care needs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis and their partners. There were no major differences between the Netherlands and Germany. Interactive interviewing could be an attractive method to acquire insights into the needs and preferences of patients and partners, while providing them with information at the same time.

  4. eHealth Literacy and Partner Involvement in Treatment Decision Making for Men With Newly Diagnosed Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lixin; Tatum, Kimberly; Greene, Giselle; Chen, Ronald C

    2017-03-01

    To examine how the eHealth literacy of partners of patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer affects their involvement in decision making, and to identify the factors that influence their eHealth literacy.
. Cross-sectional exploratory study.
. North Carolina.
. 142 partners of men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer. 
. A telephone survey and descriptive and multiple linear regression analyses were used.
. The partners' eHealth literacy, involvement in treatment decision making, and demographics, and the health statuses of the patients and their partners. 
. Higher levels of eHealth literacy among partners were significantly associated with their involvement in getting a second opinion, their awareness of treatment options, and the size of the social network they relied on for additional information and support for treatment decision making for prostate cancer. The factor influencing eHealth literacy was the partners' access to the Internet for personal use, which explained some of the variance in eHealth literacy.
. This study described how partners' eHealth literacy influenced their involvement in treatment decision making for prostate cancer and highlighted the influencing factors (i.e., partners' access to the Internet for personal use).
. When helping men with prostate cancer and their partners with treatment decision making, nurses need to assess eHealth literacy levels to determine whether nonelectronically based education materials are needed and to provide clear instructions on how to use eHealth resources.

  5. Manufacturing Partner Selection by Network Based on "Invite/Submit Tenders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成颖; 杨志刚; 王先逵; 黄新刚

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic alliances are one type of production modes to realize agile manufacturing. Technology support for the dynamic alliance selection process is an important task in agile manufacturing. This paper analyzes the general dynamic alliance principle, suggests a network method for selecting partners, and analyzes the evaluation factors for partners selection in the process of setting up a manufacturing alliance. The results show that these factors can be divided into two levels: macro- and micro-characteristics. The decision-making process by each member has five main technical activities, which form the technology support system for the manufacturing alliance bid.

  6. Partner preferences among survivors of betrayal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, Robyn L

    2012-01-01

    Betrayal trauma theory suggests that social and cognitive development may be affected by early trauma such that individuals develop survival strategies, particularly dissociation and lack of betrayal awareness, that may place them at risk for further victimization. Several experiences of victimization in the context of relationships predicated on trust and dependence may contribute to the development of relational schema whereby abuse is perceived as normal. The current exploratory study investigates interpersonal trauma as an early experience that might impact the traits that are desired in potential romantic partners. Participants in the current study were asked to rate the desirability of several characteristics in potential romantic partners. Although loyalty was desirable to most participants regardless of their trauma history, those who reported experiences of high betrayal trauma rated loyalty less desirable than those who reported experiences of traumas that were low and medium in betrayal. Participants who reported experiences of revictimization (defined as the experience of trauma perpetrated by a close other during 2 different developmental periods) differed from participants who only reported 1 experience of high betrayal trauma in their self-reported desire for a romantic partner who possessed the traits of sincerity and trustworthiness. Preference for a partner who uses the tactic of verbal aggression was also associated with revictimization status. These preliminary findings suggest that victimization perpetrated by close others may affect partner preferences.

  7. Partner Market Opportunities and Relationship Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Rapp

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although partner market opportunities are generally considered to be important for relationship stability, they have never been measured accurately. In order to be able to test the anticipated effects of partner market opportunities, this study conceptualises them as individual opportunities for contact and interaction in concrete social contexts, like the neighbourhood, the workplace, leisure activities, etc. Using data from the German Marriage Market Survey, we first examine the impact of individual partner market opportunities on the risk of separation. Second, we examine to what extend the most frequently studied determinants of divorce and separation depend on partner market opportunities. Our results show that the number of opposite sex contacts increases the probability of separation. Sharing the same contacts with one’s partner decreases the risk of separation. Our results indicate further that reducing opposite sex contacts in the course of the relationship is partly responsible for the higher stability of longer-lasting relationships. Having a migration background is associated with fewer opposite sex contacts. This means that having a migration background would be more destabilising if these individuals did not have less opposite sex contacts than individuals without a migration background. In contrast, joint home ownership, church attendance, higher education and residing in western Germany would generally be more stabilising if these factors were not connected with more opposite sex contacts.

  8. Sustainable development: women as partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dem, M

    1993-02-01

    The economic recession and the structural adjustment programs imposed y the International Monetary Fund have caused sluggish or no economic growth and a decline in living conditions in sub-Saharan Africa. Senegal's New Agricultural Policy has eliminated subsidies for agricultural inputs, worsening the already declining living conditions. Population growth in Senegal exceeds food production; it is very rapid in cities (urban growth rate, 2.7%). Women, especially, suffer from the economic crisis; it increases the burden on women for income generation, but the increased workload does not equate more income. This workload restricts women's opportunities to improve their physical environment and does not improve their status within society. Women still face discrimination daily; power lies with men. Oxfam supports urban women financially and technically as they organize and pursue income generation activities to institute change leading to sustainable development. It has helped a Serere women's group in Dakar to organize and provided credit funds to support their trading activities and family planning sensitization training. Oxfam also finances rural women coming to Dakar during the dry season to pound millet to sell. Problems which have to be overcome to achieve sustainable development acceptable to women are numerous. Women need access to the ways and means of food production. Resources are insufficient and inaccessible to women because women are excluded from the decision-making process. Women generally do not have access to information and training which would help them make their own choices and manage their own lives. Political and sociocultural environments, especially those of the poor, do not easily allow women opportunities for independent reflection and expression. Grassroots women's groups provide the best base to develop female solidarity and women's representation, leading to sustainable development. Development organizations must take up a new dynamic

  9. Dyadic coping, quality of life, and psychological distress among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and their partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Meier1, Guy Bodenmann2, Hanspeter Mörgeli1, Josef Jenewein11Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland; 2Institute of Psychology, University of Zurich, SwitzerlandBackground: Successfully coping with a chronic disease depends significantly on social support, particularly that of a significant other. Thus, it depends on the ways of dealing with stress within a couple (dyadic coping. In this study, the relationship between dyadic coping and well-being was investigated among couples in which one partner suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Methods: A total of 43 couples participated. They were mailed questionnaires on anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-BREF, and dyadic coping (Dyadic Coping Inventory.Results: Low scores of positive and high scores of negative dyadic coping were associated with poorer quality of life and higher psychological distress among couples. Delegated coping (assistance with daily tasks was higher among partners. When estimated by patients, high delegated partner coping (frequent provision of support by partners and low delegated personal coping (low provision of support by patients were associated with poorer quality of life for both patient and partner. COPD patients suffering from depression were supported more often and attributed deficits in dyadic coping primarily to themselves, whereas partners with higher scores of depression provided higher estimates of both their own negative coping and the negative coping of their partner.Conclusion: The higher the patient perceived the imbalance in delegated dyadic coping, the lower the couple's quality of life. More negative and less positive dyadic coping were associated with lower quality of life and higher psychological distress. Psychotherapeutic interventions to improve dyadic coping may lead to better

  10. Relational experiences of partnered Japanese immigrant women with affect disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuki, Yoriko; Kennedy, Michael G; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study that explored characteristics of relationships of Japanese immigrant women partnered both intraculturally and interculturally, and analysed the role of Japanese culture in these relationships. Immigration can cause shifts in interpersonal structures with partners. When there are large discrepancies in gender roles and communication styles between the original and host cultures, the psychological impact on both partners may be significant. However, currently no empirical data are available to support this assumption. Ten cases selected from the 68 medical records of Japanese-speaking women seen at a mental health clinic from September 2001 to September 2004 were analysed. All of the 10 women met DSM IV-TR criteria of major depressive disorder and were taking antidepressants. Half of the 10 women were in intimate intercultural partnered relationships and the remainder of the matched cases were in intracultural relationships at the time of treatment. The two cohorts were matched in age (36.2 and 43.2 years), length of stay in the United States of America (12 and 16.2 years), and length of treatment (1.2 and 1 years). The length of time of the sample in individual psychodynamic psychotherapy ranged from 20 to 317 hours, depending on the intensity of therapy. Inductive data analysis revealed two themes: (1) Lack of awareness of differences in culturally bound communication by Japanese women in intercultural partnerships; (2) Lack of individuality in Japanese women in intracultural partnerships. Neither group appeared to consider relational aspects of partnership, or to make efforts to improve direct communication with their partners. The influence of Japanese culture on gender role and communication styles functions contrary to the mainstream Western culture of the United States of America. In the future, interpersonal elements of cultural differences between host and original cultures in immigration should be considered in

  11. Compelled to Risk: Does Sexual Compulsivity Explain the Connection Between Borderline Personality Disorder Features and Number of Sexual Partners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Charles; Sharp, Carla; Garey, Lorra; Vanwoerden, Salome; Crist, Nic; Elhai, Jon D; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2017-01-10

    Having more sexual partners increases the likelihood of new HIV infections among women. Women with more borderline personality disorder (BPD) features have been known to have greater numbers of sexual partners. However, the mechanisms linking BPD features with more sexual partners remain to be clarified. Sexual compulsivity (lack of control, increased distress over sexual behavior) may be one such explanatory factor, as it overlaps with BPD features (e.g., impulsivity, negative affectivity). The present study examined whether sexual compulsivity explained the relation of BPD features with number of sexual partners among a diverse sample of college females (N = 1,326). Results demonstrated a significant indirect effect of BPD features via sexual compulsivity on number of sexual partners. These findings support the relation between BPD features and sexual compulsivity and suggest sexual compulsivity as a target in the promotion of the sexual health of women with BPD who demonstrate risky sexual practices.

  12. Welcoming spouses and partners to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The questions related to Diversity were examined in the framework of the Five-yearly Review, which was approved in December 2015. The first themes implemented this year concern helping spouses or partners integrate into the working world, and improving the balance between professional and private life.   To this end, the Social Affairs Service and the CERN Diversity Office organised together on Tuesday, 15 November, a “Welcome Drink” for the spouses and partners of employed members of the personnel of CERN who have recently arrived in the region. This event was an occasion for the spouses and partners to meet and greet with various internal services at CERN, including the Staff Association, as well as local networks that can provide assistance in integrating into the region, in terms of job search for instance. Therefore, several service providers were present, including: the Geneva Welcome Center (CAGI), a welcoming network for newly arrived employees of international organi...

  13. Partner manipulation stabilises a horizontally transmitted mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Martin; Barajas-Barron, Alejandro; Orona-Tamayo, Domancar; Wielsch, Natalie; Svatos, Ales

    2014-02-01

    Mutualisms require protection from non-reciprocating exploiters. Pseudomyrmex workers that engage in an obligate defensive mutualism with Acacia hosts feed exclusively on the sucrose-free extrafloral nectar (EFN) that is secreted by their hosts, a behaviour linking ant energy supply directly to host performance and thus favouring reciprocating behaviour. We tested the hypothesis that Acacia hosts manipulate this digestive specialisation of their ant mutualists. Invertase (sucrose hydrolytic) activity in the ant midguts was inhibited by chitinase, a dominant EFN protein. The inhibition occurred quickly in cell-free gut liquids and in native gels and thus likely results from an enzyme-enzyme interaction. Once a freshly eclosed worker ingests EFN as the first diet available, her invertase becomes inhibited and she, thus, continues feeding on host-derived EFN. Partner manipulation acts at the phenotypic level and means that one partner actively controls the phenotype of the other partner to enhance its dependency on host-derived rewards.

  14. Evaluating self and partner physical attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Furnham, Adrian; Georgiades, Chrissa; Pang, Lily

    2007-03-01

    This study used a novel questionnaire to examine ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. Seventy-two men and 83 women estimated their own and their opposite-sex partner's overall physical attractiveness and the attractiveness of various body parts and measures. They also answered six simple questions concerning physical attractiveness. Results showed significant gender differences in self-estimates of overall facial attractiveness and upper body features. In general, and regardless of gender, participants rated their opposite-sex partners as being significantly more attractive than themselves. In addition, the results showed that body weight and facial attractiveness were the best predictors of overall physical attractiveness. Implications of these results in terms of social biases are considered.

  15. AIDS, partner notification and gender issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildesheimer, Galya M

    2002-01-01

    The interplay between public health, human rights, legal obligations and physicians' ethical concerns was revealed dramatically in Israel in recent cases involving reporting of the HIV positive status of patients. This paper reviews and critically analyses the decision-making process of Israeli Ethics Committees regarding HIV partner notification. One aim of this analysis is to suggest principles that may guide the decision in such cases. It is argued that the resolution concerning disclosure to partners be based on the Principle of Proportionality, taking into account the type of relationship between partner and patient, their cultural background and gender issues. The paper demonstrates the advantages of addressing such issues by professional multidisciplinary Ethics Committees, whose decisions can bring to bear the scope of relevant considerations.

  16. Whom to Choose as License Partner?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Reichstein, Toke; Trombini, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the matching of firms on the market for technology. The paper forwards two dimensions along which license formation occurs: technology and product-market. Both sides of the market search for a partner representing potential for high technology synergies to maximize licensing...... benefits and obviate issues related to technology transfer and knowledge recombination. At the same time, firms wish to select a partner operating in a different product market to minimize competitive downside issues and to access other product markets, skills and resources. We contend interdependence...... between technology and market forces: if partners are market distant, the likelihood of technology license contractual partnership decreases with partners’ technological distance. Using data on the formation of license partnerships in the global biopharmaceutical industry over the period 1994...

  17. Research on Partner-fly Infrared Decoys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Yang; LI Yan-jun; WANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    With the rapid development of new generation of infrared-guided missiles, it is very difficult for the traditional point-source infrared decoys to confront them. Therefore it is important to research the jamming mechanism and tactical application of infrared decoys. Through the research on rocket-propelled infrared decoys, a movement model and a radiation pattern of partner-fly infrared decoy are established based on the jamming mechanism of infrared centroid effect, the aerodynamics principle as well as the aeronautical dynamics principle. A dynamic simulation seeking superiority is conducted for its firing range and direction, a tactical application method of partner-fly infrared decoy against infrared-guided missile is explored, and the technical conditions of partner-fly infrared decoys are determined.

  18. Emergency nurses' experiences of caring for survivors of intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wath, Annatjie; van Wyk, Neltjie; Janse van Rensburg, Elsie

    2013-10-01

    To report a study of emergency nurses' experiences of caring for survivors of intimate partner violence. Emergency nurses have the opportunity to intervene during the period following exposure to intimate partner violence when survivors are most receptive for interventions. The confrontation with the trauma of intimate partner violence can, however, affect emergency nurses' ability to engage empathetically with survivors, which is fundamental to all interventions. The research was guided by the philosophical foundations of phenomenology as founded by Husserl. A descriptive phenomenological inquiry grounded in Husserlian philosophy was used. The phenomenological reductions were applied throughout data collection and analysis. During 2010, concrete descriptions were obtained from interviewing 11 nurses working in emergency units of two public hospitals in an urban setting in South Africa. To arrive at a description of the essence, the data were analysed by searching for the meaning given to the experience of caring for survivors of intimate partner violence. Emergency nurses in South Africa are often witnesses of the emotional and physical effects of intimate partner violence. Exposure to the vulnerability and suffering of survivors elicits sympathy and emotional distress. Emergency nurses are left with the emotional impact and disruptive and recurrent memories. Exploring the tacit internal experiences related to caring for survivors of intimate partner violence revealed emergency nurses' vulnerability to the effects of secondary traumatic stress. The findings generated an opportunity to develop guidelines through which to support and empower emergency nurses. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Mindfulness during romantic conflict moderates the impact of negative partner behaviors on cortisol responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Heidemarie K; Hertz, Robin; Nelson, Benjamin; Laurent, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to test whether romantic partners' mindfulness-present moment, nonjudgmental awareness-during a conflict discussion could buffer the effects of negative partner behaviors on neuroendocrine stress responses. Heterosexual couples (n=88 dyads) provided 5 saliva samples for cortisol assay during a laboratory session involving a conflict discussion task. Conflict behaviors were coded by outside observers using the System for Coding Interactions in Dyads, and partners rated their mindfulness during the task using the Toronto Mindfulness Scale. Interactions tested using multilevel modeling revealed that participants with higher levels of mindfulness during the conflict showed either quicker cortisol recovery or an absence of slowed recovery in the presence of more negative partner behaviors. Whereas the attitudinal component of mindfulness (curiosity) moderated effects of negative partner engagement in the conflict (i.e., attempts to control, coerciveness, negativity and conflict), the attentional component of mindfulness (decentering) moderated the effect of partner disengagement (i.e., withdrawal). These findings lend support to the idea that mindfulness during a stressful interaction can mitigate the physiological impacts of negative behaviors.

  20. Workplace surface acting and marital partner discontent: Anxiety and exhaustion spillover mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krannitz, Morgan A; Grandey, Alicia A; Liu, Songqi; Almeida, David A

    2015-07-01

    Surface acting (i.e., faking and suppressing emotions at work) is repeatedly linked to employee negative moods and emotional exhaustion, but the consequences may also go beyond work boundaries. We provide a unique theoretical integration of these 2 emotional labor consequences with 2 work-to-family conflict mechanisms, mood spillover and resource drain, to explain why surface acting is likely to create marital partner discontent (i.e., partner's perceived work-to-family conflict and desire for the employee to quit). A survey of 197 hotel managers and their marital partners supported that managers' surface acting was directly related to their partner wanting them to quit, and indirectly to partner's perception of work-to-family conflict via exhaustion consistent with the resource drain mechanism. Anxiety from surface acting had an indirect mediating effect on marital partner discontent through exhaustion. Importantly, controlling for dispositional negativity and job demands did not weaken these effects. Implications for theory and future research integrating work-family and emotional labor are discussed.

  1. Effect of physical intimate partner violence on body mass index in low-income adult women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Freitas Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess whether physical intimate partner violence affects the nutritional status of adult women with different levels of body mass index (BMI. This was a population-based cross-sectional study with 625 women selected through complex multistage cluster sampling. Information on physical intimate partner violence was obtained with the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales, and nutritional status was measured as BMI (kg/m2. A quantile regression model was used to assess the effect of physical intimate partner violence at all percentiles of BMI distribution. Physical intimate partner violence occurred in 27.6% of the women (95%CI: 20.0; 35.2. Mean BMI was 27.9kg/m2 (95%CI: 27.1; 28.7. The results showed that physical intimate partner violence was negatively associated with BMI between the 25th and 85th percentiles, corresponding to 22.9 and 31.2kg/m2. The findings support previous studies indicating that physical intimate partner violence can reduce BMI in low-income women.

  2. Increased risk of severe depression in male partners of women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Naoki; Saito-Nakaya, Kumi; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Uchitomi, Yosuke; Johansen, Christoffer

    2010-12-01

    A few small studies published to date have suggested that major psychosocial problems develop in the partners of cancer patients; however, to the authors' knowledge, no studies to date have addressed their risk for severe depression. In a retrospective cohort study, the risk for hospitalization with an affective disorder of the male partners of women with breast cancer was investigated, using unbiased, nationwide, population-based information. Followed were 1,162,596 men born between 1925 and 1973 who were aged ≥30 years at study entry, resided in Denmark between 1994 and 2006, had no history of hospitalization for an affective disorder, and had lived continuously with the same partner for at least 5 years. A Cox regression analysis included detailed clinical information regarding the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and on annually updated socioeconomic and health-related indicators obtained from national administrative and disease registers. During the 13 years of follow-up, breast cancer was diagnosed in the partners of 20,538 men. On multivariable analysis, men whose partner was diagnosed with breast cancer were found to be at an increased risk of being hospitalized with an affective disorder (hazards ratio, 1.39; 95%confidence interval, 1.20-1.61), with a dose-response pattern for the severity of breast cancer. Furthermore, men whose partner died after breast cancer had a significant, 3.6-fold increase in risk for an affective disorder when compared with men whose partner survived breast cancer. The results of the current study supported the hypothesis that men whose partner had breast cancer were at an increased risk for hospitalization with an affective disorder. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  3. Understanding Adolescent and Family Influences on Intimate Partner Psychological Violence During Emerging Adulthood and Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Brenda J.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Senia, Jennifer M.; Schofield, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The intergenerational transmission of violence directed toward intimate partners has been documented for the past three decades. Overall, the literature shows that violence in the family of origin leads to violence in the family of destination. However, this predominately cross–sectional or retrospective literature is limited by self–selection, endogeneity, and reporter biases as it has not been able to assess how individual and family behaviors simultaneously experienced during adolescence influence intimate partner violence throughout adulthood. The present study used data from the Iowa Youth and Families Project (IYFP; N = 392; 52 % Female), a multi–method, multi–trait prospective approach, to overcome this limitation. We focused on psychological intimate partner violence in both emerging adulthood (19 – 23 years) and adulthood (27 – 31 years), and include self and partner ratings of violence as well as observational data in a sample of rural non-Hispanic white families. Controlling for a host of individual risk factors as well as interparental psychological violence from adolescence (14 – 15 years), the results show that exposure to parent–to–child psychological violence during adolescence is a key predictor of intimate partner violence throughout adulthood. In addition, negative emotionality and the number of sexual partners in adolescence predicted intimate partner violence in both emerging adulthood and adulthood. Exposure to family stress was associated positively with intimate partner violence in adulthood but not in emerging adulthood, whereas academic difficulties were found to increase violence in emerging adulthood only. Unlike previous research, results did not support a direct effect of interparental psychological violence on psychological violence in the next generation. Gender differences were found only in emerging adulthood. Implications of these findings are discussed in light of the current literature and future directions

  4. Failure to capitalize on sharing good news with romantic partners: Exploring positivity deficits of socially anxious people with self-reports, partner-reports, and behavioral observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashdan, Todd B; Ferssizidis, Patty; Farmer, Antonina S; Adams, Leah M; McKnight, Patrick E

    2013-10-01

    Extending prior work on social anxiety and positivity deficits, we examined whether individual differences in social anxiety alter the ability to share and respond to the good news of romantic partners (i.e., capitalization support) and how this influences romantic relationship satisfaction and commitment. In this study of 174 heterosexual couples (average age of 21.5 with 58.3% identifying as Caucasian), greater social anxiety was associated with the provision and receipt of less supportive responses to shared positive events as measured by trait questionnaires, partner reports, and behavioral observations in the laboratory. In longitudinal analyses, individuals in romantic relationships with socially anxious partners who experienced inadequate capitalization support were more likely to terminate their relationship and report a decline in relationship quality six months later. As evidence of construct specificity, social anxiety effects were independent of depressive symptoms. Taken together, social anxiety influenced a person's ability to receive and provide support for shared positive events; these deficits had adverse romantic consequences. Researchers and clinicians may better understand social anxiety by exploring a wider range of interpersonal contexts and positive constructs. The addition of capitalization support to the social anxiety literature offers new insights into interpersonal approaches and treatments.

  5. Failure to capitalize on sharing good news with romantic partners: Exploring positivity deficits of socially anxious people with self-reports, partner-reports, and behavioral observations☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashdan, Todd B.; Ferssizidis, Patty; Farmer, Antonina S.; Adams, Leah M.; McKnight, Patrick E.

    2013-01-01

    Extending prior work on social anxiety and positivity deficits, we examined whether individual differences in social anxiety alter the ability to share and respond to the good news of romantic partners (i.e., capitalization support) and how this influences romantic relationship satisfaction and commitment. In this study of 174 heterosexual couples (average age of 21.5 with 58.3% identifying as Caucasian), greater social anxiety was associated with the provision and receipt of less supportive responses to shared positive events as measured by trait questionnaires, partner reports, and behavioral observations in the laboratory. In longitudinal analyses, individuals in romantic relationships with socially anxious partners who experienced inadequate capitalization support were more likely to terminate their relationship and report a decline in relationship quality six months later. As evidence of construct specificity, social anxiety effects were independent of depressive symptoms. Taken together, social anxiety influenced a person's ability to receive and provide support for shared positive events; these deficits had adverse romantic consequences. Researchers and clinicians may better understand social anxiety by exploring a wider range of interpersonal contexts and positive constructs. The addition of capitalization support to the social anxiety literature offers new insights into interpersonal approaches and treatments. PMID:23916635

  6. Preparing Scientists to be Community Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Many students, especially students from historically under-represented communities, leave science majors or avoid choosing them because scientific careers do not offer enough opportunity to contribute to their communities. Citizen science, or public participation in scientific research, may address these challenges. At its most collaborative, it means inviting communities to partner in every step of the scientific process from defining the research question to applying the results to community priorities. In addition to attracting and retaining students, this level of community engagement will help diversify science, ensure the use and usability of our science, help buttress public support of science, and encourage the application of scientific results to policy. It also offers opportunities to tackle scientific questions that can't be accomplished in other way and it is demonstrably effective at helping people learn scientific concepts and methods. In order to learn how to prepare scientists for this kind of intensive community collaboration, we examined several case studies, including a project on disease and public health in Africa and the professionally evaluated experience of two summer interns in Southern Louisiana. In these and other cases, we learned that scientific expertise in a discipline has to be accompanied by a reservoir of humility and respect for other ways of knowing, the ability to work collaboratively with a broad range of disciplines and people, patience and enough career stability to allow that patience, and a willingness to adapt research to a broader set of scientific and non-scientific priorities. To help students achieve this, we found that direct instruction in participatory methods, mentoring by community members and scientists with participatory experience, in-depth training on scientific ethics and communication, explicit articulation of the goal of working with communities, and ample opportunity for personal reflection were essential

  7. Internalizing sexism within close relationships: Perceptions of intimate partners' benevolent sexism promote women's endorsement of benevolent sexism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Matthew D; Overall, Nickola C; Cross, Emily J

    2016-02-01

    The current research demonstrated that women's adoption of benevolent sexism is influenced by their perceptions of their intimate partners' agreement with benevolent sexism. In 2 dyadic longitudinal studies, committed heterosexual couples reported on their own sexism and perceptions of their partner's sexism twice across 9 months (Study 1) and 5 times across 1 year (Study 2). Women who perceived that their male partner more strongly endorsed benevolent sexism held greater and more stable benevolent sexism across time, whereas lower perceptions of partners' benevolent sexism predicted declines in women's benevolent sexism across time. Changes in men's endorsement of sexism were unrelated to perceptions of their partner's sexist attitudes. The naturalistic change in sexist attitudes shown in Studies 1 and 2 was supported by experimental evidence in Studies 3 and 4: Manipulations designed to increase perceptions of partner's benevolent sexism led women (but not men) to report greater benevolent sexism. Studies 3 and 4 also provided evidence that perceptions of partner's benevolent sexism fosters perceived regard and relationship security in women, but not men, and these relationship factors enhance attitude alignment. Discriminant analyses demonstrated that these effects were specific to women's perceptions of partner's, rather than societal, levels of sexism. In sum, these studies illustrate that women endorse benevolent sexism when they perceive that the reverence and security that benevolent sexism promises women are accessible in their relationships.

  8. Violence and substance use among female partners of men in treatment for intimate-partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wupperman, Peggilee; Amble, Paul; Devine, Susan; Zonana, Howard; Fals-Stewart, William; Easton, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    To improve understanding of the complex dynamics in intimate partner violence (IPV) in heterosexual relationships, we explored violence and substance use among the female partners of men entering treatment for both IPV and substance-related problems. All male participants (n = 75) were alcohol dependent and had at least one domestic-violence arrest. Results showed that female partners were as likely as men to engage in substance use the week before treatment; however, according to reports by the men, the female partners were more likely than men to use substances during the last week of treatment, due to a reported increase in use during the men's treatment. Regarding violence, 59 percent of female IPV victims reported engaging in some form of mild violence against their male partners, and 55 percent reported engaging in some form of severe violence. By contrast, only 23 percent of male batterers reported that their female partners had engaged in mild violence, and only 19 percent reported that their partners had engaged in severe violence. Regardless of whether the violence was defensive in nature, the data suggest that women in relationships involving substance abuse and IPV are in need of treatment. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. Erotica viewing effects on intimate relationships and self/partner evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Cameron; Prause, Nicole

    2013-05-01

    Viewing visual sexual stimuli (VSS) has been documented to have both positive (e.g., increased sexual arousal and sexual behaviors) and negative (e.g., higher anxiety, devaluing of partner attractiveness) effects. Excitation transfer and social comparison theories were used to generate hypotheses that could explain these mixed findings. Forty-four monogamous, heterosexual couples viewed erotic, exciting (non-erotic films), and nature films both alone and together. They rated their feelings of general arousal and relationship satisfaction as well as perceptions of self and partner sexual behaviors and attractiveness. Participants viewing both the erotic and exciting films reported equivalent increases in excitement; however, the erotic film was rated as slightly more generally arousing and increased participant's desire to be close to their partner. Viewing the erotic films also induced greater reports of negative affect, guilt, and anxiety. These findings moderately support a transfer of excitation interpretation. No effects of partner presence or absence while viewing the films was found. Viewing erotic films led to more positive evaluations of one's own sexual behaviors. These findings provide mixed support in regard to self and partner social comparisons. Co-occurring positive and negative emotional reactions were explored as possible explanation to the complex reactions to VSS.

  10. Passengers, Participants, Partners and Practitioners. Working with Risk To Empower Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Heather

    2000-01-01

    Participant responsibility in outdoor education programs is placed on a continuum from passenger status through participant and partner to practitioner. Corresponding leader roles are directive, coaching, supporting, and delegating. The disempowering effects of the passenger approach to risk management and the value of teaching a group to manage…

  11. THE ANALYSIS OF THE QUALITY OF ADMINISTRATION OF COMPANY RELATIONS WITH COMMERCIAL PARTNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fat Codruta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The proper development of the activity of a company depends largely upon the way it administrates its relations with commercial partners (suppliers and clients, as they support the activity of exploitment, which is the main activity of the company. The q

  12. 77 FR 39733 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: Appalachian Trail Management Partner Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... receiving support from the Appalachian Trail Park Office (ATPO) to protect trail resources and provide for the public enjoyment and visitor experience of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (Trail). To... Information Collection; Comment Request: Appalachian Trail Management Partner Survey AGENCY: National...

  13. Passengers, Participants, Partners and Practitioners. Working with Risk To Empower Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Heather

    2000-01-01

    Participant responsibility in outdoor education programs is placed on a continuum from passenger status through participant and partner to practitioner. Corresponding leader roles are directive, coaching, supporting, and delegating. The disempowering effects of the passenger approach to risk management and the value of teaching a group to manage…

  14. Subtyping Male Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Westen, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence is a serious problem with far-reaching consequences. This study applies a new methodology to derive subtypes of male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. As part of a larger National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded study, a national sample of randomly selected psychologists and psychiatrists describe 188 adult male…

  15. Risk Recognition and Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Tricia H.; Kendra, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether female victims of physical forms of intimate partner violence (IPV) displayed deficits in risk recognition, or the ability to detect danger, in physically violent dating encounters. A total of 182 women watched a video depicting a psychologically and physically aggressive encounter between…

  16. Self and partner personality in intimate relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, D.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine the relations between both partners' personality and marital quality in married or cohabiting heterosexual couples. In Study 1 (N = 1380, or 690 couples), personality was assessed by means of the Dutch Personality Questionnaire, whereas in Study 2 (N = 564, or 2

  17. Auditory Training with Frequent Communication Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spehar, Brent; Sommers, Mitchell; Barcroft, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with hearing loss engage in auditory training to improve their speech recognition. They typically practice listening to utterances spoken by unfamiliar talkers but never to utterances spoken by their most frequent communication partner (FCP)--speech they most likely desire to recognize--under the assumption that familiarity…

  18. Yorkie and Scalloped: partners in growth activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Edgar, Bruce A

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway limits organ growth in organisms from Drosophila to mammals by suppressing the activity of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki)/YAP. The TEAD/TEF factor Scalloped (Sd) has been identified as the first known transcription factor to partner with Yki as a downstream target of Hpo signaling.

  19. Physical Health Effects of Intimate Partner Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillito, Carrie LeFevre

    2012-01-01

    Although intimate partner violence has been recognized as both a social problem and health issue, the extent to which it is a health issue for both males and females in the general population is largely unknown. This longitudinal research uses data from the National Survey of Family and Households (1987-2003). Random effects logistic regression…

  20. Intimate Partner Violence Victimization and Associated Factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Protective factors. Self-rated health status was assessed by a single ... Life satisfaction was elicited with one question,. “All things ... 95% confidence interval (CI) to determine the associations .... severe depression and 21.1% for PTSD. Regarding .... Table 3: Associations with Intimate Partner Violence among Men. Variables.

  1. Librarians as Community Partners: An Outreach Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Carol, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Including 66 focused snapshots of outreach in action, this resource reflects the creative solutions of librarians searching for new and innovative ways to build programs that meet customer needs while expanding the library's scope into the community. This contributed volume includes: (1) A huge array of program options for partnering with other…

  2. Gender Symmetry, Sexism, and Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher T.; Swan, Suzanne C.; Raghavan, Chitra

    2009-01-01

    This study of a predominantly Hispanic sample of 92 male and 140 female college students examines both gender symmetry in intimate partner violence (IPV) and inconsistent relationships found in previous studies between sexist attitudes and IPV. Results indicate that although comparable numbers of men and women perpetrate and are victimized in…

  3. Intimate partner violence in orthopaedic trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprague, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) or domestic violence is a common and serious public health problem around the globe. Victims of IPV frequently present to health care practitioners including orthopaedic surgeons. Substantial research has been conducted on IPV over the past few decades, but very

  4. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Dwyer, Robert S.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein−protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multiprotein complexes and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners, causing their sequences to be correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify, from sequence data alone, which proteins are specific interaction partners. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the 3D structures of proteins from sequences. Thus inspired, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from two protein families whose members are known to interact. We first assess the algorithm’s performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. We obtain a striking 0.93 true positive fraction on our complete dataset without any a priori knowledge of interaction partners, and we uncover the origin of this success. We then apply the algorithm to proteins from ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter complexes, and obtain accurate predictions in these systems as well. Finally, we present two metrics that accurately distinguish interacting protein families from noninteracting ones, using only sequence data. PMID:27663738

  5. Self and partner personality in intimate relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, D.P.H.

    Two studies were conducted to examine the relations between both partners' personality and marital quality in married or cohabiting heterosexual couples. In Study 1 (N = 1380, or 690 couples), personality was assessed by means of the Dutch Personality Questionnaire, whereas in Study 2 (N = 564, or

  6. Intimate Partner Violence within Law Enforcement Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Anita S.; Lo, Celia C.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Baltimore Police Stress and Domestic Violence study, the authors examined how exposure to stressful events on the job affects law enforcement employees' physical aggression toward domestic partners, evaluating the role of negative emotions and authoritarian spillover in mediating the impact of such task-related stress. The…

  7. Alcohol Misuse and Multiple Sexual Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Bazargan-Hejazi, PhD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We examine the association between self-reported alcohol misuse and alcohol usewithin 2 hours of having sex and the number of sexual partners among a sample of African-Americanand Latino emergency department (ED patients.Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected prospectively from a randomized sample of all EDpatients during a 5-week period. In face-to-face interviews, subjects were asked to report their alcoholuse and number of sexual partners in the past 12 months. Data were analyzed using multiple variablenegative binomial regression models, and effect modification was assessed through inclusion ofinteraction terms.Results: The 395 study participants reported an average of 1.4 (standard error¼0.11 sexual partnersin the past 12 months, 23% reported misusing alcohol, and 28% reported consuming alcohol beforesex. There was no statistically significant association between alcohol misuse and the number ofsexual partners; however, alcohol before sex was associated with a larger number of sexual partners inthe past year. Moreover, among those who misused alcohol, participants who reported alcohol beforesex were 3 times more likely to report a higher number of sexual partners (risk ratio¼3.2; confidenceinterval [CI]¼1.9–5.6. The association between alcohol use before sex and number of sexual partnersis dependent upon whether a person has attributes of harmful drinking over the past 12 months.Overall, alcohol use before sex increases the number of sexual partners, but the magnitude of thiseffect is significantly increased among alcohol misusers.Conclusion: Alcohol misusers and those who reported having more than 1 sexual partner were morelikely to cluster in the same group, ie, those who used alcohol before sex. Efforts to reduce the burdenof sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus, and other consequences ofrisky sexual behavior in the ED population should be cognizant of the interplay of alcohol and

  8. Determining Mobility Support Advisory Squadron Effectiveness in Support of Building Partner Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    allowing me to sit in their classes and share their outlook. Thanks to Col Eric Watkins, HAF/A3; Ken Arteaga , AETC/A3; and Deo Lachman and Paul...AEAS Col J. Olaf Holm AAA/CC Mrs. Susan Alaniz AFSOS/BPACC Director Col Scott Graham HAF/A3 Mr. Kenneth Arteaga AETC/A3 Col Eric Watkins HAF/A3 Mr

  9. Predictors of dyadic planning: Perspectives of prostate cancer survivors and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jan; Wiedemann, Amelie U; Hohl, Diana Hilda; Scholz, Urte; Burkert, Silke; Schrader, Mark; Knoll, Nina

    2017-02-01

    Extending individual planning of health behaviour change to the level of the dyad, dyadic planning refers to a target person and a planning partner jointly planning the target person's health behaviour change. To date, predictors of dyadic planning have not been systematically investigated. Integrating cognitive predictors of individual planning with four established predictor domains of social support provision, we propose a framework of predictors of dyadic planning. Including target persons' and partners' perspectives, we examine these predictor domains in the context of prostate cancer patients' rehabilitative pelvic floor exercise (PFE) following radical prostatectomy. Longitudinal data from 175 patients and their partners were analysed in a study with four post-surgery assessments across 6 months. PFE-related dyadic planning was assessed from both partners together with indicators from four predictor domains: context, target person, partner, and relationship factors. Individual planning and social support served as covariates. Findings from two-level models nesting repeated assessments in individuals showed that context (patients' incontinence), target person (i.e., positive affect and self-efficacy), and relationship factors (i.e., relationship satisfaction) were uniquely associated with dyadic planning, whereas partner factors (i.e., positive and negative affects) were not. Factors predicting patients' and partners' accounts of dyadic planning differed. Resembling prior findings on antecedents of support provision in this context, partner factors did not prevail as unique predictors of dyadic planning, whereas indicators from all other predictor domains did. To establish predictive direction, future work should use lagged predictions with shorter intermeasurement intervals. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Dyadic planning has been shown to be linked to health behaviour change. However, its role in behaviour regulation

  10. Service Utilization, Perceived Changes of Self, and Life Satisfaction among Women Who Experienced Intimate Partner Abuse: The Mediation Effect of Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li-yu

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the growth experiences of women abused by their intimate partner, specifically focusing on the associations between social services and empowerment, perceived changes of self, and life satisfaction. The potential effects of demographic variables, social support, coping, and experience of partner abuse were also explored. A…

  11. Service Utilization, Perceived Changes of Self, and Life Satisfaction among Women Who Experienced Intimate Partner Abuse: The Mediation Effect of Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li-yu

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the growth experiences of women abused by their intimate partner, specifically focusing on the associations between social services and empowerment, perceived changes of self, and life satisfaction. The potential effects of demographic variables, social support, coping, and experience of partner abuse were also explored. A…

  12. A web-based self-help intervention for partners of cancer patients based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy : a protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohle, Nadine; Drossaert, Constance H. C.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.; Hagedoorn, Mariet; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a growing recognition that cancer not only affects the lives of the patients, but also the lives of their partners. Partners of cancer patients are highly involved in the illness trajectory by providing informal care and they often experience distress. However, supporting interv

  13. Number of sexual partners and sexual assertiveness predict sexual victimization: do more partners equal more risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dave P; Messman-Moore, Terri L; Ward, Rose Marie

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies, number of sexual partners and sexual assertiveness were examined as independent risk factors for sexual victimization among college women. Using a sample of 335 college women, this study examined the interaction of number of sexual partners and sexual assertiveness on verbal sexual coercion and rape. Approximately 32% of the sample reported unwanted sexual intercourse, 6.9% (n = 23) experienced verbal sexual coercion, 17.9% (n = 60) experienced rape, and 7.2% (n = 24) experienced both. As number of sexual partners increased, instances of verbal sexual coercion increased for women low in relational sexual assertiveness but not for women high in relational sexual assertiveness. A similar relationship was not found for rape. Among women who experienced both verbal sexual coercion and rape, increases in number of partners in the context of low refusal and relational assertiveness were associated with increases in verbal sexual coercion and rape. Findings suggest sexual assertiveness is related to fewer experiences of sexual coercion.

  14. Partner dependency and intimate partner abuse: A sociocultural grounding of spousal abuse in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, Stephen Baffour

    2015-01-01

    While sociocultural scholarship has attempted an ecological explanation of intimate partner violence, it has largely been criticized for ignoring dispositional factors of both perpetrators and victims. Dependent personality and attachment-related emotional problems have been implicated in the ext......While sociocultural scholarship has attempted an ecological explanation of intimate partner violence, it has largely been criticized for ignoring dispositional factors of both perpetrators and victims. Dependent personality and attachment-related emotional problems have been implicated...... of dependency and attachment-related spousal violence as a form of a psychopathology. This article discusses partner dependency and jealousy-motivated spousal violence as socioculturally situated, dependent on contextual and relational conditions of meaning embedded in the communal society of Ghana....... It highlights Ghanaian communal personality, gendered socialization and meaning systems of marriage as salient sociocultural features for conceptualizing partner dependency and emotional-related spousal violence....

  15. Ants use partner specific odors to learn to recognize a mutualistic partner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru K Hojo

    Full Text Available Regulation via interspecific communication is an important for the maintenance of many mutualisms. However, mechanisms underlying the evolution of partner communication are poorly understood for many mutualisms. Here we show, in an ant-lycaenid butterfly mutualism, that attendant ants selectively learn to recognize and interact cooperatively with a partner. Workers of the ant Pristomyrmex punctatus learn to associate cuticular hydrocarbons of mutualistic Narathura japonica caterpillars with food rewards and, as a result, are more likely to tend the caterpillars. However, the workers do not learn to associate the cuticular hydrocarbons of caterpillars of a non-ant-associated lycaenid, Lycaena phlaeas, with artificial food rewards. Chemical analysis revealed cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of the mutualistic caterpillars were complex compared with those of non-ant-associated caterpillars. Our results suggest that partner-recognition based on partner-specific chemical signals and cognitive abilities of workers are important mechanisms underlying the evolution and maintenance of mutualism with ants.

  16. Direct observation of supported W bis-methylidene from supported W-methyl/methylidyne species

    KAUST Repository

    Callens, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Extensive solid-state NMR analyses unambiguously determine the formation of silica supported W bis-methylidene methyl species by reaction of the corresponding methyl carbyne with trimethylphosphine or a cyclic olefin. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  17. Rules about casual sex partners, relationship satisfaction, and HIV risk in partnered gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Starks, Tyrel J; Rendina, H Jonathon; Parsons, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The authors used latent class analysis to investigate rules guiding nonmonogamy in partnered gay and bisexual men. Data are from a 2010 survey (N = 463) from which those in relationships (n = 191) were analyzed. More than half (56%) were nonmonogamous, and these men responded to 13 rules about sex outside of their relationship. The safe anonymous sex group (34%) included men who indicated that they must use condoms for anal sex and not have sex with people they know. The communication mandate group (19%) included men who indicated that they must talk about outside partners before sex occurs, disclose their relationship status to outside partners, and use condoms for anal sex. The play together group (9%) included men who indicated that they must play with others as a couple, not have anal sex with outside partners, and not spend the night with outside partners. Those in the no salient rule group (37%) were individuals who did not endorse a clear set of rules. These 4 groups (and compared with monogamous men) differed in age, agreement formality and flexibility, relationship satisfaction, and whether anal sex recently occurred with casual partners. This study provides a novel approach for understanding nonmonogamous same-sex relationships and highlights their complexity.

  18. Partner violence victimization and unintended pregnancy in Latina and Asian American women: Analysis using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Susan; Masho, Saba W; Heh, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a pervasive public health problem in the U.S., affecting nearly one in every three women over their lifetimes. Using structural equation modeling, we evaluated the association between IPV and unintended pregnancy, mediated by condom use and perceived spousal/partner support among Latina and Asian women. Data came from the 2002-2003 National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS). The analysis was restricted to married or cohabiting female respondents aged 18+ years (n = 1,595). Dependent variables included unintended pregnancy, condom use, and perceived partner support. Independent variables included physical abuse or threats by current partner and primary decision-maker. Weighted least squares was used to fit path models to data comprising dichotomous and ordinal variables. More than 13% of women reported IPV during their relationship with their partner/spouse. Abused women were twice as likely as non-abused women to have had an unintended pregnancy. This association was partially mediated by perceived partner support. Condom use had a positive, but non-significant association with unintended pregnancy, and IPV had a negative, but non-significant association with condom use. Results highlight the importance of IPV screening for minority women. Efforts to combine family planning and violence prevention services may help reduce unintended pregnancy.

  19. Does his paycheck also matter?: The socioeconomic resources of co-residential partners and entry into parenthood in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Jalovaara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Previous research on fertility has focused on women, and less attention has been paid to men and couples. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to examine how the socioeconomic resources of cohabiting and married partners affect entry into parenthood in a relatively gender-egalitarian welfare society. METHODS The study is based on Finnish register data and uses event-history analysis to predict first births from both partners' socioeconomic characteristics. RESULTS The results show that each partner being employed (as opposed to studying and having a higher income seems to encourage entry into parenthood. As compared to employed couples, either partner being currently unemployed or having recent spells of unemployment had very weak effects, whereas either partner being economically inactive seems to discourage childbearing. Although the resources of male partners also have an effect, the female partner's situation appears to be equally or even more influential. The effects of female partners' characteristics are almost as great when male characteristics are controlled as when they are not, and women's and men's characteristics do not interact with each other. Moreover, with regard to income and educational attainment beyond age 30, for example, the woman's resources have a stronger positive effect than the resources of the male partner. CONCLUSIONS Together with several previous studies from the Nordic countries, this study lends support to the idea that the influence of women's and men's economic resources on family formation are perhaps much more symmetrical than conventional theories suggest. COMMENTS The significance of women's own resources, net of the male partner's resources, suggests that previous studies have not overestimated their positive impact.

  20. Do episodic self- and partner-uncertainty mediate the association between attachment orientations and emotional responses to relationship-threatening events in dating couples?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehuis, Sylvia; Reifman, Alan; Fischer, Judith L; Lee, Kyung-Hee

    2016-09-01

    This study examined relational-uncertainty perceptions (a form of cognitive appraisal) to investigate how partners in 272 heterosexual couples responded emotionally to a relationship-challenging event. Participants rated themselves on attachment anxiety and avoidance. Then, after listing a challenging event, they rated how uncertain it made them about their own and their partner's continued involvement in the relationship. Participants also rated how angry and fearful the event made them. An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model yielded three sets of results. First, actor effects from insecure attachment orientations to episodic relational uncertainty emerged. Second, proposed mediation between attachment orientations and emotional reactions by uncertainty was partially supported (perceived partner-uncertainty partially mediated the positive association of anxious attachment and fear, and self-uncertainty partially mediated the positive relation between avoidant attachment and anger). Finally, a partner effect was found between one couple member's avoidant attachment and the other's perceived partner uncertainty. Men and women exhibited similar findings.

  1. Gay men and intimate partner violence: a gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina; Maria, Estephanie Sta; Lohan, Maria; Howard, Terry; Stewart, Donna E; MacMillan, Harriet

    2014-05-01

    Though intimate partner violence (IPV) is predominately understood as a women's health issue most often emerging within heterosexual relationships, there is increasing recognition of the existence of male victims of IPV. In this qualitative study we explored connections between masculinities and IPV among gay men. The findings show how recognising IPV was based on an array of participant experiences, including the emotional, physical and sexual abuse inflicted by their partner, which in turn led to three processes. Normalising and concealing violence referred to the participants' complicity in accepting violence as part of their relationship and their reluctance to disclose that they were victims of IPV. Realising a way out included the participants' understandings that the triggers for, and patterns of, IPV would best be quelled by leaving the relationship. Nurturing recovery detailed the strategies employed by participants to mend and sustain their wellbeing in the aftermath of leaving an abusive relationship. In terms of masculinities and men's health research, the findings reveal the limits of idealising hegemonic masculinities and gender relations as heterosexual, while highlighting a plurality of gay masculinities and the need for IPV support services that bridge the divide between male and female as well as between homosexual and heterosexual. © 2014 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Nurse and midwifery education and intimate partner violence: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, Nerissa; Hooker, Leesa; Reisenhofer, Sonia

    2017-08-01

    This scoping review aims to identify the scope of current literature considering nurse/midwife educational practices in the areas of intimate partner violence to inform future nursing/midwifery educational policy and practice. Intimate partner violence is a global issue affecting a significant portion of the community. Healthcare professionals including nurses/midwives in hospital- and community-based environments are likely to encounter affected women and need educational strategies that support best practice and promote positive outcomes for abused women and their families. Scoping review of relevant literature from January 2000 to July 2015. Search of databases: CINHAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PROQUEST Central and COCHRANE Library. Reference lists from included articles were searched for relevant literature as were several grey literature sources. This review demonstrates low levels of undergraduate or postregistration intimate partner violence education for nursing/midwifery staff and students. Existing intimate partner violence education strategies are varied in implementation, method and content. Outcomes of these educational programmes are not always rigorously evaluated for staff or client-based outcomes. Further research is needed to evaluate existing intimate partner violence education programmes for nurses/midwives and identify the most effective strategies to promote improved clinical practice and outcomes for abused women and their families. Intimate partner violence has a significant social and public health impact. The World Health Organization has identified the need to ensure that healthcare professionals are adequately trained to meet the needs of abused women. Intimate partner violence education programmes, commencing at undergraduate studies for nurses/midwives, need to be implemented with rigorously evaluated programmes to ensure they meet identified objectives, promote best practice and improve care for abused women. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Role of male partners in the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osoti A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alfred Osoti,1–3 Hannah Han,4 John Kinuthia,1,5 Carey Farquhar3,4,6 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, AIC Kijabe Hospital, Kijabe, Kenya; 3Department of Epidemiology, 4Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, USA; 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya; 6Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA Abstract: There is emerging evidence that in resource-limited settings with a high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV burden, male partner involvement in prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT is associated with improved uptake of effective interventions and infant HIV-free survival. There is also increasing evidence that male partner involvement positively impacts non-HIV related outcomes, such as skilled attendance at delivery, exclusive breastfeeding, uptake of effective contraceptives, and infant immunizations. Despite these associations, male partner involvement remains low, especially when offered in the standard antenatal clinic setting. In this review we explore strategies for improving rates of antenatal male partner HIV testing and argue that the role of male partners in PMTCT must evolve from one of support for HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women to one of comprehensive engagement in prevention of primary HIV acquisition, avoidance of unintended pregnancies, and improved HIV-related care and treatment for the HIV-infected and uninfected women, their partners, and children. Involving men in all components of PMTCT has potential to contribute substantially to achieving virtual elimination of mother-to-child HIV transmission; promoting partner-friendly programs and policies, as well as pursuing research into numerous gaps in knowledge identified in this review, will help drive this process. Keywords: male involvement, limited-resource settings

  4. Individual, partner, and partnership level correlates of anal sex among youth in Baltimore City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Luciana E; Lilleston, Pamela S; Jennings, Jacky M; Sherman, Susan G

    2015-04-01

    Anal sex is an efficient mode of STI transmission and studies indicate that anal sex is common among heterosexuals, including adolescents. We examined the association between individual, partner, and sexual partnership-level characteristics with anal sex among a household survey of 263 individuals aged 15-24 years in Baltimore City, Maryland. We used weighted multiple logistic regression to examine correlates of anal sex in a heterosexual partnership by gender. Twenty-nine percent of males and 15% of females reported anal sex in a partnership in the past 6 months. For males, anal sex was associated with having two or more partners in the past 3 months (AOR = 13.93, 95% CI 3.87-50.12), having been tested for HIV (AOR = 0.30, 95% CI 0.12-0.72), and oral sex with a partner (AOR = 8.79, 95% CI 1.94-39.78). For females, anal sex was associated with reporting having a main partner (AOR = 6.74, 95% CI 1.74-23.65), partner meeting place (AOR = 3.03, 95% CI 1.04-8.82), partner history of STI (AOR = 0.20, 95% CI 0.05-0.85), and oral sex with a partner (AOR = 8.47, 95% CI 1.08-66.25). Anal sex was associated with inconsistent condom use for both males (OR = 5.77, 95% CI 1.68-19.79) and females (OR = 5.16, 95% CI 1.46-18.30). We conclude that anal sex is a prevalent risk behavior among heterosexual youth and is associated with a range of factors at the individual and partnership levels. These findings provide support for comprehensive sex education that includes information about anal sex; findings from this study can inform public health campaigns targeting youth at risk for STIs.

  5. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) is an ongoing, nationally representative survey to assess experiences of intimate partner violence,...

  6. Intimate partner violence and mental health in Bolivia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meekers, Dominique; Pallin, Sarah C; Hutchinson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Latin America has among the highest rates of intimate partner violence. While there is increasing evidence that intimate partner violence is associated with mental health problems, there is little such research for developing countries...

  7. Positive illusions about a partner's personality and relationship quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown individuals to hold positive biases about their relationships. The present study examined positive illusions about a partner's specific personality characteristics in relation to relationship quality and personality. Both partners of 120 heterosexual couples participated

  8. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey: 2010 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey CDC’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) is an ongoing, nationally-representative telephone survey that collects detailed ...

  9. HIV Treatment Protects Uninfected Partner from The Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html HIV Treatment Protects Uninfected Partner From the Virus Study of gay couples duplicates findings of earlier ... HealthDay News) -- HIV treatment prevented transmission of the virus in gay couples when only one partner had ...

  10. Positive illusions about a partner's personality and relationship quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    Previous studies have shown individuals to hold positive biases about their relationships. The present study examined positive illusions about a partner's specific personality characteristics in relation to relationship quality and personality. Both partners of 120 heterosexual couples participated

  11. Compassionate love for a romantic partner, love styles and subjective well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Neto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently a compassionate love scale was developed to assess compassionate love or altruistic love for different targets (e.g., romantic partner, close others and all the humanity; Sprecher & Fehr, 2005. This study was conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the Compassionate Love Scale in the Portuguese context. In addition, it has been examined how compassionate love for a romantic partner was related to socio-demographic variables, love styles, and subjective well-being. Two hundred and eighty one men and women participated (42% of women with a mean age of 21.89. All participants were currently in a romantic relationship. The Compassionate Love Scale shows satisfactory psychometric properties. Furthermore, our predictions were supported, as those who experience high levels of compassionate love for a romantic partner are more likely to report Eros and altruistic love (Agape, and subjective well-being.

  12. Hazardous alcohol use and intimate partner aggression among dating couples: the role of impulse control difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Laura E; Maldonado, Rosalita C; DiLillo, David

    2014-01-01

    To date, research identifying moderators of the alcohol-intimate partner aggression (IPA) relationship has focused almost exclusively on male-perpetrated aggression, without accounting for the dyadic processes of IPA. The current study examined hazardous alcohol use and impulse control difficulties as predictors of IPA among a sample of 73 heterosexual dating couples. Both actor and partner effects of these risk factors on physical and psychological aggression were examined. Results indicated that impulse control difficulties were an important actor and partner predictor of both physical and psychological aggression. Findings supported the multiple threshold model such that the interaction between impulse control difficulties and hazardous alcohol use significantly predicted physical aggression severity. These results suggest the importance of targeting impulse control difficulties and hazardous alcohol use in IPA treatment, as well as the advantages of examining risk factors of IPA within a dyadic rather than individual framework.

  13. The Prototype of Indicators of a Responsive Partner Shapes Information Processing: A False Recognition Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    When judging whether a relationship partner can be counted on to "be there" when needed, people may draw upon knowledge structures to process relevant information. We examined one such knowledge structure using the prototype methodology: indicators of a partner who is likely to be there when needed. In the first study (N = 91), the structure, content, and reliability of the prototype of indicators were examined. Then, using a false recognition study (N = 77), we demonstrated that once activated, the prototype of indicators of a partner who is likely to be there when needed affects information processing. Thus, the prototype of indicators may shape how people process support-relevant information in everyday life, affecting relationship outcomes. Using this knowledge structure may help a person process relevant information quickly and with cognitive economy. However, it may also lead to biases in judgments in certain situations.

  14. Performance improvement with patient service partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J P

    1998-01-01

    Once the decision is made to use a patient-focused care delivery system, a variety of methods can be used to successfully design the model. The author describes the process used by a multilevel, multidisciplinary team at a community hospital to design and implement a Service Partner role that would meet and exceed customer expectations. Demonstrated performance improvements included increased patient satisfaction, productive labor dollar savings, and improvements in the work environment for staff members.

  15. Unperceived intimate partner violence and women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonego, Michela; Gandarillas, Ana; Zorrilla, Belén; Lasheras, Luisa; Pires, Marisa; Anes, Ana; Ordobás, María

    2013-01-01

    Women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) often do not perceive themselves as abused. This study sought to estimate the health effects of unperceived IPV (uIPV), taking violence-free women as the reference, and to compare the effects of uIPV with those of perceived IPV (pIPV). We performed a cross-sectional population study through telephone interviews of 2835 women aged 18 to 70 years living in the region of Madrid and having an ongoing intimate partner relationship or contact with a former partner in the preceding year. Based on 26 questions from the Conflict Tactics Scale-1 and the Enquête Nacional sur les Violences envers les Femmes en France and the question "Do you feel abused by your partner?" a variable was constructed in three categories, namely, the absence of IPV, uIPV and pIPV. Using logistic regression, we analyzed the association between health problems, medication use, health-service utilization and IPV (perceived and unperceived) vis-à-vis the absence of IPV. There were 247 cases of uIPV and 96 of pIPV (prevalences of 8.8% and 3.4%, respectively). The multivariate analysis showed that a substantial number of the outcomes explored were associated with uIPV, pIPV, or both. The highest odds ratios (ORs) were obtained for depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9≥10) (uIPV: OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.4-3.8; and pIPV: 4.1, 95%CI 2.5-6.8). In most problems, the ORs did not significantly differ between the two types of IPV. uIPV is 2.6 times more frequent than pIPV and is associated with at least as many health problems as pIPV. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Capitalizing on the success of romantic partners : A laboratory investigation on subjective, facial, and physiological emotional processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montfort, S.S.; Kaczmarek, L.D.; Kashdan, T.B.; Drążkowski, D.; Kosakowski, M.; Guzik, P.; Krauze, T.; Gracanin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Receiving a constructive, supportive response from romantic partners after sharing good news has been shown to magnify the positivity of events and predict healthy relationship outcomes. We conducted a laboratory social interaction to determine whether supportive responses to success led to changes

  17. Linking Syndemic Stress and Behavioral Indicators of Main Partner HIV Transmission Risk in Gay Male Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Tyrel J; Tuck, Andrew N; Millar, Brett M; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine whether syndemic stress in partnered gay men might undermine communication processes essential to the utilization of negotiated safety and other harm reduction strategies that rely on partners' HIV status disclosure. Participants included 100 gay male couples (N = 200 individuals) living in the U.S., who responded to an online survey. Participants completed measures of five syndemic factors (depression, poly-drug use, childhood sexual abuse, intimate partner violence, and sexual compulsivity). They also reported on whether condoms were used during first intercourse together and the timing of first condomless anal intercourse (CAI) relative to HIV disclosure in their relationship. Results of binary logistic regression analyses supported the hypothesis that the sum of partners' syndemic stress was negatively associated with condom use at first intercourse and with HIV disclosure prior to first CAI. Syndemic stress may contribute to HIV transmission risk between main partners in part because it accelerates the progression to CAI and interferes with communication processes central to harm reduction strategies utilized by gay men in relationships. Implications for prevention strategies and couples interventions, such as couples HIV counseling and testing, that facilitate communication skill-building, are discussed.

  18. HIV-related intimate partner violence among pregnant women in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyginus, Ezegwui; Chukwuemeka, Iyoke; Lawrence, Ikeako; Sunday, Mbah

    2012-03-01

    To compare the prevalences and patterns of intimate partner violence between HIV-positive and HIV-negative pregnant women receiving prenatal care at a tertiary hospital in South East Nigeria A comparative cross-sectional study of HIV-positive and HIV-negative pregnant women was done. Statistical analysis was by descriptive and inferential statistics at 95% level of confidence A total of 220 pregnant women studied. These were equally divided between HIV-positive women (cases) and HIV-negative women (controls). Cases did not differ significantly from controls with respect to age, parity, tribe, religion, marital status, monthly family income. HIV positive respondents experienced physical violence in the course of the index pregnancy six times more than controls; sexual violence about 4 times more than controls and were 12 times more likely to be denied sex by their partner compared to controls. Threat of being hurt, deprivation of financial support and denial of communication were the commonest forms of intimate partner violence among HIV-positive pregnant women and these also occurred significantly more among HIV positive women than the controls. HIV-positive status predisposes pregnant women to increased intimate partner violence more of emotional nature further underlying the enormity of social rejection suffered as a result of HIV infection. Intimate partner violence screening should form part of their routine antenatal care

  19. Patterns in PARTNERing across Public Health Collaboratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A. Bevc

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inter-organizational networks represent one of the most promising practice-based approaches in public health as a way to attain resources, share knowledge, and, in turn, improve population health outcomes. However, the interdependencies and effectiveness related to the structure, management, and costs of these networks represents a critical item to be addressed. The objective of this research is to identify and determine the extent to which potential partnering patterns influence the structure of collaborative networks. This study examines data collected by PARTNER, specifically public health networks (n = 162, to better understand the structured relationships and interactions among public health organizations and their partners, in relation to collaborative activities. Combined with descriptive analysis, we focus on the composition of public health collaboratives in a series of Exponential Random Graph (ERG models to examine the partnerships between different organization types to identify the attribute-based effects promoting the formation of network ties within and across collaboratives. We found high variation within and between these collaboratives including composition, diversity, and interactions. The findings of this research suggest common and frequent types of partnerships, as well as opportunities to develop new collaborations. The result of this analysis offer additional evidence to inform and strengthen public health practice partnerships.

  20. Intimate partner violence is everyone's problem, but how should we ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    feel fortunate to have a partner, that they would never cope with- out their partner or are ... pelvic pain). • Vague ... Has your partner ever threatened you or forced you to do some- thing you didn't want ... My patient is being abused – now what?

  1. Logistics in Security Force Assistance: Sustainable Partner Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    original hypothesis of this paper was that efforts to build partner capacity historically only included sustainment training in a limited fashion . The...LOGISTICS IN SECURITY FORCE ASSISTANCE: SUSTAINABLE PARTNER DEVELOPMENT A Monograph by MAJ J. Troy Fisher United...Logistics in Security Force Assistance: Sustainable Partner Development 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  2. Trends in Intimate Partner Violence: 1980-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Rachael A.; Kaukinen, Catherine Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Research on trends in partner violence has primarily relied on official measures of victimization focusing primarily on women's risk for intimate partner homicide. The current study uses 28 years of data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to examine the trends of intimate partner violence against female victims and identify…

  3. Positive illusions about a partner's physical attractiveness and relationship quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined the existence of positive illusions about a partner's physical attractiveness and its relations to relationship quality. Positive illusions were assumed to exist when individuals rated their partner as more attractive than their partner rated him or herself. In two Dutc

  4. Positive illusions about a partner's physical attractiveness and relationship quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    The present research examined the existence of positive illusions about a partner's physical attractiveness and its relations to relationship quality. Positive illusions were assumed to exist when individuals rated their partner as more attractive than their partner rated him or herself. In two

  5. Partner's Stake in Conformity and Abused Wives' Psychological Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaris, Alfred; Kaukinen, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the potential buffering effect of help-seeking in the association between intimate partner assault and women's psychological trauma, and how this, in turn, may depend on the partner's stake in conformity. The sample consists of 374 women reporting the experience of domestic violence from a current intimate partner, drawn…

  6. Innovation durch Partnering im deutschen Schlüsselfertigbau

    OpenAIRE

    Schmolke, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In der angloamerikanischen Baubranche werden bereits seit Jahren innovative Managementkonzepte zur Steuerung partnerschaftlicher Kooperationen nach dem Leitgedanken des Partnering zwischen Haupt- und Nachunternehmern im Schlüsselfertigbau erfolgreich umgesetzt. Hierzulande bleibt der Einsatz derartiger Partnering-Modelle bislang jedoch weitgehend unbeachtet. Das Ziel der Arbeit besteht daher darin, wesentliche Elemente und Erfahrungen des angloamerikanischen Partnering-Konzeptes im Hinb...

  7. 45 CFR 162.915 - Trading partner agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trading partner agreements. 162.915 Section 162... REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS General Provisions for Transactions § 162.915 Trading partner agreements. A covered entity must not enter into a trading partner agreement that would do any of...

  8. Centralized Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2011-01-01

      With the complexities surrounding the choice of decentralized vs. centralized labs, as well as the most optimal use of biomarkers in clinical trials, choosing the right lab or CRO partner is paramount...

  9. Rebuild America Partner Update, January--February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    Rebuild America Partner Update, the bimonthly newsletter about the Rebuild America community, covers partnership activities, industry trends, and program news. Rebuild America is a network of community partnerships--made up of local governments and businesses--that save money by saving energy. These voluntary partnerships, working with the US Department of Energy, choose the best ways to improve the energy efficiency of commercial, government and apartment buildings. Rebuild America supports them with business and technical tools and customized assistance. By the year 2003, 250 Rebuild America partnerships will be involved in over 2 billion square feet of building renovations, which will save $650 million every year in energy costs, generate $3 billion in private community investment, create 26,000 new private sector jobs, and reduce air pollution by 1.6 million tons of carbon dioxide a year.

  10. PARTNeR: A Tool for Outreach and Teaching Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Juan Ángel Vaquerizo; Fuertes, Carmen Blasco

    PARTNeR is an acronym for Proyecto Académico con el Radio Telescopio de NASA en Robledo (Academic Project with the NASA Radio Telescope at Robledo). It is intended for general Astronomy outreach and, in particular, radioastronomy, throughout Spanish educational centres. To satisfy this target, a new educational material has been developed in 2007 to help not only teachers but also students. This material supports cross curricular programs and provides with the possibility of including Astronomy in related subjects like Physics, Chemistry, Technology, Mathematics or even English language. In this paper, the material that has been developed will be shown in detail and how it can be adapted to the disciplines from 4th year ESO (Enseñanza Secundaria Obligatoria-Compulsory Secondary Education) to High School. The pedagogic results obtained for the first year it has been implemented with students in classrooms will also be presented.

  11. Eclipse 2017: Partnering with NASA MSFC to Inspire Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Craig " Ghee" Adams, Mitzi; Gallagher, Dennis; Krause, Linda

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is partnering with the U.S. Space and Rocket Center (USSRC), and Austin Peay State University (APSU) to engage citizen scientists, engineers, and students in science investigations during the 2017 American Solar Eclipse. Investigations will support the Citizen Continental America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE), Ham Radio Science Citizen Investigation(HamSCI), and Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiments (INSPIRE). All planned activities will engage Space Campers and local high school students in the application of the scientific method as they seek to explore a wide range of observations during the eclipse. Where planned experiments touch on current scientific questions, the camper/students will be acting as citizen scientists, participating with researchers from APSU and MSFC. Participants will test their expectations and after the eclipse, share their results, experiences, and conclusions to younger Space Campers at the US Space & Rocket Center.

  12. Employment status and intimate partner violence among Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas-Carrillo, Elizabeth C; McWhirter, Paula T

    2015-04-01

    Exploring risk factors and profiles of intimate partner violence in other countries provides information about whether existing theories of this phenomenon hold consistent in different cultural settings. This study will present results of a regression analysis involving domestic violence among Mexican women (n = 83,159). Significant predictors of domestic violence among Mexican women included age, number of children in the household, income, education, self-esteem, family history of abuse, and controlling behavior of the husband. Women's employment status was not a significant predictor when all variables were included in the model; however, when controlling behavior of the husband was withdrawn from the model, women's employment status was a significant predictor of domestic violence toward women. Results from this research indicate that spousal controlling behavior may serve as a mediator of the predictive relationship between women's employment status and domestic violence among Mexican women. Findings provide support for continued exploration of the factors that mediate experiences of domestic violence among women worldwide.

  13. Partner notification for sexually transmitted infections and perception of notified partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elani Graça Ferreira Cavalcante

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Learn the perceptions of patients with sexually transmitted infections and sexual partners who are notified of the infection. METHOD A descriptive and qualitative study, based on the collective subject discourse technique, was conducted in four healthcare centers of reference in Fortaleza, Ceará, from March to July 2014. The sample comprised 21 subjects (11 index patients and 10 notified partners. RESULTS The index patients reported complicity, concern about the partner's health and revelation of diagnosis aiming to preserve the relationship. The partners showed antagonistic perceptions: tranquility-betrayal, fear of death, of incurability and the diagnosis, especially of HIV. The reasons for coming to a healthcare center were: fear of being sick, attenuation of guilt of infection transmission, need for diagnosis, early start of treatment. CONCLUSION Fear of losing trust, insecurities when dealing with a sexual infection and being responsible or co-responsible for the transmission were the predominant feelings. Various types of partner notification were reported (verbal, telephone, notification card, according to individual convenience. This study suggests the use of alternative methods of notification and an integrated system of notification.

  14. The influences of partner accuracy and partner memory ability on social false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numbers, Katya T; Meade, Michelle L; Perga, Vladimir A

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examined whether increasing the proportion of false information suggested by a confederate would influence the magnitude of socially introduced false memories in the social contagion paradigm Roediger, Meade, & Bergman (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 8:365-371, 2001). One participant and one confederate collaboratively recalled items from previously studied household scenes. During collaboration, the confederate interjected 0 %, 33 %, 66 %, or 100 % false items. On subsequent individual-recall tests across three experiments, participants were just as likely to incorporate misleading suggestions from a partner who was mostly accurate (33 % incorrect) as they were from a partner who was not at all accurate (100 % incorrect). Even when participants witnessed firsthand that their partner had a very poor memory on a related memory task, they were still as likely to incorporate the confederate's entirely misleading suggestions on subsequent recall and recognition tests (Exp. 2). Only when participants witnessed firsthand that their partner had a very poor memory on a practice test of the experimental task itself were they able to reduce false memory, and this reduction occurred selectively on a subsequent individual recognition test (Exp. 3). These data demonstrate that participants do not always consider their partners' memory ability when working on collaborative memory tasks.

  15. Romantic Partners, Friends, Friends with Benefits, and Casual Acquaintances As Sexual Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Wyndol; Shaffer, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to provide a detailed examination of sexual behavior with different types of partners. A sample of 163 young adults reported on their light nongenital, heavy nongenital, and genital sexual activity with romantic partners, friends, and casual acquaintances. They described their sexual activity with “friends with benefits” as well as with friends in general. Young adults were most likely to engage in sexual behavior with romantic partners, but sexual behavior also often occurred with some type of nonromantic partner. More young adults engaged in some form of sexual behavior with casual acquaintances than with friends with benefits. The frequencies of sexual behavior, however, were greater with friends with benefits than with friends or casual acquaintances. Interview and questionnaire data revealed that friends with benefits were typically friends, but not necessarily. Nonsexual activities were also less common with friends with benefits than other friends. Taken together, the findings illustrate the value of differentiating among different types of nonromantic partners and different levels of sexual behavior. PMID:21128155

  16. Intimate Partner Violence: The Lived Experience of Single Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Laura; Scott-Tilley, Donna

    2017-03-01

    Research in intimate partner violence has focused on married, cohabiting, adolescents, or college aged women. The experience of intimate partner violence by single women has not been studied separately from other groups of women. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used with feminist inquiry to gain insight into the experience of intimate partner violence by single women. The overarching theme was control and manipulation by the abuser. Subthemes included not feeling safe, poor communication skills, and caretaking. Nurses need to be aware of the occurrence of intimate partner violence in male and female partnered relationships to provide comprehensive and nonjudgmental care.

  17. Intimate partner violence perpetrated by young adult women against men in Ukraine: Examining individual, familial, and cultural factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabukha, Iryna; Krishnakumar, Ambika; Narine, Lutchmie

    2016-07-01

    We examined the role of financial strain, parent-to-parent violence, parent-to-child violence, emotional distress, and alcohol use in intimate partner violence perpetrated by young adult women against men in Ukraine. The moderating role of acceptability of intimate partner violence and violence-related laws and regulations was also examined. Four hundred and six full-time female university students from four universities in Ukraine participated in the study. We found that emotional distress, parent-to-parent, and parent-to-child violence mediated the link between financial strain and intimate partner violence perpetrated by women on men. However, we found limited support for the moderating role of acceptability of intimate partner violence and violence-related laws and regulations in the relationship between individual and familial factors on intimate partner violence. The findings from this investigation suggest that there is a distinct need for supporting families and individuals in dealing with issues of intimate partner violence directed by women against men in Ukraine. Aggr. Behav. 42:380-393, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Similarity between partners in real and perceived personality traits as measured by the Myers-Briggs type indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordvik, H

    1996-12-01

    From 90 couples, 90 male and 90 female subjects, two sets of scores on the four personality dimensions measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) were obtained by letting each person answer each item twice, first in the ordinary way and then as he or she believed the partner would answer the item. Correlations between partners' self-reported scores were all close to zero, whereas the correlations between the partner-reported scores and the self-reported scores were high for both males and females and for all the four dimensions measured by the MBTI, thus indicating that partners were not similar in personality traits, but they had a realistic perception of each other. The results support the hypothesis that mating is random in terms of personality traits.

  19. [Factors associated with smoking continuation or cessation in men upon learning of their partner's pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouketsu, Tomomi; Gokan, Yoko; Ishihara, Takako; Tamaoki, Mariko; Gotoh, Tadao; Kobayashi, Suzuka

    2013-04-01

    Factors associated with smoking continuation or cessation were analyzed among parents of 4-month-old infants, in order to prepare the basic materials for a smoking cessation support program for pregnant women and their partners. The study focused on the changes in partners' smoking activities upon learning of their partner's pregnancy. An anonymous self-completed questionnaire was given to parents of 1,198 infants during a 4-month medical checkup in City A of Hyogo prefecture (776 couples) and City B of Gifu prefecture (422 couples). The questionnaire items collected information on age, education, smoking history, current smoking status, and awareness about smoking. The additional items for fathers were occupation, workplace smoking environment, and attitude toward smoking; and the additional items for women were number of children, family composition, and partners' attitudes and behaviors regarding smoking upon learning of their pregnancy. The number of valid answers (for pairs) was 558 (71.9%) in City A and 395 (93.6%) in City B. The data on men who had been smokers before learning of their partner's pregnancy were analyzed. For each area, a comparative item-by-item analysis was performed on data from men who ceased smoking upon learning of the pregnancy (smoking cessation group) and those who continued smoking (smoking continuation group). For logistic regression analysis, the objective variables were the 2 groups, and the explanatory variables were the items showing statistical differences between the groups and the items related to the survey areas. Of the men whose data were included in the analysis, 210 (37.6%) in City A and 204 (51.6%) in City B had been smokers before learning of their partner's pregnancy. Among these, 16 (7.6%) in City A and 26 (12.7%) in City B ceased smoking after learning of the pregnancy. The results of logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio for continuing smoking was 2.77 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-6.57] for

  20. Exploring gender norms, agency and intimate partner violence among displaced Colombian women: A qualitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Michelle E; Sterk, Claire E; Hennink, Monique; Patel, Shilpa; DePadilla, Lara; Yount, Kathryn M

    2016-01-01

    Women displaced by conflict are often exposed to many factors associated with a risk of intimate partner violence (IPV) such as high levels of community violence and the breakdown of social support systems. Previous research found that Colombian women perceived IPV to increase after displacement. This study explored how the experience of displacement altered gendered roles in ways that influenced the risk of IPV. Thirty-three qualitative interviews were conducted with displaced partnered Colombian women. Women disclosed that couples often held patriarchal gender norms; however, the roles of each partner necessitated by conditions of displacement were often in conflict with these norms. Men's underemployment and women's employment outside the home were viewed as gender transgressive within some partnerships and increased relationship conflict. Economic resources intended to empower displaced women, notably women's earnings and home ownership, had unintended negative consequences for women's agency. These consequences included a corresponding decrease in partner financial contributions and reduced mobility. Women's ability to obtain support or leave violent relationships was hindered by interpersonal, social and structural barriers. For women to have agency to leave violent relationships, power relationships at all levels from the interpersonal to societal must be recognised and addressed.

  1. Type D personality is associated with increased anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and their partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; van Domburg, Ron T; Theuns, Dominic A M J;

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and their partners, and the role of personality factors and social support as determinants of distress.......We investigated the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and their partners, and the role of personality factors and social support as determinants of distress....

  2. Decision Support Services provided by the NWS Alaska Regional Operations Center in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breukelen, C. M.; Osiensky, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The NWS Alaska Region's Regional Operations Center (AR ROC) provides a variety of decision support services to partners and customers across the state. The AR ROC is virtual most times but can flex to stand up support for partners as needed. Support can vary from briefings over the phone or in person to dedicated virtual support to providing on-site meteorologist at an Emergency Operations Center or Incident Command Post to provide tailored support services. During 2015 there have been a number of situations where the AR ROC provided unique support services. This presentation will outline a few examples of how these unique support services benefitted partner agency decisions.

  3. Facebook tells me so: applying the theory of planned behavior to understand partner-monitoring behavior on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvell, Millie J; Walsh, Shari P; White, Katherine M

    2011-12-01

    The social networking site (SNS) Facebook is becoming increasingly recognized as a medium through which individuals can investigate and monitor others' activities. However, little is known about whether Facebook monitoring behavior occurs within romantic relationships and, accordingly, the psychological predictors of this behavior. The present study employed an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework including self-esteem, partner trust, and demographic characteristics, to predict frequent Facebook partner-monitoring. Facebook users (N=244) in romantic relationships completed measures assessing the standard TPB constructs (attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control), additional predictor variables (self-esteem and partner trust), and demographic characteristics (age, gender, relationship length, daily Facebook logins, and time spent per login). One week later, participants reported their level of Facebook partner-monitoring during the previous week. Regression analyses supported the standard TPB constructs of attitude and subjective norm in predicting intentions to engage in frequent Facebook partner-monitoring, with intention, in turn, predicting behavior. Partner trust, but not self-esteem, significantly predicted frequent Facebook partner-monitoring intentions. Of the demographic characteristics, daily Facebook logins significantly predicted both intention and behavior and, unexpectedly, relationship length directly affected behavior. Overall, the current study revealed that frequent Facebook partner-monitoring is influenced by attitudinal, normative, and relational factors and, potentially, increased visits to Facebook. These findings provide a new understanding of an individual's use of the world's leading SNS to monitor their partner's activities and provide a foundation for future studies to investigate the potential negative implications this activity may have for those in romantic relationships.

  4. Associations of Partner Age Gap at Sexual Debut with Teenage Parenthood and Lifetime Number of Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masho, Saba W; Chambers, Gregory J; Wallenborn, Jordyn T; Ferrance, Jacquelyn L

    2017-06-01

    Age at sexual debut and age gap between partners at debut are modifiable characteristics that may be related to risky sexual behaviors. Understanding any such relationships is a necessary first step toward strengthening risk interventions. Age at sexual debut and partner age gap were examined for 3,154 female and 2,713 male respondents to the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth who first had intercourse before age 18. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess associations between these measures and teenage parenthood and reporting a high lifetime number of partners (i.e., a number above the sample median). Females' odds of teenage parenthood were elevated if sexual debut occurred at ages 15-17 and involved a partner age gap of 3-4 years (odds ratio, 1.8) or more (2.0); they were reduced if debut occurred before age 15 and the gap was 3-4 years (0.8). Females' likelihood of reporting a high lifetime number of partners was negatively associated with age gap (0.4-0.7, depending on age at debut and length of age gap). Males' likelihood of reporting a large number of partners was positively associated with age gap if sexual debut was before age 15 and the gap was five or more years (1.7) or if debut was at ages 15-17 and involved a 3-4-year gap (2.0). Identifying the mechanisms underlying these associations could inform program design and implementation. Copyright © 2017 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  5. Partner experiences of "near-miss" events in pregnancy and childbirth in the UK: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Hinton

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Severe life-threatening complications in pregnancy that require urgent medical intervention are commonly known as "near-miss" events. Although these complications are rare (1 in 100 births, there are potentially 8,000 women and their families in the UK each year who live through a life-threatening emergency and its aftermath. Near-miss obstetric emergencies can be traumatic and frightening for women, and their impact can last for years. There is little research that has explored how these events impact on partners. The objective of this interview study was to explore the impact of a near-miss obstetric emergency, focusing particularly on partners. DESIGN: Qualitative study based on narrative interviews, video and audio recorded and transcribed for analysis. A qualitative interpretative approach was taken, combining thematic analysis with constant comparison. The analysis presented here focuses on the experiences of partners. PARTICIPANTS: Maximum variation sample included 35 women, 10 male partners, and one lesbian partner who had experienced a life-threatening obstetric emergency. SETTING: Interviews were conducted in participants' own homes. RESULTS: In the hospital, partner experiences were characterized by powerlessness and exclusion. Partners often found witnessing the emergency shocking and distressing. Support (from family or staff was very important, and clear, honest communication from medical staff highly valued. The long-term emotional effects for some were profound; some experienced depression, flashbacks and post-traumatic stress disorder months and years after the emergency. These, in turn, affected the whole family. Little support was felt to be available, nor acknowledgement of their ongoing distress. CONCLUSION: Partners, as well as women giving birth, can be shocked to experience a life-threatening illness in childbirth. While medical staff may view a near-miss as a positive outcome for a woman and her baby, there

  6. Community Partners for Healthy Farming Intervention Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, J; Palermo, T

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of the Community Partners for Healthy Farming Intervention Research (CPHF-IR) program is to implement and evaluate existing or new interventions for reduction of agriculture-related injuries, hazards, and illnesses. Objectives include the development of active partnerships between experienced researchers, communities, workers, managers, agricultural organizations, agribusinesses, and other stakeholders. Specific intervention projects were selected by the competitive review process in response to a request for proposals. The second series of projects (funded 2000-2003) targeted: improved ergonomics for handling grapes (CA) and for small-scale berry growers (WI, IA, MI, MN), engineering controls (KY, VA, SC) and training (IN) related to tractors, private-sector financial incentives for safety (IA, NE), and reducing eye injuries in Latino farmworkers (IL, MI, FL). Partners have provided their unique resources for accessing the target population, planning, implementation, dissemination, and evaluation. They have produced useful engineering controls, educational and motivational tools, and helped build infrastructure for promoting agricultural health as essential to sustainable agriculture. Additional outcomes have included: increased interest among participants in collaborating in further research, the feasibility of Latino lay health advisors as active partners in research, and the value of process evaluation of a partnership to enhance intervention sustainability. NIOSH is utilizing the model created for Simple Solutions: Ergonomics for Farm Workers, a document related to earlier CPHF-IR projects, for a comparable document for construction in both English and Spanish. This program has confirmed that such partnerships can produce not only sustainable interventions but also products and models with the potential to expand farther geographically than originally anticipated and even into other sectors, e.g., for primary prevention among healthcare workers and

  7. TEP Power Partners Project [Tucson Electric Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-06

    The Arizona Governor’s Office of Energy Policy, in partnership with Tucson Electric Power (TEP), Tendril, and Next Phase Energy (NPE), formed the TEP Power Partners pilot project to demonstrate how residential customers could access their energy usage data and third party applications using data obtained from an Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) network. The project applied for and was awarded a Smart Grid Data Access grant through the U.S. Department of Energy. The project participants’ goal for Phase I is to actively engage 1,700 residential customers to demonstrate sustained participation, reduction in energy usage (kWh) and cost ($), and measure related aspects of customer satisfaction. This Demonstration report presents a summary of the findings, effectiveness, and customer satisfaction with the 15-month TEP Power Partners pilot project. The objective of the program is to provide residential customers with energy consumption data from AMR metering and empower these participants to better manage their electricity use. The pilot recruitment goals included migrating 700 existing customers from the completed Power Partners Demand Response Load Control Project (DRLC), and enrolling 1,000 new participants. Upon conclusion of the project on November 19, 2013; 1,390 Home Area Networks (HANs) were registered; 797 new participants installed a HAN; Survey respondents’ are satisfied with the program and found value with a variety of specific program components; Survey respondents report feeling greater control over their energy usage and report taking energy savings actions in their homes after participating in the program; On average, 43 % of the participants returned to the web portal monthly and 15% returned weekly; and An impact evaluation was completed by Opinion Dynamics and found average participant savings for the treatment period1 to be 2.3% of their household use during this period.2 In total, the program saved 163 MWh in the treatment period of 2013.

  8. Coordinating the United States Interagency Partnering Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    stage over the last 6 years.7 The DoD is on the cutting edge of partnering and there have been valuable lessons learned at the tactical and...global stage . “3D are the three pillars that provide the foundation for promoting and protecting U.S. national security interests abroad.”33 DoD, DoS...operations now will mean throwing 18 away hard-fought gains, and expose the United States to new risks from across the globalising

  9. Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidan, Ahmet; Bui, Hoan N

    2016-08-01

    The present study examines intimate partner violence (IPV) reported by a sample of women in Zimbabwe to explore factors associated with the problem. Findings from the study indicate an important role of gender relationships in violence against women. The effects of gender inequalities on the likelihood of IPV vary with types of violence, but husband's patriarchal behaviors increase the likelihood of all forms of violence. The study suggests the importance of improving gender equality through public education on gender relationships, increasing women's education and economic opportunities, and eliminating customary laws that sustain gender inequality as necessary steps to combat IPV against women in Zimbabwe. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Jacobi photonic lattices and their SUSY partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Segundo, A; Rodríguez-Lara, B M; Fernández C, David J; Moya-Cessa, H M

    2014-01-13

    We present a classical analog of quantum optical deformed oscillators in arrays of waveguides. The normal modes of these one-dimensional photonic crystals are given in terms of Jacobi polynomials. We show that it is possible to attack the problem via factorization by exploiting the corresponding quantum optical model. This allows us to provide an unbroken supersymmetric partner of the proposed Jacobi lattices. Thanks to the underlying SU(1, 1) group symmetry of the lattices, we present the analytic propagators and impulse functions for these one-dimensional photonic crystals.

  11. Hiring your next partner: AOA critical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasier, R Dale; Gagnon, Michael R; Iannotti, Joseph P; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Hiring a new partner into an orthopaedic department or group can be a daunting task. A recent American Orthopedic Association symposium sought to address three major aspects of hiring that affect orthopaedic leaders: (1) when to hire-the chairperson's role; (2) generational issues that affect hiring; and (3) the development of an initial compensation package.How does the chairperson recruit new physicians? Hiring a new partner into the academic setting requires a good deal of foresight. There must be an established game plan. Advertising and interviews need to be orchestrated. Chairpersons can find information about candidates from many unique sources. Fit within the department and community is important and must be cultivated. Spouses and families need special attention. Research candidates have individual needs. Perhaps the most important aspect of recruitment is the development of a realistic business plan. This paper provides an overview of factors to consider in managing a new hire.Generational issues are intriguing. Should they affect our hiring practices? It seems clear to established physicians that the new generation of graduates is different from their predecessors. Is this really true? Most everyone is familiar with the terms "Silent Generation," "Baby Boomers," "Generation X," and "Generation Y." Is there anything to be gained by categorizing an applicant? Is it important to hire a replica of one's self? This paper provides a thoughtful overview of generational issues as they apply to hiring new partners.Most department chairpersons are not trained as negotiators. Some preparation and experience are helpful in guiding the process of making an initial offer to a candidate. It is not all about pay. The package includes the guarantee period, expectations for the new hire, mentorship, and resources. How much should new orthopaedic academic hires be paid? Recent benchmark data from the Academic Orthopaedic Consortium suggest a mean income of $282,667 for

  12. Dyadic dynamics of HIV risk among transgender women and their primary male sexual partners: the role of sexual agreement types and motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarel, Kristi E; Reisner, Sari L; Darbes, Lynae A; Hoff, Colleen C; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Nemoto, Toru; Operario, Don

    2016-01-01

    Transgender women - individuals assigned a male sex at birth who identify as women, female, or on the male-to-female trans feminine spectrum - are at high-risk of HIV worldwide. Prior research has suggested that transgender women more frequently engage in condomless sex with primary cisgender (i.e., non-transgender) male partners compared with casual or paying partners, and that condomless sex in this context might be motivated by relationship dynamics such as trust and intimacy. The current study examined sexual agreement types and motivations as factors that shape HIV risk behaviors in a community sample of 191 transgender women and their cisgender primary male partners who completed a cross-sectional survey. Overall, 40% of couples had monogamous, 15% open, and 45% discrepant sexual agreements (i.e., partners disagreed on their type of agreement). Actor-partner interdependence models were fit to examine the influence of sexual agreement type and motivations on extra-dyadic HIV risk (i.e., condomless sex with outside partners) and intra-dyadic HIV serodiscordant risk (i.e., condomless sex with serodiscordant primary partners). For male partners, extra-dyadic risk was associated with their own and their partners' sexual agreement motives, and male partners who engaged in extra-dyadic HIV risk had an increased odds of engaging in HIV serodiscordant intra-dyadic risk. Study findings support inclusion of the male partners of transgender women into HIV prevention efforts. Future research is warranted to explore the interpersonal and social contexts of sexual agreement types and motivations in relationships between transgender women and their male partners to develop interventions that meet their unique HIV prevention needs.

  13. For better or for worse: a longitudinal study on dyadic coping and quality of life among couples with a partner suffering from COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaske, Isabelle; Thöne, Maximiliane Florentine; Kühl, Kerstin; Keil, Daniel Christian; Schürmann, Wolfgang; Rief, Winfried; Stenzel, Nikola Maria

    2015-12-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, impairments of dyadic coping are associated with reduced quality of life. However, existing studies have a cross-sectional design. The present study explores changes in dyadic coping over time and its long-term effects on quality of life of both patients suffering from COPD and their partners. Dyadic coping, psychological distress, health-related quality of life, and exercise capacity were assessed in 63 patients suffering from COPD with their partners, at baseline and 3-year-follow-up. Correlation analyses and actor-partner interdependence models (APIMs) were conducted. Patients' delegated dyadic coping (taking over tasks) and common dyadic coping (mutual coping efforts when both partners are stressed) rated by the spouses decreased. Correlation analyses showed that patients' quality of life at follow-up was positively influenced by partners' stress communication (signaling stress). Partners' quality of life at follow-up was negatively influenced by patients' negative dyadic coping (reacting superficially, ambivalently or hostilely) and positively influenced by partners' delegated dyadic coping rated by patients (taking over tasks). APIMs mostly supported these results. It seems important that both partners communicate about stress and provide appropriate instrumental and emotional support to maintain quality of life.

  14. Lived experiences of male intimate partners of female rape victims in Cape Town, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalina van Wijk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual violence in South Africa is a major public health and social problem. Sexual assault or rape is a traumatic event which disrupts not only the life of the female rape victim, but also that of her male intimate partner (MIP, irrespective of whether he witnessed or was informed of the incident.Objectives: The study aimed to explore the lived experiences of MIPs of female rape victims and the meaning of these experiences in the six months following the partner’s rape.Method: We conducted a longitudinal hermeneutic phenomenological study. Nine purposively sampled adult MIPs were interviewed over a period of six months. The participants were in an intimate relationship with a female rape victim prior to and immediately after the rape; their partners had been treated at a specialised centre for victims of rape and sexual assault. Four interviews were conducted with each of the nine intimate partners of female rape victims: (1 within 14 days of, (2 a month after, (3 three months after, and (4 six months after the rape.Results: Two major themes emerged: being-in-the-world as a secondary victim of rape, and living in multiple worlds, those of their female partners, family, friends, society, employers or colleagues, professionals and the justice system. The participant’s familiar world became strange and even threatening, and his relationship with his partner became uncertain.Conclusion: Early supportive intervention for intimate partners of female rape victims is required to prevent on-going emotional trauma and alleviate the effects of chronic post-traumatic stress disorder and suffering at intra- and interpersonal levels.

  15. Intimate relationships in young adults with perinatally acquired HIV: partner considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Clare; Evangeli, Michael; Frize, Graham; Foster, Caroline; Fidler, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Due to developments in anti-retroviral treatment, an increasing number of children with perinatally acquired HIV are now surviving into late adolescence and young adulthood. This cohort is facing normative challenges in terms of their intimate relationships as well as challenges that face all individuals with HIV regardless of the route of transmission (for example, concerns about disclosure). There may be additional issues specific to having grown up with HIV that affect intimate relationships, for example, the awareness of being HIV positive before the onset of intimate relationships and the way that identity is shaped by having lived with HIV from a young age. To date there has been some limited research on the experience of intimate relationships in perinatally infected adolescents but none in young adults. This exploratory study examined, in depth, experiences of intimate relationships in perinatally acquired young adults and how they perceived having grown up with HIV to have affected such relationships. Seven participants (five females, two males) aged 18-23 years, were interviewed, with the data analysed according to the principles of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Three themes emerged that related to partners' perceptions of HIV: (1) HIV being viewed by partners as being linked to AIDS and sexual transmission, (2) discrepancy between young people and their partners' views of HIV, (3) partner views of risk of HIV transmission. There were strong links between participants' personal experiences of HIV-related challenges, for example, disclosure and HIV-related stigma, and their thinking about the perceptions of partners. These findings have important implications for supporting young people in disclosing their HIV status to intimate partners in appropriate ways. Suggestions for future research are offered.

  16. An approach to non-traditional partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ornela Fabani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the evolution of the political-diplomatic and the economic and trade links between Argentina and the Gulf monarchies, as well as the factors that explain this evolution, during the administrations of Cristina Fernandez (2007-2015. Meanwhile, the premise that informs it is that that during Fernandez's governments the political and diplomatic relations between Argentina and the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Qatar became more dynamic as a result of the Argentine interest in strengthening economic and trade ties with those States. The deepening of these ties is explained in terms of some of the main areas of Argentina's foreign trade policy, which focus on the following: to diversify trade partners, attract investment and increase the volume of trade. Moreover, the aforementioned actors are perceived as potential partners in that the Gulf monarchies need to ensure food security and advance technological cooperation, in a context marked by the international financial crisis.

  17. Designing Comprehensive Partnering Agreements : An Introduction to the Partnering Agreement Scorecard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Pfisterer (Stella); N. Payandeh (Nasim); S. Reid

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAgreements are a key mechanism of partnerships because their role is to govern interactions. They help partnerships become more effective by allowing partners to cope with relational, performance and situational risks that characterise inter-organisational relationships. The Partnerships

  18. Actor and Partner Effects of Adolescents' Romantic Working Models and Styles on Interactions with Romantic Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Wyndol; Simon, Valerie A.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined how adolescents' and their romantic partners' romantic working models and relational styles were related to their interactions with each other. Sixty-five couples (M age=18.1 years) were observed interacting. Romantic working models were assessed in interviews about their romantic experiences; romantic styles were…

  19. Violence in childhood, attitudes about partner violence, and partner violence perpetration among men in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yount, K.M.; Huyen, T.P.; Tran, H.M.; Krause, K.H.; Schuler, S.R.; Hoang, T.A.; VanderEnde, K.; Kramer, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We assess the association of men’s exposure to violence in childhood—witnessing physical violence against one’s mother and being hit or beaten by a parent or adult relative—with their attitudes about intimate partner violence (IPV) against women. We explore whether men’s perpetration of IPV

  20. Chronic pain in women survivors of intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Judith; Merritt-Gray, Marilyn; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn; Lent, Barbara; Varcoe, Colleen; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    2008-11-01

    In this descriptive study of chronic pain in a community sample of 292 women who had separated from their abusive partners on average 20 months previously, more than one-third experienced high disability pain as measured by Von Korff's Chronic Pain Grade. Beyond the usual pain locations associated with abuse, 43.2% reported swollen/painful joints. More interference in daily life was attributed to joint pain than to back, head, stomach, pelvic or bowel pain. Women with high disability pain were more likely to have experienced child abuse, adult sexual assault, more severe spousal abuse, lifetime abuse-related injuries, symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, lifetime suicide attempts, difficulty sleeping, and unemployment. High disability pain also was associated with visits to a family doctor and psychiatrist and use of medication in more than prescribed dosages. Less than 25% of women with high disability pain were taking opioids, or prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications. Interestingly, high disability pain was not related to smoking, use of street drugs, potential for alcohol dependence, age, income, or education. The findings add to knowledge of severity and patterns of chronic pain in abused women and support the need for further multivariate analysis of the relationships among abuse experiences, mental health, and chronic pain severity to better inform decisions regarding diagnosis and treatment. Understanding patterns of chronic pain in abuse survivors and their associations with abuse history, mental health symptoms, health service use, and medication is important for clinical assessment and intervention. Chronic pain persisted long after leaving abusive partners and extended beyond usual locations (back, headache, pelvic, gastrointestinal) to include swollen/painful joints.

  1. The connection between adult partner attachment and parenting styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Jurič

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The child-mother relation in infancy was found very important not only as a predictor of a child's social adaptation, personality predisposition and capacity development, but also as a prototype of establishing contacts with others later in life (Bowlby, 1975. These early attachment bondings with the child's mother are the basis for all close relationships with potential partners later in life. The survey covers the attachment factors of two parents (30 to 60 years old and their style of parenting their 14- to 15-years-old adolescent. The participants were the primary school pupils of Gorenjska and Ljubljana regions. Adult attachment style was measured with Experience in Close Relationship Questionnaire - Revised (Fraley, Waller in Brennan, 2000. The children completed 30-item Parental Authority Questionnaire for the Mother's and Father's Parenting Style (Buri, 1991. We expected that the parents with low results in Anxiety and Avoidance were the ones who mostly used the authoritative parenting style compared to the parents with higher results of Anxiety and Avoidance in their relationship. The second hypothesis was that high results in Anxiety in parental relationship would mean a more authoritarian parenting style. The results confirmed our assumptions. Parents with a secure mutual relationship mainly raised their children in an authoritative manner with lots of warmth, support and appropriate borders. The second hypothesis was confirmed for fathers only. Fathers with high Anxiety in partner relationship (fear of abandonment, feelings of uncompetency mostly raised their children in an authoritarian manner. The authoritarian manner consists of many strict borders, a lot of control and obedience. The connection of Anxiety in partnership and authoritarian parenting style was not significant for mothers.

  2. Intimate partner violence and maternal educational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Josianne Maria Mattos da; Lima, Marília de Carvalho; Ludermir, Ana Bernarda

    2017-04-10

    The objective of this study is to analyze the association between intimate partner violence against women and maternal educational practice directed to children at the beginning of formal education. This is a cross-sectional study, carried out between 2013 and 2014, with 631 mother/child pairs, registered in the Family Health Strategy of the Health District II of the city of Recife, State of Pernambuco, Brazil. It integrates a prospective cohort study designed to investigate the consequences of exposure to intimate partner violence in relation to the child who was born between 2005 and 2006. The maternal educational practice has been assessed by the Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scale and the intimate partner violence by a questionnaire adapted from the Multi-Country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence of the World Health Organization. Intimate partner violence referred to the last 12 months and was defined by specific acts of psychological, physical, and sexual violence inflicted to women by the partner. The crude and adjusted prevalence ratios were estimated for the association studied, using log-binomial regression. The prevalence of intimate partner violence was 24.4%, and violent maternal educational practice was 93.8%. The use of non-violent discipline was mentioned by 97.6% of the women, coexisting with violent strategies of discipline. Children whose mothers reported intimate partner violence presented a higher chance of suffering psychological aggression (PR = 2.2; 95%CI 1.0-4.7). The violence suffered by the mother interferes in the parental education. The findings show high prevalence of violent maternal educational practice, pointing to the need for interventions that minimize the damage of violence in women and children. Analisar a associação entre a violência pelo parceiro íntimo contra a mulher e a prática educativa materna direcionada às crianças no início da escolaridade formal. Estudo transversal, realizado entre 2013 e 2014, com

  3. Preferential partner selection in an evolutionary study of prisoner's dilemma

    CERN Document Server

    Ashlock, D; Stanley, E A; Tesfatsion, L; Ashlock, Dan; Smucker, Mark D; Stanley, E Ann; Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1994-01-01

    Partner selection is an important process in many social interactions, permitting individuals to decrease the risks associated with cooperation. In large populations, defectors may escape punishment by roving from partner to partner, but defectors in smaller populations risk social isolation. We investigate these possibilities for an evolutionary prisoner's dilemma in which agents use expected payoffs to choose and refuse partners. In comparison to random or round-robin partner matching, we find that the average payoffs attained with preferential partner selection tend to be more narrowly confined to a few isolated payoff regions. Most ecologies evolve to essentially full cooperative behavior, but when agents are intolerant of defections, or when the costs of refusal and social isolation are small, we also see the emergence of wallflower ecologies in which all agents are socially isolated. In between these two extremes, we see the emergence of ecologies whose agents tend to engage in a small number of defecti...

  4. Infrastructure for Personalized Medicine at Partners HealthCare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott T. Weiss

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine (PPM is a center within the Partners HealthCare system (founded by Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital whose mission is to utilize genetics and genomics to improve the care of patients in a cost effective manner. PPM consists of five interconnected components: (1 Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM, a CLIA laboratory performing genetic testing for patients world-wide; (2 Translational Genomics Core (TGC, a core laboratory providing genomic platforms for Partners investigators; (3 Partners Biobank, a biobank of samples (DNA, plasma and serum for 50,000 Consented Partners patients; (4 Biobank Portal, an IT infrastructure and viewer to bring together genotypes, samples, phenotypes (validated diagnoses, radiology, and clinical chemistry from the electronic medical record to Partners investigators. These components are united by (5 a common IT system that brings researchers, clinicians, and patients together for optimal research and patient care.

  5. Partner Selection Optimization Model of Agricultural Enterprises in Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feipeng Guo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With more and more importance of correctly selecting partners in supply chain of agricultural enterprises, a large number of partner evaluation techniques are widely used in the field of agricultural science research. This study established a partner selection model to optimize the issue of agricultural supply chain partner selection. Firstly, it constructed a comprehensive evaluation index system after analyzing the real characteristics of agricultural supply chain. Secondly, a heuristic method for attributes reduction based on rough set theory and principal component analysis was proposed which can reduce multiple attributes into some principal components, yet retaining effective evaluation information. Finally, it used improved BP neural network which has self-learning function to select partners. The empirical analysis on an agricultural enterprise shows that this model is effective and feasible for practical partner selection.

  6. Partner Power: A study of two distance education consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Banks Pidduck

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This research reports findings from a study which explored the process and criteria of partner selection – how and why partners are chosen – for two distance education consortia. The researchers reviewed recent literature on partnerships and partner selection. Two Canada-wide distance education consortia were identified as large-scale case studies for investigation of the research theory. A total of 34 informants were contacted. Written business plans, contracts, documents, partner network diagrams, and 231 archival emails from 36 correspondents were collected and analyzed for the two consortia. The research identified four criteria that influence why specific partners are chosen: requirements, resource availability, social network, and reputation. These findings suggest that the formation of partnerships and the process of partner selection are both very complex.

  7. The psychopathic intimate partner batterer: a non-psychopathological profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Pozueco-Romero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical study reviews two of the most cited profiles of intimate partner batterers in the scientific literature, paying special attention to the most notable differences between them, as well as to their common criteria. The study also discusses one of the longest standing controversies in various research studies, including the particular overview with respect to Spain: it being the constant yet erroneous reference to the equivalence of psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder. Similarly, special attention is paid to the implications of considering intimate partner batterers as having either a psychopathological or psychopathic profile, while also stressing the specific role played by psychopathy in the intimate partner batterer and, concerning psychopathic intimate partner batterers, such aspects as their specific motives for perpetrating intimate partner violence and the evaluation instruments of this particular profile. Finally, a series of future directives for research concerning psychopathic intimate partner batterers are also pointed out.

  8. Witnessing Partner Violence in Childhood: Factors Influencing Emotion Regulation Difficulties in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Amatya, Kaushalendra

    2014-01-01

    Witnessing partner violence (WPV) in childhood and adolescence can have significant impact on psychological functioning throughout development. Studies have shown that parenting factors, perceived social support, coping strategies, age at exposure, and gender can influence the relationship between WPV and outcomes. Although WPV can have serious implications towards emotion regulation abilities, empirical research on the link between WPV and emotion regulation is inadequate. The current stu...

  9. 'Knowledge is power': perceived needs and preferred services of male partners of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Terry; Jackman, Maureen; McQuestion, Maurene; Fitch, Margaret

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this qualitative exploratory study was to assess the perceived needs and preferred services of male partners of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Twenty-seven male partners participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. An inductive analysis was used to identify the patterns, themes and categories from the data. A diagnosis of breast cancer and subsequent treatment significantly affect the male partners of women diagnosed with this illness, creating 'needs' that require coping responses. To help them support their wife and family, they relied on their internal resources and informal sources of support. Many participants suggested that the health care system provides information addressing their needs to facilitate their role of caring for their wife. The findings did not support the clinical assumption that men would be interested in a men's group focused on them and their needs. The diagnosis of breast cancer significantly affected the male partners, creating the need for support services including information on a variety of topics. An information binder tailored specifically to their needs was the preferred method of facilitating their husbandly role and coping. Findings did not support the clinical assumption that men would be interested in a men's group focused on them and their needs.

  10. Dispositional Mindfulness as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Perceived Partner Infidelity and Women's Dating Violence Perpetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Meagan J; Wolford-Clevenger, Caitlin; Zapor, Heather; Elmquist, Joanna; Shorey, Ryan C; Stuart, Gregory L

    2015-09-08

    Mindfulness gained increased attention as it relates to aggressive behavior, including dating violence. However, no known studies examined how the combined influences of dispositional mindfulness and perceived partner infidelity, a well-documented correlate of dating violence, relate to women's dating violence perpetration. Using a sample of college women (N = 203), we examined the relationship between perceived partner infidelity and physical dating violence perpetration at varying levels of dispositional mindfulness, controlling for the influence of alcohol use. Results indicated perceived partner infidelity and dating violence perpetration were positively related for women with low and mean dispositional mindfulness, but not for women with high dispositional mindfulness. These results further support the applicability of mindfulness theory in the context of dating violence. Implications of the present findings provide preliminary support for mindfulness intervention in relationships characterized by infidelity concerns.

  11. Perpetration and Victimization of Intimate Partner Aggression Among Rural Mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab Reese, Laura M.; Harland, Karisa; Smithart, Kelsey; Ramirez, Marizen

    2015-01-01

    Intimate partner aggression is a leading cause of injury among women of child-bearing age. Research suggests that pregnancy and the postpartum period are times of increased vulnerability to aggression. Since rural women are at an increased risk of intimate partner aggression, research is needed to examine the role of pregnancy and the presence of children on intimate partner aggression among this vulnerable population. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between young chil...

  12. Community Partners in Care (CPIC): Video Summary of Rationale, Study Approach / Implementation, and Client 6-month Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Joseph; Cabiling, Eileen; Jones, Loretta; Lucas-Wright, Aziza; Williams, Pluscedia; Wells, Kenneth; Pulido, Esmeralda; Meldrum, Marcia; Ramos, Ana; Chung, Bowen

    2014-02-25

    "Community Partners in Care (CPIC): Video Summary of Rationale, Study Approach / Implementation, and Client 6-month Outcomes" is a 2 minute, 46 second video summarizing the study rationale, study approach, and the 6-month outcomes. The video was produced by four agencies: Healthy African American Families II, a health advocacy organization in South Los Angeles; Behavioral Health Services, the largest substance/alcohol abuse service provider in LA County; UCLA; and RAND Health; contract filmmakers Eileen Cabiling and Joe Mango handled cinematography, editing, and video support. The individuals appearing in the video are key CPIC community and academic partners. The celebratory tone of the video is consistent with a Community Partnered Participatory Research approach, a local variant of participatory action research, where study findings are celebrated by the partners, and dissemination efforts include approaches intended for general audiences, especially from low-income, low-literacy, minority communities, in addition to traditional academic products like peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts. The CPIC video offers a community perspective on the study results to our partners, the general public, other scientists and policy makers. We designed the video to teach community and healthcare partners how to adapt and implement the CPIC depression care model and to offer other community -academic partnerships an example of a non-traditional product developed for dissemination from an NIH-funded research study.

  13. Wired on steroids: Sexual differentiation of the brain and its role in the expression of sexual partner preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Mae Alexander

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The preference to seek out a sexual partner of the opposite sex is robust and ensures reproduction and survival of the species. Development of female-directed partner preference in the male is dependent on exposure of the developing brain to gonadal steroids synthesized during critical periods of sexual differentiation of the central nervous system. In the absence of androgen exposure, a male-directed partner preference develops. The development and expression of sexual partner preference has been extensively studied in rats, ferrets, and sheep model systems. From these models it is clear that gonadal testosterone, often through estrogenic metabolites, cause both masculinization and defeminization of behavior during critical periods of brain development. Changes in the steroid environment during these critical periods results in atypical sexual partner preference. In this manuscript, we review the major findings which support the hypothesis that the organizational actions of sex steroids are responsible for sexual differentiation of sexual partner preferences in select non-human species. We also explore how this information has helped to frame our understanding of the biological influences on human sexual orientation and gender identity.

  14. [Prevalence and factors associated with intimate partner abuse in female users of public health services in Mexico: a comparative analyses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Burgos, Leticia; Valdez-Santiagob, Rosario; Barroso-Quiab, Abigail; Híjar, Martha; Rojas, Rosalba; Del Río-Zolezzi, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the evolution of the prevalence in intimate partner violence during the years 2003 and 2006 in Mexico, identifying factors associated with its severity, comparing our results with findings from 2003. Data from the Encuesta Nacional de Violencia contra las Mujeres (ENVIM 2006) was used; it has urban-rural national representation of female users of Mexican public health services. A total of 22,318 women above 14 years of age were interviewed. A multinomial logistic regression model was adjusted. The dependent variable was the Index of Intimate Partner Abuse. Intimate partner abuse increased 17% in comparison to the year 2003. Women's personal history of childhood abuse (ORA= 5.12, 95% CI4.15-6.30) and rape (ORA = 3.5, 95% CI = 2.66-4.62) were the most important women's factors that were found associated with severe violence. Male partner's daily alcohol consumption increased eleven fold the possibility of severe violence; higher disagreement with traditional female gender roles and higher education of both partners were protective factors. Factors associated with violence and their severities were consistent with findings reported in 2003. Intimate partner violence is a highly prevalent social problem which requires comprehensive strategies supporting empowerment of women through higher education, early detection and care of those battered, as well as structured interventions to prevent violence in future generations.

  15. Exploring the association between women's access to economic resources and intimate partner violence in Dar es Salaam and Mbeya, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Seema; Jansen, Henrica Afm; Heise, Lori; Mbwambo, Jessie

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between women's access to economic resources, e.g. employment or access to micro-credit, and experience of intimate partner violence is complex. Empirical evidence documents that in some settings women's employment is associated with higher risk of partner violence but in other settings with lower risk. Evidence also shows that these conflicting associations exist not only between countries but also within different country settings. Using two population-based data sets gathered in 2002 in contrasting Tanzania settings-Dar es Salaam and Mbeya-, we used multivariate logistic regression to examine the relationship between women's access to economic resources and partner violence. Two indicators of economic resources were examined: whether women earned money and whether women owned a business either with someone or exclusively. In Dar es Salaam we found evidence of a higher risk association among women who earned money and who owned a business exclusively by themselves and a lower risk association among women who owned a business with someone. We found no relationship between either indicator of economic resources and partner violence in Mbeya. Other factors were similarly associated with partner violence in both settings and the strongest associations found were related to the respondents' partners: refusal to give money; alcohol use and relationships with other women. The findings support the assertion that women's access to economic resources operate differently in different country settings, thus highlighting the need for targeted prevention efforts that are relevant for the context.

  16. Ovulatory shifts in women's attractions to primary partners and other men: further evidence of the importance of primary partner sexual attractiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larson, Christina M; Pillsworth, Elizabeth G; Haselton, Martie G

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has documented shifts in women's attractions to their romantic partner and to men other than their partner across the ovulation cycle, contingent on the degree to which her partner...

  17. High Rate of Partner Treatment Among Chlamydia trachomatis-Infected Pregnant Women in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh; Cabeza, Jeanne; Segura, Eddy; García, Patricia J; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-05-01

    This was a substudy of 60 Chlamydia trachomatis-infected women from a larger study of pregnant women in Lima, Peru. Participants were encouraged to bring their partners in for concurrent patient-partner treatment. The alternative partner treatment was expedited partner therapy. Partner treatment uptake was 91.7%. Twenty-one partners (38.2%) received treatment through concurrent patient-partner treatment, and 34 (61.8%) through expedited partner therapy. Living with the partner was significantly associated with having the partner treated (P=0.0028).

  18. Neural and cortisol responses during play with human and computer partners in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Elliot Kale; Merkle, Kristen; Corbett, Blythe A

    2015-08-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit impairment in reciprocal social interactions, including play, which can manifest as failure to show social preference or discrimination between social and nonsocial stimuli. To explore mechanisms underlying these deficits, we collected salivary cortisol from 42 children 8-12 years with ASD or typical development during a playground interaction with a confederate child. Participants underwent functional MRI during a prisoner's dilemma game requiring cooperation or defection with a human (confederate) or computer partner. Search region of interest analyses were based on previous research (e.g. insula, amygdala, temporal parietal junction-TPJ). There were significant group differences in neural activation based on partner and response pattern. When playing with a human partner, children with ASD showed limited engagement of a social salience brain circuit during defection. Reduced insula activation during defection in the ASD children relative to TD children, regardless of partner type, was also a prominent finding. Insula and TPJ BOLD during defection was also associated with stress responsivity and behavior in the ASD group under playground conditions. Children with ASD engage social salience networks less than TD children during conditions of social salience, supporting a fundamental disturbance of social engagement. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Partner Influence in Diet and Exercise Behaviors: Testing Behavior Modeling, Social Control, and Normative Body Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciurkaite, Gabriele; Brady, Christy Freadreacea; Garcia, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has documented social contagion in obesity and related health behaviors, but less is known about the social processes underlying these patterns. Focusing on married or cohabitating couples, we simultaneously explore three potential social mechanisms influencing obesity: normative body size, social control, and behavior modeling. We analyze the association between partner characteristics and the obesity-related health behaviors of focal respondents, comparing the effects of partners’ body type, partners’ attempts to manage respondents’ eating behaviors, and partners’ own health behaviors on respondents’ health behaviors (physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fast food consumption). Data on 215 partners are extracted from a larger study of social mechanisms of obesity in family and community contexts conducted in 2011 in the United States. Negative binomial regression models indicate that partner behavior is significantly related to respondent behavior (p obesity-related patterns of consumption and physical activity. In contrast, we find little support for the influence of normative body size or partner social control in this sample, though generalizations about the relevance of these processes may be inappropriate. These results underscore the importance of policies and interventions that target dyads and social groups, suggesting that adoption of exercise or diet modifications in one individual is likely to spread to others, creating a social environment characterized by mutual reinforcement of healthy behavior. PMID:28033428

  20. Relationship dynamics and sexual risk behaviour of male partners of female sex workers in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonye, Martin; Siu, Godfrey E; Kiwanuka, Thadeus; Seeley, Janet

    2016-07-01

    Regular male partners of female sex workers (FSWs) represent an important population to reach with HIV-prevention interventions. This paper discusses the relationship dynamics and HIV/sexually transmitted infection risk behaviour of men involved with self-identified FSWs in Kampala. Between 2011 and 2014 we conducted repeat in-depth interviews with 42 male partners of FSWs attending a clinic for women at high risk of HIV-infection in Kampala. Men publicly struggled with the stigma of dating women who are considered to be engaged in a shamed profession, but privately saw meaning in these relationships. In coping with the stigma, some described the work of their partners in terms that distanced them from sex work, while others struggled to have the control that "being a man" demanded since they could not monitor all movements of their partners. Dealing with HIV disclosure was hard and seeking support was difficult for some of the men, leading to missed opportunities and guilt. Despite challenges, relationships with sex workers offered men some benefits such as access to much needed care and treatment. A few men also admitted to being motivated by material and financial benefits from sex workers who they perceived as being rich and this was one factor that helped them sustain the relationships. These findings offer insights into the complex relationship dynamics within high risk sexual partnerships. However, the findings suggest that effective interventions that are couple centred can be established to promote better health.

  1. Sex differences in the implications of partner physical attractiveness for the trajectory of marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Andrea L; McNulty, James K; Jackson, Grace L; Karney, Benjamin R

    2014-03-01

    Do men value physical attractiveness in a mate more than women? Scientists in numerous disciplines believe that they do, but recent research using speed-dating paradigms suggests that males and females are equally influenced by physical attractiveness when choosing potential mates. Nevertheless, the premise of the current work is that sex differences in the importance of physical attractiveness are most likely to emerge in research on long-term relationships. Accordingly, the current work drew from 4 independent, longitudinal studies to examine sex differences in the implications of partner physical attractiveness for trajectories of marital satisfaction. In all 4 studies, both partners' physical attractiveness was objectively rated at baseline, and both partners reported their marital satisfaction up to 8 times over the first 4 years of marriage. Whereas husbands were more satisfied at the beginning of the marriage and remained more satisfied over the next 4 years to the extent that they had an attractive wife, wives were no more or less satisfied initially or over the next 4 years to the extent that they had an attractive husband. Most importantly, a direct test indicated that partner physical attractiveness played a larger role in predicting husbands' satisfaction than predicting wives' satisfaction. These findings strengthen support for the idea that sex differences in self-reported preferences for physical attractiveness do have implications for long-term relationship outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Borderline personality disorder symptoms and newlyweds' observed communication, partner characteristics, and longitudinal marital outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavner, Justin A; Lamkin, Joanna; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-11-01

    Given borderline personality disorder's (BPD) relation with interpersonal dysfunction, there is substantial interest in understanding BPD's effect on marriage. The current study used data from a community sample of 172 newlywed couples to examine spouses' BPD symptoms in relation to their observed communication, partner BPD symptoms, 4-year marital quality trajectories, and 10-year divorce rates. BPD symptoms were correlated cross-sectionally with more negative skills during observational problem-solving and social support tasks, and spouses reporting more BPD symptoms were married to partners reporting more BPD symptoms. Longitudinally, hierarchical linear modeling of newlyweds' 4-year marital trajectories indicated that BPD symptoms predicted the intercept of marital quality for spouses and their partners, reflecting lower levels of marital satisfaction and higher levels of marital problems. BPD symptoms did not predict 10-year divorce rates. These findings highlight the chronic relationship impairment associated with BPD symptoms, indicate that distress begins early in marriage, and suggest that partners with higher levels of BPD symptoms remain in more troubled marriages. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Current evidence on perinatal home visiting and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, Phyllis W; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Baty, Marguerite L; Walker, Keisha S; Bair-Merritt, Megan H

    2008-01-01

    To describe current evidence on home visiting interventions for pregnant or postpartum women with specific intimate partner violence assessment and content. Online bibliographic databases including PubMed, CINAHL Plus, and Web of Science and a hand search of bibliographies of relevant articles. Original research and intervention studies were included that contained (a) a well-described prenatal and/or postpartum home visitation; (b) an assessment of perinatal intimate partner violence; and (c) quantitative data describing health outcomes for the women and their infants. The search yielded 128 articles, and 8 relevant articles met all of the inclusion criteria. Nonresearch, nonintervention, and international articles were excluded. No perinatal home visiting interventions were designed to address intimate partner violence. Programs that screened for intimate partner violence found high rates, and the presence of intimate partner violence limited the ability of the intervention to improve maternal and child outcomes. Perinatal home visitation programs likely improve pregnancy and infant outcomes. Home visiting interventions addressing intimate partner violence in nonperinatal population groups have been effective in minimizing intimate partner violence and improving outcomes. This suggests that perinatal home visiting programs adding specific intimate partner violence interventions may reduce intimate partner violence and improve maternal and infant health. Continued rigorous research is needed.

  4. Partner Selection for Interfirm Collaboration: The Context of Ship Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solesvik, Marina Z.; Encheva, Sylvia

    There is a growing body of research devoted to the issues of cooperative design. However, there are still gaps in the existing knowledge on partner selection for cooperation. This paper intends to explore partner selection issues in the context of collaborative ship design. The study aims to fill a gap in the partner selection literature by proposing a quantitative technique based on formal concept analysis. An illustrative example of the selection of a partner for a project-based alliance in a naval architect firm is presented. The study has implications for practitioners and researchers.

  5. Partner change among Norwegian teenage girls attending youth health clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egil Skjeldestad, Finn; Nilsen, Stine

    2008-01-01

    To examine incidence and risk factors of partner change among Norwegian teenage girls attending youth health clinics. Prospective cohort study. Setting. Study subjects were 691 girls, aged 16 to 19 years, who participated in a study on prescription of oral contraceptives at three youth health clinics in the city of Trondheim, Norway. Eligible for analysis were participants who were sexually active, and who returned for at least one follow-up visit more than 120 days after study start. All demographic and behavior data were collected through interview by public health nurses. All analyses were performed with SPSS for Windows (version 15.0) using chi-square test, survival analyses and logistic regression. New sexual male partners. Four out of five girls (80%) did not have any new partner during the study period of 12 months. From survival analyses the 12-month incidence rate were 29.8 (95% CI: 25.3-34.1) and 10.6 per 100-women months (95% CI: 7.3-13.9) for one or two or more partners, respectively. Predictors of partner change were partner change during the last six month prior study start, being single and sexual debut within three years after menarche. CONCLUSION. Being in a regular relationship with a boyfriend reduce considerably the risk of having a new sexual partner. Recent history of partner change is the strongest predictor of future partner change.

  6. Uncertainty in Partner Selection for Virtual Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispim, José; de Sousa, Jorge Pinho

    A virtual enterprise (VE) is a temporary organization that pools the core competencies of its member enterprises and exploits fast changing market opportunities. The success of such an organization is strongly dependent on its composition, and the selection of partners becomes therefore a crucial issue. This problem is particularly difficult because of the uncertainties related to information, market dynamics, customer expectations and technology speed up. In this paper we propose an integrated approach to rank alternative VE configurations in business environments with uncertainty, using an extension of the TOPSIS method for fuzzy data, improved through the use of a stochastic multiobjective tabu search meta-heuristic. Preliminary computational results clearly demonstrate the potential of this approach for practical application.

  7. Physical intimate partner violence in northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragavan, Maya I; Iyengar, Kirti; Wurtz, Rebecca M

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we examine perceptions about the definition of physical intimate partner violence (IPV) in northern India utilizing feminist perspectives as a framework. We interviewed 56 women and 52 men affiliated with a health services nongovernmental organization in the Udaipur district of Rajasthan. We transcribed, coded, and analyzed the interviews utilizing grounded theory. We found that perceptions regarding physical IPV were associated with both structural and ideological patriarchal beliefs and microlevel constructs such as alcohol use. We discovered multiple types of physical IPV in the study region, including rationalized violence (socially condoned violence perpetrated by a husband against his wife), unjustified violence (socially prohibited violence perpetrated by a husband against his wife), and majboori violence (violence perpetrated by a wife against her husband). Our results add to the breadth of research available about IPV in India and create a framework for future research and IPV prevention initiatives.

  8. Top Partners Searches and Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii; Wulzer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  9. Top partners searches and composite Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii; Panico, Giuliano; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  10. The clinical studies to developing BV Partner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Gi-Rok

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was performed to examine the Herbal Acupuncture decrease the side effect of Bee Venom. Methods: We treated Bee Venom and various Herbal Acupuncture mixed Bee Venom using double blind test to 70th health youth, and checked pain, edema size, CBC, Serum biochemistry and Thermography. Results:1. Herbal Acupuncture made by Morus bombycis Koidzumi showed good results to decrease the side effect of Bee Venom than any other Herbal Acupuncture. 2. We examined CBC, ESR and Serum biochemistry before and after treated. Special change was not showed. 3. We observed the pain and edema after treated Bee Venom and Morus bombycis Koidzumi Herbal Acupuncture mixed Bee Venom. We knew that Morus bombycis Koidzumi Herbal Acupuncture was decrease the pain and edema due to Bee Venom. 4. According to these clinical studies, Morus bombycis Koidzumi Herbal Acupuncture has a possibility to be a good partner of Bee Venom.

  11. New partners of TKS4 scaffold protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropyvko S. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available TKS4 scaffold protein is involved in the formation of invadopodia, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by tumor cells and other cellular processes. Aim. To identify new TKS4 partners involved in the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and endo-/exocytosis. Methods. The GST pull-down assay was used to identify the interaction. Results. We revealed that TKS4 SH3 domains interact with the actin cytoskeleton reorganization proteins N-WASP and CR16, as well as with DNM2, SYNJ1 and OPHN1 which are involved in endo-/exocytosis. We also tested the WIP, WIRE, SHIP2, RhoU, RhoV and NUMB proteins, but their interaction with the SH3 domains of TKS4 was not found. Conclusions. The SH3 domains of TKS4 interact with N-WASP, DNM2, SYNJ1, OPHN1 and weakly with CR16 in vitro.

  12. Strategy Guideline. Partnering for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, Duncan [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. This guide is intended for use by all parties associated in the design and construction of high performance homes. It serves as a starting point and features initial tools and resources for teams to collaborate to continually improve the energy efficiency and durability of new houses.

  13. Effects of partner violence in migrant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Guadalupe Delgadillo Guzmán

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the relationship between partner violence, depression and maternal self-efficacy in migrant women. It is thought that this type of violence brings about sinking morale and a hindrance for their development as mothers. It is a quantitative study of an explanatory correlational type, worked with 40 immigrant women with a residence of two to 25 years, with at least one reported episode of violation and at least one son in preschool. Three instruments were employed: “The Parental Involvement and Efficacy”, “The Survey-Depression Scale” and“The Revised Conflict Tactic Scale”. The results showed important relationships between the variables, namely, the more violence women suffer, the greater the depression is, and the greater the depression is, the lesser the maternal self-efficacy becomes.

  14. Top partner searches and Composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Panico, Giuliano [Barcelona Univ. Autonoma (Spain). IFAE; Wulyer, Andrea [Padova Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica e Astronomia; INFN, Padova (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  15. When Two Different Worlds Encouter: The Role of a Partner in the Life of a Women Occupying Academic Professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Očenášková

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a socially current topic of partnership satisfaction of women working in academic professions. The research project from 2013 focused on a deeper examination of subjective experiences of women working at Czech state universities and colleges. The presented part of the research provides an insight into women's perceptions of their partners' attitudes to their profession and their partners' roles regarding the harmony of their personal and professional life. The core of the research is qualitative methodology which allowed us to analyze obtained answers in more detail and obtain new and discovered research knowledge about partnership relations of a specific category of women. The main method for data collection was a semi-structured interview. Medical history questionnaires and observation were also used. The research sample of the population consisted of 32 women in young and middle adulthood who have dedicated themselves to academic careers at state universities (n=28 and at research institutes (n=4 in the Czech Republic for at least three (3 years (at the positions of assistant and associate professor and who have been in a permanent partner relationship for at least three years. Teaching, research and publishing is also a part of their active profession. Most research female participants (n=28 assess their partners' attitude toward their profession as a positive one; they mentioned such things as respect, mutual understanding and friendship. In all cases (n=32, partners help to deal with their professional and personal life requirements on several levels. The partner's role has a psychologically supportive meaning for the participants, since the partner provides psychological support, an opportunity to share and a sense of safety and security. He also boosts her confidence and self-esteem in her professional life. For thirty (30 women, their partner is a natural support. The mentally instrumental role of their partner

  16. Objectification in Virtual Romantic Contexts: Perceived Discrepancies between Self and Partner Ideals Differentially affect Body Consciousness in Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Nicole M; Quinn, Diane M; Marsh, Kerry L

    2015-11-01

    The current study examined whether exposure to sexually objectifying images in a potential romantic partner's virtual apartment affects discrepancies between people's perception of their own appearance (i.e., self-perceptions) and their perception of the body ideal that is considered desirable to a romantic partner (i.e., partner-ideals). Participants were 114 heterosexual undergraduate students (57 women and 57 men) from a northeastern U.S. university. The study used a 2 (Participant Gender) x 2 (Virtual Environment: Sexualized vs. Non-Sexualized) between-subjects design. We predicted that women exposed to sexually objectifying images in a virtual environment would report greater discrepancies between their self-perceptions and partner-ideals than men, which in turn would contribute to women's body consciousness. Findings support this hypothesis and show that perceived discrepancies account for the relationship between exposure to sexually objectifying images and body consciousness for women but not men. We also found gender asymmetries in objectification responses when each component of perceived discrepancies, i.e., self-perceptions versus perceptions of a romantic partner's body ideal, were examined separately. For men, exposure to muscular sexualized images was significantly associated with their self-perceptions but not their perceptions of the body size that is considered desirable to a romantic partner. For women, exposure to thin sexualized images was significantly associated with their perceptions that a romantic partner preferred a woman with a smaller body size. However, exposure to these images did not affect women's self-perceptions. Implications for gender asymmetries in objectification responses and perceived discrepancies that include a romantic partner's perceptions are discussed.

  17. Virtual conversation partner for adults with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepagnier, Cheryl Y; Olsen, Dale E; Boteler, Laura; Bell, Corinne A

    2011-01-01

    Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is notable for severely impaired reciprocal social interaction skills relative to language and intellectual abilities, presenting a major barrier to social integration and vocational success. Evidence-based interventions to address these needs are lacking. We report on the development of a small, prototype conversation simulation to teach conversational skills to adolescents and adults with ASD and average to superior intellectual abilities. We also report on a test of the feasibility and acceptability of the simulation approach with a sample of the target population. The simulation engages the user in a virtual conversation with an on-screen partner whose reactions provide naturalistic feedback geared to the appropriateness of the learner's response choices. The prototype simulation, which provides for up to 12 potentially unique multi-turn conversations, was used over a period of 2 weeks by 16 adolescents and adults who then rated statements about the system on a linear scale of 1 (disagreement) to 5 (high agreement). The participants highly endorsed the majority of positive statements about the quality and credibility of the interaction and the virtual conversation partner. In contrast, agreement with positive statements about instructional features external to the conversation was moderate. Unexpectedly, most participants strongly agreed that using the simulation had been helpful to them. Further development and testing in the context of a controlled study with randomized assignment to control and experimental groups are needed to determine whether this approach is effective in improving real-world pragmatic language behavior of high-functioning adults with ASD.

  18. Support at Work and Home: The Path to Satisfaction through Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Zivnuska, Suzanne; Whitten, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    This study examines social support (from both coworkers and partners) and its path to satisfaction through work-family balance. This study fills a gap by explaining how support impacts satisfaction in the same domain, across domains, and how it crosses over to impact the partner's domain. Using a matched dataset of 270 job incumbents and their…

  19. Social Support, Family Functioning and Parenting Competence in Adolescent Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Angley, Meghan; Divney, Anna; Magriples, Urania; Kershaw, Trace

    2015-01-01

    Depression is known to mediate the association between low social support and parenting competence in adult mothers, but this relationship is rarely assessed in adolescent mothers and fathers. The primary aim of this study was to identify the association between social support, family functioning and social capital on parenting competence, including self-efficacy and satisfaction in adolescent mothers and their partners. Secondary aims included identifying potential partner effects (e.g. whet...

  20. High prevalence and partner correlates of physical and sexual violence by intimate partners among street and off-street sex workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Argento

    Full Text Available Intimate partner violence (IPV is associated with increased risk of HIV among women globally. There is limited evidence and understanding about IPV and potential HIV risk pathways among sex workers (SWs. This study aims to longitudinally evaluate prevalence and correlates of IPV among street and off-street SWs over two-years follow-up.Longitudinal data were drawn from an open prospective cohort, AESHA (An Evaluation of Sex Workers Health Access in Metro Vancouver, Canada (2010-2012. Prevalence of physical and sexual IPV was measured using the WHO standardized IPV scale (version 9.9. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE were used to examine interpersonal and structural correlates of IPV over two years.At baseline, 387 SWs had a male, intimate sexual partner and were eligible for this analysis. One-fifth (n = 83, 21.5% experienced recent physical/sexual IPV at baseline and 26.2% over two-years follow-up. In multivariable GEE analysis, factors independently correlated with physical/sexual IPV in the last six months include: childhood (<18 years sexual/physical abuse (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-3.69, inconsistent condom use for vaginal and/or anal sex with intimate partner (AOR = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.07-3.16, support to intimate partner (AOR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.05-2.59, and sourcing drugs from intimate partner (AOR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.02-2.26.Our results demonstrate that over one-fifth of SWs in Vancouver report physical/sexual IPV in the last six months. The socio-structural correlates of IPV uncovered here highlight potential HIV risk pathways through SWs' intimate, non-commercial partner relationships. The high prevalence of IPV among SWs is a critical public health concern and underscores the need for integrated violence and HIV prevention and intervention strategies

  1. Psychosocial adjustment and marital intimacy among partners of patients with breast cancer: a comparison study with partners of healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the psychosocial adjustment of 70 partners of patients with breast cancer by comparing their emotional adjustment and quality of life (QoL) with 70 partners of women without cancer. The role of marital intimacy in their adjustment and the moderating effect of group type were analyzed. The partners of patients with breast cancer presented higher levels of anxious and depressive symptomatology; poor social, psychological, general and physical QoL; and higher levels of intimacy. The moderation analysis showed that higher levels of intimacy predicted lower levels of depression and anxiety and greater QoL only among the partners of cancer patients.

  2. Gaze transfer in remote cooperation: is it always helpful to see what your partner is attending to?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Romy; Helmert, Jens R; Pannasch, Sebastian; Velichkovsky, Boris M

    2013-01-01

    Establishing common ground in remote cooperation is challenging because nonverbal means of ambiguity resolution are limited. In such settings, information about a partner's gaze can support cooperative performance, but it is not yet clear whether and to what extent the abundance of information reflected in gaze comes at a cost. Specifically, in tasks that mainly rely on spatial referencing, gaze transfer might be distracting and leave the partner uncertain about the meaning of the gaze cursor. To examine this question, we let pairs of participants perform a joint puzzle task. One partner knew the solution and instructed the other partner's actions by (1) gaze, (2) speech, (3) gaze and speech, or (4) mouse and speech. Based on these instructions, the acting partner moved the pieces under conditions of high or low autonomy. Performance was better when using either gaze or mouse transfer compared to speech alone. However, in contrast to the mouse, gaze transfer induced uncertainty, evidenced in delayed responses to the cursor. Also, participants tried to resolve ambiguities by engaging in more verbal effort, formulating more explicit object descriptions and fewer deictic references. Thus, gaze transfer seems to increase uncertainty and ambiguity, thereby complicating grounding in this spatial referencing task. The results highlight the importance of closely examining task characteristics when considering gaze transfer as a means of support.

  3. Romantic partners in a market perspective: expectations about what ensures a highly desirable partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Felipe N; Hattori, Wallisen T; Yamamoto, Maria Emília; Lopes, Fívia A

    2013-10-01

    This study used the biological market perspective and influential statistical models from the marketing field to investigate males' and females' expectations regarding which combination of characteristics are most relevant in ensuring desirable partnerships for same-sex individuals. Thus, 358 Brazilian undergraduates assessed eight descriptions of same-gender stimulus targets (formulated with different levels of physical attractiveness, social skills, and current or prospective social status) and evaluated the overall desirability of the targets' expected or probable partners. From the possible combinations, three groups emerged: for one group, mainly composed of men, status characteristics were the most important attributes; for the others, mostly composed of women, social skills or physical characteristics were identified as most important in appealing to a desirable partner. This work expands the understanding of variability in male and female romantic expectations, and its implications are discussed from an evolutionary perspective.

  4. The Link Between Community-Based Violence and Intimate Partner Violence: the Effect of Crime and Male Aggression on Intimate Partner Violence Against Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ligia; Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Hossain, Mazeda; Watts, Charlotte; Zimmerman, Cathy

    2015-08-01

    Both intimate partner violence (IPV) and community violence are prevalent globally, and each is associated with serious health consequences. However, little is known about their potential links or the possible benefits of coordinated prevention strategies. Using aggregated data on community violence from the São Paulo State Security Department (INFOCRIM) merged with WHO multi-country study on women's health and domestic violence data, random intercept models were created to assess the effect of crime on women's probability of experiencing IPV. The association between IPV and male aggression (measured by women's reports of their partner's fights with other men) was examined using logistic regression models. We found little variation in the likelihood of male IPV perpetration related to neighborhood crime level but did find an increased likelihood of IPV experiences among women whose partners were involved in male-to-male violence. Emerging evidence on violence prevention has suggested some promising avenues for primary prevention that address common risk factors for both perpetration of IPV and male interpersonal violence. Strategies such as early identification and effective treatment of emotional disorders, alcohol abuse prevention and treatment, complex community-based interventions to change gender social norms and social marketing campaigns designed to modify social and cultural norms that support violence may work to prevent simultaneously male-on-male aggression and IPV. Future evaluations of these prevention strategies should simultaneously assess the impact of interventions on IPV and male interpersonal aggression.

  5. Latent Profiles of Perceived Time Adequacy for Paid Work, Parenting, and Partner Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soomi; Almeida, David M.; Davis, Kelly D.; King, Rosalind B.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Kelly, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined feelings of having enough time (i.e., perceived time adequacy) in a sample of employed parents (N=880) in information technology and extended-care industries. Adapting a person-centered latent profile approach, we identified three profiles of perceived time adequacy for paid work, parenting, and partner roles: Family Time Protected, Family Time Sacrificed, and Time Balanced. Drawing upon the Conservation of Resources theory (Hobfòll, 1989), we examined the associations of stressors and resources with the time adequacy profiles. Parents in the Family Time Sacrificed profile were more likely to be younger, women, have younger children, work in the extended-care industry, and have nonstandard work schedules compared to those in the Family Time Protected profile. Results from multinomial logistic regression analyses revealed that, with the Time Balanced profile as the reference group, having fewer stressors and more resources in the family context (less parent-child conflict and more partner support), work context (longer company tenure, higher schedule control and job satisfaction), and work-family interface (lower work-to-family conflict) was linked to a higher probability of membership in the Family Time Protected profile. By contrast, having more stressors and fewer resources, in the forms of less partner support and higher work-to-family conflict, predicted a higher likelihood of being in the Family Time Sacrificed profile. Our findings suggest that low work-to-family conflict is the most critical predictor of membership in the Family Time Protected profile, whereas lack of partner support is the most important factor to be included in the Family Time Sacrificed profile. PMID:26075739

  6. Between rigidity and chaos: worldviews of partners experiencing intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enosh, Guy; Eisikovits, Zvi; Gross, Chen

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this article was to examine the worldviews of cohabiting or married men and women who experienced domestic violence in their relationships. The study was based on content analysis of in-depth interviews with 48 men and women (24 couples), who were living together after experiencing at least one violent event in their relationships over the previous 12 months. Using constructivist grounded theory, the authors examined the deep structure of the ways by which partners living with intimate partner violence constructed their world. The men and women under study constructed heuristic models in two major life domains-psychological processes and how the world works overall. The analysis has revealed two axes resulting in four worldviews. The two axes were the construction of the world and the construction of the mind. Constructions of the mind ranged from chaotic to deterministic. Constructions of external reality ranged from static to fluid and uncontrollable. The theoretical model developed suggested four different types of basic worldviews. The suggested typology was examined in relation to existing typologies in the field of intimate partner violence and in relation to future research and interventions.

  7. Communicatie in de relatie als voorspeller van relatietevredenheid en depressieve symptomen van kankerpatiënten en hun intieme partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henselmans, I; Hagedoorn, M.; Buunk, Abraham (Bram); Sanderman, R.

    2004-01-01

    (from the journal abstract) The communication of support plays a central role in the adaptation process following the cancer diagnosis, for both patients and their partners. This study deals with the question how marital communication relates to marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms. The 174

  8. If You Get Better, Will I? An Actor-Partner Analysis of the Mutual Influence of Group Therapy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Jill D.; Kivlighan, D. Martin, III; Drogosz, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of group psychotherapy has been empirically studied and supported over several decades; however, there remains much to understand regarding the specific factors contributing to effective group psychotherapy. The current study uses Kashy and Kenny's (2000) actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) to examine the relationship…

  9. Exploring risk factors associated with intimate partner violence in Vietnam: results from a cross-sectional national survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.A.F.M.; Nguyen, T.V.N.; Hoang, T.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Empirical evidence documents that some risk factors for intimate partner violence (IPV) are similar across contexts, while others differ considerably. In Vietnam, there was a need to investigate risk factors for IPV to support evidence-based policy and programming. Methods Using the datas

  10. Promoting Young Children's Social Competence through the Preschool PATHS Curriculum and MyTeachingPartner Professional Development Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, Bridget K.; Pianta, Robert C.; Mashburn, Andrew J.; Downer, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: Children's (n = 980) social competence during prekindergarten was assessed as a function of their teachers' (n = 233) exposure to the Preschool Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) curriculum and 2 levels of support through MyTeachingPartner, a Web-based approach to professional development. Children in classrooms…

  11. Exploring risk factors associated with intimate partner violence in Vietnam: results from a cross-sectional national survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.A.F.M.; Nguyen, T.V.N.; Hoang, T.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Empirical evidence documents that some risk factors for intimate partner violence (IPV) are similar across contexts, while others differ considerably. In Vietnam, there was a need to investigate risk factors for IPV to support evidence-based policy and programming. Methods Using the

  12. Tips for Postpartum Dads and Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression During Pregnancy & Postpartum Anxiety During Pregnancy & Postpartum Pregnancy or Postpartum Obsessive Symptoms Postpartum Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Bipolar Mood Disorders Postpartum Psychosis Social Support ...

  13. When women tell: intimate partner violence and the factors related to police notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novisky, Meghan A; Peralta, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    We analyze how victim perceptions of mandatory arrest policies, perpetrator substance use, and presence of children are related to decisions to invoke law enforcement assistance. Logistic regression was used on survey responses from women receiving care in domestic violence shelters. Results suggest that as victim support for mandatory arrest increases, the odds of law enforcement notification of the abuse also increase. Accordingly, mandatory arrest may simply be reducing the probability of reporting intimate partner violence (IPV) among those who do not support the policy, instead of reducing IPV. Results also suggest that perpetrator substance use plays a significant role in law enforcement notification.

  14. Striving to make a difference: health care worker experiences with intimate partner violence clients in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laisser, Rose M; Lugina, Helen I; Lindmark, Gunilla; Nystrom, Lennarth; Emmelin, Maria

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe health care workers' (HCWs') experiences and perceptions of meeting clients exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). Qualitative content analysis of in-depth interviews from 16 informants resulted in four main themes. The first, "internalizing women's suffering and powerlessness," describes HCWs' perceptions of violence, relating it to gender relations. The second, "caught between encouraging disclosure and lack of support tools," refers to views on possibilities for transparency and openness. The third, "Why bother? A struggle to manage with limited resources," illustrates the consequences of a heavy workload. Last; "striving to make a difference," emphasizes a desire to improve abilities to support clients and advocate for prevention.

  15. "He Was the Story of My Drug Use Life": A Longitudinal Qualitative Study of the Impact of Partner Incarceration on Substance Misuse Patterns Among African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Hannah Lf; Clark, Claire Ducharme; Barham, Terrika; Embry, Venita; Caruso, Bethany; Comfort, Megan

    2013-08-21

    This NIH-funded longitudinal qualitative study explored pathways through which partner incarceration affected substance misuse among African American women. Four waves of semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 substance-misusing African American women whose partners had recently been incarcerated. Data were collected in Atlanta, Georgia, during 2010-2011. Transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Analyses suggest that partner incarceration initially precipitated multiple crises in women's lives (e.g., homelessness); over time, and with formal and informal support, women got their lives "back on track." Substance misuse declined over time, though spiked for some women during the crisis period. We discuss implications for research and interventions.

  16. Discussing partner abuse: Does doctor's gender really matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, S.H.; Jonge, A. de; Wester, F.P.J.; Mol, S.S.L.; Römkens, R.R.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are conflicting findings on the influence of gender on responding to partner abuse. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to explore gender differences in family doctors' views, attitudes, experiences and practices regarding intimate partner abuse against women. METHODS: We used the focus-group

  17. Discussing partner abuse : Does doctor's gender really matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo Fo Wong, S.; de Jonge, A.; Wester, F.; Mol, S.; Römkens, R.; Lagro-Janssen, T.

    2006-01-01

    Background. There are conflicting findings on the influence of gender on responding to partner abuse. Objectives. We aimed to explore gender differences in family doctors' views, attitudes, experiences and practices regarding intimate partner abuse against women. Methods. We used the focus-group

  18. 76 FR 68745 - Seneca Power Partners, L.P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ...] Seneca Power Partners, L.P. v. New York Independent System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Complaint Take... and Procedures, 18 CFR 385.206, Seneca Power Partners, L.P. (Complainant) filed a complaint against... TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Comment Date: 5 p.m. Eastern Time on November 28, 2011. Dated: October...

  19. The crossover of burnout and its relation to partner health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Bakker (Arnold)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTwo studies among medical residents and teachers in the Netherlands and Greece tested the hypothesis that burnout may transfer from employees to their intimate partners at home and indirectly influence the partner's health. Study 1 included a general index of self-rated health, whereas,

  20. Intimate Partner Violence and Belief Systems in Liberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mary; Devitt, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Intimate partner violence is endemic in parts of the African continent. A small scale survey (n = 229) was conducted in 2009 in Northern Liberia, West Africa, to determine the prevalence and nature of intimate partner violence, and the cultural beliefs and gender norms that underpin respondent experiences and views towards intimate partner…

  1. Attitudes toward Intimate Partner Violence in Dating Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincham, Frank D.; Cui, Ming; Braithwaite, Scott; Pasley, Kay

    2008-01-01

    Prevention of intimate partner violence on college campuses includes programs designed to change attitudes, and hence, a scale that assesses such attitudes is needed. Study 1 (N = 859) cross validates the factor structure of the Intimate Partner Violence Attitude Scale-Revised using exploratory factor analysis and presents initial validity data on…

  2. Trauma Symptoms among Infants Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogat, G. Anne; DeJonghe, Erika; Levendosky, Alytia A.; Davidson, William S.; von Eye, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether infants have a traumatic response to intimate partner violence (male violence toward their female partner; IPV) experienced by their mothers, two questions were explored: (1) Is the number of infant trauma symptoms related to the infant's temperament and the mother's mental health? (2) Does severity of violence…

  3. 76 FR 50715 - Briefing on Partner Vetting System Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Agency for International Development Briefing on Partner Vetting System Pilot Program... briefing. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of a briefing on the Partner Vetting System (PVS) pilot program. The objective of the briefing is to provide information about the PVS pilot program. Members of the...

  4. Interaction Design Patterns for ePartners : Method and Example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulissen, R.T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cremers, A.H.M.; Kranenborg, K.

    2013-01-01

    An ePartner is a personal computer application that helps its user to achieve personal goals such as managing his or her health related behaviors concerning nutrition, exercise and medication. The aim of the first phase of the ‘ePartners that Care’ project is to achieve a general method and framewor

  5. Betriebliche Bildungsmanager als Business Partner: Professionalisierung und Kompetenzen

    OpenAIRE

    Breßler, Julia; Gehde, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Das Paper ist motiviert durch die Arbeiten von Hasanbegovic, die Bildungsmanagement einbetten in Beratungsforschung und in Managementkonzepte sowie die Arbeit von Diesner, die den Typ 3 Bildungsmanagement als Business Partner einführt. Aufgrund dieser Vorarbeiten analysieren wir betriebliche Bildungsmanager als Business Partner und erarbeiten ein spezifisches Kompetenzprofil. Darauf aufbauend synthetisieren wir die Ergebnisse im Hinblick auf die Professionalisierungstheorie nach Freidson. ...

  6. Parenting and Women Arrested for Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Catherine A.; Lehmann, Peter; Dia, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the relationship between parenting and women's use of violence the current study surveyed 106 mothers arrested for intimate partner violence (IPV) related crimes on parenting styles and attitudes toward when using violence against their partner is justified. Findings indicate parenting styles indicative of low belief in using physical…

  7. Intimate Partner Violence: Building Resilience with Families and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Thomasine T.

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence includes physical, emotional, or sexual maltreatment from an intimate partner that may include name-calling, hitting, controlling behaviors, use of weapons, rape, intimidation, and a plethora of other physical and emotional tactics (Kress, Protivnak, & Sadlak, 2008; United States Department of Justice, 2013). Such…

  8. Self and partner personality and responses to relationship threats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2008-01-01

    Two studies examined the relations between three different types of jealousy and personality characteristics of self and partner in two large heterogeneous community samples of heterosexual couples (459 and 230 couples, respectively). It was expected that partners would resemble each other to some e

  9. Associating Pregnancy with Partner Violence against Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ko Ling; Brownridge, Douglas A.; Tiwari, Agnes; Fong, Daniel Y. T.; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ho, Pak Chung

    2011-01-01

    The present study discusses if pregnancy is a risk factor for intimate partner violence using a large, representative sample containing detailed information on partner violence including physical and sexual abuse as well as perpetrator-related risk factors. Data from a representative sample of 2,225 men were analyzed. The self-reported prevalence…

  10. Differences between Partners from Heterosexual, Gay, and Lesbian Cohabiting Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-01

    Partners from four types of couples without children (gay unmarried, lesbian unmarried, heterosexual unmarried, and heterosexual married, Ns=1,412, 1,310, 1,036, and 1,728, respectively) were compared to partners from heterosexual married couples with children ("N"= 3,116) on mean levels of variables from a model of relationship adjustment as well…

  11. Sex Partner with No Zika Symptoms Transmits Virus: CDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_160643.html Sex Partner With No Zika Symptoms Transmits Virus: CDC New report also highlights ties between Zika ... HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials report that the Zika virus can be spread sexually even when a partner ...

  12. Colorful Twisted Top Partners and Partnerium at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, Yevgeny; McCullough, Matthew; Perez, Gilad; Soreq, Yotam; Thaler, Jesse

    2017-06-01

    In scenarios that stabilize the electroweak scale, the top quark is typically accompanied by partner particles. In this work, we demonstrate how extended stabilizing symmetries can yield scalar or fermionic top partners that transform as ordinary color triplets but carry exotic electric charges. We refer to these scenarios as "hypertwisted" since they involve modifications to hypercharge in the top sector. As proofs of principle, we construct two hypertwisted scenarios: a supersymmetric construction with spin-0 top partners, and a composite Higgs construction with spin-1/2 top partners. In both cases, the top partners are still phenomenologically compatible with the mass range motivated by weak-scale naturalness. The phenomenology of hypertwisted scenarios is diverse, since the lifetimes and decay modes of the top partners are model dependent. The novel coupling structure opens up search channels that do not typically arise in top-partner scenarios, such as pair production of top-plus-jet resonances. Furthermore, hypertwisted top partners are typically sufficiently long lived to form "top-partnerium" bound states that decay predominantly via annihilation, motivating searches for rare narrow resonances with diboson decay modes.

  13. Gender Differences in Expectations of Self and Future Partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1992-01-01

    Investigated expectations that 131 single female and 103 male college students had for themselves and their future marital partners. Genders did not differ on expectations for personal success but did differ on expectations for success of future marital partner. Women expected more success for future husbands than men expected for wives.…

  14. Interaction Design Patterns for ePartners : Method and Example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulissen, R.T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cremers, A.H.M.; Kranenborg, K.

    2013-01-01

    An ePartner is a personal computer application that helps its user to achieve personal goals such as managing his or her health related behaviors concerning nutrition, exercise and medication. The aim of the first phase of the ‘ePartners that Care’ project is to achieve a general method and framewor

  15. Institutional Distance and Partner Selection in International Technological Alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krammer, Marius

    2013-01-01

    This study posits that institutional distance has a negative influence on partner selection in international technological alliances. Empirical results based on a dataset of firms in the global tire industry confirm that firms prefer technological partners from closer cognitive, normative and regula

  16. Partner's stake in conformity and abused wives' psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaris, Alfred; Kaukinen, Catherine

    2008-10-01

    This study investigates the potential buffering effect of help-seeking in the association between intimate partner assault and women's psychological trauma, and how this, in turn, may depend on the partner's stake in conformity. The sample consists of 374 women reporting the experience of domestic violence from a current intimate partner, drawn from the larger survey Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996. Help-seeking did not appear to buffer the impact of assault severity, contrary to expectation. However, the partner's stake in conformity did condition the effect of his or her having been arrested. Victims had higher levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) when police arrested partners of average or below-average stake in conformity. But victims of partners characterized by higher than average stake in conformity did not show elevated PTSD due to their partners having been arrested. On the other hand, PTSD was higher among women experiencing more emotional abuse from the partner.

  17. Differences between Partners from Heterosexual, Gay, and Lesbian Cohabiting Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-01

    Partners from four types of couples without children (gay unmarried, lesbian unmarried, heterosexual unmarried, and heterosexual married, Ns=1,412, 1,310, 1,036, and 1,728, respectively) were compared to partners from heterosexual married couples with children ("N"= 3,116) on mean levels of variables from a model of relationship adjustment as well…

  18. Partnering with Big Pharma-What Academics Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Stuart A; Nordstedt, Christer

    2016-04-21

    Knowledge of the parameters of drug development can greatly aid academic scientists hoping to partner with pharmaceutical companies. Here, we discuss the three major pillars of drug development-pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity studies-which, in addition to pre-clinical efficacy, are critical for partnering with Big Pharma to produce novel therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gender Differences in Expectations of Self and Future Partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1992-01-01

    Investigated expectations that 131 single female and 103 male college students had for themselves and their future marital partners. Genders did not differ on expectations for personal success but did differ on expectations for success of future marital partner. Women expected more success for future husbands than men expected for wives.…

  20. The crossover of burnout and its relation to partner health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Bakker (Arnold)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTwo studies among medical residents and teachers in the Netherlands and Greece tested the hypothesis that burnout may transfer from employees to their intimate partners at home and indirectly influence the partner's health. Study 1 included a general index of self-rated health, whereas,