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Sample records for extra chromosomal dna

  1. Rapid evolution of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Xylose fermentation through formation of extra-chromosomal circular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeke, Mekonnen M; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M

    2015-03-01

    Circular DNA elements are involved in genome plasticity, particularly of tandem repeats. However, amplifications of DNA segments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reported so far involve pre-existing repetitive sequences such as ribosomal DNA, Ty elements and Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs). Here, we report the generation of an eccDNA, (extrachromosomal circular DNA element) in a region without any repetitive sequences during an adaptive evolution experiment. We performed whole genome sequence comparison between an efficient D-xylose fermenting yeast strain developed by metabolic and evolutionary engineering, and its parent industrial strain. We found that the heterologous gene XylA that had been inserted close to an ARS sequence in the parent strain has been amplified about 9 fold in both alleles of the chromosomal locus of the evolved strain compared to its parent. Analysis of the amplification process during the adaptive evolution revealed formation of a XylA-carrying eccDNA, pXI2-6, followed by chromosomal integration in tandem arrays over the course of the evolutionary adaptation. Formation of the eccDNA occurred in the absence of any repetitive DNA elements, probably using a micro-homology sequence of 8 nucleotides flanking the amplified sequence. We isolated the pXI2-6 eccDNA from an intermediate strain of the evolutionary adaptation process, sequenced it completely and showed that it confers high xylose fermentation capacity when it is transferred to a new strain. In this way, we have provided clear evidence that gene amplification can occur through generation of eccDNA without the presence of flanking repetitive sequences and can serve as a rapid means of adaptation to selection pressure.

  2. Extra-chromosomal DNA maintenance in Bacillus subtilis, dependence on flagellation factor FliF and moonlighting mediator EdmS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakumai, Yuichi; Shimomoto, Kouko; Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2015-05-15

    Extra-chromosomal DNA maintenance (EDM) as an important process in the propagation and genetic engineering of microbes. Bacillus subtilis EdmS (formerly PgsE), a protein comprising 55 amino acids, is a mediator of the EDM process. In this study, the effect of mutation of global regulators on B. subtilis EDM was examined. Mutation of the swrA gene abolished EdmS-mediated EDM. It is known that swrA predominantly regulates expression of the fla/che operon in B. subtilis. We therefore performed EDM analysis using fla/che-deletion mutants and identified an EDM-mediated EDM cooperator in the flgB-fliL region. Further genetic investigation identified the flagellation factor FliF is a crucial EDM cooperator. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of the moonlighting function of FliF in DNA maintenance.

  3. Origin of extra chromosome in Patau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikiriyama, S; Niikawa, N

    1984-01-01

    Five live-born infants with Patau syndrome were studied for the nondisjunctional origin of the extra chromosome. Transmission modes of chromosomes 13 from parents to a child were determined using both QFQ- and RFA-heteromorphisms as markers, and the origin was ascertained in all of the patients. The extra chromosome had originated in nondisjunction at the maternal first meiotic division in two patients, at the maternal second meiosis in other two, and at the paternal first meiosis in the remaining one. Summarizing the results of the present study, together with those of the previous studies on a liveborn and abortuses with trisomy 13, nondisjunction at the maternal and the paternal meiosis occurred in this trisomy in the ratio of 14:3. This ratio is not statistically different from that inferred from the previous studies for Down syndrome. These findings suggest that there may be a fundamental mechanism common to the occurrence of nondisjunction in the acrocentric trisomies.

  4. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Bryan Utter

    Full Text Available In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01 from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC. Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT.

  5. The blessing effect of an extra copy of chromosome 21

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solaf M. Elsayed

    2014-02-25

    Feb 25, 2014 ... The protective effect of the extra copy of chromosome against the ... genesis by decreasing the vascular endothelial growth factor. C (VEGF-C) levels in .... [8] Sun Y, Wang J, Liu Y, Song X, Zhang Y, Li K, et al. Results of.

  6. The origin of the extra Y chromosome in males with a 47,XYY karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D O; Jacobs, P A

    1999-11-01

    The presence of an extra Y chromosome in males is a relatively common occurrence, the 47,XYY karyotype being found in approximately 1 in 1000 male births. The error of disjunction must occur either during paternal meiosis II or as a post-zygotic mitotic error, both of which are rare events for other chromosomes. It is therefore of interest to determine when errors of Y chromosome disjunction occur. It is possible to distinguish between the different mechanisms of non-disjunction by analysing DNA polymorphisms at the distal tip of the Xp/Yp pseudoautosomal region in 47,XYY males, their parents and in some cases paternal grandparents. A cohort of 28 non-mosaic 47,XYY males was analysed. The results show that there are at least two mechanisms causing non-disjunction of the Y chromosome. In 16 of the 19 cases from which parents were available, the extra Y was generated by non-disjunction at meiosis II after a normal chiasmate meiosis I. Three cases were due to either a post-zygotic mitotic error or non-disjunction at meiosis II after a nullichiasmate meiosis I. Of the nine cases with no parental DNA available, at least four were due to meiosis II non-disjunction following a normal chiasmate meiosis I.

  7. Social cognition and underlying cognitive mechanisms in children with an extra X chromosome : a comparison with autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, S.; Stockmann, L.; van Buggenhout, G.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.; Swaab, H.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with an extra X chromosome are at increased risk for autism symptoms. This study is the first to assess theory of mind and facial affect labeling in children with an extra X chromosome. Forty-six children with an extra X chromosome (29 boys with Klinefelter syndrome and 17 girls with Tri

  8. SCREENING OF PRESENCE OF EXTRA Y CHROMOSOME IN AGGRESSIVE TALL MALES OF NORTH INDIAN REGION

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    Balreet kaur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aggression has been hypothesised with biological instinctual theory, frustration theory and social learning theory. The biological instinctual theory was based on hereditary factors and is associated with XYY syndrome. Objectives: To find out the presence of extra Y chromosome in aggressive taller males of north Indian region. Materials and Methods: Buss and Perry questionnaire was used to find out the aggression of the subjects. The height was measured with the help of metallic tape. Quinacrine dihydrochloride and Macllvaines Buffer was used to stain the buccal smear slide for the general screening of the number of Y chromosomes. The conventional metaphase was prepared for the confirmation of number of Y chromosomes and the slides were stained with giemsa. Observations: The aggression was found more in taller males and they had no extra Y chromosome. Conclusions: Extra Y chromosome may be the cause of aggression and more height in males. But in the present study of males of north Indian region no extra Y chromosome was found in aggressive and taller males.

  9. Fifty probands with extra structurally abnormal chromosomes characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, E.; Telenius, H.; Nordenskjoeld, M. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-01-02

    Extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (ESACs) are small supernumerary chromosomes often associated with developmental abnormalities and malformations. We present 50 probands with ESACs characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization using centromere-specific probes and chromosome-specific libraries. ESAC-specific libraries were constructed by flow sorting and subsequent amplification by DOP-PCR. Using such ESAC-specific libraries we were able to outline the chromosome regions involved. Twenty-three of the 50 ESACs were inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup(15)), including patients with normal phenotypes and others with similar clinical symptoms. These 2 groups differed in size and shape of the inv dup(15). Patients with a large inv dup(15), which included the Prader-Willi region, had a high risk of abnormality, whereas patients with a small inv dup(15), not including the Prader-Willi region, were normal. ESACs derived from chromosomes 13 or 21 appeared to have a low risk of abnormality, while one out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 14 had discrete symptoms. One out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 22 had severe anomalies, corresponding to some of the manifestations of the cat eye syndrome. Small extra ring chromosomes of autosomal origin and ESACs identified as i(12p) or i(18p) were all associated with a high risk of abnormality. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

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    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  11. Origin and molecular organization of supernumerary chromosomes of Prochilodus lineatus (characiformes, prochilodontidae) obtained by DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltolin, Tatiana Aparecida; Laudicina, Alejandro; Senhorini, José Augusto; Bortolozzi, Jehud; Oliveira, Cláudio; Foresti, Fausto; Porto-Foresti, Fábio

    2010-12-01

    In Prochilodus lineatus B-chromosomes are visualized as reduced size extra elements identified as microchromosomes and are variable in morphology and number. We describe the specific total probe (B-chromosome probe) in P. lineatus obtained by chromosome microdissection and a whole genomic probe (genomic probe) from an individual without B-chromosome. The specific B-chromosome was scraped and processed to obtain DNA with amplification by DOP-PCR, and so did the genomic probe DNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using the B-chromosome probe labeled with dUTP-Tetramethyl-rhodamine and the genomic probe labeled with digoxigenin-FITC permitted to establish that in this species supernumerary chromosomes with varying number and morphology had different structure of chromatin when compared to that of the regular chromosomes or A complement, since only these extra elements were labeled in the metaphases. The present findings suggest that modifications in the chromatin structure of B-chromosomes to differentiate them from the A chromosomes could occur along their dispersion in the individuals of the population.

  12. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  13. Associated chromosomal DNA changes in polyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, S N; Parida, A; Koul, K K; Salimath, S S; Bisht, M S; Raja, V; Khoshoo, T N

    1994-08-01

    The 2C and 4C nuclear DNA amounts were estimated in eight diploid species, belonging to three diverse genera (Vicia, Tephrosia, and Phlox) and their corresponding colchitetraploids. In P. drummondii, T. purpurea, and T. oxygona tetraploids the deviation from the expectation was highly significant. The DNA in P. drummondii was further discarded in subsequent (C1, C2) generations, thus attaining an overall reduction of about 25%. The DNA content in the subsequent generations was the same as that of C2. It is concluded that rapid DNA loss in the first and subsequent generations was not only associated with the substantial increase (30-66%) in the seed set, but it also helped in the establishment and stabilization of the tetraploid. The possible relationship between such a nucleotypic change and success of polyploids is discussed. The DNA change from the expected value in the P. drummondii tetraploid was achieved by equal decrement to each chromosome independent of size, i.e., small chromosomes loose the same amount of DNA as the large chromosomes.

  14. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

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    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  15. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  16. Proptosis, Micrognathia, Low Set Ear and Chest Deformity in a Patient with Extra Marker Chromosome 22

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    Asieh Mosallanejad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a number of syndromes, associated with proptosis, micrognathia, low-set ear and chest deformity. Herein, we report a 9-year-old female with such phenotype who was presented with a vaginal neuroma. The result of karyotype showed 47XX, with extra marker chromosome 22. Although such a manifestation had not been reported in the literature, it should be considered as a very rare manifestation of the disease.

  17. Sex ratio in normal and disomic sperm: Evidence that the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome

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    Griffin, D.K.; Millie, E.A.; Hassold, T.J. [Case Western Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    In humans, deviations from a 1:1 male:female ratio have been identified in both chromosomally normal and trisomic live births: among normal newborns there is a slight excess of males, among trisomy 18 live borns a large excess of females, and among trisomy 21 live borns an excess of males. These differences could arise from differential production of or fertilization by Y- or X-bearing sperm or from selection against male or female conceptions. To examine the proportion of Y- and X- bearing sperm in normal sperm and in sperm disomic for chromosomes 18 or 21, we used three-color FISH (to the X and Y and either chromosome 18 or chromosome 21) to analyze > 300,000 sperm from 24 men. In apparently normal sperm, the sex ratio was nearly 1:1 (148,074 Y-bearing to 148,657 X-bearing sperm), and the value was not affected by the age of the donor. Certain of the donors, however, had significant excesses of Y- or X-bearing sperm. In disomy 18 sperm, there were virtually identical numbers of Y- and X-bearing sperm; thus, the excess of females in trisomy 18 presumably is due to selection against male trisomic conceptions. In contrast, we observed 69 Y-bearing and 44 X-bearing sperm disomic for chromosome 21. This is consistent with previous molecular studies, which have identified an excess of males among paternally derived cases of trisomy 21, and suggests that some of the excess of males among Down syndrome individuals is attributable to a nondisjunctional mechanism in which the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. B chromosome in the beetle Coprophanaeus cyanescens (Scarabaeidae: emphasis in the organization of repetitive DNA sequences

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    Gomes de Oliveira Sarah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To contribute to the knowledge of coleopteran cytogenetics, especially with respect to the genomic content of B chromosomes, we analyzed the composition and organization of repetitive DNA sequences in the Coprophanaeus cyanescens karyotype. We used conventional staining and the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH mapping using as probes C0t-1 DNA fraction, the 18S and 5S rRNA genes, and the LOA-like non-LTR transposable element (TE. Results The conventional analysis detected 3 individuals (among 50 analyzed carrying one small metacentric and mitotically unstable B chromosome. The FISH analysis revealed a pericentromeric block of C0t-1 DNA in the B chromosome but no 18S or 5S rDNA clusters in this extra element. Using the LOA-like TE probe, the FISH analysis revealed large pericentromeric blocks in eight autosomal bivalents and in the B chromosome, and a pericentromeric block extending to the short arm in one autosomal pair. No positive hybridization signal was observed for the LOA-like element in the sex chromosomes. Conclusions The results indicate that the origin of the B chromosome is associated with the autosomal elements, as demonstrated by the hybridization with C0t-1 DNA and the LOA-like TE. The present study is the first report on the cytogenetic mapping of a TE in coleopteran chromosomes. These TEs could have been involved in the origin and evolution of the B chromosome in C. cyanescens.

  19. [DNA image-fluorimetry of individual human chromosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, N A; Sakuta, G A; Rozanov, Iu M; Shteĭn, G I; Kudriavtsev, B N

    2013-01-01

    Mucrofluorimetric method for the determination of DNA content in individual human chromosomes has been developed. The method is based on a preliminary identification of chromosomes with Hoechst 33258, followed by staining of the chromosomes with Feulgen reaction using Schiffs reagent type ethidium bromide-SO2, then measuring the fluorescence intensity of the chromosomes using an image analyzer. The method allows to determine the DNA content of individual chromosomes with accuracy up to 4.5 fg. DNA content of individual human chromosomes, their p-and q-arms as well as homologous chromosomes were measured using the developed method. It has been shown that the DNA content in the chromosomes of normal human karyotype is unstable. Fluctuations in the DNA content in some chromosomes can vary 35-40 fg.

  20. Analysis of repetitive DNA in chromosomes by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brind'Amour, Julie; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2011-06-01

    We developed a flow cytometry method, chromosome flow fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), called CFF, to analyze repetitive DNA in chromosomes using FISH with directly labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes. We used CFF to measure the abundance of interstitial telomeric sequences in Chinese hamster chromosomes and major satellite sequences in mouse chromosomes. Using CFF we also identified parental homologs of human chromosome 18 with different amounts of repetitive DNA.

  1. Fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA using click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Takumi; Liu, Hong Shan; Ito, Kenichiro; Xu, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome visualization is essential for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. Here, we developed a click chemistry approach for multicolor imaging of chromosomal DNA instead of the traditional dye method. We first demonstrated that the commercially available reagents allow for the multicolor staining of chromosomes. We then prepared two pro-fluorophore moieties that served as light-up reporters to stain chromosomal DNA based on click reaction and visualized the clear chromosomes in multicolor. We applied this strategy in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, telomere DNA at the end of the chromosome. We further extended this approach to observe several basic stages of cell division. We found that the click reaction enables direct visualization of the chromosome behavior in cell division. These results suggest that the technique can be broadly used for imaging chromosomes and may serve as a new approach for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics.

  2. Fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA using click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Takumi; Liu, Hong Shan; Ito, Kenichiro; Xu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome visualization is essential for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. Here, we developed a click chemistry approach for multicolor imaging of chromosomal DNA instead of the traditional dye method. We first demonstrated that the commercially available reagents allow for the multicolor staining of chromosomes. We then prepared two pro-fluorophore moieties that served as light-up reporters to stain chromosomal DNA based on click reaction and visualized the clear chromosomes in multicolor. We applied this strategy in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, telomere DNA at the end of the chromosome. We further extended this approach to observe several basic stages of cell division. We found that the click reaction enables direct visualization of the chromosome behavior in cell division. These results suggest that the technique can be broadly used for imaging chromosomes and may serve as a new approach for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. PMID:27620982

  3. The origin of human chromosome 2 analyzed by comparative chromosome mapping with a DNA microlibrary

    OpenAIRE

    Wienberg, Johannes; Jauch, Anna; Lüdecke, H J; Senger, G.; Horsthemke, B; Claussen, U.; Cremer, Thomas; Arnold, N; Lengauer, Christoph

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescencein situ hybridization (FISH) of microlibraries established from distinct chromosome subregions can test the evolutionary conservation of chromosome bands as well as chromosomal rearrangements that occurred during primate evolution and will help to clarify phylogenetic relationships. We used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning from the entire long arm of human chromosome 2 for fluorescencein situ hybridization and comparative mapping of the chromosomes of ...

  4. Isolation and characterization of DNA probes for human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, P C

    1990-01-01

    A coordinated effort to map and sequence the human genome has recently become a national priority. Chromosome 21, the smallest human chromosome accounting for less than 2% of the human genome, is an attractive model system for developing and evaluating genome mapping technology. Several strategies are currently being explored including the development of chromosome 21 libraries from somatic cell hybrids as reported here, the cloning of chromosome 21 in yeast artificial chromosomes (McCormick et al., 1989b), and the construction of chromosome 21 libraries using chromosome flow-sorting techniques (Fuscoe et al., 1989). This report describes the approaches used to identify DNA probes that are useful for mapping chromosome 21. Probes were successfully isolated from both phage and cosmid libraries made from two somatic cell hybrids that contain human chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome. The 15 cosmid clones from the WA17 library, reduced to cloned DNA sequences of an average size of 3 kb, total 525 kb of DNA which is approximately 1% of chromosome 21. From these clones, a set of polymorphic DNA markers that span the length of the long arm of chromosome 21 has been generated. All of the probes thus far analyzed from the WA17 libraries have been mapped to chromosome 21 both by physical and genetic mapping methods. It is therefore likely that the WA17 hybrid cell line contains human chromosome 21 as the only human component, in agreement with cytogenetic observation. The 153E7b cosmid libraries will provide an alternative source of cloned chromosome 21 DNA. Library screening techniques can be employed to obtain cloned DNA sequences from the same genetic loci of the two different chromosome 21s. Comparative analysis will allow direct estimation of DNA sequence variation for different regions of chromosome 21. Mapped DNA probes make possible the molecular analysis of chromosome 21 at a level of resolution not achievable by classical cytogenetic techniques (Graw et al

  5. Z-DNA immunoreactivity in fixed metaphase chromosomes of primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas-Péquignot, E; Derbin, C; Malfoy, B; Taillandier, E; Leng, M; Dutrillaux, B

    1983-10-01

    Antibodies against Z-DNA bind to fixed metaphase chromosomes of man and Cebus albifrons (Platyrrhini, Primate). By indirect immunofluorescence and indirect immunoperoxidase techniques, a heavy staining is detected in some segments of chromosomes of C. albifrons. These segments correspond to R-band-positive heterochromatin, which has a high G + C-base content. Euchromatin of human and Cebus chromosomes show a weak and heterogeneous staining that consistently reproduces an R- and T-banding pattern in both species. Because chromosome homologies previously were demonstrated between these distantly related species by chromosome banding, our results suggest that Z-DNA has been conserved during the course of primate evolution.

  6. [The paternal origin of an extra chromosome 13 from the patient with patau syndrome.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qin; Cui, Ying-Xia; Wang, Yong-Mei; Huang, Yu-Feng

    2005-05-01

    A boy was born at 38 week's gestation by Cesarean delivery . Affected newborn was characteristically bilateral cleft lip and severe cleft palate. The sternum was malformation. The sacrospinal bifida and the talipes varus were found and the testes were not descended. The boy died after delivery within 10 minutes owing to respiratory failure. Cytogenetic analysis of his peripheral lymphocyte by G banding showed a karyotype 47,XY,+13 , which was also confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The locus D13S317 was detected by the peripheral blood from the boy and the parents. Three alleles were found from the boy in locus D13S317 and two from the father. The extra chromosome 13 was from the nondisjunction during the first meiotic division of the father.

  7. Forensic use of Y-chromosome DNA: a general overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe male-specific part of the human Y chromosome is widely used in forensic DNA analysis, particularly in cases where standard autosomal DNA profiling is not informative. A Y-chromosomal gene fragment is applied for inferring the biological sex of a crime scene trace donor. Haplotypes co

  8. Characters of DNA Constitution in the Rye B Chromosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Long; Zhong-Xia Qi; Xiao-Ming Sun; Cheng-Bin Chen; Xiu-Lan Li; Wen-Qin Song; Rui-Yang Chen

    2008-01-01

    We have used chromosome microdissection and microcloning to construct a DNA library of the entire B chromosome (B) of rye. New rye B-specific sequences have been screened from this pool, blasted with other sequences and analyzed to elucidate the characters of DNA constitution and the possible pathway of the origin of the rye B chromosome. We report the discovery of a new sequence that is specific to the rye B centromere.

  9. The parent-of-origin of the extra X chromosome may differentially affect psychopathology in Klinefelter syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, Hilgo; van Rijn, Sophie; Swaab, Hanna; Giltay, Jacques; Kates, Wendy; Kas, Martien J H; van Engeland, Herman; de Sonneville, Leo

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several genetic mechanisms have been proposed for the variability of the Klinefelter syndrome (KS) phenotype such as the parent-of-origin of the extra X chromosome. Parent-of-origin effects on behavior in KS can possibly provide insights into X-linked imprinting effects on psychopatholog

  10. The Parent-of-Origin of the Extra X Chromosome May Differentially Affect Psychopathology in Klinefelter Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, Hilgo; van Rijn, Sophie; Swaab, Hanna; Giltay, Jacques; Kates, Wendy; Kas, Martien J. H.; van Engeland, Herman; de Sonneville, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several genetic mechanisms have been proposed for the variability of the Klinefelter syndrome (KS) phenotype such as the parent-of-origin of the extra X chromosome. Parent-of-origin effects on behavior in KS can possibly provide insights into X-linked imprinting effects on psychopatholog

  11. The Social Behavioral Phenotype in Boys and Girls with an Extra X Chromosome (Klinefelter Syndrome and Trisomy X) : A Comparison with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Stockmann, Lex; Borghgraef, Martine; Bruining, Hilgo; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Hansson, Kerstin; Swaab, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to gain more insight in the social behavioral phenotype, and related autistic symptomatology, of children with an extra X chromosome in comparison to children with ASD. Participants included 60 children with an extra X chromosome (34 boys with Klinefelter syndrome and 26 girl

  12. The Social Behavioral Phenotype in Boys and Girls with an Extra X Chromosome (Klinefelter Syndrome and Trisomy X): A Comparison with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Stockmann, Lex; Borghgraef, Martine; Bruining, Hilgo; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Hansson, Kerstin; Swaab, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to gain more insight in the social behavioral phenotype, and related autistic symptomatology, of children with an extra X chromosome in comparison to children with ASD. Participants included 60 children with an extra X chromosome (34 boys with Klinefelter syndrome and 26 girls with Trisomy X), 58 children with ASD and 106…

  13. Extremely underwound chromosomal DNA in nucleoids of mouse sarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, M; Matthes, E; Arnold, W

    1981-07-01

    The superhelical properties of chromosomal DNA from cells of a mouse sarcoma were investigated in neutral sucrose gradients containing ethidium bromide. Removal of negative supercoiling from the DNA of the sarcoma cells required a substantially higher dye concentration than was necessary in the case of DNA from cultured mouse fibroblasts. The calculated value of the mean superhelical density in malignant cells (sigma = -0.14) appears abnormally high compared with the value (sigma = -0.09) obtained for DNA of mouse fibroblasts. Chromosomal DNA from mouse sarcoma cells is therefore concluded to be highly deficient in helical turns.

  14. Poor socio-economic status in 47,XXX --an unexpected effect of an extra X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Juul, Svend; Gravholt, Claus H

    2013-06-01

    One of the most common sex chromosomal abnormalities in females is 47,XXX syndrome, which is characterized by tall stature and reduced IQ, but with a variable phenotype. In order to elaborate on the characteristics of this syndrome, we undertook an investigation in all diagnosed 47,XXX females at risk in Denmark and compared their socio-economic status with an age-matched cohort of the female background population as well as with all Danes diagnosed with Turner syndrome. We focused on cohabitation, motherhoods, income, education, retirement and convictions. Furthermore, we investigated whether some of these parameters influenced the increased mortality identified previously. Thus, socio-economic data were retrieved in 108 47,XXX persons, 10,297 controls, and 831 with Turner syndrome. Comparing the 47,XXX persons with their controls, we identified significantly decreased numbers of first partnership, number of mothers, and number of persons with an education in 47,XXX persons. Significantly more 47,XXX persons retired. In the younger age groups an increased number had income below the median among controls. The increased mortality identified previously was not explained by the reduced number of partnerships or the reduced number of persons with an education. Comparing the 47,XXX persons with Turner syndrome persons, we identified increased number of first partnership, number of mothers, and reduced level of education. We hypothesize that the significantly decreased number of 47,XXX persons becoming mothers could be due to hypogonadism in some. The affected socio-economic status suggests that the presence of an extra X chromosome has more detrimental effects than previously appreciated.

  15. Z-DNA immunoreactivity in fixed metaphase chromosomes of primates.

    OpenAIRE

    Viegas-Péquignot, E; Derbin, C; Malfoy, B; Taillandier, E; Leng, M; Dutrillaux, B

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies against Z-DNA bind to fixed metaphase chromosomes of man and Cebus albifrons (Platyrrhini, Primate). By indirect immunofluorescence and indirect immunoperoxidase techniques, a heavy staining is detected in some segments of chromosomes of C. albifrons. These segments correspond to R-band-positive heterochromatin, which has a high G + C-base content. Euchromatin of human and Cebus chromosomes show a weak and heterogeneous staining that consistently reproduces an R- and T-banding patt...

  16. DNA Catenation Maintains Structure of Human Metaphase Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. V. Bauer, David; Marie, Rodolphe; Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted

    2012-01-01

    Mitotic chromosome structure is pivotal to cell division but difficult to observe in fine detail using conventional methods. DNA catenation has been implicated in both sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome condensation, but has never been observed directly. We have used a lab-on-a-chip...

  17. Evolutionarily different alphoid repeat DNA on homologous chromosomes in human and chimpanzee.

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, A L; Laursen, H B; Jones, C; Bak, A L

    1992-01-01

    Centromeric alphoid DNA in primates represents a class of evolving repeat DNA. In humans, chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid DNA while chromosomes 14 and 22 share another subfamily. We show that similar pairwise homogenizations occur in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), where chromosomes 14 and 22, homologous to human chromosomes 13 and 21, share one partially homogenized alphoid DNA subfamily and chromosomes 15 and 23, homologous to human chromosomes 14 and 22, share anothe...

  18. Microhomology directs diverse DNA break repair pathways and chromosomal translocations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana D Villarreal

    Full Text Available Chromosomal structural change triggers carcinogenesis and the formation of other genetic diseases. The breakpoint junctions of these rearrangements often contain small overlapping sequences called "microhomology," yet the genetic pathway(s responsible have yet to be defined. We report a simple genetic system to detect microhomology-mediated repair (MHMR events after a DNA double-strand break (DSB in budding yeast cells. MHMR using >15 bp operates as a single-strand annealing variant, requiring the non-essential DNA polymerase subunit Pol32. MHMR is inhibited by sequence mismatches, but independent of extensive DNA synthesis like break-induced replication. However, MHMR using less than 14 bp is genetically distinct from that using longer microhomology and far less efficient for the repair of distant DSBs. MHMR catalyzes chromosomal translocation almost as efficiently as intra-chromosomal repair. The results suggest that the intrinsic annealing propensity between microhomology sequences efficiently leads to chromosomal rearrangements.

  19. Micromechanical study of protein-DNA interactions and chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John

    I will discuss micromechanics experiments that our group has used to analyze protein-DNA interactions and chromosome organization. In single-DNA experiments we have found that a feature of protein-DNA complexes is that their dissociation rates can depend strikingly on bulk solution concentrations of other proteins and DNA segments; I will describe experiments which demonstrate this effect, which can involve tens-fold changes in off-rates with submicromolar changes in solution concentrations. Second, I will discuss experiments aimed at analyzing large-scale human chromosome structure; we isolate metaphase chromosomes, which in their native form behave as remarkably elastic networks of chromatin. Exposure to DNA-cutting restriction enzymes completely eliminates this elasticity, indicating that there is not a mechanically contiguous protein ''scaffold'' from which the chromosome gains its stability. I will show results of siRNA experiments indicating that depletion of condensin proteins leads to destabilization of chromosome mechanics, indicating condensin's role as the major chromatin ''cross-linker'' in metaphase chromosomes. Finally I will discuss similar experiments on human G1 nuclei, where we use genetic and chemical modifications to separate the contributions of the nuclear lamina and chromatin to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus as a whole. Supported by the NSF (DMR-1206868, MCB-1022117) and the NIH (GM105847, CA193419).

  20. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  1. REVIEW ARTICLE: DNA protein interactions and bacterial chromosome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavans, Joel; Oppenheim, Amos

    2006-12-01

    Bacteria, like eukaryotic organisms, must compact the DNA molecule comprising their genome and form a functional chromosome. Yet, bacteria do it differently. A number of factors contribute to genome compaction and organization in bacteria, including entropic effects, supercoiling and DNA-protein interactions. A gamut of new experimental techniques have allowed new advances in the investigation of these factors, and spurred much interest in the dynamic response of the chromosome to environmental cues, segregation, and architecture, during both exponential and stationary phases. We review these recent developments with emphasis on the multifaceted roles that DNA-protein interactions play.

  2. Integrative bacterial artificial chromosomes for DNA integration into the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a well-characterized model bacterium frequently used for a number of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Novel strategies combining the advantages of B. subtilis with the DNA assembly and editing tools of Escherichia coli are crucial for B. subtilis engineering efforts. We combined Gibson Assembly and λ red recombineering in E. coli with RecA-mediated homologous recombination in B. subtilis for bacterial artificial chromosome-mediated DNA integration into the well-characterized amyE target locus of the B. subtilis chromosome. The engineered integrative bacterial artificial chromosome iBAC(cav) can accept any DNA fragment for integration into B. subtilis chromosome and allows rapid selection of transformants by B. subtilis-specific antibiotic resistance and the yellow fluorescent protein (mVenus) expression. We used the developed iBAC(cav)-mediated system to integrate 10kb DNA fragment from E. coli K12 MG1655 into B. subtilis chromosome. iBAC(cav)-mediated chromosomal integration approach will facilitate rational design of synthetic biology applications in B. subtilis.

  3. Impact of chromosomal rearrangement upon DNA methylation patterns in leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byun Hyang-Min

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability, including genetic mutations and chromosomal rearrangements, can lead to cancer development. Aberrant DNA methylation occurs commonly in cancer cells. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of a specific chromosomal lesion the BCR-ABL translocation t(9:22, in establishing DNA methylation profiles in cancer. Materials and methods We compared DNA methylation of 1,505 selected promoter CpGs in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL with and without the Philadelphia chromosome t(9:22, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells transfected with BCR-ABL, and other tumors without BCR-ABL (acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST. In this study, the DNA methylation profile of CML was more closely related to APL, another myeloid leukemia, than Ph+ ALL. Although DNA methylation profiles were consistent within a specific tumor type, overall DNA methylation profiles were no influenced by BCR-ABL gene translocation in the cancers and tissues studied. We conclude that DNA methylation profiles may reflect the cell of origin in cancers rather than the chromosomal lesions involved in leukemogenesis.

  4. DNA methylation profiling of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22

    OpenAIRE

    Eckhardt, Florian; Lewin, Joern; Cortese, Rene; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Attwood, John; Burger, Matthias; Burton, John; Cox, Tony V.; Davies, Rob; Down, Thomas A; Haefliger, Carolina; Horton, Roger; Howe, Kevin; Jackson, David K.; Kunde, Jan

    2006-01-01

    DNA methylation constitutes the most stable type of epigenetic modifications modulating the transcriptional plasticity of mammalian genomes. Using bisulfite DNA sequencing, we report high-resolution methylation reference profiles of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22, providing a resource of about 1.9 million CpG methylation values derived from 12 different tissues. Analysis of 6 annotation categories, revealed evolutionary conserved regions to be the predominant sites for differential DNA methyl...

  5. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mark T; Grafham, Darren V; Coffey, Alison J; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L; Howe, Kevin L; Ashurst, Jennifer L; Fulton, Robert S; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C; Hurles, Matthew E; Andrews, T Daniel; Scott, Carol E; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P; Hunt, Sarah E; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I S; Babbage, Anne K; Bagguley, Claire L; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E; Barlow, Karen F; Barrett, Ian P; Bates, Karen N; Beare, David M; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M; Brown, Andrew J; Brown, Mary J; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G; Conquer, Jen S; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; Deshazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J; Huckle, Elizabeth J; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J; Hunt, Adrienne R; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J; Joseph, Shirin S; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E; Lovell, Jamieson D; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O'Dell, Christopher N; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V; Pearson, Danita M; Pelan, Sarah E; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G; Sehra, Harminder K; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D; Smith, Michelle L; Sotheran, Elizabeth C; Steingruber, Helen E; Steward, Charles A; Storey, Roy; Swann, R Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C; d'Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L; Whiteley, Mathew N; Wilkinson, Jane E; Willey, David L; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L; Wray, Paul W; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J; Hillier, Ladeana W; Willard, Huntington F; Wilson, Richard K; Waterston, Robert H; Rice, Catherine M; Vaudin, Mark; Coulson, Alan; Nelson, David L; Weinstock, George; Sulston, John E; Durbin, Richard; Hubbard, Tim; Gibbs, Richard A; Beck, Stephan; Rogers, Jane; Bentley, David R

    2005-03-17

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.

  6. Guarding chromosomes from oxidative DNA damage to the very end

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Tan; Li Lan

    2016-01-01

    The ends of each chromosome are capped by the telomere assembly to protect chromosomal integrity from telomere attrition and DNA damage.In response to DNA damage,DNA repair factors are enriched at damage sites by a sophisticated signaling and recruitment cascade.However,DNA damage response at telomeres is different from non-telomeric region of genomic DNA due to specialized sequences and structures of the telomeres.In the course of normal DNA replication or DNA damage repair,both the telomere shelterin protein complex and the condensed telomeric chromatin structure in mammalian cells are modified to protect telomeres from exposing free DNA ends which are subject to both telemere shortening and chromosome end fusion.Initiation of either homologous recombination or non-homologous end joint repair at telomeres requires disassembling andaor post-translational modifications of the shelterin complex and telomeric chromatin.In addition,cancer cells utilize distinct mechanisms to maintain telomere length and cell survival upon damage.In this review,we summarize current studies that focus on telomere end protection and telomere DNA repair using different methodologies to model telomere DNA damage and disruption.These include genetic ablation of sheltering proteins,targeting endonuclease to telomeres,and delivering oxidative damage directly.These different approaches,when combined,offer better understanding of the mechanistic differences in DNA damage response between telomeric and genomic DNA,which will provide new hope to identify potential cancer therapeutic targets to curtail cancer cell proliferation via induction of telomere dysfunctions.

  7. Cell-free DNA screening and sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennuti, Michael T; Chandrasekaran, Suchitra; Khalek, Nahla; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2015-10-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing is increasingly being used to screen pregnant women for fetal aneuploidies. This technology may also identify fetal sex and can be used to screen for sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). Physicians offering this screening will need to be prepared to offer comprehensive prenatal counseling about these disorders to an increasing number of patients. The purpose of this article is to consider the source of information to use for counseling, factors in parental decision-making, and the performance characteristics of cfDNA testing in screening for SCAs. Discordance between ultrasound examination and cfDNA results regarding fetal sex is also discussed.

  8. Oxidative DNA damage in mouse sperm chromosomes: Size matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocer, Ayhan; Henry-Berger, Joelle; Noblanc, Anais; Champroux, Alexandre; Pogorelcnik, Romain; Guiton, Rachel; Janny, Laurent; Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Saez, Fabrice; Johnson, Graham D; Krawetz, Stephen A; Alvarez, Juan G; Aitken, R John; Drevet, Joël R

    2015-12-01

    Normal embryo and foetal development as well as the health of the progeny are mostly dependent on gamete nuclear integrity. In the present study, in order to characterize more precisely oxidative DNA damage in mouse sperm we used two mouse models that display high levels of sperm oxidative DNA damage, a common alteration encountered both in in vivo and in vitro reproduction. Immunoprecipitation of oxidized sperm DNA coupled to deep sequencing showed that mouse chromosomes may be largely affected by oxidative alterations. We show that the vulnerability of chromosomes to oxidative attack inversely correlated with their size and was not linked to their GC richness. It was neither correlated with the chromosome content in persisting nucleosomes nor associated with methylated sequences. A strong correlation was found between oxidized sequences and sequences rich in short interspersed repeat elements (SINEs). Chromosome position in the sperm nucleus as revealed by fluorescent in situ hybridization appears to be a confounder. These data map for the first time fragile mouse sperm chromosomal regions when facing oxidative damage that may challenge the repair mechanisms of the oocyte post-fertilization.

  9. Integration of hepatitis B virus DNA into chromosomal DNA during acute hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gerald C Kimbi; Anna Kramvis; Michael C Kew

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the serum from black African patients with acute hepatitis B to ascertain if integrants of viral DNA can be detected in fragments of cellular DNA leaking from damaged hepatocytes into the circulation.METHODS: DNA was extracted from the sera of five patients with uncomplicated acute hepatitis B and one with fulminant disease. Two subgenomic PCRs designed to amplify the complete genome of HBV were used and the resulting amplicons were cloned and sequenced.RESULTS: HBV and chromosomal DNA were amplified from the sera of all the patients. In one patient with uncomplicated disease, HBV DNA was integrated into host chromosome 7 q11.23 in the WBSCR1 gene. The viral DNA comprised 200 nucleotides covering the S and X genes in opposite orientation, with a 1 169 nudeotide deletion. The right virus/host junction was situated at nucleotide 1774 in the cohesive overlap region of the viral genome, at a preferred topoisomerase I cleavage motif. The chromosomal DNA was not rearranged.The patient made a full recovery and seroconverted to anti-HBs- and anti-HBe-positivity. Neither HBV nor chromosomal DNA could be amplified from his serum at that time.CONCLUSION: Integration of viral DNA into chromosomal DNA may occur rarely during acute hepatitis B and, with clonal propagation of the integrant, might play a role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  10. Distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in chromosomes of five opisthorchid species (Trematoda, Opisthorchiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadesenets, Kira S; Karamysheva, Tatyana V; Katokhin, Alexei V; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A; Rubtsov, Nikolay B

    2012-03-01

    Genomes of opisthorchid species are characterized by small size, suggesting a reduced amount of repetitive DNA in their genomes. Distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the chromosomes of five species of the family Opisthorchiidae (Opisthorchis felineus 2n = 14 (Rivolta, 1884), Opisthorchis viverrini 2n = 12 (Poirier, 1886), Metorchis xanthosomus 2n = 14 (Creplin, 1846), Metorchis bilis 2n = 14 (Braun, 1890), Clonorchis sinensis 2n = 14 (Cobbold, 1875)) was studied with C- and AgNOR-banding, generation of microdissected DNA probes from individual chromosomes and fluorescent in situ hybridization on mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. Small-sized C-bands were discovered in pericentric regions of chromosomes. Ag-NOR staining of opisthorchid chromosomes and FISH with ribosomal DNA probe showed that karyotypes of all studied species were characterized by the only nucleolus organizer region in one of small chromosomes. The generation of DNA probes from chromosomes 1 and 2 of O. felineus and M. xanthosomus was performed with chromosome microdissection followed by DOP-PCR. FISH of obtained microdissected DNA probes on chromosomes of these species revealed chromosome specific DNA repeats in pericentric C-bands. It was also shown that microdissected DNA probes generated from chromosomes could be used as the Whole Chromosome Painting Probes without suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization. Chromosome painting using microdissected chromosome specific DNA probes showed the overall repeat distribution in opisthorchid chromosomes.

  11. Dynamic organization of chromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, H; Yamaichi, Y; Hiraga, S

    2000-01-15

    We have revealed the subcellular localization of different DNA segments that are located at approximately 230-kb intervals on the Escherichia coli chromosome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The series of chromosome segments is localized within the cell in the same order as the chromosome map. The large chromosome region including oriC shows similar localization patterns, which we call the Ori domain. In addition, the localization pattern of the large segment including dif is characteristic of the replication terminus region. The segment also shows similar localization patterns, which we call the Ter domain. In newborn cells, Ori and Ter domains of the chromosome are differentially localized near opposite cell poles. Subsequently, in the B period, the Ori domain moves toward mid-cell before the initiation of replication, and the Ter domain tends to relocate at mid-cell. An inversion mutant, in which the Ter domain is located close to oriC, shows abnormal subcellular localization of ori and dif segments, resulting in frequent production of anucleate cells. These studies thus suggest that the E. coli chromosome is organized to form a compacted ring structure with the Ori and Ter domains; these domains participate in the cell cycle-dependent localization of the chromosome.

  12. Increased frequency of asynapsis and associated meiotic silencing of heterologous chromatin in the presence of irradiation-induced extra DNA double strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Derijck, Alwin A; de Boer, Peter; Laven, Joop S E; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2008-05-01

    In meiotic prophase of male placental mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, which activates meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), leading to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. MSCI is most likely related to meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), a mechanism that can silence autosomal unsynapsed chromatin. However, heterologous synapsis and escape from silencing also occur. In mammalian species, formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) during leptotene precedes meiotic chromosome pairing. These DSBs are essential to achieve full synapsis of homologous chromosomes. We generated 25% extra meiotic DSBs by whole body irradiation of mice. This leads to a significant increase in meiotic recombination frequency. In mice carrying translocation chromosomes with synaptic problems, we observed an approximately 35% increase in asynapsis and MSUC of the nonhomologous region in the smallest chromosome pair following irradiation. However, the same nonhomologous region in the largest chromosome pair, shows complete synapsis and escape from MSUC in almost 100% of the nuclei, irrespective of exposure to irradiation. We propose that prevention of synapsis and associated activation of MSUC is linked to the presence of unrepaired meiotic DSBs in the nonhomologous region. Also, spreading of synaptonemal complex formation from regions of homology may act as an opposing force, and drive heterologous synapsis.

  13. Extraction of Chromosomal DNA from Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-05-02

    Extraction of DNA from Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells is required for various uses, including templating polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), Southern blotting, library construction, and high-throughput sequencing. To purify high-quality DNA, the cell wall is removed by digestion with Zymolyase or Lyticase and the resulting spheroplasts lysed using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Cell debris, SDS, and SDS-protein complexes are subsequently precipitated by the addition of potassium acetate and removed by centrifugation. Finally, DNA is precipitated using isopropanol. At this stage, purity is usually sufficient for PCR. However, for more sensitive procedures, such as restriction enzyme digestion, additional purification steps, including proteinase K digestion and phenol-chloroform extraction, are recommended. All of these steps are described in detail here.

  14. Directly labeled fluorescent DNA probes for chromosome mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrone, B.L.; Deaven, L.L.; Chen, D.J.; Park, Min S.; MacInnes, M.A.; Salzman, G.C.; Yoshida, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A new strategy is briefly described for employing nucleic acid probes that are directly labeled with fluorochromes in fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. These probes will permit the detection, quantitation, and high-precision spatial analysis of multiple DNA sequences along a single chromosome using video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing and analysis. Potential advantages of direct labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization far surpass currently available, indirect DNA probe labeling techniques in ease of use, versatility, and increased signal- to-noise ratio.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis: Biotechnology for separation of DNA and chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George O., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Electrophoresis has been used for the separation of particles, ions, and molecules for a number of years. The technology for separation and detection of the results has many applications in the life sciences. One of the major goals of the scientific community is to separate DNA molecules and intact chromosomes based upon their different lengths or number of base pairs. This may be achieved by using some of the commercially available and widely used methods, but these processes require a considerable amount of time. The challenge is to achieve separation of intact chromosomes in a short time, preferably in a matter of minutes.

  16. Development of a bench-top extra-cleanroom for DNA amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Satoh, Takahiro; Kanahara, Hiroko; Kubota, Yuji; Hirose, Tamaki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Okamura, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Taketo; Kobori, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of airborne contamination has become an important factor in biotechnology; however, conventional laminar-airflow cabinets (LAF-cabinets) are no longer sufficient as a countermeasure against nano-sized airborne contaminants in the laboratory. Here we present a bench-top extra-cleanroom classified as ISO-1 that can prevent contamination from airborne nanoparticles. This bench-top extra-cleanroom consists of a novel clean-zone-creating system that is equipped with nanofibrous, nonwoven filters. In addition, the cleanroom is also equipped with an ionizer to prevent plasticware from collecting dust by electrostatic charge attraction. This combination of features allows the cleanroom to prevent DNA contamination derived from airborne nanoparticles. Our extra-cleanroom with ionizer could be useful in various areas of biotechnology that are easily affected by airborne contaminants.

  17. Unrepaired DNA damage facilitates elimination of uniparental chromosomes in interspecific hybrid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Yin, Hao; Lv, Lei; Feng, Yingying; Chen, Shaopeng; Liang, Junting; Huang, Yun; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Hanwei; Bukhari, Ihtisham; Wu, Lijun; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Elimination of uniparental chromosomes occurs frequently in interspecific hybrid cells. For example, human chromosomes are always eliminated during clone formation when human cells are fused with mouse cells. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we show that the elimination of human chromosomes in human-mouse hybrid cells is accompanied by continued cell division at the presence of DNA damage on human chromosomes. Deficiency in DNA damage repair on human chromosomes occurs after cell fusion. Furthermore, increasing the level of DNA damage on human chromosomes by irradiation accelerates human chromosome loss in hybrid cells. Our results indicate that the elimination of human chromosomes in human-mouse hybrid cells results from unrepaired DNA damage on human chromosomes. We therefore provide a novel mechanism underlying chromosome instability which may facilitate the understanding of carcinogenesis.

  18. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimwood, Jane; Gordon, Laurie A; Olsen, Anne; Terry, Astrid; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lamerdin, Jane; Hellsten, Uffe; Goodstein, David; Couronne, Olivier; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Ashworth, Linda; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caenepeel, Sean; Carrano, Anthony; Caoile, Chenier; Chan, Yee Man; Christensen, Mari; Cleland, Catherine A; Copeland, Alex; Dalin, Eileen; Dehal, Paramvir; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Garcia, Carmen; Georgescu, Anca M; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Ho, Isaac; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Larionov, Vladimer; Leem, Sun-Hee; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Malfatti, Stephanie; Martinez, Diego; McCready, Paula; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nelson, Kathryn; Nolan, Matt; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Popkie, Anthony P; Predki, Paul; Quan, Glenda; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanine; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; She, Xinwei; Smith, Doug; Slezak, Tom; Solovyev, Victor; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wagner, Mark; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Xie, Gary; Yang, Joan; Dubchak, Inna; Furey, Terrence S; DeJong, Pieter; Dickson, Mark; Gordon, David; Eichler, Evan E; Pennacchio, Len A; Richardson, Paul; Stubbs, Lisa; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Myers, Richard M; Rubin, Edward M; Lucas, Susan M

    2004-04-01

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high G + C content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolaemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one-quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  19. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimwood, J; Gordon, L A; Olsen, A; Terry, A; Schmutz, J; Lamerdin, J; Hellsten, U; Goodstein, D; Couronne, O; Tran-Gyamfi, M

    2004-04-06

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high GC content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in Mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  20. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimwood, Jane; Gordon, Laurie A.; Olsen, Anne; Terry, Astrid; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lamerdin, Jane; Hellsten, Uffe; Goodstein, David; Couronne, Olivier; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Ashworth, Linda; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caenepeel, Sean; Carrano, Anthony; Caoile, Chenier; Chan, Yee Man; Christensen, Mari; Cleland, Catherine A.; Copeland, Alex; Dalin, Eileen; Dehal, Paramvir; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Garcia, Carmen; Georgescu, Anca M.; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eldelyn; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Ho, Issac; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Larionov, Vladimer; Leem, Sun-Hee; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Malfatti, Stephanie; Martinez, Diego; McCready, Paula; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nelson, Kathryn; Nolan, Matt; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Popkie, Anthony P.; Predki, Paul; Quan, Glenda; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanine; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; She, Xinwei; Smith, Doug; Slezak, Tom; Solovyev, Victor; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wagner, Mark; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Xie, Gary; Yang, Joan; Dubchak, Inna; Furey, Terrence S.; DeJong, Pieter; Dickson, Mark; Gordon, David; Eichler, Evan E.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Richardson, Paul; Stubbs, Lisa; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan M.

    2003-09-15

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high G1C content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9 percent of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolaemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one-quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25 percent of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, a nd segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  1. The effect of early life stress on the cognitive phenotype of children with an extra X chromosome (47,XXY/47,XXX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Barneveld, Petra; Descheemaeker, Mie-Jef; Giltay, Jacques; Swaab, Hanna

    2016-11-28

    Studies on gene-environment interactions suggest that some individuals may be more susceptible to life adversities than others due to their genetic profile. This study assesses whether or not children with an extra X chromosome are more vulnerable to the negative impact of early life stress on cognitive functioning than typically-developing children. A total of 50 children with an extra X chromosome and 103 non-clinical controls aged 9 to 18 years participated in the study. Cognitive functioning in domains of language, social cognition and executive functioning were assessed. Early life stress was measured with the Questionnaire of Life Events. High levels of early life stress were found to be associated with compromised executive functioning in the areas of mental flexibility and inhibitory control, irrespective of group membership. In contrast, the children with an extra X chromosome were found to be disproportionally vulnerable to deficits in social cognition on top of executive dysfunction, as compared to typically-developing children. Within the extra X group the number of negative life events is significantly correlated with more problems in inhibition, mental flexibility and social cognition. It is concluded that children with an extra X chromosome are vulnerable to adverse life events, with social cognition being particularly impacted in addition to the negative effects on executive functioning. The findings that developmental outcome is codependent on early environmental factors in genetically vulnerable children also underscores opportunities for training and support to positively influence the course of development.

  2. Vertically transmitted fecal IgA levels distinguish extra-chromosomal phenotypic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Meghan A.; D, Carey-Ann; Burnham; Virgin, Herbert W.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The proliferation of genetically modified mouse models has exposed phenotypic variation between investigators and institutions that has been challenging to control1-5. In many cases, the microbiota is the presumed culprit of the variation. Current solutions to account for phenotypic variability include littermate and maternal controls or defined microbial consortia in gnotobiotic mice6,7. In conventionally raised mice, the microbiome is transmitted from the dam2,8,9. Here we show that microbially–driven dichotomous fecal IgA levels in WT mice within the same facility mimic the effects of chromosomal mutations. We observed in multiple facilities that vertically-transmissible bacteria in IgA-Low mice dominantly lowered fecal IgA levels in IgA-High mice after cohousing or fecal transplantation. In response to injury, IgA-Low mice showed increased damage that was transferable by fecal transplantation and driven by fecal IgA differences. We found that bacteria from IgA-Low mice degraded the secretory component (SC) of SIgA as well as IgA itself. These data indicate that phenotypic comparisons between mice must take into account the non-chromosomal hereditary variation between different breeders. We propose fecal IgA as one marker of microbial variability and conclude that cohousing and/or fecal transplantation enables analysis of progeny from different dams. PMID:25686606

  3. Differences in DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity between prokaryotic chromosomes and phages, and relationship to chromosomal prophage content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodic spacing of A-tracts (short runs of A or T with the DNA helical period of ~10–11 bp is characteristic of intrinsically bent DNA. In eukaryotes, the DNA bending is related to chromatin structure and nucleosome positioning. However, the physiological role of strong sequence periodicity detected in many prokaryotic genomes is not clear. Results We developed measures of intensity and persistency of DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity and applied them to prokaryotic chromosomes and phages. The results indicate that strong periodic signals present in chromosomes are generally absent in phage genomes. Moreover, chromosomes containing prophages are less likely to possess a persistent periodic signal than chromosomes with no prophages. Conclusions Absence of DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity in phages could arise from constraints associated with DNA packaging in the viral capsid. Lack of prophages in chromosomes with persistent periodic signal suggests that the sequence periodicity and concomitant DNA curvature could play a role in protecting the chromosomes from integration of phage DNA.

  4. A device for extraction, manipulation and stretching of DNA from single human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted; Marie, Rodolphe; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2011-01-01

    by time-lapse imaging; pressure-driven flow was then used to shunt the chromosomal DNA package into a nanoslit. A long linear DNA strand (>1.3 Mbp) was seen to stretch out from the DNA package and along the length of the nanoslit. Delivery of DNA in its native metaphase chromosome package as well...... as the microfluidic environment prevented DNA from shearing and will be important for preparing ultra-long lengths of DNA for nanofluidic analysis....

  5. DNA-damage response during mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P; Zaki, Bassem I; Compton, Duane A

    2014-11-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here, we show that activation of the DNA-damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and PLK1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or CHK2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, the DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs, creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. The genome-protective role of the DDR depends on its ability to delay cell division until damaged DNA can be fully repaired. Here, we show that when DNA damage is induced during mitosis, the DDR unexpectedly induces errors in the segregation of entire chromosomes, thus linking structural and numerical chromosomal instabilities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Development of specific chromosomal DNA pool for rice field eel and their application to gene mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10 and 12 of rice field eel (Monopterus albus Zuiew) have been microdissected successfully from meiosis I diakinesis spreads by using glass microneedle under an inverted microscope. And the DOP-PCR products of the single chromosome dotted on the nylon membrane as "specific chromosomal DNA pool", have been hybridized with 6 probes to map these genes. The mapping results show that Zfa has been mapped to chromosome 1, rDNA to chromosomes 3 and 7, both Gh and Pdeg to chromosome 10, Hsl to chromosome 5 and Hox genes have been detected on chromosomes 1, 3, 6 and 10 meantime. It has initiatively been suggested that chromosome 10 of rice field eel might possess the commom conserved synteny to that on chromosome 17 of human, chromosome 11 of mouse,chromosome 12 of pig and chromosome 19 of bovine. And so chromosome 3 of rice field eel might also contain the commom conserved synteny to that on chromosome 2 of zebrafish. Our study is an attempt to establish a new and feasible method to advance the study of gene mapping and chromosome evolution in fish, and also to provide a new idea to distinguish each chromosome on the base of molecular markers for fish.

  7. Repair-mediated duplication by capture of proximal chromosomal DNA has shaped vertebrate genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Pace

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are a common form of cellular damage that can lead to cell death if not repaired promptly. Experimental systems have shown that DSB repair in eukaryotic cells is often imperfect and may result in the insertion of extra chromosomal DNA or the duplication of existing DNA at the breakpoint. These events are thought to be a source of genomic instability and human diseases, but it is unclear whether they have contributed significantly to genome evolution. Here we developed an innovative computational pipeline that takes advantage of the repetitive structure of genomes to detect repair-mediated duplication events (RDs that occurred in the germline and created insertions of at least 50 bp of genomic DNA. Using this pipeline we identified over 1,000 probable RDs in the human genome. Of these, 824 were intra-chromosomal, closely linked duplications of up to 619 bp bearing the hallmarks of the synthesis-dependent strand-annealing repair pathway. This mechanism has duplicated hundreds of sequences predicted to be functional in the human genome, including exons, UTRs, intron splice sites and transcription factor binding sites. Dating of the duplication events using comparative genomics and experimental validation revealed that the mechanism has operated continuously but with decreasing intensity throughout primate evolution. The mechanism has produced species-specific duplications in all primate species surveyed and is contributing to genomic variation among humans. Finally, we show that RDs have also occurred, albeit at a lower frequency, in non-primate mammals and other vertebrates, indicating that this mechanism has been an important force shaping vertebrate genome evolution.

  8. Nuclear DNA content and chromosome number in Brachiaria spp. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza de Oliveira Timbó

    Full Text Available Breeding programs for Brachiaria spp. use both intraspecies and interspecies crosses between sexual and apomictic plants in order to obtain new cultivars with the desired characteristics. As there are different ploidy levels both within and between species of this genus, it becomes necessary to evaluate the genotypes used in breeding programs, as a guide to breeders when adopting crossing strategies. In this work, DNA content and chromosome number were determined in order to characterise ploidy levels in Brachiaria spp. genotypes. In the analysis of 15 genotypes, DNA content varied with the ploidy levels (2x, 3x and 4x, and between species and/or taxon. The average DNA content was 1.74 pg (2x in B. ruziziensis, 3.74 pg (4x in B. decumbens and 3.52 pg (4x for B. brizantha. For the genotype 86, 2.57 pg of DNA was obtained and 2n = 3x = 27, indicating a triploid accession, probably a natural hybrid. The variation in the total DNA content allowed the differentiation of Brachiaria ruziziensis (2n = 2x = 18 from the tetraploid species Brachiaria Brizantha and Brachiaria decumbens (2n = 4x = 36, as well as the probable hybrid triploid (2n = 3x = 18 of these species.

  9. Poetry in motion: Increased chromosomal mobility after DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael J; Rothstein, Rodney

    2017-08-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most lethal DNA lesions, and a variety of pathways have evolved to manage their repair in a timely fashion. One such pathway is homologous recombination (HR), in which information from an undamaged donor site is used as a template for repair. Although many of the biochemical steps of HR are known, the physical movements of chromosomes that must underlie the pairing of homologous sequence during mitotic DSB repair have remained mysterious. Recently, several groups have begun to use a variety of genetic and cell biological tools to study this important question. These studies reveal that both damaged and undamaged loci increase the volume of the nuclear space that they explore after the formation of DSBs. This DSB-induced increase in chromosomal mobility is regulated by many of the same factors that are important during HR, such as ATR-dependent checkpoint activation and the recombinase Rad51, suggesting that this phenomenon may facilitate the search for homology. In this perspective, we review current research into the mobility of chromosomal loci during HR, as well as possible underlying mechanisms, and discuss the critical questions that remain to be answered. Although we focus primarily on recent studies in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, examples of experiments performed in higher eukaryotes are also included, which reveal that increased mobility of damaged loci is a process conserved throughout evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychophysiological markers of vulnerability to psychopathology in men with an extra X chromosome (XXY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie van Rijn

    Full Text Available Studying genetically defined syndromes associated with increased risk for psychopathology may help in understanding neurodevelopmental mechanisms related to risk for psychopathology. Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY is one of the most common sex chromosomal aneuploidies (1 in 650 male births and associated with increased vulnerability for psychopathology, including psychotic symptoms. Yet, it remains unknown whether this increased risk is associated with underlying psychophysiological mechanisms that are typically deficient in individuals with psychotic disorders. The present study assessed three "classic" psychophysiological markers of psychosis in Klinefelter syndrome (KS: smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEM, prepulse inhibition (PPI and P50 suppression. Fourteen adults with KS and 15 non-clinical adults participated in the study. Data on SPEM (reflecting visuo-motor control as well as PPI and P50 suppression (reflecting sensory gating were collected. Dysfunctions in SPEM were observed in individuals with KS, with less smooth pursuit as expressed in lower position gain. Also, reduced sensory gating in individuals with KS was suggested by significantly reduced prepulse inhibition of the startle response (PPI (effect size 1.6. No abnormalities were found in suppression of the P50 (effect size 0.6. We speculate that impairments in these psychophysiological mechanisms may reflect core brain dysfunctions that may also mediate the described increased vulnerability for psychotic symptoms in KS. Although speculative, such deficit specific, rather than disorder specific, psychophysiological dysfunctions in KS might convey vulnerability to other types of psychopathology as well. As KS already can be diagnosed prenatally, the predictive value of childhood impairments in prepulse inhibition and smooth pursuit for development of psychopathology later in life could be assessed. In sum, studying individuals with KS may prove to be an avenue of research leading to

  11. Intercalation of psoralen into DNA of plastid chromosomes decreases late during barley chloroplast development.

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, J. P.; Thompson, R.J.; Mosig, G

    1991-01-01

    We have used a DNA crosslinking assay to measure intercalation of the psoralen derivative HMT (4'-hydroxymethyl-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen) into barley (Hordeum vulgare) plastid chromosomal DNA during chloroplast and etioplast development. Intercalation into DNA in intact plastids in vivo and in plastid lysates in vitro shows that chromosomal DNA in the most mature chloroplasts intercalates HMT less efficiently than DNA in younger chloroplasts. In contrast, there is no change in HMT intercalati...

  12. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne' , Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  13. Extra Copper-mediated Enhancement of the DNA Cleavage Activity Supported with Wild-type Cu, Zn Superoxide Dismutase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ruo-Yu; JIANG Wei; ZHANG Li-Na; WANG Li; LIU Chang-Lin

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that the primary function of wild type Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (holo SOD) is to catalyze the conversion of the superoxide anion to H2O2 and O2 as an antioxidant enzyme. However, the aberrant copper-mediated oxidation chemistry in the enzyme (including its mutation forms) that damages nucleic acids, proteins including itself and cell membrane has attracted extensive attention in the past decade. The present study examined the hydrogen peroxide-dependent DNA cleavage activity supported with the combinations between holo SOD and extra copper (holo SOD+nCu(Ⅱ)). The results indicate that the presence of extra copper can enhance the DNA cleavage activity and a cooperative effect between holo SOD and the extra Cu(Ⅱ) occurs in DNA cleavage. The relative activity and kinetic assay showed that the DNA cleavage activity of holo SOD+nCu(Ⅱ) was enhanced upon addition of extra Cu(Ⅱ). The favorable pH regions for the DNA cleavage were observed to be 3.6-5.6 and 9.0-10, suggesting the species responsible for the DNA cleavage are different in different pH regions. In addition,to obtain an insight into DNA cleavage pathways, the effect of free radical scavengers and inhibitors on the DNA cleavage activity was probed.

  14. Pre-cancerous (DNA and chromosomal) lesions in professional sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Radhika; Gandhi, Gursatej

    2012-01-01

    Exhaustive exercises may become detrimental, causing disturbance of intracellular oxidant-antioxidant balance and damage to macromolecules, leading to genomic instability when DNA/chromosomes get damaged. As these are precancerous lesions, cancer occurrence is probable. Because professional sports requires high-intensity training and increasing physical demand, there may occur cellular genomic instability. To evaluate genetic damage at DNA and chromosomal levels in hockey and baseball-soft ball players and compare with levels in age- and sex-matched sedentary controls. Players professionally active in their sport from 3 to 11 years on a daily training session of 4h/day were contacted during their camps, and the study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. All participants were healthy individuals, not on any medication and were not taking any supplements. Genetic damage using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay and buccal micronucleus cytome assay of 56 individuals (36 players and 20 controls) was evaluated. Student's t -test, ANOVA, Pearson correlation and linear regression and Chi-square analysis were performed. Players had significantly elevated levels of genetic damage. There were no gender differences and also no significant difference in the genetic damage incurred in both sports types. However, the extent of DNA migration in hockey players was higher. Significantly increased genomic instability in players of both sports was observed. Both repaired and repairable genetic damage cells were observed in different tissues of the same subject. The presence of such genetic damage implies that these players are at an individual risk from cancer- and age-related diseases.

  15. Telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats are chromosomal targets of the bloom syndrome DNA helicase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paric Enesa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is one of the most cancer-predisposing disorders and is characterized by genomic instability and a high frequency of sister chromatid exchange. The disorder is caused by loss of function of a 3' to 5' RecQ DNA helicase, BLM. The exact role of BLM in maintaining genomic integrity is not known but the helicase has been found to associate with several DNA repair complexes and some DNA replication foci. Results Chromatin immunoprecipitation of BLM complexes recovered telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats. The N-terminus of BLM, required for NB localization, is the same as the telomere association domain of BLM. The C-terminus is required for ribosomal DNA localization. BLM localizes primarily to the non-transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA repeat where replication forks initiate. Bloom syndrome cells expressing the deletion alleles lacking the ribosomal DNA and telomere association domains have altered cell cycle populations with increased S or G2/M cells relative to normal. Conclusion These results identify telomere and ribosomal DNA repeated sequence elements as chromosomal targets for the BLM DNA helicase during the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. BLM is localized in nuclear bodies when it associates with telomeric repeats in both telomerase positive and negative cells. The BLM DNA helicase participates in genomic stability at ribosomal DNA repeats and telomeres.

  16. Telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats are chromosomal targets of the bloom syndrome DNA helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawalder, James; Paric, Enesa; Neff, Norma F

    2003-10-27

    Bloom syndrome is one of the most cancer-predisposing disorders and is characterized by genomic instability and a high frequency of sister chromatid exchange. The disorder is caused by loss of function of a 3' to 5' RecQ DNA helicase, BLM. The exact role of BLM in maintaining genomic integrity is not known but the helicase has been found to associate with several DNA repair complexes and some DNA replication foci. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of BLM complexes recovered telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats. The N-terminus of BLM, required for NB localization, is the same as the telomere association domain of BLM. The C-terminus is required for ribosomal DNA localization. BLM localizes primarily to the non-transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA repeat where replication forks initiate. Bloom syndrome cells expressing the deletion alleles lacking the ribosomal DNA and telomere association domains have altered cell cycle populations with increased S or G2/M cells relative to normal. These results identify telomere and ribosomal DNA repeated sequence elements as chromosomal targets for the BLM DNA helicase during the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. BLM is localized in nuclear bodies when it associates with telomeric repeats in both telomerase positive and negative cells. The BLM DNA helicase participates in genomic stability at ribosomal DNA repeats and telomeres.

  17. Chromosome breakages associated with 45S ribosomal DNA sequences in spotted snakehead fish Channa punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mamta; Barman, Anindya Sundar

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that transcriptionally inactive rRNA genes are correlated with DNA hyper-methylation and histone hypo-methylation and there is clear evidence in humans that DNA and histone modification which alter chromatin structure are related to chromosome fragility. Very little is known about the biological cause of 45S rDNA fragility. In this report we characterized the chromosome breakage or gap associated with 45S rDNA in a fish species Channa punctatus. The rDNA mapping in C. punctatus, showed many chromosome breakages or gap formations, and all occurred exclusively in the 45S rDNA sites in anterior kidney cells. We observed that the number of chromosomes plus chromosome fragments was often more than the expected 32 in most cells. Total 67 % metaphase spread showed the expected or normal 32 chromosomes, while 33 % metaphase spread showed 33 and/or 34 chromosomes and/or chromosome fragments. The chromosome lesions observed in this study are very similar cytologically to that of fragile sites observed in human chromosomes. Possible causes for the spontaneous expression of fragile sites and their potential biological significance are also discussed in present report.

  18. Isolation and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 20-specific alpha-satellite DNA clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, A; Archidiacono, N; Carbone, R; Bolino, A; Shridhar, V; Miller, O J; Miller, D A; Ward, D C; Rocchi, M

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a human genomic DNA clone (PZ20, locus D20Z2) that identifies, under high-stringency hybridization conditions, an alphoid DNA subset specific for chromosome 20. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sequence analysis confirmed our previously reported data on the great similarity between the chromosome 20 and chromosome 2 alphoid subsets. Comparative mapping of pZ20 on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes, also performed under high-stringency conditions, indicates that the alphoid subset has ancestral sequences on chimpanzee chromosome 11 and gorilla chromosome 19. However, no hybridization was observed to chromosomes 21 in the great apes, the homolog of human chromosome 20.

  19. Replication initiator DnaA binds at the Caulobacter centromere and enables chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Paola E; Kalogeraki, Virginia S; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-11-11

    During cell division, multiple processes are highly coordinated to faithfully generate genetically equivalent daughter cells. In bacteria, the mechanisms that underlie the coordination of chromosome replication and segregation are poorly understood. Here, we report that the conserved replication initiator, DnaA, can mediate chromosome segregation independent of replication initiation. It does so by binding directly to the parS centromere region of the chromosome, and mutations that alter this interaction result in cells that display aberrant centromere translocation and cell division. We propose that DnaA serves to coordinate bacterial DNA replication with the onset of chromosome segregation.

  20. Influence of the presence of B chromosomes on DNA damage in Crepis capillaris.

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    Jolanta Kwasniewska

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of different plant species to mutagenic agents is related to the DNA content and organization of the chromatin, which have been described in ABCW and bodyguard hypotheses, respectively. Plant species that have B chromosomes are good models for the study of these hypotheses. This study presents an analysis of the correlation between the occurrence of B chromosomes and the DNA damage that is induced by the chemical mutagen, maleic hydrazide (MH, in Crepis capillaris plants using comet assay. The presence of B chromosomes has a detectable impact on the level of DNA damage. The level of DNA damage after MH treatment was correlated with the number of B chromosomes and it was observed that it increased significantly in plants with 3B chromosomes. We did not find evidence of the protective role from chemical mutagens of the constitutive heterochromatin for euchromatin in relation to DNA damage. The DNA damage involving the 25S rDNA sequences was analyzed using the comet-FISH technique. Fragmentation within or near the 25S rDNA involved the loci on the A and B chromosomes. The presence of B chromosomes in C. capillaris cells had an influence on the level of DNA damage that involves the 25S rDNA region.

  1. Chromosomal locations of four minor rDNA loci and a marker microsatellite sequence in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.; Linde-Laursen, I.

    1994-01-01

    is located about 54% out on the short arm of chromosome 4 and it has not previously been reported in barley. We have designated the new locus Nor-I6. rDNA loci on homoeologous group 4 chromosomes have not yet been reported in other Triticeae species. The origin of these 4 minor rDNA loci is discussed...

  2. Sex chromosome inactivation in germ cells: emerging roles of DNA damage response pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ichijima, Yosuke; Sin, Ho-Su; Satoshi H Namekawa

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosome inactivation in male germ cells is a paradigm of epigenetic programming during sexual reproduction. Recent progress has revealed the underlying mechanisms of sex chromosome inactivation in male meiosis. The trigger of chromosome-wide silencing is activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, which is centered on the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), a binding partner of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX). This DDR pathway shares features with the somatic DDR p...

  3. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem r...

  4. 45S rDNA regions are chromosome fragile sites expressed as gaps in vitro on metaphase chromosomes of root-tip meristematic cells in Lolium spp.

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    Jing Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In humans, chromosome fragile sites are regions that are especially prone to forming non-staining gaps, constrictions or breaks in one or both of the chromatids on metaphase chromosomes either spontaneously or following partial inhibition of DNA synthesis and have been well identified. So far, no plant chromosome fragile sites similar to those in human chromosomes have been reported. METHODS AND RESULTS: During the course of cytological mapping of rDNA on ryegrass chromosomes, we found that the number of chromosomes plus chromosome fragments was often more than the expected 14 in most cells for Lolium perenne L. cv. Player by close cytological examination using a routine chromosome preparation procedure. Further fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH using 45S rDNA as a probe indicated that the root-tip cells having more than a 14-chromosome plus chromosome fragment count were a result of chromosome breakage or gap formation in vitro (referred to as chromosome lesions at 45S rDNA sites, and 86% of the cells exhibited chromosome breaks or gaps and all occurred at the sites of 45S rDNA in Lolium perenne L. cv. Player, as well as in L. multiflorum Lam. cv. Top One. Chromatin depletion or decondensation occurred at various locations within the 45S rDNA regions, suggesting heterogeneity of lesions of 45S rDNA sites with respect to their position within the rDNA region. CONCLUSIONS: The chromosome lesions observed in this study are very similar cytologically to that of fragile sites observed in human chromosomes, and thus we conclude that the high frequency of chromosome lesions in vitro in Lolium species is the result of the expression of 45S rDNA fragile sites. Possible causes for the spontaneous expression of fragile sites and their potential biological significance are discussed.

  5. Delimiting the origin of a B chromosome by FISH mapping, chromosome painting and DNA sequence analysis in Astyanax paranae (Teleostei, Characiformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duílio M Z de A Silva

    Full Text Available Supernumerary (B chromosomes have been shown to contain a wide variety of repetitive sequences. For this reason, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH is a useful tool for ascertaining the origin of these genomic elements, especially when combined with painting from microdissected B chromosomes. In order to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in the fish species Astyanax paranae, these two approaches were used along with PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences obtained from the B chromosomes and its comparison with those residing in the A chromosomes. Remarkably, chromosome painting with the one-arm metacentric B chromosome probe showed hybridization signals on entire B chromosome, while FISH mapping revealed the presence of H1 histone and 18S rDNA genes symmetrically placed in both arms of the B chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that the B chromosome of A. paranae is an isochromosome. Additionally, the chromosome pairs Nos. 2 or 23 are considered the possible B chromosome ancestors since both contain syntenic H1 and 18S rRNA sequences. The analysis of DNA sequence fragments of the histone and rRNA genes obtained from the microdissected B chromosomes showed high similarity with those obtained from 0B individuals, which supports the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in A. paranae. Finally, the population hereby analysed showed a female-biased B chromosome presence suggesting that B chromosomes in this species could influence sex determinism.

  6. Delimiting the origin of a B chromosome by FISH mapping, chromosome painting and DNA sequence analysis in Astyanax paranae (Teleostei, Characiformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Duílio M Z de A; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Daniel, Sandro Natal; Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Oliveira, Cláudio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Foresti, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Supernumerary (B) chromosomes have been shown to contain a wide variety of repetitive sequences. For this reason, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) is a useful tool for ascertaining the origin of these genomic elements, especially when combined with painting from microdissected B chromosomes. In order to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in the fish species Astyanax paranae, these two approaches were used along with PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences obtained from the B chromosomes and its comparison with those residing in the A chromosomes. Remarkably, chromosome painting with the one-arm metacentric B chromosome probe showed hybridization signals on entire B chromosome, while FISH mapping revealed the presence of H1 histone and 18S rDNA genes symmetrically placed in both arms of the B chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that the B chromosome of A. paranae is an isochromosome. Additionally, the chromosome pairs Nos. 2 or 23 are considered the possible B chromosome ancestors since both contain syntenic H1 and 18S rRNA sequences. The analysis of DNA sequence fragments of the histone and rRNA genes obtained from the microdissected B chromosomes showed high similarity with those obtained from 0B individuals, which supports the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in A. paranae. Finally, the population hereby analysed showed a female-biased B chromosome presence suggesting that B chromosomes in this species could influence sex determinism.

  7. Fragile sites, dysfunctional telomere and chromosome fusions: What is 5S rDNA role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Alain Victor; Wolski, Michele Andressa Vier; Nogaroto, Viviane; Almeida, Mara Cristina; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo

    2017-04-15

    Repetitive DNA regions are known as fragile chromosomal sites which present a high flexibility and low stability. Our focus was characterize fragile sites in 5S rDNA regions. The Ancistrus sp. species shows a diploid number of 50 and an indicative Robertsonian fusion at chromosomal pair 1. Two sequences of 5S rDNA were identified: 5S.1 rDNA and 5S.2 rDNA. The first sequence gathers the necessary structures to gene expression and shows a functional secondary structure prediction. Otherwise, the 5S.2 rDNA sequence does not contain the upstream sequences that are required to expression, furthermore its structure prediction reveals a nonfunctional ribosomal RNA. The chromosomal mapping revealed several 5S.1 and 5S.2 rDNA clusters. In addition, the 5S.2 rDNA clusters were found in acrocentric and metacentric chromosomes proximal regions. The pair 1 5S.2 rDNA cluster is co-located with interstitial telomeric sites (ITS). Our results indicate that its clusters are hotspots to chromosomal breaks. During the meiotic prophase bouquet arrangement, double strand breaks (DSBs) at proximal 5S.2 rDNA of acrocentric chromosomes could lead to homologous and non-homologous repair mechanisms as Robertsonian fusions. Still, ITS sites provides chromosomal instability, resulting in telomeric recombination via TRF2 shelterin protein and a series of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Our proposal is that 5S rDNA derived sequences, act as chromosomal fragile sites in association with some chromosomal rearrangements of Loricariidae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Mark T.; Grafham, Darren V.; Coffey, Alison J; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R.; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P.; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L.; Howe, Kevin L; Jennifer L Ashurst; Fulton, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a...

  9. A new light on DNA replication from the inactive X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladjem, Mirit I; Fu, Haiqing

    2014-06-01

    While large portions of the mammalian genome are known to replicate sequentially in a distinct, tissue-specific order, recent studies suggest that the inactive X chromosome is duplicated rapidly via random, synchronous DNA synthesis at numerous adjacent regions. The rapid duplication of the inactive X chromosome was observed in high-resolution studies visualizing DNA replication patterns in the nucleus, and by allele-specific DNA sequencing studies measuring the extent of DNA synthesis. These studies conclude that inactive X chromosomes complete replication earlier than previously thought and suggest that the strict order of DNA replication detected in the majority of genomic regions is not preserved in non-transcribed, "silent" chromatin. These observations alter current concepts about the regulation of DNA replication in non-transcribed portions of the genome in general and in the inactive X-chromosome in particular.

  10. Extensive polymorphism and chromosomal characteristics of ribosomal DNA in the characid fish Triportheus venezuelensis (Characiformes, Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Nirchio

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype and chromosomal characteristics of the characid fish Triportheus venezuelensis were investigated using differential staining techniques (C-banding, Ag-NOR staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with an 18S rDNA probe. The diploid chromosome number (2n = 52, karyotype composition and sex chromosome determination system of the ZZ/ZW type were the same as previously described in other species of the genus Triportheus. However, extensive variation regarding nucleolus organizer regions (NOR different from other species was observed. 18S rDNA sequences were distributed on nine chromosome pairs, but the number of chromosomes with Ag-NORs was usually lower, reaching a maximum of four chromosomes. When sequential staining experiments were performed, it was demonstrated that: 1. active NORs usually corresponded to segments with 18S rDNA genes identified in FISH experiments; 2. several 18S rDNA sequences were not silver-stained, suggesting that they do not correspond to active NORs; and 3. some chromosomes with silver-stained regions did not display any 18S rDNA signals. These findings characterize an extensive polymorphism associated with the NOR-bearing chromosomes of T. venezuelensis and emphasize the importance of combining traditional and molecular techniques in chromosome studies.

  11. Malformation/dysplasia syndrome (neural tube defect, hypospadias neuroblastoma) associated with an extra dicentric marker chromosome 15 ({open_quotes}inversion duplication 15{close_quotes})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitnauer, P.J.; Rao, K.W.; Tepperberg, J.H. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Extra dicentric 15 marker chromosomes are associated with variable degrees of mental retardation but not major structural birth defects. We have studied a unique patient, a male infant who was prenatally diagnosed with lumbar meningomyelocele and an extra pseudodicentric marker chromosome: 47,XY,+psu dic(15)t(15;15)(?q12,?q12)mat. Hairy ears and a coronal hypospadias were noted at birth. At three months of age, a stage I thoracic neuroblastoma was primarily resected. Tumor cells, skin fibroblasts and peripheral blood lymphocytes contained the dicentric 15. The mother is mosaic for the marker chromosome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies using a classic 15 satellite probe (D15Z1 [Oncor]) confirmed the presence of 2 number 15 centromeres in the marker. The marker is felt to be the result of a translocation rather than an inverted duplication because the G-band morphology of the short arm/satellite complexes differ from one another, implying that the arms originate from 2 different number 15s. FISH analysis using cosmid probes for the Prader-Willi/Angelman critical region (D15S11 and GABRB3 [Oncor]) revealed 2 copies of this region, indicating that these loci are duplicated in the marker. Although some features of the patient`s phenotype such as developmental delay and hypotonia have been associated with dicentric chromosome 15 markers, this is the first malformation/dysplasia syndrome or neuroblastoma reported to our knowledge. The association of neuroblastoma with chromosome 15 aberrations in this case provides speculation as to the role of chromosome 15 loci in cell division control.

  12. Intercalation of psoralen into DNA of plastid chromosomes decreases late during barley chloroplast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J P; Thompson, R J; Mosig, G

    1991-01-01

    We have used a DNA crosslinking assay to measure intercalation of the psoralen derivative HMT (4'-hydroxymethyl-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen) into barley (Hordeum vulgare) plastid chromosomal DNA during chloroplast and etioplast development. Intercalation into DNA in intact plastids in vivo and in plastid lysates in vitro shows that chromosomal DNA in the most mature chloroplasts intercalates HMT less efficiently than DNA in younger chloroplasts. In contrast, there is no change in HMT intercalation during etioplast differentiation in the dark. Our results also show that DNA in higher plant plastid chromosomes is under superhelical tension in vivo. The lower susceptibility to HMT intercalation of DNA in the most mature chloroplasts indicates that late during chloroplast development the superhelical tension or the binding of proteins to the DNA or both change. Images PMID:1923805

  13. Both Chromosome Decondensation and Condensation Are Dependent on DNA Replication in C. elegans Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneville, Remi; Craig, Gillian; Labib, Karim; Gartner, Anton; Blow, J Julian

    2015-07-21

    During cell division, chromatin alternates between a condensed state to facilitate chromosome segregation and a decondensed form when DNA replicates. In most tissues, S phase and mitosis are separated by defined G1 and G2 gap phases, but early embryogenesis involves rapid oscillations between replication and mitosis. Using Caenorhabditis elegans embryos as a model system, we show that chromosome condensation and condensin II concentration on chromosomal axes require replicated DNA. In addition, we found that, during late telophase, replication initiates on condensed chromosomes and promotes the rapid decondensation of the chromatin. Upon replication initiation, the CDC-45-MCM-GINS (CMG) DNA helicase drives the release of condensin I complexes from chromatin and the activation or displacement of inactive MCM-2-7 complexes, which together with the nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS tethers condensed chromatin to the nuclear envelope, thereby promoting chromatin decondensation. Our results show how, in an early embryo, the chromosome-condensation cycle is functionally linked with DNA replication.

  14. DNA double strand break repair, chromosome synapsis and transcriptional silencing in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Akiko; Schoenmakers, Sam; Baarends, Willy M

    2010-05-16

    Chromosome pairing and synapsis during meiotic prophase requires the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the topoisomerase-like enzyme SPO11. Chromosomes, or chromosomal regions, that lack a pairing partner, such as the largely heterologous X and Y chromosomes, show delayed meiotic DSB repair and are transcriptionally silenced. Herein, we review meiosis-specific aspects of DSB repair in relation to homology recognition and meiotic silencing of heterologous regions. We propose a dynamic interplay between progression of synapsis and persistent meiotic DSBs. Signaling from these persistent breaks could inhibit heterologous synapsis and stimulate meiotic silencing of the X and Y chromosomes.

  15. Chromosomal localization of 5S rDNA in Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis):a chromosome-specific marker for chromosome identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郇聘; 张晓军; 李富花; 赵翠; 张成松; 相建海

    2010-01-01

    Chinese shrimp(Fenneropenaeus chinensis)is an economically important aquaculture species in China.However,cytogenetic and genomic data is limited in the organism partly because the chromosomes are difficult to isolate and analyze.In this study,fluorescence in-situ hybridization(FISH) was used to identify the chromosomes of F.chinensis.The 5S ribosomal RNA gene(rDNA)of F. chinensis was isolated,cloned and then used as a hybridization probe.The results show that the 5S rDNA was located on one pair of homologo...

  16. Comparative mapping of a gorilla-derived alpha satellite DNA clone on great ape and human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, A; Miller, D A; Shridhar, V; Rocchi, M; Miller, O J; Ward, D C

    1991-11-01

    We have isolated an alpha satellite DNA clone, pG3.9, from gorilla DNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on banded chromosomes under high stringency conditions revealed that pG3.9 identifies homologous sequences at the centromeric region of ten gorilla chromosomes, and, with few exceptions, also recognizes the homologous chromosomes in human. A pG3.9-like alphoid DNA is present on a larger number of orangutan chromosomes, but, in contrast, is present on only two chromosomes in the chimpanzee. These results show that the chromosomal subsets of related alpha satellite DNA sequences may undergo different patterns of evolution.

  17. Coupling amplified DNA from flow-sorted chromosomes to high-density SNP mapping in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartoš Jan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow cytometry facilitates sorting of single chromosomes and chromosome arms which can be used for targeted genome analysis. However, the recovery of microgram amounts of DNA needed for some assays requires sorting of millions of chromosomes which is laborious and time consuming. Yet, many genomic applications such as development of genetic maps or physical mapping do not require large DNA fragments. In such cases time-consuming de novo sorting can be minimized by utilizing whole-genome amplification. Results Here we report a protocol optimized in barley including amplification of DNA from only ten thousand chromosomes, which can be isolated in less than one hour. Flow-sorted chromosomes were treated with proteinase K and amplified using Phi29 multiple displacement amplification (MDA. Overnight amplification in a 20-microlitre reaction produced 3.7 – 5.7 micrograms DNA with a majority of products between 5 and 30 kb. To determine the purity of sorted fractions and potential amplification bias we used quantitative PCR for specific genes on each chromosome. To extend the analysis to a whole genome level we performed an oligonucleotide pool assay (OPA for interrogation of 1524 loci, of which 1153 loci had known genetic map positions. Analysis of unamplified genomic DNA of barley cv. Akcent using this OPA resulted in 1426 markers with present calls. Comparison with three replicates of amplified genomic DNA revealed >99% concordance. DNA samples from amplified chromosome 1H and a fraction containing chromosomes 2H – 7H were examined. In addition to loci with known map positions, 349 loci with unknown map positions were included. Based on this analysis 40 new loci were mapped to 1H. Conclusion The results indicate a significant potential of using this approach for physical mapping. Moreover, the study showed that multiple displacement amplification of flow-sorted chromosomes is highly efficient and representative which

  18. Circular chromosomal DNA in the sulfur-dependent archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamagishi, A; Oshima, T

    1990-01-01

    The shape of the chromosomal DNA of the sulfur-dependent archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was analyzed by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis(PFGE). S.acidocaldarius DNA digested with Notl showed two DNA bands at around 1.0 Mbp and 2.1 Mbp. Notl-linking clones were isolated from the library of S.acidocaldarius chromosomal DNA. It contained two Notl sites. Both 1.0 and 2.1 Mbp DNA band separated by PFGE were hybridized with the two independent Notl-linking fragment. Each right and le...

  19. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-08-18

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein-DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein-DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin.

  20. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing, into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  1. A model of DNA repeat-assembled mitotic chromosomal skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  2. Chromosomal Localization of DNA Amplifications in Neuroblastoma Tumors Using cDNA Microarray Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Beheshti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional comparative genomic hybridization (CGH profiling of neuroblastomas has identified many genomic aberrations, although the limited resolution has precluded a precise localization of sequences of interest within amplicons. To map high copy number genomic gains in clinically matched stage IV neuroblastomas, CGH analysis using a 19,200-feature cDNA microarray was used. A dedicated (freely available algorithm was developed for rapid in silico determination of chromosomal localizations of microarray cDNA targets, and for generation of an ideogram-type profile of copy number changes. Using these methodologies, novel gene amplifications undetectable by chromosome CGH were identified, and larger MYCN amplicon sizes (in one tumor up to 6 Mb than those previously reported in neuroblastoma were identified. The genes HPCAL1, LPIN1/KIAA0188, NAG, and NSE1/LOC151354 were found to be coamplified with MYCN. To determine whether stage IV primary tumors could be further subclassified based on their genomic copy number profiles, hierarchical clustering was performed. Cluster analysis of microarray CGH data identified three groups: 1 no amplifications evident, 2 a small MYCN amplicon as the only detectable imbalance, and 3 a large MYCN amplicon with additional gene amplifications. Application of CGH to cDNA microarray targets will help to determine both the variation of amplicon size and help better define amplification-dependent and independent pathways of progression in neuroblastoma.

  3. Construction of a DNA library from chromosome 4 of rice (Oryza sativa) by microdissection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAOYINGWEI; SIYUANLIANG; 等

    1998-01-01

    A simple method to create a chromosome-specific DNA librqary of rice,including microdissection,amplification,charterization and cloning,is described.Rice chromosome 4 from a metaphase cell has been isolated and amplified by the Linker Adapter PCR (LA-PCR).The PCR products were labeled as probes with DIG-11-dUTP using the random priming method.Southern blot analysis with rice genomic DNA and specific RFLP markers demonstrated that the PCR products were derived from rice chromosome 4.A large library comprising over 100,000 recombinant plasmid microclones from rice chromosome 4 was constructed.Colony hybridization showed that 58% of the clones contained single or low-copy sequences and 42% contained repetitive sequences.The size of inserts generated by PCR ranged from 140bp to 500bp.This method will facilitate cloning of the specific chromosome DNA markers and important genes of rice.

  4. Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in spontaneous abortion with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyae Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in maternal circulation have been proposed as potential markers for noninvasive monitoring of the placental condition during the pregnancy. However, the correlation of and change in cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in spontaneous abortion (SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy have not yet been reported. Therefore, we investigated cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A nested case-control study was conducted with maternal plasma collected from 268 women in their first trimester of pregnancy. Subjects included 41 SA with normal fetal karyotype, 26 SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy, and 201 normal controls. The unmethylated PDE9A gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free fetal DNA. The GAPDH gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free total DNA. The diagnostic accuracy was measured using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curves. Levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were significantly higher in both SA women with normal fetal karyotype and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy in comparison with the normal controls (P<0.001 in both. The correlation between cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels was stronger in the normal controls (r = 0.843, P<0.001 than in SA women with normal karyotype (r = 0.465, P = 0.002 and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy (r = 0.412, P = 0.037. The area under the ROC curve for cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA was 0.898 (95% CI, 0.852-0.945 and 0.939 (95% CI, 0.903-0.975, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Significantly high levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were found in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. Our findings suggest that cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA may be useful biomarkers for the prediction of SA

  5. Repetitive DNA Sequences and Evolution of ZZ/ZW Sex Chromosomes in Characidium (Teleostei: Characiformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scacchetti, Priscilla Cardim; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; da Costa Silva, Guilherme José; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Characidium constitutes an interesting model for cytogenetic studies, since a large degree of karyotype variation has been detected in this group, like the presence/absence of sex and supernumerary chromosomes and variable distribution of repetitive sequences in different species/populations. In this study, we performed a comparative cytogenetic analysis in 13 Characidium species collected at different South American river basins in order to investigate the karyotype diversification in this group. Chromosome analyses involved the karyotype characterization, cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences and cross-species chromosome painting using a W-specific probe obtained in a previous study from Characidium gomesi. Our results evidenced a conserved diploid chromosome number of 2n = 50, and almost all the species exhibited homeologous ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in different stages of differentiation, except C. cf. zebra, C. tenue, C. xavante and C. stigmosum. Notably, some ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes showed 5S and/or 18S rDNA clusters, while no U2 snDNA sites could be detected in the sex chromosomes, being restricted to a single chromosome pair in almost all the analyzed species. In addition, the species Characidium sp. aff. C. vidali showed B chromosomes with an inter-individual variation of 1 to 4 supernumerary chromosomes per cell. Notably, these B chromosomes share sequences with the W-specific probe, providing insights about their origin. Results presented here further confirm the extensive karyotype diversity within Characidium in contrast with a conserved diploid chromosome number. Such chromosome differences seem to constitute a significant reproductive barrier, since several sympatric Characidium species had been described during the last few years and no interespecific hybrids were found.

  6. Nucleolar organization, ribosomal DNA array stability, and acrocentric chromosome integrity are linked to telomere function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Stimpson

    Full Text Available The short arms of the ten acrocentric human chromosomes share several repetitive DNAs, including ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA. The rDNA arrays correspond to nucleolar organizing regions that coalesce each cell cycle to form the nucleolus. Telomere disruption by expressing a mutant version of telomere binding protein TRF2 (dnTRF2 causes non-random acrocentric fusions, as well as large-scale nucleolar defects. The mechanisms responsible for acrocentric chromosome sensitivity to dysfunctional telomeres are unclear. In this study, we show that TRF2 normally associates with the nucleolus and rDNA. However, when telomeres are crippled by dnTRF2 or RNAi knockdown of TRF2, gross nucleolar and chromosomal changes occur. We used the controllable dnTRF2 system to precisely dissect the timing and progression of nucleolar and chromosomal instability induced by telomere dysfunction, demonstrating that nucleolar changes precede the DNA damage and morphological changes that occur at acrocentric short arms. The rDNA repeat arrays on the short arms decondense, and are coated by RNA polymerase I transcription binding factor UBF, physically linking acrocentrics to one another as they become fusogenic. These results highlight the importance of telomere function in nucleolar stability and structural integrity of acrocentric chromosomes, particularly the rDNA arrays. Telomeric stress is widely accepted to cause DNA damage at chromosome ends, but our findings suggest that it also disrupts chromosome structure beyond the telomere region, specifically within the rDNA arrays located on acrocentric chromosomes. These results have relevance for Robertsonian translocation formation in humans and mechanisms by which acrocentric-acrocentric fusions are promoted by DNA damage and repair.

  7. Regulation of DNA Replication Initiation by Chromosome Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Magnan, David; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in fluorescence imaging have shown that the bacterial nucleoid is surprisingly dynamic in terms of both behavior (movement and organization) and structure (density and supercoiling). Links between chromosome structure and replication initiation have been made in a number of species, and it is universally accepted that favorable chromosome structure is required for initiation in all cells. However, almost nothing is known about whether cells use changes in chromosome struct...

  8. Assignment of ten DNA repair genes from Schizosaccharomyces pombe to chromosomal NotI restriction fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Broughton; N.C. Barbet; J. Murray (Johanne); F.Z. Watts (Felicity); M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); A.R. Lehmann (Alan); A.M. Carr (Anthony)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractTen DNA repair (rad) genes from the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe were mapped to the 17 NotI fragments of the three chromosomes. Nine of the genes map to chromosome I, but there is no evidence for significant clustering.

  9. Molecular cloaking of H2A.Z on mortal DNA chromosomes during nonrandom segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yang Hoon; Sherley, James L

    2011-10-01

    Although nonrandom sister chromatid segregation is a singular property of distributed stem cells (DSCs) that are responsible for renewing and repairing mature vertebrate tissues, both its cellular function and its molecular mechanism remain unknown. This situation persists in part because of the lack of facile methods for detecting and quantifying nonrandom segregating cells and for identifying chromosomes with immortal DNA strands, the cellular molecules that signify nonrandom segregation. During nonrandom segregation, at each mitosis, asymmetrically self-renewing DSCs continuously cosegregate to themselves the set of chromosomes that contain immortal DNA strands, which are the oldest DNA strands. Here, we report the discovery of a molecular asymmetry between segregating sets of immortal chromosomes and opposed mortal chromosomes (i.e., containing the younger set of DNA template strands) that constitutes a new convenient biomarker for detection of cells undergoing nonrandom segregation and direct delineation of chromosomes that bear immortal DNA strands. In both cells engineered with DSC-specific properties and ex vivo-expanded mouse hair follicle stem cells, the histone H2A variant H2A.Z shows specific immunodetection on immortal DNA chromosomes. Cell fixation analyses indicate that H2A.Z is present on mortal chromosomes as well but is cloaked from immunodetection, and the cloaking entity is acid labile. The H2A.Z chromosomal asymmetry produced by molecular cloaking provides a first direct assay for nonrandom segregation and for chromosomes with immortal DNA strands. It also seems likely to manifest an important aspect of the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for nonrandom sister chromatid segregation in DSCs.

  10. Hidden chromosome symmetry: in silico transformation reveals symmetry in 2D DNA walk trajectories of 671 chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S Poptsova

    Full Text Available Maps of 2D DNA walk of 671 examined chromosomes show composition complexity change from symmetrical half-turn in bacteria to pseudo-random trajectories in archaea, fungi and humans. In silico transformation of gene order and strand position returns most of the analyzed chromosomes to a symmetrical bacterial-like state with one transition point. The transformed chromosomal sequences also reveal remarkable segmental compositional symmetry between regions from different strands located equidistantly from the transition point. Despite extensive chromosome rearrangement the relation of gene numbers on opposite strands for chromosomes of different taxa varies in narrow limits around unity with Pearson coefficient r = 0.98. Similar relation is observed for total genes' length (r = 0.86 and cumulative GC (r = 0.95 and AT (r = 0.97 skews. This is also true for human coding sequences (CDS, which comprise only several percent of the entire chromosome length. We found that frequency distributions of the length of gene clusters, continuously located on the same strand, have close values for both strands. Eukaryotic gene distribution is believed to be non-random. Contribution of different subsystems to the noted symmetries and distributions, and evolutionary aspects of symmetry are discussed.

  11. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aiuto, L; Antonacci, R; Marzella, R; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M

    1993-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed.

  12. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Chromosomal mapping of 18S-28S rRNA genes and 10 cDNA clones of human chromosome 1 in the musk shrew (Suncus murinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroiwa, A; Matsubara, K; Nagase, T; Nomura, N; Seong, J K; Ishikawa, A; Anunciado, R V; Tanaka, K; Yamagata, T; Masangkay, J S; Dang, V B; Namikawa, T; Matsuda, Y

    2001-01-01

    The direct R-banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was used to map 18S-28S ribosomal RNA genes and 10 human cDNA clones on the chromosomes of the musk shrew (Suncus murinus). The chromosomal locations of 18S-28S ribosomal RNA genes were examined in the five laboratory lines and wild animals captured in the Philippines and Vietnam, and the genes were found on chromosomes 5, 6, 9, and 13 with geographic variation. The comparative mapping of 10 cDNA clones of human chromosome 1 demonstrated that human chromosome 1 consisted of at least three segments homologous to Suncus chromosomes (chromosomes 7, 10, and 14). This approach with the direct R-banding FISH method is useful for constructing comparative maps between human and insectivore species and for explicating the process of chromosomal rearrangements during the evolution of mammals.

  14. The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzny, Donna M; Scherer, Steven E; Kaul, Rajinder

    2006-01-01

    After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chr...

  15. Independent control of replication initiation of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes by DnaA and RctB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duigou, Stephane; Knudsen, Kristine Groth; Skovgaard, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Although the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes initiate replication in a coordinated fashion, we show here that each chromosome appears to have a specific replication initiator. DnaA overproduction promoted overinitiation of chromosome I and not chromosome II. In contrast, overproduction of Rct...

  16. The 5S rDNA in two Abracris grasshoppers (Ommatolampidinae: Acrididae): molecular and chromosomal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Mariguela, Tatiane Casagrande; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2016-08-01

    The 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are subject of dynamic evolution at chromosomal and molecular levels, evolving through concerted and/or birth-and-death fashion. Among grasshoppers, the chromosomal location for this sequence was established for some species, but little molecular information was obtained to infer evolutionary patterns. Here, we integrated data from chromosomal and nucleotide sequence analysis for 5S rDNA in two Abracris species aiming to identify evolutionary dynamics. For both species, two arrays were identified, a larger sequence (named type-I) that consisted of the entire 5S rDNA gene plus NTS (non-transcribed spacer) and a smaller (named type-II) with truncated 5S rDNA gene plus short NTS that was considered a pseudogene. For type-I sequences, the gene corresponding region contained the internal control region and poly-T motif and the NTS presented partial transposable elements. Between the species, nucleotide differences for type-I were noticed, while type-II was identical, suggesting pseudogenization in a common ancestor. At chromosomal point to view, the type-II was placed in one bivalent, while type-I occurred in multiple copies in distinct chromosomes. In Abracris, the evolution of 5S rDNA was apparently influenced by the chromosomal distribution of clusters (single or multiple location), resulting in a mixed mechanism integrating concerted and birth-and-death evolution depending on the unit.

  17. DNA amount of X and B chromosomes in the grasshoppers Eyprepocnemis plorans and Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ruano, F J; Ruiz-Estévez, M; Rodríguez-Pérez, J; López-Pino, J L; Cabrero, J; Camacho, J P M

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the DNA amount in X and B chromosomes of 2 XX/X0 grasshopper species (Eyprepocnemis plorans and Locusta migratoria), by means of Feulgen image analysis densitometry (FIAD), using previous estimates in L. migratoria as standard (5.89 pg). We first analyzed spermatids of 0B males and found a bimodal distribution of integrated optical densities (IODs), suggesting that one peak corresponded to +X and the other to -X spermatids. The difference between the 2 peaks corresponded to the X chromosome DNA amount, which was 1.28 pg in E. plorans and 0.80 pg in L. migratoria. In addition, the +X peak in E. plorans gave an estimate of the C-value in this species (10.39 pg). We next analyzed diplotene cells from 1B males in E. plorans and +B males in L. migratoria (a species where Bs are mitotically unstable and no integer B number can be defined for an individual) and measured B chromosome IOD relative to X chromosome IOD, within the same cell, taking advantage of the similar degree of condensation for both positively heteropycnotic chromosomes at this meiotic stage. From this proportion, we estimated the DNA amount for 3 different B chromosome variants found in individuals from 3 E. plorans Spanish populations (0.54 pg for B1 from Saladares, 0.51 pg for B2 from Salobreña and 0.64 for B24 from Torrox). Likewise, we estimated the DNA amount of the B chromosome in L. migratoria to be 0.15 pg. To automate measurements, we wrote a GPL3 licensed Python program (pyFIA). We discuss the utility of the present approach for estimating X and B chromosome DNA amount in a variety of situations, and the meaning of the DNA amount estimates for X and B chromosomes in these 2 species.

  18. A 6. 5-Mb yeast artificial chromosome contig incorporating 33 DNA markers on the human X chromosome at Xq22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetrie, D.; Kendall, E.; Coffey, A.; Hassock, S.; Collins, J.; Todd, C.; Bobrow, M.; Bentley, D.R. (Paediatric Research Unit, London (United Kingdom)); Lehrach, H. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)); Harris, A. (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    The Xq22 region of the human X chromosome contains genes for a number of inherited disorders. Sixty-nine yeast artificial chromosome clones have been isolated and assembled into a 6.5-Mb contig that contains 33 DNA markers localized to this region. This contig extends distally from DXS366 to beyond DXS87 and includes the genes involved in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (btk), Fabry disease (GLA), and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PLP). The order of markers in this contig is consistent with the known genetic and physical mapping information of Xq22. This cloned material provides a source from which to isolate other genes located in this part of the X chromosome. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Dynamic in situ chromosome immobilisation and DNA extraction using localized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) phase transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh; Marie, Rodolphe

    2011-01-01

    A method of in situ chromosome immobilisation and DNA extraction in a microfluidic polymer chip was presented. Light-induced local heating was used to induce poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) phase transition in order to create a hydrogel and embed a single chromosome such that it was immobilised....... This was achieved with the use of a near-infrared laser focused on an absorption layer integrated in the polymer chip in close proximity to the microchannel. It was possible to proceed to DNA extraction while holding on the chromosome at an arbitrary location by introducing protease K into the microchannel. © 2011...

  20. Sex chromosome inactivation in germ cells: emerging roles of DNA damage response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijima, Yosuke; Sin, Ho-Su; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2012-08-01

    Sex chromosome inactivation in male germ cells is a paradigm of epigenetic programming during sexual reproduction. Recent progress has revealed the underlying mechanisms of sex chromosome inactivation in male meiosis. The trigger of chromosome-wide silencing is activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, which is centered on the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), a binding partner of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX). This DDR pathway shares features with the somatic DDR pathway recognizing DNA replication stress in the S phase. Additionally, it is likely to be distinct from the DDR pathway that recognizes meiosis-specific double-strand breaks. This review article extensively discusses the underlying mechanism of sex chromosome inactivation.

  1. Association of condensin with chromosomes depends on DNA binding by its HEAT-repeat subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ilaria; Rutkowska, Anna; Ori, Alessandro; Walczak, Marta; Metz, Jutta; Pelechano, Vicent; Beck, Martin; Haering, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Condensin complexes have central roles in the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes during cell divisions, but how they interact with chromatin to promote chromosome segregation is largely unknown. Previous work has suggested that condensin, in addition to encircling chromatin fibers topologically within the ring-shaped structure formed by its SMC and kleisin subunits, contacts DNA directly. Here we describe the discovery of a binding domain for double-stranded DNA formed by the two HEAT-repeat subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin complex. From detailed mapping data of the interfaces between the HEAT-repeat and kleisin subunits, we generated condensin complexes that lack one of the HEAT-repeat subunits and consequently fail to associate with chromosomes in yeast and human cells. The finding that DNA binding by condensin's HEAT-repeat subunits stimulates the SMC ATPase activity suggests a multistep mechanism for the loading of condensin onto chromosomes.

  2. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents.

  3. The escherichia coli chromosome replication initiator protein, DnaA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Malene

    The experimental work presented in this thesis involve mutational analysis of the DNA binding domain of the DnaA protein and analysis of the A184V substitution in the ATP area of domain III and other amino acid substitutions found in the DnaA5 and DnaA4G proteins....

  4. [Loop organization of eukaryotic chromosomes and triple-stranded DNA structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazkov, M V

    2011-01-01

    To study possible involvement of polypurine and polypyrimidine DNA tracks potentially capable to form triple-stranded structures (H-form of DNA) in compactization of eukaryotic chromosomes a search in silico for "complementary" polypurine and polypyrimidine tracks within 12 eukaryotic gene nucleotide sequences was carried out. Polypurine and polypyrimidine tracks (10-11 b.p.) potentially capable of interacting with each other with the formation of triplex structures ("structurizing" regions) has been shown to be located in chromosomal locus of genes, predominantly in introns and flanking regions. In the case of in vivo realization of such DNA-DNA interactions the chromosomal gene domains can be folded into several small loops. An involvement of DNA triplexes in the chromosomal gene loci compactization may be associated with the gene functioning. The analogous analysis carried out for nucleotide sequences of long (LINE) and short (SINE) repeats dispersed over the genome as well as of satellite DNA has demonstrated a fundamental identity between mechanisms of chromosomal encoding and non-coding regions' compactization.

  5. Separation of Y-chromosomal haplotypes from male DNA mixtures via multiplex haplotype-specific extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Jessica; Nagy, Marion

    2015-11-01

    In forensic analysis, the interpretation of DNA mixtures is the subject of ongoing debate and requires expertise knowledge. Haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) is an alternative method that enables the separation of large chromosome fragments or haplotypes by using magnetic beads in conjunction with allele-specific probes. HSE thus allows physical separation of the components of a DNA mixture. Here, we present the first multiplex HSE separation of a Y-chromosomal haplotype consisting of six Yfiler short tandem repeat markers from a mixture of male DNA.

  6. Association of Chromosomal Telomere DNA With Nuclear Matrix in HeLa Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪国顺; 罗文捷; 潘惟钧; 丁明孝; 翟中和

    1994-01-01

    Using Electron Spectroscopic Imaging (ESI), we visualized the in situ binding of nucleic acids to nuclear matrix and 3H-thymidine incorporation which indicates that a small partial DNA bound to nuclear matrix tightly. Furthermore we found that chromosomal telomere DNA could bind to nuclear matrix specifically by the dot and Southern hybridization. The result of the Southwestern blot suggests that telomere DNA has high affinity to lamin B, vimentin and some nuclear matrix proteins. Therefore, the nuclear matrix and lamina of HeLa cell are possibly associated with spatial organization and action of chromosome.

  7. Unique and universal features of Epsilonproteobacterial origins of chromosome replication and DnaA-DnaA box interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Jaworski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, chromosome replication is initiated by the interaction of the initiator protein DnaA with a defined region of a chromosome at which DNA replication starts (oriC. While DnaA proteins share significant homology regardless of phylogeny, oriC regions exhibit more variable structures. The general architecture of oriCs is universal, i.e. they are composed of a cluster of DnaA binding sites, a DNA-unwinding element, and sequences that bind regulatory proteins. However, detailed structures of oriCs are shared by related species while being significantly different in unrelated bacteria. In this work, we characterised Epsilonproteobacterial oriC regions. Helicobacter pylori was the only species of the class for which oriC was characterised. A few unique features were found such as bipartite oriC structure, not encountered in any other Gram-negative species, and topology-sensitive DnaA-DNA interactions, which have not been found in any other bacterium. These unusual H. pylori oriC features raised questions of whether oriC structure and DnaA-DNA interactions are unique to this bacterium or they are common to related species. By in silico and in vitro analyses we identified putative oriCs in three Epsilonproteobacterial species: pathogenic Arcobacter butzleri, symbiotic Wolinella succinogenes and free-living Sulfurimonas denitrificans. We propose that oriCs typically co-localize with ruvC-dnaA-dnaN in Epsilonproteobacteria, with the exception of Helicobacteriaceae species. The clusters of DnaA boxes localize upstream (oriC1 and downstream (oriC2 of dnaA, and they likely constitute bipartite origins. In all cases, DNA unwinding was shown to occur in oriC2. Unlike the DnaA box pattern, which is not conserved in Epsilonproteobacterial oriCs, the consensus DnaA box sequences and the mode of DnaA-DnaA box interactions are common to the class. We propose that the typical Epsilonproteobacterial DnaA box consists of the core nucleotide sequence 5

  8. Unique and Universal Features of Epsilonproteobacterial Origins of Chromosome Replication and DnaA-DnaA Box Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Pawel; Donczew, Rafal; Mielke, Thorsten; Thiel, Marcel; Oldziej, Stanislaw; Weigel, Christoph; Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, chromosome replication is initiated by the interaction of the initiator protein DnaA with a defined region of a chromosome at which DNA replication starts (oriC). While DnaA proteins share significant homology regardless of phylogeny, oriC regions exhibit more variable structures. The general architecture of oriCs is universal, i.e., they are composed of a cluster of DnaA binding sites, a DNA-unwinding element, and sequences that bind regulatory proteins. However, detailed structures of oriCs are shared by related species while being significantly different in unrelated bacteria. In this work, we characterized Epsilonproteobacterial oriC regions. Helicobacter pylori was the only species of the class for which oriC was characterized. A few unique features were found such as bipartite oriC structure, not encountered in any other Gram-negative species, and topology-sensitive DnaA-DNA interactions, which have not been found in any other bacterium. These unusual H. pylori oriC features raised questions of whether oriC structure and DnaA-DNA interactions are unique to this bacterium or whether they are common to related species. By in silico and in vitro analyses we identified putative oriCs in three Epsilonproteobacterial species: pathogenic Arcobacter butzleri, symbiotic Wolinella succinogenes, and free-living Sulfurimonas denitrificans. We propose that oriCs typically co-localize with ruvC-dnaA-dnaN in Epsilonproteobacteria, with the exception of Helicobacteriaceae species. The clusters of DnaA boxes localize upstream (oriC1) and downstream (oriC2) of dnaA, and they likely constitute bipartite origins. In all cases, DNA unwinding was shown to occur in oriC2. Unlike the DnaA box pattern, which is not conserved in Epsilonproteobacterial oriCs, the consensus DnaA box sequences and the mode of DnaA-DnaA box interactions are common to the class. We propose that the typical Epsilonproteobacterial DnaA box consists of the core nucleotide sequence 5′-TTCAC-3

  9. Detection of Y chromosome microdeletions and mitochondrial DNA mutations in male infertility patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güney, A I; Javadova, D; Kırac, D; Ulucan, K; Koc, G; Ergec, D; Tavukcu, H; Tarcan, T

    2012-04-27

    Infertility affects about 10-15% of all couples attempting pregnancy with infertility attributed to the male partner in approximately half of the cases. Proposed causes of male infertility include sperm motility disturbances, Y chromosome microdeletions, chromosomal abnormalities, single gene mutations, and sperm mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements. To investigate the etiology of decreased sperm fertility and motility of sperm and to develop an appropriate therapeutic strategy, the molecular basis of these defects must be elucidated. In this study, we aimed to reveal the relationships between the genetic factors including sperm mtDNA mutations, Y chromosome microdeletions, and sperm parameters that can be regarded as candidate factors for male infertility. Thirty men with a history of infertility and 30 fertile men were recruited to the study. Y chromosome microdeletions were analyzed by multiplex PCR. Mitochondrial genes ATPase6, Cytb, and ND1, were amplified by PCR and then analyzed by direct sequencing. No Y chromosome microdeletions were detected in either group. However, a total of 38 different nucleotide substitutions were identified in the examined mitochondrial genes in both groups, all of which are statistically non-significant. Fifteen substitutions caused an amino acid change and 12 were considered novel mutations. As a conclusion, mtDNA mutations and Y chromosome microdeletions in male infertility should be examined in larger numbers in order to clarify the effect of genetic factors.

  10. Chromosomal mapping of specific DNA gains and losses in solid tumors using comparative genomic hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrock, E.; Manoir, S. du; Speicher, M. [National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a new molecular cytogenetic technique that is based on two color FISH and quantitative digital imaging microscopy. CGH is used to comprehensively survey tumor genomes for copy number changes and to determine the map position of amplification sites on normal reference chromosomes. CGH was used to analyze 107 different solid tumors, including 16 low grade astrocytomas, 15 recurrent astrocytic tumors, 13 high grade astrocytomas, 13 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), 14 breast cancer samples (7 diploid and 7 aneupoid tumors), 18 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas and 5 seminomas. Tumor DNA was extracted from frozen tissue, autopic material and formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Our results revealed tumor specific gains and losses of certain chromosomes or chromosomal subregions (e.g., chromosomes 7 and 10 in glioblastomas, chromosomes 3 and 5 in SCLC). Numerous DNA-amplifications were mapped on reference metaphase and prometaphase chromosomes. The frequent amplification of the EGFR gene (malignant gliomas), protooncogenes of the myc family (SCLC) and of c-myc, int-2 and c-erbB2 (breast cancer) was confirmed. Many additional amplification sites, however, were mapped that were not described before. The results of CGH analysis were independently confirmed by means of cytogenetic banding analysis, interphase cytogenetics with region specific DNA-clones, Southern-Blot analysis, DNA-cytometry and studies of loss of heterozygosity.

  11. The DNA Sequence And Comparative Analysis Of Human Chromosome5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, Steve; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie,Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black,Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan,Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner,Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou,Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar,Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers,Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang,Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, SusanM.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-08-01

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes and contains numerous intrachromosomal duplications, yet it has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting that they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-coding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families. We also completely sequenced versions of the large chromosome-5-specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and probably have a mechanistic role in human physiological variation, as deletions in these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy.

  12. Distribution of 5S and 45S rDNA sites in plants with holokinetic chromosomes and the "chromosome field" hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, A; Barros e Silva, A E; Cuadrado, A; Loarce, Y; Alves, M V; Guerra, M

    2011-08-01

    Secondary constrictions or 45S rDNA sites are commonly reported to be located mainly in the terminal regions of the chromosomes. This distribution has been assumed to be related to the existence of a "chromosome field" lying between the centromere and the telomere, an area in which certain cytogenetic events may predominantly occur. If this hypothesis is true this distribution should not be observed in holokinetic chromosomes, as they do not have a localized centromere. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, a comparative study was made of the distributions of 5S and 45S rDNA sites using fluorescence in situ hybridization in representatives of the genera Eleocharis, Diplacrum, Fimbristylis, Kyllinga and Rhynchospora, all of which belong to the family Cyperaceae. The numbers of sites per diploid chromosome complement varied from 2 to ∼10 for 5S rDNA, and from 2 to ∼45 for 45S rDNA. All of the 11 species analyzed had terminally located 45S rDNA sites on the chromosomes whereas the 5S rDNA sites also generally had terminal distributions, except for the Rhynchospora species, where their position was almost always interstitial. These results, together with other previously published data, suggest that the variation in the number and position of the rDNA sites in species with holokinetic chromosomes is non-random and similar to that reported for species with monocentric chromosomes. Therefore, the predominant terminal position of the 45S rDNA sites does not appear to be influenced by the centromere-telomere polarization as suggested by the "chromosome field" hypothesis. Additionally, the hybridization of 5S and 45S rDNA sites provides interesting markers to distinguish several chromosomes on the rather symmetrical karyotypes of Cyperaceae.

  13. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  14. Extra skeletal Soft Tissue Ewing’s Sarcoma with Variant Translocation of Chromosome t (4; 22 (q35; q12-A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Nagaraj

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ewing’s sarcomas is a rare primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET which has an annual incidence of 2.9 /million population in USA 1Jeffery Toretsky et al (2008 They are very uncommon in African and Asian population .lt is commonly associated with reciprocal translocation between chromosome 11 and 12 t (11:12 or less frequently the t(21 ;22(q22;ql 2 translocation. It is highly aggressive tumor which is PAS- and CD99 (MIC2-positive relatively few variant translocations have been reported in primary Ewing’s sarcomas (ES. Case Report: We are hereby presenting a case of extra skeletal soft tissue Ewing’s sarcoma with unusual translocation of chromosome t (4, 22 (q35, q12.Patient presented to us in advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis and lower limb neurological deficit.Relatively few variant translocations have been reported in primary Ewing’s sarcomas (ES.To date, 13 variants of the EWS fusion gene have been described in literature. They are extremely rare, representing altogether < 1% of the cases’ 23we are reporting a case of a variant simple translocation of chromosome t (4; 22 (q35;1 2. In our exhaustive literature search we could find only one case of complex translocation which was identified in a dysmorphic 15-year-old girl, t (4:11; 22(q21; q24; q12 reported by Squire Jet al (1993. Conclusion: This type of translocation is extremely rare and has not been reported in the literature so far. Clinical presentation was initial indolent but later at the time patient presented to our institute he had developed pulmonary metastases and paraplegia due to involvement of spine. Our case report will provide new insight about rare translocation types in Ewing’s sarcoma and understand their clinical behavior of Ewing’s sarcoma with such type of translocation. Keywords: Ewings sarcoma, Translocation, Neuroectodermal tumours, Chromosome

  15. DNA topoisomerase II must act at mitosis to prevent nondisjunction and chromosome breakage.

    OpenAIRE

    Holm, C.; Stearns, T.; Botstein, D

    1989-01-01

    The hypothesis that DNA topoisomerase II facilitates the separation of replicated sister chromatids was tested by examining the consequences of chromosome segregation in the absence of topoisomerase II activity. We observed a substantial elevation in the rate of nondisjunction in top2/top2 cells incubated at the restrictive temperature for one generation time. In contrast, only a minor increase in the amount of chromosome breakage was observed by either physical or genetic assays. These resul...

  16. A neocentromere on human chromosome 3 without detectable alpha-satellite DNA forms morphologically normal kinetochores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, A; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, Niels

    1998-01-01

    A neocentromere at 3q26 was observed in a father and his daughter on a chromosome 3 with deleted centromeric region. No alpha-satellite DNA was detectable at the 3q26 neocentromere, but it was weakly positive with anticentromere (CREST) antibodies. Electron microscopy showed that the neocentromere...... formed microtubule-associated kinetochores with normal morphology and of the same size as the kinetochores of other large chromosomes. The deleted centromere formed a small linear marker chromosome that reacted strongly with anticentromere antibodies, but showed reduced kinetochore size. The 3q26...

  17. Chromosomal localization of ribosomal DNA sequences in an apple rootstock using a digoxygenin detection system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUJIMEI; SEGARDINER

    1995-01-01

    A 6kb rDNA probe comprising the 18S coding plus spacer sequences has been hybridized to the metaphase chromosomes of apple rootstock cultivar MM106 demonstrating the localization of ribosomal gene arrays in the vicinity of the telomeric regions of the short arms of chromosomes 6 and 14.The in situ results using digoxygenin labelling coupled to an alkaline phosphatase immunoassay were confirmed by silver staining for NORs and nucleoli.This study demonstrates the feasibility of molecular cytogenetic analysis of very small chromosomes(1.0-2.7μm) of apple.

  18. Chromosomal bands affected by acute oil exposure and DNA repair errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Monyarch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a previous study, we showed that individuals who had participated in oil clean-up tasks after the wreckage of the Prestige presented an increase of structural chromosomal alterations two years after the acute exposure had occurred. Other studies have also reported the presence of DNA damage during acute oil exposure, but little is known about the long term persistence of chromosomal alterations, which can be considered as a marker of cancer risk. OBJECTIVES: We analyzed whether the breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage can help to assess the risk of cancer as well as to investigate their possible association with DNA repair efficiency. METHODS: Cytogenetic analyses were carried out on the same individuals of our previous study and DNA repair errors were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin. RESULTS: Three chromosomal bands, 2q21, 3q27 and 5q31, were most affected by acute oil exposure. The dysfunction in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosomal damage, was significantly higher in exposed-oil participants than in those not exposed (p= 0.016. CONCLUSION: The present study shows that breaks in 2q21, 3q27 and 5q31 chromosomal bands, which are commonly involved in hematological cancer, could be considered useful genotoxic oil biomarkers. Moreover, breakages in these bands could induce chromosomal instability, which can explain the increased risk of cancer (leukemia and lymphomas reported in chronically benzene-exposed individuals. In addition, it has been determined that the individuals who participated in clean-up of the oil spill presented an alteration of their DNA repair mechanisms two years after exposure.

  19. v-Src Causes Chromosome Bridges in a Caffeine-Sensitive Manner by Generating DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Honda, Takuya; Kuga, Takahisa; Saito, Youhei; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-06-02

    An increase in Src activity is commonly observed in epithelial cancers. Aberrant activation of the kinase activity is associated with malignant progression. However, the mechanisms that underlie the Src-induced malignant progression of cancer are not completely understood. We show here that v-Src, an oncogene that was first identified from a Rous sarcoma virus and a mutant variant of c-Src, leads to an increase in the number of anaphase and telophase cells having chromosome bridges. v-Src increases the number of γH2AX foci, and this increase is inhibited by treatment with PP2, a Src kinase inhibitor. v-Src induces the phosphorylation of KAP1 at Ser824, Chk2 at Thr68, and Chk1 at Ser345, suggesting the activation of the ATM/ATR pathway. Caffeine decreases the number of cells having chromosome bridges at a concentration incapable of inhibiting Chk1 phosphorylation at Ser345. These results suggest that v-Src induces chromosome bridges via generation of DNA damage and the subsequent DNA damage response, possibly by homologous recombination. A chromosome bridge gives rise to the accumulation of DNA damage directly through chromosome breakage and indirectly through cytokinesis failure-induced multinucleation. We propose that v-Src-induced chromosome bridge formation is one of the causes of the v-Src-induced malignant progression of cancer cells.

  20. The cohesion stabilizer sororin favors DNA repair and chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Jie; Yuan, Yi-Feng; Wu, Di; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Jiao, Xiao-Fei; Huo, Li-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Maintenance and timely termination of cohesion on chromosomes ensures accurate chromosome segregation to guard against aneuploidy in mammalian oocytes and subsequent chromosomally abnormal pregnancies. Sororin, a cohesion stabilizer whose relevance in antagonizing the anti-cohesive property of Wings-apart like protein (Wapl), has been characterized in mitosis; however, the role of Sororin remains unclear during mammalian oocyte meiosis. Here, we show that Sororin is required for DNA damage repair and cohesion maintenance on chromosomes, and consequently, for mouse oocyte meiotic program. Sororin is constantly expressed throughout meiosis and accumulates on chromatins at germinal vesicle (GV) stage/G2 phase. It localizes onto centromeres from germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) to metaphase II stage. Inactivation of Sororin compromises the GVBD and first polar body extrusion (PBE). Furthermore, Sororin inactivation induces DNA damage indicated by positive γH2AX foci in GV oocytes and precocious chromatin segregation in MII oocytes. Finally, our data indicate that PlK1 and MPF dissociate Sororin from chromosome arms without affecting its centromeric localization. Our results define Sororin as a determinant during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation by favoring DNA damage repair and chromosome separation, and thereby, maintaining the genome stability and generating haploid gametes.

  1. Mammalian DNA ligase III: Molecular cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression in spermatocytes undergoing meiotic recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingwen; Danehower, S.; Besterman, J.M.; Husain, I. [Glaxo Research Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Three biochemically distinct DNA ligase activities have been identified in mammalian cell extracts. We have recently purified DNA ligase II and DNA ligase III to near homogeneity from bovine liver and testis tissue, respectively. Amino acid sequencing studies indicated that these enzymes are encoded by the same gene. In the present study, human and murine cDNA clones encoding DNA ligase III were isolated with probes based on the peptide sequences. The human DNA ligase III cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 862 amino acids, whose sequence is more closely related to those of the DNA ligases encoded by poxviruses than to replicative DNA ligases, such as human DNA ligase I. In vitro transcription and translation of the cDNA produced a catalytically active DNA ligase similar in size and substrate specificity to the purified bovine enzyme. The DNA ligase III gene was localized to human chromosome 17, which eliminated this gene as a candidate for the cancer-prone disease Bloom syndrome that is associated with DNA joining abnormalities. DNA ligase III is ubiquitously expressed at low levels, except in the testes, in which the steady-state levels of DNA ligase III mRNA are at least 10-fold higher than those detected in other tissues and cells. Since DNA ligase I mRNA is also present at high levels in the testes, we examined the expression of the DNA ligase genes during spermatogenesis. DNA ligase I mRNA expression correlated with the contribution of proliferating supermatogonia cells to the testes, in agreement with the previously defined role of this enzyme in DNA replications. In contrast, elevated levels of DNA ligase III mRNA were observed in primary supermatocytes undergoing recombination prior to the first meiotic division. Therefore, we suggest that DNA ligase III seals DNA strand breaks that arise during the process of meiotic recombination in germ cells and as a consequence of DNA damage in somatic cells. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Short Communication A small B chromosome in the grasshopper Ommexecha virens (Ommexechidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, T E; Silva-Neto, L C; Santos, J F; Loreto, V; Rieger, T T

    2015-12-21

    B chromosomes, also called supernumerary or accessory chromosomes, have been characterized as extra elements found in the karyotypes of different eukaryotic species. B chromosomes are nonvital and only occur in some individuals within a species. Moreover, the chromosomes contain silenced genes, and they exhibit heterochromatinization and the accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons. In the present study, we describe an extra chromosome in the grasshopper Ommexecha virens for the first time, using conventional staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization techniques, and we discuss the possible origin of the B chromosome.

  3. Both Chromosome Decondensation and Condensation Are Dependent on DNA Replication in C. elegans Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi Sonneville

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During cell division, chromatin alternates between a condensed state to facilitate chromosome segregation and a decondensed form when DNA replicates. In most tissues, S phase and mitosis are separated by defined G1 and G2 gap phases, but early embryogenesis involves rapid oscillations between replication and mitosis. Using Caenorhabditis elegans embryos as a model system, we show that chromosome condensation and condensin II concentration on chromosomal axes require replicated DNA. In addition, we found that, during late telophase, replication initiates on condensed chromosomes and promotes the rapid decondensation of the chromatin. Upon replication initiation, the CDC-45-MCM-GINS (CMG DNA helicase drives the release of condensin I complexes from chromatin and the activation or displacement of inactive MCM-2–7 complexes, which together with the nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS tethers condensed chromatin to the nuclear envelope, thereby promoting chromatin decondensation. Our results show how, in an early embryo, the chromosome-condensation cycle is functionally linked with DNA replication.

  4. Multiple DNA binding proteins contribute to timing of chromosome replication in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. Dna...... replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology...... in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on ori...

  5. Interference in DNA replication can cause mitotic chromosomal breakage unassociated with double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Fujita

    Full Text Available Morphological analysis of mitotic chromosomes is used to detect mutagenic chemical compounds and to estimate the dose of ionizing radiation to be administered. It has long been believed that chromosomal breaks are always associated with double-strand breaks (DSBs. We here provide compelling evidence against this canonical theory. We employed a genetic approach using two cell lines, chicken DT40 and human Nalm-6. We measured the number of chromosomal breaks induced by three replication-blocking agents (aphidicolin, 5-fluorouracil, and hydroxyurea in DSB-repair-proficient wild-type cells and cells deficient in both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining (the two major DSB-repair pathways. Exposure of cells to the three replication-blocking agents for at least two cell cycles resulted in comparable numbers of chromosomal breaks for RAD54(-/-/KU70(-/- DT40 clones and wild-type cells. Likewise, the numbers of chromosomal breaks induced in RAD54(-/-/LIG4(-/- Nalm-6 clones and wild-type cells were also comparable. These data indicate that the replication-blocking agents can cause chromosomal breaks unassociated with DSBs. In contrast with DSB-repair-deficient cells, chicken DT40 cells deficient in PIF1 or ATRIP, which molecules contribute to the completion of DNA replication, displayed higher numbers of mitotic chromosomal breaks induced by aphidicolin than did wild-type cells, suggesting that single-strand gaps left unreplicated may result in mitotic chromosomal breaks.

  6. Genetic variation of the East Balkan Swine (Sus scrofa) in Bulgaria, revealed by mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, D; Doichev, V D; Raichev, E G; Palova, N A; Nakev, J L; Yordanov, Y M; Kaneko, Y; Masuda, R

    2015-04-01

    East Balkan Swine (EBS) Sus scrofa is the only aboriginal domesticated pig breed in Bulgaria and is distributed on the western coast of the Black Sea in Bulgaria. To reveal the breed's genetic characteristics, we analysed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosomal DNA sequences of EBS in Bulgaria. Nucleotide diversity (πn ) of the mtDNA control region, including two newly found haplotypes, in 54 EBS was higher (0.014 ± 0.007) compared with that of European (0.005 ± 0.003) and Asian (0.006 ± 0.003) domestic pigs and wild boar. The median-joining network based on the mtDNA control region showed that the EBS and wild boar in Bulgaria comprised mainly two major mtDNA clades, European clade E1 (61.3%) and Asian clade A (38.7%). The coexistence of two mtDNA clades in EBS in Bulgaria may be the relict of historical pig translocation. Among the Bulgarian EBS colonies, the geographical differences in distribution of two mtDNA clades (E1 and A) could be attributed to the source pig populations and/or historical crossbreeding with imported pigs. In addition, analysis of the Y chromosomal DNA sequences for the EBS revealed that all of the EBS had haplotype HY1, which is dominant in European domestic pigs.

  7. DNA marker mining of ILSTS035 microsatellite locus on chromosome 6 of Hanwoo cattle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jung-Sou Yeo; Jea-Young Lee; Jae-Woo Kim

    2004-12-01

    We describe tests for detecting and locating quantitative trait loci (QTL) for traits in Hanwoo cattle. From results of a permutation test to detect QTL for marbling, we selected the microsatellite locus ILSTS035 on chromosome 6 for further analysis. -means clustering analysis applied to five traits and nine DNA markers in ILSTS035 resulted in three cluster groups. Finally we employed the bootstrap test method to calculate confidence intervals using the resampling method to find major DNA markers. We conclude that the major markers of ILSTS035 locus on chromosome 6 of Hanwoo cattle are markers 235 bp and 266 bp.

  8. High similarity of U2 snDNA sequence between A and B chromosomes in the grasshopper Abracris flavolineata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-de-Carvalho, Nahanna Zimmermann; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Milani, Diogo; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2015-10-01

    B chromosomes are frequently enriched for a wide variety of repetitive DNAs. Among grasshoppers in the species Abracris flavolineata (Ommatolampidinae) the B chromosomes are submetacentric, C-negative and harbor repetitive DNAs such as, U2 snDNA, C 0 t-1 DNA, two Mariner-like elements and some microsatellites. Here, we provide evidence showing the intragenome similarity between the B chromosome and the A complement in A. flavolineata, combining analysis of microdissection and chromosome painting and B chromosome-specific amplification through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of U2 snDNA. Chromosome painting revealed signals spread through the C-negative regions, including the A and B chromosomes. Moreover, significant clustered signals forming bands were observed in some A chromosomes, and for the B chromosome, significant signals were located on both arms, which could be caused by accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences. The C-positive regions did not reveal any signals. Sequence comparison of U2 snDNA between that obtained from a genome without the B chromosome and that from µB-DNA revealed high similarity with the occurrence of four shared haplotypes, one of them (i.e., Hap1) being highly prevalent and putatively ancestral. The highest divergence from Hap1 was observed for Hap3, which was caused by only six mutational steps. These data support an intraspecific origin of the B chromosome in A. flavolineata that is highly similar with the A complement, and the low U2 snDNA sequence diversity observed in the B chromosome could be related to its recent origin, besides intrachromosomal concerted evolution for U2 snDNA repeats in the B chromosome.

  9. Chromosome loss caused by DNA fragmentation induced in main nuclei and micronuclei of human lymphoblastoid cells treated with colcemid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mika; Wakata, Akihiro; Aoki, Yoshinobu; Miyamae, Yoichi; Kodama, Seiji

    2014-04-01

    Aneuploidy, a change in the number of chromosomes, plays an essential role in tumorigenesis. Our previous study demonstrated that a loss of a whole chromosome is induced in human lymphocytes by colcemid, a well-known aneugen. Here, to clarify the mechanism for colcemid-induced chromosome loss, we investigated the relationship between chromosome loss and DNA fragmentation in human lymphoblastoid cells treated with colcemid (an aneugen) compared with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS; a clastogen). We analyzed the number of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) signals targeted for a whole chromosome 2 in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated TK6 cells and WTK-1 cells treated with colcemid and MMS, and concurrently detected DNA fragmentation by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results revealed that DNA fragmentation occurred in 60% of all binucleated TK6 cells harboring colcemid-induced chromosome loss (30% of micronuclei and 30% of main nuclei). DNA fragmentation was observed in colcemid-induced micronuclei containing a whole chromosome but not in MMS-induced micronuclei containing chromosome fragments. In contrast, colcemid-induced nondisjunction had no effect on induction of DNA fragmentation, suggesting that DNA fragmentation was triggered by micronuclei containing a whole chromosome but not by micronuclei containing chromosome fragments or nondisjunction. In addition, the frequency of binucleated cells harboring chromosome loss with DNA fragmentation in micronuclei or main nuclei was higher in wild-type p53 TK6 cells than in mutated-p53 WTK-1 cells treated with colcemid. Taken together, these present and previous results suggest that colcemid-induced chromosome loss is caused by DNA fragmentation, which is triggered by a micronucleus with a whole chromosome and controlled by the p53-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Chromosome alterations in breast carcinomas: frequent involvement of DNA losses including chromosomes 4q and 21q.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwendel, A.; Richard, F.; Langreck, H.; Kaufmann, O.; Lage, H.; Winzer, K.J.; Petersen, I; Dietel, M

    1998-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization was applied to map DNA gains and losses in 39 invasive ductal breast carcinomas. Frequent abnormalities included gains on chromosomal regions 1q, 8q, 11q12-13, 16p, 19, 20q and X as well as frequent losses on 1p, 5q, 6q, 9p, 11q, 13q and 16q. Furthermore, frequent losses on 4q (20 cases) and 21q (14 cases) were found for the first time in this tumour type. High copy number amplifications were observed at 8q12-24, 11q11-13 and 20q13-ter. Highly differentiated ...

  11. Prognostic value of DNA alterations on chromosome 17p13.2 for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ubol Chuensumran; Sopit Wongkham; Chawalit Pairojkul; Siri Chauin; Songsak Petmitr

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To characterize and evaluate DNA alterations among intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) patients.METHODS: DNA from tumor and corresponding normal tissues of 52 patients was amplified with 33 arbitrary primers. The DNA fragment that alters most frequently in ICC was cloned, sequenced, and identified by comparison with known nucleotide sequences in the genome database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). The DNA copy numbers of the allelic alterations in cholangiocarcinoma were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and interpreted as allelic loss or DNA amplification by comparison with the reference gene. Associations between allelic imbalance and clinicopathological parameters of ICC patients were evaluated by x2-test.The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze survival rates.RESULTS: From 33 primers, an altered DNA fragment (518 bp) amplified from BC17 random primer was found frequently in the tumors analyzed and mapped to chromosome 17p13.2. Sixteen of 52 (31%) cases showed DNA amplification, while 7 (13%) showed allelic loss. Interestingly, DNA amplification on chromosome 17p13.2 was associated with a good prognosis, median survival time (wk) of amp vs no amp was 44.14 vs 24.14,P = 0.002; whereas allelic loss of this DNA sequence corresponded with a poor prognosis, median survival time (wk) of loss vs no loss was 18.00 vs 28.71, P =0.019). Moreover, Kaplan-Meier curves comparing the DNA alterations with survival depicted highly significant separation that the median survival time equal to DNA amplification, allelic loss, and normal was 44.14 wk,18.00 wk, and 24.29 wk, respectively (P = 0.005).CONCLUSION: Alterations in the DNA sequence on chromosome 17p13.2 may be involved in cholangiocarcinogenesis, and could be used as a prognostic marker in the treatment of ICC patients.

  12. Molecular organization and chromosomal localization of 5S rDNA in Amazonian Engystomops (Anura, Leiuperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Débora Silva; Rivera, Miryan; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni

    2012-03-20

    For anurans, knowledge of 5S rDNA is scarce. For Engystomops species, chromosomal homeologies are difficult to recognize due to the high level of inter- and intraspecific cytogenetic variation. In an attempt to better compare the karyotypes of the Amazonian species Engystomops freibergi and Engystomops petersi, and to extend the knowledge of 5S rDNA organization in anurans, the 5S rDNA sequences of Amazonian Engystomops species were isolated, characterized, and mapped. Two types of 5S rDNA, which were readily differentiated by their NTS (non-transcribed spacer) sizes and compositions, were isolated from specimens of E. freibergi from Brazil and E. petersi from two Ecuadorian localities (Puyo and Yasuní). In the E. freibergi karyotypes, the entire type I 5S rDNA repeating unit hybridized to the pericentromeric region of 3p, whereas the entire type II 5S rDNA repeating unit mapped to the distal region of 6q, suggesting a differential localization of these sequences. The type I NTS probe clearly detected the 3p pericentromeric region in the karyotypes of E. freibergi and E. petersi from Puyo and the 5p pericentromeric region in the karyotype of E. petersi from Yasuní, but no distal or interstitial signals were observed. Interestingly, this probe also detected many centromeric regions in the three karyotypes, suggesting the presence of a satellite DNA family derived from 5S rDNA. The type II NTS probe detected only distal 6q regions in the three karyotypes, corroborating the differential distribution of the two types of 5S rDNA. Because the 5S rDNA types found in Engystomops are related to those of Physalaemus with respect to their nucleotide sequences and chromosomal locations, their origin likely preceded the evolutionary divergence of these genera. In addition, our data indicated homeology between Chromosome 5 in E. petersi from Yasuní and Chromosomes 3 in E. freibergi and E. petersi from Puyo. In addition, the chromosomal location of the type II 5S rDNA

  13. Global DNA Methylation patterns on marsupial and devil facial tumour chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Emory D; Deakin, Janine E

    2015-01-01

    Despite DNA methylation being one of the most widely studied epigenetic modifications in eukaryotes, only a few studies have examined the global methylation status of marsupial chromosomes. The emergence of devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), a clonally transmissible cancer spreading through the Tasmanian devil population, makes it a particularly pertinent time to determine the methylation status of marsupial and devil facial tumour chromosomes. DNA methylation perturbations are known to play a role in genome instability in human tumours. One of the interesting features of the devil facial tumour is its remarkable karyotypic stability over time as only four strains with minor karyotypic differences having been reported. The cytogenetic monitoring of devil facial tumour (DFT) samples collected over an eight year period and detailed molecular cytogenetic analysis performed on the different DFT strains enables chromosome rearrangements to be correlated with methylation status as the tumour evolves. We used immunofluorescent staining with an antibody to 5-methylcytosine on metaphase chromosomes prepared from fibroblast cells of three distantly related marsupials, including the Tasmanian devil, as well as DFTD chromosomes prepared from samples collected from different years and representing different karyotypic strains. Staining of chromosomes from male and female marsupial cell lines indicate species-specific differences in global methylation patterns but with the most intense staining regions corresponding to telomeric and/or centromeric regions of autosomes. In males, the X chromosome was hypermethylated as was one X in females. Similarly, telomeric regions on DFTD chromosomes and regions corresponding to material from one of the two X chromosomes were hypermethylated. No difference in global methylation in samples of the same strain taken in different years was observed. The methylation patterns on DFTD chromosomes suggests that the hypermethylated active X was

  14. Isolation of 24 novel cDNA fragments from microdis—sected human chromosome band

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGMIN; LONGYU; 等

    1998-01-01

    The strategy of isolating the band0specific expression fragments from a probe pool generated by human chromosome microdissection was reported.A chromosome 14q 24.3 band-specific single copy DNA pool was constructed based on this probe pool.Using total DNA of the pool as probe to hybridize the human marrow cDNA library,68 primary positive clones were selected from 5×105 cDNA clones.Among these primary clones,32 secondary clones were obtained after second-round screening and designed as cFD14-1-32.Finally,24 band-specific expression fragments were identified from these 32 positive clones by DNA hybridization.Those band-specific clones can hybridize to both 14q24.3 DNA and human genomic DNA but cann't hybridize to 17q11-12 DNA,Partial sequences of 13 fragments of them were sequenced and idenfified as novel cDNA sequences,and these sequences were proved to have some homology with known genes in NCBI database.Analysis of expression spectrum of cFD 14-1 suggested that the cDNA fragments thus obtained should be used to isolate the genes can not been cloned in 14q24.3 region.

  15. The chromosomal constitution of fish hybrid lineage revealed by 5S rDNA FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Ye, Lihai; Chen, Yiyi; Xiao, Jun; Wu, Yanhong; Tao, Min; Xiao, Yamei; Liu, Shaojun

    2015-12-03

    The establishment of the bisexual fertile fish hybrid lineage including the allodiploid and allotetraploid hybrids, from interspecific hybridization of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var. 2n = 100, 2n = AA) (♀) × common carp (Cyprinus carpio L. 2n = 100, 2n = BB) (♂), provided a good platform to investigate genetic relationship between the parents and their hybrid progenies. The chromosomal inheritance of diploid and allotetraploid hybrid progenies in successive generations, was studied by applying 5S rDNA fluorescence in situ hybridization. Signals of 5S rDNA distinguished the chromosomal constitution of common carp (B-genome) from red crucian carp (A-genome), in which two strong signals were observed on the first submetacentric chromosome, while no major signal was found in common carp. After fish hybridization, one strong signal of 5S rDNA was detected in the same locus on the chromosome of diploid hybrids. As expected, two strong signals were observed in 4nF3 tetraploid hybrids offspring and it is worth mentioning that two strong signals were detected in a separating bivalent of a primary spermatocyte in 4nF3. Furthermore, the mitosis of heterozygous chromosomes was shown normal and stable with blastular tissue histological studies. We revealed that 5S rDNA signal can be applied to discern A-genome from B-genome, and that 5S rDNA bearing chromosomes can be stably passed down in successive generations. Our work provided a significant method in fish breeding and this is important for studies in fish evolutionary biology.

  16. DNA Cross-Bridging Shapes a Single Nucleus from a Set of Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwer, Matthias; Schneider, Maximilian W G; Hoefler, Rudolf; Schmalhorst, Philipp S; Jude, Julian G; Zuber, Johannes; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2017-08-24

    Eukaryotic cells store their chromosomes in a single nucleus. This is important to maintain genomic integrity, as chromosomes packaged into separate nuclei (micronuclei) are prone to massive DNA damage. During mitosis, higher eukaryotes disassemble their nucleus and release individualized chromosomes for segregation. How numerous chromosomes subsequently reform a single nucleus has remained unclear. Using image-based screening of human cells, we identified barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) as a key factor guiding membranes to form a single nucleus. Unexpectedly, nuclear assembly does not require BAF's association with inner nuclear membrane proteins but instead relies on BAF's ability to bridge distant DNA sites. Live-cell imaging and in vitro reconstitution showed that BAF enriches around the mitotic chromosome ensemble to induce a densely cross-bridged chromatin layer that is mechanically stiff and limits membranes to the surface. Our study reveals that BAF-mediated changes in chromosome mechanics underlie nuclear assembly with broad implications for proper genome function. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Universal spectrum for DNA base C+G frequency distribution in Human chromosomes 1 to 24

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2007-01-01

    Power spectra of human DNA base C+G frequency distribution in all available contiguous sections exhibit the universal inverse power law form of the statistical normal distribution for the 24 chromosomes. Inverse power law form for power spectra of space-time fluctuations is generic to dynamical systems in nature and indicate long-range space-time correlations. A recently developed general systems theory predicts the observed non-local connections as intrinsic to quantumlike chaos governing space-time fluctuations of dynamical systems. The model predicts the following. (1) The quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern for the nested coiled structure of the DNA molecule in the chromosome resulting in maximum packing efficiency. (2) The DNA molecule functions as a unified whole fuzzy logic network with ordered two-way signal transmission between the coding and non-coding regions. Recent studies indicate influence of non-coding regions on functions of coding regions in the DNA molecule.

  18. Separation of DNA replication from the assembly of break-competent meiotic chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah G Blitzblau

    Full Text Available The meiotic cell division reduces the chromosome number from diploid to haploid to form gametes for sexual reproduction. Although much progress has been made in understanding meiotic recombination and the two meiotic divisions, the processes leading up to recombination, including the prolonged pre-meiotic S phase (meiS and the assembly of meiotic chromosome axes, remain poorly defined. We have used genome-wide approaches in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to measure the kinetics of pre-meiotic DNA replication and to investigate the interdependencies between replication and axis formation. We found that replication initiation was delayed for a large number of origins in meiS compared to mitosis and that meiotic cells were far more sensitive to replication inhibition, most likely due to the starvation conditions required for meiotic induction. Moreover, replication initiation was delayed even in the absence of chromosome axes, indicating replication timing is independent of the process of axis assembly. Finally, we found that cells were able to install axis components and initiate recombination on unreplicated DNA. Thus, although pre-meiotic DNA replication and meiotic chromosome axis formation occur concurrently, they are not strictly coupled. The functional separation of these processes reveals a modular method of building meiotic chromosomes and predicts that any crosstalk between these modules must occur through superimposed regulatory mechanisms.

  19. The combined evidential value of autosomal and Y-chromosomal DNA profiles obtained from the same sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zoete, J.; Sjerps, M.; Meester, R.; Cator, E.

    2014-01-01

    When a Y-chromosomal and a (partial) autosomal DNA profile are obtained from one crime sample, and both profiles match the suspect's profiles, we would like to know the combined evidential value. To calculate the likelihood ratio of observing the autosomal and Y-chromosomal DNA profiles combined, we

  20. Isolation, Mapping, DNA Sequence and RFLPs Studies of Random Single-Copy DNA Segments on Human X Chromosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭骏; 邱信芳; 薛京伦; 朱锡华; 纪贤文; 张冬梅; 秦世真

    1994-01-01

    Using the total human/mouse DNA as the probe, screening has been carried out three times with in situ plaque hybridization to obtain the single-copy DNA sequence from the human X chromosome genomic library. The effective rate of screening is 1. 45%. DNAs from clones containing single-copy inserts have been analyzed by a panel of hybrid cells with or without human X chromosome. Three segments, designated by DXFD52,73,75, are mapped to the X chromosome. DXFD52 has been precisely localized on Xq12-q13 with in situ chromosomal hybridization. DXFD52 has been partially sequenced. The results indicate that DXFD52 is a new isolated single-copy segment on the X chromosome. Great progress in the RFLPs study with DXFD52 has been achieved in the population of Chongqing, Sichuan Province. The results show that the DXFD52 can be used to detect the RFLP with Hind Ⅲ, Bgl Ⅱ, and Hinf Ⅰ. DXFD52 will be a potential "landmark" for the construction of the complete linkage map of human genome and the analysis of genomic s

  1. Exploring function of conserved non-coding DNA in its chromosomal context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delores J. Grant

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is renewed interest in understanding expression of vertebrate genes in their chromosomal context because regulatory sequences that confer tissue-specific expression are often distributed over large distances along the DNA from the gene. One approach inserts a universal sensor/reporter-gene into the mouse or zebrafish genome to identify regulatory sequences in highly conserved non-coding DNA in the vicinity of the integrated reporter-gene. However detailed mechanisms of interaction of these regulatory elements among themselves and/or with the genes they influence remain elusive with the strategy. The inability to associate distant regulatory elements with the genes they regulate makes it difficult to examine the contribution of sequence changes in regulatory DNA to human disease. Such associations have been obtained in favorable circumstances by testing the regulatory potential of highly conserved non-coding DNA individually in small reporter-gene-containing plasmids. Alternative approaches use tiny fragments of chromosomes in Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes, BACs, where the gene of interest is tagged in vitro with a reporter/sensor gene and integrated into the germ-line of animals for expression. Mutational analysis of the BAC DNA identifies regulatory sequences. A recent approach inserts a sensor/reporter-gene into a BAC that is also truncated progressively from an end of genomic insert, and the end-deleted BAC carrying the sensor is then integrated into the genome of a developing animal for expression. The approach allows mechanisms of tissue-specific gene expression to be explored in much greater detail, although the chromosomal context of such mechanisms is limited to the length of the BAC. Here we discuss the relative strengths of the various approaches and explore how the integrated-sensor in the BACs method applied to a contig of BACs spanning a chromosomal region is likely to address mechanistic questions on interactions between

  2. Genetic linkage analysis of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using human chromosome 21 microsatellite DNA markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, D.R.; Sapp, P.; O`Regan, J.; McKenna-Yasek, D.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Haines, J.L.; Gusella, J.F.; Horvitz, H.R.; Brown, R.H. Jr. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-05-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig`s Disease) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease of upper and lower motorneurons in the brain and spinal cord. We previously reported linkage of a gene for familial ALS (FALS) to human chromosome 21 using 4 restriction fragment length polymorphism DNA markers and identified disease-associated mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1 gene in some ALS families. We report here the genetic linkage data that led us to examine the SOD-1 gene for mutations. We also report a new microsatellite DNA marker for D21S63, derived from the cosmid PW517. Ten microsatellite DNA markers, including the new marker D21S63, were used to reinvestigate linkage of FALS to chromosome 21. Genetic linkage analysis performed with 13 ALS familes for these 10 DNA markers confirmed the presence of a FALS gene on chromosome 21. The highest total 2-point LOD score for all families was 4.33, obtained at a distance of 10 cM from the marker D21S223. For 5 ALS families linked to chromosome 21, a peak 2-point LOD score of 5.94 was obtained at the DNA marker D21S223. A multipoint score of 6.50 was obtained with the markers D21S213, D21S223, D21S167, and FALS for 5 chromosome 21-linked ALS families. The haplotypes of these families for the 10 DNA markers reveal recombination events that further refined the location of the FALS gene to a segment of approximately 5 megabases (Mb) between D21S213 and D21S219. The only characterized gene within this segment was SOD-1, the structural gene for Cu, Zn SOD. 30 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Polymorphic distribution of Y-chromosome haplotype and mitochondrial DNA in the Bouyei people in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永念; 左丽; 文波; 柯越海; 黄薇; 金力

    2004-01-01

    @@ In the evolution of humans, many kinds of mutations in the human genome have been accumulated, providing credible genetic evidence for the study of human origins and migrations. The "out-of-Africa" hypothesis of modern human evolution and the genetic origin of the Japanese has come about by studying mitochondrial DNA.l,2 Recently, researchers have recognized the power of Y-chromosome markers in resolving migratory patterns of modern humans as more and more Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism markers have been found. The markers on the nonrecombinant part of the Y-chromosome allows for the reconstruction of intact haplotypes which are probably the best genetic tools to study human migrations. We can analyze the paternal history of some people in different areas by Y-chromosome haplotypes.

  4. Recruiting a microtubule-binding complex to DNA directs chromosome segregation in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Andrew W.; Lacefield, Soni; Lau, Tsz Cham Derek

    2009-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation depends on the kinetochore, the complex of proteins that link microtubules to centromeric DNA1. The budding yeast kinetochore consists of more than 80 proteins assembled on a 125bp region of DNA1. We studied the assembly and function of kinetochore components by fusing individual kinetochore proteins to the lactose repressor (LacI) and testing their ability to improve the segregation of a plasmid carrying tandem repeats of the lactose operator (LacO). Targeting...

  5. Specific and non-specific interactions of ParB with DNA: implications for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Pastrana, Cesar L; Butterer, Annika; Pernstich, Christian; Gwynn, Emma J; Sobott, Frank; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of many bacterial chromosomes is dependent on the interactions of ParB proteins with centromere-like DNA sequences called parS that are located close to the origin of replication. In this work, we have investigated the binding of Bacillus subtilis ParB to DNA in vitro using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. We observe tight and specific binding of a ParB homodimer to the parS sequence. Binding of ParB to non-specific DNA is more complex and displays apparent positive co-operativity that is associated with the formation of larger, poorly defined, nucleoprotein complexes. Experiments with magnetic tweezers demonstrate that non-specific binding leads to DNA condensation that is reversible by protein unbinding or force. The condensed DNA structure is not well ordered and we infer that it is formed by many looping interactions between neighbouring DNA segments. Consistent with this view, ParB is also able to stabilize writhe in single supercoiled DNA molecules and to bridge segments from two different DNA molecules in trans. The experiments provide no evidence for the promotion of non-specific DNA binding and/or condensation events by the presence of parS sequences. The implications of these observations for chromosome segregation are discussed.

  6. Ribosomal DNA is active in different B chromosome variants of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz-Estévez, Mercedes; López-León, M Dolores; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2013-09-01

    B chromosomes are considered to be genetically inert elements. However, some of them are able to show nucleolus organizer region (NOR) activity, as detected by both cytological and molecular means. The grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans shows a B chromosome polymorphism characterized by the existence of many B variants. One of them, B24, shows NOR activity in about half of B-carrying males in the Torrox population. Molecular data have suggested the recent origin for B chromosomes in this species, and on this basis it would be expected that NOR activity was widespread among the different B variants. Here we test this hypothesis in four different B chromosome variants (B1, B2, B5, and B24) from 11 natural populations of the grasshopper E. plorans covering the south and east of the Iberian Peninsula plus the Balearic Islands. We used two different approaches: (1) the cytological observation of nucleoli attached to the distal region of the B chromosome (where the rDNA is located), and (2) the molecular detection of the rDNA transcripts carrying an adenine insertion characteristic of B chromosome ITS2 sequences. The results showed NOR expression not only for B24 but also for the B1 and B2 variants. However, the level of B-NOR expression in these latter variants, measured by the proportion of cells showing nucleoli attached to the B chromosomes, was much lower than that previously reported for B24. This suggests the possibility that structural or genetic background conditions are enhancing the expressivity of the rDNA in the B24 variant.

  7. Gyramides prevent bacterial growth by inhibiting DNA gyrase and altering chromosome topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendram, Manohary; Hurley, Katherine A; Foss, Marie H; Thornton, Kelsey M; Moore, Jared T; Shaw, Jared T; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-06-20

    Antibiotics targeting DNA gyrase have been a clinical success story for the past half-century, and the emergence of bacterial resistance has fueled the search for new gyrase inhibitors. In this paper we demonstrate that a new class of gyrase inhibitors, the gyramides, are bacteriostatic agents that competitively inhibit the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli gyrase and produce supercoiled DNA in vivo. E. coli cells treated with gyramide A have abnormally localized, condensed chromosomes that blocks DNA replication and interrupts chromosome segregation. The resulting alterations in DNA topology inhibit cell division through a mechanism that involves the SOS pathway. Importantly, gyramide A is a specific inhibitor of gyrase and does not inhibit the closely related E. coli enzyme topoisomerase IV. E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to gyramide A do not display cross-resistance to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin. The results demonstrate that the gyramides prevent bacterial growth by a mechanism in which the topological state of chromosomes is altered and halts DNA replication and segregation. The specificity and activity of the gyramides for inhibiting gyrase makes these compounds important chemical tools for studying the mechanism of gyrase and the connection between DNA topology and bacterial cell division.

  8. [Analysis of sperm chromosomal abnormalities and sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile males].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Leiguang; Zhang, Lihong; Yang, Dantong; Zhang, Aidong; Yu, Jianchun

    2008-12-01

    To investigate changes in sperm chromosome and sperm DNA integrity of infertile males. The level of DNA fragmentation was determined by Sperm Chromatin Dispersion (SCD) test in infertile males with idiopathic severe oligoasthenozoospermia (ISOA, n= 19), couples with unexplained recurrent miscarriage (URM, n= 38) and adult healthy fertile men (control group, n= 32). Multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed with probes specific for chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y in the control group (n= 5), the ISOA (n= 10) and the URM (n= 12). Patients with ISOA and URM showed a significantly higher abnormality with total rate of 4.02% (n= 19) and 3.91%(n= 38) for chromosomes 13, 18 and 21, and 2.03%, 1.98% for chromosomes X and Y, respectively, in their spermatozoa compared to control (1.29% and 0.61%, Pchromosomal aberration and the rate of sperm DNA fragmentation (gamma = 0.874, Pabnormal sperm (gamma = - 0.571, gamma = - 0.616 and gamma = 0.637, respectively, Pchromosomal aneuploidy and may lead to male infertility. Screening for sperm DNA damage may provide useful information in the diagnosis of male idiopathic infertility.

  9. New procedure for recovering extra- and intracellular DNA from marine sediment samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawi, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a ubiquitous biological compound in aquatic sediment and soil. Despite major methodological advances, analysis of DNA from sediment is still technically challenging, not just because of the co-elution of inhibitory substances, but also due to co-elution of extracellular DNA, which potentially leads to an overestimate of the actual diversity. Previous studies suggested that eDNA might play an important role in biogeochemical element cycling, horizontal gene transfer and stabilization of biofilm structures. Several protocols based on the precipitation of eDNA e.g. with CTAB and ethanol have already been published. However, using these methods we did not succeed in quantifying very low amounts of eDNA (e.g. PCR can be performed. To evaluate the new extraction method two sediments with rather opposing composition were analyzed. Sediment from the South Pacific Gyre, the most oligotrophic oceanic region on earth and organic-rich Baltic Sea sediment (Northern Germany) were processed. Using this new procedure high purity genomic iDNA and eDNA with a molecular size range between 20 bp and 50k bp can be simultaneously recovered even from very oligotrophic sediment with very low cell abundances. The main fraction of recovered eDNA was suitable for downstream applications like PCR and had a molecular size that indicates minimal shearing. Despite about two decades of research many questions about deep subsurface life remain unanswered. The fact that microbes can be found even in deep oligotrophic marine sediment raises the fundamental questions of the types and availability of substrates and their biogeochemical cycling. This is the first study that provides evidence that eDNA is an important potential substrate for microorganisms in the deep biosphere. Also, our results show a link between cell counts and eDNA content, indicating that the eDNA pool in the investigated sediment consist mainly of microbial DNA. Comparative sequence analysis of

  10. Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zessin, Patrick J M; Finan, Kieran; Heilemann, Mike

    2012-02-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is a powerful tool for understanding cellular function. However one of the most important biomolecules - DNA - remains somewhat inaccessible because it cannot be effectively and appropriately labeled. Here, we demonstrate that robust and detailed super-resolution images of DNA can be produced by combining 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) labeling using the 'click chemistry' approach and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). This method can resolve fine chromatin structure, and - when used in conjunction with pulse labeling - can reveal the paths taken by individual fibers through the nucleus. This technique should provide a useful tool for the study of nuclear structure and function.

  11. Método rápido de extração de DNA de bactérias A fast DNA extraction method for bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dias Rosa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Desenvolveu-se um método rápido para extração de DNA de bactérias, que ao contrário de outros métodos, não requer o uso de enzimas, como lisozima e proteinase K, previamente, utilizado-se o carbonato de silício (carborundum como agente físico para efetuar a quebrar da parede celular da bactéria. Com este método conseguiu-se extrair DNA bacteriano num menor tempo, além de mais rápido, ele mostrou-se mais simples e econômico, quando comparado aos métodos convencionais. O DNA obtido pode ser utilizado para diversas finalidades relacionadas ao DNA de bactérias, obtendo-se uma quantidade razoável de DNA, que varia de 725 µg/mL a 1170 µg/mL por cada 0,1 g de célula bacteriana, com ótima qualidade.A fast extraction method for bacteria DNA was developed. Unlike some other methods, the method does not require enzymes like lysozime and proteinase K. Carbonate silicate (carborundum was used to break cell more efficiently. This method is fast, simple and more economic when compared to the previously report ones. The prepared DNA from bacteria has good quality and amount.

  12. Construction of Agropyrum intermedium 2Ai-2 Chromosome DNA Library and Cloning of Species-Specific DNA Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Cong-fen; MA You-zhi; XIN Zhi-yong; XU Qiong-fang; LI Lian-cheng

    2004-01-01

    The univalent from the meiosis-metaphase spreads of F1 (Z2× wheat variety Wan7107) was identified to be Agropyrum intermedium 2Ai-2 chromosome by GISH. The 2Ai-2 chromosomes were microisolated and collected. After two rounds of PCR amplification, the PCR products were ranged from 150 - 3 000 bp,with predominant fragments at about 200 - 2 000 bp. Using Ag.intermediumgenomic DNA as a probe, Southern blotting analysis confirmed the products originated from Ag. intermediumgenome. The products were purified, ligated to pUC18 and then transformed into competence E.coli DH5α to produce a 2Ai-2 chromosome DNA library. The microcloning experiments produced approximately 5×105 clones, the size range of the cloned inserts was 200- 1 500 bp, with an average of 580bp. Using Ag. intermediumgenomic DNA as a probe, dot blotting results showed that 56% clones are unique/low copy sequences, 44% are repetitive sequences in the library. Four Ag. intermedium clones were screened from the library by RFLP, and three clones(Mag065, Mag088, Mag139)belong to low/single sequences, one clone(Mag104)was repetitive sequence, and GISH results indicated that Mag104 was Ag.intermedium species-specific repetitive DNA sequence.

  13. Preparation of high molecular weight gDNA and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biradar, Siddanagouda S; Nie, Xiaojun; Feng, Kewei; Weining, Song

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries are extremely valuable large-insert DNA libraries for physical mapping, positional cloning, comparative genomic analysis, complete genome sequencing, and evolutionary studies. Due to their stability and relative simplicity BAC libraries are most preferred over other approaches for cloning large genomic DNA fragments for large-insert libraries. Isolation of intact high molecular weight (HMW) DNA is a critical step underlying the success of large-insert genomic DNA library construction. It requires the isolation of purified nuclei, embedding them into LMP agarose plugs, restriction digestion of the plugs, and quite often size selection using PFGE and electro-elution of insert DNA. The construction of BAC libraries is complex and challenging for most molecular laboratories. To facilitate the construction of BAC libraries, we present a step-by-step protocol for isolation of HMW DNA and construction of plant BAC libraries.

  14. Restrictions Limiting the Generation of DNA Double Strand Breaks during Chromosomal V(D)J Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Robert E.; Wooley, Andrea L.; Hughes, Maureen M.; Wehrly, Tara D.; Swat, Wojciech; Sleckman, Barry P.

    2002-01-01

    Antigen receptor loci are composed of numerous variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments, each flanked by recombination signal sequences (RSSs). The V(D)J recombination reaction proceeds through RSS recognition and DNA cleavage steps making it possible for multiple DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to be introduced at a single locus. Here we use ligation-mediated PCR to analyze DNA cleavage intermediates in thymocytes from mice with targeted RSS mutations at the endogenous TCRβ locus. We show that DNA cleavage does not occur at individual RSSs but rather must be coordinated between RSS pairs flanking gene segments that ultimately form coding joins. Coordination of the DNA cleavage step occurs over great distances in the chromosome and favors intra- over interchromosomal recombination. Furthermore, through several restrictions imposed on the generation of both nonpaired and paired DNA DSBs, this requirement promotes antigen receptor gene integrity and genomic stability in developing lymphocytes undergoing V(D)J recombination. PMID:11828005

  15. Initiation of DNA replication from non-canonical sites on an origin-depleted chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi L Bogenschutz

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from multiple sites on each chromosome called replication origins (origins. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, origins are defined at discrete sites. Regular spacing and diverse firing characteristics of origins are thought to be required for efficient completion of replication, especially in the presence of replication stress. However, a S. cerevisiae chromosome III harboring multiple origin deletions has been reported to replicate relatively normally, and yet how an origin-deficient chromosome could accomplish successful replication remains unknown. To address this issue, we deleted seven well-characterized origins from chromosome VI, and found that these deletions do not cause gross growth defects even in the presence of replication inhibitors. We demonstrated that the origin deletions do cause a strong decrease in the binding of the origin recognition complex. Unexpectedly, replication profiling of this chromosome showed that DNA replication initiates from non-canonical loci around deleted origins in yeast. These results suggest that replication initiation can be unexpectedly flexible in this organism.

  16. Evidence for a DNA-relay mechanism in ParABS-mediated chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hoong Chuin; Surovtsev, Ivan Vladimirovich; Beltran, Bruno Gabriel; Huang, Fang; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-05-23

    The widely conserved ParABS system plays a major role in bacterial chromosome segregation. How the components of this system work together to generate translocation force and directional motion remains uncertain. Here, we combine biochemical approaches, quantitative imaging and mathematical modeling to examine the mechanism by which ParA drives the translocation of the ParB/parS partition complex in Caulobacter crescentus. Our experiments, together with simulations grounded on experimentally-determined biochemical and cellular parameters, suggest a novel 'DNA-relay' mechanism in which the chromosome plays a mechanical function. In this model, DNA-bound ParA-ATP dimers serve as transient tethers that harness the elastic dynamics of the chromosome to relay the partition complex from one DNA region to another across a ParA-ATP dimer gradient. Since ParA-like proteins are implicated in the partitioning of various cytoplasmic cargos, the conservation of their DNA-binding activity suggests that the DNA-relay mechanism may be a general form of intracellular transport in bacteria.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02758.001.

  17. Isolation and Quantitation of Topoisomerase Complexes Accumulated on Escherichia coli Chromosomal DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important targets in anticancer and antibacterial therapy because drugs can initiate cell death by stabilizing the transient covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex. In this study, we employed a method that uses CsCl density gradient centrifugation to separate unbound from DNA-bound GyrA/ParC in Escherichia coli cell lysates after quinolone treatment, allowing antibody detection and quantitation of the covalent complexes on slot blots. Using these procedures modified from the in vivo complexes of enzyme (ICE) bioassay, we found a correlation between gyrase-DNA complex formation and DNA replication inhibition at bacteriostatic (1× MIC) norfloxacin concentrations. Quantitation of the number of gyrase-DNA complexes per E. coli cell permitted an association between cell death and chromosomal gyrase-DNA complex accumulation at norfloxacin concentrations greater than 1× MIC. When comparing levels of gyrase-DNA complexes to topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes in the absence of drug, we observed that the gyrase-DNA complex level was higher (∼150-fold) than that of the topoisomerase IV-DNA complex. In addition, levels of gyrase and topoisomerase IV complexes reached a significant increase after 30 min of treatment at 1× and 1.7× MIC, respectively. These results are in agreement with gyrase being the primary target for quinolones in E. coli. We further validated the utility of this method for the study of topoisomerase-drug interactions in bacteria by showing the gyrase covalent complex reversibility after removal of the drug from the medium, and the resistant effect of the Ser83Leu gyrA mutation on accumulation of gyrase covalent complexes on chromosomal DNA. PMID:22869559

  18. Isolation and quantitation of topoisomerase complexes accumulated on Escherichia coli chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Sandra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2012-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important targets in anticancer and antibacterial therapy because drugs can initiate cell death by stabilizing the transient covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex. In this study, we employed a method that uses CsCl density gradient centrifugation to separate unbound from DNA-bound GyrA/ParC in Escherichia coli cell lysates after quinolone treatment, allowing antibody detection and quantitation of the covalent complexes on slot blots. Using these procedures modified from the in vivo complexes of enzyme (ICE) bioassay, we found a correlation between gyrase-DNA complex formation and DNA replication inhibition at bacteriostatic (1× MIC) norfloxacin concentrations. Quantitation of the number of gyrase-DNA complexes per E. coli cell permitted an association between cell death and chromosomal gyrase-DNA complex accumulation at norfloxacin concentrations greater than 1× MIC. When comparing levels of gyrase-DNA complexes to topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes in the absence of drug, we observed that the gyrase-DNA complex level was higher (∼150-fold) than that of the topoisomerase IV-DNA complex. In addition, levels of gyrase and topoisomerase IV complexes reached a significant increase after 30 min of treatment at 1× and 1.7× MIC, respectively. These results are in agreement with gyrase being the primary target for quinolones in E. coli. We further validated the utility of this method for the study of topoisomerase-drug interactions in bacteria by showing the gyrase covalent complex reversibility after removal of the drug from the medium, and the resistant effect of the Ser83Leu gyrA mutation on accumulation of gyrase covalent complexes on chromosomal DNA.

  19. Antibodies to left-handed Z-DNA bind to interband regions of Drosophila polytene chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, Alfred; Pardue, Mary Lou; Lafer, Eileen M.; Möller, Achim; Stollar, B. David; Rich, Alexander

    1981-12-01

    Antibodies which are specific to the Z-DNA conformation have been purified and characterized on the basis of their binding to three different DNA polymers which can form this left-handed helix. These antibodies bind specifically to polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster as visualized by fluorescent staining. The staining is found in the interband regions and its intensity varies among different interbands in a reproducible manner. This is the first identification of the Z-DNA conformation in material of biological origin.

  20. Protocols for Pachytene Chromosome and DNA Fiber FISH in Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ren-hai; LING Jian; WANG Kun-bo; WANG Chun-ying; SONG Guo-li; LIU Fang

    2008-01-01

    @@ Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become the most important technique in plant molecular cytogenetics research.FISH-based physical mapping provides a valuable complementary approach in genome sequeneing to measure the physical distances between adjacent BAC contigs and delineating the structure and DNA composition of genomic regions of centromere and telomere.The accuracy and precision of the FISH-base physical maps depend on the resolution power of FISH.

  1. Identification of chromosomal errors in human preimplantation embryos with oligonucleotide DNA microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liang

    Full Text Available A previous study comparing the performance of different platforms for DNA microarray found that the oligonucleotide (oligo microarray platform containing 385K isothermal probes had the best performance when evaluating dosage sensitivity, precision, specificity, sensitivity and copy number variations border definition. Although oligo microarray platform has been used in some research fields and clinics, it has not been used for aneuploidy screening in human embryos. The present study was designed to use this new microarray platform for preimplantation genetic screening in the human. A total of 383 blastocysts from 72 infertility patients with either advanced maternal age or with previous miscarriage were analyzed after biopsy and microarray. Euploid blastocysts were transferred to patients and clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were measured. Chromosomes in some aneuploid blastocysts were further analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH to evaluate accuracy of the results. We found that most (58.1% of the blastocysts had chromosomal abnormalities that included single or multiple gains and/or losses of chromosome(s, partial chromosome deletions and/or duplications in both euploid and aneuploid embryos. Transfer of normal euploid blastocysts in 34 cycles resulted in 58.8% clinical pregnancy and 54.4% implantation rates. Examination of abnormal blastocysts by FISH showed that all embryos had matching results comparing microarray and FISH analysis. The present study indicates that oligo microarray conducted with a higher resolution and a greater number of probes is able to detect not only aneuploidy, but also minor chromosomal abnormalities, such as partial chromosome deletion and/or duplication in human embryos. Preimplantation genetic screening of the aneuploidy by DNA microarray is an advanced technology used to select embryos for transfer and improved embryo implantation can be obtained after transfer of the screened normal

  2. An optmized protocol for simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from soils Protocolo otimizado para extração simultanea de DNA e RNA de solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Costa

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report an optimized protocol for simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from soil matrices. Treatment of soil matrices with ethanol followed by bead-beating worked as a successful strategy to lyse the cells without considerable degradation of nucleic acids, resulting in DNA and RNA of good yield and integrity. The reverse transcribed RNA could be amplified with primers targeting a glutamine synthetase (glnA gene fragment. From both DNA and cDNA, 16S rDNA fragments were amplified and analyzed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE. The method was applied to soil and rhizosphere (strawberry and oilseed rape samples. Two other protocols for the extraction of nucleic acids from soil were applied to the same set of samples in order to compare the methods in terms of efficiency and reproducibility. The DGGE profiles indicated no relevant differences between the patterns obtained. The method described here is suitable for rapid processing of many samples and therefore appropriate for ecological studies.Nesse trabalho descrevemos um protocolo otimizado para extração simultânea de DNA e RNA de solo. O tratamento das amostras de solo com etanol e posterior agitação com partículas foi uma estratégia bem sucedida para lise das células sem degradação significativa dos ácidos nucléicos, resultando em bom rendimento de DNA e RNA íntegros. O RNA transcrito pode ser amplificado com iniciadores com alvo no fragmento do gene da glutamina sintetase (glnA. Os fragmentos 16S rDNA, tanto do DNA como do cDNA, foram amplificados e analisados por DGGE. O método foi aplicado para amostras de solo e rizosfera (morango e canola. Dois outros protocolos para extração de ácidos nucléicos de solo foram aplicados para o mesmo lote de amostras, de forma a comparar os métodos quanto à eficiência e reprodutibilidade. Os perfis de DGGE mostraram não haver diferença relevante nos padrões obtidos. O método descrito é apropriado para

  3. Chromosomal Aberrations and DNA Repair Gene Variants in a Radon-exposed Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, A.; Lindholm, C.; Koivistoinen, A.; Salomaa, S.

    2004-07-01

    Polymorphisms of XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1), XRCC3 (X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3), and hOGG1 (the human homologue of the yeast OGG1 gene) DNA repair genes have been associated with altered DNA repair capacity and risk of various cancers. In the present study our goal was to clarify the influence of various DNA repair gene variants on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in subjects exposed to residential radon. The study group of 84 non-smoking, healthy individuals exposed to domestic radon were analysed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) technique. No association between radon concentration and CA frequencies was observed. However, a significant increase with age was shown as well as a large variability in translocation frequencies between individuals within the same age group. In order to investigate the role of individual susceptibility to this variation genotypes of DNA repair genes XRCC1 (codons 194, 280 and 399), XRCC3 (codon 241) and hOGG1 (codon 326) were determined from leukocyte DNA using methods based on polymerase chain reaction. Multiple regression analysis was applied to evaluate the effect of the polymorphisms and the other confounding factors (age, exposure to randon etc) to the frequency of CA. The preliminary statistical analyses showed that the different gene appeared not to be related to a pronounced increase in chromosome aberration frequencies observed by FISH painting. However, the analysis indicated that the homozygous variant of XRCC3 codon 241 was associated (P<0.05) with two-ways translocations in conjunction with age. Larger studies, both with regard to the cohort and the number of gene variants are needed to elucidate the influence of other DNA repair variants to the yield of chromosomal aberrations. The results indicate that the chromosomal translocations accumulated by age (spontaneous background) may be partly explained by defects in homologous recombination repair. (Author

  4. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O' Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  5. Rapid assessment of the effect of ciprofloxacin on chromosomal DNA from Escherichia coli using an in situ DNA fragmentation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosalvez Jaime

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroquinolones are extensively used antibiotics that induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by trapping DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV on DNA. This effect is usually evaluated using biochemical or molecular procedures, but these are not effective at the single-cell level. We assessed ciprofloxacin (CIP-induced chromosomal DNA breakage in single-cell Escherichia coli by direct visualization of the DNA fragments that diffused from the nucleoid obtained after bacterial lysis in an agarose microgel on a slide. Results Exposing the E. coli strain TG1 to CIP starting at a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 0.012 μg/ml and at increasing doses for 40 min increased the DNA fragmentation progressively. DNA damage started to be detectable at the MIC dose. At a dose of 1 μg/ml of CIP, DNA damage was visualized clearly immediately after processing, and the DNA fragmentation increased progressively with the antibiotic incubation time. The level of DNA damage was much higher when the bacteria were taken from liquid LB broth than from solid LB agar. CIP treatment produced a progressively slower rate of DNA damage in bacteria in the stationary phase than in the exponentially growing phase. Removing the antibiotic after the 40 min incubation resulted in progressive DSB repair activity with time. The magnitude of DNA repair was inversely related to CIP dose and was noticeable after incubation with CIP at 0.1 μg/ml but scarce after 10 μg/ml. The repair activity was not strictly related to viability. Four E. coli strains with identified mechanisms of reduced sensitivity to CIP were assessed using this procedure and produced DNA fragmentation levels that were inversely related to MIC dose, except those with very high MIC dose. Conclusion This procedure for determining DNA fragmentation is a simple and rapid test for studying and evaluating the effect of quinolones.

  6. Applying Small-Scale DNA Signatures as an Aid in Assembling Soybean Chromosome Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myron Peto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has established a genomic signature based on relative counts of the 16 possible dinucleotides. Until now, it has been generally accepted that the dinucleotide signature is characteristic of a genome and is relatively homogeneous across a genome. However, we found some local regions of the soybean genome with a signature differing widely from that of the rest of the genome. Those regions were mostly centromeric and pericentromeric, and enriched for repetitive sequences. We found that DNA binding energy also presented large-scale patterns across soybean chromosomes. These two patterns were helpful during assembly and quality control of soybean whole genome shotgun scaffold sequences into chromosome pseudomolecules.

  7. Cytomolecular discrimination of the A(m) chromosomes of Triticum monococcum and the A chromosomes of Triticum aestivum using microsatellite DNA repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megyeri, Mária; Mikó, Péter; Farkas, András; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Molnár, István

    2017-02-01

    The cytomolecular discrimination of the A(m)- and A-genome chromosomes facilitates the selection of wheat-Triticum monococcum introgression lines. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with the commonly used DNA probes Afa family, 18S rDNA and pSc119.2 showed that the more complex hybridisation pattern obtained in T. monococcum relative to bread wheat made it possible to differentiate the A(m) and A chromosomes within homoeologous groups 1, 4 and 5. In order to provide additional chromosomal landmarks to discriminate the A(m) and A chromosomes, the microsatellite repeats (GAA)n, (CAG)n, (CAC)n, (AAC)n, (AGG)n and (ACT)n were tested as FISH probes. These showed that T. monococcum chromosomes have fewer, generally weaker, simple sequence repeat (SSR) signals than the A-genome chromosomes of hexaploid wheat. A differential hybridisation pattern was observed on 6A(m) and 6A chromosomes with all the SSR probes tested except for the (ACT)n probe. The 2A(m) and 2A chromosomes were differentiated by the signals given by the (GAA)n, (CAG)n and (AAC)n repeats, while only (GAA)n discriminated the chromosomes 3A(m) and 3A. Chromosomes 7A(m) and 7A could be differentiated by the lack of (GAA)n and (AGG)n signals on 7A. As potential landmarks for identifying the A(m) chromosomes, SSR repeats will facilitate the introgression of T. monococcum chromatin into wheat.

  8. Generation of Gross Chromosomal Rearrangements by a Single Engineered DNA Double Strand Break

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhijun; Zhang, Zhenhua; Roschke, Anna; Varga, Tamas; Aplan, Peter D.

    2017-01-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs), including translocations, inversions amplifications, and deletions, can be causal events leading to malignant transformation. GCRs are thought to be triggered by DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), which in turn can be spontaneous or induced by external agents (eg. cytotoxic chemotherapy, ionizing radiation). It has been shown that induction of DNA DSBs at two defined loci can produce stable balanced chromosomal translocations, however, a single engineered DNA DSB could not. Herein, we report that although a single engineered DNA DSB in H2AX “knockdown” cells did not generate GCRs, repair of a single engineered DNA DSB in fibroblasts that had ablated H2ax did produce clonal, stable GCRs, including balanced translocations and megabase-pair inversions. Upon correction of the H2ax deficiency, cells no longer generated GCRs following a single engineered DNA DSB. These findings demonstrate that clonal, stable GCRs can be produced by a single engineered DNA DSB in H2ax knockout cells, and that the production of these GCRs is ameliorated by H2ax expression. PMID:28225067

  9. The Caulobacter crescentus chromosome replication origin evolved two classes of weak DnaA binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Ouimet, Marie-Claude; Wargachuk, Richard; Marczynski, Gregory T

    2011-10-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus replication initiator DnaA and essential response regulator CtrA compete to control chromosome replication. The C. crescentus replication origin (Cori) contains five strong CtrA binding sites but only two apparent DnaA boxes, termed G-boxes (with a conserved second position G, TGATCCACA). Since clusters of DnaA boxes typify bacterial replication origins, this discrepancy suggested that C. crescentus DnaA recognizes different DNA sequences or compensates with novel DNA-binding proteins. We searched for novel DNA sites by scanning mutagenesis of the most conserved Cori DNA. Autonomous replication assays showed that G-boxes and novel W-boxes (TCCCCA) are essential for replication. Further analyses showed that C. crescentus DnaA binds G-boxes with moderate and W-boxes with very weak affinities significantly below DnaA's capacity for high-affinity Escherichia coli-boxes (TTATCCACA). Cori has five conserved W-boxes. Increasing W-box affinities increases or decreases autonomous replication depending on their strategic positions between the G-boxes. In vitro, CtrA binding displaces DnaA from proximal G-boxes and from distal W-boxes implying CtrA-DnaA competition and DnaA-DnaA cooperation between G-boxes and W-boxes. Similarly, during cell cycle progression, CtrA proteolysis coincides with DnaA binding to Cori. We also observe highly conserved W-boxes in other replication origins lacking E. coli-boxes. Therefore, strategically weak DnaA binding can be a general means of replication control. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Random amplified polymorphic DNA markers of the Brassica alboglabra chromosome of a B. campestris-alboglabra addition line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke; Chen, B.Y.; Cheng, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    The alien C-genome chromosome in a Brassica campestris-alboglabra monosomic addition line was characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. The alien chromosome carried three loci, E(c), W-c and Lap-1C, controlling synthesis of erucic acid, white flower colour and a fast......-migrating band of leucine aminopeptidase (Lap-1C(c)) respectively. The RAPD analysis revealed 17 markers specific to the alien chromosome. Among 45 offspring plants from the selfed addition line the alien C-chromosome was transmitted to 15 plants, four plants had only parts of this chromosome and the remaining...

  11. Satellite DNA and Transposable Elements in Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides), a Dioecious Plant with Small Y and Large X Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puterova, Janka; Razumova, Olga; Martinek, Tomas; Alexandrov, Oleg; Divashuk, Mikhail; Kubat, Zdenek; Hobza, Roman; Karlov, Gennady

    2017-01-01

    Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) is a dioecious shrub commonly used in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and environmental industry as a source of oil, minerals and vitamins. In this study, we analyzed the transposable elements and satellites in its genome. We carried out Illumina DNA sequencing and reconstructed the main repetitive DNA sequences. For data analysis, we developed a new bioinformatics approach for advanced satellite DNA analysis and showed that about 25% of the genome consists of satellite DNA and about 24% is formed of transposable elements, dominated by Ty3/Gypsy and Ty1/Copia LTR retrotransposons. FISH mapping revealed X chromosome-accumulated, Y chromosome-specific or both sex chromosomes-accumulated satellites but most satellites were found on autosomes. Transposable elements were located mostly in the subtelomeres of all chromosomes. The 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA were localized on one autosomal locus each. Although we demonstrated the small size of the Y chromosome of the seabuckthorn and accumulated satellite DNA there, we were unable to estimate the age and extent of the Y chromosome degeneration. Analysis of dioecious relatives such as Shepherdia would shed more light on the evolution of these sex chromosomes. PMID:28057732

  12. Transitory increase in chromosomal DNA (Fleulgen) during floral differentiation in Rhoeo discolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, E; Nagl, W

    1979-02-01

    Scanning cytophotometric measurements on 3200 telophase and 1700 interphase nuclei (Feulgen-stained) in vegetative and reproductive buds of Rhoeo discolor revealed a transitory increase in staining intensity in more than half of the cells in early differentiating floral buds. The differences between the vegetative and floral nuclei are significant at the 0.001 level of probability and highly reproducible, independent of the type of hydrolysis used. We suggest that the different Feulgen extinction values reflect different nuclear DNA amounts, because methodical errors can fairly be excluded. The occurrence of an extra DNA (control DNA) of the kind of the floral DNA' detected by Wardell and Skoog (1973) and Wardell (1976) in tobacco is discussed.

  13. Chromosomal aberrations, Yq microdeletion, and sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile men opting for assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Monis B; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Neena; Singh, Nita; Mittal, Suneeta; Upadhyay, Ashish D; Dada, Rima

    2012-09-01

    Male infertility is a multi-factorial disorder, and identification of its etiology in an individual is critical for treatment. Systematically elucidating the underlying genetic causes (chromosomal and Yq microdeletion) and factors, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), which contribute to sperm DNA damage, may help to reduce the number of men with idiopathic infertility and provide them with the most suitable therapeutics and counseling. This study was done to comprehensively investigate genetic and oxidative stress factors that might be the etiology of a large percentage of men with idiopathic infertility. One hundred twelve infertile men and 76 fertile controls were screened for chromosomal aberrations and Yq microdeletions. ROS, TAC, and sperm DNA damage were assessed in cytogenetically normal, non-azoospermic men with intact Y chromosome (n = 93). ROS was assessed in neat and washed semen by chemiluminescence; seminal TAC with a commercially available kit; and sperm DNA damage by the comet assay. Two men had cytogenetic abnormalities and seven men harbored Yq microdeletions. ROS levels in neat and washed semen of infertile men were significantly higher (P fragmentation in infertile men was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than controls. Genetic factors and oxidative stress cumulatively account for large number of idiopathic infertile cases. Unlike, genetic causes, which cannot be cured, timely identification and management of oxidative stress may help to reverse/reduce the effects on induced DNA damage, and improve the outcomes for infertile males.

  14. An infertile case of 47,XYY syndrome without autistic spectrum: Cost effective well-define of extra Y chromosome by GTG, C bandings, QF-PCR and FISH analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özturk Özdemir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD was frequently reported in autosomal and sex chromosome abnormalities and limited findings pointed out the Y chromosome. In the current case, it was aimed to identify the genetic cause for a man without autism profiles using combined cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques. Automated karyotype analysis was made after combined methods with GTG, C bandings, QF-PCR and FISH techniquesfor the current case. Additional Y chromosome was identified after conventional GTG and C-banded karyotype analysis. The current case of 47,XYY syndrome was reported due to without autistic profiles such as language and social impairment. The proband’s karyotype was determined as 47,XYY. No other numerical and/or structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in the karyotype analysis. Cytogenetic methods combined with cost-effective techniques such as C, GTG banding and FISH provide well-define of extra Y chromosome in the presented case of without autistic spectrum. Both Y chromosomes were in the same size and C-banded profiles in the current proband pointed out that both are originated from one chromosome by endoreduplication Y chromosome after zigot formation

  15. Time-lapse ultrashort pulse microscopy of infection in three-dimensional versus two-dimensional culture environments reveals enhanced extra-chromosomal virus replication compartment formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Holly C.; Sing, Garwin; Armas, Juan Carlos González; Campbell, Colin J.; Ghazal, Peter; Yeh, Alvin T.

    2013-03-01

    The mechanisms that enable viruses to harness cellular machinery for their own survival are primarily studied in cell lines cultured in two-dimensional (2-D) environments. However, there are increasing reports of biological differences between cells cultured in 2-D versus three-dimensional (3-D) environments. Here we report differences in host-virus interactions based on differences in culture environment. Using ultrashort pulse microscopy (UPM), a form of two-photon microscopy that utilizes sub-10-fs pulses to efficiently excite fluorophores, we have shown that de novo development of extra-chromosomal virus replication compartments (VRCs) upon murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV) infection is markedly enhanced when host cells are cultured in 3-D collagen gels versus 2-D monolayers. In addition, time-lapse imaging revealed that mCMV-induced VRCs have the capacity to grow by coalescence. This work supports the future potential of 3-D culture as a useful bridge between traditional monolayer cultures and animal models to study host-virus interactions in a more physiologically relevant environment for the development of effective anti-viral therapeutics. These advances will require broader adoption of modalities, such as UPM, to image deep within scattering tissues.

  16. Large-scale oscillation of structure-related DNA sequence features in human chromosome 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentian; Miramontes, Pedro

    2006-08-01

    Human chromosome 21 is the only chromosome in the human genome that exhibits oscillation of the (G+C) content of a cycle length of hundreds kilobases (kb) ( 500kb near the right telomere). We aim at establishing the existence of a similar periodicity in structure-related sequence features in order to relate this (G+C)% oscillation to other biological phenomena. The following quantities are shown to oscillate with the same 500kb periodicity in human chromosome 21: binding energy calculated by two sets of dinucleotide-based thermodynamic parameters, AA/TT and AAA/TTT bi- and tri-nucleotide density, 5'-TA-3' dinucleotide density, and signal for 10- or 11-base periodicity of AA/TT or AAA/TTT. These intrinsic quantities are related to structural features of the double helix of DNA molecules, such as base-pair binding, untwisting or unwinding, stiffness, and a putative tendency for nucleosome formation.

  17. Binding of Multiple Rap1 Proteins Stimulates Chromosome Breakage Induction during DNA Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greicy H Goto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres, the ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes, have a specialized chromatin structure that provides a stable chromosomal terminus. In budding yeast Rap1 protein binds to telomeric TG repeat and negatively regulates telomere length. Here we show that binding of multiple Rap1 proteins stimulates DNA double-stranded break (DSB induction at both telomeric and non-telomeric regions. Consistent with the role of DSB induction, Rap1 stimulates nearby recombination events in a dosage-dependent manner. Rap1 recruits Rif1 and Rif2 to telomeres, but neither Rif1 nor Rif2 is required for DSB induction. Rap1-mediated DSB induction involves replication fork progression but inactivation of checkpoint kinase Mec1 does not affect DSB induction. Rap1 tethering shortens artificially elongated telomeres in parallel with telomerase inhibition, and this telomere shortening does not require homologous recombination. These results suggest that Rap1 contributes to telomere homeostasis by promoting chromosome breakage.

  18. Chromosome thripsis by DNA double strand break clusters causes enhanced cell lethality, chromosomal translocations and 53BP1-recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipler, Agnes; Mladenova, Veronika; Soni, Aashish; Nikolov, Vladimir; Saha, Janapriya; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2016-09-19

    Chromosome translocations are hallmark of cancer and of radiation-induced cell killing, reflecting joining of incongruent DNA-ends that alter the genome. Translocation-formation requires DNA end-joining mechanisms and incompletely characterized, permissive chromatin conditions. We show that chromatin destabilization by clusters of DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs) generated by the I-SceI meganuclease at multiple, appropriately engineered genomic sites, compromises c-NHEJ and markedly increases cell killing and translocation-formation compared to single-DSBs. Translocation-formation from DSB-clusters utilizes Parp1 activity, implicating alt-EJ in their formation. Immunofluorescence experiments show that single-DSBs and DSB-clusters uniformly provoke the formation of single γ-H2AX foci, suggesting similar activation of early DNA damage response (DDR). Live-cell imaging also shows similar single-focus recruitment of the early-response protein MDC1, to single-DSBs and DSB-clusters. Notably, the late DDR protein, 53BP1 shows in live-cell imaging strikingly stronger recruitment to DSB-clusters as compared to single-DSBs. This is the first report that chromatin thripsis, in the form of engineered DSB-clusters, compromises first-line DSB-repair pathways, allowing alt-EJ to function as rescuing-backup. DSB-cluster-formation is indirectly linked to the increased biological effectiveness of high ionization-density radiations, such as the alpha-particles emitted by radon gas or the heavy-ions utilized in cancer therapy. Our observations provide the first direct mechanistic explanation for this long-known effect.

  19. Cloning chromosome specific genes by reciprocal probing of arrayed cDNA and cosmid libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, A.; Lee, C.C.; Wehnert, M. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A human gene map will greatly facilitate the association of genes to single locus diseases and provide candidates for genes involved in complex genetic traits. Given the estimated 100,000 human genes an integrated strategy with a high throughput approach for isolation and mapping of expressed sequences is needed to create such a gene map. We have developed an approach that allows high throughput gene isolation and mapping using arrayed genomic and cDNA lambda libraries. Reciprocal probing of the arrayed genomic and cDNA cosmic libraries can rapidly establish cDNA-cosmid associations. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosomal mapping and expressed sequence tag/sequence tag site (EST/STS) primers generated from DNA sequence of PCR-based mapping using somatic hybrid cell line mapping panels were utilized to characterize further the hybridization-based cDNA cosmid association. We have applied this approach to chromosome 17 using a placental cDNA library and have identified a total of 30 genes out of which 11 are novel. Furthermore seven cDNAs were mapped to 17q21 in this study, providing novel candidate genes for BRCA-1 gene for early onset breast cancer. The results of our study clearly show that an integration of an expression map into physical and genetic maps can provide candidate genes for human diseases that have been mapped to specific regions. This approach combined with the current physical mapping efforts could efficiently provide a detailed human gene map.

  20. Nonhomologous DNA end joining and chromosome aberrations in human embryonic lung fibroblasts treated with environmental pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossner, Pavel, E-mail: prossner@biomed.cas.cz; Rossnerova, Andrea; Beskid, Olena; Tabashidze, Nana; Libalova, Helena; Uhlirova, Katerina; Topinka, Jan; Sram, Radim J.

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • We analyzed the effect of air pollutants on NHEJ and chromosome aberrations. • In HEL12469 cells B[a]P and extractable organic matter induced DSBs. • The compounds induced XRCC4 expression and a weak Ku70/80 response. • We found increased frequency of aberrations of chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and 17. • The tested compounds preferentially affected chromosome 7. - Abstract: In order to evaluate the ability of a representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and PAH-containing complex mixtures to induce double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and repair of damaged DNA in human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469 cells), we investigated the effect of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and extractable organic matter (EOM) from ambient air particles <2.5 μm (PM2.5) on nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) and induction of stable chromosome aberrations (CAs). PM2.5 was collected in winter and summer 2011 in two Czech cities differing in levels and sources of air pollutants. The cells were treated for 24 h with the following concentrations of tested chemicals: B[a]P: 1 μM, 10 μM, 25 μM; EOMs: 1 μg/ml, 10 μg/ml, 25 μg/ml. We tested several endpoints representing key steps leading from DSBs to the formation of CAs including histone H2AX phosphorylation, levels of proteins Ku70, Ku80 and XRCC4 participating in NHEJ, in vitro ligation activity of nuclear extracts of the HEL12469 cells and the frequency of stable CAs assessed by whole chromosome painting of chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and 17 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our results show that 25 μM of B[a]P and most of the tested doses of EOMs induced DSBs as indicated by H2AX phosphorylation. DNA damage was accompanied by induction of XRCC4 expression and an increased frequency of CAs. Translocations most frequently affected chromosome 7. We observed only a weak induction of Ku70/80 expression as well as ligation activity of nuclear extracts. In summary, our data suggest the induction of DSBs and

  1. Reduced rDNA Copy Number Does Not Affect “Competitive” Chromosome Pairing in XYY Males of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Keith A. Maggert

    2014-01-01

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are causal agents in X-Y chromosome pairing in meiosis I of Drosophila males. Despite broad variation in X-linked and Y-linked rDNA copy number, polymorphisms in regulatory/spacer sequences between rRNA genes, and variance in copy number of interrupting R1 and R2 retrotransposable elements, there is little evidence that different rDNA arrays affect pairing efficacy. I investigated whether induced rDNA copy number polymorphisms affect chromosome pairing in a “co...

  2. Cloning and characterization of dispersed repetitive DNA derived from microdissected sex chromosomes of Rumex acetosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Beatrice; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Lozano, Rafael; Parker, John S; de la Herrán, Roberto; Rejón, Carmelo Ruiz; Rejón, Manuel Ruiz; Garrido-Ramos, Manuel; Jamilena, Manuel

    2006-02-01

    Rumex acetosa is characterized by a multiple chromosome system (2n = 12 + XX for females, and 2n = 12 + XY1Y2 for males), in which sex is determined by the ratio between the number of X chromosomes and autosome sets. For a better understanding of the molecular structure and evolution of plant sex chromosomes, we have generated a sex chromosome specific library of R. acetosa by microdissection. The screening of this library has allowed us to identify 5 repetitive DNA families that have been characterized in detail. One of these families, DOP-20, has shown no homology with other sequences in databases. Nevertheless, the putative proteins encoded by the other 4 families, DOP-8, DOP-47, DOP-60, and DOP-61, show homology with proteins from different plant retroelements, including poly proteins from Ty3-gypsy- and Ty1-copia-like long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements, and reverse transcriptase from non-LTR retro elements. Results indicate that sequences from these 5 families are dispersed throughout the genome of both males and females, but no appreciable accumulation or differentiation of these types of sequences have been found in the Y chromosomes. These repetitive DNA sequences are more conserved in the genome of other dioecious species such as Rumex papillaris, Rumex intermedius, Rumex thyrsoides, Rumex hastatulus, and Rumex suffruticosus, than in the polygamous, gynodioecious, or hermaphrodite species Rumex induratus, Rumex lunaria, Rumex con glom er atus, Rumex crispus, and Rumex bucephalo phorus, which supports a single origin of dioecious species in this genus. The implication of these transposable elements in the origin and evolution of the heteromorphic sex chromosomes of R. acetosa is discussed.

  3. Admixture estimates for Caracas, Venezuela, based on autosomal, Y-chromosome, and mtDNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Helios; Rodríguez-Larralde, Alvaro; Izaguirre, Mary Helen; De Guerra, Dinorah Castro

    2007-04-01

    The present Venezuelan population is the product of admixture of Amerindians, Europeans, and Africans, a process that was not homogeneous throughout the country. Blood groups, short tandem repeats (STRs), mtDNA, and Y-chromosome markers have been used successfully in admixture studies, but few such studies have been conducted in Venezuela. In this study we aim to estimate the admixture components of samples from two different socioeconomic levels from Caracas, Venezuela's capital city, compare their differences, and infer sexual asymmetry in the European Amerindian union patterns. Gene frequencies for blood groups ABO and Rh (CDE) and for the STRs VWA, F13A01, and FES/FPS and mtDNA and Y-chromosome haplogroups were studied in a sample of 60 individuals living in Caracas, taken from a private clinic (high socioeconomic level), and 50 individuals, also living in Caracas, drawn from a public maternity clinic (low socioeconomic level). The admixture analysis for the five autosomal markers gives a high European component (0.78) and an almost negligible African sub-Saharan component (0.06) for the high socioeconomic level, whereas for the low socioeconomic level the sub-Saharan, European, and Amerindian components were 0.21, 0.42, and 0.36, respectively. Estimates of admixture based on mtDNA and Y-chromosome markers reveal that the Amerindian contribution to these Caracas samples is almost entirely through females, because the Y-chromosome Amerindian and African sub-Saharan chromosomes found in this study were scarce. Our study reveals that the identification of the grandparents' geographic origin is an important methodological aspect to take into account in genetic studies related to the reconstruction of historical events.

  4. DNA and chromosome breaks induced by {sup 123}I-estrogen in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology]|[Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Mustafi, R.; Hughes, A.; DeSombre, E.R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the Auger electron-emitting isotope I-123, covalently bound to estrogen, on DNA single- and double-strand breakage and on chromosome breakage was determined in estrogen positive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-ER) cells. Exposure to the {sup 123}I-estrogen induced both single- and double-strand breaks with a ratio of single- to double-strand breaks of 2.2. The corresponding ratio with {sup 60}Co gamma rays was 15.6. The dose-response was biphasic suggesting that either receptor sites are saturated at high does, or that there is a nonrandom distribution of breaks induced by the {sup 123}I-estrogen. The {sup 123}I-estrogen treatment induced chromosome aberrations with an efficiency of about 1 aberration for each 1,000 disintegrations per cell. This corresponds to the mean lethal dose of {sup 123}I-estrogen for these cells suggesting that the lethal event induced by the Auger electron emitter bound to estrogen is a chromosome aberration. Most of the chromosome-type aberrations were dicentrics and rings, suggesting that {sup 123}I-estrogen-induced chromosome breaks are rejoined. The F-ratio, the ratio of dicentrics to centric rings, was 5.8 {plus_minus} 1.7, which is similar to that seen with high LET radiations. Their results suggest that I-123 bound to estrogen is an efficient clastogenic agent, that the cytotoxic damage produced by I-123 bound to estrogen is very like high LET-induced damage, and the I-123 in the estrogen-receptor-DNA complex is probably in close proximity to the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA.

  5. Noc protein binds to specific DNA sequences to coordinate cell division with chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling Juan; Ishikawa, Shu; Kawai, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake; Errington, Jeff

    2009-07-08

    Coordination of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis is crucial for efficient cell proliferation. In Bacillus subtilis, the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc protects the chromosomes by associating with the chromosome and preventing cell division in its vicinity. Using protein localization, ChAP-on-Chip and bioinformatics, we have identified a consensus Noc-binding DNA sequence (NBS), and have shown that Noc is targeted to about 70 discrete regions scattered around the chromosome, though absent from a large region around the replication terminus. Purified Noc bound specifically to an NBS in vitro. NBSs inserted near the replication terminus bound Noc-YFP and caused a delay in cell division. An autonomous plasmid carrying an NBS array recruited Noc-YFP and conferred a severe Noc-dependent inhibition of cell division. This shows that Noc is a potent inhibitor of division, but that its activity is strictly localized by the interaction with NBS sites in vivo. We propose that Noc serves not only as a spatial regulator of cell division to protect the nucleoid, but also as a timing device with an important role in the coordination of chromosome segregation and cell division.

  6. Cascade of chromosomal rearrangements caused by a heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the double-strand break repair model for T-DNA integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufei; Chen, Zhiyu; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Huang, Jilei

    2017-02-28

    Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens can be integrated into the plant genome. The double-strand break repair (DSBR) pathway is a major model for T-DNA integration. From this model, we expect that two ends of a T-DNA molecule would invade into a single DNA double-strand break (DSB) or independent DSBs in the plant genome. We call the later phenomenon a heterogeneous T-DNA integration which has never been observed. In this work, we demonstrated it in an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant seb19. To resolve the chromosomal structural changes caused by T-DNA integration at both the nucleotide and chromosome levels, we performed inverse PCR, genome resequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and linkage analysis. We found, in seb19, a single T-DNA connected two different chromosomal loci and caused complex chromosomal rearrangements. The specific break-junction pattern in seb19 is consistent with the result of heterogeneous T-DNA integration but not of recombination between two T-DNA insertions. We demonstrated that, in seb19, heterogeneous T-DNA integration evoked a cascade of incorrect repair of seven DSBs on chromosome 4 and 5, and then produced translocation, inversion, duplication and deletion. Heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the DSBR model and suggests that two ends of a T-DNA molecule could be integrated into the plant genome independently. Our results also show a new origin of chromosomal abnormalities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Tandem repeat DNA localizing on the proximal DAPI bands of chromosomes in Larix, Pinaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizume, Masahiro; Shibata, Fukashi; Matsumoto, Ayako; Maruyama, Yukie; Hayashi, Eiji; Kondo, Teiji; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Shozo; Hong, Deyuan

    2002-08-01

    Repetitive DNA was cloned from HindIII-digested genomic DNA of Larix leptolepis. The repetitive DNA was about 170 bp long, had an AT content of 67%, and was organized tandemly in the genome. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and subsequent DAPI banding, the repetitive DNA was localized in DAPI bands at the proximal region of one arm of chromosomes in L. leptolepis and Larix chinensis. Southern blot hybridization to genomic DNA of seven species and five varieties probed with cloned repetitive DNA showed that the repetitive DNA family was present in a tandem organization in genomes of all Larix taxa examined. In addition to the 170-bp sequence, a 220-bp sequence belonging to the same DNA family was also present in 10 taxa. The 220-bp repeat unit was a partial duplication of the 170-bp repeat unit. The 220-bp repeat unit was more abundant in L. chinensis and Larix potaninii var. macrocarpa than in other taxa. The repetitive DNA composed 2.0-3.4% of the genome in most taxa and 0.3 and 0.5% of the genome in L. chinensis and L. potaninii var. macrocarpa, respectively. The unique distribution of the 220-bp repeat unit in Larix indicates the close relationship of these two species. In the family Pinaceae, the LPD (Larix proximal DAPI band specific repeat sequence family) family sequence is widely distributed, but their amount is very small except in the genus Larix. The abundant LPD family in Larix will occur after its speciation.

  8. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  9. DNA ligase III promotes alternative nonhomologous end-joining during chromosomal translocation formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Deniz; Brunet, Erika; Wong, Sunnie Yan-Wai; Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Yankun; McKinnon, Peter J; Lou, Jacqueline; Zhang, Lei; Li, James; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Jasin, Maria

    2011-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4), suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1.

  10. DNA ligase III promotes alternative nonhomologous end-joining during chromosomal translocation formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Simsek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4, suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1.

  11. DNA ligase III promotes alternative nonhomologous end-joining during chromosomal translocation formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Simsek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4, suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1.

  12. [Analysis of DNA and chromosome damage by the methods of molecular cytogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutiunian, R M; Oganesian, G G

    2011-01-01

    The main hybrid techniques of molecular cytogenetics are described. Methodological aspects of combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the comet assay and micronuclei (MN) test are discussed along with results of their application to evaluate and locate DNA and chromosome damage in the genome. The experience of the authors with the application of FISH in combination with the comet assay and MN test are reported.

  13. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Fousteri, Maria I.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase III alpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is indispensa

  14. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Fousteri, Maria I.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase III alpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is

  15. Differences in the rDNA-bearing chromosome divide the Asian-Pacific and Atlantic species of Crassostrea (Bivalvia, Mollusca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongping; Xu, Zhe; Guo, Ximing

    2004-02-01

    Karyotype and chromosomal location of the major ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) were studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in five species of CRASSOSTREA: three Asian-Pacific species (C. gigas, C. plicatula, and C. ariakensis) and two Atlantic species (C. virginica and C. rhizophorae). FISH probes were made by PCR amplification of the intergenic transcribed spacer between the 18S and 5.8S rRNA genes, and labeled with digoxigenin-11-dUTP. All five species had a haploid number of 10 chromosomes. The Atlantic species had 1-2 submetacentric chromosomes, while the three Pacific species had none. FISH with metaphase chromosomes detected a single telomeric locus for rDNA in all five species without any variation. In all three Pacific species, rDNA was located on the long arm of Chromosome 10 (10q)--the smallest chromosome. In the two Atlantic species, rDNA was located on the short arm of Chromosome 2 (2p)--the second longest chromosome. A review of other studies reveals the same distribution of NOR sites (putative rDNA loci) in three other species: on 10q in C. sikamea and C. angulata from the Pacific Ocean and on 2p in C. gasar from the western Atlantic. All data support the conclusion that differences in size and shape of the rDNA-bearing chromosome represent a major divide between Asian-Pacific and Atlantic species of CRASSOSTREA: This finding suggests that chromosomal divergence can occur under seemingly conserved karyotypes and may play a role in reproductive isolation and speciation.

  16. Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, LiHong; Liu, Yang; Kong, DaoChun

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is one of the central biological events occurring inside cells. Due to its large size, the replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotes initiates at hundreds to tens of thousands of sites called DNA origins so that the replication could be completed in a limited time. Further, eukaryotic DNA replication is sophisticatedly regulated, and this regulation guarantees that each origin fires once per S phase and each segment of DNA gets duplication also once per cell cycle. The first step of replication initiation is the assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC). Since 1973, four proteins, Cdc6/Cdc18, MCM, ORC and Cdt1, have been extensively studied and proved to be pre-RC components. Recently, a novel pre-RC component called Sap1/Girdin was identified. Sap1/Girdin is required for loading Cdc18/Cdc6 to origins for pre-RC assembly in the fission yeast and human cells, respectively. At the transition of G1 to S phase, pre-RC is activated by the two kinases, cyclindependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and subsequently, RPA, primase-polα, PCNA, topoisomerase, Cdc45, polδ, and polɛ are recruited to DNA origins for creating two bi-directional replication forks and initiating DNA replication. As replication forks move along chromatin DNA, they frequently stall due to the presence of a great number of replication barriers on chromatin DNA, such as secondary DNA structures, protein/DNA complexes, DNA lesions, gene transcription. Stalled forks must require checkpoint regulation for their stabilization. Otherwise, stalled forks will collapse, which results in incomplete DNA replication and genomic instability. This short review gives a concise introduction regarding the current understanding of replication initiation and replication fork stabilization.

  17. Bacterial chromosome segregation: structure and DNA binding of the Soj dimer — a conserved biological switch

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Butler, P Jonathan; Löwe, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Soj and Spo0J of the Gram-negative hyperthermophile Thermus thermophilus belong to the conserved ParAB family of bacterial proteins implicated in plasmid and chromosome partitioning. Spo0J binds to DNA near the replication origin and localises at the poles following initiation of replication. Soj oscillates in the nucleoid region in an ATP- and Spo0J-dependent fashion. Here, we show that Soj undergoes ATP-dependent dimerisation in solution and forms nucleoprotein filaments with DNA. Crystal s...

  18. SCAI promotes DNA double-strand break repair in distinct chromosomal contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rebecca Kring; Mund, Andreas; Poulsen, Sara Lund

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose accurate repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) is crucial for genome integrity and is strongly influenced by the local chromatin environment. Here, we identify SCAI (suppressor of cancer...... in repressive chromatin environments. Moreover, we establish an important role of SCAI in meiotic recombination, as SCAI deficiency in mice leads to germ cell loss and subfertility associated with impaired retention of the DMC1 recombinase on meiotic chromosomes. Collectively, our findings uncover SCAI...

  19. DNA adenine methylation is required to replicate both Vibrio cholerae chromosomes once per cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Demarre

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA adenine methylation is widely used to control many DNA transactions, including replication. In Escherichia coli, methylation serves to silence newly synthesized (hemimethylated sister origins. SeqA, a protein that binds to hemimethylated DNA, mediates the silencing, and this is necessary to restrict replication to once per cell cycle. The methylation, however, is not essential for replication initiation per se but appeared so when the origins (oriI and oriII of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes were used to drive plasmid replication in E. coli. Here we show that, as in the case of E. coli, methylation is not essential for oriI when it drives chromosomal replication and is needed for once-per-cell-cycle replication in a SeqA-dependent fashion. We found that oriII also needs SeqA for once-per-cell-cycle replication and, additionally, full methylation for efficient initiator binding. The requirement for initiator binding might suffice to make methylation an essential function in V. cholerae. The structure of oriII suggests that it originated from a plasmid, but unlike plasmids, oriII makes use of methylation for once-per-cell-cycle replication, the norm for chromosomal but not plasmid replication.

  20. Chromosomal aneuploidies and DNA fragmentation of human spermatozoa from patients exposed to perfluorinated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governini, L; Guerranti, C; De Leo, V; Boschi, L; Luddi, A; Gori, M; Orvieto, R; Piomboni, P

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated chromosomal aneuploidies and DNA damage in spermatozoa from male patients contaminated by perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in whole blood and seminal plasma. Sperm aneuploidy and diploidy rate for chromosomes 18, X and Y were evaluated by FISH; sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling technique coupled to flow cytometry. Our results indicated that PFC contamination was present in 58% of subjects included in the study. A significant increase in alterations of sperm parameters was observed in PFC-positive subjects compared to PFC-negative subjects. As regards the sperm aneuploidy, both disomy and diploidy rates resulted significantly increased in subjects positive for PFC contamination compared to PFC-negative samples. In addition, sperm DNA fragmentation index resulted significantly increased in PFC-contaminated subjects compared to PFC-non-contaminated subjects, with a significant increased level of dimmer DNA fragmentation index. Our results clearly indicate that PFC contamination may detrimentally affect spermatogenesis, disturbing both meiotic segregation and DNA integrity. We could therefore suggest cautions to reduce or eliminate any contact with these compounds because the long-term effects of PFC accumulation in the body are not predictable. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Rad54 and Mus81 cooperation promotes DNA damage repair and restrains chromosome missegregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghamrasni, S El; Cardoso, R; Li, L;

    2016-01-01

    Rad54 and Mus81 mammalian proteins physically interact and are important for the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway; however, their functional interactions in vivo are poorly defined. Here, we show that combinatorial loss of Rad54 and Mus81 results in hypersensitivity to DNA......-damaging agents, defects on both the homologous recombination and non-homologous DNA end joining repair pathways and reduced fertility. We also observed that while Mus81 deficiency diminished the cleavage of common fragile sites, very strikingly, Rad54 loss impaired this cleavage to even a greater extent....... The inefficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Rad54(-/-)Mus81(-/-) cells was accompanied by elevated levels of chromosome missegregation and cell death. Perhaps as a consequence, tumor incidence in Rad54(-/-)Mus81(-/-) mice remained comparable to that in Mus81(-/-) mice. Our study highlights...

  2. Chromosomal characteristics and distribution of rDNA sequences in the brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill, 1814).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwińska-Jewsiewicka, A; Kuciński, M; Kirtiklis, L; Dobosz, S; Ocalewicz, K; Jankun, Malgorzata

    2015-08-01

    Brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill, 1814) chromosomes have been analyzed using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques enabling characteristics and chromosomal location of heterochromatin, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), ribosomal RNA-encoding genes and telomeric DNA sequences. The C-banding and chromosome digestion with the restriction endonucleases demonstrated distribution and heterogeneity of the heterochromatin in the brook trout genome. DNA sequences of the ribosomal RNA genes, namely the nucleolus-forming 28S (major) and non-nucleolus-forming 5S (minor) rDNAs, were physically mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and primed in situ labelling. The minor rDNA locus was located on the subtelo-acrocentric chromosome pair No. 9, whereas the major rDNA loci were dispersed on 14 chromosome pairs, showing a considerable inter-individual variation in the number and location. The major and minor rDNA loci were located at different chromosomes. Multichromosomal location (3-6 sites) of the NORs was demonstrated by silver nitrate (AgNO3) impregnation. All Ag-positive i.e. active NORs corresponded to the GC-rich blocks of heterochromatin. FISH with telomeric probe showed the presence of the interstitial telomeric site (ITS) adjacent to the NOR/28S rDNA site on the chromosome 11. This ITS was presumably remnant of the chromosome rearrangement(s) leading to the genomic redistribution of the rDNA sequences. Comparative analysis of the cytogenetic data among several related salmonid species confirmed huge variation in the number and the chromosomal location of rRNA gene clusters in the Salvelinus genome.

  3. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-02-19

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  4. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1. PMID:23429197

  5. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gosálvez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH. A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL, 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL, and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  6. Abstracts of papers presented at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on quantitative Biology: DNA and chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral and poster presentations made at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitles DNA & Chromosomes. The meeting was held June 2--June 9, 1993 at Cold Spring Harbor, New York.

  7. Protocol for DNA extraction of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in fecal samples Protocolo para extração de DNA de oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. em amostras fecais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice M.N. Gonçalves

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp.oocysts in clinical samples is useful for public health since it allows the study of sources of contamination as well as the transmission in different geographical regions. Although widely used in developed countries, in Brazil it is restricted to academic studies, mostly using commercial kits for the extraction of genomic DNA, or in collaboration with external reference centers, rendering the method expensive and limited. The study proposes the application of the modifications recently introduced in the method improving feasibility with lower cost. This method was efficient for clinical samples preserved at -20 °C for up to six years and the low number of oocysts may be overcomed by repetitions of extraction.A caracterização molecular de oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. em amostras clínicas é útil à saúde pública, pois permite estudo das fontes de contaminação e a transmissão em determinadas regiões geográficas. Apesar de largamente utilizada em países desenvolvidos, no Brasil está restrita aos estudos acadêmicos, na maioria utilizando kits comerciais para extração do DNA genômico, ou em colaborações com centros de referência externos, o que torna o método caro e limitado. Este estudo propõe a introdução de modificações nos métodos existentes para melhorar a viabilidade e baixar custos. O método proposto foi eficiente em amostras clínicas preservadas a -20 °C por até seis anos e o baixo número de oocistos pode ser contornado por replicadas extrações de DNA.

  8. Chromosomal instability in cell-free DNA is a serum biomarker for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Ekkehard; Akbari, Mohammad R; Beck, Julia; Urnovitz, Howard; Zhang, William W; Bornemann-Kolatzki, Kirsten; Mitchell, William M; Nam, Robert K; Narod, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability resulting in copy number variation is a hallmark of malignant transformation and may be identified through massive parallel sequencing. Tumor-specific cell free DNA (cfDNA) present in serum and plasma provides a real-time, easily accessible surrogate. DNA was extracted from serum of 204 patients with prostate cancer (Gleason score 2-10), 207 male controls, and patients with benign hyperplasia (n = 10) and prostatitis (n = 10). DNA was amplified by use of random primers, tagged with molecular identifiers, sequenced on a SOLID system, and aligned to the human genome. We evaluated the number of sequence reads of cfDNA in sliding 100-kbp intervals for variation from controls. We used chromosomal regions with significant variations in alignment hits for their ability to segregate patients and matched controls. Using ROC curves to assess diagnostic performance, we evaluated the number of regions in a first subset (n = 177), with variations in alignment hits alone, provided an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.81 (95% CI 0.7-0.9, P prostate cancer from controls with an AUC of 0.92 (0.87-0.95), reaching a diagnostic accuracy of 83%. Both benign prostatic hypertrophy and prostatitis could be distinguished from prostate cancer by use of cfDNA, with an accuracy of 90%. Assessment of a limited number of chromosomal structural instabilities by use of massive parallel sequencing of cfDNA was sufficient to distinguish between prostate cancer and controls. This large cohort demonstrates the utility of cfDNA in prostate cancer recently established in other malignant neoplasms. © 2014 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  9. The effect of extra virgin olive oil and soybean on DNA, cytogenicity and some antioxidant enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kholy, Thanaa A; Abu Hilal, Mohammad; Al-Abbadi, Hatim Ali; Serafi, Abdulhalim Salim; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad K; Sobhy, Hanan M; Richardson, John R C

    2014-06-23

    We investigated the effect of extra virgin (EV) olive oil and genetically modified (GM) soybean on DNA, cytogenicity and some antioxidant enzymes in rodents. Forty adult male albino rats were used in this study and divided into four groups. The control group of rodents was fed basal ration only. The second group was given basal ration mixed with EV olive oil (30%). The third group was fed basal ration mixed with GM (15%), and the fourth group survived on a combination of EV olive oil, GM and the basal ration for 65 consecutive days. On day 65, blood samples were collected from each rat for antioxidant enzyme analysis. In the group fed on basal ration mixed with GM soyabean (15%), there was a significant increase in serum level of lipid peroxidation, while glutathione transferase decreased significantly. Interestingly, GM soyabean increased not only the percentage of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCE), but also the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes to normochromatic erythrocytes (PEC/NEC); however, the amount of DNA and NCE were significantly decreased. Importantly, the combination of EV olive oil and GM soyabean significantly altered the tested parameters towards normal levels. This may suggest an important role for EV olive oil on rodents' organs and warrants further investigation in humans.

  10. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  11. Differential repetitive DNA composition in the centromeric region of chromosomes of Amazonian lizard species in the family Teiidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Natalia D M; Carmo, Edson; Neves, Rogerio O; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Differences in heterochromatin distribution patterns and its composition were observed in Amazonian teiid species. Studies have shown repetitive DNA harbors heterochromatic blocks which are located in centromeric and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868), and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758). In Cnemidophorus sp.1, repetitive DNA has multiple signals along all chromosomes. The aim of this study was to characterize moderately and highly repetitive DNA sequences by C ot1-DNA from Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 genomes through cloning and DNA sequencing, as well as mapping them chromosomally to better understand its organization and genome dynamics. The results of sequencing of DNA libraries obtained by C ot1-DNA showed that different microsatellites, transposons, retrotransposons, and some gene families also comprise the fraction of repetitive DNA in the teiid species. FISH using C ot1-DNA probes isolated from both Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 showed these sequences mainly located in heterochromatic centromeric, and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin chromosomes, indicating they play structural and functional roles in the genome of these species. In Cnemidophorus sp.1, C ot1-DNA probe isolated from Ameiva ameiva had multiple interstitial signals on chromosomes, whereas mapping of C ot1-DNA isolated from the Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 highlighted centromeric regions of some chromosomes. Thus, the data obtained showed that many repetitive DNA classes are part of the genome of Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentroyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin, and these sequences are shared among the analyzed teiid species, but they were not always allocated at the same chromosome position.

  12. Intermittency as a universal characteristic of the complete chromosome DNA sequences of eukaryotes: From protozoa to human genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybalko, S.; Larionov, S.; Poptsova, M.; Loskutov, A.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale dynamical properties of complete chromosome DNA sequences of eukaryotes are considered. Using the proposed deterministic models with intermittency and symbolic dynamics we describe a wide spectrum of large-scale patterns inherent in these sequences, such as segmental duplications, tandem repeats, and other complex sequence structures. It is shown that the recently discovered gene number balance on the strands is not of a random nature, and certain subsystems of a complete chromosome DNA sequence exhibit the properties of deterministic chaos.

  13. Multicolor FISHs for simultaneous detection of genes and DNA segments on human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Maekawa, Masahiko; Asai, Satoko; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a convenient multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) (five-, four-, three-, and two-color FISHs) for detecting specific genes/DNA segments on the human chromosomes. As a foundation of multicolor FISH, we first isolated 80 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes that specifically detect the peri-centromeres (peri-CEN) and subtelomeres (subTEL) of 24 different human chromosomes (nos. 1~22, X, and Y) by screening our homemade BAC library (Keio BAC library) consisting of 200,000 clones. Five-color FISH was performed using human DNA segments specific for peri-CEN or subTEL, which were labeled with five different fluorescent dyes [7-diethylaminocoumarin (DEAC): blue, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC): green, rhodamine 6G (R6G): yellow, TexRed: red, and cyanine5 (Cy5): purple]. To observe FISH signals under a fluorescence microscope, five optic filters were carefully chosen to avoid overlapping fluorescence emission. Five-color FISH and four-color FISH enabled us to accurately examine the numerical anomaly of human chromosomes. Three-color FISH using two specific BAC clones, that distinguish 5' half of oncogene epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) from its 3' half, revealed the amplification and truncation of EGFR in EGFR-overproducing cancer cells. Moreover, two-color FISH readily detected a fusion gene in leukemia cells such as breakpoint cluster region (BCR)/Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue (ABL) on the Philadelphia (Ph') chromosome with interchromosomal translocation. Some other successful cases such as trisomy 21 of Down syndrome are presented. Potential applications of multicolor FISH will be discussed.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome diversity in East Adriatic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencakovic, M; Curik, I; Pérez-Pardal, L; Royo, L J; Cubric-Curik, V; Fernández, I; Alvarez, I; Kostelic, A; Sprem, N; Krapinec, K; Goyache, F

    2013-04-01

    Variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome haplotypes was analysed in nine domestic sheep breeds (159 rams) and 21 mouflon (Ovis musimon) sampled in the East Adriatic. Mitochondrial DNA analyses revealed a high frequency of type B haplotypes, predominantly in European breeds, and a very low frequency of type A haplotypes, which are more frequent in some Asian breeds. Mitochondrial haplotype Hmt-3 was the most frequent (26.4%), and 37.1%, 20.8% and 7.6% of rams had haplotypes one, two and three mutations remote from Hmt-3 respectively. In contrast, Y-chromosome analyses revealed extraordinary paternal allelic richness: HY-6, 89.3%; HY-8, 5.0%; HY-18, 3.1%; HY-7, 1.3%; and HY-5, 1.3%. In fact, the number of haplotypes observed is comparable to the number found in Turkish breeds and greater than the number found in European breeds so far. Haplotype HY-18 (A-oY1/135-SRYM18), identified here for the first time, provides a link between the haplotype HY-12 (A-oY1/139-SRYM18) found in a few rams in Turkey and haplotype HY-9 (A-oY1/131-SRYM18) found in one ram in Ethiopia. All mouflons had type B mtDNA haplotypes, including the private haplotype (Hmt-55), and all were paternally monomorphic for haplotype HY-6. Our data support a quite homogeneous maternal origin of East Adriatic sheep, which is a characteristic of European breeds. At the same time, the high number of haplotypes found was surprising and intriguing, and it begs for further analysis. Simultaneous analysis of mtDNA and Y-chromosome information allowed us to detect a large discrepancy between maternal and paternal lineages in some populations. This is most likely the result of breeder efforts to 'upgrade' local populations using rams with different paternal origins.

  15. Cloning of DNA sequences localized on proximal fluorescent chromosome bands by microdissection in Pinus densiflora Sieb. & Zucc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizume, M; Shibata, F; Maruyama, Y; Kondo, T

    2001-09-01

    Japanese red pine, Pinus densiflora, has 2n=24 chromosomes, of which most carry chromomycin A3 (CMA) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) bands at their centromere-proximal regions. It was proposed that these regions contain highly repetitive DNA. The DNA localized in the proximal fluorescent bands was isolated and characterized. In P. densiflora, centromeric and neighboring segments of the somatic chromosomes were dissected with a manual micromanipulator. The centromeric DNA was amplified from the DNA contained in dissected centromeric segments by degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) and a cloned DNA library was constructed. Thirty-one clones carrying highly repetitive DNA were selected by colony hybridization using Cot-1 DNA from this species as a probe, and their chromosomal localization was determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Clone PDCD501 was localized to the proximal CMA band of 20 chromosomes. This clone contained tandem repeats, comprising a 27 bp repeat unit, which was sufficient to provide the proximal FISH signal, with a 52.3% GC content. The repetitive sequence was named PCSR (proximal CMA band-specific repeat). Clone PDCD159 was 1700 bp in length, with a 61.7% AT content, and produced FISH signals at the proximal DAPI band of the remaining four chromosomes. Four clones hybridized strongly to the secondary constriction and gave weak signals at the centromeric region of several chromosomes. Clone PDCD537, one of the four clones, was homologous to the 26S rRNA gene. A PCR experiment using microdissected centromeric regions suggested that the centromeric region contains 18S and 26S rDNA. Another 24 clones hybridized to whole chromosome arms, with varying intensities and might represent dispersed repetitive DNA.

  16. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mezzanotte

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of stallion (Spanish breed and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome.

  17. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gosalvez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of stallion (Spanish breed and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome.

  18. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finocchiaro, G.; Taroni, F.; Martin, A.L.; Colombo, I.; Tarelli, G.T.; DiDonato, S. (Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy)); Rocchi, M. (Istituto G. Gaslini, Genoa (Italy))

    1991-01-15

    The authors have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH{sub 2}-terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH{sub 2}-terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hanster somatic cell hybrids.

  19. The bacterial chromosome segregation protein Spo0J spreads along DNA from parS nucleation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Heath; Ferreira, Henrique; Errington, Jeff

    2006-09-01

    Regulation of chromosome inheritance is essential to ensure proper transmission of genetic information. To accomplish accurate genome segregation, cells organize their chromosomes and actively separate them prior to cytokinesis. In Bacillus subtilis the Spo0J protein is required for accurate chromosome segregation and it regulates the developmental switch from vegetative growth to sporulation. Spo0J is a DNA-binding protein that recognizes at least eight identified parS sites located near the origin of replication. As judged by fluorescence microscopy, Spo0J forms discrete foci associated with the oriC region of the chromosome throughout the cell cycle. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms utilized by Spo0J to facilitate productive chromosome segregation, we have investigated the DNA binding activity of Spo0J. In vivo we find Spo0J associates with several kilobases of DNA flanking its specific binding sites (parS) through a parS-dependent nucleation event that promotes lateral spreading of Spo0J along the chromosome. Using purified components we find that Spo0J has the ability to coat non-specific DNA substrates. These 'Spo0J domains' provide large structures near oriC that could potentially demark, organize or localize the origin region of the chromosome.

  20. Method for isolating chromosomal DNA in preparation for hybridization in suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Joe N.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. Chromosomal DNA in a sample containing cell debris is prepared for hybridization in suspension by treating the mixture with RNase. The treated DNA can also be fixed prior to hybridization.

  1. Evolutionary dynamics of Anolis sex chromosomes revealed by sequencing of flow sorting-derived microchromosome-specific DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichigin, Ilya G; Giovannotti, Massimo; Makunin, Alex I; Ng, Bee L; Kabilov, Marsel R; Tupikin, Alexey E; Barucchi, Vincenzo Caputo; Splendiani, Andrea; Ruggeri, Paolo; Rens, Willem; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Trifonov, Vladimir A

    2016-10-01

    Squamate reptiles show a striking diversity in modes of sex determination, including both genetic (XY or ZW) and temperature-dependent sex determination systems. The genomes of only a handful of species have been sequenced, analyzed and assembled including the genome of Anolis carolinensis. Despite a high genome coverage, only macrochromosomes of A. carolinensis were assembled whereas the content of most microchromosomes remained unclear. Most of the Anolis species have homomorphic XY sex chromosome system. However, some species have large heteromorphic XY chromosomes (e.g., A. sagrei) and even multiple sex chromosomes systems (e.g. A. pogus), that were shown to be derived from fusions of the ancestral XY with microautosomes. We applied next generation sequencing of flow sorting-derived chromosome-specific DNA pools to characterize the content and composition of microchromosomes in A. carolinensis and A. sagrei. Comparative analysis of sequenced chromosome-specific DNA pools revealed that the A. sagrei XY sex chromosomes contain regions homologous to several microautosomes of A. carolinensis. We suggest that the sex chromosomes of A. sagrei are derived by fusions of the ancestral sex chromosome with three microautosomes and subsequent loss of some genetic content on the Y chromosome.

  2. Genome organization and DNA methylation patterns of B chromosomes in the red fox and Chinese raccoon dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno-Poniewierska, Monika; Solek, Przemysław; Wronski, Mariusz; Potocki, Leszek; Jezewska-Witkowska, Grażyna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-12-01

    The molecular structure of B chromosomes (Bs) is relatively well studied. Previous research demonstrates that Bs of various species usually contain two types of repetitive DNA sequences, satellite DNA and ribosomal DNA, but Bs also contain genes encoding histone proteins and many others. However, many questions remain regarding the origin and function of these chromosomes. Here, we focused on the comparative cytogenetic characteristics of the red fox and Chinese raccoon dog B chromosomes with particular attention to the distribution of repetitive DNA sequences and their methylation status. We confirmed that the small Bs of the red fox show a typical fluorescent telomeric distal signal, whereas medium-sized Bs of the Chinese raccoon dog were characterized by clusters of telomeric sequences along their length. We also found different DNA methylation patterns for the B chromosomes of both species. Therefore, we concluded that DNA methylation may maintain the transcriptional inactivation of DNA sequences localized to B chromosomes and may prevent genetic unbalancing and several negative phenotypic effects.

  3. DNA methylation analysis of chromosome 21 gene promoters at single base pair and single allele resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Differential DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic signal for gene regulation, development, and disease processes. We mapped DNA methylation patterns of 190 gene promoter regions on chromosome 21 using bisulfite conversion and subclone sequencing in five human cell types. A total of 28,626 subclones were sequenced at high accuracy using (long-read Sanger sequencing resulting in the measurement of the DNA methylation state of 580427 CpG sites. Our results show that average DNA methylation levels are distributed bimodally with enrichment of highly methylated and unmethylated sequences, both for amplicons and individual subclones, which represent single alleles from individual cells. Within CpG-rich sequences, DNA methylation was found to be anti-correlated with CpG dinucleotide density and GC content, and methylated CpGs are more likely to be flanked by AT-rich sequences. We observed over-representation of CpG sites in distances of 9, 18, and 27 bps in highly methylated amplicons. However, DNA sequence alone is not sufficient to predict an amplicon's DNA methylation status, since 43% of all amplicons are differentially methylated between the cell types studied here. DNA methylation in promoter regions is strongly correlated with the absence of gene expression and low levels of activating epigenetic marks like H3K4 methylation and H3K9 and K14 acetylation. Utilizing the single base pair and single allele resolution of our data, we found that i amplicons from different parts of a CpG island frequently differ in their DNA methylation level, ii methylation levels of individual cells in one tissue are very similar, and iii methylation patterns follow a relaxed site-specific distribution. Furthermore, iv we identified three cases of allele-specific DNA methylation on chromosome 21. Our data shed new light on the nature of methylation patterns in human cells, the sequence dependence of DNA methylation, and its function as epigenetic signal in gene

  4. First description of B chromosomes in the Hyphessobrycon (Characiformes, Characidae) genus: a hypothesis for the extra element of Hyphessobrycon eques Steindachner, 1882

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscor, Diovani; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia Pasquali

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Hyphessobrycon are allocated in the incertae sedis group of the Characidae family, one of the genera with more species of the group. The chromosomes of some species of Hyphessobrycon are known, and the diploid number most common for genus is 2n = 50 chromosomes. The aims of this study were to examine the karyotype macrostructure in the Hyphessobrycon eques Steindachner, 1882, and show a new origin hypothesis for B chromosomes. The diploid number observed for Hyphessobrycon eques was 2n = 52 chromosomes, and a karyotype formulae of 12m + 18sm + 8st + 14a, with FN (fundamental number) = 90 for both sexes. Only two females showed one B chromosome. The heterochromatin was observed mainly on centromeric regions, and in the long arm of the B chromosome. In this paper, the relationship of the B chromosome of Hyphessobrycon eques with an occasional chromosome rearrangement was discussed. PMID:26310656

  5. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

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    Heinz-Ulrich G. Weier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols.

  6. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

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    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  7. Enhanced integration of large DNA into E. coli chromosome by CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Mu-En; Yeh, I-Hsin; Sung, Li-Yu; Wu, Meng-Ying; Chao, Yun-Peng; Ng, I-Son; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic engineering often necessitates chromosomal integration of multiple genes but integration of large genes into Escherichia coli remains difficult. CRISPR/Cas9 is an RNA-guided system which enables site-specific induction of double strand break (DSB) and programmable genome editing. Here, we hypothesized that CRISPR/Cas9-triggered DSB could enhance homologous recombination and augment integration of large DNA into E. coli chromosome. We demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 system was able to trigger DSB in >98% of cells, leading to subsequent cell death, and identified that mutagenic SOS response played roles in the cell survival. By optimizing experimental conditions and combining the λ-Red proteins and linear dsDNA, CRISPR/Cas9-induced DSB enabled homologous recombination of the donor DNA and replacement of lacZ gene in the MG1655 strain at efficiencies up to 99%, and allowed high fidelity, scarless integration of 2.4, 3.9, 5.4, and 7.0 kb DNA at efficiencies approaching 91%, 92%, 71%, and 61%, respectively. The CRISPR/Cas9-assisted gene integration also functioned in different E. coli strains including BL21 (DE3) and W albeit at different efficiencies. Taken together, our methodology facilitated precise integration of dsDNA as large as 7 kb into E. coli with efficiencies exceeding 60%, thus significantly ameliorating the editing efficiency and overcoming the size limit of integration using the commonly adopted recombineering approach. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 172-183. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. In situ amplification of DNA fragments specific for human Y chromosome in cellular nuclei by PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锡元; 姜海波; 李立家; 马琦; 杨建琪; 刘汀

    1996-01-01

    Using single primer pairs Y3 and Y4, in siru polymerase chain reaction (in situ PCR) was successfully performed on the specimen slides of peripheral leukocytes. By both of the direct digpxiginin-11-dUTP incorporation into PCR products with in situ PCR (direct in situ PCR) and in situ PCR followed by detection of in situ hybridization (indirect in siru PCR), DNA fragments specific for human Y chromosome were obviously amplified in cellular nuclei of specimens on the slides. The results were verified by Southern analysis. The methodology of in situ PCR and its application were discussed.

  9. Regulation of DNA replication and chromosomal polyploidy by the MLL-WDR5-RBBP5 methyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Wu, Xiaojun; Yin, Feng; Chia-Fang Lee, Christina; Yu, Min; Mihaylov, Ivailo S.; Yu, Jiekai; Sun, Hong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA replication licensing occurs on chromatin, but how the chromatin template is regulated for replication remains mostly unclear. Here, we have analyzed the requirement of histone methyltransferases for a specific type of replication: the DNA re-replication induced by the downregulation of either Geminin, an inhibitor of replication licensing protein CDT1, or the CRL4CDT2 ubiquitin E3 ligase. We found that siRNA-mediated reduction of essential components of the MLL-WDR5-RBBP5 methyltransferase complexes including WDR5 or RBBP5, which transfer methyl groups to histone H3 at K4 (H3K4), suppressed DNA re-replication and chromosomal polyploidy. Reduction of WDR5/RBBP5 also prevented the activation of H2AX checkpoint caused by re-replication, but not by ultraviolet or X-ray irradiation; and the components of MLL complexes co-localized with the origin recognition complex (ORC) and MCM2-7 replicative helicase complexes at replication origins to control the levels of methylated H3K4. Downregulation of WDR5 or RBBP5 reduced the methylated H3K4 and suppressed the recruitment of MCM2-7 complexes onto replication origins. Our studies indicate that the MLL complexes and H3K4 methylation are required for DNA replication but not for DNA damage repair. PMID:27744293

  10. Preparations of meiotic pachytene chromosomes and extended DNA fibers from cotton suitable for fluorescence in situ hybridization.

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    Renhai Peng

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH

  11. Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric (TTAGG)n repeats in blue butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) with low and high chromosome numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershinina, Alisa O.; Anokhin, Boris A.; Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric repeats are important parts of eukaryotic genome. However, little is known about their organization and localization in karyotypes of organisms with holocentric chromosomes. Here we present first cytogenetic study of these molecular structures in seven blue butterflies of the genus Polyommatus Latreille, 1804 with low and high chromosome numbers (from n=10 to n=ca.108) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG)n telomeric probes. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe showed the presence of two different variants of the location of major rDNA clusters in Polyommatus species: with one or two rDNA-carrying chromosomes in haploid karyotype. We discuss evolutionary trends and possible mechanisms of changes in the number of ribosomal clusters. We also demonstrate that Polyommatus species have the classical insect (TTAGG)n telomere organization. This chromosome end protection mechanism probably originated de novo in small chromosomes that evolved via fragmentations. PMID:26140159

  12. DistAMo: A web-based tool to characterize DNA-motif distribution on bacterial chromosomes

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    Patrick eSobetzko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Short DNA motifs are involved in a multitude of functions such as for example chromosome segregation, DNA replication or mismatch repair. Distribution of such motifs is often not random and the specific chromosomal pattern relates to the respective motif function. Computational approaches which quantitatively assess such chromosomal motif patterns are necessary. Here we present a new computer tool DistAMo (Distribution Analysis of DNA Motifs. The algorithm uses codon redundancy to calculate the relative abundance of short DNA motifs from single genes to entire chromosomes. Comparative genomics analyses of the GATC-motif distribution in γ-proteobacterial genomes using DistAMo revealed that (i genes beside the replication origin are enriched in GATCs, (ii genome-wide GATC distribution follows a distinct pattern and (iii genes involved in DNA replication and repair are enriched in GATCs. These features are specific for bacterial chromosomes encoding a Dam methyltransferase. The new software is available as a stand-alone or as an easy-to-use web-based server version at http://www.computational.bio.uni-giessen.de/distamo.

  13. The Ba813 chromosomal DNA sequence effectively traces the whole Bacillus anthracis community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisse, V; Patra, G; Vaissaire, J; Mock, M

    1999-08-01

    Plasmid genes that are responsible for virulence of Bacillus anthracis are important targets for the DNA-based detection of anthrax. We evaluated the distribution of the Ba813 chromosomal DNA sequence (Ba813) within closely related Bacillus species. Ba813 was systematically identified from 47 strains or isolates of B. anthracis tested, thus indicating its reliability as a tracer for that species. From the 60 strains of closely related Bacillus spp. examined, three bona fide B. cereus and one bona fide B. thuringiensis were found to harbour Ba813. This marker was also detected in Bacillus sp. isolates that were present at high levels in soil samples collected in a place where an anthrax outbreak had occurred. The significance and the possible function of the Ba813 locus is discussed.

  14. Molecular-Cytological Identification and Chromosome Behavior Analysis of Telotetrasomic in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Zhi-yun; GAO Qing-song; YU Heng-xiu; YI Chuan-deng; GU Ming-hong

    2008-01-01

    From the progenies of a telotrisomic of chromosome 9 short arm of an indica rice variety, Zhongxian 3037, a phenotypical variant was selected. The variant plant had rolled leaves, dispersed plant type, as well as a low seed-setting rate. Cytological and molecular cytological investigations revealed two extra chromosomes, which were the shortest in somatic cells of the variant. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using a rice centromere specific DNA (RCS2) and a DNA sequence specific for chromosome 9 on premetaphase and pachytene chromosomes showed that these two chromosomes were the short arms of chromosome 9. That is to say, the variant was a telotetrasomic of chromosome 9. Among the 25 pachytene cells, the two telosomic chromosomes paired each other to form a bivalent and didn't pair with other normal chromosome 9 as multivalents in 96% cells. However, the bivalent was easy to disassociate in advance.

  15. Molecular-Cytological Identification and Chromosome Behavior Analysis of Telotetrasomic in Rice

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    Zhi-yun Gong

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available From the progenies of a telotrisomic of chromosome 9 short arm of an indica rice variety, Zhongxian 3037, a phenotypical variant was selected. The variant plant had rolled leaves, dispersed plant type, as well as a low seed-setting rate. Cytological and molecular cytological investigations revealed two extra chromosomes, which were the shortest in somatic cells of the variant. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH analysis using a rice centromere specific DNA (RCS2 and a DNA sequence specific for chromosome 9 on premetaphase and pachytene chromosomes showed that these two chromosomes were the short arms of chromosome 9. That is to say, the variant was a telotetrasomic of chromosome 9. Among the 25 pachytene cells, the two telosomic chromosomes paired each other to form a bivalent and didn't pair with other normal chromosome 9 as multivalents in 96% cells. However, the bivalent was easy to disassociate in advance.

  16. Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and genomic organization of 5S rDNA in Oreochromis mossambicus, O. urolepis hornorum and their hybrid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hua Ping Zhu; Mai Xin Lu; Feng Ying Gao; Zhang Han Huang; Li Ping Yang; Jain Fang Gui

    2010-08-01

    In this study, classical and molecular cytogenetic analyses were performed in tilapia fishes, Oreochromis mossambicus (XX/XY sex determination system), O. urolepis hornorum (WZ/ZZ sex determination system) and their hybrid by crossing O. mossambicus female × O. u. hornorum male. An identical karyotype (($2n = 44$, NF (total number of chromosomal arms) = 50) was obtained from three examined tilapia samples. Genomic organization analysis of 5S rDNA revealed two different types of 5S rDNA sequences, 5S type I and 5S type II. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S rDNA probes showed six positive fluorescence signals on six chromosomes of all the analysed metaphases from the three tilapia samples. Subsequently, 45S rDNA probes were also prepared, and six positive fluorescence signals were observed on three chromosome pairs in all analysed metaphases of the three tilapia samples. The correlation between 45 rDNA localization and nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) was confirmed by silver nitrate staining in tilapia fishes. Further, different chromosomal localizations of 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA were verified by two different colour FISH probes. Briefly, the current data provide an insights for hybridization projects and breeding improvement of tilapias.

  17. DNA Ploidy and Chromosome (FISH Pattern Analysis of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

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    Anett Hruska

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and methods: 44 peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST (27 schwannomas, 9 neurofibromas and 8 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST were analyzed to determine DNA ploidy pattern and to clarify the conflicting data in the literature concerning this topic (whether benign PNSTs are aneuploid or not. For further insight we analyzed 6 schwannomas, one atypical neurofibroma and five MPNSTs by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique using centromeric chromosome probes (7, 17 and 18 and automatic image analysis station, Metafer 4. Results: Benign schwannomas (including the problematic variants as ancient, cellular, neuroblastoma like and multiplex schwannomas could be characterized by euploid‐polyploidisation and by their 4c peak height value which was usually more than 10% of total cell number measured. These characters were not found among neurofibromas and MPNST‐s. FISH analysis revealed and confirmed that the ‘normal’ euploid–polyploid cells are mainly eusomic–polysomic containing two, four, eight or sixteen signals for each chromosomes examined, but in a small proportion aneusomy was found among tumor cells of benign schwannomas (average: 2.58; range 1.33–3.44. In contrast, the atypical neurofibroma displayed marked aneusomy (18.44% but it contained normal eusomic and polysomic cells too. Two diploid MPNSTs proved to be clearly aneusomic with trisomy of chromosome 17 and monosomy of chromosome 18. Conclusions: All these data suggest that ploidy pattern determination combined with FISH analysis may be a very useful supplementary tool for making a right diagnosis (to differentiate benign versus malignant schwannomas in problematic variants and to understand better the malignant transformation in PNSTs.

  18. Chromosome numbers and DNA content in some species of Mecardonia (Gratiolae, Plantaginaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, María M.; Angulo, María B.; Greppi, Julián A.; Bugallo, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetic characterization and determination of DNA content by flow cytometry of five species of Mecardonia Ruiz et Pavon, 1798 (Gratiolae, Plantaginaceae) was performed. This is the first study of nuclear DNA content carried out in the genus. Mitotic analysis revealed a base chromosome number x = 11 for all entities and different ploidy levels, ranging from diploid (2n = 2x = 22) to hexaploid (2n = 6x = 66). The results include the first report of the chromosome numbers for Mecardonia flagellaris (Chamisso & Schlechtendal, 1827) (2n = 22), Mecardonia grandiflora (Bentham) Pennell, 1946 (2n = 22), Mecardonia kamogawae Greppi & Hagiwara, 2011 (2n = 66), and Mecardonia sp. (2n = 44). The three ploidy levels here reported suggest that polyploidy is common in Mecardonia and appear to be an important factor in the evolution of this genus. The 2C- and 1Cx-values were also estimated in all the species. The 2C-values ranged from 1.91 to 5.29 pg. The 1Cx-values ranged from 0.88 to 1.03 pg. The general tendency indicated a decrease in the 1Cx-value with increasing ploidy level. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to taxonomy of the genus. PMID:28123693

  19. Chromosome Synapsis Alleviates Mek1-Dependent Suppression of Meiotic DNA Repair.

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    Vijayalakshmi V Subramanian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Faithful meiotic chromosome segregation and fertility require meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes rather than the equally available sister chromatid, a bias that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the meiotic kinase, Mek1. Mek1 is thought to mediate repair template bias by specifically suppressing sister-directed repair. Instead, we found that when Mek1 persists on closely paired (synapsed homologues, DNA repair is severely delayed, suggesting that Mek1 suppresses any proximal repair template. Accordingly, Mek1 is excluded from synapsed homologues in wild-type cells. Exclusion requires the AAA+-ATPase Pch2 and is directly coupled to synaptonemal complex assembly. Stage-specific depletion experiments further demonstrate that DNA repair in the context of synapsed homologues requires Rad54, a repair factor inhibited by Mek1. These data indicate that the sister template is distinguished from the homologue primarily by its closer proximity to inhibitory Mek1 activity. We propose that once pairing or synapsis juxtaposes homologues, exclusion of Mek1 is necessary to avoid suppression of all templates and accelerate repair progression.

  20. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

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    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  1. Cohesin Is limiting for the suppression of DNA damage-induced recombination between homologous chromosomes.

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    Shay Covo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Double-strand break (DSB repair through homologous recombination (HR is an evolutionarily conserved process that is generally error-free. The risk to genome stability posed by nonallelic recombination or loss-of-heterozygosity could be reduced by confining HR to sister chromatids, thereby preventing recombination between homologous chromosomes. Here we show that the sister chromatid cohesion complex (cohesin is a limiting factor in the control of DSB repair and genome stability and that it suppresses DNA damage-induced interactions between homologues. We developed a gene dosage system in tetraploid yeast to address limitations on various essential components in DSB repair and HR. Unlike RAD50 and RAD51, which play a direct role in HR, a 4-fold reduction in the number of essential MCD1 sister chromatid cohesion subunit genes affected survival of gamma-irradiated G(2/M cells. The decreased survival reflected a reduction in DSB repair. Importantly, HR between homologous chromosomes was strongly increased by ionizing radiation in G(2/M cells with a single copy of MCD1 or SMC3 even at radiation doses where survival was high and DSB repair was efficient. The increased recombination also extended to nonlethal doses of UV, which did not induce DSBs. The DNA damage-induced recombinants in G(2/M cells included crossovers. Thus, the cohesin complex has a dual role in protecting chromosome integrity: it promotes DSB repair and recombination between sister chromatids, and it suppresses damage-induced recombination between homologues. The effects of limited amounts of Mcd1and Smc3 indicate that small changes in cohesin levels may increase the risk of genome instability, which may lead to genetic diseases and cancer.

  2. Chromosome segregation in Archaea mediated by a hybrid DNA partition machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliomaa-Sanford, Anne K; Rodriguez-Castañeda, Fernando A; McLeod, Brett N; Latorre-Roselló, Victor; Smith, Jasmine H; Reimann, Julia; Albers, Sonja V; Barillà, Daniela

    2012-03-06

    Eukarya and, more recently, some bacteria have been shown to rely on a cytoskeleton-based apparatus to drive chromosome segregation. In contrast, the factors and mechanisms underpinning this fundamental process are underexplored in archaea, the third domain of life. Here we establish that the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus harbors a hybrid segrosome consisting of two interacting proteins, SegA and SegB, that play a key role in genome segregation in this organism. SegA is an ortholog of bacterial, Walker-type ParA proteins, whereas SegB is an archaea-specific factor lacking sequence identity to either eukaryotic or bacterial proteins, but sharing homology with a cluster of uncharacterized factors conserved in both crenarchaea and euryarchaea, the two major archaeal sub-phyla. We show that SegA is an ATPase that polymerizes in vitro and that SegB is a site-specific DNA-binding protein contacting palindromic sequences located upstream of the segAB cassette. SegB interacts with SegA in the presence of nucleotides and dramatically affects its polymerization dynamics. Our data demonstrate that SegB strongly stimulates SegA polymerization, possibly by promoting SegA nucleation and accelerating polymer growth. Increased expression levels of segAB resulted in severe growth and chromosome segregation defects, including formation of anucleate cells, compact nucleoids confined to one half of the cell compartment and fragmented nucleoids. The overall picture emerging from our findings indicates that the SegAB complex fulfills a crucial function in chromosome segregation and is the prototype of a DNA partition machine widespread across archaea.

  3. Differential behavior of plasmids containing chromosomal DNA insertions of various sizes during transformation and conjugation in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Plasmids with chromosomal insertions were constructed by removal of a 1.1-kilobase-pair piece from the 9.8-kilobase-pair vector plasmid pDM2 by EcoRI digestion and inserting in its place various lengths of chromosomal DNA (1.7, 3.4, and 9.0 kilobase pairs) coding for resistance to novobiocin. A fourth plasmid was constructed by insertion of the largest piece of chromosomal DNA into the SmaI site of pDM2. The plasmids without inserts were taken up poorly by competent cells and thus were considered not to contain specific DNA uptake sites. The presence of even the smallest insert of chromosomal DNA caused a large increase in transformation of Rec/sup +/ and Rec/sup -/ strains. The frequency of plasmid establishment in Rec/sup +/ cells by transformation increased exponentially with increasing insert size, but in Rec/sup -/ cells there was less transformation by the larger plasmids. Conjugal transfer of these plasmids was carried out with the 35-kilobase-pair mobilizing plasmid pHD147. The frequency of establishment of plasmids by this method not only was not markedly affected by the presence of the insertions, but also decreased somewhat with increase in insert size and was independent of rec-1 and rec-2 genes. Recombination between plasmid and chromosome was readily detected after transformation, but could not be detected after transconjugation even when the recipient cells were Rec/sup +/ and made competent. These data suggested that there is a special processing of plasmid DNA that enters the competent cells in transformation that makes possible recombination of homologous regions of the plasmid with the chromosome and pairing with the chromosome that aids plasmid establishment.

  4. Stability in chromosome number and DNA content in synthetic tetraploids of Lolium multiflorum after two generations of selection

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    Roselaine Cristina Pereira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Chromosome doubling of Italian ryegrass genotypes ( Lolium multiflorum Lam. adapted to the brazilian edaphoclimatic conditions is an important strategy used by breeders and aims to obtain more vigorous genotypes with better forage quality and disease resistance. The effectiveness of chromosome doubling can be measured by genetic stability and fertility rates of plants over generations. However, a common problem in the polyploidization process is the regeneration of mixoploid plants that have impaired fertility and genetic stability. The objective of this study was to verify if progenies of recently tetraploidized plants remain stable regarding DNA content and chromosome number, over two generations. Progenies of L. multiflorum plants artificially tetraploidized with colchicine treatment were evaluated. Chromosome counting and estimates of the DNA content were used to evaluate the genetic stability. The percentage of tetraploid plants (4X increased over generations (18%, 34% and 91% in cycle 0, 1 and 2, respectively. All progenies identified as tetraploid by flow citometry showed variation in chromosome number (mixoploidy, but produced viable seeds. Results showed that stabilization in chromosome number and DNA content in tetraploidized plant progenies requires time and that the success of this procedure depends on a continuous and accurate screening and selection.

  5. Evolutionary dynamics of rDNA genes on chromosomes of the Eucinostomus fishes: cytotaxonomic and karyoevolutive implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, L L; Bertollo, L A C; Cioffi, M B; Costa, G W W F; Jacobina, U P; Molina, W F

    2014-11-27

    Several chromosomal features of Gerreidae fish have been found to be conserved. In this group, it is unclear whether the high degree of chromosomal stasis is maintained when analyzing more dynamic regions of chromosomes, such as rDNA sites that generally show a higher level of variability. Thus, cytogenetic analyses were performed on 3 Atlantic species of the genus Eucinostomus using conventional banding (C-banding, Ag-NOR), AT- and GC-specific fluorochromes, and fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of telomeric sequences and 5S and 18S rDNA sites. The results showed that although the karyotypical macrostructure of these species is similar (2n = 48 chromosomes, simple Ag-NORs seemingly located on homeologous chromosomes and centromeric heterochromatin pattern), there are differences in the positions of rDNA subunits 5S and 18S. Thus, the ribosomal sites have demonstrated to be effective cytotaxonomic markers in Eucinostomus, presenting a different evolutionary dynamics in relation to other chromosomal regions and allowing access to important evolutionary changes in this group.

  6. Divergence between C. melo and African Cucumis Species Identified by Chromosome Painting and rDNA Distribution Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunpeng; Wang, Huaisong; Wang, Jiming; Sun, Jianying; Li, Zongyun; Han, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    The 5S and 45S rDNA sites are useful chromosome landmarks and can provide valuable information about karyotype evolution and species interrelationships. In this study, we employed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to determine the number and chromosomal location of 5S and 45S rDNA loci in 8 diploid Cucumis species. Two oligonucleotide painting probes specific for the rDNA-bearing chromosomes in C. melo were hybridized to other Cucumis species in order to investigate the homeologies among the rDNA-carrying chromosomes in Cucumis species. The analyzed diploid species showed 3 types of rDNA distribution patterns, which provided clear cytogenetic evidence on the divergence between C. melo and wild diploid African Cucumis species. The present results not only show species interrelationships in the genus Cucumis, but the rDNA FISH patterns can also be used as cytological markers for the discrimination of closely related species. The data will be helpful for breeders to choose the most suitable species from various wild species for improvement of cultivated melon.

  7. Enhancement of soil DNA extraction by the use of a hand held mixer Otimização da extração de DNA do solo utilizando um homogeneizador manual

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    Jefferson Luis da Silva Costa

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of soil DNA extraction using a bead beater homogenizer (Biospec Products - Germany was compared to that obtained with a hand held mixer (Moulinex - Brazil. The hand held mixer costs 100 times less and extracted seven times more crude DNA than the bead beater.A eficiência da extração de DNA do solo utilizando um homogeneizador bead beater (Biospec Products - Alemanha foi comparada àquela obtida utilizando um homogeneizador manual (Moulinex - Brasil. O homogeneizador manual tem custo 100 vezes menor e revelou-se mais eficiente que o bead beater extraindo sete vezes mais DNA.

  8. Correction of chromosomal instability and sensitivity to diverse mutagens by a cloned cDNA of the XRCC3 DNA repair gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tebbs, R.S.; Tucker, J.D.; Hwang, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-03

    The mutagen-sensitive CHO line irs1SF was previously isolated on the basis of hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and was found to be chromosomally unstable as well as cross-sensitive to diverse kinds of DNA-damaging agents. The analysis of somatic cell hybrids formed between irs1SF and human lymphocytes implicated a human gene (defined as XRCC3; x-ray repair cross-complementing), which partially restored mitomycin C resistance to the mutant. A functional cDNA that confers mitomycin C resistance was transferred to irs1SF cells by transforming them with an expression cDNA library and obtaining primary and secondary transformants. Functional cDNA clones were recovered from a cosmid library prepared from a secondary transformant. Transformants also showed partial correction of sensitivity to displatin and {gamma}-rays, efficient correction of chromosomal instability, and substantially improved plating efficiency and growth rate. The XRCC3 cDNA insert is {approx} 2.5 kb and detects an {approx} 3.0-kb mRNA on Northern blots. The cDNA was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 14q32.3, which was consistent with the chromosome concordance data of two independent hybrid clone panels. 30 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Extração de DNA genômico de tecidos foliares maduros de espécies nativas do cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Nara da Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Grandes quantidades de contaminantes na amostra de DNA dificultam a obtenção de DNA genômico de qualidade durante a extração. A presença de polissacarídeos, fenóis e outros compostos secundários representa o principal problema com o procedimento de isolamento do DNA e sua aplicação subsequente, por inibir a atividade das enzimas Taq DNA polimera-se e enzimas de restrição. Neste estudo, descreveu-se um procedimento modificado baseado no hexadecyltrimethylammonium (CTAB, rendendo DNA genômico satisfatório para técnicas de manipulação subsequente, como reações de PCR e digestão com enzima de restrição. Nesse protocolo foram utilizadas diferentes concentrações de β-mercaptoetanol no tampão de extração (0,0; 0,2; 10; 15; 25; e 50 uL de β-mercaptoetanol/mL do tampão de extração: 100 mM de Tris-HCl, pH 8; 20 mM de EDTA; 1,4 mM de NaCl; 2% de CTAB; 1% de PVP, cujo procedimento foi aplicado no caso de folhas maduras e testado em Annona crassiflora (arati-cum, Eugenia dysenterica (cagaita, Anacardium humilis (caju-do-campo, Hancornia speciosa (mangaba e Caryocar brasiliense (pequi. O protocolo foi eficiente no isolamento de DNA livre de polissacarídeos e polifenóis, com rendimento do DNA com alto peso molecu-lar, utilizando-se concentrações a partir de 1% de β-mercaptoetanol no tampão de extração. O DNA isolado por esse método mostrou alta pureza, de acordo com as análises de digestão por restrição e amplificação por PCR.

  10. Chromosomal aberrations and DNA damage in human populations exposed to the processing of electronics waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Cao, Jia; Li, Ke Qiu; Miao, Xu Hong; Li, Guang; Fan, Fei Yue; Zhao, Yong Cheng

    2009-05-01

    It has been known that the pollutants of electronic wastes (E-wastes) can lead to severe pollution to the environment. It has been reported that about 50% to 80% of E-wastes from developed countries are exported to Asia and Africa. It has become a major global environmental problem to deal with 'E-wastes'. E-waste recycling has remained primitive in Jinghai, China. This not only produces enormous environmental pollution but also can bring about toxic or genotoxic effects on the human body, threatening the health of both current residents and future generations living in the local environment. The concentration of lead in the blood of children in the E-waste polluted area in China is higher than that of the control area. But little is known about the cytogenetic effect to human beings caused by the pollution of E-wastes. In the present study, experiments have been performed to investigate the genetics of permanent residents of three villages with numerous E-waste disposal sites and to analyze the harmful effects of exposure to E-wastes. In total, 171 villagers (exposed group) were randomly selected from permanent residents of three villages located in Jinghai County of Tianjin, China, where there has been massive disposal of E-wastes. Thirty villagers were selected from the neighboring towns without E-waste disposal sites to serve as controls. Chromosomal aberrations and cytokinesis blocking micronucleus were performed to detect the cytogenetic effect, dic + r (dicentric and ring chromosome), monomer, fragments (acentric fragments, minute chromosomes, and acentric rings), translocation, satellite, quadriradial, total aberrations, and micronuclear rate were scored for each subject. DNA damage was detected using comet assay; the DNA percentage in the comet tail (TDNA%), tail moment (TM), and Olive tail moment (OTM) were recorded to describe DNA damage to lymphocytes. The total chromosome aberration rates (5.50%) and micronuclear rates (16.99%) of the exposure group

  11. 核型为48,XXXY的异常核型一例起源分析%Parental origin of the extra chromosomes in a case of XXXY syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪国敏; 崔英霞; 夏欣一; 范晓博; 姚兵; 戈一峰; 商学军; 李晓军; 黄宇烽

    2011-01-01

    目的 对一例核型为48,XXXY的Klinefelter综合征患者的异常核型起源进行分析,探讨其发病机制.方法 选择DXS7593和DXS8064位点,对患者及其父母进行X染色体的短串连重复序列分析.结果 DXS7593位点检测提示患者的1条X染色体源自父亲,另2条X染色体源自母亲的同源染色体;DXS8064位点没有提供信息.结论 患者异常核型发生机制为母亲的生殖细胞X染色体第二次减数分裂不分离导致携带XX卵子与父亲生殖细胞第一次减数分裂不分离携带XY精子相结合,形成核型48,XXXY的胚胎.%Objective; To investigate the origin of an abnormal karyotype 48,XXXY and discuss the pathogenesis. Methods; Two polymorphic loci, DXS7593 and DXS8064 located in chromosome X, were analyzed to determine the origin of the extra chromosome X. Results; Locus DXS7593 showed three dosages in the patient. One chromosome X from his father and the other two chromosomes X from homologous chromosomes of the mother by comparing the patient's result with those of the parents. Locus DXS8064 did not show any information. Conclusion; The data supports a mechanism of gonosome nondisjunction during maternal and paternal gametogenesis. Maternal second meiosis and paternal first meiosis of gonosomes lead to the patient's sex chromosome polysomy.

  12. Comparative molecular cytogenetic analysis of three Leuciscus species (Pisces, Cyprinidae) using chromosome banding and FISH with rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boron, Alicja; Porycka, Katarzyna; Ito, Daisuke; Abe, Syuiti; Kirtiklis, Lech

    2009-03-01

    A comparative molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed on three species of the genus Leuciscus viz. ide L. idus, chub L. cephalus and dace L. leuciscus distributed in Poland, using C-, Ag- and chromomycin A(3) (CMA(3))-stainings and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5.8S + 28S rDNA as a probe. Although the three species examined shared 2n = 50 chromosomes and the largest acrocentric chromosome pair in the complement, they were characterized with karyotypic differences in terms of the number of uni- and biarmed chromosomes and the localization of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) revealed by Ag-staining and FISH. L. idus and L. cephalus showed the rDNA sites on the long arms of one submetacentric (SM) chromosome pair and on the short arms of one subtelocentric (ST) chromosome pair, respectively. These NORs were CMA(3)-positive, GC-rich and C-positive heterochromatic sites in both species. Such chromosome banding features were also true for four NORs localizing on one of each SM and ST pair in L. leuciscus, but considerable numerical NOR polymorphism became apparent with Ag-staining and FISH due to a different combination of these NOR-bearing SMs and STs in this dace. The present results indicate that the molecular cytogenetic analysis applied herein may become useful to elucidate the karyotype evolution and phylogenetic relationships among the species in the genus Leuciscus and other related groups.

  13. Non-Random Distribution of 5S rDNA Sites and Its Association with 45S rDNA in Plant Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, Fernando; Guerra, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    5S and 45S rDNA sites are the best mapped chromosome regions in eukaryotic chromosomes. In this work, a database was built gathering information about the position and number of 5S rDNA sites in 784 plant species, aiming to identify patterns of distribution along the chromosomes and its correlation with the position of 45S rDNA sites. Data revealed that in most karyotypes (54.5%, including polyploids) two 5S rDNA sites (a single pair) are present, with 58.7% of all sites occurring in the short arm, mainly in the proximal region. In karyotypes of angiosperms with only 1 pair of sites (single sites) they are mostly found in the proximal region (52.0%), whereas in karyotypes with multiple sites the location varies according to the average chromosome size. Karyotypes with multiple sites and small chromosomes (6 µm) more commonly show terminal or interstitial sites. In species with holokinetic chromosomes, the modal value of sites per karyotype was also 2, but they were found mainly in a terminal position. Adjacent 5S and 45S rDNA sites were often found in the short arm, reflecting the preferential distribution of both sites in this arm. The high frequency of genera with at least 1 species with adjacent 5S and 45S sites reveals that this association appeared several times during angiosperm evolution, but it has been maintained only rarely as the dominant array in plant genera. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  15. Effect of aspirin on chromosome aberration and DNA damage induced by X-rays in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikawa, M.; Chuuriki, K.; Shibuya, K.; Seo, M.; Nagase, H.

    In order to reveal the anticlastogenic potency of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray. Aspirin at doses of 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally or orally at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation. The anticlastogenic activity of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray was determined in the mouse micronucleus test and alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) assay in vivo. The frequency by polychromatic erythrocytes with micronuclei (MNPCEs) was decreased by about 19-61% at 0.5 h after and about 23-62% at 0.5 h before the X-ray irradiation. DNA damage by X-ray was significantly decreased by oral administration of aspirin at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation for the SCG assay. We consider aspirin can be used as preventive agents against exposure of X-ray.

  16. Structure and chromosomal localization of DNA sequences related to ribosomal subrepeats in Vicia faba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggini, F; Cremonini, R; Zolfino, C; Tucci, G F; D'Ovidio, R; Delre, V; DePace, C; Scarascia Mugnozza, G T; Cionini, P G

    1991-05-01

    Subrepeating sequences of 325 bp found in the ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS) of Vicia faba and responsible for variations in the length of the polycistronic units for rRNA were isolated and used as probes for in situ hybridization. Hybridization occurs at many regions of the metaphase chromosomes besides those bearing rRNA genes, namely chromosome ends and all the heterochromatic regions revealed by enhanced fluorescence after quinacrine staining. The DNA homologous to the 325 bp repeats that does not reside in the IGS was isolated, cloned and sequenced. It is composed of tandemly arranged 336 bp elements, each comprising two highly related 168 bp sequences. This structure is very similar to that of the IGS repeats and ca. 75% nucleotide sequence identity can be observed between these and the 168 bp doublets. The most obvious difference lies in the deletion, in the former, of a 14 bp segment from one of the two related sequences. It is hypothesized that the IGS repeats are derived from the 336 bp elements and have been transposed to ribosomal cistrons from other genome fractions. The possible relations between these sequences and others with similar structural features found in other species are discussed.

  17. A linkage between DNA markers on the X chromosome and male sexual orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamer, D.H.; Hu, S.; Magnuson, V.L.; Hu, N.; Pattatucci, A.M.L.

    1993-07-16

    The role of genetics in male sexual orientation was investigated by pedigree and linkage analyses on 114 families of homosexual men. Increased rates of same-sex orientation were found in the maternal uncles and male cousins of these subjects, but not in their fathers or paternal relatives, suggesting the possibility of sex-linked transmission in a portion of the population. DNA linkage analysis of a selected group of 40 families in which there were two gay brothers and no indication of nonmaternal transmission revealed a correlation between homosexual orientation and the inheritance of polymorphic markers on the X chromosome in approximately 64 percent of the sib-pairs tested. The linkage to markers on Xq28, the subtelomeric region of the long arm of the sex chromosome, had a multipoint lod score of 4.0(P = 10[sup [minus]5]), indicating a statistical confidence level of more than 99 percent that at least one subtype of male sexual orientation is genetically influenced.

  18. A linkage between DNA markers on the X chromosome and male sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, D H; Hu, S; Magnuson, V L; Hu, N; Pattatucci, A M

    1993-07-16

    The role of genetics in male sexual orientation was investigated by pedigree and linkage analyses on 114 families of homosexual men. Increased rates of same-sex orientation were found in the maternal uncles and male cousins of these subjects, but not in their fathers or paternal relatives, suggesting the possibility of sex-linked transmission in a portion of the population. DNA linkage analysis of a selected group of 40 families in which there were two gay brothers and no indication of nonmaternal transmission revealed a correlation between homosexual orientation and the inheritance of polymorphic markers on the X chromosome in approximately 64 percent of the sib-pairs tested. The linkage to markers on Xq28, the subtelomeric region of the long arm of the sex chromosome, had a multipoint lod score of 4.0 (P = 10(-5), indicating a statistical confidence level of more than 99 percent that at least one subtype of male sexual orientation is genetically influenced.

  19. Cloning and deletion mapping of the recF dnaN region of the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, L W; Clark, A J

    1983-09-01

    By cloning a 3.6-kb EcoRI fragment of the Escherichia coli chromosome with pBR322 we located more precisely recF relative to dnaN. By deletion mapping we localized functional recF to a 1.65-kb region of the cloned fragment and allowed rough mapping of the C terminus of dnaN. Cloned recF+, separated from functional flanking genes dnaN and gyrB, complemented chromosomal recF mutations presumably by coding for a cytodiffusible product. The protein encoded by dnaN was observed as a band on a polyacrylamide gel from minicells. Identification of a recF protein was not made.

  20. 53BP1 nuclear bodies form around DNA lesions generated by mitotic transmission of chromosomes under replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Claudia; Savic, Velibor; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Completion of genome duplication is challenged by structural and topological barriers that impede progression of replication forks. Although this can seriously undermine genome integrity, the fate of DNA with unresolved replication intermediates is not known. Here, we show that mild replication...... bodies shield chromosomal fragile sites sequestered in these compartments against erosion. Together, these data indicate that restoration of DNA or chromatin integrity at loci prone to replication problems requires mitotic transmission to the next cell generations....... increases after genetic ablation of BLM, a DNA helicase associated with dissolution of entangled DNA. Conversely, 53BP1 nuclear bodies are partially suppressed by knocking down SMC2, a condensin subunit required for mechanical stability of mitotic chromosomes. Finally, we provide evidence that 53BP1 nuclear...

  1. Chromosome evolution in tiger beetles: Karyotypes and localization of 18S rDNA loci in Neotropical Megacephalini (Coleoptera, Cicindelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia J.R. Proença

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Four Neotropical tiger beetle species, three from the genus Megacephala and one from the genus Oxycheila, currently assigned to the tribe Megacephalini were examined cytogenetically. All three Megacephala species showed simple sex chromosome systems of the X0/XX type but different numbers of autosomal pairs (15 in M. cruciata, 14 in M. sobrina and 12 in M. rutilans, while Oxycheila tristis was inferred to have a multiple sex chromosome system with four X chromosomes (2n = 24 + X1X2X3X4Y/X1X1X2X2X3X3X4X4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH using a PCR-amplified 18S rDNA fragment as a probe revealed the presence of rDNA clusters located exclusively on the autosomes in all the Megacephala species (five clusters in M. cruciata, eight in M. sobrina and three in M. rutilans, indicating variability in the number of clusters and the presence of structural polymorphisms. The same methodology showed that O. tristis had six rDNA clusters, apparently also located on the autosomes. Although our data also show cytogenetic variability within the genus Megacephala, our findings support the most accepted hypothesis for chromosome evolution in the family Cicindelidae. The description of multiple sex chromosomes in O. tristis along with phylogenetic analyses and larval morphological characters may be assumed as an additional evidence for the exclusion of the genus Oxycheila and related taxa from the tribe Megacephalini.

  2. CTAB methods for DNA extraction of sweetpotato for microsatellite analysis Métodos CTAB de extração de DNA para a análise de microssatélites em batata-doce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Borges

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers have proved to be useful in genetic diversity assessments of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas but practical DNA extraction methods to ensure good quality and quantity DNA for these studies are yet to be established. This study compares the efficiency of three modified methodologies for DNA extraction of six sweetpotato landraces using the CTAB extraction buffer in regard to quantity and purity of DNA quantification and microsatellite band patterns. All methodologies yielded satisfactory results, but the method based in leaf tissue macerated in liquid nitrogen was deemed more adequate because of its simplicity and lower cost. However, the method based in dry leaf tissue was considered more advantageous, first because elicits practicability in the plant acquisition and drying process, especially when the collection is performed in situ, and also because its simplicity makes possible the cold storage of the dry, ground samples for future DNA extractions.Os marcadores microssatélites são úteis para a análise da diversidade genética de variedades tradicionais de batata-doce (Ipomoea batatas. Para estes estudos, métodos práticos de extração de DNA precisam ser estabelecidos para assegurar uma boa qualidade e quantidade de DNA extraído. Assim, foi comparada a eficiência de três metodologias para extração de DNA usando o tampão de extração CTAB, todas com modificações. Para verificar a quantidade e pureza na quantificação de DNA, bem como o padrão de bandas de microssatélites para as três metodologias utilizaram-se seis etnovariedades de batata-doce. Os testes mostraram que as três metodologias apresentaram resultados satisfatórios. Uma das metodologias baseada em tecido foliar macerado em nitrogênio líquido mostrou-se a mais adequada devido à simplicidade e menor custo. Entretanto, o método baseado em tecido foliar seco foi o mais vantajoso devido à praticidade na aquisição da planta e no processo de

  3. The origin of Mosuo people as revealed by mtDNA and Y chromosome variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN; Bo; SHI; Hong; REN; Ling; XI; Huifeng; LI; Kaiyuan; ZHA

    2004-01-01

    The Mosuo, living in the Lugu Lake area in northwest Yunnan Province, China, is the only matriarchal population in China. The Mosuo was officially identified as Naxi nationality although its relationship with Naxi remains controversial. We studied the genetic relationship between the Mosuo and five other ethnic groups currently residing in northwest Yunnan, i.e. Naxi, Tibetan, Bai, Yi and Pumi, by typing the genetic variations in mtDNA HVS1 and 21 Y chromosome markers (13 SNPs & 8 STR markers). We showed that the maternal lineages of the Mosuo bear the strongest resemblance with those found in Naxi while its paternal lineages are more similar to those that are prevalent in Yunnan Tibetan. The marked difference between paternal and maternal lineages may be attributable to the genetic history, matriarchal structure, and visiting marriage.

  4. Chromosomal location of 18S and 5S rDNA sites in Triportheus fish species (Characiformes, Characidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The location of 18S and 5S rDNA sites was determined in eight species and populations of the fish genus Triportheus by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The males and females of all species had 2n = 52 chromosomes and a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. A single 18S rDNA site that was roughly equivalent to an Ag-NOR was detected on the short arms of a submetacentric pair in nearly all species, and up to two additional sites were also observed in some species. In addition, another 18S rDNA cluster was identified in a distal region on the long arms of the W chromosome; this finding corroborated previous evidence that this cluster would be a shared feature amongst Triportheus species. In T. angulatus, a heterozygotic paracentric inversion involving the short arms of one homolog of a metacentric pair was associated with NORs. The 5S rDNA sites were located on the short arms of a single submetacentric chromosomal pair, close to the centromeres, except in T. auritus, which had up to ten 5S rDNA sites. The 18S and 5S rDNA sites were co-localized and adjacent on the short arms of a chromosomal pair in two populations of T. nematurus. Although all Triportheus species have a similar karyotypic macrostructure, the results of this work show that in some species ribosomal genes may serve as species-specific markers when used in conjunction with other putatively synapomorphic features. PMID:21637644

  5. Mating patterns amongst Siberian reindeer herders: inferences from mtDNA and Y-chromosomal analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakendorf, Brigitte; Novgorodov, Innokentij N; Osakovskij, Vladimir L; Stoneking, Mark

    2007-07-01

    The Evenks and Evens, who speak closely related languages belonging to the Northern Tungusic branch of the Tungusic family, are nomadic reindeer herders and hunters. They are spread over an immense territory in northeastern Siberia, and consequently different subgroups are in contact with diverse peoples speaking Samoyedic, Turkic, Mongolic, Chukotka-Kamchatkan, and Yukaghir languages. Nevertheless, the languages and culture of the Evenks and Evens are similar enough for them to have been classified as a single ethnic group in the past. This linguistic and cultural similarity indicates that they may have spread over their current area of habitation relatively recently, and thus may be closely related genetically. On the other hand, the great distances that separate individual groups of Evens and Evenks from each other might have led to preferential mating with geographic neighbors rather than with linguistically related peoples. In this study, we assess the correlation between linguistic and genetic relationship in three different subgroups of Evenks and Evens, respectively, via mtDNA and Y-chromosomal analyses. The results show that there is some evidence of a common origin based on shared mtDNA lineages and relatively similar Y-haplogroup frequencies amongst most of the Evenk and Even subgroups. However, there is little sharing of Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes, indicating that males within Evenk and Even subgroups have remained relatively isolated. There is further evidence of some female admixture in different Even subgroups with their respective geographic neighbors. However, the Tungusic groups, and especially the Evenks, show signs of genetic drift, making inferences about their prehistory difficult.

  6. DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome short tandem repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.; Brenner, C.; Brinkmann, B.;

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a relat...... a relatively new area, namely Y-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). This report addresses nomenclature, use of allelic ladders, population genetics and reporting methods Udgivelsesdato: 2001/12...

  7. Comparative analysis of chromosomal localization of ribosomal and telomeric DNA markers in three species of Pyrgomorphidae grasshoppers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya G. Buleu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The karyotypes of three species of Pyrgomorphidae grasshoppers were studied: Zonocerus elegans (Thunberg, 1815, Pyrgomorpha guentheri (Burr, 1899 and Atractomorpha lata (Mochulsky, 1866. Data on karyotypes of P. guentheri and Z. elegans are reported here for the first time. All species have karyotypes consisting of 19 acrocentric chromosomes in males and 20 acrocentric chromosomes in females (2n♂=19, NF=19; 2n♀=20, NF=20 and X0/XX sex determination system. A comparative analysis of the localization of C-heterochromatin, clusters of ribosomal DNA, and telomere repeats revealed inter-species diversity in these cytogenetic markers. These differences indicate that the karyotype divergence in the species studied is not associated with structural chromosome rearrangements, but with the evolution of repeated DNA sequences.

  8. Characterization of the Arachis (Leguminosae D genome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH chromosome markers and total genome DNA hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Robledo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome markers were developed for Arachis glandulifera using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of the 5S and 45S rRNA genes and heterochromatic 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI positive bands. We used chromosome landmarks identified by these markers to construct the first Arachis species ideogram in which all the homologous chromosomes were precisely identified. The comparison of this ideogram with those published for other Arachis species revealed very poor homeologies with all A and B genome taxa, supporting the special genome constitution (D genome of A. glandulifera. Genomic affinities were further investigated by dot blot hybridization of biotinylated A. glandulifera total DNA to DNA from several Arachis species, the results indicating that the D genome is positioned between the A and B genomes.

  9. Chromosomal DNA probes for the identification of Bacteroides tectum and Bacteroides fragilis from the oral cavity of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, D N; Bailey, G D

    1993-01-01

    A dot-blot hybridisation assay using high molecular weight DNA as whole chromosomal probes was used to differentiate Bacteroides tectum from Bacteroides fragilis. 32P-labelled probes were compared with digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled probes. The whole chromosomal probes were specific--differentiating B. tectum from B. fragilis and both from a variety of other species (including other members of the genera Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Prevotella) found in normal and abnormal mouths of cats and horses. However, even at very high stringencies, B. tectum homology groups I, II and III were not distinguishable from one another using either 32P-labelled or DIG-labelled probes. Thus, DIG-labelled whole chromosome probes directed against cellular DNA released directly onto nitrocellulose membranes is considered a useful method for diagnostic veterinary laboratories wishing to identify B. tectum and distinguish it from B. fragilis and other oral anaerobic flora of cats.

  10. An Extra X or Y Chromosome: Contrasting the Cognitive and Motor Phenotypes in Childhood in Boys with 47,XYY Syndrome or 47,XXY Klinefelter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Judith L.; Zeger, Martha P. D.; Kushner, Harvey; Zinn, Andrew R.; Roeltgen, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to contrast the cognitive phenotypes in boys with 47,XYY (XYY) karyotype and boys with 47,XXY karyotype [Klinefelter syndrome, (KS)], who share an extra copy of the X-Y pseudoautosomal region but differ in their dosage of strictly sex-linked genes. Methods: Neuropsychological evaluation of general cognitive…

  11. Non-histone chromosomal proteins HMG1 and 2 enhance ligation reaction of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaki, S; Yamamoto, M; Yumoto, Y; Shirakawa, H; Yoshida, M; Teraoka, H

    1998-05-08

    DNA ligase IV in a complex with XRCC4 is responsible for DNA end-joining in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and V(D)J recombination. We found that non-histone chromosomal high mobility group (HMG) proteins 1 and 2 enhanced the ligation of linearized pUC119 DNA with DNA ligase IV from rat liver nuclear extract. Intra-molecular and inter-molecular ligations of cohesive-ended and blunt-ended DNA were markedly stimulated by HMG1 and 2. Recombinant HMG2-domain A, B, and (A + B) polypeptides were similarly, but non-identically, effective for the stimulation of DSB ligation reaction. Ligation of single-strand breaks (nicks) was only slightly activated by the HMG proteins. The DNA end-binding Ku protein singly or in combination with the catalytic component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) as the DNA-PK holoenzyme was ineffective for the ligation of linearized pUC119 DNA. Although the stimulatory effect of HMG1 and 2 on ligation of DSB in vitro was not specific to DNA ligase IV, these results suggest that HMG1 and 2 are involved in the final ligation step in DNA end-joining processes of DSB repair and V(D)J recombination.

  12. Use of laser microdissection for the construction of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 (Cannabaceae sex chromosome-specific DNA library and cytogenetics analysis

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    Nickolay Yakovin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dioecy is relatively rare among plant species, and distinguishable sex chromosomes have been reported in few dioecious species. The multiple sex chromosome system (XX/XY1Y2 of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 differs from that of other members of the family Cannabaceae, in which the XX/XY chromosome system is present. Sex chromosomes of H. japonicus were isolated from meiotic chromosome spreads of males by laser microdissection with the P.A.L.M. MicroLaser system. The chromosomal DNA was directly amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR. Fast fluorescence in situ hybridization (FAST-FISH using a labeled, chromosome-specific DOP-PCR product as a probe showed preferential hybridization to sex chromosomes. In addition, the DOP-PCR product was used to construct a short-insert, H. japonicus sex chromosomes-specific DNA library. The randomly sequenced clones showed that about 12% of them have significant homology to H. lupulus and 88% to Cannabis sativa Linnaeus, 1753 sequences from GenBank database. Forty-four percent of the sequences show homology to plant retroelements. It was concluded that laser microdissection is a useful tool for isolating the DNA of sex chromosomes of H. japonicus and for the construction of chromosome-specific DNA libraries for the study of the structure and evolution of sex chromosomes. The results provide the potential for identifying unique or sex chromosome-specific sequence elements in H. japonicus and could aid in the identification of sex chromosome-specific repeat and coding regions through chromosome isolation and genome complexity reduction.

  13. Glutathione depletion and carbon ion radiation potentiate clustered DNA lesions, cell death and prevent chromosomal changes in cancer cells progeny.

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    Maïté Hanot

    Full Text Available Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape.This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and L-buthionine sulfoximine association combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61 displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable

  14. Glutathione depletion and carbon ion radiation potentiate clustered DNA lesions, cell death and prevent chromosomal changes in cancer cells progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanot, Maïté; Boivin, Anthony; Malésys, Céline; Beuve, Michaël; Colliaux, Anthony; Foray, Nicolas; Douki, Thierry; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape.This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and L-buthionine sulfoximine association) combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered) and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B) expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61) displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay) demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss) in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable advantage in the

  15. The origin of the extra chromosome 21 in Down syndrome. Studies of fluorescent variants and satelite association in 26 informative families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, A; Mikkelsen, M

    1978-01-01

    Studies of fluorescence and other chromosomal variants were informative in 26 out of 72 families. Maternal nondisjunction was found in 19 and paternal in 7 cases. Satellite association studies of these parents and 94 controls from the same age group showed a highly significant increase in the satellite association index (AI) for chromosome 21 in the parents where the nondisjunctional event had taken place. The AI was also higher for chromosome 14. In addition, the parents who produced the normal gametes had significantly higher AI's for some acrocentrics than the controls. Exogenous factors increasing satellite association cannot be ruled out. The number of 21-21 association was significantly increased in the parents with nondisjunction in meiosis 1. The results indicate that satellite association may play a role in the etiology of Down syndrome.

  16. Rapid detection of chromosome 18 copy number in buccal smears using DNA probes and FISH

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    Harris, C.; Nunez, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, WI (United States); Giraldez, R. [ONCOR, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Rapid diagnosis of trisomy 18 in newborns is often critical to clinical management decisions that must be made in a minimum of time. DNA probes combined with FISH can be used to accurately to determine the copy number of chromosome 18 in interphase cells. We have used the D18Z1 alpha satellite DNA probe to determine signal frequency in normal, previously karyotyped subjects, 12 females and 6 males. We also present one clinical case of trisomy 18, confirmed by karyotype, for comparison to the results obtained from normal subjects. Buccal smears, unlike cytogenetic preparations from peripheral blood, are quite resistant to penetration of probes and detection reagents resulting in higher levels of false monosomy. We have studied 19 individuals and have obtained consistent FISH results, ranging from 64 to 90% disomy. False monosomy rates ranged from 10 to 36%, while false trisomy or tetrasomy was less than 1% in all samples. High rates of false monosomy make this test questionable for detection of low order mosaicism for monosomy, but the extremely low false hyperploidy rate suggests that this is a dependable procedure for detection of trisomy 18, enabling the use of buccal epithelium which can be collected easily from even premature and tiny infants.

  17. Detection of obesity QTLs on mouse chromosomes 1 and 7 by selective DNA pooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, B.A.; Phillips, S.J. [Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States)

    1996-06-15

    The inheritance of obesity has been analyzed in an intercross between the lean 129/Sv mouse strain and the obesity-prone EL/Suz mouse strain. The weights of three major fat pads were determined on 4-month-old mice, and the sum of these weights, divided by body weight, was used as an adiposity index. The strategy of selective DNA pooling was used as a primary screen to identify putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting adiposity index. DNA pools representing the leanest 15% and fattest 15% of the F2 progeny were compared for differential allelic enrichment using widely dispersed microsatellite variants. To evaluate putative QTLs, individual genotyping and interval mapping were employed to estimate QTL effects and assess statistical significance. One QTL affecting adiposity index, which accounted for 12.3% of phenotypic variance in gender-merged data, was mapped to the central region of Chromosome (Chr) 7. The QTL allele inherited from EL conferred increased adiposity. A second QTL that accounts for 6.3% of phenotypic variance was identified on Chr 1 near D1Mitt211. At both QTLs, the data are consistent with dominant inheritance of the allele contributing to obesity. The possible relationships between these QTLs and previously described obesity QYLs, major obesity mutations, and candidate genes are discussed. 42 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Heritable alteration of DNA methylation induced by whole-chromosome aneuploidy in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lihong; Diarso, Moussa; Zhang, Ai; Zhang, Huakun; Dong, Yuzhu; Liu, Lixia; Lv, Zhenling; Liu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy causes changes in gene expression and phenotypes in all organisms studied. A previous study in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana showed that aneuploidy-generated phenotypic changes can be inherited to euploid progenies and implicated an epigenetic underpinning of the heritable variations. Based on an analysis by amplified fragment length polymorphism and methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, we found that although genetic changes at the nucleotide sequence level were negligible, extensive changes in cytosine DNA methylation patterns occurred in all studied homeologous group 1 whole-chromosome aneuploid lines of common wheat (Triticum aestivum), with monosomic 1A showing the greatest amount of methylation changes. The changed methylation patterns were inherited by euploid progenies derived from the aneuploid parents. The aneuploidy-induced DNA methylation alterations and their heritability were verified at selected loci by bisulfite sequencing. Our data have provided empirical evidence supporting earlier suggestions that heritability of aneuploidy-generated, but aneuploidy-independent, phenotypic variations may have an epigenetic basis. That at least one type of aneuploidy - monosomic 1A - was able to cause significant epigenetic divergence of the aneuploid plants and their euploid progenies also lends support to recent suggestions that aneuploidy may have played an important and protracted role in polyploid genome evolution.

  19. Patterns of rDNA chromosomal localization in Palearctic Cephalota and Cylindera (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindelini with different numbers of X-chromosomes

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    Sonia J. R. Proença

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The ribosomal clusters of six Paleartic taxa belonging to the tiger beetle genera Cephalota Dokhtourow, 1883 and Cylindera Westwood, 1831, with multiple sex chromosomes (XXY, XXXY and XXXXY have been localised on mitotic and meiotic cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, using a PCR-amplified 18S rDNA fragment as a probe. Four patterns of rDNA localization in these tiger beetles were found: 1. Two clusters located in one autosomal pair; 2. Two clusters located in one autosomal pair and one in an X chromosome; 3. Three clusters located in three heterosomes (XXY; 4. Two clusters located in one autosomal pair and two in the heterosomes (one of the Xs and the Y. These results illustrate that ribosomal cistrons have changed their number and localization during the evolution of these genera, showing a dynamic rather than a conservative pattern. These changes in rDNA localization are uncoupled with changes in the number of autosomes and/or heterosomes. A mechanism that involves transposable elements that carry ribosomal cistrons appears to be the most plausible explanation for these dynamics that involve jumping from one location in the genome to another, in some cases leaving copies in the original location.

  20. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  1. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for radiation molecular cytogenetics

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    Repin Mikhail V

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this work is to obtain the correct relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for the use at FISH analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Results The relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the male and female human diploid genomes have been calculated from the publicly available international Human Genome Project data. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of human chromosomes were compared with the data recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2001. The differences in the values of the relative DNA contents of chromosomes obtained by using different approaches for 15 human chromosomes, mainly for large chromosomes, were below 2%. For the chromosomes 13, 17, 20 and 22 the differences were above 5%. Conclusion New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes were obtained. This approach, based on the genome sequence, can be recommended for the use in radiation molecular cytogenetics.

  2. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haishan; Luo, Xuan; You, Weiwei; Dong, Yunwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82%) and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14%) and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%). The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA)3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies.

  3. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haishan Wang

    Full Text Available We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82% and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14% and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%. The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies.

  4. Characterization of a new aberration of the human Y chromosome by banding methods and DNA restriction endonuclease analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Gall, H; Schempp, W; Weber, L; Schmidtke, J

    1981-01-01

    Comparative cytogenetic analyses were performed with ten different banding methods on a previously undescribed, inherited structural aberration of a Y chromosome, and the results compared with those of normal Y chromosomes occurring in the same family. The value of the individual staining techniques in investigations of Y chromosomal aberrations is emphasized. The aberrant Y chromosome analyzed can be formally derived from an isodicentric Y chromosome for the short arm with a very terminal long-arm breakpoint, in which the centromere, an entire short arm, and the proximal region on one long arm was lost. This interpretation was confirmed by determining the amount of the two Y-specific DNA sequences (2.1 and 3.4 kb in length) by means of Hae III restriction endonuclease analysis. The karyotype-phenotype correlations in the men with this aberrant Y chromosome, especially the fertility dysfunctions (oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, cryptozoospermia), are discussed. The possibility of the existence of fertility factors involved in the control of spermatogenesis within the quinacrine-bright heterochromatic region of the Y long arm is presented.

  5. Break-seq reveals hydroxyurea-induced chromosome fragility as a result of unscheduled conflict between DNA replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A; McCulley, Andrew; Haarer, Brian; Arnak, Remigiusz; Feng, Wenyi

    2015-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication, checkpoint inactivation via a mec1 mutation leads to chromosome breakage at replication forks initiated from virtually all origins after transient exposure to hydroxyurea (HU), an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase. Here we sought to determine whether all replication forks containing single-stranded DNA gaps have equal probability of producing double-strand breaks (DSBs) when cells attempt to recover from HU exposure. We devised a new methodology, Break-seq, that combines our previously described DSB labeling with next generation sequencing to map chromosome breaks with improved sensitivity and resolution. We show that DSBs preferentially occur at genes transcriptionally induced by HU. Notably, different subsets of the HU-induced genes produced DSBs in MEC1 and mec1 cells as replication forks traversed a greater distance in MEC1 cells than in mec1 cells during recovery from HU. Specifically, while MEC1 cells exhibited chromosome breakage at stress-response transcription factors, mec1 cells predominantly suffered chromosome breakage at transporter genes, many of which are the substrates of those transcription factors. We propose that HU-induced chromosome fragility arises at higher frequency near HU-induced genes as a result of destabilized replication forks encountering transcription factor binding and/or the act of transcription. We further propose that replication inhibitors can induce unscheduled encounters between replication and transcription and give rise to distinct patterns of chromosome fragile sites.

  6. Tissue-specific variation in DNA methylation levels along human chromosome 1

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    De Bustos Cecilia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification important for regulating gene expression and suppressing spurious transcription. Most methods to scan the genome in different tissues for differentially methylated sites have focused on the methylation of CpGs in CpG islands, which are concentrations of CpGs often associated with gene promoters. Results Here, we use a methylation profiling strategy that is predominantly responsive to methylation differences outside of CpG islands. The method compares the yield from two samples of size-selected fragments generated by a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme. We then profile nine different normal tissues from two human donors relative to spleen using a custom array of genomic clones covering the euchromatic portion of human chromosome 1 and representing 8% of the human genome. We observe gross regional differences in methylation states across chromosome 1 between tissues from the same individual, with the most striking differences detected in the comparison of cerebellum and spleen. Profiles of the same tissue from different donors are strikingly similar, as are the profiles of different lobes of the brain. Comparing our results with published gene expression levels, we find that clones exhibiting extreme ratios reflecting low relative methylation are statistically enriched for genes with high expression ratios, and vice versa, in most pairs of tissues examined. Conclusion The varied patterns of methylation differences detected between tissues by our methylation profiling method reinforce the potential functional significance of regional differences in methylation levels outside of CpG islands.

  7. Chromosomal DNA probes for the identification of asaccharolytic anaerobic pigmented bacterial rods from the oral cavity of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, D N; Bailey, G D; Bastin, D

    1992-06-01

    A dot-blot hybridisation assay using isolated high molecular weight DNA as whole chromosomal probes of the cat pigmented asaccharolytic Bacteroides/Porphyromonas species was used against both purified high molecular weight DNA and DNA released on membranes from whole cells for the identification of B. salivosus and for its differentiation from the other anaerobic species isolated from normal and diseased mouths of cats and horses. 32P-labelled probes were compared with digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled probes (Boehringer-Mannheim). The whole chromosomal probes were specific--differentiating B. salivosus from a variety of species (including members of the genera Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Prevotella) found in normal and abnormal mouths of cats and horses. Likewise, asaccharolytic black pigmented Group 2 strains were distinguishable from all strains tested. However, cat strains of P. gingivalis which show 68-76% DNA-DNA homology with human strain P. gingivalis ATCC 33277T, were not distinguishable from each other using either 32P-labelled or DIG-labelled probes. The minimum amount of pure Bacteroides DNA which could be detected by the 32P-labelled probe was 100-300 pg, while the amount of pure DNA detected by the DIG system was 1-3 mg after room temperature colour development for 1 h and 100-300 pg after 6 h colour development.

  8. Identification of two new repetitive elements and chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNA sequences in the fish Gymnothorax unicolor (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae

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    E. Coluccia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Muraenidae is a species-rich family, with relationships among genera and species and taxonomy that have not been completely clarified. Few cytogenetic studies have been conducted on this family, and all of them showed the same diploid chromosome number (2n=42 but with conspicuous karyotypic variation among species. The Mediterranean moray eel Gymnothorax unicolor was previously cytogenetically studied using classical techniques that allowed the characterization of its karyotype structure and the constitutive heterochromatin and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs distribution pattern. In the present study, we describe two new repetitive elements (called GuMboI and GuDdeI obtained from restricted genomic DNA of G. unicolor that were characterized by Southern blot and physically localized by in situ hybridization on metaphase chromosomes. As they are highly repetitive DNA sequences, they map in heterochromatic regions. However, while GuDdeI was localized in the centromeric regions, the GuMboI fraction was distributed on some centromeres and was co-localized with the nucleolus organizer region (NOR. Comparative analysis with other Mediterranean species such as Muraena helena pointed out that these DNA fractions are species-specific and could potentially be used for species discrimination. As a new contribution to the karyotype of this species, we found that the major ribosomal genes are localized on acrocentric chromosome 9 and that the telomeres of each chromosome are composed of a tandem repeat derived from a poly-TTAGGG DNA sequence, as it occurs in most vertebrate species. The results obtained add new information useful in comparative genomics at the chromosomal level and contribute to the cytogenetic knowledge regarding this fish family, which has not been extensively studied.

  9. Structure and evolution of the Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA of cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaar, Edward Louis Christian

    2004-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on the structure and evolution of the bovine Y-chromosome and the use of paternal markers in molecular diagnostics. The Y-chromosome has emerged together with the X-chromosome early during the evolution of the mammals by differentiation of a pair of a

  10. Structure and evolution of the Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA of cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaar, Edward Louis Christian

    2003-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on the structure and evolution of the bovine Y-chromosome and the use of paternal markers in molecular diagnostics. The Y-chromosome has emerged together with the X-chromosome early during the evolution of the mammals by differentiation of a pair of

  11. Comparative AFLP reveals paternal sex ratio chromosome specific DNA sequences in the parasitoid wasp Trichogramma kaykai

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, van J.J.F.A.; Hulst, van der R.G.M.; Pruijssers, A.; Verbaarschot, P.G.H.; Stouthamer, R.; Jong, de H.

    2009-01-01

    The parasitoid wasp Trichogramma kaykai with a haplo-diploid sex determination has a B chromosome called the paternal sex ratio (PSR) chromosome that confers paternal genome loss during early embryogenesis, resulting in male offspring. So far, it is not well known whether the PSR chromosome has uniq

  12. Differential genetic interactions between Sgs1, DNA-damage checkpoint components and DNA repair factors in the maintenance of chromosome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Lillian; Harris, Lorena; Viebranz, Emilie; Schmidt, Kristina H

    2011-10-31

    Genome instability is associated with human cancers and chromosome breakage syndromes, including Bloom's syndrome, caused by inactivation of BLM helicase. Numerous mutations that lead to genome instability are known, yet how they interact genetically is poorly understood. We show that spontaneous translocations that arise by nonallelic homologous recombination in DNA-damage-checkpoint-defective yeast lacking the BLM-related Sgs1 helicase (sgs1Δ mec3Δ) are inhibited if cells lack Mec1/ATR kinase. Tel1/ATM, in contrast, acts as a suppressor independently of Mec3 and Sgs1. Translocations are also inhibited in cells lacking Dun1 kinase, but not in cells defective in a parallel checkpoint branch defined by Chk1 kinase. While we had previously shown that RAD51 deletion did not inhibit translocation formation, RAD59 deletion led to inhibition comparable to the rad52Δ mutation. A candidate screen of other DNA metabolic factors identified Exo1 as a strong suppressor of chromosomal rearrangements in the sgs1Δ mutant, becoming even more important for chromosomal stability upon MEC3 deletion. We determined that the C-terminal third of Exo1, harboring mismatch repair protein binding sites and phosphorylation sites, is dispensable for Exo1's roles in chromosomal rearrangement suppression, mutation avoidance and resistance to DNA-damaging agents. Our findings suggest that translocations between related genes can form by Rad59-dependent, Rad51-independent homologous recombination, which is independently suppressed by Sgs1, Tel1, Mec3 and Exo1 but promoted by Dun1 and the telomerase-inhibitor Mec1. We propose a model for the functional interaction between mitotic recombination and the DNA-damage checkpoint in the suppression of chromosomal rearrangements in sgs1Δ cells.

  13. Structure, organization, and sequence of alpha satellite DNA from human chromosome 17: evidence for evolution by unequal crossing-over and an ancestral pentamer repeat shared with the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1986-09-01

    The centromeric regions of all human chromosomes are characterized by distinct subsets of a diverse tandemly repeated DNA family, alpha satellite. On human chromosome 17, the predominant form of alpha satellite is a 2.7-kilobase-pair higher-order repeat unit consisting of 16 alphoid monomers. We present the complete nucleotide sequence of the 16-monomer repeat, which is present in 500 to 1,000 copies per chromosome 17, as well as that of a less abundant 15-monomer repeat, also from chromosome 17. These repeat units were approximately 98% identical in sequence, differing by the exclusion of precisely 1 monomer from the 15-monomer repeat. Homologous unequal crossing-over is suggested as a probable mechanism by which the different repeat lengths on chromosome 17 were generated, and the putative site of such a recombination event is identified. The monomer organization of the chromosome 17 higher-order repeat unit is based, in part, on tandemly repeated pentamers. A similar pentameric suborganization has been previously demonstrated for alpha satellite of the human X chromosome. Despite the organizational similarities, substantial sequence divergence distinguishes these subsets. Hybridization experiments indicate that the chromosome 17 and X subsets are more similar to each other than to the subsets found on several other human chromosomes. We suggest that the chromosome 17 and X alpha satellite subsets may be related components of a larger alphoid subfamily which have evolved from a common ancestral repeat into the contemporary chromosome-specific subsets.

  14. A screen for suppressors of gross chromosomal rearrangements identifies a conserved role for PLP in preventing DNA lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Kanellis

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome instability is a hallmark of cancer cells. One class of genome aberrations prevalent in tumor cells is termed gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs. GCRs comprise chromosome translocations, amplifications, inversions, deletion of whole chromosome arms, and interstitial deletions. Here, we report the results of a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae aimed at identifying novel suppressors of GCR formation. The most potent novel GCR suppressor identified is BUD16, the gene coding for yeast pyridoxal kinase (Pdxk, a key enzyme in the metabolism of pyridoxal 5' phosphate (PLP, the biologically active form of vitamin B6. We show that Pdxk potently suppresses GCR events by curtailing the appearance of DNA lesions during the cell cycle. We also show that pharmacological inhibition of Pdxk in human cells leads to the production of DSBs and activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Finally, our evidence suggests that PLP deficiency threatens genome integrity, most likely via its role in dTMP biosynthesis, as Pdxk-deficient cells accumulate uracil in their nuclear DNA and are sensitive to inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase. Since Pdxk links diet to genome stability, our work supports the hypothesis that dietary micronutrients reduce cancer risk by curtailing the accumulation of DNA damage and suggests that micronutrient depletion could be part of a defense mechanism against hyperproliferation.

  15. An improved method for genomic DNA extraction from strawberry leaves Otimização de um método para extração de DNA genômico a partir de folhas de morangueiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinéia Ferreira Nunes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Several extraction methods of genomic DNA for identification and characterization of genetic diversity in different plant species are routinely applied during molecular analysis. However, the presence of undesirable compounds such as polyphenols and polysaccharides is one of the biggest problems faced during the isolation and purification of high quality DNA in plants. Therefore, achievement of fast and accurate methods for DNA extraction is crucial in order to produce pure samples. Leaves of strawberry genotypes (Fragaria ananassa have high contents of polysaccharides and polyphenols which increase the sample viscosity and decrease the DNA quality, interfering with the PCR performance. Thereby, in this study we evaluated the quality and amount of genomic DNA extracted from young leaves of strawberry after tissue lyophilization and maceration in presence of polivinilpirrolidone (PVP. The CTAB method was used as reference procedure and it was modified to improve the DNA extraction. The modifications consisted of tissue lyophilization overnight until it was completely freeze-dried and addition of PVP during the tissue maceration in liquid nitrogen. The results showed the efficiency and reliability of the modified method compared to the unmodified method, indicating that combination of lyophilization and PVP improve the quality and amount of the DNA extracted from strawberry leaves.Vários métodos de extração de DNA genômico para a identificação e caracterização da diversidade genética em diferentes espécies de plantas são rotineiramente aplicados durante a análise molecular. Entretanto, a presença de compostos indesejáveis, tais como polifenóis e polissacarídeos, é um dos maiores problemas que ocorrem durante o isolamento e purificação de DNA de alta qualidade em plantas. Dessa forma, o sucesso no desenvolvimento de métodos de extração de DNA rápidos e acurados é crucial para produzir amostras puras. Folhas de genótipos de

  16. Effects of dietary extra virgin olive oil and its fractions on antioxidant status and DNA damage in the heart of rats co-exposed to aluminum and acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Imen; Khemakhem, Mouna; Boudawara, Ons; Marrekchi, Rim; Jamoussi, Kamel; Ben Amar, Raja; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba; Grati Kamoun, Naziha

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress generated by an excessive production of free radicals has been linked to the development of several health problems such as cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the protective efficacy of Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) and its lipophilic fraction (OOLF) and hydrophilic fraction (OOHF) against the cardiotoxicity and DNA damage induced by co-exposure to aluminum (AlCl3) and acrylamide (ACR). Rats were divided into eight groups of six each: controls, AlCl3 (50 mg per kg body weight) administered via drinking water and ACR (20 mg per kg body weight) given by gavage, combined group plus EVOO (300 μl); combined group plus the hydrophilic fraction (1 ml); combined group plus the lipophilic fraction (300 μl); extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and its fractions were administered daily by gavage for 21 days. Three other groups, considered as positive controls, received either EVOO, OOLF or OOLH. Exposure of rats to both AlCl3 and ACR provoked oxidative stress objectified by an increase in MDA, AOPP and a decrease in GSH, NPSH and vitamin C levels. The activities of CAT, GPx and SOD were also decreased. EVOO and its OOLF fraction exhibited a pronounced enhancement of antioxidant status while a partial recovery in the antioxidant status was obtained with the OOHF fraction. Plasma LDH and CK activities, TC, LDL-C levels, TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios were increased, while HDL-C and TG decreased in rats treated with both AlCl3 and ACR. Co-administration of EVOO, OOLF or OOHF to treated rats restored cardiac biomarkers and lipid profile to near-normal values. Histological studies and DNA damage confirmed the biochemical parameters and the beneficial role of EVOO and its two fractions. Our results suggest that extra virgin olive oil and its two fractions can decrease the frequency of cardiac complications and genotoxicity.

  17. Genetic diversity within Streptococcus mutans evident from chromosomal DNA restriction fragment polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caufield, P W; Walker, T M

    1989-02-01

    Attempts to study the acquisition, transmission, and other aspects of the natural history of Streptococcus mutans infections in humans have been hampered by limitations and inconsistencies in methods by which phenotypic characteristics of individual isolates are examined. Because most mutans streptococci associated with human dental caries fall within the biotype I (serotypes c and f) grouping, designated S. mutans, these typing methods are of little value in distinguishing individual isolates. Here we show that strains of S. mutans obtained from over 30 individuals demonstrate unique "fingerprints" of chromosomal DNA digested with restriction endonuclease HaeIII. To demonstrate that this polymorphism in restriction fragments can be used to study the acquisition and transmission of this organism, we examined isolates of S. mutans from three mother-infant pairs obtained at the time the infant first became colonized by this organism. Results indicate that strains of S. mutans found in infants exhibit restriction fragment profiles identical to those of their mothers, strongly supporting the notion that mothers transmit this organism to their infants. Also, we show that strains of S. mutans with the same restriction fragment profile were stably maintained over a 3-year interval in the one mother-infant pair studied. Moreover, we found that mothers and their infants harbored only a few individual strains, suggesting that transmission of this organism is probably confined within discrete family cohorts. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential utility of genomic fingerprinting in studying the natural history of S. mutans infections in humans.

  18. cDNA cloning, chromosome mapping and expression characterization of human geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) mainly participates in post-translational modification for various proteins including Rho/Rac, Rap and Rab families, as well as in regulation for cell apoptosis. Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase (GGPPS), which catalyzes the condensation reaction between farnesyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate, is the key enzyme for synthesizing GGPP. We report the isolation of a gene transcript showing high homology with Drosophila GGPPS cDNA. The transcript is 1 466 bp in length and contains an intact open reading frame (ORF) ranging from nt 239 to 1 138. This ORF encodes a deduced protein of 300 residues with calculated molecular weight of 35 ku. The deduced protein shows 57.5% identity and 75% similarity with Drosophila GGPPS, and contains five characteristic domains of prenyltransferases. Northern hybridization revealed that human GGPPS was expressed highest in heart, and moderately in spleen, testis, brain, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney and pancreas. No obvious bands were detected in other examined tissues. The GGPPS gene was located on human chromosome 1q43 by Radiation Hybrid mapping method. It was proved that there was a putative predisposing gene for prostate cancer in this region, and that analogs of GGPP can inhibit the geranylgeranylation of p21rap protein in PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. These facts suggest that GGPPS may be one of the candidate genes for prostate cancer.

  19. Chromosomal assignment of human DNA fingerprint sequences by simultaneous hybridization to arbitrarily primed PCR products from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Jun; Sekiya, Takao [National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Navarro, J.M. [Burnham Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-15

    We have developed a technique for the simultaneous chromosomal assignment of multiple human DNA sequences from DNA fingerprints obtained by the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Radioactively labeled human AP-PCR products are hybridized to DNA fingerprints generated with the same arbitrary primer from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids after electroblotting to a nylong membrane. Human-specific hybridization bands in the human/rodent fingerprints unambiguously determine their chromosome of origin. We named this method simultaneous hybridization of arbitrarily primed PCR DNA fingerprinting products (SHARP). Using this approach, we determined the chromosomal origins of most major bands of human AP-PCR fingerprints obtained with two arbitrary primers. Altogether, the chromosomal localization of near 50 DNA fragments, comprehensive of all human chromosomes except chromosomes 21 and Y, was achieved in this simple manner. Chromosome assignment of fingerprint bands is essential for molecular karyotyping of cancer by AP-PCR DNA fingerprinting. The SHARP method provides a convenient and powerful tool for this purpose. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Potential use of buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of autosomal trisomy or chromosomal sex in newborn infants using DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, C.; Clark, K.; Lazarski, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Wilkerson, C. [Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Meisner, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)]|[Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Buccal smears from 3 women and 1 man were probed with alpha satellite DNA probes for chromosomes 8, 18, X, and Y. Buccal smears were also collected from an adolescent phenotypic female with uterine agenesis, as well as from newborn infants with suspected trisomy 18 and trisomy 21. The clinical cases were confirmed with conventional cytogenetic studies of peripheral lymphocytes. Overall probe efficiency at detecting expected chromosome number in interphase cells was found to be 71% {+-} 6.8%. Higher than expected n-1 signal numbers may be due to karyopyknotic intermediate epithelial cells present in all collected samples. Overall probe efficiency was found to be consistent using alpha satellite and cosmid probes, both of which accurately reflected the modal copy number of the target chromosomes. False trisomy was less than 1%. This study suggests DNA probes can be used in buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of trisomies and chromosomal sex in newborns, but because of high rates of false hydropoploid signals, probed buccal smear specimens may not be accurate at diagnosing mosaicism. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA Elements and Its Implications for the Chromosomal Evolution of Channid Fishes (Actinopterygii, Perciformes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Villa, Mateo Andres; de Oliveira, Ezequiel Aguiar; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Chaveerach, Arunrat

    2015-01-01

    Channid fishes, commonly referred to as “snakeheads”, are currently very important in Asian fishery and aquaculture due to the substantial decline in natural populations because of overexploitation. A large degree of chromosomal variation has been found in this family, mainly through the use of conventional cytogenetic investigations. In this study, we analyzed the karyotype structure and the distribution of 7 repetitive DNA sequences in several Channa species from different Thailand river basins. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosomal differentiation among species and populations to improve upon the knowledge of its biodiversity and evolutionary history. Rearrangements, such as pericentric inversions, fusions and polyploidization, appear to be important events during the karyotypic evolution of this genus, resulting in the chromosomal diversity observed among the distinct species and even among populations of the same species. In addition, such variability is also increased by the genomic dynamism of repetitive elements, particularly by the differential distribution and accumulation of rDNA sequences on chromosomes. This marked diversity is likely linked to the lifestyle of the snakehead fishes and their population fragmentation, as already identified for other fish species. The karyotypic features highlight the biodiversity of the channid fishes and justify a taxonomic revision of the genus Channa, as well as of the Channidae family as a whole, as some nominal species may actually constitute species complexes. PMID:26067030

  2. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA Elements and Its Implications for the Chromosomal Evolution of Channid Fishes (Actinopterygii, Perciformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Bello Cioffi

    Full Text Available Channid fishes, commonly referred to as "snakeheads", are currently very important in Asian fishery and aquaculture due to the substantial decline in natural populations because of overexploitation. A large degree of chromosomal variation has been found in this family, mainly through the use of conventional cytogenetic investigations. In this study, we analyzed the karyotype structure and the distribution of 7 repetitive DNA sequences in several Channa species from different Thailand river basins. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosomal differentiation among species and populations to improve upon the knowledge of its biodiversity and evolutionary history. Rearrangements, such as pericentric inversions, fusions and polyploidization, appear to be important events during the karyotypic evolution of this genus, resulting in the chromosomal diversity observed among the distinct species and even among populations of the same species. In addition, such variability is also increased by the genomic dynamism of repetitive elements, particularly by the differential distribution and accumulation of rDNA sequences on chromosomes. This marked diversity is likely linked to the lifestyle of the snakehead fishes and their population fragmentation, as already identified for other fish species. The karyotypic features highlight the biodiversity of the channid fishes and justify a taxonomic revision of the genus Channa, as well as of the Channidae family as a whole, as some nominal species may actually constitute species complexes.

  3. Detection of cryptic chromosomal abnormalities in unexplained mental retardation: A general strategy using hypervariable subtelomeric DNA polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkie, A.O.M.

    1993-09-01

    Given the availability of DNA from both parents, unusual segregation of hypervariable DNA polymorphisms (HVPs) in the offspring may be attributable to deletion, unbalanced chromosomal translocation, or uniparental disomy. The telomeric regions of chromosomes are rich in both genes and hypervariable minisatellite sequences and may also be particularly prone to cryptic breakage events. Here the author describes and analyzes a general approach to the detection of subtelomeric abnormalities and uniparental disomy in patients with unexplained mental retardation. With 29 available polymorphic systems, [approximately]50%-70% of these abnormalities could currently be detected. Development of subtelomeric HVPs physically localized with respect to their telomers should provide a valuable resource in routine diagnostics. 73 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Protocolo da extração de DNA de material parafinado para análise de microssatélites em leiomioma DNA extraction from paraffin material protocol in order to analyse microssatellites in uterine leiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericson Martins Nascimento

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available É apresentada a padronização de protocolo de extração de DNA de material parafinado para análise da instabilidade de microssatélites de genes relacionados ao leiomioma uterino, utilizando-se 30mg a 40mg de tecido retirado de blocos de parafina. Os blocos são desparafinizados por banhos de xilol a 65ºC, reidratados com soluções de concentrações decrescentes de ETOH e água deionizada. A extração de DNA é obtida através das etapas de lise celular, com solução Promega, digestão de proteínas por proteinase K, precipitação com proteínas com solução Promega e precipitação do DNA com ETOH 70% gelado e ressuspendido com solução Promega. Este protocolo resulta em um DNA viável para uso na reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR.The standardization of the protocol of the DNA extraction from paraffin material in order to analyze the instability of microsatellites in genes related to the uterine leiomyoma, using 30 to 40mg of tissue removed from paraffin blocks is presented. Desparaffin throught xilol baths to 65ºC, rehydrated with solutions of decreasing concentrations of ETOH and deionisation water. The extraction of DNA was obtained through the stages of cellular lysis, with Promega solution, digestion of proteins by Proteinase K, precipitation proteins with Promega solution and precipitation of DNA with ETOH 70% colded and ressuspended with Promega solution. This protocol results in a viable DNA to be use in the Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR.

  5. Differential chromosomal organization between Saguinus midas and Saguinus bicolor with accumulation of differences the repetitive sequence DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfaty, Dayane Martins Barbosa; Carvalho, Natália Dayane Moura; Gross, Maria Claudia; Gordo, Marcelo; Schneider, Carlos Henrique

    2017-06-20

    Saguinus is the largest and most complex genus of the subfamily Callitrichinae, with 23 species distributed from the south of Central America to the north of South America with Saguinus midas having the largest geographical distribution while Saguinus bicolor has a very restricted one, affected by the population expansion in the state of Amazonas. Considering the phylogenetic proximity of the two species along with evidence on the existence of hybrids between them, as well as cytogenetic studies on Saguinus describing a conserved karyotypic macrostructure, we carried out a physical mapping of DNA repeated sequences in the mitotic chromosome of both species, since these sequences are less susceptible to evolutionary pressure and possibly perform an important function in speciation. Both species presented 2n = 46 chromosomes; in S. midas, chromosome Y is the smallest. Multiple ribosomal sites occur in both species, but chromosome pairs three and four may be regarded as markers that differ the species when subjected to G banding and distribution of retroelement LINE 1, suggesting that it may be cytogenetic marker in which it can contribute to identification of first generation hybrids in contact zone. Saguinus bicolor also presented differences in the LINE 1 distribution pattern for sexual chromosome X in individuals from different urban fragments, probably due to geographical isolation. In this context, cytogenetic analyses reveal a differential genomic organization pattern between species S. midas and S. bicolor, in addition to indicating that individuals from different urban fragments have been accumulating differences because of the isolation between them.

  6. Human sulfotransferase SULT1C1: cDNA cloning, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Her, Chengtao; Weinshilboum, R.M. [Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States); Kaur, G.P. [Temple Univ. Medical School, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    We have isolated and sequenced a cDNA that encodes an apparent human orthologue of a rat sulfotransferase (ST) cDNA that has been referred to as {open_quotes}ST1C1{close_quotes} - although it was recently recommended that sulfotransferase proteins and cDNAs be abbreviated {open_quotes}SULT.{close_quotes} The new human cDNA was cloned from a fetal liver-spleen cDNA library and had an 888-bp open reading frame. The amino acid sequence of the protein encoded by the cDNA was 62% identical with that encoded by the rat ST1C1 cDNA and included signature sequences that are conserved in all cytosolic SULT enzymes. Dot blot analysis of mRNA from 50 human tissues indicated that the cDNA was expressed in adult human stomach, kidney, and thyroid, as well as fetal kidney and liver. Northern blot analyses demonstrated that the major SULT1C1 mRNA in those same tissues was 1.4 kb in length. We next determined the partial human SULT1C1 gene sequence for a portion of the 5{prime}-terminus of one intron. That sequence was used to design SULT1C1 gene-specific primers that were used to perform the PCR with DNA from human/rodent somatic cell hybrids to demonstrate that the gene was located on chromosome 2. PCR amplifications performed with human chromosome 2/rodent hybrid cell DNA as template sublocalized SULT1C1 to a region between bands 2q11.1 and 2q11.2. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Sequence information encoded in DNA that may influence long-range chromatin structure correlates with human chromosome functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi E Takasuka

    Full Text Available Little is known about the possible function of the bulk of the human genome. We have recently shown that long-range regular oscillation in the motif non-T, A/T, G (VWG existing at ten-nucleotide multiples influences large-scale nucleosome array formation. In this work, we have determined the locations of all 100 kb regions that are predicted to form distinctive chromatin structures throughout each human chromosome (except Y. Using these data, we found that a significantly greater fraction of 300 kb sequences lacked annotated transcripts in genomic DNA regions > or = 300 kb that contained nearly continuous chromatin organizing signals than in control regions. We also found a relationship between the meiotic recombination frequency and the presence of strong VWG chromatin organizing signals. Large (> or = 300 kb genomic DNA regions having low average recombination frequency are enriched in chromatin organizing signals. As additional controls, we show using chromosome 1 that the VWG motif signals are not enriched in randomly selected DNA regions having the mean size of the recombination coldspots, and that non-VWG motif sets do not generate signals that are enriched in recombination coldspots. We also show that tandemly repeated alpha satellite DNA contains strong VWG signals for the formation of distinctive nucleosome arrays, consistent with the low recombination activity of centromeres. Our correlations cannot be explained simply by variations in the GC content. Our findings suggest that a specific set of periodic DNA motifs encoded in genomic DNA, which provide signals for chromatin organization, influence human chromosome function.

  8. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA in Woodpeckers (Aves, Piciformes): Implications for Karyotype and ZW Sex Chromosome Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Thays Duarte; Kretschmer, Rafael; Bertocchi, Natasha Avila; Degrandi, Tiago Marafiga; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2017-01-01

    Birds are characterized by a low proportion of repetitive DNA in their genome when compared to other vertebrates. Among birds, species belonging to Piciformes order, such as woodpeckers, show a relatively higher amount of these sequences. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of different classes of repetitive DNA-including microsatellites, telomere sequences and 18S rDNA-in the karyotype of three Picidae species (Aves, Piciformes)-Colaptes melanochloros (2n = 84), Colaptes campestris (2n = 84) and Melanerpes candidus (2n = 64)-by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clusters of 18S rDNA were found in one microchromosome pair in each of the three species, coinciding to a region of (CGG)10 sequence accumulation. Interstitial telomeric sequences were found in some macrochromosomes pairs, indicating possible regions of fusions, which can be related to variation of diploid number in the family. Only one, from the 11 different microsatellite sequences used, did not produce any signals. Both species of genus Colaptes showed a similar distribution of microsatellite sequences, with some difference when compared to M. candidus. Microsatellites were found preferentially in the centromeric and telomeric regions of micro and macrochromosomes. However, some sequences produced patterns of interstitial bands in the Z chromosome, which corresponds to the largest element of the karyotype in all three species. This was not observed in the W chromosome of Colaptes melanochloros, which is heterochromatic in most of its length, but was not hybridized by any of the sequences used. These results highlight the importance of microsatellite sequences in differentiation of sex chromosomes, and the accumulation of these sequences is probably responsible for the enlargement of the Z chromosome.

  9. ParA2, a Vibrio cholerae chromosome partitioning protein, forms left-handed helical filaments on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Monica P; Galkin, Vitold E; Yu, Xiong; Stasiak, Alicja Z; Stasiak, Andrzej; Waldor, Matthew K; Egelman, Edward H

    2010-03-01

    Most bacterial chromosomes contain homologs of plasmid partitioning (par) loci. These loci encode ATPases called ParA that are thought to contribute to the mechanical force required for chromosome and plasmid segregation. In Vibrio cholerae, the chromosome II (chrII) par locus is essential for chrII segregation. Here, we found that purified ParA2 had ATPase activities comparable to other ParA homologs, but, unlike many other ParA homologs, did not form high molecular weight complexes in the presence of ATP alone. Instead, formation of high molecular weight ParA2 polymers required DNA. Electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction revealed that ParA2 formed bipolar helical filaments on double-stranded DNA in a sequence-independent manner. These filaments had a distinct change in pitch when ParA2 was polymerized in the presence of ATP versus in the absence of a nucleotide cofactor. Fitting a crystal structure of a ParA protein into our filament reconstruction showed how a dimer of ParA2 binds the DNA. The filaments formed with ATP are left-handed, but surprisingly these filaments exert no topological changes on the right-handed B-DNA to which they are bound. The stoichiometry of binding is one dimer for every eight base pairs, and this determines the geometry of the ParA2 filaments with 4.4 dimers per 120 A pitch left-handed turn. Our findings will be critical for understanding how ParA proteins function in plasmid and chromosome segregation.

  10. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Jyoti K; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid-the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication of Vibrio cholerae Chr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that promotes initiation by reducing

  11. Dietary unsaponifiable fraction of extra virgin olive oil supplementation attenuates lung injury and DNA damage of rats co-exposed to aluminum and acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Imen; Chaâbane, Mariem; Boudawara, Ons; Kamoun, Naziha Grati; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2016-10-01

    Aluminum chloride (AlCl3) and acrylamide (ACR) are well known as environmental pollutants inducing oxidative stress. Our study investigated the effects of these contaminants and if the hydrophilic fraction of extra virgin olive oil was able to prevent lung oxidative stress and DNA damage. Animals were divided into four groups of six each: group 1, serving as controls, received distilled water; group 2 received in drinking water aluminum chloride (50 mg/ kg body weight) and by gavage acrylamide (20 mg/kg body weight); group 3 received both aluminum and acrylamide in the same way and the same dose as group 2 and hydrophilic fraction from olive oil (OOHF) (1 ml) by gavage; group 4 received only OOHF by gavage. Exposure of rats to both aluminum and acrylamide provoked oxidative stress in lung tissue based on biochemical parameters and histopathological alterations. In fact, we have observed an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA), H2O2, and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) and a decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH), non-protein thiols (NPSH), and vitamin C levels. Activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were also decreased. Histopathological changes in lung tissue were noted like emphysema, vascular congestion, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. A random DNA degradation was observed on agarose gel in the lung of AlCl3 and acrylamide (ACR)-treated rats. Co-administration of OOHF to treated rats improved biochemical parameters to near control values and lung histoarchitecture. The smear formation of genomic DNA was reduced. The hydrophilic fraction of extra virgin olive oil might provide a basis for developing a new dietary supplementation strategy in order to prevent lung tissue damage.

  12. Charge conduction properties of a parallel-stranded DNA G-quadruplex: implications for chromosomal oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu Chuan; Cheng, Alan K H; Yu, Hua-Zhong; Sen, Dipankar

    2009-07-28

    The charge-flow properties and concomitant guanine damage patterns of a number of intermolecular and wholly parallel-stranded DNA G-quadruplexes were investigated. The DNA constructs were structurally well-defined and consisted of the G-quadruplex sandwiched and stacked between two Watson-Crick base-paired duplexes. Such duplex-quadruplex-duplex constructs were designed to minimize torsional stress as well as steric crowding at the duplex-quadruplex junctions. When anthraquinone was used to induce charge flow within the constructs, it was found that the quadruplex served both as a sink and as a moderately good conductor of electron holes, relative to DNA duplexes. Most strikingly, the quadruplex suffered very little charge-flow generated oxidative damage relative to guanines in the duplex regions and, indeed, to guanines in antiparallel quadruplexes reported in prior studies. It is likely that these differences result from a combination of steric and electronic factors. A biological conclusion that may be drawn from these data is that if, as anticipated, G-quadruplex structures form in vivo at the telomeres and other loci in eukaryotic chromosomes, their ability to serve as protective sinks against chromosomal oxidative damage may depend on their specific character and topology. From a separate perspective, our results on the conduction properties of duplex-quadruplex-duplex DNA composites suggest the utility of G-quadruplexes as junction modules in the construction of DNA-based biosensors and nanocircuitry.

  13. Replication fork progression is paused in two large chromosomal zones flanking the DNA replication origin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Oshima, Taku; Chumsakul, Onuma; Ishikawa, Shu; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-08-01

    Although the speed of nascent DNA synthesis at individual replication forks is relatively uniform in bacterial cells, the dynamics of replication fork progression on the chromosome are hampered by a variety of natural impediments. Genome replication dynamics can be directly measured from an exponentially growing cell population by sequencing newly synthesized DNA strands that were specifically pulse-labeled with the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). However, a short pulse labeling with BrdU is impracticable for bacteria because of poor incorporation of BrdU into the cells, and thus, the genomewide dynamics of bacterial DNA replication remain undetermined. Using a new thymidine-requiring Escherichia coli strain, eCOMB, and high-throughput sequencing, we succeeded in determining the genomewide replication profile in bacterial cells. We also found that fork progression is paused in two ~200-kb chromosomal zones that flank the replication origin in the growing cells. This origin-proximal obstruction to fork progression was overcome by an increased thymidine concentration in the culture medium and enhanced by inhibition of transcription. These indicate that DNA replication near the origin is sensitive to the impediments to fork progression, namely a scarcity of the DNA precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate and probable conflicts between replication and transcription machineries.

  14. A comparison of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, DNA fragments and AAV-1 for targeted episomal and chromosomal gene repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclerc Xavier

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current strategies for gene therapy of inherited diseases consist in adding functional copies of the gene that is defective. An attractive alternative to these approaches would be to correct the endogenous mutated gene in the affected individual. This study presents a quantitative comparison of the repair efficiency using different forms of donor nucleic acids, including synthetic DNA oligonucleotides, double stranded DNA fragments with sizes ranging from 200 to 2200 bp and sequences carried by a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-1. Evaluation of each gene repair strategy was carried out using two different reporter systems, a mutated eGFP gene or a dual construct with a functional eGFP and an inactive luciferase gene, in several different cell systems. Gene targeting events were scored either following transient co-transfection of reporter plasmids and donor DNAs, or in a system where a reporter construct was stably integrated into the chromosome. Results In both episomal and chromosomal assays, DNA fragments were more efficient at gene repair than oligonucleotides or rAAV-1. Furthermore, the gene targeting frequency could be significantly increased by using DNA repair stimulating drugs such as doxorubicin and phleomycin. Conclusion Our results show that it is possible to obtain repair frequencies of 1% of the transfected cell population under optimized transfection protocols when cells were pretreated with phleomycin using rAAV-1 and dsDNA fragments.

  15. Chromosomal localization of a tandemly repeated DNA sequence in Trifilium repens L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUJM; NWELLISON; 等

    1996-01-01

    A karyotype of Trifolium repens constructed from mitotic cells revealed 13 pairs of metacentric and 3 pairs of submetacentric chromosomes including a pair of satellites located at the end of the short arm of chromosome 16.C-bands were identified around the centromeric regions of 8 pairs of chromosomes.A 350 bp tandemly repeated DNAsequence from T.repens labelled with digoxygenin hybridized to the proximal centromeric regions of 12 chromosome pairs.Some correlation between the distribution of the repeat sequence and the distribution of C-banding was demonstrated.

  16. The U2 snDNA Is a Useful Marker for B Chromosome Detection and Frequency Estimation in the Grasshopper Abracris flavolineata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Diogo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio M; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we describe a strategy to determine the presence of B chromosomes in the living grasshopper Abracris flavolineata by FISH using U2 snDNA as a probe in interphase hemolymph nuclei. In individuals without B chromosomes, (0B) 2 dot signals were noticed, corresponding to A complement U2 snDNA clusters. In +1B and +2B individuals, 4 or 8 additional signals were noticed, respectively. In all cases, the absence or presence of 1 or 2 B chromosomes correlated in hemolymph and in somatic or germline tissues, validating the efficiency of the marker. Our data suggest that the B chromosome of A. flavolineata is present in all somatic tissues. B-carrying individuals showed the same number of B chromosomes in germ and somatic cells, suggesting that the B is mitotically stable. The marker was used to compare B chromosome frequency in the analyzed population with a sample collected previously, in order to test for B frequency changes and differences of B chromosome prevalence among sexes, but no statistically significant differences were noticed. The identification of living animals harboring B chromosomes will be very useful in future studies of B chromosome transmission, as well as in functional studies involving RNA analysis, thus contributing to the understanding of evolutionary history and the possible role of the B chromosome in A. flavolineata. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Structural chromosome abnormalities, increased DNA strand breaks and DNA strand break repair deficiency in dermal fibroblasts from old female human donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Seggewiß, Sabine; Walter, Regina; Tigges, Julia; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bürkle, Alexander; Ohse, Sebastian; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Boege, Fritz

    2015-02-01

    Dermal fibroblasts provide a paradigmatic model of cellular adaptation to long-term exogenous stress and ageing processes driven thereby. Here we addressed whether fibroblast ageing analysedex vivo entails genome instability. Dermal fibroblasts from human female donors aged 20-67 years were studied in primary culture at low population doubling. Under these conditions, the incidence of replicative senescence and rates of age-correlated telomere shortening were insignificant. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed age-related impairment of mitosis, telomere and chromosome maintenance and induction of genes associated with DNA repair and non-homologous end-joining, most notably XRCC4 and ligase 4. We observed an age-correlated drop in proliferative capacity and age-correlated increases in heterochromatin marks, structural chromosome abnormalities (deletions, translocations and chromatid breaks), DNA strand breaks and histone H2AX-phosphorylation. In a third of the cells from old and middle-aged donors repair of X-ray induced DNA strand breaks was impaired despite up-regulation of DNA repair genes. The distinct phenotype of genome instability, increased heterochromatinisation and (in 30% of the cases futile) up-regulation of DNA repair genes was stably maintained over several cell passages indicating that it represents a feature of geroconversion that is distinct from cellular senescence, as it does not encompass a block of proliferation.

  18. Chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNAs in Gobionellus oceanicus and G. stomatus (Gobiidae; Perciformes): A shared XX/XY system and an unusual distribution of 5S rDNA sites on the Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Filho, Paulo A; Amorim, Karlla D J; Cioffi, Marcelo B; Bertollo, Luiz A C; Molina, Wagner F

    2014-01-01

    With nearly 2,000 species, Gobiidae is the most specious family of the vertebrates. This high level of speciation is accompanied by conspicuous karyotypic modifications, where the role of repetitive sequences remains largely unknown. This study analyzed the karyotype of 2 species of the genus Gobionellus and mapped 18S and 5S ribosomal RNA genes and (CA)15 microsatellite sequences onto their chromosomes. G. oceanicus (2n = 56; ♂ 12 metacentrics (m) + 4 submetacentrics (sm) + 1 subtelocentric (st) + 39 acrocentrics (a); ♀ 12m + 4sm + 2st + 38a) and G. stomatus (2n = 56; ♂ 20m + 14sm + 1st + 21a; ♀ 20m + 14sm + 2st + 20a) possess the highest diploid chromosome number among the Gobiidae and have different karyotypes. Both species share an XX/XY sex chromosome system with a large subtelocentric X and a small acrocentric Y chromosome which is rich in (CA)15 sequences and bears 5S rRNA sites. Although coding and noncoding repetitive DNA sequences may be involved in the genesis or differentiation of the sex chromosomes, the exclusive presence of 5S rDNA sites on the Y, but not on the X chromosome of both species, represents a novelty in fishes. In summary, the karyotypic differences, as well as new data on the sex chromosome systems in these 2 Gobiidae species, confirm the high chromosomal dynamism observed in this family.

  19. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyoyeon [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyeon, E-mail: jylee@kist.re.kr [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. - Highlights: • We prepared a probe linked between QD and telomeric oligonucleotide with platinum-guanine bonding. • Telomeres were detected by our new telomere probes successfully in three different human metaphase chromosomes. • QDPt-DNA probe has high fluorescence intensity in comparison with organic dye-DNA probe.

  20. SpoIIIE and a novel type of DNA translocase, SftA, couple chromosome segregation with cell division in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimer, Christine; González-Pastor, José Eduardo; Graumann, Peter L

    2009-11-01

    Cell division must only occur once daughter chromosomes have been fully separated. However, the initiating event of bacterial cell division, assembly of the FtsZ ring, occurs while chromosome segregation is still ongoing. We show that a two-step DNA translocase system exists in Bacillus subtilis that couples chromosome segregation and cell division. The membrane-bound DNA translocase SpoIIIE assembled very late at the division septum, and only upon entrapment of DNA, while its orthologue, SftA (YtpST), assembled at each septum in B. subtilis soon after FtsZ. Lack of SftA resulted in a moderate segregation defect at a late stage in the cell cycle. Like the loss of SpoIIIE, the absence of SftA was deleterious for the cells during conditions of defective chromosome segregation, or after induction of DNA damage. Lack of both proteins exacerbated all phenotypes. SftA forms soluble hexamers in solution, binds to DNA and has DNA-dependent ATPase activity, which is essential for its function in vivo. Our data suggest that SftA aids in moving DNA away from the closing septum, while SpoIIIE translocates septum-entrapped DNA only when septum closure precedes complete segregation of chromosomes.

  1. Studies on the integration of hepatitis B virusDNA sequence in human sperm chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-MinHUANG; Tian-HuaHUANG

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To study the integration of hepatitis Bvirus(HBV)DNAinto sperm chromosomes in hepatitsBpatients and the features of its integration.Methods:Sperm chromosomes of 14subjects(5healthy controls and9HBpatients,including1acute hepatitis B,2chronic active hepatitisB,4chronic persistent hepatitsB,2HBsAg chronic carriers with no clinical symptoms)were prepared using imterspecific in vitro fertilization between zona-free hamster oocytes and human spermatozoa.Fluosescence in situ hybridization(FISH)to sperm chromosome spreads was carried out with biotin-labeled full length HBVDNAprobe to detect the specificHBVDNA sequences in the sperm chromosomes.Results:Specific fluorescent signal spots for HBVDNAwere seen iv sperm chromosomes of one patient with chronic persistent hepatitisB.In9(9/42)sperm chromosome complements containing fluorescent signal spots,one presented5obvious FISHspots and the others2to4signals.The fluorescence intensity showed significant difference among the signal spots.The distribution of signal sites among chromosomes seems to be random.Con clusion:HBV could integrate into human sperm chromosomes.Results suggest that the possibility of vertical transmission of HBVvia the germ line tothe next generation is present.

  2. Intergenic DNA sequences from the human X chromosome reveal high rates of global gene flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Jeffrey D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive efforts devoted to collecting human polymorphism data, little is known about the role of gene flow in the ancestry of human populations. This is partly because most analyses have applied one of two simple models of population structure, the island model or the splitting model, which make unrealistic biological assumptions. Results Here, we analyze 98-kb of DNA sequence from 20 independently evolving intergenic regions on the X chromosome in a sample of 90 humans from six globally diverse populations. We employ an isolation-with-migration (IM model, which assumes that populations split and subsequently exchange migrants, to independently estimate effective population sizes and migration rates. While the maximum effective size of modern humans is estimated at ~10,000, individual populations vary substantially in size, with African populations tending to be larger (2,300–9,000 than non-African populations (300–3,300. We estimate mean rates of bidirectional gene flow at 4.8 × 10-4/generation. Bidirectional migration rates are ~5-fold higher among non-African populations (1.5 × 10-3 than among African populations (2.7 × 10-4. Interestingly, because effective sizes and migration rates are inversely related in African and non-African populations, population migration rates are similar within Africa and Eurasia (e.g., global mean Nm = 2.4. Conclusion We conclude that gene flow has played an important role in structuring global human populations and that migration rates should be incorporated as critical parameters in models of human demography.

  3. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish Squalius lucumonis and three other Italian leuciscines using chromosome banding and FISH with rDNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Anna Rita; Milana, Valentina; Hett, Anne Kathrin; Tancioni, Lorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Karyotype and other chromosomal characteristics of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish, Toscana stream chub Squalius lucumonis, were analysed using conventional banding and FISH with 45S and 5S rDNA probes. The diploid chromosome number (2n = 50) and karyotype characteristics including pericentromeric heterochromatic blocks and GC-rich CMA(3)-positive sites corresponding to both positive Ag-NORs and 45S rDNA loci on the short arms of a single medium-sized submetacentric chromosome pair were consistent with those found in most European leuciscine cyprinids. On other hand, 5S rDNA FISH in the Toscana stream chub and three other Italian leuciscines, S. squalus, Rutilus rubilio and Telestes muticellus, revealed a species-specific hybridization pattern, i.e. signals on four (S. lucumonis), three (S. squalus and R. rubilio) and two (T. muticellus) chromosome pairs. Whereas all the species shared the 5S rDNA loci on the largest subtelocentric chromosome pair, a "leuciscine" cytotaxonomic marker, S. lucumonis showed both classes of rDNA loci tandem aligned on the short arms of chromosome pair No. 12. The present findings suggest that the observed high variability of 5S rDNA loci provides a powerful tool for investigation of karyotype differentiation in karyologically conservative leuciscine fishes.

  4. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti K. Jha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2 depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid—the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.

  5. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA in the fish Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ricardo Vicari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We used differential staining techniques (BSG, GTG, AgNO3, DAPI and CMA3 banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with 5S and 18S probes to investigated the karyotypic and cytogenetic chracteristics of Prochilodus lineatus specimens from a population in Vila Velha state park (Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná state, southern Brazil. The specimens studied showed the same karyotype as that found in other P. lineatus populations, i.e. 2n = 54 biarmed chromosomes (40m + 14 sm and c-positive heterochromatin preferentially located pericentromerically in all chromosomes. The presence of partial or totally heterochromatic supernumerary chromosomes with numeric intra-individual variation was confirmed in the analyzed population. The nucleolar organizing regions (NORs were interstitially situated on the long arm of chromosome pair 4 directly beneath the centromere. The differential banding techniques and FISH revealed NOR size polymorphism due to structural events such as breaks and duplication of the larger rDNA site cluster. We also observed syntenic localization of the 5S ribosomal genes in the distal segment of the 45S cluster.

  6. Clinical utility of chromosomal microarray analysis of DNA from buccal cells: detection of mosaicism in three patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdano, Mallory R; Vanzo, Rena J; Martin, Megan M; Baldwin, Erin E; South, Sarah T; Rope, Alan F; Allen, William P; Kearney, Hutton

    2014-12-01

    Mosaic chromosomal abnormalities are relatively common. However, mosaicism may be missed due to multiple factors including failure to recognize clinical indications and order appropriate testing, technical limitations of diagnostic assays, or sampling tissue (s) in which mosaicism is either not present, or present at very low levels. Blood leukocytes have long been the "gold standard" sample for cytogenetic analysis; however, the culturing process for routine chromosome analysis can complicate detection of mosaicism since the normal cell line may have a growth advantage in culture, or may not be present in the cells that produce metaphases (the lymphocytes). Buccal cells are becoming increasingly utilized for clinical analyses and are proving to have many advantages. Buccal swabs allow for simple and noninvasive DNA collection. When coupled with a chromosomal microarray that contains single nucleotide polymorphic probes, analysis of buccal cells can maximize a clinician's opportunity to detect cytogenetic mosaicism. We present three cases of improved diagnosis of mosaic aberrations using buccal specimens for chromosomal microarray analysis. In each case, the aberration was either undetectable in blood or present at such a low level it likely could have gone undetected. These cases highlight the limitations of certain laboratory methodologies for identifying mosaicism. We also present practice implications for genetic counselors, including clinic workflow changes and counseling approaches based on increasing use of buccal samples.

  7. Localization of the human fibromodulin gene (FMOD) to chromosome 1q32 and completion of the cDNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the human fibromodulin cDNA and its use to map the gene. For somatic cell hybrids, the generation of the PCR product was concordant with the presence of chromosome 1 and discordant with the presence of all other chromosomes, confirming that the fibromodulin gene is located within region q32 of chromosome 1. The physical mapping of genes is a critical step in the process of identifying which genes may be responsible for various inherited disorders. Specifically, the mapping of the fibromodulin gene now provides the information necessary to evaluate its potential role in genetic disorders of connective tissues. The analysis of previously reported diseases mapped to chromosome 1 reveals two genes located in the proximity of the fibromodulin locus. These are Usher syndrome type II, a recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, and Van der Woude syndrome, a dominant condition associated with abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate and hyperdontia. The genes for both of these disorders have been projected to be localized to 1q32 of a physical map that integrates available genetic linkage and physical data. However, it seems improbable that either of these disorders, exhibiting restricted tissue involvement, could be linked to the fibromodulin gene, given the wide tissue distribution of the encoded proteoglycan, although it remains possible that the relative importance of the quantity and function of the proteoglycan may avry between tissues. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 2 in a patient with a DGUOK mutation associated with hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudry, Coralie; de Lonlay, Pascale; Malan, Valerie; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Assouline, Zahra; Pruvost, Solenn; Brassier, Anais; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Munnich, Arnold; Rötig, Agnès; Lebre, Anne-Sophie

    2012-12-01

    We report maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 2 (matUPD2) in a 9-month-old girl presenting with hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome. This patient was homozygous for the c.352C>T (p.Arg118Cys) mutation in DGUOK gene. The proband's mother was heterozygous for the mutation was absent in DNA of the father. For proband, the absence of paternal contribution at the DGUOK locus prompted us to exclude intragenic DGUOK deletion of the paternal allele with Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis. We also excluded non-paternity by studying various markers at different loci. Then we performed an analysis of copy number variations and absence of heterozygosity (AOH) on the proband DNA using high resolution oligonucleotides microarray. Several large regions of AOH with no copy number change were detected on chromosome 2 and one of these AOH regions encompassed DGUOK gene. These results were confirmed with haplotype analysis using polymorphic markers. Informative SNPs and microsatellites markers spanning the whole chromosome 2 showed a matUPD2 with heterodisomy and isodisomy regions, the absence of paternal allele and presence of two maternal alleles, with only one maternal allele on the region of DGUOK locus in 2p13.1. This is the first demonstration of matUPD2 with segmental isodisomy at 2p13.1 locus in hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome. The identification of UPD2 will impact genetic counseling for the proband's parents. Because the recurrence risk for UPD2 is very low, the risk for disease in further offspring for this couple is negligible.

  9. Chromosome mapping of 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA by dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization in the half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L; Jiang, J; Liu, J; Yuan, J; Chen, Y; Zhang, Q; Wang, X

    2014-12-18

    Half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) is an important aquaculture flatfish in China. Cytogenetic analysis has revealed that its sex determination system is female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW). The W chromosome is morphologically larger and has been considered evolutionarily younger than any other chromosome in the set. However, the genetic origin and evolution process of this neo-chromosome remains unclear. In this study, 2 tandem arrays of rRNA genes were chosen to address this question. Both the major rDNA (18S rDNA) and the minor rDNA (5S rDNA) were located on the C. semilaevis chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Six 18S rDNA signals were observed on the centromeric regions of 3 pairs of autosomes in both males and females. In females, there was an additional 18S rDNA signal mapping to the telomeric region of the W chromosome long arm. With respect to the 5S rDNA, 12 signals were mapped to the centromeric regions of six pairs of autosomes. Two-color FISH further confirmed that the two pairs of the 5S rDNA signals were correspondingly located at the same positions of the same autosomes as those of the 18S rDNA signals. These results allowed us to speculate about the evolution process of the W chromosome. Chromosome fusions and repetitive sequence accumulations might have occurred in C. semilaevis. The synteny and non-synteny of C. semilaevis 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA might imply the original and evolutionary characteristics of this species. These findings will facilitate studies on karyotype evolution of the order Pleuronectiformes.

  10. DNA double-strand breaks coupled with PARP1 and HNRNPA2B1 binding sites flank coordinately expressed domains in human chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolai A Tchurikov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome instability plays a key role in multiple biological processes and diseases, including cancer. Genome-wide mapping of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is important for understanding both chromosomal architecture and specific chromosomal regions at DSBs. We developed a method for precise genome-wide mapping of blunt-ended DSBs in human chromosomes, and observed non-random fragmentation and DSB hot spots. These hot spots are scattered along chromosomes and delimit protected 50-250 kb DNA domains. We found that about 30% of the domains (denoted forum domains possess coordinately expressed genes and that PARP1 and HNRNPA2B1 specifically bind DNA sequences at the forum domain termini. Thus, our data suggest a novel type of gene regulation: a coordinated transcription or silencing of gene clusters delimited by DSB hot spots as well as PARP1 and HNRNPa2B1 binding sites.

  11. An improved, non-isotopic method of screening cells from patients with abnormalities of sexual differentiation for Y chromosomal DNA content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, M; Michalczak, K; Latos-Bielenska, A; Jaruzelska, J; Kuczora, I; Lopez, M

    1993-04-01

    The detection of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism in patients with abnormalities of sexual differentiation is of crucial diagnostic importance. Here we present application of a PCR based method of detection of alphoid repeats of Y chromosomal origin. The method detects 0.01% of male DNA on a female DNA background. Out of 28 patients studied, in all cases where the Y chromosome or a part of it containing centromeric sequences was present, a positive amplification signal of Y chromosomal alphoid repeats was detected. In five cases the Y origin of marker chromosomes was diagnosed. The pattern of amplification signal distribution of the SRY gene was identical to that of Y specific alphoid primers, which confirms applicability of this method in the molecular diagnostic laboratory. The other diagnostic advantage is the ability to use dried blood specimens as an easy to handle and efficient source of DNA.

  12. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, John K.; Okely, Ewa A.; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K.; Leach, David R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  13. Isolation and mapping of a polymorphic DNA sequence (HBI18P1) on chromosome 11 (D11S147)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julier, C.; Nakamura, Y.; Lanthrop, G.M.; Lalouel, J.M.; White, R. (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City (USA))

    1989-11-25

    A 4.7 kb PstI fragment, isolated from cosmid HBI18, was subcloned. MspI identifies a 2 allele polymorphism with bands at 5.2 kb (M2) and 4.8 kb (M2). HBI18P1 polymorphic system is derived from the same cosmid as pHBI18P2. Both systems have been assigned to chromosome 11 by multilocus linkage analysis with markers known to map on this chromosome. Co-dominant segregation of the MspI RFLP has been observed in 41 three generation families. This probe may contain repetitive sequences, and should be used in the presence of an excess of total human DNA in the prehybridization and hybridization mixtures.

  14. DNA methylation signature in peripheral blood reveals distinct characteristics of human X chromosome numerical aberrations

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal sex chromosome numbers in humans are observed in Turner (45,X) and Klinefelter (47,XXY) syndromes. Both syndromes are associated with several clinical phenotypes, whose molecular mechanisms are obscure, and show a range of inter-individual penetrance. In order to understand the effect of abnormal numbers of X chromosome on the methylome and its correlation to the variable clinical phenotype, we performed a genome-wide methylation analysis using MeDIP and Illumina’s Infiniu...

  15. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA in Woodpeckers (Aves, Piciformes): Implications for Karyotype and ZW Sex Chromosome Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Rafael; Bertocchi, Natasha Avila; Degrandi, Tiago Marafiga; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Garnero, Analía del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2017-01-01

    Birds are characterized by a low proportion of repetitive DNA in their genome when compared to other vertebrates. Among birds, species belonging to Piciformes order, such as woodpeckers, show a relatively higher amount of these sequences. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of different classes of repetitive DNA—including microsatellites, telomere sequences and 18S rDNA—in the karyotype of three Picidae species (Aves, Piciformes)—Colaptes melanochloros (2n = 84), Colaptes campestris (2n = 84) and Melanerpes candidus (2n = 64)–by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clusters of 18S rDNA were found in one microchromosome pair in each of the three species, coinciding to a region of (CGG)10 sequence accumulation. Interstitial telomeric sequences were found in some macrochromosomes pairs, indicating possible regions of fusions, which can be related to variation of diploid number in the family. Only one, from the 11 different microsatellite sequences used, did not produce any signals. Both species of genus Colaptes showed a similar distribution of microsatellite sequences, with some difference when compared to M. candidus. Microsatellites were found preferentially in the centromeric and telomeric regions of micro and macrochromosomes. However, some sequences produced patterns of interstitial bands in the Z chromosome, which corresponds to the largest element of the karyotype in all three species. This was not observed in the W chromosome of Colaptes melanochloros, which is heterochromatic in most of its length, but was not hybridized by any of the sequences used. These results highlight the importance of microsatellite sequences in differentiation of sex chromosomes, and the accumulation of these sequences is probably responsible for the enlargement of the Z chromosome. PMID:28081238

  16. Identification of 2nd chromosome region translocated onto the W chromosome by RFLP with EST-cDNA clones in the Gensei-kouken strains of the mulberry silkworm, Bombyx mori L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaramakurup Sreekumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In silkworms, sex-limited strains are either obtained spontaneously or induced by X-rays or gamma rays. When a fragment of an autosome carrying a dominant allele of those genes responsible for certain characters is translocated onto a W chromosome, the female of the successive generations will express these phenotypic characters and sex discrimination can be facilitated. Gensei-kouken strains are sex-limited strains of silkworms developed by irradiating the pupae with gamma rays, by which a portion of the second chromosome is translocated onto the W chromosome. In these improved strains, the females are yellow-blooded and spin yellow cocoons. By using the EST-cDNA clones mapped on the Z chromosome, we identified the sex according to the polymorphic banding pattern or intensity of the signals. Furthermore, by using the clones on the second chromosome, the region of the second chromosome translocated onto the W chromosome was also defined. In both the A95 and A 96 strains selected for the present study, only the mid-portion of the second chromosome was translocated. The differences in length of the fragments translocated in these strains are discussed.

  17. Micro RNAs and DNA methylation are regulatory players in human cells with altered X chromosome to autosome balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpathak, Shriram N.; Deobagkar, Deepti D.

    2017-01-01

    The gene balance hypothesis predicts that an imbalance in the dosage sensitive genes affects the cascade of gene networks that may influence the fitness of individuals. The phenotypes associated with chromosomal aneuploidies demonstrate the importance of gene dosage balance. We have employed untransformed human fibroblast cells with different number of X chromosomes to assess the expression of miRNAs and autosomal genes in addition to the DNA methylation status. High throughput NGS analysis using illumina Next seq500 has detected several autosomal as well as X linked miRNAs as differentially expressed in X monosomy and trisomy cells. Two of these miRNAs (hsa-miR-125a-5p and 335-5p) are likely to be involved in regulation of the autosomal gene expression. Additionally, our data demonstrates altered expression and DNA methylation signatures of autosomal genes in X monosomy and trisomy cells. In addition to miRNAs, expression of DNMT1 which is an important epigenetic player involved in many processes including cancer, is seen to be altered. Overall, present study provides a proof for regulatory roles of micro RNAs and DNA methylation in human X aneuploidy cells opening up possible new ways for designing therapeutic strategies. PMID:28233878

  18. Chromosomal Locations of 5S and 45S rDNA in Gossypium Genus and Its Phylogenetic Implications Revealed by FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yimei; Liu, Fang; Chen, Dan; Wu, Qiong; Qin, Qin; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the locations of 5S and 45S rDNA in Gossypium diploid A, B, D, E, F, G genomes and tetraploid genome (AD) using multi-probe fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for evolution analysis in Gossypium genus. The rDNA numbers and sizes, and synteny relationships between 5S and 45S were revealed using 5S and 45S as double-probe for all species, and the rDNA-bearing chromosomes were identified for A, D and AD genomes with one more probe that is single-chromosome-specific BAC clone from G. hirsutum (A1D1). Two to four 45S and one 5S loci were found in diploid-species except two 5S loci in G. incanum (E4), the same as that in tetraploid species. The 45S on the 7th and 9th chromosomes and the 5S on the 9th chromosomes seemed to be conserved in A, D and AD genomes. In the species of B, E, F and G genomes, the rDNA numbers, sizes, and synteny relationships were first reported in this paper. The rDNA pattern agrees with previously reported phylogenetic history with some disagreements. Combined with the whole-genome sequencing data from G. raimondii (D5) and the conserved cotton karyotype, it is suggested that the expansion, decrease and transposition of rDNA other than chromosome rearrangements might occur during the Gossypium evolution.

  19. Contrasting patterns of Y chromosome and mtDNA variation in Africa: evidence for sex-biased demographic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Elizabeth T; Stover, Daryn A; Ehret, Christopher; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Spedini, Gabriella; McLeod, Howard; Louie, Leslie; Bamshad, Mike; Strassmann, Beverly I; Soodyall, Himla; Hammer, Michael F

    2005-07-01

    To investigate associations between genetic, linguistic, and geographic variation in Africa, we type 50 Y chromosome SNPs in 1122 individuals from 40 populations representing African geographic and linguistic diversity. We compare these patterns of variation with those that emerge from a similar analysis of published mtDNA HVS1 sequences from 1918 individuals from 39 African populations. For the Y chromosome, Mantel tests reveal a strong partial correlation between genetic and linguistic distances (r=0.33, P=0.001) and no correlation between genetic and geographic distances (r=-0.08, P>0.10). In contrast, mtDNA variation is weakly correlated with both language (r=0.16, P=0.046) and geography (r=0.17, P=0.035). AMOVA indicates that the amount of paternal among-group variation is much higher when populations are grouped by linguistics (Phi(CT)=0.21) than by geography (Phi(CT)=0.06). Levels of maternal genetic among-group variation are low for both linguistics and geography (Phi(CT)=0.03 and 0.04, respectively). When Bantu speakers are removed from these analyses, the correlation with linguistic variation disappears for the Y chromosome and strengthens for mtDNA. These data suggest that patterns of differentiation and gene flow in Africa have differed for men and women in the recent evolutionary past. We infer that sex-biased rates of admixture and/or language borrowing between expanding Bantu farmers and local hunter-gatherers played an important role in influencing patterns of genetic variation during the spread of African agriculture in the last 4000 years.

  20. Bub3-BubR1-dependent sequestration of Cdc20Fizzy at DNA breaks facilitates the correct segregation of broken chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derive, Nicolas; Landmann, Cedric; Montembault, Emilie; Claverie, Marie-Charlotte; Pierre-Elies, Priscillia; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Founounou, Nabila; McCusker, Derek; Royou, Anne

    2015-11-09

    The presence of DNA double-strand breaks during mitosis is particularly challenging for the cell, as it produces broken chromosomes lacking a centromere. This situation can cause genomic instability resulting from improper segregation of the broken fragments into daughter cells. We recently uncovered a process by which broken chromosomes are faithfully transmitted via the BubR1-dependent tethering of the two broken chromosome ends. However, the mechanisms underlying BubR1 recruitment and function on broken chromosomes were largely unknown. We show that BubR1 requires interaction with Bub3 to localize on the broken chromosome fragments and to mediate their proper segregation. We also find that Cdc20, a cofactor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), accumulates on DNA breaks in a BubR1 KEN box-dependent manner. A biosensor for APC/C activity demonstrates a BubR1-dependent local inhibition of APC/C around the segregating broken chromosome. We therefore propose that the Bub3-BubR1 complex on broken DNA inhibits the APC/C locally via the sequestration of Cdc20, thus promoting proper transmission of broken chromosomes.

  1. On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola

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    Beleza Sandra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current information about the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples is hampered by the scarcity of genetic data from well identified populations from southern Africa. Here, we fill an important gap in the analysis of the western edge of the Bantu migrations by studying for the first time the patterns of Y-chromosome, mtDNA and lactase persistence genetic variation in four representative groups living around the Namib Desert in southwestern Angola (Ovimbundu, Ganguela, Nyaneka-Nkumbi and Kuvale. We assessed the differentiation between these populations and their levels of admixture with Khoe-San groups, and examined their relationship with other sub-Saharan populations. We further combined our dataset with previously published data on Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation to explore a general isolation with migration model and infer the demographic parameters underlying current genetic diversity in Bantu populations. Results Correspondence analysis, lineage sharing patterns and admixture estimates indicate that the gene pool from southwestern Angola is predominantly derived from West-Central Africa. The pastoralist Herero-speaking Kuvale people were additionally characterized by relatively high frequencies of Y-chromosome (12% and mtDNA (22% Khoe-San lineages, as well as by the presence of the -14010C lactase persistence mutation (6%, which likely originated in non-Bantu pastoralists from East Africa. Inferred demographic parameters show that both male and female populations underwent significant size growth after the split between the western and eastern branches of Bantu expansions occurring 4000 years ago. However, males had lower population sizes and migration rates than females throughout the Bantu dispersals. Conclusion Genetic variation in southwestern Angola essentially results from the encounter of an offshoot of West-Central Africa with autochthonous Khoisan-speaking peoples from the south. Interactions between the Bantus

  2. Co-located 18S/5S rDNA arrays: an ancient and unusual chromosomal trait in Julidini species (Labridae, Perciformes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Karlla Danielle Jorge; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Soares, Rodrigo Xavier; de Souza, Allyson Santos; da Costa, Gideão Wagner Werneck Felix; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wrasses (Labridae) are extremely diversified marine fishes, whose species exhibit complex interactions with the reef environment. They are widely distributed in the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Their species have displayed a number of karyotypic divergent processes, including chromosomal regions with complex structural organization. Current cytogenetic information for this family is phylogenetically and geographically limited and mainly based on conventional cytogenetic techniques. Here, the distribution patterns of heterochromatin, GC-specific chromosome regions and Ag-NORs, and the organization of 18S and 5S rDNA sites of the Atlantic species Thalassoma noronhanum (Boulenger, 1890), Halichoeres poeyi (Steindachner, 1867), Halichoeres radiatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Halichoeres brasiliensis (Bloch, 1791) and Halichoeres penrosei Starks, 1913, belonging to the tribe Julidini were analyzed. All the species exhibited 2n=48 chromosomes with variation in the number of chromosome arms among genera. Thalassoma noronhanum has 2m+46a, while species of the genus Halichoeres Rüppell, 1835 share karyotypes with 48 acrocentric chromosomes. The Halichoeres species exhibit differences in the heterochromatin distribution patterns and in the number and distribution of 18S and 5S rDNA sites. The occurrence of 18S/5S rDNA syntenic arrangements in all the species indicates a functionally stable and adaptive genomic organization. The phylogenetic sharing of this rDNA organization highlights a marked and unusual chromosomal singularity inside the family Labridae. PMID:28123678

  3. Genetic polymorphisms in XRCC1, OGG1, APE1 and XRCC3 DNA repair genes, ionizing radiation exposure and chromosomal DNA damage in interventional cardiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Foffa, Ilenia [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Sant' Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa (Italy); Manfredi, Samantha; Botto, Nicoletta [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Cioppa, Angelo [Clinica Cardiologica ' Montevergine' , Mercogliano (Italy); Picano, Eugenio [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Clinica Cardiologica ' Montevergine' , Mercogliano (Italy)

    2009-06-18

    Interventional cardiologists working in high-volume cardiac catheterization laboratory are exposed to significant occupational radiation risks. Common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes are thought to modify the effects of low-dose radiation exposure on DNA damage, the main initiating event in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between XRCC1 (Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln), OGG1 (Ser326Cys), APE1 (Asp148Glu) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) SNPs and chromosomal DNA damage. We enrolled 77 subjects: 40 interventional cardiologists (27 male, 41.3 {+-} 9.4 years and 13 female, 37.8 {+-} 8.4 years) and 37 clinical cardiologists (26 male, 39.4 {+-} 9.5 years and 11 female, 35.0 {+-} 9.8 years) without radiation exposure as the control group. Micronucleus (MN) assay was performed as biomarker of chromosomal DNA damage and an early predictor of cancer. MN frequency was significantly higher in interventional cardiologists than in clinical physicians (19.7 {+-} 7.8 per mille vs. 13.5 {+-} 6.3 per mille , p = 0.0003). Within the exposed group, individuals carrying a XRCC3 Met241 allele had higher frequency than homozygous XRCC3 Thr241 (21.2 {+-} 7.8 per mille vs. 16.6 {+-} 7.1 per mille , p = 0.03). Individuals with two or more risk alleles showed a higher MN frequency when compared to subjects with one or no risk allele (18.4 {+-} 6.6 per mille vs. 14.4 {+-} 6.1 per mille , p = 0.02). An interactive effect was found between smoking, exposure >10 years and the presence of the two or more risk alleles on the MN frequency (F = 6.3, p = 0.02). XRCC3 241Met alleles, particularly in combination with multiple risk alleles of DNA repair genes, contribute to chromosomal DNA damage levels in interventional cardiologists.

  4. Self-assembly and DNA binding of the blocking factor in x chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Nicodemi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is the phenomenon occurring in female mammals whereby dosage compensation of X-linked genes is obtained by transcriptional silencing of one of their two X chromosomes, randomly chosen during early embryo development. The earliest steps of random X-inactivation, involving counting of the X chromosomes and choice of the active and inactive X, are still not understood. To explain "counting and choice," the longstanding hypothesis is that a molecular complex, a "blocking factor" (BF, exists. The BF is present in a single copy and can randomly bind to just one X per cell which is protected from inactivation, as the second X is inactivated by default. In such a picture, the missing crucial step is to explain how the molecular complex is self-assembled, why only one is formed, and how it binds only one X. We answer these questions within the framework of a schematic Statistical Physics model, investigated by Monte Carlo computer simulations. We show that a single complex is assembled as a result of a thermodynamic process relying on a phase transition occurring in the system which spontaneously breaks the symmetry between the X's. We discuss, then, the BF interaction with X chromosomes. The thermodynamics of the mechanism that directs the two chromosomes to opposite fates could be, thus, clarified. The insights on the self-assembling and X binding properties of the BF are used to derive a quantitative scenario of biological implications describing current experimental evidences on "counting and choice."

  5. Sequence analysis of a 10 kb DNA fragment from yeast chromosome VII reveals a novel member of the DnaJ family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Belmonte, E; Rodriguez-Torres, A M; Tizon, B; Cadahia, J L; Gonzalez-Siso, I; Ramil, E; Becerra, M; Gonzalez-Dominguez, M; Cerdan, E

    1996-02-01

    We report the sequence analysis of a 10 kb DNA fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VII. This sequence contains four complete open reading frames (ORFs) of greater than 100 amino acids. There are also two incomplete ORFs flanking the extremes: one of these, G2868, is the 5' part of the SCS3 gene (Hosaka et al., 1994). ORFs G2853 and G2856 correspond to the genes CEG1, coding for the alfa subunit of the mRNA guanylyl transferase and a 3' gene of unknown function previously sequenced (Shibagaki et al., 1992). G2864 is identical to SOH1 also reported (Fan and Klein, 1994).

  6. Three Different Pathways Prevent Chromosome Segregation in the Presence of DNA Damage or Replication Stress in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Palou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A surveillance mechanism, the S phase checkpoint, blocks progression into mitosis in response to DNA damage and replication stress. Segregation of damaged or incompletely replicated chromosomes results in genomic instability. In humans, the S phase checkpoint has been shown to constitute an anti-cancer barrier. Inhibition of mitotic cyclin dependent kinase (M-CDK activity by Wee1 kinases is critical to block mitosis in some organisms. However, such mechanism is dispensable in the response to genotoxic stress in the model eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show here that the Wee1 ortholog Swe1 does indeed inhibit M-CDK activity and chromosome segregation in response to genotoxic insults. Swe1 dispensability in budding yeast is the result of a redundant control of M-CDK activity by the checkpoint kinase Rad53. In addition, our results indicate that Swe1 is an effector of the checkpoint central kinase Mec1. When checkpoint control on M-CDK and on Pds1/securin stabilization are abrogated, cells undergo aberrant chromosome segregation.

  7. C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization with rDNA sequences in chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mariza Dortas Maffei

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea using C-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH rDNA probes, and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining. The chromosome number was 2n = 18 + XX for females and 2n = 18 + Xy for males. The X chromosome was metacentric and the Y chromosome was very small. During meiosis, the karyotypic meioformula was n = 9 + Xy p, and sex chromosomes configured a parachute at metaphase I. At the beginning of pachytene, bivalents were still individualized, and sex chromosomes were associated end-to-end through the heteropycnotic region of the X chromosome. Later in pachytene, further condensation led to the formation of a pseudo-ring by the sex bivalent. All chromosomes showed pericentromeric heterochromatin. FISH and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining evidenced the location of the nucleolar organizer region in one pair of autosomes (at spermatogonial metaphase. During meiosis, these genes were mapped to a region outside the sex vesicle by FISH, although Xy p was deeply stained with silver at metaphase I. These results suggest that these argyrophilic substances are of a nucleolar protein nature, and seem to be synthesized by a pair of autosomes and imported during meiosis (prophase I to the sex pair, during the association of the sex chromosomes.

  8. Role of Fanconi Anemia FANCG in Preventing Double-Strand Breakage and Chromosomal Rearrangement during DNA Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tebbs, R S; Hinz, J M; Yamada, N A; Wilson, J B; Jones, N J; Salazar, E P; Thomas, C B; Jones, I M; Thompson, L H

    2003-10-04

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins overlap with those of homologous recombination through FANCD1/BRCA2, but the biochemical functions of other FA proteins are unknown. By constructing and characterizing a null fancg mutant of hamster CHO cells, we present several new insights for FA. The fancg cells show a broad sensitivity to genotoxic agents, not supporting the conventional concept of sensitivity to only DNA crosslinking agents. The aprt mutation rate is normal, but hprt mutations are reduced, which we ascribe to the lethality of large deletions. CAD and dhfr gene amplification rates are increased, implying excess chromosomal breakage during DNA replication, and suggesting amplification as a contributing factor to cancer-proneness in FA patients. In S-phase cells, both spontaneous and mutagen-induced Rad51 nuclear foci are elevated. These results support a model in which FancG protein helps to prevent collapse of replication forks by allowing translesion synthesis or lesion bypass through homologous recombination.

  9. The B chromosomes of the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens harbour 18S rRNA gene copies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Cesar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diverse plant and animal species have B chromosomes, also known as accessory, extra or supernumerary chromosomes. Despite being widely distributed among different taxa, the genomic nature and genetic behavior of B chromosomes are still poorly understood. Results In this study we describe the occurrence of B chromosomes in the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens. One or two large B chromosome(s occurring in 39.6% of the analyzed individuals (both male and female were identified. To better characterize the karyotype and assess the nature of the B chromosomes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH was performed using probes for telomeric DNA repeats, 18S and 5S rRNA genes, SATA centromeric satellites, and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs enriched in repeated DNA sequences. The B chromosomes are enriched in repeated DNAs, especially non-active 18S rRNA gene-like sequences. Conclusion Our results suggest that the B chromosome could have originated from rDNA bearing subtelo/acrocentric A chromosomes through formation of an isochromosome, or by accumulation of repeated DNAs and rRNA gene-like sequences in a small proto-B chromosome derived from the A complement.

  10. Isolation of chromosome DNA of wheat blue dwarf phytoplasma%小麦蓝矮植原体染色体DNA的分离

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈旺; 李艳; 吴云锋

    2013-01-01

    [目的]分离小麦蓝矮(WBD)植原体染色体DNA,并建立WBD植原体染色体分离纯化体系.[方法]采用差速离心和脉冲电泳(PFGE)方法富集纯化WBD植原体染色体DNA,并通过PCR和Southern blot进行检测验证,实时荧光定量PCR方法对分离纯化效果进行定量检测.[结果]脉冲电泳凝胶中出现一条大小约为650 kb的条带,经PCR检测和Southern blot分析表明该条带为WBD植原体的染色体DNA.实时荧光定量PCR检测结果表明采用差速离心与脉冲电泳结合的方法可以将WBD植原体基因组的相对拷贝数提高436.5倍.[结论]采用差速离心与脉冲电泳法结合可以有效地从感染WBD长春花中分离到纯的WBD植原体染色体DNA,WBD植原体染色体DNA大小约为650 kb.%[Objective] Isolating chromosome DNA of wheat blue dwarf (WBD) phytoplasma and establishing an effective protocol of purification for chromosome DNA. [Methods] Dif- ferential centrifugation and plus-filed gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to purify the chromosome DNA of WBD phytoplasma. The band observed in PFGE was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot. The effect of each step was detected by real-time quantitative PCR analysis. [Results] Using differential centrifugation and PFGE, a band about 650 kb was observed, which was confirmed as the chromosome DNA of WBD phytoplasma by Southern blot hybridization and PCR. Meanwhile, real-time PCR analysis showed that the relative copies of WBD phytoplasma chromosome DNA derived from differential centrifugation and PFGE was 436.5 times than that in the total DNA of infected periwinkle. [Conclusion] The size of WBD phytoplasma chromosome DNA is about 650 kb, purified WBD phytoplasma chromosome DNA can be obtained effectively using differential centrifugation and PFGE.

  11. Alignment of Homologous Chromosomes and Effective Repair of Programmed DNA Double-Strand Breaks during Mouse Meiosis Require the Minichromosome Maintenance Domain Containing 2 (MCMDC2) Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterbusch, Friederike; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Dereli, Ihsan; Stanzione, Marcello; Tränkner, Daniel; Tóth, Attila

    2016-10-01

    Orderly chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division requires meiotic recombination to form crossovers between homologous chromosomes (homologues). Members of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase family have been implicated in meiotic recombination. In addition, they have roles in initiation of DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair and mitotic DNA double-strand break repair. Here, we addressed the function of MCMDC2, an atypical yet conserved MCM protein, whose function in vertebrates has not been reported. While we did not find an important role for MCMDC2 in mitotically dividing cells, our work revealed that MCMDC2 is essential for fertility in both sexes due to a crucial function in meiotic recombination. Meiotic recombination begins with the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into the genome. DNA ends at break sites are resected. The resultant 3-prime single-stranded DNA overhangs recruit RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases that promote the invasion of homologous duplex DNAs by the resected DNA ends. Multiple strand invasions on each chromosome promote the alignment of homologous chromosomes, which is a prerequisite for inter-homologue crossover formation during meiosis. We found that although DNA ends at break sites were evidently resected, and they recruited RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases, these recombinases were ineffective in promoting alignment of homologous chromosomes in the absence of MCMDC2. Consequently, RAD51 and DMC1 foci, which are thought to mark early recombination intermediates, were abnormally persistent in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Importantly, the strand invasion stabilizing MSH4 protein, which marks more advanced recombination intermediates, did not efficiently form foci in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Thus, our work suggests that MCMDC2 plays an important role in either the formation, or the stabilization, of DNA strand invasion events that promote homologue alignment and provide the basis for inter-homologue crossover formation during

  12. Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii OP with a broad host range plasmid containing a cloned chromosomal nif-DNA marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingle, W H

    1988-05-01

    The non-nitrogen-fixing (Nif-) strain UW10 of Azotobacter vinelandii OP (UW) was naturally induced to competence and transformed with broad host range plasmid pKT210 containing the cloned wild-type nif-10 locus from A. vinelandii UW (Nif+); this marker was unable to complement the nif-10 mutation in trans, but could through recombination with the chromosome. The most frequent type of transformation event observed was recombination between the homologous regions of the plasmid and chromosome (producing Nif+ transformants) with loss of the plasmid vector. At a substantially lower frequency, transformants expressing the plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance determinants were isolated which were phenotypically Nif-. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that these transformants contained a plasmid migrating with the same mobility as the original donor plasmid. During culture these transformants acquired a Nif+ phenotype without the loss of the plasmid, as judged by the use of a hybridization probe specific for the cloned nif-DNA fragment. These data indicate that plasmids carrying sequences homologous to chromosomal sequences could be maintained in recombination-proficient A. vinelandii UW. The introduction of plasmids containing sequences homologous to chromosomal sequences was facilitated by prelinearization of the plasmid using a restriction endonuclease generating cohesive ends. Because the site of linearization could be chosen outside the region of shared homology, it was unlikely that the route of plasmid establishment occurred via a homology-facilitated transformation mechanism. The data also indicated that A. vinelandii UW could harbor broad host range cloning vectors based on plasmid RSF1010 without significant impairment of its nitrogen-fixation ability.

  13. The mutagenic potential of a single DNA double-strand break in a mammalian chromosome is not influenced by transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Chris; Miller, Cheryl A; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2003-10-07

    In eukaryotes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by competing HR and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways. DSB repair by HR is highly accurate, while NHEJ can result in deletions and insertions. Transcription enhances certain DNA repair pathways and spontaneous homologous recombination (HR). As a means to promote accurate repair in active genes, we thought it possible that the balance between HR and NHEJ would be shifted toward HR in highly transcribed regions. We tested this idea by examining products of DSB repair in integrated neo-direct repeats under conditions of low-level constitutive, or high-level induced transcription regulated by the dexamethasone (Dex)-responsive mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. DSBs were introduced into one copy of neo by expressing I-SceI nuclease, and DSB repair products were isolated and characterized with an efficient, non-selective assay. We found that transcription does not significantly change the relative frequencies of HR and NHEJ, the relative frequencies of sequence capture and gross chromosomal rearrangement, nor the average size of deletions. About one-third of DSB repair products showed large-scale rearrangements, indicating that a single DSB in a mammalian chromosome has significant mutagenic potential.

  14. History of click-speaking populations of Africa inferred from mtDNA and Y chromosome genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishkoff, Sarah A; Gonder, Mary Katherine; Henn, Brenna M; Mortensen, Holly; Knight, Alec; Gignoux, Christopher; Fernandopulle, Neil; Lema, Godfrey; Nyambo, Thomas B; Ramakrishnan, Uma; Reed, Floyd A; Mountain, Joanna L

    2007-10-01

    Little is known about the history of click-speaking populations in Africa. Prior genetic studies revealed that the click-speaking Hadza of eastern Africa are as distantly related to click speakers of southern Africa as are most other African populations. The Sandawe, who currently live within 150 km of the Hadza, are the only other population in eastern Africa whose language has been classified as part of the Khoisan language family. Linguists disagree on whether there is any detectable relationship between the Hadza and Sandawe click languages. We characterized both mtDNA and Y chromosome variation of the Sandawe, Hadza, and neighboring Tanzanian populations. New genetic data show that the Sandawe and southern African click speakers share rare mtDNA and Y chromosome haplogroups; however, common ancestry of the 2 populations dates back >35,000 years. These data also indicate that common ancestry of the Hadza and Sandawe populations dates back >15,000 years. These findings suggest that at the time of the spread of agriculture and pastoralism, the click-speaking populations were already isolated from one another and are consistent with relatively deep linguistic divergence among the respective click languages.

  15. Cohesin SMC1 beta is required for meiotic chromosome dynamics, sister chromatid cohesion and DNA recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revenkova, E.; Eijpe, M.; Heyting, C.; Hodges, C.A.; Hunt, P.A.; Liebe, B.; Scherthan, H.; Jessberger, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion ensures the faithful segregation of chromosomes in mitosis and in both meiotic divisions1, 2, 3, 4. Meiosis-specific components of the cohesin complex, including the recently described SMC1 isoform SMC15, were suggested to be required for meiotic sister chromatid cohesion a

  16. Karyotyping and in situ chromosomal localization of rDNA sites in black cumin Bunium persicum (Boiss B. Fedtsch,1915 (Apiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Chahota

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH technique has been applied to somatic chromosomes in the medicinally important species, Bunium persicum, to elucidate its karyotypes. The bicolour FISH technique involving 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S ribosomal RNA genes as probes was used to assign physical localization and measurement of rDNA sites on homologous pairs of chromosomes. The two 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA gene sites were at the terminal regions of the short arms of the chromosomes 1 and 2 involving NOR region of chromosome 1. The 5S rDNA sites were found on subtelomeric region of the long arm of the chromosome number 5 and at interstitial regions of the short arm of chromosome 7. Based on direct visual analysis of chromosome length, morphology and position of FISH signals, a pioneer attempt has been made to construct metaphase karyotype in B. persicum, an endangered medicinal plant of North Western Himalayas.

  17. Karyotypic Evolution and Chromosomal Organization of Repetitive DNA Sequences in Species of Panaque, Panaqolus, and Scobinancistrus (Siluriformes and Loricariidae) from the Amazon Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres-Alves, Thayana; Cardoso, Adauto Lima; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Sousa, Leandro Melo de; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Noronha, Renata Coelho Rodrigues

    2017-06-01

    Loricariidae family comprises the greatest variability of Neotropical catfish species, with more than 800 valid species. This family shows significant chromosomal diversity. Mapping of repetitive DNA sequences can be very useful in exploring such diversity, especially among groups that appear to share a preserved karyotypic macrostructure. We describe the karyotypes of Panaque armbrusteri and Panaqolus sp., as assessed using classical cytogenetic methods. Moreover, we offer a map of their repetitive sequences, including 18S and 5S ribosomal DNAs, the Rex1 and Rex3 retrotransposons, and the Tc1-mariner transposon in P. armbrusteri, Panaqolus sp., Scobinancistrus aureatus, and Scobinancistrus pariolispos. Those species share chromosome numbers of 2n = 52, but are divergent in their chromosome structures and the distributions of their repetitive DNA sequences. In situ hybridization with 18S and 5S rDNA probes confirms chromosome location in different pairs; in Panaqolus sp. these sites are in synteny. This multigene family organization can be explained by the occurrence of chromosome rearrangements, and possible events, such as transposition and unequal crossing-over. Rex1 and Rex3 retrotransposons and the Tc1-mariner transposon appeared predominantly dispersed and in small clusters in some chromosome regions. These data emphasize the importance of repetitive sequences in promoting the karyotypic evolution of these species.

  18. Inactivation of ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint promotes androgen induced chromosomal instability in prostate epithelial cells.

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    Yung-Tuen Chiu

    Full Text Available The ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint functions in the maintenance of genetic stability and some missense variants of the ATM gene have been shown to confer a moderate increased risk of prostate cancer. However, whether inactivation of this checkpoint contributes directly to prostate specific cancer predisposition is still unknown. Here, we show that exposure of non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (HPr-1AR to androgen led to activation of the ATM/ATR DNA damage response and induction of cellular senescence. Notably, knockdown of the ATM gene expression in HPr-1AR cells can promote androgen-induced TMPRSS2: ERG rearrangement, a prostate-specific chromosome translocation frequently found in prostate cancer cells. Intriguingly, unlike the non-malignant prostate epithelial cells, the ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint appears to be defective in prostate cancer cells, since androgen treatment only induced a partial activation of the DNA damage response. This mechanism appears to preserve androgen induced autophosphorylation of ATM and phosphorylation of H2AX, lesion processing and repair pathway yet restrain ATM/CHK1/CHK2 and p53 signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that ATM/ATR inactivation is a crucial step in promoting androgen-induced genomic instability and prostate carcinogenesis.

  19. Human platelet/erythroleukemia cell prostaglandin G/H synthase: cDNA cloning, expression, and gene chromosomal assignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, C.D.; Funk, L.B.; Kennedy, M.E.; Pong, A.S.; Fitzgerald, G.A. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Platelets metabolize arachidonic acid to thromboxane A{sub 2}, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor compound. The first step of this transformation is catalyzed by prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase, a target site for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We have isolated the cDNA for both human platelet and human erythroleukemia cell PGG/H synthase using the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein was expressed in COS-M6 cells. Microsomal fractions from transfected cells produced prostaglandin endoperoxide derived products which were inhibited by indomethacin and aspirin. Mutagenesis of the serine residue at position 529, the putative aspirin acetylation site, to an asparagine reduced cyclooxygenase activity to barely detectable levels, an effect observed previously with the expressed sheep vesicular gland enzyme. Platelet-derived growth factor and phorbol ester differentially regulated the expression of PGG/H synthase mRNA levels in the megakaryocytic/platelet-like HEL cell line. The PGG/H synthase gene was assigned to chromosome 9 by analysis of a human-hamster somatic hybrid DNA panel. The availability of platelet PGG/H synthase cDNA should enhance our understanding of the important structure/function domains of this protein and it gene regulation.

  20. PprA Protein Is Involved in Chromosome Segregation via Its Physical and Functional Interaction with DNA Gyrase in Irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devigne, Alice; Guérin, Philippe; Lisboa, Johnny; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Armengaud, Jean; Sommer, Suzanne; Bouthier de la Tour, Claire; Servant, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, was previously shown to be required for cell survival and accurate chromosome segregation after exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, we used an in vivo approach to determine, by shotgun proteomics, putative PprA partners coimmunoprecipitating with PprA when cells were exposed to gamma rays. Among them, we found the two subunits of DNA gyrase and, thus, chose to focus our work on characterizing the activities of the deinococcal DNA gyrase in the presence or absence of PprA. Loss of PprA rendered cells hypersensitive to novobiocin, an inhibitor of the B subunit of DNA gyrase. We showed that treatment of bacteria with novobiocin resulted in induction of the radiation desiccation response (RDR) regulon and in defects in chromosome segregation that were aggravated by the absence of PprA. In vitro, the deinococcal DNA gyrase, like other bacterial DNA gyrases, possesses DNA negative supercoiling and decatenation activities. These two activities are inhibited in vitro by novobiocin and nalidixic acid, whereas PprA specifically stimulates the decatenation activity of DNA gyrase. Together, these results suggest that PprA plays a major role in chromosome decatenation via its interaction with the deinococcal DNA gyrase when D. radiodurans cells are recovering from exposure to ionizing radiation. IMPORTANCE D. radiodurans is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. This bacterium is able to cope with high levels of DNA lesions generated by exposure to extreme doses of ionizing radiation and to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Here, we identified partners of PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, previously shown to be required for radioresistance. Our study leads to three main findings: (i) PprA interacts with DNA gyrase after irradiation, (ii) treatment of cells with novobiocin results in defects in chromosome segregation that are

  1. Construction of a DNA library representing 15q11-13 by subtraction of two flow sorted marker chromosome-specific libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, E.; Werelius, B.; Nordenskjoeld, M. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Constitutional extra {open_quotes}marker chromosomes{close_quotes} are found in {approx}0.5/1000 of newborns. Of these, 50% are inverted duplications of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 15, including two variants; (1) inv dup(15)(pter{yields}q11:q11{yields}pter) and (2) inv dup(15) (pter{yields}q12-13::q12-13{yields}pter). Variant (1) is found in phenotypically normal individuals, whereas variant (2) will produce a typical clinical picture including mental retardation, autism, hyperactivity and discrete dysmorphic features. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using single copy probes from the Prader-Willi region confirms these observations as well as chromosome painting using a flow-sorted marker chromosome-specific library from a variant (1) marker, hybridized to the chromosomes of a patient with a variant (2) marker chromosome. Followingly, a flow-sorted biotinylated variant (1) library was subtracted from a non-labeled variant (2) library using magnetic beads and subsequent amplification by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). The successful result was demonstrated by using the amplified material for chromosome painting on chromosome slides from variant (1) and variant (2) patients. We have constructed a library from 15q11-13. This region contains genes producing a specific abnormal phenotype when found in a tri- or tetrasomic state. The region also contains the genes responsible for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes when the paternal/maternal copy is missing, respectively. It is therefore a region where parental imprinting plays an important role. The isolated library may be used to isolate single copy clones which will allow further investigations of this region.

  2. Isolation and Quantitation of Topoisomerase Complexes Accumulated on Escherichia coli Chromosomal DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Aedo, Sandra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2012-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important targets in anticancer and antibacterial therapy because drugs can initiate cell death by stabilizing the transient covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex. In this study, we employed a method that uses CsCl density gradient centrifugation to separate unbound from DNA-bound GyrA/ParC in Escherichia coli cell lysates after quinolone treatment, allowing antibody detection and quantitation of the covalent complexes on slot blots. Using these procedures modified from th...

  3. Homology among extra-cryptic DNA bands and the typical plasmids in Brazilian Yersinia pestis strains Homologia entre bandas extras de DNA críptico e os plasmídios típicos em cepas brasileiras de Yersinia pestis

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    Nilma Cintra Leal

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague, harbors three well-characterized plasmids: pFra (90-110kb, pYV (70 kb and pPst (9.5 kb. Furthermore, some extra-cryptic DNA bands have been observed in a number of wild strains from several foci of the world. Additional bands have also been reported in Brazilian strains. Looking for any relationship among these cryptic DNA bands and the three-prototypical plasmids, we analyzed twelve strains displaying different plasmid content. The DNA bands were hybridized by southern blot with probes directed at the genes caf1, lcrV and pla located respectively on the plasmids pFra, pYV and pPst. The probes were constructed by PCR amplification and labeled with digoxigenin. The Pla probe hybridized with its target (pPst and with bands of about 35 kb suggesting some homology among them. The Caf1 probe hybridized with the target (pFra as well as with higher bands. The LcrV also hybridized with the target (pYV and both with the bands higher than pFra and the bands between pFra and pYV. These results suggest that the large-cryptic bands could represent some rearrangement, open circular or linearized forms of the pFra and pYV plasmids.Yersinia pestis, o agente causador da peste, possui três plasmídios bem caracterizados: pFra (90-110 kb, pYV (70 kb e pPst (9.5 kb. Adicionalmente, algumas bandas extras de DNA críptico têm sido observadas em numerosas cepas selvagens em vários focos do mundo. Bandas extras também foram observadas em cepas brasileiras. Para verificar se existe alguma homologia entre as bandas extras de DNA críptico e os três plasmídios típicos, foram analisadas 12 culturas de Y. pestis através de hibridização com sondas dirigidas aos genes caf1, lcrV e pla localizados respectivamente nos plasmídios pFra, pYV e pPst. As sondas foram construídas através de amplificação por PCR e marcadas com digoxigenina. A sonda Pla reconheceu seu alvo (pPst e bandas de cerca de 35 kb sugerindo que

  4. Chromosomal localization of 45S rDNA, sex-specific C values, and heterochromatin distribution in Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Biplab Kumar; Yamamoto, Masashi; Jha, Sumita

    2016-01-01

    Coccinia grandis is a widely distributed dioecious cucurbit in India, with heteromorphic sex chromosomes and X-Y sex determination mode. The present study aids in the cytogenetic characterization of four native populations of this plant employing distribution patterns of 45S rDNA on chromosomes and guanine-cytosine (GC)-rich heterochromatin in the genome coupled with flow cytometric determination of genome sizes. Existence of four nucleolar chromosomes could be confirmed by the presence of four telomeric 45S rDNA signals in both male and female plants. All four 45S rDNA sites are rich in heterochromatin evident from the co-localization of telomeric chromomycin A (CMA)(+ve) signals. The size of 45S rDNA signal was found to differ between the homologues of one nucleolar chromosome pair. The distribution of heterochromatin is found to differ among the male and female populations. The average GC-rich heterochromatin content of male and female populations is 23.27 and 29.86 %, respectively. Moreover, the male plants have a genome size of 0.92 pg/2C while the female plants have a size of 0.73 pg/2C, reflecting a huge genomic divergence between the genders. The great variation in genome size is owing to the presence of Y chromosome in the male populations, playing a multifaceted role in sexual divergence in C. grandis.

  5. Fetal sex determination in the first trimester of pregnancy using a Y chromosome-specific DNA probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Y.; Huang, S.; Chen, M.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Dong, J.; Ku, A.; Xu, S.

    1987-05-01

    Prenatal determination of fetal sex is important for the prevention of X-linked disorders such as hemophilia, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The complex procedures of prenatal diagnosis for X-linked disorders are unnecessary if the fetus is female, because usually no clinical symptoms ever appear in female. pY 3.4 probe used in this work for sex determination is a 3.4 kilobase human repeat sequence. The probe is specific for the Y chromosome of males and can be used for sex determination. The other prove pBLUR used in this paper as control is a widely dispersed, highly repeated human Alu family DNA sequence, represented equally in male and female DNA. On the basis of the relative densities of the autoradiographic spots produced by hybridization of fetal DNA with pY3.4 and pBLUR, the sex of fetus can be clearly identified. Further the authors can determine the radioactive intensity (cpm) of the hybridized DNA spots and the ratio of hybridization with Y3.4 to pBLUR (Y3.4/pBLUR x 10). Results show that the hybridization ratio of DNA from chorionic villi of male (1.03 +/- 0.24) is significantly higher than that of female (0.16 +/- 0.09). Therefore, sex determination of the fetus can be made, based on the ratio of pY3.4/pBLUR x 10. If necessary they can also use Southern hybridization with pY 3.4 probe of DNA isolated from chorionic villi to confirm the result of dot hybridization.

  6. Chromosomal mapping of rDNAs and H3 histone sequences in the grasshopper rhammatocerus brasiliensis (acrididae, gomphocerinae: extensive chromosomal dispersion and co-localization of 5S rDNA/H3 histone clusters in the A complement and B chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Nathalia L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supernumerary B chromosomes occur in addition to standard karyotype and have been described in about 15% of eukaryotes, being the repetitive DNAs the major component of these chromosomes, including in some cases the presence of multigene families. To advance in the understanding of chromosomal organization of multigene families and B chromosome structure and evolution, the distribution of rRNA and H3 histone genes were analyzed in the standard karyotype and B chromosome of three populations of the grasshopper Rhammatocerus brasiliensis. Results The location of major rDNA was coincident with the previous analysis for this species. On the other hand, the 5S rDNA mapped in almost all chromosomes of the standard complement (except in the pair 11 and in the B chromosome, showing a distinct result from other populations previously analyzed. Besides the spreading of 5S rDNA in the genome of R. brasiliensis it was also observed multiple sites for H3 histone genes, being located in the same chromosomal regions of 5S rDNAs, including the presence of the H3 gene in the B chromosome. Conclusions Due to the intense spreading of 5S rRNA and H3 histone genes in the genome of R. brasiliensis, their chromosomal distribution was not informative in the clarification of the origin of B elements. Our results indicate a linked organization for the 5S rRNA and H3 histone multigene families investigated in R. brasiliensis, reinforcing previous data concerning the association of both genes in some insect groups. The present findings contribute to understanding the organization/evolution of multigene families in the insect genomes.

  7. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  8. The evolving male: spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) ecotypes are divergent at Y chromosome but not mtDNA or autosomal markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Kimberly R; Perrin, William F; Oremus, Marc; Karczmarski, Leszek; Bowen, Brian W; Puritz, Jonathan B; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    The susceptibility of the Y chromosome to sexual selection may make this chromosome an important player in the formation of reproductive isolating barriers, and ultimately speciation. Here, we investigate the role of the Y chromosome in phenotypic divergence and reproductive isolation of spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) ecotypes. This species contains six known ecotypes (grouped into four subspecies) that exhibit striking differences in morphology, habitat and mating system, despite having adjacent or overlapping ranges and little genetic divergence at previously studied mtDNA and autosomal markers. We examined the phylogeographic structure for all six ecotypes across the species range (n = 261, 17 geographic locations) using DNA sequences from three Y chromosome markers, two maternally inherited mitochondrial (mtDNA) markers, and a biparentally inherited autosomal intron. mtDNA and autosomal analyses revealed low divergence (most Φ(ST) values <0.1) between ecotypes and geographic regions, concordant with previous studies. In contrast, Y intron analyses revealed fixed differences amongst the three most phenotypically divergent groups: S. l. longirostris vs. S. l. roseiventris vs. combined S. l. orientalis/S. l. centroamericana/Tres Marias ecotypes). Another ecotype (whitebelly), previously postulated to be a hybrid between the two phenotypically most divergent ecotypes, had Y haplotypes from both putative parent ecotypes, supporting a hybrid designation. Reduced introgression of the Y chromosome has previously been observed in other organisms ranging from insects to terrestrial mammals, and here we demonstrate this phenomenon in a marine mammal with high dispersal capabilities. These results indicate that reduced introgression of the Y chromosome occurs in a wide taxonomic range of organisms and support the growing body of evidence that rapid evolution of the Y chromosome is important in evolutionary diversification.

  9. Y-chromosome and mtDNA genetics reveal significant contrasts in affinities of modern Middle Eastern populations with European and African populations.

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    Danielle A Badro

    Full Text Available The Middle East was a funnel of human expansion out of Africa, a staging area for the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution, and the home to some of the earliest world empires. Post LGM expansions into the region and subsequent population movements created a striking genetic mosaic with distinct sex-based genetic differentiation. While prior studies have examined the mtDNA and Y-chromosome contrast in focal populations in the Middle East, none have undertaken a broad-spectrum survey including North and sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and Middle Eastern populations. In this study 5,174 mtDNA and 4,658 Y-chromosome samples were investigated using PCA, MDS, mean-linkage clustering, AMOVA, and Fisher exact tests of F(ST's, R(ST's, and haplogroup frequencies. Geographic differentiation in affinities of Middle Eastern populations with Africa and Europe showed distinct contrasts between mtDNA and Y-chromosome data. Specifically, Lebanon's mtDNA shows a very strong association to Europe, while Yemen shows very strong affinity with Egypt and North and East Africa. Previous Y-chromosome results showed a Levantine coastal-inland contrast marked by J1 and J2, and a very strong North African component was evident throughout the Middle East. Neither of these patterns were observed in the mtDNA. While J2 has penetrated into Europe, the pattern of Y-chromosome diversity in Lebanon does not show the widespread affinities with Europe indicated by the mtDNA data. Lastly, while each population shows evidence of connections with expansions that now define the Middle East, Africa, and Europe, many of the populations in the Middle East show distinctive mtDNA and Y-haplogroup characteristics that indicate long standing settlement with relatively little impact from and movement into other populations.

  10. Differential chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA synthesis in temperature-sensitive mutants of Ustilago maydis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P.

    1977-01-01

    The amount and type of residual DNA synthesis was determined in eight temperature-sensitive mutants of the smut fungus Ustilago maydis after incubation at the restrictive temperature (32/sup 0/C) for eight hours. Mutants ts-220, ts-207, ts-432 and ts-346 were found to have an overall reduction in the synthesis of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in comparison to the wild-type. In mutants ts-20, tsd 1-1, ts-84 and pol 1-1 nuclear DNA synthesis was depressed relative to mitochondrial synthesis. The DNA-polymerase mutant pol 1-1 had persistent nuclear synthesis at about 50% of the rate of synthesis of mitochondrial DNA and similar behavior was observed in a diploid homozygous strain. Mutant ts-84 had an initial burst of DNA synthesis which was reduced for nuclear but not mitochondrial synthesis after three hours preincubation at 32/sup 0/C. tsd 1-1 and ts-20 had nuclear residual synthesis amounting to about 25% of the relative rate of mitochondrial synthesis which correlates to increasing UV sensitivity of these strains on incubation at 32/sup 0/C. A pol 1-1 ts-84 double mutant had an additive loss of nuclear DNA synthesis which indicates that the steps of replication involved may be sequential.

  11. An adaptive detection method for fetal chromosomal aneuploidy using cell-free DNA from 447 Korean women

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    Sunshin Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT using massively parallel sequencing of cell-free DNA (cfDNA is increasingly being used to predict fetal chromosomal abnormalities. However, concerns over erroneous predictions which occur while performing NIPT still exist in pregnant women at high risk for fetal aneuploidy. We performed the largest-scale clinical NIPT study in Korea to date to assess the risk of false negatives and false positives using next-generation sequencing. Methods A total of 447 pregnant women at high risk for fetal aneuploidy were enrolled at 12 hospitals in Korea. They underwent definitive diagnoses by full karyotyping by blind analysis and received aneuploidy screening at 11–22 weeks of gestation. Three steps were employed for cfDNA analyses. First, cfDNA was sequenced. Second, the effect of GC bias was corrected using normalization of samples as well as LOESS and linear regressions. Finally, statistical analysis was performed after selecting a set of reference samples optimally adapted to a test sample from the whole reference samples. We evaluated our approach by performing cfDNA testing to assess the risk of trisomies 13, 18, and 21 using the sets of extracted reference samples. Results The adaptive selection algorithm presented here was used to choose a more optimized reference sample, which was evaluated by the coefficient of variation (CV, demonstrated a lower CV and higher sensitivity than standard approaches. Our adaptive approach also showed that fetal aneuploidies could be detected correctly by clearly splitting the z scores obtained for positive and negative samples. Conclusions We show that our adaptive reference selection algorithm for optimizing trisomy detection showed improved reliability and will further support practitioners in reducing both false negative and positive results.

  12. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes.

  13. Genetic relationships of Kampung, Pelung, Sentul and Black Kedu Chicken using Microsatellite DNA Markers: I. Lingkage group of macro chromosome

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    Tike Sartika

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic relationships of Kampung, Pelung, Sentul and Black Kedu chickens were studied on the basis of microsatellite DNA polymorphism. DNA samples were analyzed using nine microsatellite markers which chosen from linkage group of macrochromosome (chromosome 1-8 such as, locus ABR 258, ABR359, ABR 297, ABR 339, ABR 75, ABR 209, ABR 28, ABR 419 and ABR 604. Analyses of amplified DNA fragments were performed using Gene Mapper 2.0 software (PE, Applied Biosystems. The allele frequencies in each breed estimated by direct counting. Since all nine microsatellite markers were polymorphic, genetic distance between the breeds could be calculated based on the frequencies of alleles of the microsatellite. Genetic relationships between the breeds could be constructed. The results indicated that a total of 73 allele were detected while typing all the four breeds of local chicken and one breed of White Leghorn as outgroup breed acrossed nine loci. The number of alleles was observed in all of the breed ranged 3-17 alleles according to the microsatellite under scrutiny. Highest observed number of alleles was found in Kampung Chicken 60 alleles (82.2%. The UPGMA method for dendogram based on Nei genetic distances indicated that the local chickens have the same of ancestor, while Kampung and Sentul chicken have the same cluster followed by Black Kedu and Pelung Chicken.

  14. A Method to Quantify Cell-Free Fetal DNA Fraction in Maternal Plasma Using Next Generation Sequencing: Its Application in Non-Invasive Prenatal Chromosomal Aneuploidy Detection.

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    Xu-Ping Xu

    Full Text Available The fraction of circulating cell-free fetal (cff DNA in maternal plasma is a critical parameter for aneuploidy screening with non-invasive prenatal testing, especially for those samples located in equivocal zones. We developed an approach to quantify cff DNA fractions directly with sequencing data, and increased cff DNAs by optimizing library construction procedure.Artificial DNA mixture samples (360, with known cff DNA fractions, were used to develop a method to determine cff DNA fraction through calculating the proportion of Y chromosomal unique reads, with sequencing data generated by Ion Proton. To validate our method, we investigated cff DNA fractions of 2,063 pregnant women with fetuses who were diagnosed as high risk of fetal defects. The z-score was calculated to determine aneuploidies for chromosomes 21, 18 and 13. The relationships between z-score and parameters of pregnancies were also analyzed. To improve cff DNA fractions in our samples, two groups were established as follows: in group A, the large-size DNA fragments were removed, and in group B these were retained, during library construction.A method to determine cff DNA fractions was successfully developed using 360 artificial mixture samples in which cff DNA fractions were known. A strong positive correlation was found between z-score and fetal DNA fraction in the artificial mixture samples of trisomy 21, 18 and 13, as well as in clinical maternal plasma samples. There was a positive correlation between gestational age and the cff DNA fraction in the clinical samples, but no correlation for maternal age. Moreover, increased fetal DNA fractions were found in group A compared to group B.A relatively accurate method was developed to determine the cff DNA fraction in maternal plasma. By optimizing, we can improve cff DNA fractions in sequencing samples, which may contribute to improvements in detection rate and reliability.

  15. Condensation patterns of prophase/prometaphase chromosome are correlated with H4K5 histone acetylation and genomic DNA contents in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitoza, Lidiane; Costa, Lucas; Guerra, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic prophase chromosome condensation plays an essential role in nuclear division being therefore regulated by highly conserved mechanisms. However, degrees of chromatin condensation in prophase-prometaphase cells may vary along the chromosomes resulting in specific condensation patterns. We examined different condensation patterns (CPs) of prophase and prometaphase chromosomes and investigated their relationship with genome size and distribution of histone H4 acetylated at lysine 5 (H4K5ac) in 17 plant species. Our results showed that most species with small genomes (2C < 5 pg) (Arachis pusilla, Bixa orellana, Costus spiralis, Eleutherine bulbosa, Indigofera campestris, Phaseolus lunatus, P. vulgaris, Poncirus trifoliata, and Solanum lycopersicum) displayed prophase chromosomes with late condensing terminal regions that were highly enriched in H4K5ac, and early condensing regions with apparently non-acetylated proximal chromatin. The species with large genomes (Allium cepa, Callisia repens, Araucaria angustifolia and Nothoscordum pulchellum) displayed uniformly condensed and acetylated prophase/prometaphase chromosomes. Three species with small genomes (Eleocharis geniculata, Rhynchospora pubera, and R. tenuis) displayed CP and H4K5ac labeling patterns similar to species with large genomes, whereas a forth species (Emilia sonchifolia) exhibited a gradual chromosome labeling, being more acetylated in the terminal regions and less acetylated in the proximal ones. The nucleolus organizer chromatin was the only chromosomal region that in prometaphase or metaphase could be hyperacetylated, hypoacetylated or non-acetylated, depending on the species. Our data indicate that the CP of a plant chromosome complement is influenced but not exclusively determined by nuclear and chromosomal DNA contents, whereas the CP of individual chromosomes is clearly correlated with H4K5ac distribution.

  16. Recurrence of Chromosome Rearrangements and Reuse of DNA Breakpoints in the Evolution of the Triticeae Genomes

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    Wanlong Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal rearrangements (CRs play important roles in karyotype diversity and speciation. While many CR breakpoints have been characterized at the sequence level in yeast, insects, and primates, little is known about the structure of evolutionary CR breakpoints in plant genomes, which are much more dynamic in genome size and sequence organization. Here, we report identification of breakpoints of a translocation between chromosome arms 4L and 5L of Triticeae, which is fixed in several species, including diploid wheat and rye, by comparative mapping and analysis of the draft genome and chromosome survey sequences of the Triticeae species. The wheat translocation joined the ends of breakpoints downstream of a WD40 gene on 4AL and a gene of the PMEI family on 5AL. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor gene in 5AL junction was significantly restructured. Rye and wheat share the same position for the 4L breakpoint, but the 5L breakpoint positions are not identical, although very close in these two species, indicating the recurrence of 4L/5L translocations in the Triticeae. Although barley does not carry the translocation, collinearity across the breakpoints was violated by putative inversions and/or transpositions. Alignment with model grass genomes indicated that the translocation breakpoints coincided with ancient inversion junctions in the Triticeae ancestor. Our results show that the 4L/5L translocation breakpoints represent two CR hotspots reused during Triticeae evolution, and support breakpoint reuse as a widespread mechanism in all eukaryotes. The mechanisms of the recurrent translocation and its role in Triticeae evolution are also discussed.

  17. Isolation and Purification of Nosema bombycis Chromosomal DNA%家蚕微孢子虫(Nosema bombycis)染色体DNA的分离纯化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄为; 马振刚; 张时恒; 潘国庆; 李田; 周泽扬

    2012-01-01

    为了获取可供家蚕微孢子虫(Nosema bombycis)单染色体测序的基础材料,通过脉冲场凝胶电泳(PFGE)技术分离家蚕微孢子虫CQ1株系的染色体DNA,随后切取含有目的染色体DNA条带的琼脂糖胶块,分别利用电洗脱法、柱式胶回收试剂盒法及玻璃奶胶回收试剂盒法进行染色体DNA的分离纯化实验.结果显示3种方法均能回收到目的染色体DNA,但分离纯化的效率和样品质量存在差异:电洗脱法对胶块中的DNA损失较大,回收的染色体DNA含量低,而柱式胶回收试剂盒回收的染色体DNA断裂严重,因此这2种方法获得的样品质量均达不到染色体建库测序的要求;通过优化后的玻璃奶胶回收试剂盒法获得的染色体DNA相对完整且污染较少,质量检验分析133 μL样品中的DNA质量浓度为8.495 ng/μL(DNA总量1.13μg),达到后续构建染色体测序文库的要求.玻璃奶胶回收试剂盒法不仅适用于家蚕微孢子虫染色体DNA的分离纯化,也可供基因组较小的物种制备单染色体建库测序材料参考.%To obtain basic materials for Nosema bombycis single chromosome sequencing, in this study, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to isolate chromosomal DNA of N. Bombycis CQ1 strain. Agarose gels containing the target chromosomal DNA band were excised and subjected to further isolation and purification by means of electroe-lution, column gel recovery kit and glassmilk gel recovery kit. The results showed that all three methods could recover the target DNA but differed in efficiency of isolation and purification and in quality of obtained sample. Electroelution method led to high loss of DNA in the gel and the content of chromosomal DNA was low, while large portion of chromosomal DNA recovered by column gel extraction kit was in small pieces. The quality of sample purified using these two methods could not satisfy the sequencing requirement for library construction of chromosome. The

  18. Plasmid loss and changes within the chromosomal DNA of Streptomyces reticuli.

    OpenAIRE

    Schrempf, H

    1982-01-01

    The sporulating wild-type strain of Streptomyces reticuli, which produces a melanin pigment and the macrolide leucomycin, contains plasmid DNA of 48 to 49 megadaltons. Plasmidless variants had an altered secondary metabolism and a changed antibiotic resistance pattern. By using a new colony hybridization technique developed for streptomycetes, it could be shown that plasmidless variants could be transformed with the wild-type plasmid DNA, which, however, is quickly lost from regenerated mycel...

  19. The murine decorin. Complete cDNA cloning, genomic organization, chromosomal assignment, and expression during organogenesis and tissue differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholzen, T; Solursh, M; Suzuki, S; Reiter, R; Morgan, J L; Buchberg, A M; Siracusa, L D; Iozzo, R V

    1994-11-11

    Decorin, a proteoglycan known to interact with collagen and growth factors, may play key roles during ontogenesis, tissue remodeling, and cancer. We have deciphered the complete protein sequence of the murine decorin by cDNA cloning, elucidated its gene structure and chromosomal location, and investigated its expression in the developing embryo. The decorin protein and the gene were highly conserved vis à vis the human counterpart; however, the murine gene lacked a leader exon, exon Ib, which was found only in the human. Using interspecific backcrossing, we assigned the gene to chromosome 10 just proximally to the Steel gene locus. In situ hybridization studies of developing mouse embryos showed a distinct pattern of expression with a progressive increase of decorin mRNA during ontogenesis. At early stages (day 11 postconception), decorin was detectable only in the floor plate region. Subsequently (days 13-16 postconception), decorin expression was especially prominent in the meninges and mesothelial linings of pericardium, pleura, and coelomic cavity, as well as in the dermis and subepithelial layers of the intestine and urinary bladder. In contrast, the major parenchymal organs were only weakly positive for decorin mRNA. These findings suggest that decorin may play a role in epithelial/mesenchymal interactions during organ development and shaping.

  20. Genetic polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage in workers exposed to 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Ai-hong; Tan, Hong-shan; Feng, Nan-nan; Ye, Yun-jie; Feng, Xiao-qing; Liu, Geoffrey; Zheng, Yu-xin; Xia, Zhao-lin

    2010-05-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is important in repairing DNA damage incurred from occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD). This study examines the relationship between inherited polymorphisms of the BER pathway (x-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln, T-77C, ADPRT Val762Ala, MGMT Leu84Phe and APE1 Asp148Glu) and chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers, using the cytokinesis-blocked (CB) micronucleus (MN) assay in peripheral lymphocytes of 166 workers occupationally exposed to BD and 41 non-exposed healthy individuals. The MN frequency of exposed workers (3.39 +/- 2.42) per thousand was higher than that of the non-exposed groups (1.48 +/- 1.26) per thousand (P damage among BD-exposed workers. In workers exposed to BD, multiple BER polymorphisms and a XRCC1 haplotype were associated with differential levels of chromosome damage.

  1. Molecular genetic evidence for the human settlement of the Pacific: analysis of mitochondrial DNA, Y chromosome and HLA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelberg, E; Kayser, M; Nagy, M; Roewer, L; Zimdahl, H; Krawczak, M; Lió, P; Schiefenhövel, W

    1999-01-29

    Present-day Pacific islanders are thought to be the descendants of Neolithic agriculturalists who expanded from island South-east Asia several thousand years ago. They speak languages belonging to the Austronesian language family, spoken today in an area spanning half of the circumference of the world, from Madagascar to Easter Island, and from Taiwan to New Zealand. To investigate the genetic affinities of the Austronesian-speaking peoples, we analysed mitochondrial DNA, HLA and Y-chromosome polymorphisms in individuals from eight geographical locations in Asia and the Pacific (China, Taiwan, Java, New Guinea highlands, New Guinea coast, Trobriand Islands, New Britain and Western Samoa). Our results show that the demographic expansion of the Austronesians has left a genetic footprint. However, there is no simple correlation between languages and genes in the Pacific.

  2. Isolation and characterization of DNA probes from a flow-sorted human chromosome 8 library that detect restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, S.; Starr, T V; Shukin, R J

    1986-01-01

    We have used a recombinant DNA library constructed from flow-sorted human chromosome 8 as a source of single-copy human probes. These probes have been screened for restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) by hybridization to Southern transfers of genomic DNA from five unrelated individuals. We have detected six RFLPs distributed among four probes after screening 741 base pairs for restriction site variation. These RFLPs all behave as codominant Mendelian alleles. Two of the probes dete...

  3. GeneBreak: detection of recurrent DNA copy number aberration-associated chromosomal breakpoints within genes [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evert van den Broek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of cancer is driven by somatic alterations, including numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations. Currently, several computational methods are available and are widely applied to detect numerical copy number aberrations (CNAs of chromosomal segments in tumor genomes. However, there is lack of computational methods that systematically detect structural chromosomal aberrations by virtue of the genomic location of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks and identify genes that appear non-randomly affected by chromosomal breakpoints across (large series of tumor samples. ‘GeneBreak’ is developed to systematically identify genes recurrently affected by the genomic location of chromosomal CNA-associated breaks by a genome-wide approach, which can be applied to DNA copy number data obtained by array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH or by (low-pass whole genome sequencing (WGS. First, ‘GeneBreak’ collects the genomic locations of chromosomal CNA-associated breaks that were previously pinpointed by the segmentation algorithm that was applied to obtain CNA profiles. Next, a tailored annotation approach for breakpoint-to-gene mapping is implemented. Finally, dedicated cohort-based statistics is incorporated with correction for covariates that influence the probability to be a breakpoint gene. In addition, multiple testing correction is integrated to reveal recurrent breakpoint events. This easy-to-use algorithm, ‘GeneBreak’, is implemented in R (www.cran.r-project.org and is available from Bioconductor (www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/GeneBreak.html.

  4. Chromosome damage induced by DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors combined with {gamma}-radiation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Maria Cristina P.; Dias, Francisca da Luz; Cecchi, Andrea O.; Antunes, Lusania M.G.; Takahashi, Catarina S. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Genetica

    1998-09-01

    Combined radiation and antineoplastic drug treatment have important applications in cancer therapy. In the present work, an evaluation was made of two known topoisomerase II inhibitors, doxorubicin (DXR) and mitoxantrone (MXN), with {gamma}-radiation. The effect of DXR or MXN on {gamma}radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were analyzed. Two concentrations of each drug, 0.5 and 1.0 {mu}g/ml DXR, and 0.02 and 0.04 {mu}g/ml MXN, were applied in combination with two doses of {gamma}-radiation (20 and 40 cGy). A significant potentiating effect on chromosomal aberrations was observed in CHO cells exposed to 1.0 {mu}g/ml DXR plus 40 cGy. In the other tests, the combination of {gamma}-radiation with DXR or MXN gave approximately additive effects. Reduced mitotic indices reflected higher toxicity of the drugs when combined with radiation. (author) 55 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.; e-mail: mcaraujo at spider.usp.br

  5. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  6. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  7. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  8. Engineering of Systematic Elimination of a Targeted Chromosome in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic trisomy leads to abortion or congenital genetic disorders in humans. The most common autosomal chromosome abnormalities are trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21. Although alteration of gene dosage is thought to contribute to disorders caused by extra copies of chromosomes, genes associated with specific disease phenotypes remain unclear. To generate a normal cell from a trisomic cell as a means of etiological analysis or candidate therapy for trisomy syndromes, we developed a system to eliminate a targeted chromosome from human cells. Chromosome 21 was targeted by integration of a DNA cassette in HeLa cells that harbored three copies of chromosome 21. The DNA cassette included two inverted loxP sites and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk gene. This system causes missegregation of chromosome 21 after expression of Cre recombinase and subsequently enables the selection of cells lacking the chromosome by culturing in a medium that includes ganciclovir (GCV. Cells harboring only two copies of chromosome 21 were efficiently induced by transfection of a Cre expression vector, indicating that this approach is useful for eliminating a targeted chromosome.

  9. Description of a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system in Thoracocharax cf. stellatus (Teleostei, Characiformes, Gasteropelecidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Margarida Lima

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The family Gasteropelecidae is composed of three genera and eight species. This study shows that Thoracocharax cf. stellatus has 2n = 52 chromosomes for both sexes. The five males studied showed 8 metacentric, 16 submetacentric, 4 subtelocentric, and 24 acrocentric chromosomes; the seven females showed only one submetacentric chromosome, belonging to pair 11, and one extra acrocentric chromosome, smaller than all the other chromosomes, characterizing the presence of a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system in this species. Nucleolus organizing regions (NORs were detected on the short arms of the subtelocentric chromosome pair 13. Constitutive heterochromatin was identified at pericentromeric and terminal positions in almost all chromosomes. The W chromosome was almost entirely heterochromatic, except for a small terminal euchromatic segment. The analyses of the amount of nuclear DNA found 2.18 ± 0.09 pg of DNA per diploid nucleus, without significant differences between sexes. A discussion about the evolution of the sex chromosomes in this group is presented.

  10. TRF2-Mediated Control of Telomere DNA Topology as a Mechanism for Chromosome-End Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarroch-Popivker, Delphine; Pisano, Sabrina; Mendez-Bermudez, Aaron; Lototska, Liudmyla; Kaur, Parminder; Bauwens, Serge; Djerbi, Nadir; Latrick, Chrysa M; Fraisier, Vincent; Pei, Bei; Gay, Alexandre; Jaune, Emilie; Foucher, Kevin; Cherfils-Vicini, Julien; Aeby, Eric; Miron, Simona; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ye, Jing; Le Du, Marie-Hélène; Wang, Hong; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2016-01-21

    The shelterin proteins protect telomeres against activation of the DNA damage checkpoints and recombinational repair. We show here that a dimer of the shelterin subunit TRF2 wraps ∼ 90 bp of DNA through several lysine and arginine residues localized around its homodimerization domain. The expression of a wrapping-deficient TRF2 mutant, named Top-less, alters telomeric DNA topology, decreases the number of terminal loops (t-loops), and triggers the ATM checkpoint, while still protecting telomeres against non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In Top-less cells, the protection against NHEJ is alleviated if the expression of the TRF2-interacting protein RAP1 is reduced. We conclude that a distinctive topological state of telomeric DNA, controlled by the TRF2-dependent DNA wrapping and linked to t-loop formation, inhibits both ATM activation and NHEJ. The presence of RAP1 at telomeres appears as a backup mechanism to prevent NHEJ when topology-mediated telomere protection is impaired.

  11. Cloning of the cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila white gene and mapping to chromosome 21q22.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haiming Chen; Lalioti, M.D.; Perrin, G.; Antonarakis, S.E. [Univ. of Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    In an effort to contribute to the transcript map of human chromosome 21 and the understanding of the pathophysiology of trisomy 21, we have used exon trapping to identify fragments of chromosome 21 genes. Two trapped exons, from pools of chromosome 21-specific cosmids, showed homology to the Drosophila white (w) gene. We subsequently cloned the corresponding cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila w gene (hW) from human retina and fetal brain cDNA libraries. The gene belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family and is homologous to Drosophila w (and to 2 genes from other species) and to a lesser extent to Drosophila brown (bw) and scarlet (st) genes that are all involved in the transport of eye pigment precursor molecules. A DNA polymorphism with 62% heterozygosity due to variation of a poly (T) region in the 3{prime} UTR of the hW has been identified and used for the incorporation of this gene to the genetic map of chromosome 21. The hW is located at 21q22.3 between DNA markers D21S212 and D21S49 in a P1 clone that also contains marker BCEI. The gene is expressed at various levels in many human tissues. The contributions of this gene to the Down syndrome phenotypes, to human eye color, and to the resulting phenotypes of null or missense mutations are presently unknown. 56 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Comparison of RBE values of high-LET α-particles for the induction of DNA-DSBs, chromosome aberrations and cell reproductive death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, N.A.P.; ten Cate, R.; Krawczyk, P.M.; Stap, J.; Haveman, J.; Aten, J.; Barendsen, G.W.

    2011-01-01

    Various types of radiation effects in mammalian cells have been studied with the aim to predict the radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues, e.g. DNA double strand breaks (DSB), chromosome aberrations and cell reproductive inactivation. However, variation in correlations with clinical results

  13. Genetic structure analysis of three Hispanic populations from Costa Rica, Mexico, and the southwestern United States using Y-chromosome STR markers and mtDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Sánchez, Rebeca; Barrantes, Ramiro; Silva, Sandra; Escamilla, Michael; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Mendoza, Ricardo; Munoz, Rodrigo; Raventos, Henriette

    2006-10-01

    Two hundred seventeen male subjects from Costa Rica, Mexico, and the Hispanic population of the southwestern United States were studied. Twelve Y-chromosome STRs and the HVSI sequence of the mtDNA were analyzed to describe their genetic structure and to compare maternal and paternal lineages. All subjects are part of two NIMH-funded studies to localize schizophrenia susceptibility genes in Hispanic populations of Mexican and Central American ancestry. We showed that these three populations are similar in their internal genetic characteristics, as revealed by analyses of mtDNA and Y-chromosome STR diversity. These populations are related through their maternal lineage in a stronger way than through their paternal lineage, because a higher number of shared haplotypes and polymorphisms are seen in the mtDNA (compared to Y-chromosome STRs). These results provide evidence of previous contact between the three populations and shared histories. An analysis of molecular variance revealed no genetic differentiation for the mtDNA for the three populations, but differentiation was detected in the Y-chromosome STRs. Genetic distance analysis showed that the three populations are closely related, probably as a result of migration between close neighbors, as indicated by shared haplotypes and their demographic histories. This relationship could be an important common feature for genetic studies in Latin American and Hispanic populations.

  14. Non-invasive prenatal cell-free fetal DNA testing for down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darija Strah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis as definitive diagnostic procedures represent a gold standard for prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. The methods are invasive and lead to a miscarriage and fetal loss in approximately 0.5–1 %. Non-invasive prenatal DNA testing (NIPT is based on the analysis of cell-free fetal DNA from maternal blood. It represents a highly accurate screening test for detecting the most common fetal chromosomal abnormalities. In our study we present the results of NIPT testing in the Diagnostic Center Strah, Slovenia, over the last 3 years.Methods: In our study, 123 pregnant women from 11th to 18th week of pregnancy were included. All of them had First trimester assessment of risk for trisomy 21, done before NIPT testing.Results: 5 of total 6 high-risk NIPT cases (including 3 cases of Down syndrome and 2 cases of Klinefelter’s syndrome were confirmed by fetal karyotyping. One case–Edwards syndrome was false positive. Patau syndrome, triple X syndrome or Turner syndrome were not observed in any of the cases. Furthermore, there were no false negative cases reported. In general, NIPT testing had 100 % sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 46.29 %–100.00 % and 98.95 % specificity (95 % confidence interval: 93.44 %–99.95 %. In determining Down syndrome alone, specificity (95 % confidence interval: 95.25 %- 100.00 % and sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 31.00 %–100.00 % turned out to be 100 %. In 2015, the average turnaround time for analysis was 8.3 days from the day when the sample was taken. Repeated blood sampling was required in 2 cases (redraw rate = 1.6 %.Conclusions: Our results confirm that NIPT represents a fast, safe and highly accurate advanced screening test for most common chromosomal abnormalities. In current clinical practice, NIPT would significantly decrease the number of unnecessary invasive procedures and the rate of fetal

  15. Cloning, tissue expression pattern characterization and chromosome localization of human peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase cDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Oxidation and reduction of some amino acids are one of the molecular mechanisms for regulating the function of proteins. The oxidation of methionine (Met) to methionine sulfoxide (Met(O)) results in decreasing or loss of the biological activity of related proteins. It was found that peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase (msrA) can reduce Met(O) to Met and therefore restored the biological function of the oxidized proteins. To reveal the methionine oxidation-reduction mechanism in human body, in this study, the cDNA sequence of bovine msrA was used as an information-probe to screen the human EST database. Based on a contig assembled from homologous ESTs, a 1 256-bp human MSRA cDNA was cloned from several human cDNA libraries. The cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 705 bp in length, which encodes 235 amino acid residues. Homology comparison revealed that human MSRA shares 88% and 61% identities with bovine and Escherichia coli msrA protein respectively. Expression pattern analysis revealed a single 1.6-kb transcript of human MSRA in most human tissues and with highest expression in kidney. By radiation hybrid panel mapping, the gene was localized to human chromosome 8p22-23 between markers D8S518 and D8S550. There are 2 human inherited diseases Keratolytic Winter Erythema and Microcephaly related genes in this region, it is inferred that human MSRA might be the candidate of the two diseases.

  16. Isolation of subtelomeric DNA sequences labelling sheep and goat chromosome ends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribiu Edmond P

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two techniques that make it possible to isolate telomere DNA are presented, using sheep as an example. The first technique is based upon the screening of a sheep BAC library with PCR amplified DNA segments preserved from high-power laser beam irradiation. Twenty-three BACs hybridising to 13 subtelomeric regions in sheep and goats were obtained (out of 27 in the sheep complement, of which 13 recognised more than one region, telomeric or not. Twenty-three microsatellites were isolated from these BACs and 22 were genetically mapped on the sheep international genetic map, always consistently with the cytogenetical localisation in 17 cases out of 22. These results are discussed. The second technique is based upon the selective cloning of subtelomeric enriched DNA. Preliminary results were obtained by this approach.

  17. Determination of plasmid copy number reveals the total plasmid DNA amount is greater than the chromosomal DNA amount in Bacillus thuringiensis YBT-1520.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunying Zhong

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is the most widely used bacterial bio-insecticide, and most insecticidal crystal protein-coding genes are located on plasmids. Most strains of B. thuringiensis harbor numerous diverse plasmids, although the plasmid copy numbers (PCNs of all native plasmids in this host and the corresponding total plasmid DNA amount remains unknown. In this study, we determined the PCNs of 11 plasmids (ranging from 2 kb to 416 kb in a sequenced B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain YBT-1520 using real-time qPCR. PCNs were found to range from 1.38 to 172, and were negatively correlated to plasmid size. The amount of total plasmid DNA (∼8.7 Mbp was 1.62-fold greater than the amount of chromosomal DNA (∼5.4 Mbp at the mid-exponential growth stage (OD(600 = 2.0 of the organism. Furthermore, we selected three plasmids with different sizes and replication mechanisms to determine the PCNs over the entire life cycle. We found that the PCNs dynamically shifted at different stages, reaching their maximum during the mid-exponential growth or stationary phases and remaining stable and close to their minimum after the prespore formation stage. The PCN of pBMB2062, which is the smallest plasmid (2062 bp and has the highest PCN of those tested, varied in strain YBT-1520, HD-1, and HD-136 (172, 115, and 94, respectively. These findings provide insight into both the total plasmid DNA amount of B. thuringiensis and the strong ability of the species to harbor plasmids.

  18. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol' li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  19. Validation of a reaction volume reduction protocol for analysis of Y chromosome haplotypes targeting DNA databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S; Santos, S M; Rabêlo, K C N; Soriano, E P; Carvalho, M V D; Junior, A F Caldas; Porto, G G; Campello, R I C; Antunes, A A; Queiroz, R A; Souza, S M

    2017-04-28

    The use of Y chromosome haplotypes, important for the detection of sexual crimes in forensics, has gained prominence with the use of databases that incorporate these genetic profiles in their system. Here, we optimized and validated an amplification protocol for Y chromosome profile retrieval in reference samples using lesser materials than those in commercial kits. FTA(®) cards (Flinders Technology Associates) were used to support the oral cells of male individuals, which were amplified directly using the SwabSolution reagent (Promega). First, we optimized and validated the process to define the volume and cycling conditions. Three reference samples and nineteen 1.2 mm-diameter perforated discs were used per sample. Amplification of one or two discs (samples) with the PowerPlex(®) Y23 kit (Promega) was performed using 25, 26, and 27 thermal cycles. Twenty percent, 32%, and 100% reagent volumes, one disc, and 26 cycles were used for the control per sample. Thereafter, all samples (N = 270) were amplified using 27 cycles, one disc, and 32% reagents (optimized conditions). Data was analyzed using a study of equilibrium values between fluorophore colors. In the samples analyzed with 20% volume, an imbalance was observed in peak heights, both inside and in-between each dye. In samples amplified with 32% reagents, the values obtained for the intra-color and inter-color standard balance calculations for verification of the quality of the analyzed peaks were similar to those of samples amplified with 100% of the recommended volume. The quality of the profiles obtained with 32% reagents was suitable for insertion into databases.

  20. DNA repair gene polymorphisms in relation to chromosome aberration frequencies in retired radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilding, Craig S. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: craig.wilding@westlakes.ac.uk; Relton, Caroline L. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Paediatric and Lifecourse Epidemiology Research Group, School of Clinical Medical Sciences (Child Health), Newcastle University, Sir James Spence Institute, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 4LP (United Kingdom); Rees, Gwen S. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Tarone, Robert E. [International Epidemiology Institute, 1455 Research Boulevard, Suite 550, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Whitehouse, Caroline A. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Tawn, E. Janet [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    Polymorphic variation in DNA repair genes was examined in a group of retired workers from the British Nuclear Fuels plc facility at Sellafield in relation to previously determined translocation frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Variation at seven polymorphisms in four genes involved in the base excision repair (XRCC1 R194W, R399Q and a [AC]{sub n} microsatellite in the 3' UTR) and double strand break repair (XRCC3 T241M and a [AC]{sub n} microsatellite in intron 3 of XRCC3, XRCC4 I134T, and a GACTAn microsatellite located 120kb 5' of XRCC5) pathways was determined for 291 retired radiation workers who had received cumulative occupational external radiation doses of between 0 and 1873mSv. When the interaction between radiation dose and each DNA repair gene polymorphism was examined in relation to translocation frequency there was no evidence for any of the polymorphisms studied influencing the response to occupational exposure. A positive interaction observed between genotype (individuals with at least one allele >=20 repeat units) at a microsatellite locus in the XRCC3 gene and smoking status should be interpreted cautiously because interactions were investigated for seven polymorphisms and two exposures. Nonetheless, further research is warranted to examine whether this DNA repair gene variant might be associated with a sub-optimal repair response to smoking-induced DNA damage and hence an increased frequency of translocations.

  1. Subnuclear relocalization and silencing of a chromosomal region by an ectopic ribosomal DNA repeat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Domange Jordö, Marie Elise; Mebarek, Mazhoura Aït;

    2013-01-01

    dimerization, providing a mechanism for the observed relocalization. Replacing the full rDNA repeat with Reb1-binding sites, and using mutants lacking the histone H3K9 methyltransferase Clr4, indicated that the relocalized region was silenced redundantly by heterochromatin and another mechanism, plausibly...

  2. Personalised pathway analysis reveals association between DNA repair pathway dysregulation and chromosomal instability in sporadic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Srihari, Sriganesh; Lal, Samir; Gautier, Benoît; Simpson, Peter T; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ragan, Mark A; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh

    2016-01-01

    The Homologous Recombination (HR) pathway is crucial for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated during DNA replication. Defects in HR repair have been linked to the initiation and development of a wide variety of human malignancies, and exploited in chemical, radiological and targeted therapies. In this study, we performed a personalised pathway analysis independently for four large sporadic breast cancer cohorts to investigate the status of HR pathway dysregulation in individual sporadic breast tumours, its association with HR repair deficiency and its impact on tumour characteristics. Specifically, we first manually curated a list of HR genes according to our recent review on this pathway (Liu et al., 2014), and then applied a personalised pathway analysis method named Pathifier (Drier et al., 2013) on the expression levels of the curated genes to obtain an HR score quantifying HR pathway dysregulation in individual tumours. Based on the score, we observed a great diversity in HR dysregulation between and within gene expression-based breast cancer subtypes, and by using two published HR-defect signatures, we found HR pathway dysregulation reflects HR repair deficiency. Furthermore, we identified a novel association between HR pathway dysregulation and chromosomal instability (CIN) in sporadic breast cancer. Although CIN has long been considered as a hallmark of most solid tumours, with recent extensive studies highlighting its importance in tumour evolution and drug resistance, the molecular basis of CIN in sporadic cancers remains poorly understood. Our results imply that HR pathway dysregulation might contribute to CIN in sporadic breast cancer.

  3. DNA binding by FOXP3 domain-swapped dimer suggests mechanisms of long-range chromosomal interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yongheng; Chen, Chunxia; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Chun-Chi; Johnson, Matthew E.; Espinoza, Celso A.; Edsall, Lee E.; Ren, Bing; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Grant, Struan F.A.; Wells, Andrew D.; Chen, Lin (LICR); (UPENN); (USC)

    2015-01-07

    FOXP3 is a lineage-specific transcription factor that is required for regulatory T cell development and function. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of the FOXP3 forkhead domain bound to DNA. The structure reveals that FOXP3 can form a stable domain-swapped dimer to bridge DNA in the absence of cofactors, suggesting that FOXP3 may play a role in long-range gene interactions. To test this hypothesis, we used circular chromosome conformation capture coupled with high throughput sequencing (4C-seq) to analyze FOXP3-dependent genomic contacts around a known FOXP3-bound locus, Ptpn22. Our studies reveal that FOXP3 induces significant changes in the chromatin contacts between the Ptpn22 locus and other Foxp3-regulated genes, reflecting a mechanism by which FOXP3 reorganizes the genome architecture to coordinate the expression of its target genes. Our results suggest that FOXP3 mediates long-range chromatin interactions as part of its mechanisms to regulate specific gene expression in regulatory T cells.

  4. Cloning of genomic DNA of rice 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase gene and chromosomal localization of the gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐军望; 冯德江; 李旭刚; 常团结; 朱祯

    2002-01-01

    The shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSPs) is the target of nonselective herbicide glyphosate. A partial rice epsps cDNA was generated by RT-PCR with primers designed according to EST sequence in GenBank and used as probe for rice genomic library screening. In a screen of approximately 8.0×104 clones from the rice genomic library, sixteen positive clones were obtained, which strongly hybridized to the probe. One clone, E11, was selected for further analysis and the full-length 3661 bp rice epsps genomic sequence was obtained. Sequence analysis and homologous comparison revealed that epsps gene is composed of 8 exons and 7 introns. Analysis by restriction fragment length polymorphism with the probe of rice epsps cDNA fragment confirmed that rice epsps is located on chromosome 6 with an indica-japonica (ZYQ8-JX17) double-haploid (DH) population. This is the first report on the EPSP synthase from monocotyledons.

  5. Increased frequency of asynapsis and associated meiotic silencing of heterologous chromatin in the presence of irradiation-induced extra DNA double strand breaks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, S.; Wassenaar, E.; Cappellen, W.A. van; Derijck, A.A.; Boer, P. de; Laven, J.S.E.; Grootegoed, J.A.; Baarends, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    In meiotic prophase of male placental mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, which activates meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), leading to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. MSCI is most likely related to meiotic silencing of unsynapsed ch

  6. Extraction of genomic DNA from solid tissues of teleostei fish/ Extração de DNA genômico em tecidos sólidos de peixes teleósteos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Gasparino

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The object of this work was to extract the genomic DNA of solid tissue from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus, piau (Leporinus sp. and curimba (Prochilodus lineatus, using the methods Proteinase K (PK and Cetyltrimethylammiun Bromide (CTAB. The DNA extractedfrom samples of liver, kidney, tail fin, heart, muscle and gills were quantified in spectrophotometer to determine the concentration and purity through the ratio A260nm/A280nm. The data were statistically analyzed and there were no significant effect of interaction between species and tissues about the purityand concentration of the DNA obtained with CTAB, but for the PK there were interaction about the concentration. Using the CTAB method was verified that the mean quantity of DNA in the curimbakidney was significantly (pO objetivo desse trabalho foi extrair o DNA genômico de tecidos sólidos de tilápia do Nilo (Oreochromis niloticus, pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus, piau (Leporinus sp. e curimba (Prochilodus lineatus, utilizando os métodos Proteinase K (PK e Brometo de Cetiltrimetilamônio (CTAB. O DNA extraído das amostras de fígado, rim, nadadeira caudal, coração, músculo e brânquias foi quantificado em espectrofotômetro para determinação da concentração e da pureza por meio da razão A260nm/A280nm. Os dados foram estatisticamente analisados e não se observou efeito significativo para a interação entre espécies e tecidos em relação à pureza e concentração do DNA obtido a partir do CTAB, porém para PK houve interação em relação à concentração. Utilizando o método CTAB verificou-se que a concentração média de DNA no rim de curimba foi significativamente (p < 0,05 inferior (106,98 ?g/mL à observada em pacu (1727,90 ?g/mL, porém não diferiram das encontradas em piau (497,20 ?g/mL e tilápia (234,50 ?g/ mL. Para o método PK, a concentração média de DNA utilizando o músculo de tilápia do Nilo apresentou o menor valor

  7. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  8. Characterization of a DNA sequence family in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region in 15q11-q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, B.; Knoblauch, H.; Buiting, K.; Horsthemke, B. (Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany))

    1993-04-01

    IR4-3R (D15S11) is an anonymous DNA sequence from human chromosome 15. Using YAC cloning and restriction enzyme analysis, the authors have found that IR4-3R detects five related DNA sequences, which are spread over 700 kb within the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region in 15q11-q 13. The RsaI and StyI polymorphisms, which were described previously, are associated with the most proximal copy of IR4-3R and are in strong linkage disequilibrium. IR4-3R represents the third DNA sequence family that has been identified in 15q11-q13. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Universal spectrum for DNA base C+G concentration variability in Human chromosome Y

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2004-01-01

    The spatial distribution of DNA base sequence A, C, G and T exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations and the corresponding power spectra follow inverse power law form, which implies the following: (1) A scale invariant eddy continuum, namely, the amplitudes of component eddies are related to each other by a scale factor alone. In general, the scale factor is different for different scale ranges and indicates a multifractal structure for the spatial distribution of DNA base sequence. (2) Long-range spatial correlations of the eddy fluctuations. Multifractal structure to space-time fluctuations and the associated inverse power law form for power spectra is generic to spatially extended dynamical systems in nature and is a signature of self-organized criticality. The exact physical mechanism for the observed self-organized criticality is not yet identified. The author has developed a general systems theory where quantum mechanical laws emerge as self-consistent explanations for the observed long-range space-time...

  10. SCAI promotes DNA double-strand break repair in distinct chromosomal contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rebecca Kring; Mund, Andreas; Poulsen, Sara Lund;

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose accurate repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) is crucial for genome integrity and is strongly influenced by the local chromatin environment. Here, we identify SCAI (suppressor of cancer...... cell invasion) as a 53BP1-interacting chromatin-associated protein that promotes the functionality of several DSB repair pathways in mammalian cells. SCAI undergoes prominent enrichment at DSB sites through dual mechanisms involving 53BP1-dependent recruitment to DSB-surrounding chromatin and 53BP1......-independent accumulation at resected DSBs. Cells lacking SCAI display reduced DSB repair capacity, hypersensitivity to DSB-inflicting agents and genome instability. We demonstrate that SCAI is a mediator of 53BP1-dependent repair of heterochromatin-associated DSBs, facilitating ATM kinase signalling at DSBs...

  11. High frequency of centromere inactivation resulting in stable dicentric chromosomes of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fangpu; Lamb, Jonathan C; Birchler, James A

    2006-02-28

    Somatic chromosome spreads from maize (Zea mays L.) plants containing B-A translocation chromosomes undergoing the chromosome type breakage-fusion-bridge cycle were examined by FISH. The size and type of extra chromosomes varied among cells of the same individual. A collection of minichromosomes derived from the chromosome type breakage-fusion-bridge cycle was examined for the presence of stable dicentric chromosomes. Six of 23 chromosomes in the collection contained two regions with DNA sequences typical of centromeres. Functional analysis and immunolabeling of CENH3, the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, revealed only one functional centromere per chromosome, despite the duplicate centromere sequences. One plant was found with an inactive B centromere that had been translocated to the short arm of chromosome 9. The translocated centromere region appeared identical to that of a normal B chromosome. The inactivation of the centromeres was stable for at least four generations. By using dicentrics from dispensable chromosomes, centromere inactivation was found to be quite common under these circumstances.

  12. Chromosome damage induced by DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors combined with g-radiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina P. Araújo

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined radiation and antineoplastic drug treatment have important applications in cancer therapy. In the present work, an evaluation was made of two known topoisomerase II inhibitors, doxorubicin (DXR and mitoxantrone (MXN, with g-radiation. The effects of DXR or MXN on g-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells were analyzed. Two concentrations of each drug, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/ml DXR, and 0.02 and 0.04 µg/ml MXN, were applied in combination with two doses of g-radiation (20 and 40 cGy. A significant potentiating effect on chromosomal aberrations was observed in CHO cells exposed to 1.0 µg/ml DXR plus 40 cGy. In the other tests, the combination of g-radiation with DXR or MXN gave approximately additive effects. Reduced mitotic indices reflected higher toxicity of the drugs when combined with radiation.A associação de radiação ionizante com drogas antineoplásicas tem importante aplicação na terapia do câncer. No presente trabalho, foram avaliados os efeitos de dois inibidores de topoisomerase II, doxorubicina (DXR e mitoxantrona (MXN, sobre as aberrações cromossômicas induzidas pelas radiações-g em células do ovário de hamster chinês (CHO. Foram usadas as concentrações 0,5 e 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e 0,02 e 0,04 mg/ml de MXN, combinadas com duas doses de radiações gama (20 e 40 cGy. Um significativo efeito potenciador das aberrações cromossômicas foi observado em células CHO tratadas com 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e expostas a 40 cGy de radiação. Nos outros testes, a combinação da radiação-g com a DXR ou MXN apresentou um efeito próximo ao aditivo. A redução dos índices mitóticos refletiu a alta citotoxicidade das drogas quando combinadas às radiações-g.

  13. Assignment of heregulin (HGL) to human chromosome 8p22-p11 by PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrid DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.; Wood, W.I. (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Heregulin is a recently described ligand and specific activator of the receptor tyrosine kinase designated HER2 (also called erbB2 or neu). Heregulin is a secreted 45-kDa protein that contains a region with amino acid sequence similarity to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The receptors for heregulin and EGF are encoded by related protooncogenes that can produce cellular transformation and are associated with human malignancies. The overexpression of HER2 correlates with a poor prognosis in breast, ovarian, and other cancers. Heregulin was purified from the conditioned medium of a human breast cancer cell line. The isolation of cDNA clones encoding heregulin show that several alternatively spliced variants of the protein are produced. The mature protein is derived from the N-terminal half of a 640-amino-acid precursor that includes a hydrophobic domain that may anchor the precursor in the cell membrane. Recombinantly produced heregulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of HER2 in a number of cell lines and augments the proliferation of the HER2-overexpressing cell line, SK-BR-3. Heregulin mRNA is expressed in many human tissues including breast, brain, ovary, testis, small intestine, and others. The rat homologue of heregulin has also been isolated, and cDNA clones encoding this protein have been described. The rat protein has been termed Neu differentiation factor based on its ability to induce the differentiation of a mammary tumor cell line. The gene for heregulin was mapped to human chromosome 8 by PCR amplification using primers specific for human but not rodent DNA in somatic cell hybrids.

  14. Detection of chromosome aneuploidy in breast lesions with fluorescence in situ hybridization: Comparison of whole nuclei to thin tissue sections and correlation with flow cytometric DNA analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visscher, D.W.; Wallis, T.; Ritchie, C.A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    We compared flow-cytometric DNA histogram pattern to counts of 4 fluorescent-labelled centromeric probes (chromosomes 1, 7, 8, and 17) in whole nuclei (WN) and in nuclei from formalin-fixed deparaffinized thin tissue section (TS) in 25 breast lesions. In benign lesions, signal gains (i.e., trisomic nuclei) were never observed in greater than 10% of nuclei from either WN or TS preparations. Loss of signal in benign breast lesions, however, varied considerably (0-43%) between individual case and between chromosome probes. The mean incidence of signal loss in WN of benign lesions ranged from 8.9% (chromosome 7) to 14.4 % (chromosome 1) of nuclei. These signal loss frequencies exceeded those of benign lymphoid control cells. In three benign lesions, signal loss in WN (with one probe) was observed in at least 25% of nuclei. Signal losses in benign TS, on average, were 50-150% greater than in matched WN preparations (chromosome 1: 21.7%, chromosome 7: 21.5%). Malignant lesions generally, but not always, displayed fewer monosomic nuclei and more trisomic nuclei in compared to TS, compatible with a slicing (i.e., nuclear truncation) artifact. Signal counts in carcinomas correlated well with flow cytometric DNA index; however, they were also characterized by evidence of genetic instability, manifest as signal gains in a subset of nuclei (10-25%) with individual probes in diploid range cases, as well as intratumoral heterogeneity, reflected as discrepancies in probe counts between WN and TS samples. We conclude that signal losses with centromeric probes are largely, but not entirely, explained by nuclear slicing. The minimum signal loss threshold for establishment of monosomy using interphase cytogenetics is thus unclear, even in WN. Signal gains indicative of trisomy, in contrast, are reliably associated with malignancy and may reflect gross DNA aneuploidy as well as genetic instability. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Discriminatory profile of rDNA sites and trend for acrocentric chromosome formation in the genus Trachinotus Lacépède, 1801 (Perciformes, Carangidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uedson Jacobina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal traits have provided valuable information for phylogeny and taxonomy of several fish groups. Three Atlantic Carangidae species of the genus Trachinotus Lacépède, 1801 (T. goodei Jordan et Evermann, 1896, T. carolinus (Linnaeus, 1766 and T. falcatus (Linnaeus, 1758 were investigated,2n=48 chromosomes but different chromosomal arms (FN number, i.e., 52, 56 and 58, respectively, in view of the different number of two-armed chromosomes found in their karyotypes. Thus, T. goodei, T. carolinus and T. falcatus present a progressive distance from the probable basal karyotype proposed for Perciformes (2n=48 acrocentrics, FN=48. At first sight, these findings do not agree with the phylogenetic hypothesis based on mitochondrial sequences, where T. goodei appear as the most derived species, followed by T. falcatus and T. carolinus, respectively. However, the chromosomal mapping of ribosomal DNAs was informative for clarifying this apparent conflict. Indeed, the multiple 5S and 18S rDNA sites found in T. goodei corroborate the most derived condition for this species. In this sense, the occurrence of the unexpected number of two-armed chromosomes and FN value for this species, as well as for T. carolinus, must be due to additional rounds of acrocentric formation in these species, modifying the macrostructure of their karyotypes.

  16. Cytogenetic analysis in three Bryconamericus species (Characiformes, Characidae): first description of the 5S rDNA-bearing chromosome pairs in the genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Nowadays, the genus Bryconamericus is placed in subfamily Stevardiinae within of Characidae, but not shows consistent evidence of monophyletism. The purpose of this work was to study the chromosomes of three species of Bryconamericus, aiming to add cytogenetic knowledge and contribute to the understanding of the chromosomal evolution of this genus. Results The chromosomes of three species of Bryconamericus were analyzed using cytogenetic techniques. The karyotype of Bryconamericus stramineus contained 6 metacentric (m) + 10 submetacentric (sm) + 16 subtelocentric (st) + 20 acrocentric (a), the fundamental number (FN) of 84, one silver impregnated (Ag-NOR) pair, one pair bearing the 18S ribosomal DNA sites, another pair bearing the 5S rDNA sites, and a few positive C-bands. Bryconamericus turiuba had a karyotype containing 8 m + 10sm + 14st + 20a (FN = 84), one chromosome pair Ag-NOR, two pairs bearing the 18S rDNA sites, two pairs bearing the 5S rDNA sites, and a few C-band regions. Bryconamericus cf. iheringii had a karyotype containing 10 m + 14sm + 18st + 10a (FN = 94), including one pair with a secondary constriction Ag-NOR positive. In this karyotype the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed the 18S and 5S rDNA probe in adjacent position. Conclusions The results obtained in this work showed different characteristics in the organization of two multigene families, indicating that distinct evolutionary forces acting on the diversity of rDNA sequences in the genome of three Bryconamericus species. PMID:23547656

  17. Transcription analysis of the dnaA gene and oriC region of the chromosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and its regulation by the DnaA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Leiria; Guerrero, Elba; Casart, Yveth; Turcios, Lilia; Bartoli, Fulvia

    2003-03-01

    The regions flanking the Mycobacterium dnaA gene have extensive sequence conservation, and comprise various DnaA boxes. Comparative analysis of the dnaA promoter and oriC region from several mycobacterial species revealed that the localization, spacing and orientation of the DnaA boxes are conserved. Detailed transcriptional analysis in M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG shows that the dnaN gene of both species and the dnaA gene of M. bovis BCG are transcribed from two promoters, whereas the dnaA gene of M. smegmatis is transcribed from a single promoter. RT-PCR with total RNA showed that dnaA and dnaN were expressed in both species at all growth stages. Analysis of the promoter activity using dnaA-gfp fusion plasmids and DnaA expression plasmids indicates that the dnaA gene is autoregulated, although the degree of transcriptional autorepression was moderate. Transcription was also detected in the vicinity of oriC of M. bovis BCG, but not of M. smegmatis. These results suggest that a more complex transcriptional mechanism may be involved in the slow-growing mycobacteria, which regulates the expression of dnaA and initiation of chromosomal DNA replication.

  18. Chromatin dynamics during cell cycle mediate conversion of DNA damage into chromatid breaks and affect formation of chromosomal aberrations: Biological and clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I.; Hatzi, Vasiliki I. [Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Centre for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , 15310 Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece); Donta-Bakoyianni, Catherine [Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, University of Athens Dental School, Athens (Greece); Pantelias, Gabriel E., E-mail: gabriel@ipta.demokritos.gr [Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Centre for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , 15310 Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece)

    2011-06-03

    The formation of diverse chromosomal aberrations following irradiation and the variability in radiosensitivity at different cell-cycle stages remain a long standing controversy, probably because most of the studies have focused on elucidating the enzymatic mechanisms involved using simple DNA substrates. Yet, recognition, processing and repair of DNA damage occur within the nucleoprotein complex of chromatin which is dynamic in nature, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding. The present work reviews experimental work designed to investigate the impact of chromatin dynamics and chromosome conformation changes during cell-cycle in the formation of chromosomal aberrations. Using conventional cytogenetics and premature chromosome condensation to visualize interphase chromatin, the data presented support the hypothesis that chromatin dynamic changes during cell-cycle are important determinants in the conversion of sub-microscopic DNA lesions into chromatid breaks. Consequently, the type and yield of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations at a given cell-cycle-stage depends on the combined effect of DNA repair processes and chromatin dynamics, which is cell-cycle-regulated and subject to up- or down-regulation following radiation exposure or genetic alterations. This new hypothesis is used to explain the variability in radiosensitivity observed at various cell-cycle-stages, among mutant cells and cells of different origin, or among different individuals, and to revisit unresolved issues and unanswered questions. In addition, it is used to better understand hypersensitivity of AT cells and to provide an improved predictive G2-assay for evaluating radiosensitivity at individual level. Finally, experimental data at single cell level obtained using hybrid cells suggest that the proposed hypothesis applies only to the irradiated component of the hybrid.

  19. DNA rearrangement has occurred in the carbazole-degradative plasmid pCAR1 and the chromosome of its unsuitable host, Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Ohkuma, Moriya; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    The carbazole-degradative plasmid pCAR1 carries the class II transposon Tn4676, which contains the car and ant genes, essential for conversion of carbazole into anthranilate, and anthranilate into catechol, respectively. In our previous study, DNA rearrangements in pCAR1 were frequently detected in the host Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 in the presence of carbazole, resulting in the improvement of host survivability. Several Pf0-1 mutants harbouring pCAR1 were isolated, and deletion of DNA in the plasmid ant gene was found. Here, we compared genome sequences of the parent strain Pf0-1L(pCAR1::rfp) and one of its mutants, 5EP83, to assess whether other DNA rearrangements occurred in either the plasmid or the host chromosome. We found transposition of Tn4676 into the 5EP83 chromosome. In addition, ISPre1 had transposed into the car gene intergenic region on the pCAR1-derivative plasmid of 5EP83, which inhibited car transcription. As a result of these transpositions, 5EP83 was able to metabolize carbazole due to the Tn4676 on its chromosome, although the car genes on its plasmid were non-functional. We also found that one copy of duplicate carAa genes had been deleted, and that ISPre4 had transposed into both the host chromosome and the plasmid. Our findings suggest that Pf0-1 harbouring pCAR1 is subjected to DNA rearrangements not only on the plasmid but also on its chromosome in the presence of carbazole.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF A TUMOR-MARKER CHROMOSOME BY FLOW SORTING, DNA AMPLIFICATION INVITRO, AND INSITU HYBRIDIZATION OF THE AMPLIFIED PRODUCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOSCHMAN, GA; BUYS, CHCM; VANDERVEEN, AY; RENS, W; OSINGA, J; SLATER, RM; ATEN, JA

    1993-01-01

    A method combining flow sorting and molecular cytogenetic techniques for the identification of unknown marker chromosomes is described. In this study, the bladder tumor cell line J82 was used, which was known to carry a marker chromosome of the size of chromosome 7 in every cell. From the cytogeneti

  1. Characterization of human chromosomal DNA sequences which replicate autonomously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, J F; Norbury, C J; Tuite, M F; Dobson, M J; Mills, J S; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1984-01-01

    We have characterised two restriction fragments, isolated from a "shotgun" collection of human DNA, which function as autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional domains of these fragments have been defined by subcloning and exonuclease (BAL 31) deletion analysis. Both fragments contain two spatially distinct domains. One is essential for high frequency transformation and is termed the Replication Sequence (RS) domain, the other, termed the Replication Enhancer (RE) domain, has no inherent replication competence but is essential for ensuring maximum function of the RS domain. The nucleotide sequence of these domains reveals several conserved sequences one of which is strikingly similar to the yeast ARS consensus sequence. PMID:6320114

  2. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNA Sequences in Five Species of Astyanax (Characiformes, Characidae) Reveals Independent Location of U1 and U2 snRNA Sites and Association of U1 snRNA and 5S rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Duilio M Z A; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Pansonato-Alves, José C; Oliveira, Cláudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Astyanax is a genus of Characidae fishes currently composed of 155 valid species. Previous cytogenetic studies revealed high chromosomal diversification among them, and several studies have been performed using traditional cytogenetic techniques to investigate karyotypes and chromosomal locations of 18S and 5S rDNA genes. However, only a few studies are currently available about other repetitive sequences. Here, the chromosomal location of small nuclear RNA genes, identified as U1 and U2 snRNA clusters, was established and compared to the distribution of 5S rDNA and histone clusters in 5 Astyanax species (A. paranae, A. fasciatus, A. bockmanni, A. altiparanae, and A. jordani) using FISH. The cytogenetic mapping of U1 and U2 snRNA demonstrated a conserved pattern in the number of sites per genome independent of the location in Astyanax species. The location of the U1 snRNA gene was frequently associated with 5S rDNA sequences, indicating a possible interaction between the distinct repetitive DNA families. Finally, comparisons involving the location of U1 and U2 snRNA clusters in the chromosomes of Astyanax species revealed a very diverse pattern, suggesting that many rearrangements have occurred during the diversification process of this group. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNAs in the beetle Dichotomius geminatus provides the first evidence for an association of 5S rRNA and histone H3 genes in insects, and repetitive DNA similarity between the B chromosome and A complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-de-Mello, D C; Moura, R C; Martins, C

    2010-04-01

    Chromosomal banding techniques and repetitive DNA mapping are useful tools in comparative analysis and in the elucidation of genome organization of several groups of eukaryotes. In this study, we contributed to the knowledge of Coleoptera genomes by reporting the chromosomal organization of repetitive DNA sequences, as well as the presence and characteristics of a B chromosome in two natural populations of Dichotomius geminatus (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae) using classical, chromosomal banding and molecular cytogenetic techniques. As in other coleopteran species, the heterochromatin was mainly concentrated in pericentromeric regions and the B chromosome was composed almost entirely of heterochromatin. Physical mapping using double fluorescent in situ hybridization was performed for the first time in Coleoptera; using DNA probes for 5S and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and histone H3 genes, we showed that ribosomal 18S rDNAs are located in chromosomes 3 and 4, whereas 5S rRNA and histone H3 genes are colocalized in chromosomal pair 2 and show an apparently interspersed organization. Moreover, these genes are not present in the B chromosome, suggesting that the B chromosome did not originate from chromosomal pairs 2, 3 or 4. On the other hand, mapping of the C(0)t-1 DNA fraction showed that the B chromosome is enriched in repetitive DNA elements, also present in the standard complement, indicating an intraspecific origin of this element in D. geminatus. These results will contribute to our understanding of genome organization and evolution of repetitive elements in Coleoptera and other insects regarding both A and B chromosomes.

  4. Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for rapid distinction between unique sequence positive and negative marker chromosomes in prenatal diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van Opstal (Diane); M. Boter (Marjan); P. Noomen (Petra); M. Srebniak (Malgorzata); G. Hamers (Guus); R-J.H. Galjaard (Robert-Jan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are extra structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified with conventional chromosome banding techniques. These marker chromosomes may cause an abnormal phenotype or be harmless depending on different fa

  5. Analysis of plastid and mitochondrial DNA insertions in the nucleus (NUPTs and NUMTs) of six plant species: size, relative age and chromosomal localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalovova, M; Vyskot, B; Kejnovsky, E

    2013-10-01

    We analysed the size, relative age and chromosomal localization of nuclear sequences of plastid and mitochondrial origin (NUPTs-nuclear plastid DNA and NUMTs-nuclear mitochondrial DNA) in six completely sequenced plant species. We found that the largest insertions showed lower divergence from organelle DNA than shorter insertions in all species, indicating their recent origin. The largest NUPT and NUMT insertions were localized in the vicinity of the centromeres in the small genomes of Arabidopsis and rice. They were also present in other chromosomal regions in the large genomes of soybean and maize. Localization of NUPTs and NUMTs correlated positively with distribution of transposable elements (TEs) in Arabidopsis and sorghum, negatively in grapevine and soybean, and did not correlate in rice or maize. We propose a model where new plastid and mitochondrial DNA sequences are inserted close to centromeres and are later fragmented by TE insertions and reshuffled away from the centromere or removed by ectopic recombination. The mode and tempo of TE dynamism determines the turnover of NUPTs and NUMTs resulting in their species-specific chromosomal distributions.

  6. Meiotic DNA double-strand breaks and chromosome asynapsis in mice are monitored by distinct HORMAD2-independent and -dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtasz, Lukasz; Cloutier, Jeffrey M; Baumann, Marek; Daniel, Katrin; Varga, János; Fu, Jun; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis; Reményi, Attila; Turner, James M A; Tóth, Attila

    2012-05-01

    Meiotic crossover formation involves the repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and synaptonemal complex (SC) formation. Completion of these processes must precede the meiotic divisions in order to avoid chromosome abnormalities in gametes. Enduring key questions in meiosis have been how meiotic progression and crossover formation are coordinated, whether inappropriate asynapsis is monitored, and whether asynapsis elicits prophase arrest via mechanisms that are distinct from the surveillance of unrepaired DNA DSBs. We disrupted the meiosis-specific mouse HORMAD2 (Hop1, Rev7, and Mad2 domain 2) protein, which preferentially associates with unsynapsed chromosome axes. We show that HORMAD2 is required for the accumulation of the checkpoint kinase ATR along unsynapsed axes, but not at DNA DSBs or on DNA DSB-associated chromatin loops. Consistent with the hypothesis that ATR activity on chromatin plays important roles in the quality control of meiotic prophase, HORMAD2 is required for the elimination of the asynaptic Spo11(-/-), but not the asynaptic and DSB repair-defective Dmc1(-/-) oocytes. Our observations strongly suggest that HORMAD2-dependent recruitment of ATR to unsynapsed chromosome axes constitutes a mechanism for the surveillance of asynapsis. Thus, we provide convincing evidence for the existence of a distinct asynapsis surveillance mechanism that safeguards the ploidy of the mammalian germline.

  7. Engineering of plant chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mette, Michael Florian; Houben, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Engineered minimal chromosomes with sufficient mitotic and meiotic stability have an enormous potential as vectors for stacking multiple genes required for complex traits in plant biotechnology. Proof of principle for essential steps in chromosome engineering such as truncation of chromosomes by T-DNA-mediated telomere seeding and de novo formation of centromeres by cenH3 fusion protein tethering has been recently obtained. In order to generate robust protocols for application in plant biotechnology, these steps need to be combined and supplemented with additional methods such as site-specific recombination for the directed transfer of multiple genes of interest on the minichromosomes. At the same time, the development of these methods allows new insight into basic aspects of plant chromosome functions such as how centromeres assure proper distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells or how telomeres serve to cap the chromosome ends to prevent shortening of ends over DNA replication cycles and chromosome end fusion.

  8. An unusual gene arrangement for the putative chromosome replication origin and circadian expression of dnaN in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Tsinoremas, N F

    1996-06-12

    In eubacteria, the clustering of DnaA boxes around the dnaN (beta subunit of DNA polymerase III) and dnaA genes usually defines the chromosome replication origin (oriC). In this study, the dnaN locus from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was sequenced. The gene order in this region is cbbZp-dnaN-orf288-purL-purF which contrasts with other eubacteria. A cluster of eleven DnaA boxes (consensus sequence: TTTTCCACA) was found in the intergenic region between dnaN and cbbZp. We also found a 41-bp sequence within this region that is 80% identical to the proposed oriC of Streptomyces coelicolor. Therefore, we propose that this intergenic region may serve as an oriC in Synechococcus. Using bacterial luciferase as a reporter, we also showed that dnaN is rhythmically expressed, suggesting that DNA replication could be under circadian control in this organism.

  9. cDNA cloning, chromosome mapping and expression characterization of human geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵勇[1; 余龙[2; 高洁[3; 付强[4; 华益民[5; 张宏来[6; 赵寿元[7

    2000-01-01

    Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) mainly participates in post-translational modification for various proteins including Rho/Rac, Rap and Rab families, as well as in regulation for cell apoptosis. Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase (GGPPS), which catalyzes the condensation reaction between farnesyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate, is the key enzyme for synthesizing GGPP. We report the isolation of a gene transcript showing high homology with Drosophila GGPPS cDNA. The transcript is 1 466 bp in length and contains an intact open reading frame (ORF) ranging from nt 239 to 1 138. This ORF encodes a deduced protein of 300 residues with calculated molecular weight of 35 ku. The deduced protein shows 57.5% identity and 75% similarity with Drosophila GGPPS, and contains five characteristic domains of prenyltransferases. Northern hybridization revealed that human GGPPS was expressed highest in heart, and moderately in spleen, testis, brain, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney and pancreas

  10. An easy and versatile 2-step protocol for targeted modification and subcloning of DNA from bacterial artificial chromosomes using non-commercial plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartwich Heiner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Promoter-specific expression of foreign DNA in transgenic organisms often relies on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs. This approach requires modification and subcloning of BAC-DNA by recombineering technologies in Escherichia coli. Most current protocols rely on commercial kits or isolation of BACs, their transfer between different host strains, and their restriction. Findings In this report we present a 2-step protocol for efficient modification and subcloning of DNA from bacterial artificial chromosomes using the non-commercial plasmids pKM208 and pTP223, distributed from addgene.com. A targeting cassette was successfully integrated into a BAC and 42 kb of this construct were subcloned. Both a plasmid-derived substrate with longer homology arms and a PCR-generated substrate with short homology arms (50 bp were used for recombination. pKM208 and pTP223 contain all required genes for recombineering, but differ in their antibiotic resistance genes. This makes the system independent of the selection markers on the DNA molecules targeted for recombination. Conclusions The time and cost saving protocol presented here compares favorably to currently used systems. Using non-commercial plasmids, it allows targeted modification and cloning of large DNA (> 40 kb fragments in vivo without restriction and ligation. Furthermore, both steps are performed in the same host eliminating the need to isolate BAC DNA and to use different bacterial strains.

  11. [Value of detection of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma in the prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-juan; Gao, Zhi-ying; Lu, Yan-ping; Li, Ya-li; You, Yan-qin; Zhang, Li-wen; Wang, Long-xia; Xu, Hong

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the value of detection of fetal cell-free fetal DNA (cff-DNA) in maternal plasma in the prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. The plasma from 3200 gravidas (singleton with 20.3 ± 3.8 gestational weeks) was collected from April 1(st) 2011 to May 30(th) 2012. They were divided into 3 groups: (1) To tally 1720 cases were included in the high-risk serological screening group, in which women were younger than 35 years and got high-risk results in serological screening; (2) To tally 1310 cases were included in the advanced age group, in which women's age was more than 35 years; (3) To tally 170 cases were included in the supplementary group, in which women were younger than 35 years and got low-risk results in serological screening, or women who didn't take serological screening tests. All the 3030 gravidas in group 1 and 2 didn't take invasive prenatal diagnosis because of fear of abortion or short of prenatal diagnosis. Cff-DNA were detected by next generation sequencing in Shenzhen BGI Genomics Center for clinical laboratory. Amniocentesis and karyotype analysis were provided to the positive cases and women with negative results were followed-up by telephone. (1) The 3200 cases took cff-DNA detection, and 31 cases got positive results, including 27 cases of trisomy 21 and 4 cases of trisomy 18. Sixteen cases of trisomy 21 and 1 case of trisomy 18 were in the high-risk serological screening group. 7 cases of trisomy 21 and 2 cases of trisomy 18 were in the advanced age group. Four cases of trisomy 21 and 1 case of trisomy 18 were in the supplementary group. (2) And the 84% (26/31) cff-DNA detecting positive cases received amniocentesis. In the 27 trisomy 21 positive cases, 23 received amniocentesis and got karyotype of 47XN, +21, with the diagnostic accordance rate of 100%. In the 4 cases who didn't take karyotype analysis, fetal anomaly (ventricular septal defect, dextrocardia and choroid plexus cyst) was found in 1 case before 20

  12. Comparison of RBE values of high- LET α-particles for the induction of DNA-DSBs, chromosome aberrations and cell reproductive death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aten Jacob

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various types of radiation effects in mammalian cells have been studied with the aim to predict the radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues, e.g. DNA double strand breaks (DSB, chromosome aberrations and cell reproductive inactivation. However, variation in correlations with clinical results has reduced general application. An additional type of information is required for the increasing application of high-LET radiation in cancer therapy: the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE for effects in tumours and normal tissues. Relevant information on RBE values might be derived from studies on cells in culture. Methods To evaluate relationships between DNA-DSB, chromosome aberrations and the clinically most relevant effect of cell reproductive death, for ionizing radiations of different LET, dose-effect relationships were determined for the induction of these effects in cultured SW-1573 cells irradiated with gamma-rays from a Cs-137 source or with α-particles from an Am-241 source. RBE values were derived for these effects. Ionizing radiation induced foci (IRIF of DNA repair related proteins, indicative of DSB, were assessed by counting gamma-H2AX foci. Chromosome aberration frequencies were determined by scoring fragments and translocations using premature chromosome condensation. Cell survival was mea