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Sample records for expressing gn coupled

  1. Melatonin Inhibits GnRH-1, GnRH-3 and GnRH Receptor Expression in the Brain of the European Sea Bass, Dicentrarchus labrax

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    José Antonio Muñoz-Cueto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several evidences supported the existence of melatonin effects on reproductive system in fish. In order to investigate whether melatonin is involved in the modulation of GnRH systems in the European sea bass, we have injected melatonin (0.5 µg/g body mass in male specimens. The brain mRNA transcript levels of the three GnRH forms and the five GnRH receptors present in this species were determined by real time quantitative PCR. Our findings revealed day–night variations in the brain expression of GnRH-1, GnRH-3 and several GnRH receptors (dlGnRHR-II-1c, -2a, which exhibited higher transcript levels at mid-light compared to mid-dark phase of the photocycle. Moreover, an inhibitory effect of melatonin on the nocturnal expression of GnRH-1, GnRH-3, and GnRH receptors subtypes 1c, 2a and 2b was also demonstrated. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of melatonin affected the expression of hypophysiotrophic GnRH forms and GnRH receptors that exhibit day–night fluctuations, suggesting that exogenous melatonin reinforce physiological mechanisms already established. These interactions between melatoninergic and GnRH systems could be mediating photoperiod effects on reproductive and other rhythmic physiological events in the European sea bass.

  2. Kisspeptin Activates Ankrd 26 Gene Expression in Migrating Embryonic GnRH Neurons

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    Tomoko eSoga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kisspeptin, a newly discovered neuropeptide regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH. Kisspeptins are a large RF-amide family of peptides. The kisspeptin coded by kiss1 gene is a 145-amino acid- protein that is cleaved to C-terminal peptide kisspeptin-10. G-protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54 has been identified as a kisspeptin receptor, and it is expressed in GnRH neurons and in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP labelled GnRH cells with migratory properties, which express GPR54, served as a model to study the effects of kisspeptin on cell migration. We monitored EGFP–GnRH neuronal migration in brain slide culture of embryonic day 14 transgenic rat by live cell imaging system and studied the effects of kisspeptin-10 (1nM treatment for 36h on GnRH migration. Furthermore to determine kisspeptin-induced molecular pathways related with apoptosis, and cytoskeletal changes during neuronal migration, we studied the expression levels of candidate genes in laser captured EGFP–GnRH neurons by real time PCR. We found that there was no change in the expression level of genes related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expression of ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ankrd 26 in EGFP–GnRH neurons was up-regulated by the exposure to kisspeptin. These studies suggest that ankrd26 gene plays an unidentified role in regulating neuronal movement mediated by kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling, which could be a potential pathway to suppress cell migration.

  3. Kisspeptin Activates Ankrd 26 Gene Expression in Migrating Embryonic GnRH Neurons

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    Soga, Tomoko; Lim, Wei Ling; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin, a newly discovered neuropeptide, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Kisspeptins are a large RF-amide family of peptides. The kisspeptin coded by KiSS-1 gene is a 145-amino acid protein that is cleaved to C-terminal peptide kisspeptin-10. G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) has been identified as a kisspeptin receptor, and it is expressed in GnRH neurons and in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) labeled GnRH cells with migratory properties, which express GPR54, served as a model to study the effects of kisspeptin on cell migration. We monitored EGFP–GnRH neuronal migration in brain slide culture of embryonic day 14 transgenic rat by live cell imaging system and studied the effects of kisspeptin-10 (1 nM) treatment for 36 h on GnRH migration. Furthermore, to determine kisspeptin-induced molecular pathways related with apoptosis and cytoskeletal changes during neuronal migration, we studied the expression levels of candidate genes in laser-captured EGFP–GnRH neurons by real-time PCR. We found that there was no change in the expression level of genes related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expression of ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ankrd) 26 in EGFP–GnRH neurons was upregulated by the exposure to kisspeptin. These studies suggest that ankrd 26 gene plays an unidentified role in regulating neuronal movement mediated by kisspeptin–GPR54 signaling, which could be a potential pathway to suppress cell migration. PMID:26973595

  4. Class-C SOX Transcription Factors Control GnRH Gene Expression via the Intronic Transcriptional Enhancer

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    Kim, Hee-Dae; Choe, Han Kyoung; Chung, Sooyoung; Kim, Myungjin; Seong, Jae Young

    2011-01-01

    GnRH is a pivotal hypothalamic neurohormone governing reproduction and sexual development. Because transcriptional regulation is crucial for the spatial and temporal expression of the GnRH gene, a region approximately 3.0 kb upstream of the mammalian GnRH promoter has been extensive studied. In the present study, we demonstrate a transcription-enhancer located in the first intron (intron A) region of the GnRH gene. This transcriptional enhancer harbors putative sex-determining region Y-related high-mobility-group box (SOX) family transcription factor-binding sites, which are well conserved across many mammalian species. The class-C SOX member proteins (SOX-C) (SOX4 and SOX11) specifically augment this transcriptional activation by binding to these SOX-binding sites. In accordance, SOX11 is highly enriched in immortalized GnRH-producing GT1-1 cells, and suppression of its expression significantly decreases GnRH gene expression as well as GnRH secretion. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that endogenous SOX-C factors recognize and bind to the intronic enhancer in GT1-1 cells and the hypothalamus. Accompanying immunohistochemical analysis demonstrates that SOX4 or SOX11 are highly expressed in the majority of hypothalamic GnRH neurons in adult mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that SOX-C transcription factors function as important transcriptional regulators of cell type-specific GnRH gene expression by acting on the intronic transcriptional enhancer. PMID:21527504

  5. Do GnRH analogues directly affect human endometrial epithelial cell gene expression?

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    Zhang, Xiaomei

    2010-03-04

    We examined whether Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues [leuprolide acetate (LA) and ganirelix acetate (GA)] modulate gene expression in Ishikawa cells used as surrogate for human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro. The specific aims were: (i) to study the modulatory effect of GnRH analogues by RT-PCR [in the absence and presence of E2 and P4, and cyclic adenosine monophos-phate (cAMP)] on mRNA expression of genes modulated during the window of implantation in GnRH analogues/rFSH-treated assisted reproductive technology cycles including OPTINEURIN (OPTN), CHROMATIN MODIFYING PROTEIN (CHMP1A), PROSAPOSIN (PSAP), IGFBP-5 and SORTING NEXIN 7 (SNX7), and (ii) to analyze the 5\\'-flanking regions of such genes for the presence of putative steroid-response elements [estrogen-response elements (EREs) and P4-response element (PREs)]. Ishikawa cells were cytokeratin+/vimentin2 and expressed ERa,ERb, PR and GnRH-R proteins. At 6 and 24 h, neither LA nor GA alone had an effect on gene expression. GnRH analogues alone or following E2 and/or P4 co-incubation for 24 h also had no effect on gene expression, but P4 significantly increased expression of CHMP1A.E2 + P4 treatment for 4 days, alone or followed by GA, had no effect, but E2 + P4 treatment followed by LA significantly decreased IGFBP-5 expression. The addition of 8-Br cAMP did not modify gene expression, with the exception of IGFBP-5 that was significantly increased. The GnRH analogues did not modify intracellular cAMP levels. We identified conserved EREs for OPN, CHMP1A, SNX7 and PSAP and PREs for SNX7. We conclude that GnRH analogues appear not to have major direct effects on gene expression of human endo-metrial epithelial cells in vitro. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org.

  6. Characterization and differential expression of three GnRH forms during reproductive development in cultured turbot Schophthalmus maximus

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    Zhao, Chunyan; Xu, Shihong; Feng, Chengcheng; Liu, Yifan; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yanfeng; Xiao, Yongshuang; Song, Zongcheng; Liu, Qinghua; Li, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Turbots (Schophthalmus maximus), one of the most important economic marine flatfish species, fail to undergo final spawning and spermiation naturally under artificial farming conditions. In vertebrates, reproduction is regulated by the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis (BPG-axis), and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is one of its key components. Therefore, to better understand the physiology of reproduction in the turbot, three of the genes encoding GnRH subtypes—sbGnRH, cGnRH-II and sGnRH—were cloned and sequenced by isolating the cDNA sequences. The localizations and patterns of expression of their mRNAs were also evaluated during seasonal gonadal development. All three mRNAs were expressed abundantly in the brain; sbGnRH and sGnRH mRNAs were also detected in the gonads and pituitary gland, and sbGnRH expression was much higher than that of sGnRH, indicating the critical role of sbGnRH in regulating the BPG-axis. Moreover, the brain expression patterns of sbGnRH and sGnRH mRNAs showed an increased trend during gonadal development, peaking in mature stages. This indicated the direct regulation of gonadal development by the GnRH system. In addition, cGnRH-II mRNA expression showed no significant variations, suggesting that cGnRH-II is not critically involved in the control of reproduction. Further, the mRNA abundances of the three GnRH forms in the breeding season were significantly higher than those in immature and post-breeding stages in all analyzed brain areas. Therefore, we propose that sbGnRH is the most important hormone for the regulation of reproduction in turbot via the BPG-axis. These results will help in better understanding the reproductive endocrine mechanisms of turbots and lay the groundwork for additional studies aimed at comparing the reproductive physiology of wild individuals with those raised under artificial conditions.

  7. The novel fusion proteins, GnRH-p53 and GnRHIII-p53, expression and their anti-tumor effect.

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    Peiyuan Jia

    Full Text Available p53, one of the most well studied tumor suppressor factor, is responsible to a variety of damage owing to the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the tumor cells. More than 50% of human tumors contain mutation or deletion of p53. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH, as the ligand of Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R, was used to deliver p53 into tumor cells. The p53 fusion proteins GnRH-p53 and GnRH iii-p53 were expressed and their targeted anti-tumor effects were determined. GnRH mediates its fusion proteins transformation into cancer cells. The intracellular delivery of p53 fusion proteins exerted the inhibition of the growth of H1299 cells in vitro and the reduction of tumor volume in vivo. Their anti-tumor effect was functioned by the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest induced by p53. Hence, the fusion protein could be a novel protein drug for anti-tumor therapy.

  8. A minimalist model of calcium-voltage coupling in GnRH cells

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    Rennie, Martin; Chan, Rossanna; Duan Wen; Sneyd, James [Department of Mathematics, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Schneider, David, E-mail: schneide@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica. Av. del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-03-01

    We present a minimalist model to describe the interplay between burst firing and calcium dynamics in Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells. This model attempts to give a qualitative representation of Duan's model [3], and it comprises two FithzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) coupled systems describing the dynamics of the membrane potential and calcium concentration in the GnRH cells. Within the framework of our minimalist model, we find that the calcium subsystem drives burst firing by making the voltage subsystem to undergo a Hopf bifurcation. Specifically, fast relaxation oscillations occur in a specific region of the c-z plane (c being the calcium concentration, and z a calcium-dependent gating variable). Slow calcium oscillations, instead, are carried by the voltage subsystem by successive shifts of the calcium steady state, and have the net effect of an external perturbation. The full comprehension of the phase-plane of the voltage subsystem and the 3-dimensional phase-space of the calcium subsystem ultimately allows us to study the behaviours of the entire model under the change of certain parameters. Those special parameters do not necessarily follow realistic assumptions, but merely intend to mimic some pharmacological tests which have been performed experimentally and also simulated by Duan's model under the corresponding physiological considerations.

  9. Expression and characterization of a soluble form of tomato spotted wilt virus glycoprotein GN.

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    Whitfield, Anna E; Ullman, Diane E; German, Thomas L

    2004-12-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), a member of the Tospovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae, is an economically important plant pathogen with a worldwide distribution. TSWV is transmitted to plants via thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), which transmit the virus in a persistent propagative manner. The envelope glycoproteins, G(N) and G(C), are critical for the infection of thrips, but they are not required for the initial infection of plants. Thus, it is assumed that the envelope glycoproteins play important roles in the entry of TSWV into the insect midgut, the first site of infection. To directly test the hypothesis that G(N) plays a role in TSWV acquisition by thrips, we expressed and purified a soluble, recombinant form of the G(N) protein (G(N)-S). The expression of G(N)-S allowed us to examine the function of G(N) in the absence of other viral proteins. We detected specific binding to thrips midguts when purified G(N)-S was fed to thrips in an in vivo binding assay. The TSWV nucleocapsid protein and human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B did not bind to thrips midguts, indicating that the G(N)-S-thrips midgut interaction is specific. TSWV acquisition inhibition assays revealed that thrips that were concomitantly fed purified TSWV and G(N)-S had reduced amounts of virus in their midguts compared to thrips that were fed TSWV only. Our findings that G(N)-S binds to larval thrips guts and decreases TSWV acquisition provide evidence that G(N) may serve as a viral ligand that mediates the attachment of TSWV to receptors displayed on the epithelial cells of the thrips midgut.

  10. Withania somnifera aqueous extract facilitates the expression and release of GnRH: In vitro and in vivo study.

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    Kataria, Hardeep; Gupta, Muskan; Lakhman, Sukhwinder; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2015-10-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) has a long history in traditional medicines as an aphrodisiac. It has been known to influence sexual behaviour in animal models but mechanism of action is still unknown. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which Ashwagandha extract exert its gonadotropic activities. Due to the complexity of neuroendocrine pathways, there are limited in vitro models available despite the strong demand for such systems to study and predict neuroendocrine effects of chemicals or natural products. Immortalized rat hypothalamic GnV-3 cell line was investigated as a model to screen for neuroendocrine effects of Ashwagandha extract. GnV-3 cells were cultured under different media conditions and evaluated after treatment with Ashwagandha water extract, for GnRH expression and release by immunostaining and ELISA respectively. These cells acquired differentiated morphology, characteristic shape displayed by preoptic GnRH neurons in vivo. In addition, GnV-3 cells exhibited upregulation of plasticity related polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and mature dendrite marker microtubule associated protein (MAP2) as well as GnRH expression and release. Chloroform fraction of the extract proved to exhibit all the bioactive properties as it induced differentiation and upregulated GnRH and MAP2 expression in GnV-3 cells, similar to Ashwagandha extract. Withanone and Withaferin A were found to be present in ASH-WEX and chloroform fraction while Withanone came out to be the major constituent of chloroform fraction. The preliminary in vivo studies in adult male animals showed that ASH-WEX was able to upregulate the GnRH levels although non-significantly. Taken together, this data demonstrate significant morphological and physiological changes in GnV-3 cells after treatment with Ashwagandha extract and may suggest the potential beneficial effects of Ashwagandha on reproductive functions in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  11. Non-classical testosterone signaling is mediated by a G-protein-coupled receptor interacting with Gnα11.

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    Shihan, Mazen; Bulldan, Ahmed; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone is known to mediate its effects by two different mechanisms of action. In the so-called "classical" pathway testosterone binds to cytosolic androgen receptors (AR), which essentially function as ligand-activated transcription factors. Once activated, these receptors bind to DNA and activate the expression of target genes. In the "non-classical" pathway, the steroid hormone binds to receptors associated with the plasma membrane and induces signaling cascades mediated through activation of Erk1/2. The precise nature of the membrane-associated AR, however, remains controversial. Although some assume that the membrane and cytosolic AR are identical, others propose that the AR of the membrane is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). To evaluate these two possibilities we first searched for testosterone-induced signaling cascades in the spermatogenic cell line GC-2. Testosterone was found to cause phosphorylation (activation) of Erk1/2, CREB, and ATF-1, consistent with its non-classical mechanism of action. Silencing of AR expression by means of siRNA did not influence testosterone-induced activation of Erk1/2, CREB, or ATF-1, indicating that this pathway is not activated by the classical cytosolic/nuclear AR. In contrast, when the expression of the G-protein Gnα11 is suppressed, the activation of these signaling molecules is abolished, suggesting that these responses are elicited through a membrane-bound GPCR. The results presented here and the identification of the testosterone-specific GPCR in future investigations will help to reveal and characterize new testosterone-mediated mechanisms associated not only with fertility and reproduction but perhaps also with other physiological processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Active immunization with recombinant GnRH fusion protein in boars reduces both testicular development and mRNA expression levels of GnRH receptor in pituitary.

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    Fang, Fugui; Li, Haidong; Liu, Ya; Zhang, Yunhai; Tao, Yong; Li, Yunsheng; Cao, Hongguo; Wang, Suolu; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Xiaorong

    2010-06-01

    Immunization using recombinant maltose binding protein-gonadotropin releasing hormone (MBP-GnRH6) altered both testicular development and transcription of the pituitary GnRH receptor (GnRHR) gene in boars. Scrotal measurement and blood samples were taken at 4-week interval after immunization at 9 weeks of age. The concentrations of testosterone and anti-GnRH antibodies in serum were determined by radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The results showed that active immunization with MBP-GnRH6 increased the serum concentration of anti-GnRH antibodies (Pimmunized animals as compared with MBP immunized boars. MBP-GnRH6 immunized pigs exhibited mounting behavior 4 weeks later than MBP immunized boars. No mature spermatozoa were observed from MBP-GnRH6 immunized animals. By real-time quantitative PCR analysis, the amount of GnRHR mRNA in the pituitary tissue was found to be significantly lower in MBP-GnRH6 immunized animals than in controls (P<0.05). These data demonstrate that recombinant MBP-GnRH6 was effective in immunological castration in boars. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Receptor Structure and GnRH Binding.

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    Flanagan, Colleen A; Manilall, Ashmeetha

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) regulates reproduction. The human GnRH receptor lacks a cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal tail but has amino acid sequence motifs characteristic of rhodopsin-like, class A, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This review will consider how recent descriptions of X-ray crystallographic structures of GPCRs in inactive and active conformations may contribute to understanding GnRH receptor structure, mechanism of activation and ligand binding. The structures confirmed that ligands bind to variable extracellular surfaces, whereas the seven membrane-spanning α-helices convey the activation signal to the cytoplasmic receptor surface, which binds and activates heterotrimeric G proteins. Forty non-covalent interactions that bridge topologically equivalent residues in different transmembrane (TM) helices are conserved in class A GPCR structures, regardless of activation state. Conformation-independent interhelical contacts account for a conserved receptor protein structure and their importance in the GnRH receptor structure is supported by decreased expression of receptors with mutations of residues in the network. Many of the GnRH receptor mutations associated with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, including the Glu2.53(90) Lys mutation, involve amino acids that constitute the conserved network. Half of the ~250 intramolecular interactions in GPCRs differ between inactive and active structures. Conformation-specific interhelical contacts depend on amino acids changing partners during activation. Conserved inactive conformation-specific contacts prevent receptor activation by stabilizing proximity of TM helices 3 and 6 and a closed G protein-binding site. Mutations of GnRH receptor residues involved in these interactions, such as Arg3.50(139) of the DRY/S motif or Tyr7.53(323) of the N/DPxxY motif, increase or decrease receptor expression and efficiency of receptor coupling to G protein signaling, consistent with the native residues

  14. Aberrant gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) expression and its regulation of CYP11B2 expression and aldosterone production in adrenal aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA).

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    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hattangady, Namita G; Ye, Ping; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Morimoto, Ryo; Ito-Saito, Takako; Sugawara, Akira; Ohba, Koji; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Rainey, William E; Sasano, Hironobu

    2014-03-25

    Aberrant expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) has been reported in human adrenal tissues including aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). However, the details of its expression and functional role in adrenals are still not clear. In this study, quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the mean level of GnRHR mRNA was significantly higher in APAs than in human normal adrenal (NA) (P=0.004). GnRHR protein expression was detected in human NA and neoplastic adrenal tissues. In H295R cells transfected with GnRHR, treatment with GnRH resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in CYP11B2 reporter activity. Chronic activation of GnRHR with GnRH (100nM), in a cell line with doxycycline-inducible GnRHR (H295R-TR/GnRHR), increased CYP11B2 expression and aldosterone production. These agonistic effects were inhibited by blockers for the calcium signaling pathway, KN93 and calmidazolium. These results suggest GnRH, through heterotopic expression of its receptor, may be a potential regulator of CYP11B2 expression levels in some cases of APA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. GPR54 and rGnRH I gene expression during the onset of puberty in Nile tilapia.

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    Martinez-Chavez, Carlos C; Minghetti, Matteo; Migaud, Herve

    2008-04-01

    The Kiss1/GPR54 system has recently been shown to play a key role in the onset of puberty in mammals. Growing evidence suggests that this system is also conserved across vertebrates although very few studies so far have been performed in lower vertebrates. The aims of this study were firstly in the teleost Nile tilapia to screen tissues for GPR54 expression levels, secondly to measure the expression patterns of GPR54 and GnRH I receptor (rGnRH I) in whole brains during the onset of puberty and finally to determine the effects of continuous illumination (LL) on receptor expression levels. Results confirmed that GPR54 was predominantly expressed in the brain and pituitary of adult tilapia. Furthermore, a significant increase of GPR54 gene expression was found in tilapia brains at 11 weeks post hatch (wph) followed by rGnRH I at 13 wph just prior to the histological observation of vitellogenic oocytes and active spermatogenesis in ova and testes at 17 wph. These results suggest a correlation between the increase of GPR54 expression in the brain and the onset of puberty. Finally, a significant effect of LL was observed on GPR54 expression levels which were characterized by a delayed surge with significantly lower levels than those of control fish. The current study not only suggests a link between the Kiss1/GPR54 system and the onset of puberty in a tropical batch spawning teleost that would be a highly conserved feature across vertebrates but also that the transcriptional mechanisms regulating GPR54 expression could be directly or indirectly influenced by light.

  16. Oestrogen Induces Rhythmic Expression of the Kisspeptin-1 Receptor 1 GPR54 in Hypothalamic Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH)-Secreting GT1-7 Cells

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    Tonsfeldt, Karen J.; Goodall, Cheri P.; Latham, Kristin L.; Chappell, Patrick E.

    2011-01-01

    Oestrogen-stimulated preovulatory gonadotrophin surges are temporally regulated in a way which remains not fully understood. Mammalian ovulation requires surges of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), released from specialized neurones in the hypothalamus. Surge regulation is mediated by ovarian oestrogen (E2) feedback- acting as a negative signal until the early afternoon of the pro-oestrus phase, at which point it stimulates robust increases in GnRH release. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a role for the circadian clock in surge generation, but the presence of endogenous oscillators in several neuronal populations throughout the mediobasal hypothalamus complicates elucidating the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation. In this study, we propose that endogenous oscillators within GnRH neurones are modulated by oestrogen to elicit GnRH surge secretion. One mechanism by which this may occur is through the upregulation of receptors of known stimulators of GnRH, such as kisspeptin’s cognate receptor, GPR54. Through analysis of mRNA and protein abundance patterns, we found that high levels of E2 elicit circadian expression profiles of GPR54 in vitro, and that disruption of endogenous GnRH oscillators of the clock dampens this effect. Additionally, while kisspeptin administration to GT1-7 cells does not result in surge-level secretion, we observed increased GnRH secretion from GT1-7 cells treated with positive feedback levels of E2. These results in this in vitro neuronal model system suggest a possible mechanism whereby receptor expression levels, and thus GnRH sensitivity to kisspeptin, may change dramatically over the pro-oestrus day. In this way, elevated ovarian E2 may increase kisspeptidergic tone while simultaneously increasing GnRH neuronal sensitivity to this neuropeptide for maximal surge release. PMID:21756268

  17. Expression and Characterization of a Soluble Form of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Glycoprotein GN

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    Whitfield, Anna E.; Ullman, Diane E.; German, Thomas L

    2004-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), a member of the Tospovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae, is an economically important plant pathogen with a worldwide distribution. TSWV is transmitted to plants via thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), which transmit the virus in a persistent propagative manner. The envelope glycoproteins, GN and GC, are critical for the infection of thrips, but they are not required for the initial infection of plants. Thus, it is assumed that the envelope glycoproteins play ...

  18. Kisspeptin Can Stimulate Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Release by a Direct Action at GnRH Nerve Terminals

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    d'Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Fagg, Lisa A.; Carlton, Mark B. L.; Colledge, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GPR54, and its peptide ligand kisspeptin (Kp), are crucial for the induction and maintenance of mammalian reproductive function. GPR54 is expressed by GnRH neurons and is directly activated by Kp to stimulate GnRH release. We hypothesized that Kp may be able to act at the GnRH nerve terminals located in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) region. To test this hypothesis, we used organotypic culture of MBH explants challenged with Kp, followed by RIA to detect GnRH released into the cultured medium. Kp stimulation for 1 h induced GnRH release from wild-type male MBH in a dose-dependent manner, whereas this did not occur in MBH explants isolated from Gpr54 null mice. Continuous Kp stimulation caused a sustained GnRH release for 4 h, followed by a decrease of GnRH release, suggesting a desensitization of GPR54 activity. Tetrodotoxin did not alter the Kp-induced GnRH release, indicating that Kp can act directly at the GnRH nerve terminals. To localize Gpr54 expression within the MBH, we used transgenic mice, in which Gpr54 expression is tagged with an IRES-LacZ reporter gene and can be visualized by β-galactosidase staining. Gpr54 expression was detected outside of the median eminence, in the pars tuberalis. In conclusion, our results provide evidence for a potent stimulating effect of Kp at GnRH nerve terminals in the MBH of the mouse. This study suggests a new point at which Kp can act on GnRH neurons. PMID:18450966

  19. GnRH-agonist implants suppress reproductive function and affects ovarian LHR and FSHR expression in prepubertal female cats.

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    Mehl, N S; Srisuwatanasagul, S; Swangchan-Uthai, T; Sirivaidyapong, S; Khalid, M

    2017-01-01

    Effect of a GnRH-agonist (deslorelin) was studied on reproductive function and ovarian luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) expression in prepubertal female cats that were either implanted with 4.7-mg deslorelin (implanted: n = 6) or not (controls: n = 18) or ovariohysterectomized at prepubertal age (prepubertal OVH: n = 6). Body weights, fecal estradiol, and sexual behavior of implanted and control cats were monitored for 48 weeks followed by collection of ovaries and uteri. Ovaries and uteri were collected from control cats at follicular, luteal, and inactive stage (n = 6/group) and from prepubertal OVH cats at prepubertal age. Ovaries and uteri were analyzed for anatomical/histological characteristics. Ovaries were also analyzed for LHR and FSHR expression. Statistical analysis showed higher (P ≤ 0.05) body weight in control than implanted cats only during 22nd to 26th weeks of the study. Estrus was observed in control cats only. Deslorelin reduced (P ≤ 0.05) ovarian weight and number of antral follicles but did not affect endometrial thickness and gland diameter. However, myometrial thickness of implanted cats was significantly lower than control cats at follicular and luteal stage. Ovarian LHR mRNA expression was lower (P ≤ 0.05) in implanted cats than control cats at follicular stage. FSHR mRNA and LHR protein expression did not differ among the three groups. FSHR protein expression was lower (P ≤ 0.05) in prepubertal OVH cats and was not affected by deslorelin. In conclusion, deslorelin suppresses reproductive function in prepubertal female cats for at least 48 weeks possibly through a change in the ovarian mRNA expression of LHR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Eel Kisspeptins: Identification, Functional Activity, and Inhibition on both Pituitary LH and GnRH Receptor Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Pasquier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The European eel (Anguilla anguilla presents a blockade of sexual maturation at a prepubertal stage due to a deficient production of gonadotropins. We previously initiated, in the eel, the investigation of the kisspeptin system, one of the major gatekeepers of puberty in mammals, and we predicted the sequence of two Kiss genes. In the present study, we cloned and sequenced Kiss1 and Kiss2 cDNAs from the eel brain. The tissue distributions of Kiss1 and Kiss2 transcripts, as investigated by quantitative real-time PCR, showed that both genes are primarily expressed in the eel brain and pituitary. The two 10-residue long sequences characteristic of kisspeptin, eel Kp1(10 and Kp2(10, as well as two longer sequences, predicted as mature peptides, eel Kp1(15 and Kp2(12, were synthesized and functionally analyzed. Using rat Kiss1 receptor-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, we found that the four synthesized eel peptides were able to induce [Ca2+]i responses, indicating their ability to bind mammalian KissR-1 and to activate second messenger pathways. In primary culture of eel pituitary cells, all four peptides were able to specifically and dose-dependently inhibit lhβ expression, without any effect on fshβ, confirming our previous data with heterologous kisspeptins. Furthermore, in this eel in vitro system, all four peptides inhibited the expression of the type 2 GnRH receptor (gnrh-r2. Our data revealed a dual inhibitory effect of homologous kisspeptins on both pituitary lhβ and gnrh-r2 expression in the European eel.

  1. Leptin increases L-type Ca2+ channel expression and GnRH-stimulated LH release in LβT2 gonadotropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino-Cruz, José E.; Flores, Amira; Cebada, Jorge; Mellon, Pamela L.; Felix, Ricardo; Monjaraz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Leptin, a mediator of long-term regulation of energy balance, has been implicated in the release of adenohypophyseal gonadotropins by regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the hypothalamus. However, a direct effect of leptin on hormone release from gonadotropes remains virtually unexplored. In the current report, we assessed the long-term (48 h) actions of leptin on voltage-gated channel activity and luteinizing hormone (LH) production in mouse pituitary gonadotrope LβT2 cells. Electrophysiological recordings showed that leptin treatment significantly increased whole-cell patch clamp Ba2+ current through L-type Ca2+ channels. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed increased levels of L-type (α1D) Ca2+ channel mRNA. Likewise, radioimmunoassays using specific antibodies provided evidence that leptin alone had no effect on LH release but did enhance GnRH-induced secretion of the hormone. Leptin had no apparent effects on LH gene transcription in absence of GnRH, as measured by transient transfection assays using a LH promoter-reporter gene and real time RT-PCR. These observations suggest that leptin might affect LH release by acting directly on the gonadotropes, favoring hormone production by enhancing responsiveness to GnRH as a result of increased Ca2+ channel expression. PMID:18834922

  2. Parity Differences in Heat Expression of Dairy Cows Synchronized with GnRH, CIDR and PGF2α during Dry Season in Zambia

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    E. S. Mwaanga*, K. Choongo, H. Simukoko and C. Chama1

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to investigate parity differences in heat expression of dairy cows heat-synchronized during the dry season when feed scarcity is common. Cyclic cows (n=65 aged 2 to 10 years with parity range of 0 to 7 were selected from small-holder dairy farms around Lusaka. Cows were divided into 3 groups of nulliparous, primiparous and pluriparous. Heat-was synchronized using gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH and controlled intra-vaginal drug releasing device (CIDR. Heat detection was observed after CIDR withdraw. The study showed a significantly (P<0.05 lower number of primiparous cows (68% coming into heat compared to nulliparous (81.8% and pluriparous cows (83.3%. It was concluded that parity influences estrus expression rate in dairy cows following synchronization with GnRH, CIDR and PGF2α during the dry season in the sub-tropics.

  3. The Expression of Serum Antibodies against Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH1, Progonadoliberin-2, Luteinizing Hormone (LH, and Related Receptors in Patients with Gastrointestinal Dysfunction or Diabetes Mellitus

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    Bodil Roth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH 1 and 2 and luteinizing hormone (LH receptors have been described in the gastrointestinal tract. We have previously demonstrated antibodies in serum against GnRH1 in patients with gastrointestinal dysfunction and diabetes mellitus, and antibodies against GnRH receptor, LH, and LH receptor in patients with infertility. The aim of this study was to search for the expression of serum antibodies against GnRH1 with an improved enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA, and antibodies against progonadoliberin-2, GnRH2, GnRH receptor, LH, and LH receptor with newly developed ELISAs, in patients with gastrointestinal dysfunction or diabetes mellitus. Healthy blood donors served as controls. Medical records were scrutinized. Our conclusion was that IgM antibodies against GnRH1, progonadoliberin-2, and/or GnRH receptors were more prevalent in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and/or diabetes mellitus, whereas IgG antibodies against these peptides, and LH- and LH receptor antibodies, were expressed in the same magnitude as in controls.

  4. Effects of Raloxifene and GnRH-a on VEGF expression in cultured human uterine leiomyoma cells

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    Taravat Fakheri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign pelvic tumor in women of reproductive age and is frequently associated with abnormal uterine bleeding and pelvic pressure. Combined therapy of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (GnRH-a and selective estrogen receptor inhibitors (raloxifene reduce the size of leiomyoma. Methods: Twelve uterine leiomyomas were obtained from pre-menopausal women with regular menstrual cycles in the proliferative phase who underwent abdominal hysterectomy or myomectomy in Imam Reza Hospital. The patients had received no hormonal therapy for at least 6 months before surgery.The comparative effects of treatment with graded concentrations of raloxifene (in five groups with various concentrations of 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 micrograms per milliliter, respectively and GnRH-a (in five groups, with concentrations of 50, 100, 200, 300 and 400 micrograms per milliliter, respectively and combination of these two on Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF and inhibition of leiomyoma cell proliferation were determined. Results: in the three treatment groups with graded concentration of raloxifene and GnRH-a and combined therapy, VEGF content significantly decreased (P<0.05. The VEGF decreasing levels in the combined therapy, raloxifene and GnRH-a groups were 79.16%, 64.74% and 55.29%, respectively (p<0.05. The inhibition of cell growth was significantly different between the two treatment groups (P<0.05. The inhibition of cell growth in the combined therapy group was 70.77% followed by raloxifene (60.76% and GnRH-a (15.83%, which indicated a significant difference (P<0.05. Conclusion: Treatment with graded concentrations of Raloxifene, GnRH-a and combination of both Raloxifene and GnRH-a significantly decreased the VEGF content and proliferation of leiomyoma cells.

  5. Defining global gene expression changes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in female sGnRH-antisense transgenic common carp (Cyprinus carpio.

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    Jing Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis is critical in the development and regulation of reproduction in fish. The inhibition of neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH expression may diminish or severely hamper gonadal development due to it being the key regulator of the axis, and then provide a model for the comprehensive study of the expression patterns of genes with respect to the fish reproductive system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a previous study we injected 342 fertilized eggs from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio with a gene construct that expressed antisense sGnRH. Four years later, we found a total of 38 transgenic fish with abnormal or missing gonads. From this group we selected the 12 sterile females with abnormal ovaries in which we combined suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH and cDNA microarray analysis to define changes in gene expression of the HPG axis in the present study. As a result, nine, 28, and 212 genes were separately identified as being differentially expressed in hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary, of which 87 genes were novel. The number of down- and up-regulated genes was five and four (hypothalamus, 16 and 12 (pituitary, 119 and 93 (ovary, respectively. Functional analyses showed that these genes involved in several biological processes, such as biosynthesis, organogenesis, metabolism pathways, immune systems, transport links, and apoptosis. Within these categories, significant genes for neuropeptides, gonadotropins, metabolic, oogenesis and inflammatory factors were identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study indicated the progressive scaling-up effect of hypothalamic sGnRH antisense on the pituitary and ovary receptors of female carp and provided comprehensive data with respect to global changes in gene expression throughout the HPG signaling pathway, contributing towards improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and regulative pathways in the

  6. Defining Global Gene Expression Changes of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Female sGnRH-Antisense Transgenic Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Huang, Wei; Zhong, Chengrong; Luo, Daji; Li, Shuangfei; Zhu, Zuoyan; Hu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is critical in the development and regulation of reproduction in fish. The inhibition of neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) expression may diminish or severely hamper gonadal development due to it being the key regulator of the axis, and then provide a model for the comprehensive study of the expression patterns of genes with respect to the fish reproductive system. Methodology/Principal Findings In a previous study we injected 342 fertilized eggs from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) with a gene construct that expressed antisense sGnRH. Four years later, we found a total of 38 transgenic fish with abnormal or missing gonads. From this group we selected the 12 sterile females with abnormal ovaries in which we combined suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA microarray analysis to define changes in gene expression of the HPG axis in the present study. As a result, nine, 28, and 212 genes were separately identified as being differentially expressed in hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary, of which 87 genes were novel. The number of down- and up-regulated genes was five and four (hypothalamus), 16 and 12 (pituitary), 119 and 93 (ovary), respectively. Functional analyses showed that these genes involved in several biological processes, such as biosynthesis, organogenesis, metabolism pathways, immune systems, transport links, and apoptosis. Within these categories, significant genes for neuropeptides, gonadotropins, metabolic, oogenesis and inflammatory factors were identified. Conclusions/Significance This study indicated the progressive scaling-up effect of hypothalamic sGnRH antisense on the pituitary and ovary receptors of female carp and provided comprehensive data with respect to global changes in gene expression throughout the HPG signaling pathway, contributing towards improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and regulative pathways in the reproductive system of

  7. Expression and Role of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone 2 and Its Receptor in Mammals

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    Amy T. Desaulniers

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1 and its receptor (GnRHR1 drive mammalian reproduction via regulation of the gonadotropins. Yet, a second form of GnRH (GnRH2 and its receptor (GnRHR2 also exist in mammals. GnRH2 has been completely conserved throughout 500 million years of evolution, signifying high selection pressure and a critical biological role. However, the GnRH2 gene is absent (e.g., rat or inactivated (e.g., cow and sheep in some species but retained in others (e.g., human, horse, and pig. Likewise, many species (e.g., human, chimpanzee, cow, and sheep retain the GnRHR2 gene but lack the appropriate coding sequence to produce a full-length protein due to gene coding errors; although production of GnRHR2 in humans remains controversial. Certain mammals lack the GnRHR2 gene (e.g., mouse or most exons entirely (e.g., rat. In contrast, old world monkeys, musk shrews, and pigs maintain the coding sequence required to produce a functional GnRHR2. Like GnRHR1, GnRHR2 is a 7-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptor that interacts with Gαq/11 to mediate cell signaling. However, GnRHR2 retains a cytoplasmic tail and is only 40% homologous to GnRHR1. A role for GnRH2 and its receptor in mammals has been elusive, likely because common laboratory models lack both the ligand and receptor. Uniquely, both GnRH2 and GnRHR2 are ubiquitously expressed; transcript levels are abundant in peripheral tissues and scarcely found in regions of the brain associated with gonadotropin secretion, suggesting a divergent role from GnRH1/GnRHR1. Indeed, GnRH2 and its receptor are not physiological modulators of gonadotropin secretion in mammals. Instead, GnRH2 and GnRHR2 coordinate the interaction between nutritional status and sexual behavior in the female brain. Within peripheral tissues, GnRH2 and its receptor are novel regulators of reproductive organs. GnRH2 and GnRHR2 directly stimulate steroidogenesis within the porcine testis. In the female, GnRH2 and

  8. Laser-captured single digoxigenin-labeled neurons of gonadotropin-releasing hormone types reveal a novel G protein-coupled receptor (Gpr54) during maturation in cichlid fish.

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    Parhar, Ishwar S; Ogawa, Satoshi; Sakuma, Yasuo

    2004-08-01

    GPR54 is a novel G protein-coupled receptor speculated to be essential for sexual development. However, its role in the regulation of GnRH types is unknown. To address this issue, we cloned GPR54 from the brain of a cichlid fish (tilapia Oreochromis niloticus) and determined its expression in immature and mature males using our newly developed technique: laser-captured microdissection of single digoxigenin-labeled GnRH neurons coupled with real-time quantitative PCR. The tilapia GPR54 cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1131 bp encoding 377 amino acids and exhibits 56% identity to human GPR54. Absolute copies of GnRH1 and GnRH3, not GnRH2, mRNAs were significantly high in mature compared with immature males. At the single-cell level, only in mature males, GnRH1 mRNA levels were inversely related to GPR54 mRNA (P GPR54 was expressed in a significantly high percentage (45.0-60.0%) of mature GnRH1, GnRH2, and GnRH3 neurons and in immature GnRH3 neurons, which had migrated to the vicinity of their final locations in the brain; on the contrary, only 5.0% of immature GnRH1 and GnRH2 neurons had GPR54 transcripts (P GPR54, which is highly conserved during evolution and is expressed in GnRH1, GnRH2, and GnRH3 neurons. Furthermore, we propose that the expression of GPR54 is a "stop signal" for GnRH1, GnRH2, and GnRH3 neuronal migration, leading to suppression of cell growth and modulation of GnRH secretion, which is important for normal sexual development.

  9. Effect of GnRHa ovulation trigger dose on follicular fluid characteristics and granulosa cell gene expression profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuong, Thi Ngoc Lan; Ho, M T; Ha, T Q

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: A recent dose-finding study showed no significant differences in number of mature oocytes, embryos and top-quality embryos when triptorelin doses of 0.2, 0.3 or 0.4 mg were used to trigger final oocyte maturation in oocyte donors co-treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn...... in oocyte donors undergoing a single stimulation cycle at IVFMD, My Duc Hospital, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, from August 2014 to March 2015. A total of 165 women aged 18–35 years with body mass index 1.25 ng/mL, and antral follicle count ≥6 were randomised to three...

  10. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and distribution of feline GnRH receptor (GnRHR) and resequencing of canine GnRHR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylov, Alexandre M; Napier, India D; Morrison, Nancy E; Martin, Douglas R; Cox, Nancy R; Samoylova, Tatiana I

    2015-01-15

    GnRH receptors play vital roles in mammalian reproduction via regulation of gonadotropin secretion, which is essential for gametogenesis and production of gonadal steroids. GnRH receptors for more than 20 mammalian species have been sequenced, including human, mouse, and dog. This study reports the molecular cloning and sequencing of GnRH receptor (GnRHR) cDNA from the pituitary gland of the domestic cat, an important species in biomedical research. Feline GnRHR cDNA is composed of 981 nucleotides and encodes a 327 amino acid protein. Unlike the majority of mammalian species sequenced so far, but similar to canine GnRHR, feline GnRHR protein lacks asparagine in position three of the extracellular domain of the protein. At the amino acid level, feline GnRHR exhibits 95.1% identity with canine, 93.8% with human, and 88.9% with mouse GnRHR. Comparative sequence analysis of GnRHRs for multiple mammalian species led to resequencing of canine GnRHR, which differed from that previously published by a single base change that translates to a different amino acid in position 193. This single base change was confirmed in dogs of multiple breeds. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of GnRHR messenger RNA in different tissues from four normal cats indicated the presence of amplicons of varying lengths, including full-length as well as shortened GnRHR amplicons, pointing to the existence of truncated GnRHR transcripts in the domestic cat. This study is the first insight into molecular composition and expression of feline GnRHR and promotes better understanding of receptor organization, and distribution in various tissues of this species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuronal Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) and Astrocytic Gonadotrophin Inhibitory Hormone (GnIH) Immunoreactivity in the Adult Rat Hippocampus.

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    Ferris, J K; Tse, M T; Hamson, D K; Taves, M D; Ma, C; McGuire, N; Arckens, L; Bentley, G E; Galea, L A M; Floresco, S B; Soma, K K

    2015-10-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) are neuropeptides secreted by the hypothalamus that regulate reproduction. GnRH receptors are not only present in the anterior pituitary, but also are abundantly expressed in the hippocampus of rats, suggesting that GnRH regulates hippocampal function. GnIH inhibits pituitary gonadotrophin secretion and is also expressed in the hippocampus of a songbird; its role outside of the reproductive axis is not well established. In the present study, we employed immunohistochemistry to examine three forms of GnRH [mammalian GnRH-I (mGnRH-I), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and lamprey GnRH-III (lGnRH-III)] and GnIH in the adult rat hippocampus. No mGnRH-I and cGnRH-II+ cell bodies were present in the hippocampus. Sparse mGnRH-I and cGnRH-II+ fibres were present within the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus, along the hippocampal fissure, and within the hilus of the dentate gyrus. No lGnRH-III was present in the rodent hippocampus. GnIH-immunoreactivity was present in the hippocampus in cell bodies that resembled astrocytes. Males had more GnIH+ cells in the hilus of the dentate gyrus than females. To confirm the GnIH+ cell body phenotype, we performed double-label immunofluorescence against GnIH, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and NeuN. Immunofluorescence revealed that all GnIH+ cell bodies in the hippocampus also contained GFAP, a marker of astrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that GnRH does not reach GnRH receptors in the rat hippocampus primarily via synaptic release. By contrast, GnIH might be synthesised locally in the rat hippocampus by astrocytes. These data shed light on the sites of action and possible functions of GnRH and GnIH outside of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  12. The GnRH receptor and the response of gonadotrope cells to GnRH pulse frequency code. A story of an atypical adaptation of cell function relying on a lack of receptor homologous desensitization.

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    Christian Bleux

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain control of the reproductive system is mediated through hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH which activates specific receptors (GnRHR present at the surface of the pituitary gonadotropes to trigger secretion of the two gonadotropins LH and FSH. A unique feature of this system is the high dependence on the secretion mode of GnRH, which is basically pulsatile but undergoes considerable fluctuations in pulse frequency pattern in response to endogenous or external factors. How the physiological fluctuations of GnRH secretion that orchestrate normal reproduction are decoded by the gonadotrope cell machinery to ultimately control gonadotropin release and/or subunit gene transcription has been the subject of intensive studies during the past decades. Surprisingly, the mammalian GnRHR is unique among G protein-coupled receptor family as it lacks the carboxy-terminal tail usually involved in classical endocytotic process. Accordingly, it does not desensitize properly and internalizes very poorly. Both this atypical intrinsic property and post-receptor events may thus contribute to decode the GnRH signal. This includes the participation of a network of signaling pathways that differently respond to GnRH together with a growing amount of genes differentially sensitive to pulse frequency. Among these are two pairs of genes, the transcription factors EGR-1 and NAB, and the regulatory factors activin and follistatin, that function as intracellular autoregulatory feedback loops controlling respectively LHbeta and FSHbeta gene expression and hence, LH and FSH synthesis. Pituitary gonadotropes thus represent a unique model of cells functionally adapted to respond to a considerably fluctuating neuroendocrine stimulation, from short individual pulses to sustained GnRH as observed at the proestrus of ovarian cycle. Altogether, the data emphasize the adaptative reciprocal complementarity of hypothalamic GnRH neurones and pituitary gonadotropes to

  13. Review: Evolution of GnIH structure and function

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    Tomohiro eOsugi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH in the Japanese quail in 2000 was the first to demonstrate the existence of a hypothalamic neuropeptide inhibiting gonadotropin release. We now know that GnIH regulates reproduction by inhibiting gonadotropin synthesis and release via action on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH system and the gonadotrope in various vertebrates. GnIH peptides identified in birds and mammals have a common LPXRF-amide (X = L or Q motif at the C-terminus and inhibits pituitary gonadotropin secretion. However, the function and structure of GnIH peptides were diverse in fish. Goldfish GnIHs possessing a C-terminal LPXRF-amide motif had both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on gonadotropin synthesis or release. The C-terminal sequence of grass puffer and medaka GnIHs were MPQRF-amide. To investigate the evolutionary origin of GnIH and its ancestral structure and function, we searched for GnIH in agnathans, the most ancient lineage of vertebrates. We identified GnIH precursor gene and mature GnIH peptides with C-terminal QPQRF-amide or RPQRF-amide from the brain of sea lamprey. Lamprey GnIH fibers were in close proximity to GnRH-III neurons. Further, one of lamprey GnIHs stimulated the expression of lamprey GnRH-III peptide in the hypothalamus and gonadotropic hormone β mRNA expression in the pituitary. We further identified the ancestral form of GnIH, which had a C-terminal RPQRF-amide, and its receptors in amphioxus, the most basal chordate species. The amphioxus GnIH inhibited cAMP signaling in vitro. In sum, the original forms of GnIH may date back to the time of the emergence of early chordates. GnIH peptides may have had various C-terminal structures slightly different from LPXRF-amide in basal chordates, which had stimulatory and/or inhibitory functions on reproduction. The C-terminal LPXRF-amide structure and its inhibitory function on reproduction may be selected in later-evolved vertebrates, such as

  14. Protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with a cytotoxic daunorubicin-GnRH-III derivative bioconjugate.

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    Verena Natalie Schreier

    Full Text Available Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a new approach for the treatment of cancer, which provides increased selectivity and decreased systemic toxicity. We have recently developed a promising drug delivery system, in which the anticancer drug daunorubicin (Dau was attached via oxime bond to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-III (GnRH-III derivative used as a targeting moiety (Glp-His-Trp-Lys(Ac-His-Asp-Trp-Lys(Da  = Aoa-Pro-Gly-NH2; Glp = pyroglutamic acid, Ac = acetyl; Aoa = aminooxyacetyl. This bioconjugate exerted in vitro cytostatic/cytotoxic effect on human breast, prostate and colon cancer cells, as well as significant in vivo tumor growth inhibitory effect on colon carcinoma bearing mice. In our previous studies, H-Lys(Dau = Aoa-OH was identified as the smallest metabolite produced in the presence of rat liver lysosomal homogenate, which was able to bind to DNA in vitro. To get a deeper insight into the mechanism of action of the bioconjugate, changes in the protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with the bioconjugate or free daunorubicin were investigated by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Our results indicate that several metabolism-related proteins, molecular chaperons and proteins involved in signaling are differently expressed after targeted chemotherapeutic treatment, leading to the conclusion that the bioconjugate exerts its cytotoxic action by interfering with multiple intracellular processes.

  15. Changes in body composition and mRNA expression of ghrelin and lipoprotein lipase in rats treated with leuprolide acetate, a GnRH agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvera-Sandoval, Carlos; Betanzos-Cabrera, Gabriel; Casillas-Peñuelas, Rafael; Quintanar, J Luis

    2018-01-01

    Leuprolide acetate (LA), a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist, was identified to cause changes in body weight in experimental and clinical trials; however, to date, the effect of LA on the body composition has not been properly assessed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term effect of LA administration on body composition and the mRNA expression of ghrelin and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in rats. Ovariectomized (OVX), ovariectomized and LA-treated (OVX+LA), non-ovariectomized (CTRL) and non-ovariectomized but LA-treated (LA) rats were used. LA treatment was performed by intramuscular injection at 5 µg/kg every 72 h over 120 days. Analysis of body composition and mRNA expression of ghrelin and lipoprotein lipase were performed. The results indicated significant changes in body composition after treatment; in the OVX, LA, OVX+LA and CTRL group, the body weight was increased by 216.1, 183.7, 175.4 and 150.1%, respectively, compared with baseline. The fat mass in the LA group was 14% higher than that in the CTRL group, while that in the OVX group was 19% higher than that in the OVX+LA, and the fat-free mass was similar between the LA and CTRL as well as the OVX and OVX+LA groups. Following 120 days of treatment, the mRNA expression of ghrelin and LPL in the LA group was ~20% higher than that in the CTRL group, while that in the OVX+LA was downregulated in comparison with that in the OVX group. The results of the present study confirmed changes in body composition and mRNA expression of ghrelin and LPL caused by long-term administration of LA. LA may contribute to regulate food consumption and exert control over adipogenesis.

  16. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist triptorelin inhibits estradiol-induced serum response element (SRE) activation and c-fos expression in human endometrial, ovarian and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründker, Carsten; Günthert, Andreas R; Hellriegel, Martin; Emons, Günter

    2004-11-01

    The majority of human endometrial (>80%), ovarian (>80%) and breast (>50%) cancers express GnRH receptors. Their spontaneous and epidermal growth-factor-induced proliferation is dose- and time-dependently reduced by treatment with GnRH and its agonists. In this study, we demonstrate that the GnRH agonist triptorelin inhibits estradiol (E2)-induced cancer cell proliferation. The proliferation of quiescent estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha)-/ER beta-positive, but not of ER alpha-negative/ER beta-positive endometrial, ovarian and breast cancer cell lines, was significantly stimulated (P<0.001) (ANOVA) after treatment with E2 (10(-8) M). This effect was time- and dose-dependently antagonized by simultaneous treatment with triptorelin. The inhibitory effect was maximal at 10(-5) M concentration of triptorelin (P<0.001). In addition, we could show that, in ER alpha-/ER beta-positive cell lines, E2 induces activation of serum response element (SRE) and expression of the immediate early-response gene c-fos. These effects were blocked by triptorelin (P<0.001). E2-induced activation of estrogen-response element (ERE) was not affected by triptorelin. The transcriptional activation of SRE by E2 is due to ER alpha activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This pathway is impeded by GnRH, resulting in a reduction of E2-induced SRE activation and, in consequence, a reduction of E2-induced c-fos expression. This causes downregulation of E2-induced cancer cell proliferation.

  17. GnRH agonist triggering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Humaidan, Peter; Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær

    2013-01-01

    The concept that a bolus of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) can replace human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) as a trigger of final oocyte maturation was introduced several years ago. Recent developments in the area strengthen this premise. GnRHa trigger offers important advantages,...

  18. GnRH antagonist versus long agonist protocols in IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambalk, C B; Banga, F R; Huirne, J A

    2017-01-01

    was not the only variable between the compared study arms. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: The aim of the current study was to compare GnRH antagonist protocols versus standard long agonist protocols in couples undergoing IVF or ICSI, while accounting for various patient populations and treatment schedules. SEARCH...... METHODS: The Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Review Group specialized register of controlled trials and Pubmed and Embase databases were searched from inception until June 2016. Eligible trials were those that compared GnRH antagonist protocols and standard long GnRH agonist protocols...... the antagonist and agonist groups (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.84-1.11 and RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.65-1.17, respectively). Subgroup analyses for various antagonist treatment schedules compared to the long protocol GnRH agonist showed a significantly lower ongoing pregnancy rate when the oral hormonal programming pill (OHP...

  19. Review: Regulatory mechanisms of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH synthesis and release in photoperiodic animals

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    Kazuyoshi eTsutsui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH is a novel hypothalamic neuropeptide that was discovered in quail as an inhibitory factor for gonadotropin release. GnIH inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release in birds through actions on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons and gonadotropes, mediated via the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R, GPR147. Subsequently, GnIH was identified in mammals and other vertebrates. As in birds, mammalian GnIH inhibits gonadotropin secretion, indicating a conserved role for this neuropeptide in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis across species. Identification of the regulatory mechanisms governing GnIH expression and release is important in understanding the physiological role of the GnIH system. A nocturnal hormone, melatonin, appears to act directly on GnIH neurons through its receptor to induce expression and release of GnIH in quail, a photoperiodic bird. Recently, a similar, but opposite, action of melatonin on the inhibition of expression of mammalian GnIH was shown in hamsters and sheep, photoperiodic mammals. These results in photoperiodic animals demonstrate that GnIH expression is photoperiodically modulated via a melatonin-dependent process. Recent findings indicate that GnIH may be a mediator of stress-induced reproductive disruption in birds and mammals, pointing to a broad role for this neuropeptide in assessing physiological state and modifying reproductive effort accordingly. This paper summarizes the advances made in our knowledge regarding the regulation of GnIH synthesis and release in photoperiodic birds and mammals. This paper also discusses the neuroendocrine integration of environmental signals, such as photoperiods and stress, and internal signals, such as GnIH, melatonin and glucocorticoids, to control avian and mammalian reproduction.

  20. Noise in gene expression is coupled to growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Leeat; van Dijk, David; Weingarten-Gabbay, Shira; Davidi, Dan; Jona, Ghil; Weinberger, Adina; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2015-12-01

    Genetically identical cells exposed to the same environment display variability in gene expression (noise), with important consequences for the fidelity of cellular regulation and biological function. Although population average gene expression is tightly coupled to growth rate, the effects of changes in environmental conditions on expression variability are not known. Here, we measure the single-cell expression distributions of approximately 900 Saccharomyces cerevisiae promoters across four environmental conditions using flow cytometry, and find that gene expression noise is tightly coupled to the environment and is generally higher at lower growth rates. Nutrient-poor conditions, which support lower growth rates, display elevated levels of noise for most promoters, regardless of their specific expression values. We present a simple model of noise in expression that results from having an asynchronous population, with cells at different cell-cycle stages, and with different partitioning of the cells between the stages at different growth rates. This model predicts non-monotonic global changes in noise at different growth rates as well as overall higher variability in expression for cell-cycle-regulated genes in all conditions. The consistency between this model and our data, as well as with noise measurements of cells growing in a chemostat at well-defined growth rates, suggests that cell-cycle heterogeneity is a major contributor to gene expression noise. Finally, we identify gene and promoter features that play a role in gene expression noise across conditions. Our results show the existence of growth-related global changes in gene expression noise and suggest their potential phenotypic implications. © 2015 Keren et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. GnRH tandem peptides for inducing an immunogenic response to GnRH-I without cross-reactivity to other GnRH isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkstra, J.A.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Oonk, H.B.; Meloen, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) occurs in various isoforms in mammals, i.e. GnRH-I (mammalian GnRH), GnRH-II (chicken GnRH-II), GnRH-III (salmon GnRH) and two forms of lamprey GnRH. The function of the latter four molecules have only been partially investigated. Also not much is known about

  2. Mini-review: Discovery of GnIH and its role in hypothyroidism-induced delayed puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Son, You Lee; Kiyohara, Mika; Miyata, Ichiro

    2017-09-18

    It is known that hypothyroidism delays puberty in mammals. Interaction between the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) and hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes may be important processes in delayed puberty. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a newly discovered hypothalamic neuropeptide inhibiting gonadotropin synthesis and release in quail. It now apperas that GnIH is conserved across various mammals and primates including humans and inhibits reproduction. We have further demonstrated that GnIH is involved in pubertal delay induced by thyroid dysfunction in female mice. Hypothyroidism delays pubertal onset with the increase in hypothalamic GnIH expression and the decrease in circulating gonadotropin and estradiol levels. Thyroid status regulates GnIH expression by epigenetic modification of the GnIH promoter region. Furthermore, knockout of GnIH gene abolishes the effect of hypothyroidism on delayed pubertal onset. Accordingly, it is considered that GnIH is a mediator of pubertal disorder induced by thyroid dysfunction. This is a novel function of GnIH that interacts between the HPT-HPG axes in pubertal onset delay. This mini-review summarizes the structure, expression and function of GnIH and highlights the action of GnIH in pubertal disorder induced by thyroid dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  3. Short communication Polymorphism of the GnRHR gene and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    huis

    that the synonymous SNP can affect in vivo protein folding and consequently its function, as well as gene expression and phenotype (Kimchi-Sarfaty et al., 2007; Ren et al., 2010; Tang et al., 2011). Table 4 The association between GnRHR genotypes and litter size in Boer goats. Genotypes. Genotype at GnRHR891G/T.

  4. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  5. Functional Significance of GnRH and Kisspeptin, and Their Cognate Receptors in Teleost Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENJITHA eGOPURAPPILLY

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Guanine nucleotide binding protein (G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are eukaryotic transmembrane proteins found in all living organisms. Their versatility and roles in several physiological processes make them the single largest family of drug targets. Comparative genomic studies using various model organisms have provided useful information about target receptors. The similarity of the genetic makeup of teleosts to that of humans and other vertebrates aligns with the study of GPCRs. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH represents a critical step in the reproductive process through its cognate GnRH receptors (GnRHRs. Kisspeptin (Kiss1 and its cognate GPCR, GPR54 (=kisspeptin receptor, Kiss-R, have recently been identified as a critical signalling system in the control of reproduction. The Kiss1/GPR54 system regulates GnRH release, which is vital to pubertal development and vertebrate reproduction. This review highlights the physiological role of kisspeptin-Kiss-R signalling in the reproductive neuroendocrine axis in teleosts through the modulation of GnRH release. Moreover, we also review the recent developments in GnRHR and Kiss-R with respect to their structural variants, signalling mechanisms, ligand interactions and functional significance. Finally, we discuss the recent progress in identifying many teleost GnRH-GnRHR and kisspeptin-Kiss-R systems and will consider their physiological significance in the control of reproduction.

  6. Functional Significance of GnRH and Kisspeptin, and Their Cognate Receptors in Teleost Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopurappilly, Renjitha; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2012-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein (G-protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are eukaryotic transmembrane proteins found in all living organisms. Their versatility and roles in several physiological processes make them the single largest family of drug targets. Comparative genomic studies using various model organisms have provided useful information about target receptors. The similarity of the genetic makeup of teleosts to that of humans and other vertebrates aligns with the study of GPCRs. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) represents a critical step in the reproductive process through its cognate GnRH receptors (GnRHRs). Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and its cognate GPCR, GPR54 (=kisspeptin receptor, Kiss-R), have recently been identified as a critical signaling system in the control of reproduction. The Kiss1/Kiss-R system regulates GnRH release, which is vital to pubertal development and vertebrate reproduction. This review highlights the physiological role of kisspeptin-Kiss-R signaling in the reproductive neuroendocrine axis in teleosts through the modulation of GnRH release. Moreover, we also review the recent developments in GnRHR and Kiss-R with respect to their structural variants, signaling mechanisms, ligand interactions, and functional significance. Finally, we discuss the recent progress in identifying many teleost GnRH-GnRHR and kisspeptin-Kiss-R systems and consider their physiological significance in the control of reproduction. PMID:23482509

  7. Temperature affects sexual maturation through the control of kisspeptin, kisspeptin receptor, GnRH and GTH subunit gene expression in the grass puffer during the spawning season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahan, Md; Kitahashi, Takashi; Ando, Hironori

    2017-03-01

    Water temperature is an environmental factor of primary importance that influences reproductive function in fish. To understand the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the regulation of reproduction by temperature, we examined changes in expression of genes encoding kisspeptin (kiss2), kisspeptin receptor (kiss2r) and three gonadotropin-releasing hormones (gnrh1, gnrh2 and gnrh3) in the brain and genes encoding gonadotropin (GTH) subunits (gpa, fshb and lhb) in the pituitary of grass puffer exposed to a low temperature (14°C), normal temperature (21°C) and high temperature (28°C) for 7days. In addition, the plasma levels of cortisol were examined after exposed to three temperature conditions. The gonadosomatic index was significantly decreased in both low and high temperature conditions. The levels of kiss2 and kiss2r mRNAs were significantly decreased at both low and high temperature conditions compared to normal temperature (control) condition. gnrh1 but not gnrh2 were significantly decreased in both temperature conditions, while gnrh3 showed a decreasing tendency in low temperature. Consequently, the levels of fshb and lhb mRNAs were significantly decreased in both low and high temperature conditions. Interestingly, the plasma levels of cortisol were significantly increased in low temperature but remain unchanged in high temperature, suggesting that the fish were under stress in the low temperature conditions but not in the high temperature conditions. Taken together, the present results indicate that anomalous temperature have an inhibitory effect on reproductive function through suppressing kiss2/kiss2r/gnrh1/fshb and lhb expression and these changes may occur in a normal physiological response as well as in a malfunctional stress response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Possible role of GnIH as a mediator between adiposity and impaired testicular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabana eAnjum

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the roles of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH, as an endocrine link between increasing adiposity and impaired testicular function in mice. To achieve this, the effect of GnIH on changes in nutrients uptake and hormonal synthesis/action in the adipose tissue and testis was investigated simultaneously by in vivo study and separately by in vitro study. Mice were treated in vivo with different doses of GnIH for 8 days. In the in vitro study, adipose tissue and testes of mice were cultured with different doses of GnIH with or without insulin or LH for 24 h at 370C. The GnIH treatment in vivo showed increased food intake, up-regulation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 and increased uptake of triglycerides in the adipose tissue. These changes may be responsible for increased accumulation of fat into white adipose tissue, resulted in increase in the body mass. On the contrary to the adipose tissue, treatment with GnIH both in vivo and in vitro showed decreased uptake of glucose by down-regulation of glucose transporter 8 (GLUT8 expressions in the testes, which in turn resulted in the decreased synthesis of testosterone. The GnIH treatment in vivo also showed the decreased expression of insulin receptor protein in the testis which may also be responsible for the decreased testicular activity in the mice. These findings thus suggest that GnIH increases the uptake of glucose and triglycerides in the adipose tissue resulting in increased accumulation of fat, whereas simultaneously in the testis GnIH suppressed the GLUT8 mediated glucose uptake, which in turn may be responsible for decreased testosterone synthesis. This study thus demonstrates GnIH as mediator of increasing adiposity and impaired testicular function in mice.

  9. Estrogenic Regulation of the GnRH Neuron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally eRadovick

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive function is regulated by the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH from the pituitary and the steroid hormones from the gonads. The dynamic changes in the levels of the reproductive hormones regulate secondary sex characteristics, gametogenesis, cellular function and behavior. Hypothalamic GnRH neurons, with cell bodies located in the basal hypothalamus, represent the final common pathway for neuronally derived signals to the pituitary. As such, they serve as integrators of a dizzying array of signals including sensory inputs mediating information about circadian, seasonal, behavioral, pheromonal and emotional cues. Additionally, information about peripheral physiological function may also be included in the integrative signal to the GnRH neuron. These signals may communicate information about metabolic status, disease or infection. Gonadal steroid hormones arguably exert the most important effects on GnRH neuronal function. In both males and females, the gonadal steroid hormones exert negative feedback regulation on axis activity at both the level of the pituitary and the hypothalamus. These negative feedback loops regulate homeostasis of steroid hormone levels. In females, a cyclic reversal of estrogen feedback produces a positive feedback loop at both the hypothalamic and pituitary levels. Central positive feedback results in a dramatic increase in GnRH secretion (Sisk and others 2001; Clarke 1993; Moenter, Brand and Karsch 1992; Xia and others 1992. This is coupled with an increase in pituitary sensitivity to GnRH (Turzillo, DiGregorio and Nett 1995; Savoy-Moore and others 1980, which produces the massive surge in secretion of LH that triggers ovulation.

  10. GnRH-agonist versus GnRH-antagonist IVF cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papanikolaou, E G; Pados, G; Grimbizis, G

    2012-01-01

    In view of the current debate concerning possible differences in efficacy between the two GnRH analogues used in IVF stimulated cycles, the current study aimed to explore whether progesterone control in the late follicular phase differs when GnRH antagonist is used as compared with GnRH agonist...

  11. Evolutionary origin of GnIH and NPFF in chordates: insights from novel amphioxus RFamide peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Osugi

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH is a newly identified hypothalamic neuropeptide that inhibits pituitary hormone secretion in vertebrates. GnIH has an LPXRFamide (X = L or Q motif at the C-terminal in representative species of gnathostomes. On the other hand, neuropeptide FF (NPFF, a neuropeptide characterized as a pain-modulatory neuropeptide, in vertebrates has a PQRFamide motif similar to the C-terminal of GnIH, suggesting that GnIH and NPFF have diverged from a common ancestor. Because GnIH and NPFF belong to the RFamide peptide family in vertebrates, protochordate RFamide peptides may provide important insights into the evolutionary origin of GnIH and NPFF. In this study, we identified a novel gene encoding RFamide peptides and two genes of their putative receptors in the amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum. Molecular phylogenetic analysis and synteny analysis indicated that these genes are closely related to the genes of GnIH and NPFF and their receptors of vertebrates. We further identified mature RFamide peptides and their receptors in protochordates. The identified amphioxus RFamide peptides inhibited forskolin induced cAMP signaling in the COS-7 cells with one of the identified amphioxus RFamide peptide receptors expressed. These results indicate that the identified protochordate RFamide peptide gene is a common ancestral form of GnIH and NPFF genes, suggesting that the origin of GnIH and NPFF may date back to the time of the emergence of early chordates. GnIH gene and NPFF gene may have diverged by whole-genome duplication in the course of vertebrate evolution.

  12. GnRH Protein Levels in Atrazine-Treated Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Leupen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine is the most widely used agricultural herbicide in the United States and a known endocrine disruptor. In amphibians, it has been shown to cause gonadal malformations, feminization of males, behavioral changes, and immune suppression; however, its mechanism ofaction is unknown. We hypothesized that atrazine reduces the production of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH in the hypothalamus. Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum were exposed to atrazine, 10-8 M ß-estradiol-3-benzoate, or no treatment and were sacrificed at 6, 8, and 10 months of age. GnRH neurons were labeled using immunocytochemistry, and labeled neurons were then counted using confocal microscopy. Although no significant difference wasfound in the total number of GnRH neurons, ectopic GnRH expression was seen in some brains. A significant negative correlation was found between presence of ectopic GnRH and number of normal GnRH neurons. Atrazine-treated animals were more likely than control or estrogentreated animals to have ectopic GnRH expression. The data implicate a central site of action of atrazine.

  13. Dynamic evolution of the GnRH receptor gene family in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Barry L; Akazome, Yasuhisa; Oka, Yoshitaka; Eisthen, Heather L

    2014-10-25

    Elucidating the mechanisms underlying coevolution of ligands and receptors is an important challenge in molecular evolutionary biology. Peptide hormones and their receptors are excellent models for such efforts, given the relative ease of examining evolutionary changes in genes encoding for both molecules. Most vertebrates possess multiple genes for both the decapeptide gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and for the GnRH receptor. The evolutionary history of the receptor family, including ancestral copy number and timing of duplications and deletions, has been the subject of controversy. We report here for the first time sequences of three distinct GnRH receptor genes in salamanders (axolotls, Ambystoma mexicanum), which are orthologous to three GnRH receptors from ranid frogs. To understand the origin of these genes within the larger evolutionary context of the gene family, we performed phylogenetic analyses and probabilistic protein homology searches of GnRH receptor genes in vertebrates and their near relatives. Our analyses revealed four points that alter previous views about the evolution of the GnRH receptor gene family. First, the "mammalian" pituitary type GnRH receptor, which is the sole GnRH receptor in humans and previously presumed to be highly derived because it lacks the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain typical of most G-protein coupled receptors, is actually an ancient gene that originated in the common ancestor of jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). Second, unlike previous studies, we classify vertebrate GnRH receptors into five subfamilies. Third, the order of subfamily origins is the inverse of previous proposed models. Fourth, the number of GnRH receptor genes has been dynamic in vertebrates and their ancestors, with multiple duplications and losses. Our results provide a novel evolutionary framework for generating hypotheses concerning the functional importance of structural characteristics of vertebrate GnRH receptors. We show that five

  14. In silico and in situ characterization of the zebrafish (Danio rerio gnrh3 (sGnRH gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husebye Harald

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH is responsible for stimulation of gonadotropic hormone (GtH in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG. The regulatory mechanisms responsible for brain specificity make the promoter attractive for in silico analysis and reporter gene studies in zebrafish (Danio rerio. Results We have characterized a zebrafish [Trp7, Leu8] or salmon (s GnRH variant, gnrh3. The gene includes a 1.6 Kb upstream regulatory region and displays the conserved structure of 4 exons and 3 introns, as seen in other species. An in silico defined enhancer at -976 in the zebrafish promoter, containing adjacent binding sites for Oct-1, CREB and Sp1, was predicted in 2 mammalian and 5 teleost GnRH promoters. Reporter gene studies confirmed the importance of this enhancer for cell specific expression in zebrafish. Interestingly the promoter of human GnRH-I, known as mammalian GnRH (mGnRH, was shown capable of driving cell specific reporter gene expression in transgenic zebrafish. Conclusions The characterized zebrafish Gnrh3 decapeptide exhibits complete homology to the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar GnRH-III variant. In silico analysis of mammalian and teleost GnRH promoters revealed a conserved enhancer possessing binding sites for Oct-1, CREB and Sp1. Transgenic and transient reporter gene expression in zebrafish larvae, confirmed the importance of the in silico defined zebrafish enhancer at -976. The capability of the human GnRH-I promoter of directing cell specific reporter gene expression in zebrafish supports orthology between GnRH-I and GnRH-III.

  15. Mathematical modeling of the GnRH pulse and surge generator

    CERN Document Server

    Clement, Frederique

    2007-01-01

    We propose a mathematical model allowing for the alternating pulse and surge pattern of GnRH (Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone) secretion. The model is based on the coupling between two systems running on different time scales. The faster system corresponds to the average activity of GnRH neurons, while the slower one corresponds to the average activity of regulatory neurons. The analysis of the slow/fast dynamics exhibited within and between both systems allows to explain the different patterns (slow oscillations, fast oscillations and periodical surge) of GnRH secretion. Specifications on the model parameter values are derived from physiological knowledge in terms of amplitude, frequency and plateau length of oscillations. The behavior of the model is finally illustrated by numerical simulations reproducing natural ovarian cycles and either direct or indirect actions of ovarian steroids on GnRH secretion.

  16. In search of the molecular mechanisms mediating the inhibitory effect of the GnRH antagonist degarelix on human prostate cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Sakai

    Full Text Available Degarelix is a gonadrotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH receptor (GnRHR antagonist used in patients with prostate cancer who need androgen deprivation therapy. GnRHRs have been found in extra-pituitary tissues, including prostate, which may be affected by the GnRH and GnRH analogues used in therapy. The direct effect of degarelix on human prostate cell growth was evaluated. Normal prostate myofibroblast WPMY-1 and epithelial WPE1-NA22 cells, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-1 cells, androgen-independent PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as VCaP cells derived from a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer were used. Discriminatory protein and lipid fingerprints of normal, hyperplastic, and cancer cells were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry (MS. The investigated cell lines express GNRHR1 and GNRHR2 and their endogenous ligands. Degarelix treatment reduced cell viability in all prostate cell lines tested, with the exception of the PC-3 cells; this can be attributed to increased apoptosis, as indicated by increased caspase 3/7, 8 and 9 levels. WPE1-NA22, BPH-1, LNCaP, and VCaP cell viability was not affected by treatment with the GnRH agonists leuprolide and goserelin. Using MALDI MS, we detected changes in m/z signals that were robust enough to create a complete discriminatory profile induced by degarelix. Transcriptomic analysis of BPH-1 cells provided a global map of genes affected by degarelix and indicated that the biological processes affected were related to cell growth, G-coupled receptors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (i the GnRH antagonist degarelix exerts a direct effect on prostate cell growth through apoptosis; (ii MALDI MS analysis provided a basis to fingerprint degarelix-treated prostate cells; and (iii the clusters of genes affected by degarelix

  17. The GnRH Pulse Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasha Grachev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The pulsatile secretion of hormones is an efficient way of coding a large variety of chemical messages. The GnRH pulse pattern determines which gonadotropin is released when and at what concentration, prescribing a detailed set of instructions to the gonads that produce changes in the steroid hormone milieu. Although GnRH neurons possess some inherent rhythmicity, they are diffusely situated within the hypothalamus and in isolation are only capable of generating physiologically irrelevant messages, hence a synchronization module exists upstream. The identity of the neural unit comprising the GnRH pulse generator is now generally thought to include KNDy neurons in the arcuate nucleus. These neurons coexpress the neuropeptides kisspeptin, neurokinin B and dynorphin A, as well as other transmitters, and are in intimate contact with the GnRH network. The GnRH pulse generator’s function is the precise control of GnRH neuron excitability, coordinated activation, stimulation of neurosecretory events, modulation of gene transcription and the mediation of the negative feedback effect of gonadal steroids. Additionally, the GnRH pulse generator is an ideal venue for the integration of various sensory and homeostatic cues that regulate reproductive functions. In this chapter we provide a historical perspective of the elegant science that sparked interest in the central mechanisms underlying the functions of the reproductive system, explain how hypotheses surrounding GnRH pulse generation have evolved and describe the current state of knowledge within the dynamic field of GnRH pulse generator research.

  18. MaGnET: Malaria Genome Exploration Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Joanna L; Gerloff, Dietlind L

    2013-09-15

    The Malaria Genome Exploration Tool (MaGnET) is a software tool enabling intuitive 'exploration-style' visualization of functional genomics data relating to the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. MaGnET provides innovative integrated graphic displays for different datasets, including genomic location of genes, mRNA expression data, protein-protein interactions and more. Any selection of genes to explore made by the user is easily carried over between the different viewers for different datasets, and can be changed interactively at any point (without returning to a search). Free online use (Java Web Start) or download (Java application archive and MySQL database; requires local MySQL installation) at http://malariagenomeexplorer.org joanna.sharman@ed.ac.uk or dgerloff@ffame.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Dependence of fertility on kisspeptin-Gpr54 signaling at the GnRH neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilov, Milen; Clarkson, Jenny; Liu, Xinhuai; Roa, Juan; Campos, Pauline; Porteous, Rob; Schütz, Günther; Herbison, Allan E

    2013-01-01

    Signaling between kisspeptin and its receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (Gpr54), is now recognized as being essential for normal fertility. However, the key cellular location of kisspeptin-Gpr54 signaling is unknown. Here we create a mouse with a GnRH neuron-specific deletion of Gpr54 to assess the role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Mutant mice are infertile, fail to go through puberty and exhibit markedly reduced gonadal size and follicle-stimulating hormone levels alongside GnRH neurons that are unresponsive to kisspeptin. In an attempt to rescue the infertile phenotype of global Gpr54⁻/⁻ mutants, we use BAC transgenesis to target Gpr54 to the GnRH neurons. This results in mice with normal puberty onset, estrous cyclicity, fecundity and a recovery of kisspeptin's stimulatory action upon GnRH neurons. Using complimentary cell-specific knockout and knockin approaches we demonstrate here that the GnRH neuron is the key site of kisspeptin-Gpr54 signaling for fertility.

  20. The Interrelationship of Estrogen Receptor and GnRH in a Basal Vertebrate, the Sea Lamprey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacia A Sower

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a vertebrate innovation and seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans. Lampreys are the earliest evolved vertebrates for which there is a demonstrated neuroendocrine system. Lampreys have three hypothalamic GnRHs (lGnRH-I, -II, and –III and two and possibly three pituitary GnRH receptors involved in mediating reproductive processes. Estradiol is considered to be a major reproductive steroid in both male and female lampreys. The purpose of this study was to investigate estrogen receptor (ER expression in the lamprey brain in adult sea lampreys. Expression of ER mRNA was confirmed in the adult lamprey brain using RT-PCR. Using digoxigenin (DIG-labeled probes, ER expression was shown to yield moderate, but distinct reaction products in specific neuronal nuclei of the lamprey brain, including the olfactory lobe, hypothalamus, habenular area, and hindbrain. Expression of ER in the hypothalamic area of the brain provides evidence of potential interaction between estradiol and GnRH(s, and is consistent with previous evidence showing estrogen feedback on GnRH in adult lamprey brain. Earlier studies have reported that there is a close distribution of GAD (GABA and lamprey GnRH in the preoptic region in adult lampreys. The establishment of a direct estradiol-kisspeptin-GABA-GnRH interaction in lamprey has yet to be determined and will require future functional and co-localization studies. The phylogenetic position of lampreys as a basal vertebrate allows lampreys to be a basis for understanding the molecular evolution of the neuroendocrine system that arose in the vertebrates.

  1. Expression and purification of soluble and stable ectodomain of natural killer cell receptor LLT1 through high-density transfection of suspension adapted HEK293S GnTI(-) cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bláha, J.; Pachl, Petr; Novák, Petr; Vaněk, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, May (2015), s. 7-13 ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:OPPK(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : LLT1 * HEK293S GnTI(-) * C-type lectin -like * NK cell * glycosylation * transfection Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.407, year: 2015

  2. Transcriptome analysis of endometrial tissues following GnRH agonist treatment in a mouse adenomyosis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Song Guo,1,* Xiaowei Lu,1,* Ruihuan Gu,2 Di Zhang,3 Yijuan Sun,2 Yun Feng1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Medicine Center, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Gynecology, Shanghai Ji Ai Genetics & In Vitro Fertilization Institute, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Jinan Military General Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Adenomyosis is a common, benign gynecological condition of the female reproductive tract characterized by heavy menstrual bleeding and dysmenorrhea. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonists are one of the medications used in adenomyosis treatment; however, their underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Moreover, it is difficult to obtain endometrial samples from women undergoing such treatment. To overcome this, we generated an adenomyosis mouse model, which we treated with an GnRH agonist to determine its effect on pregnancy outcomes. We also analyzed endometrial gene expression following GnRH agonist treatment to determine the mechanisms that may affect pregnancy outcome in individuals with adenomyosis.Methods: Neonatal female mice were divided into a control group, an untreated adenomyosis group, and an adenomyosis group treated with a GnRH agonist (n=6 each. The pregnancy outcome was observed and compared among the groups. Then, three randomly chosen transcriptomes from endometrial tissues from day 4 of pregnancy were analyzed between the adenomyosis group and the GnRH agonist treatment group by RNA sequencing and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR.Results: The litter size was significantly smaller in the adenomyosis group than in the control group (7±0.28 vs 11±0.26; P<0.05. However, the average live litter

  3. Nucleosome-coupled expression differences in closely-related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebbia Marinella

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide nucleosome occupancy is negatively related to the average level of transcription factor motif binding based on studies in yeast and several other model organisms. The degree to which nucleosome-motif interactions relate to phenotypic changes across species is, however, unknown. Results We address this challenge by generating nucleosome positioning and cell cycle expression data for Saccharomyces bayanus and show that differences in nucleosome occupancy reflect cell cycle expression divergence between two yeast species, S. bayanus and S. cerevisiae. Specifically, genes with nucleosome-depleted MBP1 motifs upstream of their coding sequence show periodic expression during the cell cycle, whereas genes with nucleosome-shielded motifs do not. In addition, conserved cell cycle regulatory motifs across these two species are more nucleosome-depleted compared to those that are not conserved, suggesting that the degree of conservation of regulatory sites varies, and is reflected by nucleosome occupancy patterns. Finally, many changes in cell cycle gene expression patterns across species can be correlated to changes in nucleosome occupancy on motifs (rather than to the presence or absence of motifs. Conclusions Our observations suggest that alteration of nucleosome occupancy is a previously uncharacterized feature related to the divergence of cell cycle expression between species.

  4. DMPD: G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17456803 G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macropha...2007 Apr 24. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signali...ng in macrophages. PubmedID 17456803 Title G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function

  5. (cGnRH-II) on plasma steroid hormone, maturation and ovulation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... 100% ovulation was also observed for the fish treated with cGnRH-II 200 μg/kg with the combination of ... fish species. Among other forms of GnRH are salmon. GnRH (sGnRH), mammalian GnRH (mGnRH), catfish. GnRH (cfGnRH), seabass GnRH ..... Review: Gonadatropin action on gametogenesis.

  6. A reduction in long-term spatial memory persists after discontinuation of peripubertal GnRH agonist treatment in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, D; Bellingham, M; Haraldsen, I R; McLaughlin, M; Robinson, J E; Solbakk, A K; Evans, N P

    2017-03-01

    Chronic gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) administration is used where suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis activity is beneficial, such as steroid-dependent cancers, early onset gender dysphoria, central precocious puberty and as a reversible contraceptive in veterinary medicine. GnRH receptors, however, are expressed outside the reproductive axis, e.g. brain areas such as the hippocampus which is crucial for learning and memory processes. Previous work, using an ovine model, has demonstrated that long-term spatial memory is reduced in adult rams (45 weeks of age), following peripubertal blockade of GnRH signaling (GnRHa: goserelin acetate), and this was independent of the associated loss of gonadal steroid signaling. The current study investigated whether this effect is reversed after discontinuation of GnRHa-treatment. The results demonstrate that peripubertal GnRHa-treatment suppressed reproductive function in rams, which was restored after cessation of GnRHa-treatment at 44 weeks of age, as indicated by similar testes size (relative to body weight) in both GnRHa-Recovery and Control rams at 81 weeks of age. Rams in which GnRHa-treatment was discontinued (GnRHa-Recovery) had comparable spatial maze traverse times to Controls, during spatial orientation and learning assessments at 85 and 99 weeks of age. Former GnRHa-treatment altered how quickly the rams progressed beyond a specific point in the spatial maze at 83 and 99 weeks of age, and the direction of this effect depended on gonadal steroid exposure, i.e. GnRHa-Recovery rams progressed quicker during breeding season and slower during non-breeding season, compared to Controls. The long-term spatial memory performance of GnRHa-Recovery rams remained reduced (P<0.05, 1.5-fold slower) after discontinuation of GnRHa, compared to Controls. This result suggests that the time at which puberty normally occurs may represent a critical period of hippocampal plasticity. Perturbing normal

  7. Antitumor agent 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy mediated cell death in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz Ahmed, Kausar Begam; Kanduluru, Ananda Kumar; Feng, Li; Fuchs, Philip L; Huang, Peng

    2017-05-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the most aggressive of all skin cancers and is associated with poor prognosis owing to lack of effective treatments. 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N is a novel antitumor agent with yet undefined mechanisms of action. We sought to delineate the antitumor mechanisms of 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N in melanoma cells to determine the potential of this compound as a treatment for melanoma. Activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) has been associated with increased melanoma progression, oncogenic signaling, drug resistance, and suppression of cell death. We found that 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N induced cell death in melanoma cells at nanomolar concentrations, and this cell death was characterized by inhibition of GRP78 expression, increased expression of the ER stress marker CHOP, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and lipidation of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Importantly, normal melanocytes exhibited limited sensitivity to 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N. Subsequent in vivo results demonstrated that 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N reduced melanoma growth in mouse tumor xenografts and did not affect body weight, suggesting minimal toxicity. In summary, our findings indicate that 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N causes ER stress and massive autophagy, leading to collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and cell death in melanoma cells, with minimal effects in normal melanocytes. Thus, 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N is a promising anticancer agent that warrants further investigation.

  8. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua: tissue distributions, early ontogeny and effects of fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuziak, Sarah M; Volkoff, Hélène

    2013-12-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is classically known for its role in regulating teleost fish skin color change for environmental adaptation. Recent evidence suggests that MCH also has appetite-stimulating properties. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptide family has dual roles in endocrine control of reproduction and energy status in fish. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are a commercially important aquaculture species inhabiting the shores of Atlantic Canada. In this study, we examine MCH and GnRH transcript expression profiles during early development as well as in central and peripheral tissues and quantify juvenile Atlantic cod MCH and GnRH hypothalamic mRNA expressions following food deprivation. MCH and GnRH3 cDNAs are maternally deposited into cod eggs, while MCH has variable expression throughout early development. GnRH2 and GnRH3 mRNAs "turn-on" during mid-segmentation once the brain is fully developed. For both MCH and GnRH, highest expression appears during the exogenous feeding stages, perhaps supporting their functions as appetite regulators during early development. MCH and GnRH transcripts are found in brain regions related to appetite regulation (telencephalon/preoptic area, optic tectum/thalamus, hypothalamus), as well as the pituitary gland and the stomach, suggesting a peripheral function in food intake regulation. Atlantic cod MCH mRNA is upregulated during fasting, while GnRH2 and GnRH3 transcripts do not appear to be influenced by food deprivation. In conclusion, MCH might be involved in stimulating food intake in juvenile Atlantic cod, while GnRHs may play a more significant role in appetite regulation during early development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The human gonadotropin releasing hormone type I receptor is a functional intracellular GPCR expressed on the nuclear membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Re

    Full Text Available The mammalian type I gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R is a structurally unique G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that lacks cytoplasmic tail sequences and displays inefficient plasma membrane expression (PME. Compared to its murine counterparts, the primate type I receptor is inefficiently folded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER leading to a further reduction in PME. The decrease in PME and concomitant increase in intracellular localization of the mammalian GnRH-RI led us to characterize the spatial distribution of the human and mouse GnRH receptors in two human cell lines, HEK 293 and HTR-8/SVneo. In both human cell lines we found the receptors were expressed in the cytoplasm and were associated with the ER and nuclear membrane. A molecular analysis of the receptor protein sequence led us to identify a putative monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS in the first intracellular loop of GnRH-RI. Surprisingly, however, neither the deletion of the NLS nor the addition of the Xenopus GnRH-R cytoplasmic tail sequences to the human receptor altered its spatial distribution. Finally, we demonstrate that GnRH treatment of nuclei isolated from HEK 293 cells expressing exogenous GnRH-RI triggers a significant increase in the acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3, thereby revealing that the nuclear-localized receptor is functional. Based on our findings, we conclude that the mammalian GnRH-RI is an intracellular GPCR that is expressed on the nuclear membrane. This major and novel discovery causes us to reassess the signaling potential of this physiologically and clinically important receptor.

  10. in seasonally anoestms GnRH-

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    luteotrophic effect of progestogen priming followed by a multi- ple injection regime of GnRH. The life-span of corpora lutea induced by HCG was prolonged during postpartum anoestrus in cows pretreated with progesterone implants, but not in cows primed with oestradiol (pratt, Berardinelli, Stevens & Inskeep,. 1982).

  11. Improvement of chloride transport defect by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Benz

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF, the most common autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians, is due to mutations in the CFTR gene. F508del, the most frequent mutation in patients, impairs CFTR protein folding and biosynthesis. The F508del-CFTR protein is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and its traffic to the plasma membrane is altered. Nevertheless, if it reaches the cell surface, it exhibits a Cl(- channel function despite a short half-life. Pharmacological treatments may target the F508del-CFTR defect directly by binding to the mutant protein or indirectly by altering cellular proteostasis, and promote its plasma membrane targeting and stability. We previously showed that annexine A5 (AnxA5 directly binds to F508del-CFTR and, when overexpressed, promotes its membrane stability, leading to the restoration of some Cl(- channel function in cells. Because Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH increases AnxA5 expression in some cells, we tested it in CF cells. We showed that human epithelial cells express GnRH-receptors (GnRH-R and that GnRH induces an AnxA5 overexpression and an increased Cl(- channel function in F508del-CFTR cells, due to an increased stability of the protein in the membranes. Beside the numerous physiological implications of the GnRH-R expression in epithelial cells, we propose that a topical use of GnRH is a potential treatment in CF.

  12. Improvement of chloride transport defect by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Nathalie; Le Hir, Sophie; Norez, Caroline; Kerbiriou, Mathieu; Calvez, Marie-Laure; Becq, Frédéric; Trouvé, Pascal; Férec, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians, is due to mutations in the CFTR gene. F508del, the most frequent mutation in patients, impairs CFTR protein folding and biosynthesis. The F508del-CFTR protein is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and its traffic to the plasma membrane is altered. Nevertheless, if it reaches the cell surface, it exhibits a Cl(-) channel function despite a short half-life. Pharmacological treatments may target the F508del-CFTR defect directly by binding to the mutant protein or indirectly by altering cellular proteostasis, and promote its plasma membrane targeting and stability. We previously showed that annexine A5 (AnxA5) directly binds to F508del-CFTR and, when overexpressed, promotes its membrane stability, leading to the restoration of some Cl(-) channel function in cells. Because Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) increases AnxA5 expression in some cells, we tested it in CF cells. We showed that human epithelial cells express GnRH-receptors (GnRH-R) and that GnRH induces an AnxA5 overexpression and an increased Cl(-) channel function in F508del-CFTR cells, due to an increased stability of the protein in the membranes. Beside the numerous physiological implications of the GnRH-R expression in epithelial cells, we propose that a topical use of GnRH is a potential treatment in CF.

  13. Selection of Highly Expressed Gene Variants in Escherichia coli Using Translationally Coupled Antibiotic Selection Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennig, Maja; Daley, Daniel O.; Nørholm, Morten H. H.

    2018-01-01

    Strategies to select highly expressed variants of a protein coding sequence are usually based on trial-and-error approaches, which are time-consuming and expensive. We address this problem using translationally coupled antibiotic resistance markers. The system requires that the target gene can...... be fused at the 3'-end with a translational coupling element and an antibiotic resistance gene. Highly expressed target genes can then be selected using a fast and simple whole cell survival assay in the presence of high antibiotic concentrations. Herein we show that the system can be used to select highly...

  14. Mutual interaction of kisspeptin, estrogen and bone morphogenetic protein-4 activity in GnRH regulation by GT1-7 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaka, Tomohiro; Otsuka, Fumio; Tsukamoto, Naoko; Nakamura, Eri; Inagaki, Kenichi; Toma, Kishio; Ogura-Ochi, Kanako; Glidewell-Kenney, Christine; Lawson, Mark A.; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Reproduction is integrated by interaction of neural and hormonal signals converging on hypothalamic neurons for controlling gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Kisspeptin, the peptide product of the kiss1 gene and the endogenous agonist for the GRP54 receptor, plays a key role in the regulation of GnRH secretion. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between kisspeptin, estrogen and BMPs in the regulation of GnRH production by using mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 cells. Treatment with kisspeptin increased GnRH mRNA expression and GnRH protein production in a concentrationdependent manner. The expression levels of kiss1 and GPR54 were not changed by kisspeptin stimulation. Kisspeptin induction of GnRH was suppressed by co-treatment with BMPs, with BMP-4 action being the most potent for suppressing the kisspeptin effect. The expression of kisspeptin receptor, GPR54, was suppressed by BMPs, and this effect was reversed in the presence of kisspeptin. It was also revealed that BMP-induced Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and Id-1 expression were suppressed and inhibitory Smad6/7 was induced by kisspeptin. In addition, estrogen induced GPR54 expression, while kisspeptin increased the expression levels of ERα and ERβ, suggesting that the actions of estrogen and kisspeptin are mutually enhanced in GT1-7 cells. Moreover, kisspeptin stimulated MAPKs and AKT signaling, and ERK signaling was functionally involved in the kisspeptin-induced GnRH expression. BMP-4 was found to suppress kisspeptin-induced GnRH expression by reducing ERK signaling activity. Collectively, the results indicate that the axis of kisspeptin-induced GnRH production is bi-directionally controlled, being augmented by an interaction between ERα/β and GPR54 signaling and suppressed by BMP-4 action in GT1-7 neuron cells. PMID:23880664

  15. Fiber-coupled light-emitting diode for localized photostimulation of neurons expressing channelrhodopsin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Luke; Wang, Hong; Zylka, Mark J

    2008-03-30

    Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is a blue-light-gated ion channel that can be used to stimulate genetically defined neurons reproducibly, rapidly and non-invasively. Existing approaches for delivering light to cells expressing ChR2 rely upon microscopes, lasers, arc lamps and shutters, all of which are relatively expensive and are not readily scalable for use on more than one brain region or animal at a time. In this paper, we describe an inexpensive method for delivering blue light locally and with millisecond precision to cells expressing ChR2. We accomplished this by coupling the light from a high-intensity blue light-emitting diode (LED; XLamp XR-E from CREE) into an optical fiber. When positioned in proximity to ChR2-expressing HEK293 cells, this fiber-coupled LED provided localized illumination of up to 32mW/mm2 and generated ChR2 photocurrents as efficiently as wide-field mercury arc lamp illumination. This fiber-coupled LED was also used to photostimulate action potentials in ChR2-expressing dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. LED light power and pulse frequency were controlled with an inexpensive, custom-built amplifier circuit. This scalable fiber-coupled LED system can be used to deliver light independent of the microscope objective and could, in principle, deliver light in parallel to multiple brain regions or to multiple genetically engineered animals.

  16. GN and C Fault Protection Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This is a companion presentation for a paper by the same name for the same conference. The objective of this paper is to shed some light on the fundamentals of fault tolerant design for GN&C. The common heritage of ideas behind both faulted and normal operation is explored, as is the increasingly indistinct line between these realms in complex missions. Techniques in common practice are then evaluated in this light to suggest a better direction for future efforts.

  17. On the Finite Groupoid G(n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Azadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available ‎In this paper we study the existence of commuting regular elements‎, ‎verifying‎‎the notion left (right commuting regular elements and its properties in the‎‎groupoid $G(n$‎ . ‎Also we show that $G(n$ contains commuting regular‎‎subsemigroup and give a necessary and sufficient condition for the groupoid‎‎$G(n$ to be commuting regular‎.

  18. ISS GN and C - First Year Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) began in late 1998 with the joining of the first two US and Russ ian elements. For more than two years, the outpost was served by two Russian Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) systems. The station requires orbital translation and attitude control functions for its 100+ configurations, from the nascent two-module station to the half million kilogram completed station owned and operated by seventeen nations. With the launch of the US Laboratory module in February 2001, the integration of the US GN&C system with its Russian counterpart laid the foundation for such a robust system. In its first year of combined operation, the ISS GN&C system has performed admirably, even better than many expected, but there have been surprises. Loss of command capability, loss of communication between segments, a control system force-fight, and "non-propulsive vents" that weren't - such events have repeatedly underscored the importance of thorough program integration, testing, and operation, both across subsystem boundaries and across international borders.

  19. Distribution and postnatal development of Gpr54 gene expression in mouse brain and gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbison, Allan E; de Tassigny, Xavier d'Anglemont; Doran, Joanne; Colledge, William H

    2010-01-01

    Kisspeptin and G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) are now acknowledged to play essential roles in the neural regulation of fertility. Using a transgenic Gpr54 LacZ knock-in mouse model, this study aimed to provide 1) a detailed map of cells expressing Gpr54 in the mouse brain and 2) an analysis of Gpr54 expression in GnRH neurons across postnatal development. The highest density of Gpr54-expressing cells in the mouse central nervous system was found in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus beginning on postnatal d 6 (P6). Abundant Gpr54 expression was also noted in the septum, rostral preoptic area (rPOA), anteroventral nucleus of the thalamus, posterior hypothalamus, periaqueductal grey, supramammillary and pontine nuclei, and dorsal cochlear nucleus. No Gpr54 expression was detected in the arcuate and rostral periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. Dual-labeling experiments showed that essentially all Gpr54-expressing cells in the rPOA were GnRH neurons. Analyses of mice at birth, P1, P5, P20, and P30 and as adults revealed a gradual increase in the percentage of GnRH neurons expressing Gpr54 from approximately 40% at birth through to approximately 70% from P20 onward. Whereas GnRH neurons located in the septum displayed a consistent increase across this time, GnRH neurons in the rPOA showed a sharp reduction in Gpr54 expression after birth (to approximately 10% at P5) before increasing to the 70% expression levels by P20. Together these findings provide an anatomical basis for the exploration of Gpr54 actions outside the reproductive axis and reveal a complex temporal and spatial pattern of Gpr54 gene expression in developing GnRH neurons.

  20. A predictive biophysical model of translational coupling to coordinate and control protein expression in bacterial operons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Salis, Howard M

    2015-08-18

    Natural and engineered genetic systems require the coordinated expression of proteins. In bacteria, translational coupling provides a genetically encoded mechanism to control expression level ratios within multi-cistronic operons. We have developed a sequence-to-function biophysical model of translational coupling to predict expression level ratios in natural operons and to design synthetic operons with desired expression level ratios. To quantitatively measure ribosome re-initiation rates, we designed and characterized 22 bi-cistronic operon variants with systematically modified intergenic distances and upstream translation rates. We then derived a thermodynamic free energy model to calculate de novo initiation rates as a result of ribosome-assisted unfolding of intergenic RNA structures. The complete biophysical model has only five free parameters, but was able to accurately predict downstream translation rates for 120 synthetic bi-cistronic and tri-cistronic operons with rationally designed intergenic regions and systematically increased upstream translation rates. The biophysical model also accurately predicted the translation rates of the nine protein atp operon, compared to ribosome profiling measurements. Altogether, the biophysical model quantitatively predicts how translational coupling controls protein expression levels in synthetic and natural bacterial operons, providing a deeper understanding of an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism and offering the ability to rationally engineer operons with desired behaviors. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Rostro-caudal maturation of glial cells in the accessory olfactory system during development: involvement in outgrowth of GnRH neurites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Sarah; Lomet, Didier; Caraty, Alain; Tillet, Yves; Duittoz, Anne; Vaudin, Pascal

    2017-10-03

    During mammalian embryonic development, GnRH neurones differentiate from the nasal placode and migrate through the nasal septum towards the forebrain. We previously showed that a category of glial cells, the olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC), forms the microenvironment of migrating GnRH neurones. Here, to characterize the quantitative and qualitative importance of this glial, we investigated the spatiotemporal maturation of glial cells in situ and the role of maturing glia in GnRH neurones development ex vivo. More than 90% of migrating GnRH neurones were found to be associated with glial cells. There was no change in the cellular microenvironment of GnRH neurones in the regions crossed during embryonic development as glial cells formed the main microenvironment of these neurones (53.4%). However, the phenotype of OEC associated with GnRH neurones changed across regions. The OEC progenitors immunoreactive to brain lipid binding protein formed the microenvironment of migrating GnRH neurones from the vomeronasal organ to the telencephalon and were also present in the diencephalon. However, during GnRH neurone migration, maturation of OEC to [GFAP+] state (glial fibrillary acid protein) was only observed in the nasal septum. Inducing depletion of OEC in maturation, using transgenic mice expressing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase driven by the GFAP promoter, had no impact on neurogenesis or on triggering GnRH neurones migration in nasal explant culture. Nevertheless, depletion of [GFAP+] cells decreased GnRH neurites outgrowth by 57.4%. This study suggests that specific maturation of OEC in the nasal septum plays a role in morphological differentiation of GnRH neurones. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. In vitro expression and analysis of the 826 human G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuechen Lv

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are involved in all human physiological systems where they are responsible for transducing extracellular signals into cells. GPCRs signal in response to a diverse array of stimuli including light, hormones, and lipids, where these signals affect downstream cascades to impact both health and disease states. Yet, despite their importance as therapeutic targets, detailed molecular structures of only 30 GPCRs have been determined to date. A key challenge to their structure determination is adequate protein expression. Here we report the quantification of protein expression in an insect cell expression system for all 826 human GPCRs using two different fusion constructs. Expression characteristics are analyzed in aggregate and among each of the five distinct subfamilies. These data can be used to identify trends related to GPCR expression between different fusion constructs and between different GPCR families, and to prioritize lead candidates for future structure determination feasibility.

  3. Expression of Heat Shock Proteins in Human Fibroblast Cells under Magnetic Resonant Coupling Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Mizuno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, resonant coupling wireless power transfer (WPT technology has been attracting attention and has been widely researched for practical use. Moreover, dosimetric evaluation has also been discussed to evaluate the potential health risks of the electromagnetic field from this WPT technology based on the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines. However, there has not been much experimental evaluation of the potential health risks of this WPT technology. In this study, to evaluate whether magnetic resonant coupling WPT induces cellular stress, we focused on heat shock proteins (Hsps and determined the expression level of Hsps 27, 70 and 90 in WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells using a western blotting method. The expression level of Hsps under conditions of magnetic resonant coupling WPT for 24 h was not significantly different compared with control cells, although the expression level of Hsps for cells exposed to heat stress conditions was significantly increased. These results suggested that exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT did not cause detectable cell stress.

  4. Chloride Accumulators NKCC1 and AE2 in Mouse GnRH Neurons: Implications for GABAA Mediated Excitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Taylor-Burds

    Full Text Available A developmental "switch" in chloride transporters occurs in most neurons resulting in GABAA mediated hyperpolarization in the adult. However, several neuronal cell subtypes maintain primarily depolarizing responses to GABAA receptor activation. Among this group are gonadotropin-releasing hormone-1 (GnRH neurons, which control puberty and reproduction. NKCC1 is the primary chloride accumulator in neurons, expressed at high levels early in development and contributes to depolarization after GABAA receptor activation. In contrast, KCC2 is the primary chloride extruder in neurons, expressed at high levels in the adult and contributes to hyperpolarization after GABAA receptor activation. Anion exchangers (AEs are also potential modulators of responses to GABAA activation since they accumulate chloride and extrude bicarbonate. To evaluate the mechanism(s underlying GABAA mediated depolarization, GnRH neurons were analyzed for 1 expression of chloride transporters and AEs in embryonic, pre-pubertal, and adult mice 2 responses to GABAA receptor activation in NKCC1-/- mice and 3 function of AEs in these responses. At all ages, GnRH neurons were immunopositive for NKCC1 and AE2 but not KCC2 or AE3. Using explants, calcium imaging and gramicidin perforated patch clamp techniques we found that GnRH neurons from NKCC1-/- mice retained relatively normal responses to the GABAA agonist muscimol. However, acute pharmacological inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide eliminated the depolarization/calcium response to muscimol in 40% of GnRH neurons from WT mice. In the remaining GnRH neurons, HCO3- mediated mechanisms accounted for the remaining calcium responses to muscimol. Collectively these data reveal mechanisms responsible for maintaining depolarizing GABAA mediated transmission in GnRH neurons.

  5. Towards neuroimmunotherapy for cancer: the neurotransmitters glutamate, dopamine and GnRH-II augment substantially the ability of T cells of few head and neck cancer patients to perform spontaneous migration, chemotactic migration and migration towards the autologous tumor, and also elevate markedly the expression of CD3zeta and CD3epsilon TCR-associated chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saussez, Sven; Laumbacher, Barbara; Chantrain, Gilbert; Rodriguez, Alexandra; Gu, Songhai; Wank, Rudolf; Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    In previous studies we found that several Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides among them: Glutamate, Dopamine, Gonadotropin-releasing-hormone (GnRH) I and II, Somatostatin, CGRP and Neuropeptide Y, can each by itself, at low physiological concentration (~10 nM) bind its receptors in human T cells and trigger several key T cell functions. These findings showed that the nervous system, via Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides, can 'talk' directly to the immune system, and stimulate what we coined 'Nerve-Driven Immunity': immune responses dictated by the nervous system. In various human cancers, the immune system of the patients, and their T cells in particular, are not functioning well enough against the cancer due to several reasons, among them the suppressive effects on the immune system induced by: (1) the cancer itself, (2) the chemotherapy and radiotherapy, (3) the ongoing/chronic stress, anxiety, depression and pain felt by the cancer patients. In Head and Neck Cancer (HNC), 5-year survival rate remains below 50%, primarily because of local recurrences or second primary tumors. Two-thirds of HNC patients are diagnosed at advanced clinical stage and have significantly poorer prognosis. Most HNC patients have multiple severe immunological defects especially in their T cells. A major defect in T cells of patients with HNC or other types of cancer is low CD3zeta expression that correlates with poor prognosis, decreased proliferation, apoptotic profile, abnormal cytokine secretion and poor abilities of destructing cancer cells. T cells of cancer patients are often also unable to migrate properly towards the tumor. In this study we asked if Glutamate, Dopamine or GnRH-II can augment the spontaneous migration, chemotactic migration and towards autologous HNC migration, and also increase CD3zeta and CD3epsilon expression, of peripheral T cells purified from the blood of five HNC patients. These HNC patients had either primary tumor or recurrence, and have been already

  6. GnRH agonist for triggering of final oocyte maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær; Kol, S; Papanikolaou, E G

    2011-01-01

    GnRH agonist (GnRHa) triggering has been shown to significantly reduce the occurrence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) compared with hCG triggering; however, initially a poor reproductive outcome was reported after GnRHa triggering, due to an apparently uncorrectable luteal phase...... deficiency. Therefore, the challenge has been to rescue the luteal phase. Studies now report a luteal phase rescue, with a reproductive outcome comparable to that seen after hCG triggering....

  7. Evidence that GnRH decreases with gonadal steroid feedback but increases with age in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sabrina; Sharpless, Julie L; Rado, Kimberly; Hall, Janet E

    2002-05-01

    Studies of the effects of gonadal steroid negative feedback and age on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in postmenopausal women (PMW) have identified significant but inconsistent changes in gonadotropin dynamics. In the current study, we investigated the effect of gonadal steroid replacement and age on overall GnRH secretion estimated by using submaximal GnRH receptor blockade. Twenty-four healthy PMW, 45-55 yr (n = 13) and 70-80 yr (n = 11), were studied. Subjects were studied at baseline (BL) on no hormone replacement therapy, after 1 month of transdermal estrogen (50 microg/d; E) and again after a further month of E and 7 d of transvaginal progesterone (100 mg bid; E + P). At each admission, blood was sampled every 30 min for 4 (BL and E) or 8 h (E + P) before and 10 h after sc administration of a submaximal dose (5 microg/kg) of the NAL-GLU GnRH antagonist ([Ac-D2Nal(1), D4ClPhe(2), DPal(3), Arg(5), DGlu(AA)(6), DAla(10)] GnRH). Percent inhibition of LH was calculated by expressing the difference between the nadir following GnRH antagonist administration and the preantagonist baseline as a percent of the baseline. Physiologic E and P levels were achieved with the appropriate hormone replacement regimens. Mean LH levels decreased from baseline with E alone and decreased further with E + P (81.4 +/- 6.6, 68.2 +/- 8.1 and 48.0 +/- 4.3 IU/liter, respectively; P < 0.005). Percent inhibition of LH following submaximal GnRH receptor blockade decreased with age (57.6 +/- 1.8% in young PMW vs. 51.4 +/-2.2% in old PMW; P < 0.05) implying an increase in GnRH secretion with age. There was an increase in percent inhibition of LH in response to submaximal GnRH receptor blockade with E and a further increase with E + P (54.8 +/-1.5%, 58.8 +/- 1.9% and 69.9 +/- 2.8%, respectively; P < 0.05), indicating a progressive decrease in endogenous GnRH secretion with gonadal steroid feedback. Mean LH and FSH levels were lower at baseline in old compared with young PMW. However, the

  8. Endometrial gene expression in the early luteal phase is impacted by mode of triggering final oocyte maturation in recFSH stimulated and GnRH antagonist co-treated IVF cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, P; Van Vaerenbergh, I; Bourgain, C

    2012-01-01

    Do differences in endometrial gene expression exist after ovarian stimulation with four different regimens of triggering final oocyte maturation and luteal phase support in the same patient? SUMMARY ANSWER: Significant differences in the expression of genes involved in receptivity and early impla...

  9. The type of GnRH analogue used during controlled ovarian stimulation influences early embryo developmental kinetics: a time-lapse study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Manuel; Cruz, María; Humaidan, Peter; Garrido, Nicolás; Pérez-Cano, Inmaculada; Meseguer, Marcos

    2013-06-01

    To explore if the GnRH analogue used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and the ovulation triggering factor (GnRH agonist + hCG triggering versus GnRH antagonist + GnRH agonist triggering) affect embryo development and kinetics. In a retrospective cohort study in the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad (IVI) Alicante and the Instituto Universitario-IVI Valencia, Spain, 2817 embryos deriving from 400 couples undergoing oocyte donation were analysed. After controlled ovarian stimulation and IVF/intracytoplamic sperm injection, the timing of embryonic cleavages was assessed by a video time-lapse system. The results were analysed using Student's t test for comparison of timings (hours) and Chi-squared test for comparison of proportions. A p-value < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Embryos from cycles co-treated with GnRH antagonist + GnRH agonist (n = 2101) cleaved faster than embryos deriving from patients co-treated with GnRH agonist + hCG (n = 716): these differences were significant at the first stages of development but they disappeared as long as the embryo developed. Assessing embryo quality in terms of morphokinetic characteristics, we did not find significant differences between the two groups. By adopting a time-lapse video system, we can suggest that the type of protocol used for controlled ovarian stimulation influences embryo kinetics of development but these variations are not reflected in embryo quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modular Integrated Secretory System Engineering in Pichia pastoris To Enhance G-Protein Coupled Receptor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Katrien; Vandewalle, Kristof; Laukens, Bram; Laeremans, Toon; Vosters, Olivier; Langer, Ingrid; Parmentier, Marc; Steyaert, Jan; Callewaert, Nico

    2016-10-21

    Membrane protein research is still hampered by the generally very low levels at which these proteins are naturally expressed, necessitating heterologous expression. Protein degradation, folding problems, and undesired post-translational modifications often occur, together resulting in low expression levels of heterogeneous protein products that are unsuitable for structural studies. We here demonstrate how the integration of multiple engineering modules in Pichia pastoris can be used to increase both the quality and the quantity of overexpressed integral membrane proteins, with the human CXCR4 G-protein coupled receptor as an example. The combination of reduced proteolysis, enhanced ER folding capacity, GlycoDelete-based N-Glycan trimming, and nanobody-based fold stabilization improved the expression of this GPCR in P. pastoris from a low expression level of a heterogeneously glycosylated, proteolyzed product to substantial quantities (2-3 mg/L shake flask culture) of a nonproteolyzed, homogeneously glycosylated proteoform. We expect that this set of tools will contribute to successful expression of more membrane proteins in a quantity and quality suitable for functional and structural studies.

  11. Expressions of commitment and independence: Exploring men’s emotional responsibility in heterosexual couple relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tove Thagaard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines men’s contributions to the division of emotional labour in heterosexual couple relationships by exploring the dimensions of commitment and independence, and how couples deal with challenges. The study is based on individual interviews with each of the partners in ten urban middle-class couples in Norway. The results indicate diversity in middle-class men’s approaches to emotional responsibility, which is expressed through three models. The model of shared responsibility implies that the man’s contributions in the relationship represent expressions of responsive commitment. The man finds a balance between giving priority to his personal interests and considering shared interests; a pattern we refer to as collaborative independence, and he shares the responsibility for coping with challenges with his partner. The model of gendered responsibility implies that the man’s contributions in the relationship are characterized by non-responsive commitment. The man gives priority to his personal interests in a way we refer to as conflicting independence, and refrains from sharing the responsibility for coping with challenges with his partner. Finally, a third model, termed partial responsibility, is also evident in the data. This model is a combination of collaborative independence and non-responsive commitment, and may represent a phase of transition towards collaboration on an equal basis. A discussion of interpretations of the diversity in men’s approaches to commitment and independence concludes the paper.

  12. Dual trigger of triptorelin and HCG optimizes clinical outcome for high ovarian responder in GnRH-antagonist protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Saijiao; Zhou, Danni; Yin, Tailang; Xu, Wangming; Xie, Qingzhen; Cheng, Dan; Yang, Jing

    2018-01-12

    In this paper, a retrospective cohort study was conducted to the high ovarian responders in GnRH-antagonist protocols of IVF/ICSI cycles. The purpose of the study is to investigate whether dual triggering of final oocyte maturation with a combination of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) can improve the clinical outcome compared with traditional dose (10000IU) HCG trigger and low-dose (8000IU) HCG trigger for high ovarian responders in GnRH-antagonist in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI) cycles. Our study included 226 couples with high ovarian responders in GnRH-antagonist protocols of IVF/ICSI cycles. Standard dosage of HCG trigger (10000 IU of recombinant HCG) versus dual trigger (0.2 mg of triptorelin and 2000 IU of recombinant HCG) and low-dose HCG trigger (8000IU of recombinant HCG) were used for final oocyte maturation. Our main outcome measures were high quality embryo rate, the number of usable embryos, the risk of OHSS, duration of hospitalization and incidence rate of complications. Our evidence demonstrated that dual trigger is capable of preventing severe OHSS while still maintaining excellent high quality embryo rate in in high ovarian responders of GnRH-antagonist protocols.

  13. Optimisation of GnRH antagonist use in ART

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdine, O.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the optimisation of controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF using exogenous FSH and GnRH antagonist co-treatment, by studying the timing of the initiation of GnRH antagonist co-medication and the role of ovarian reserve markers in optimising ovarian response and reproductive

  14. GnRH injection before artificial insemination (AI) alters follicle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... control group of Animals no injection of GnRH was performed. GnRH administered (Gonadorelin, 5 ml, intramuscular, made by. Aburaihan company, Tehran, Iran) on Day 6 of the estrous cycle. (estrus = Day 0). Ultrasonography examination. Ovarian follicular development was monitored daily by transrectal.

  15. GnIH Control of Feeding and Reproductive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Ubuka, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    In 2000, Tsutsui and colleagues discovered a neuropeptide gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) that inhibits gonadotropin release in birds. Subsequently, extensive studies during the last 15 years have demonstrated that GnIH is a key neurohormone that regulates reproduction in vertebrates, acting in the brain and on the pituitary to modulate reproduction and reproductive behavior. On the other hand, deprivation of food and other metabolic challenges inhibit the reproductive axis as well as sexual motivation. Interestingly, recent studies have further indicated that GnIH controls feeding behavior in vertebrates, such as in birds and mammals. This review summarizes the discovery of GnIH and its conservation in vertebrates and the neuroendocrine control of feeding behavior and reproductive behavior by GnIH. PMID:28082949

  16. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor are expressed at tubal ectopic pregnancy implantation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Klausen, Christian; Campbell, Lisa; Leung, Peter C K; Horne, Andrew W; Bedaiwy, Mohamed A

    2016-06-01

    To investigate whether gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) are expressed at tubal ectopic pregnancy sites, and to study the potential role of GnRH signaling in regulating immortalized human trophoblast cell viability. Immunohistochemical and experimental studies. Academic research laboratory. Fallopian tube implantation sites (n = 25) were collected from women with ectopic pregnancy. First-trimester human placenta biopsies (n = 5) were obtained from elective terminations of pregnancy. None. GnRH and GnRHR expression was examined by means of immunohistochemistry and histoscoring. Trophoblastic BeWo choriocarcinoma and immortalized extravillous trophoblast (HTR-8/SVneo) cell viability was examined by means of cell counting after incubation with GnRH and/or GnRH antagonist (Antide). GnRH and GnRHR immunoreactivity was detected in cytotrophoblast, syncytiotrophoblast, and extravillous trophoblast in all women with tubal pregnancy. GnRH immunoreactivity was higher and GnRHR immunoreactivity lower in syncytiotrophoblast compared with cytotrophoblast. GnRH and GnRHR immunoreactivity was detected in adjacent fallopian tube epithelium. Whereas neither GnRH nor Antide altered HTR-8/SVneo cell viability, treatment with GnRH significantly increased the overall cell viability of BeWo cells at 48 and 72 hours, and these effects were abolished by pretreatment with Antide. GnRH and GnRHR are expressed in trophoblast cell populations and fallopian tube epithelium at tubal ectopic pregnancy sites. GnRH increases BeWo cell viability, an effect mediated by the GnRHR. Further work is required to investigate the potential role of GnRH signaling in ectopic pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel Sonic Hedgehog Mutation in a Couple with Variable Expression of Holoprosencephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aguinaga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly (HPE is the most common developmental defect of the forebrain and midface in humans. sporadic and inherited mutations in the human sonic hedgehog (SHH gene cause 37% of familial HPE. A couple was referred to our unit with a family history of two spontaneous first trimester miscarriages and a daughter with HPE who presented early neonatal death. The father had a repaired median cleft lip, absence of central incisors, facial medial hypoplasia, and cleft palate. Intelligence and a brain CT scan were normal. Direct paternal sequencing analysis showed a novel nonsense mutation (W127X. Facial characteristics are considered as HPE microforms, and the pedigree suggested autosomal dominant inheritance with a variable expression of the phenotype. This study reinforces the importance of an exhaustive evaluation of couples with a history of miscarriages and neonatal deaths with structural defects.

  18. Reduced expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases in schizophrenia but not in schizoaffective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, ER; Ahmed, MR; Gurevich, VV; Benovic, JL; Gurevich, EV

    2011-01-01

    Alterations of multiple G protein-mediated signaling pathways are detected in schizophrenia. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins terminate signaling by G protein-coupled receptors exerting powerful influence on receptor functions. Modifications of arrestin and/or GRKs expression may contribute to schizophrenia pathology. Cortical expression of arrestins and GRKs was measured postmortem in control and subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Additionally, arrestin/GRK expression was determined in elderly patients with schizophrenia and age-matched control. Patients with schizophrenia, but not schizoaffective disorder, displayed reduced concentration of arrestin and GRK mRNAs and GRK3 protein. Arrestins and GRK significantly decreased with age. In elderly patients, GRK6 was reduced, with other GRKs and arrestins unchanged. Reduced cortical concentration of GRKs in schizophrenia (resembling that in aging) may result in altered G protein-dependent signaling, thus contributing to prefrontal deficits in schizophrenia. The data suggest distinct molecular mechanisms underlying schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. PMID:21784156

  19. Hantavirus Gn and Gc glycoproteins self-assemble into virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Rodrigo; Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Márquez, Chantal L; Bulling, Manuela; Klingström, Jonas; Mancini, Roberta; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2014-02-01

    How hantaviruses assemble and exit infected cells remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of Andes (ANDV) and Puumala (PUUV) hantavirus Gn and Gc envelope glycoproteins lead to their self-assembly into virus-like particles (VLPs) which were released to cell supernatants. The viral nucleoprotein was not required for particle formation. Further, a Gc endodomain deletion mutant did not abrogate VLP formation. The VLPs were pleomorphic, exposed protrusions and reacted with patient sera.

  20. Inter-hemispherical functional coupling of EEG rhythms during the perception of facial emotional expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Babiloni, Claudio; Buffo, Paola; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Bertini, Mario

    2013-02-01

    Brain rhythms of both hemispheres are involved in the processing of emotional stimuli but their interdependence between the two hemispheres is poorly known. Here we tested the hypothesis that passive visual perception of facial emotional expressions is related to a coordination of the two hemispheres as revealed by the inter-hemispherical functional coupling of brain electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms. To this aim, EEG data were recorded in 14 subjects observing emotional faces with neutral, happy or sad facial expressions (about 33% for each class). The EEG data were analyzed by directed transfer function (DTF), which estimates directional functional coupling of EEG rhythms. The EEG rhythms of interest were theta (about 4-6 Hz), alpha 1 (about 6-8 Hz), alpha 2 (about 8-10 Hz), alpha 3 (about 10-12 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), beta 2 (21-30 Hz), and gamma (31-44 Hz). In the frontal regions, inter-hemispherical DTF values were bidirectionally higher in amplitude across all frequency bands, during the perception of faces with sad compared to neutral or happy expressions. These results suggest that the processing of emotional negative facial expressions is related to an enhancement of a reciprocal inter-hemispherical flux of information in frontal cortex, possibly optimizing executive functions and motor control. Dichotomical view of hemispherical functional specializations does not take into account remarkable reciprocal interactions between frontal areas of the two hemispheres during the processing of negative facial expressions. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mouse hair cycle expression dynamics modeled as coupled mesenchymal and epithelial oscillators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Tasseff

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The hair cycle is a dynamic process where follicles repeatedly move through phases of growth, retraction, and relative quiescence. This process is an example of temporal and spatial biological complexity. Understanding of the hair cycle and its regulation would shed light on many other complex systems relevant to biological and medical research. Currently, a systematic characterization of gene expression and summarization within the context of a mathematical model is not yet available. Given the cyclic nature of the hair cycle, we felt it was important to consider a subset of genes with periodic expression. To this end, we combined several mathematical approaches with high-throughput, whole mouse skin, mRNA expression data to characterize aspects of the dynamics and the possible cell populations corresponding to potentially periodic patterns. In particular two gene clusters, demonstrating properties of out-of-phase synchronized expression, were identified. A mean field, phase coupled oscillator model was shown to quantitatively recapitulate the synchronization observed in the data. Furthermore, we found only one configuration of positive-negative coupling to be dynamically stable, which provided insight on general features of the regulation. Subsequent bifurcation analysis was able to identify and describe alternate states based on perturbation of system parameters. A 2-population mixture model and cell type enrichment was used to associate the two gene clusters to features of background mesenchymal populations and rapidly expanding follicular epithelial cells. Distinct timing and localization of expression was also shown by RNA and protein imaging for representative genes. Taken together, the evidence suggests that synchronization between expanding epithelial and background mesenchymal cells may be maintained, in part, by inhibitory regulation, and potential mediators of this regulation were identified. Furthermore, the model suggests that

  2. Physiology of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurone: studies from embryonic GnRH neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, S

    2011-06-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-secreting neurones are the final output of the central nervous system driving fertility in all mammals. Although it has been known for decades that the efficiency of communication between the hypothalamus and the pituitary depends on the pulsatile profile of GnRH secretion, how GnRH neuronal activity is patterned to generate pulses at the median eminence is unknown. To date, the scattered distribution of the GnRH cell bodies remains the main limitation to assessing the cellular events that could lead to pulsatile GnRH secretion. Taking advantage of the unique developmental feature of GnRH neurones, the nasal explant model allows primary GnRH neurones to be maintained within a micro-network where pulsatile secretion is preserved and where individual cellular activity can be monitored simultaneously across the cell population. This review summarises the data obtained from work using this in vitro model, and brings some insights into GnRH cellular physiology. © 2011 The Author. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist in in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF/ET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depalo Raffaella

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several protocols are actually available for in Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer. The review summarizes the main differences and the clinic characteristics of the protocols in use with GnRH agonists and GnRH antagonists by emphasizing the major outcomes and hormonal changes associated with each protocol. The majority of randomized clinical trials clearly shows that in “in Vitro” Fertilization and Embryo Transfer, the combination of exogenous Gonadotropin plus a Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH agonist, which is able to suppress pituitary FSH and LH secretion, is associated with increased pregnancy rate as compared with the use of gonadotropins without a GnRH agonist. Protocols with GnRH antagonists are effective in preventing a premature rise of LH and induce a shorter and more cost-effective ovarian stimulation compared to the long agonist protocol. However, a different synchronization of follicular recruitment and growth occurs with GnRH agonists than with GnRH antagonists. Future developments have to be focused on timing of the administration of GnRH antagonists, by giving a great attention to new strategies of stimulation in patients in which radio-chemotherapy cycles are needed.

  4. ANGPTL6 expression is coupled with mitochondrial OXPHOS function to regulate adipose FGF21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seul Gi; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Choi, Min Jeong; Ryu, Min Jeong; Jung, Saetbyel; Chung, Hyo Kyun; Chang, Joon Young; Kim, Yong Kyung; Lee, Seong Eun; Kim, Hyeon-Woo; Choi, Hoil; Kim, Dong Seok; Lee, Ju Hee; Kim, Koon Soon; Kim, Hyun Jin; Lee, Chul-Ho; Oike, Yuichi; Shong, Minho

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies revealed that the inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is coupled with the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, thereby stimulating the secretion of non-cell autonomous factors, which may control systemic energy metabolism and longevity. However, the nature and roles of non-cell autonomous factors induced in adipose tissue in response to reduced OXPHOS function remain to be clarified in mammals. CR6-interacting factor 1 (CRIF1) is an essential mitoribosomal protein for the intramitochondrial production of mtDNA-encoded OXPHOS subunits. Deficiency of CRIF1 impairs the proper formation of the OXPHOS complex, resulting in reduced function. To determine which secretory factors are induced in response to reduced mitochondrial OXPHOS function, we analyzed gene expression datasets in Crif1-depleted mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Crif1 deficiency preferentially increased the expression of angiopoietin-like 6 (Angptl6) and did not affect other members of the ANGPTL family. Moreover, treatment with mitochondrial OXPHOS inhibitors increased the expression of Angptl6 in cultured adipocytes. To confirm Angptl6 induction in vivo, we generated a murine model of reduced mitochondrial OXPHOS function using adipose tissue-specific Crif1-deficient mice and verified the upregulation of Angptl6 and fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21) in white adipose tissue. Treatment with recombinant ANGPTL6 protein increased oxygen consumption and Pparα expression through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in cultured adipocytes. Furthermore, the ANGPTL6-mediated increase in Pparα expression resulted in increased FGF21 expression, thereby promoting β-oxidation. In conclusion, mitochondrial OXPHOS function governs the expression of ANGPTL6, which is an essential factor for FGF21 production in adipose tissue and cultured adipocytes. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  5. Reproductive physiology of a humanized GnRH receptor mouse model: application in evaluation of human-specific analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Javier A; Kohout, Trudy; Pineda, Rafael; Maki, Richard A; Scott Struthers, R; Millar, Robert P

    2013-07-01

    The human GnRH receptor (GNRHR1) has a specific set of properties with physiological and pharmacological influences not appropriately modeled in laboratory animals or cell-based systems. To address this deficiency, we have generated human GNRHR1 knock-in mice and described their reproductive phenotype. Measurement of pituitary GNRHR1 transcripts from homozygous human GNRHR1 knock-in (ki/ki) mice revealed a severe reduction (7- to 8-fold) compared with the mouse Gnrhr1 in wild-type mice. ¹²⁵I-GnRH binding assays on pituitary membrane fractions corroborated reduced human GNRHR1 protein expression in ki/ki mice, as occurs with transfection of human GNRHR1 in cell lines. Female homozygous knock-in mice displayed normal pubertal onset, indicating that a large reduction in GNRHR1 expression is sufficient for this process. However, ki/ki females exhibited periods of prolonged estrous and/or metestrous and reduced fertility. No impairment was found in reproductive maturity or adult fertility in male ki/ki mice. Interestingly, the serum LH response to GnRH challenge was reduced in both knock-in males and females, indicating a reduced GNRHR1 signaling capacity. Small molecules targeting human GPCRs usually have poor activities at homologous rodent receptors, thus limiting their use in preclinical development. Therefore, we tested a human-specific GnRH1 antagonist, NBI-42902, in our mouse model and demonstrated abrogation of a GnRH1-induced serum LH rise in ki/ki mice and an absence of effect in littermates expressing the wild-type murine receptor. This novel model provides the opportunity to study the human receptor in vivo and for screening the activity of human-specific GnRH analogs.

  6. Expression of JAK3 Sensitive Na+ Coupled Glucose Carrier SGLT1 in Activated Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shefalee K. Bhavsar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Similar to tumor cells, activated T-lymphocytes generate ATP mainly by glycolytic degradation of glucose. Lymphocyte glucose uptake involves non-concentrative glucose carriers of the GLUT family. In contrast to GLUT isoforms, Na+-coupled glucose-carrier SGLT1 accumulates glucose against glucose gradients and is effective at low extracellular glucose concentrations. The present study explored expression and regulation of SGLT1 in activated murine splenic cytotoxic T cells (CTLs and human Jurkat T cells. Methods: FACS analysis, immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, chemiluminescence and Western blotting were employed to estimate SGLT1 expression, function and regulation in lymphocytes, as well as dual electrode voltage clamp in SGLT1 ± JAK3 expressing Xenopus oocytes to quantify the effect of janus kinase3 (JAK3 on SGLT1 function. Results: SGLT1 is expressed in murine CTLs and also in human Jurkat T cells. 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino-2-deoxyglucose uptake was significantly decreased by SGLT1-blocker phloridzin (0.2 mM and by pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 with WHI-P131 (156 µM, WHI-P154 (11.2 µM and JAK3 inhibitor VI (0.5 µM. Electrogenic glucose transport (Iglucose in Xenopus oocytes expressing human SGLT1 was increased by additional expression of human wild type JAK3, active A568VJAK3 but not inactive K851AJAK3. Coexpression of JAK3 enhanced the maximal transport rate without significantly modifying affinity of the carrier. Iglucose in SGLT1+JAK3 expressing oocytes was significantly decreased by WHI-P154 (11.2 µM. JAK3 increased the SGLT1 protein abundance in the cell membrane. Inhibition of carrier insertion by brefeldin A (5 µM in SGLT1+JAK3 expressing oocytes resulted in a decline of Iglucose, which was similar in presence and absence of JAK3. Conclusions: SGLT1 is expressed in murine cytotoxic T cells and human Jurkat T cells and significantly contributes to glucose uptake in those cells post

  7. Molecular analysis of the koala reproductive hormones and their receptors: gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle-stimulating hormone β and luteinising hormone β with localisation of GnRH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, E R; Soeta, S; Sherwood, N M; Johnston, S D

    2014-12-01

    During evolution, reproductive hormones and their receptors in the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis have been altered by genetic mechanisms. To understand how the neuroendocrine control of reproduction evolved in mammals, it is important to examine marsupials, the closest group to placental mammals. We hypothesised that at least some of the hormones and receptors found in placental mammals would be present in koala, a marsupial. We examined the expression of koala mRNA for the reproductive molecules. Koala cDNAs were cloned from brain for gonadotrophin-releasing hormones (GnRH1 and GnRH2) or from pituitary for GnRH receptors, types I and II, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)β and luteinising hormone (LH)β, and from gonads for FSH and LH receptors. Deduced proteins were compared by sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis with those of other vertebrates. In conclusion, the koala expressed mRNA for these eight putative reproductive molecules, whereas at least one of these molecules is missing in some species in the amniote lineage, including humans. In addition, GnRH1 and 2 are shown by immunohistochemistry to be expressed as proteins in the brain. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  8. β3GnT2 null mice exhibit defective accessory olfactory bulb innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henion, Timothy R; Madany, Pasil A; Faden, Ashley A; Schwarting, Gerald A

    2013-01-01

    Vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) extend axons to the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) where they form synaptic connections that relay pheromone signals to the brain. The projections of apical and basal VSNs segregate in the AOB into anterior (aAOB) and posterior (pAOB) compartments. Although some aspects of this organization exhibit fundamental similarities with the main olfactory system, the mechanisms that regulate mammalian vomeronasal targeting are not as well understood. In the olfactory epithelium (OE), the glycosyltransferase β3GnT2 maintains expression of axon guidance cues required for proper glomerular positioning and neuronal survival. We show here that β3GnT2 also regulates guidance and adhesion molecule expression in the vomeronasal system in ways that are partially distinct from the OE. In wildtype mice, ephrinA5(+) axons project to stereotypic subdomains in both the aAOB and pAOB compartments. This pattern is dramatically altered in β3GnT2(-/-) mice, where ephrinA5 is upregulated exclusively on aAOB axons. Despite this, apical and basal VSN projections remain strictly segregated in the null AOB, although some V2r1b axons that normally project to the pAOB inappropriately innervate the anterior compartment. These fibers appear to arise from ectopic expression of V2r1b receptors in a subset of apical VSNs. The homotypic adhesion molecules Kirrel2 and OCAM that facilitate axon segregation and glomerular compartmentalization in the main olfactory bulb are ablated in the β3GnT2(-/-) aAOB. This loss is accompanied by a two-fold increase in the total number of V2r1b glomeruli and a failure to form morphologically distinct glomeruli in the anterior compartment. These results identify a novel function for β3GnT2 glycosylation in maintaining expression of layer-specific vomeronasal receptors, as well as adhesion molecules required for proper AOB glomerular formation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Expression and function of proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors in inflammatory pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Shin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammatory pain, when not effectively treated, is a costly health problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Despite the availability of pharmacologic treatments, chronic inflammatory pain remains inadequately treated. Understanding the nociceptive signaling pathways of such pain is therefore important in developing long-acting treatments with limited side effects. High local proton concentrations (tissue acidosis causing direct excitation or modulation of nociceptive sensory neurons by proton-sensing receptors are responsible for pain in some inflammatory pain conditions. We previously found that all four proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are expressed in pain-relevant loci (dorsal root ganglia, DRG, which suggests their possible involvement in nociception, but their functions in pain remain unclear. Results In this study, we first demonstrated differential change in expression of proton-sensing GPCRs in peripheral inflammation induced by the inflammatory agents capsaicin, carrageenan, and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA. In particular, the expression of TDAG8, one proton-sensing GPCR, was increased 24 hours after CFA injection because of increased number of DRG neurons expressing TDAG8. The number of DRG neurons expressing both TDAG8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 was increased as well. Further studies revealed that TDAG8 activation sensitized the TRPV1 response to capsaicin, suggesting that TDAG8 could be involved in CFA-induced chronic inflammatory pain through regulation of TRPV1 function. Conclusion Each subtype of the OGR1 family was expressed differently, which may reflect differences between models in duration and magnitude of hyperalgesia. Given that TDAG8 and TRPV1 expression increased after CFA-induced inflammation and that TDAG8 activation can lead to TRPV1 sensitization, it suggests that high concentrations of protons after

  10. Regulation versus modulation in GnRH receptor function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolman, J.C.; Theodoropoulos, T.J.

    1985-03-01

    Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration after exposure to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) indicates that an instantaneous increase occurs in the rate of release of LH directly from the anterior pituitary, as measured dynamically during superfusion in vitro. On the other hand, estradiol-17 beta (E2) alone shows no such instantaneous effect on LH release rate (at least for the first four hours), in either physiologic or pharmacologic concentrations. At the same time, brief (ten to 30 minute) exposure of isolated anterior pituitary plasma membranes to physiologic concentrations of E2 significantly alters the binding of a fully biologically active /sup 125/I-GnRH to its plasma membrane receptor protein. In order to characterize the effect of E2 on GnRH binding further, dispersed bovine anterior pituitary cells were preincubated for six hours in the presence or absence of physiologic concentrations of E2 (10(-10)M). Following preincubation in the presence of E2, the cell suspension was incubated for 30 minutes with physiologic concentrations (5 x 10(-11) - 5 x 10(-10)M) of a fully biologically active /sup 125/I-GnRH. The treatment, at least, doubled the number of biologically important high affinity GnRH binding sites (Kd's . 7.5 x -10(-11) - 4.5 x 10(-10)M), and changed the binding capacity of some of the binding sites up to three fold, which altered the cooperativity of GnRH-receptor interaction. Thus, the interaction of E2 with GnRH at the level of GnRH receptor is mandatory for the short-term pituitary effect of E2 on LH release in vitro and in vivo.

  11. GnIH Control of Feeding and Reproductive Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Ubuka, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    In 2000, Tsutsui and colleagues discovered a neuropeptide gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) that inhibits gonadotropin release in birds. Subsequently, extensive studies during the last 15 years have demonstrated that GnIH is a key neurohormone that regulates reproduction in vertebrates, acting in the brain and on the pituitary to modulate reproduction and reproductive behavior. On the other hand, deprivation of food and other metabolic challenges inhibit the reproductive axis as well as ...

  12. Expression of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER in endometriosis: a tissue microarray study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samartzis Nicolas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER is thought to be involved in non-genomic estrogen responses as well as processes such as cell proliferation and migration. In this study, we analyzed GPER expression patterns from endometriosis samples and normal endometrial tissue samples and compared these expression profiles to those of the classical sex hormone receptors. Methods A tissue microarray, which included 74 samples from different types of endometriosis (27 ovarian, 19 peritoneal and 28 deep-infiltrating and 30 samples from normal endometrial tissue, was used to compare the expression levels of the GPER, estrogen receptor (ER-alpha, ER-beta and progesterone receptor (PR. The immunoreactive score (IRS was calculated separately for epithelium and stroma as the product of the staining intensity and the percentage of positive cells. The expression levels of the hormonal receptors were dichotomized into low (IRS  =6 expression groups. Results The mean epithelial IRS (+/−standard deviation, range of cytoplasmic GPER expression was 1.2 (+/−1.7, 0–4 in normal endometrium and 5.1 (+/−3.5, 0–12 in endometriosis (p p = 0.71, of ER-alpha 10.6 (+/−2.4, 3–12 and 9.8 (+/−3.0, 2–12; p = 0.26, of ER-beta 2.4 (+/−2.2; 0–8 and 5.6 (+/−2.6; 0–10; p p p p = 0.001, of ER-beta 1.8 (+/−2.0; 0–8 and 5.4 (+/−2.5; 0–10; p p���= 0.044, respectively. Cytoplasmic GPER expression was not detectable in the stroma of endometrium and endometriosis. The observed frequency of high epithelial cytoplasmic GPER expression levels was 50% (n = 30/60 in the endometriosis and none (0/30 in the normal endometrium samples (p p = 0.01, as compared to peritoneal (9/18, 50% or deep-infiltrating endometriotic lesions (7/22, 31.8%. The frequency of high stromal nuclear GPER expression levels was 100% (n = 74/74 in endometriosis and 76.7% (n = 23/30 in normal endometrium (p

  13. Chicken GnRH II occurs together with mammalian GnRH in a South American species of marsupial (Monodelphis domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J A; Hinds, L A; Mehl, A E; Saunders, N R; Millar, R P

    1990-01-01

    Two molecular forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) were demonstrated in hypothalamic extracts of M. domestica using high performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay with specific GnRH antisera. One form eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH and was quantified equally by two mammalian GnRH antisera, while the second form coeluted with synthetic chicken GnRH II and was quantified equally with two chicken GnRH II antisera. The finding of chicken GnRH II in a South American species of marsupial, which has previously been reported in some Australian species of marsupial and in species of Aves, Reptilia, Amphibia, Osteichthyes and Chondrichthyes, supports our hypothesis that this widespread structural variant may represent an early evolved and conserved form of GnRH.

  14. Luteal blood flow in patients undergoing GnRH agonist long protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasaki Akihisa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood flow in the corpus luteum (CL is closely related to luteal function. It is unclear how luteal blood flow is regulated. Standardized ovarian-stimulation protocol with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa long protocol causes luteal phase defect because it drastically suppresses serum LH levels. Examining luteal blood flow in the patient undergoing GnRHa long protocol may be useful to know whether luteal blood flow is regulated by LH. Methods Twenty-four infertile women undergoing GnRHa long protocol were divided into 3 groups dependent on luteal supports; 9 women were given ethinylestradiol plus norgestrel (Planovar orally throughout the luteal phase (control group; 8 women were given HCG 2,000 IU on days 2 and 4 day after ovulation induction in addition to Planovar (HCG group; 7 women were given vitamin E (600 mg/day orally throughout the luteal phase in addition to Planovar (vitamin E group. Blood flow impedance was measured in each CL during the mid-luteal phase by transvaginal color-pulsed-Doppler-ultrasonography and was expressed as a CL-resistance index (CL-RI. Results Serum LH levels were remarkably suppressed in all the groups. CL-RI in the control group was more than the cutoff value (0.51, and only 2 out of 9 women had CL-RI values Conclusion Patients undergoing GnRHa long protocol had high luteal blood flow impedance with very low serum LH levels. HCG administration improved luteal blood flow impedance. This suggests that luteal blood flow is regulated by LH.

  15. Evolution of the AKH/corazonin/ACP/GnRH receptor superfamily and their ligands in the Protostomia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis

    2014-01-01

    In this review we trace the evolutionary connections between GnRH receptors from vertebrates and the receptors for adipokinetic hormone (AKH), AKH/corazonin-related peptide (ACP), and corazonin from arthropods. We conclude that these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are closely related and hav......QLTFSSDWSGamide), and the penis worm Priapulus caudatus (pQIFFSKGWRGamide). This is the first report, showing that AKH signaling is widespread in molluscs....

  16. Chromatographic and immunological evidence for mammalian GnRH and chicken GnRH II in eel (Anguilla anguilla) brain and pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J A; Dufour, S; Fontaine, Y A; Millar, R P

    1990-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptides in the brain and pituitary of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) were investigated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and radioimmunoassay with region-specific antisera. Two GnRH molecular forms were demonstrated in brain and pituitary extracts. One form eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH on HPLC and was recognized by antibodies directed against the NH2 and COOH termini of mammalian GnRH as well as by antibodies to the middle region. The second form eluted in the same position as synthetic chicken GnRH II and was recognized by specific antibodies to this molecule. Salmon GnRH and chicken GnRH I were not detected. The occurrence of mammalian GnRH in teleost fish suggests that this molecular form is more ancient than was previously suspected and arose earlier than in primitive tetrapods, or that it has arisen in the eel through random mutation of salmon GnRH. The lack of salmon GnRH in the eel brain indicates that this molecular form is not common to all teleost species. The finding in eel brain of chicken GnRH II, which has previously been described in species of Mammalia, Aves, Reptilia, Amphibia, Osteichthyes, and Chondrichthyes, supports our hypothesis that this widespread structural variant may represent an early evolved and conserved form of GnRH.

  17. Veterinary clinical application of GnRH--questions of efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A R

    2005-08-01

    The efficacy of GnRH treatments are reviewed in relation to prevention of embryo mortality, control of follicle development in synchronization programmes using PG as luteolysin, induction of ovulation in post-partum anoestrus and in bovine cystic ovarian disease. It is suggested that in cattle that GnRH is effective in increasing pregnancy rates when given either at the time of insemination (first or repeat) or between days 11 and 14 after insemination. Evidence is also presented for positive effects on pregnancy rates in sheep, mares and sows. Use of GnRH as an integral part of synchronising regimens where it is given 7 days before PG and then again 48-60 h after PG appears to be effective in increasing the synchrony of ovulation in controlled breeding programmes. The main synchronizing effect seems to reside in the second GnRH injection whereas the importance of the first is in prolonging the luteal phase in those cows treated late in the cycle. The published work on the potential use of GnRH to induce ovulation in anovulatory cattle is reviewed. Neither bolus dose injections, pulsatile, continuous infusion, nor controlled release formulations of GnRH, have yet proved effective in inducing fertile ovulations in a predictable or consistent manner. It is suggested that this is due to the variability of follicular status when treatment is initiated. GnRH is commonly used in the treatment of bovine cystic ovarian disease. However, although stimulating ovulation/luteinisation of a new follicle and luteinisation of the cyst, fertility of treated cattle remains very poor and it is suggested that a better understanding of the disease is needed before more effective treatments can be developed.

  18. Delayed puberty in spontaneously hypertensive rats involves a primary ovarian failure independent of the hypothalamic KiSS-1/GPR54/GnRH system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, L; Castellano, J M; Romero, M; Tena-Sempere, M; Gaytán, F; Aguilar, E

    2009-06-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats, extensively used as experimental models of essential human hypertension, display important alterations in the neuroendocrine reproductive axis, which manifest as markedly delayed puberty onset in females but whose basis remains largely unknown. We analyze herein in female SH rats: 1) possible alterations in the expression and function of KiSS-1/GPR54 and GnRH/GnRH-receptor systems, 2) the integrity of feedback mechanisms governing the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and 3) the control of ovarian function by gonadotropins. Our data demonstrate that, despite overtly delayed puberty, no significant decrease in hypothalamic KiSS-1, GPR54, or GnRH mRNA levels was detected in this strain. Likewise, in vivo gonadotropin responses to ovariectomy and systemic kisspeptin-10 or GnRH administration, as well as in vitro gonadotropin responses to GnRH, were fully preserved in SH rats. Moreover, circulating LH levels were grossly conserved during prepubertal maturation, whereas FSH levels were even enhanced from d 20 postpartum onwards. In striking contrast, ovarian weight and hormone (progesterone and testosterone) responses to human chorionic gonadotropin (CG) in vitro were profoundly decreased in SH rats, with impaired follicular development and delayed ovulation at puberty. Such reduced hormonal responses to human CG could not be attributed to changes in LH/CG or FSH-receptor mRNA expression but might be linked to blunted P450scc, 3beta-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase mRNA levels in ovaries from SH rats. In conclusion, our results indicate that the expression and function of KiSS-1/GPR54 and GnRH/GnRH-receptor systems is normal in SH rats, whereas ovarian development, steroidogenesis, and responsiveness to gonadotropins are strongly compromised.

  19. A second form of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), with chicken GnRH II-like properties, occurs together with mammalian GnRH in marsupial brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J A; Mehl, A E; Tyndale-Biscoe, C H; Hinds, L; Millar, R P

    1989-11-01

    GnRH peptides in the hypothalami of marsupials (tammar wallaby, short-nosed bandicoot, and eastern quoll) and a monotreme (echidna) were investigated by reverse phase HPLC and RIA with region-specific antisera. In the wallaby hypothalamic extract, a single form of GnRH was present, which eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH on HPLC and was recognized by antibodies directed against the NH2- and COOH-termini of mammalian GnRH as well as by antibodies to the middle region. Two GnRH molecular forms were demonstrated in the bandicoot and quoll hypothalamic extracts. One form eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH on HPLC and was quantified equally by two mammalian GnRH antisera. The second form eluted in the same position as synthetic chicken GnRH II and was recognized by specific antibodies to this molecule. Quantification of this immunoreactive peak with two chicken GnRH II antisera was not equal, suggesting that the peptide has similar properties to, but may not be identical to, chicken GnRH II. Immunoreactive GnRH was also detected in the echidna hypothalamic extract. These findings demonstrate that in some mammals more than one form of GnRH is present in the brain of a single species, as has previously been found in species from all nonmammalian vertebrate classes. The finding in marsupial brain of a peptide with properties of chicken GnRH II, which has previously been reported in species of Aves, Reptilia, Amphibia, Osteichthyes, and Chondrichthyes, supports our hypothesis that this widespread structural variant may represent an early early evolved and conserved form of GnRH.

  20. Effect of short-term and prolonged stress on the biosynthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in the hypothalamus and GnRHR in the pituitary of ewes during various physiological states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciechanowska, M; Łapot, M; Antkowiak, B; Mateusiak, K; Paruszewska, E; Malewski, T; Paluch, M; Przekop, F

    2016-11-01

    Using an ELISA assay, the levels of GnRH and GnRHR were analysed in the preoptic area (POA), anterior (AH) and ventromedial hypothalamus (VM), stalk/median eminence (SME); and GnRHR in the anterior pituitary gland (AP) of non-breeding and breeding sheep subjected to short-term or prolonged stress. The ELISA study was supplemented with an analysis of plasma LH concentration. Short-term footshock stimulation significantly increased GnRH levels in hypothalamus in both seasons. Prolonged stress elevated or decreased GnRH concentrations in the POA and the VM, respectively during anoestrus, and lowered GnRH amount in the POA-hypothalamus of follicular-phase sheep. An up-regulation of GnRHR levels was noted in both, anoestrous and follicular-phase animals. In the non-breeding period, a prolonged stress procedure increased GnRHR biosynthesis in the VM and decreased it in the SME and AP, while in the breeding time the quantities of GnRHR were significantly lower in the whole hypothalamus. In follicular-phase ewes the fluctuations of GnRH and GnRHR levels under short-term and prolonged stress were reflected in the changes of LH secretion, suggesting the existence of a direct relationship between GnRH and GnRH-R biosynthesis and GnRH/LH release in this period. The study showed that stress was capable of modulating the biosynthesis of GnRH and GnRHR; the pattern of changes was dependent upon the animal's physiological state and on the time course of stressor application. The obtained results indicate that the disturbances of gonadotropin secretion under stress conditions in sheep may be due to a dysfunction of GnRH and GnRHR biosynthetic pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ghrelin decreases firing activity of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons in an estrous cycle and endocannabinoid signaling dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Farkas

    Full Text Available The orexigenic peptide, ghrelin is known to influence function of GnRH neurons, however, the direct effects of the hormone upon these neurons have not been explored, yet. The present study was undertaken to reveal expression of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R in GnRH neurons and elucidate the mechanisms of ghrelin actions upon them. Ca(2+-imaging revealed a ghrelin-triggered increase of the Ca(2+-content in GT1-7 neurons kept in a steroid-free medium, which was abolished by GHS-R-antagonist JMV2959 (10 µM suggesting direct action of ghrelin. Estradiol (1nM eliminated the ghrelin-evoked rise of Ca(2+-content, indicating the estradiol dependency of the process. Expression of GHS-R mRNA was then confirmed in GnRH-GFP neurons of transgenic mice by single cell RT-PCR. Firing rate and burst frequency of GnRH-GFP neurons were lower in metestrous than proestrous mice. Ghrelin (40 nM-4 μM administration resulted in a decreased firing rate and burst frequency of GnRH neurons in metestrous, but not in proestrous mice. Ghrelin also decreased the firing rate of GnRH neurons in males. The ghrelin-evoked alterations of the firing parameters were prevented by JMV2959, supporting the receptor-specific actions of ghrelin on GnRH neurons. In metestrous mice, ghrelin decreased the frequency of GABAergic mPSCs in GnRH neurons. Effects of ghrelin were abolished by the cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1 antagonist AM251 (1µM and the intracellularly applied DAG-lipase inhibitor THL (10 µM, indicating the involvement of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling. These findings demonstrate that ghrelin exerts direct regulatory effects on GnRH neurons via GHS-R, and modulates the firing of GnRH neurons in an ovarian-cycle and endocannabinoid dependent manner.

  2. GnRH-induced Ca2+ signaling patterns and gonadotropin secretion in pituitary gonadotrophs. Functional adaptations to both ordinary and extraordinary physiological demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa eDurán-Pastén

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary gonadotrophs are a small fraction of the anterior pituitary population, yet they synthesize gonadotropins: luteinizing (LH and follicle stimulating (FSH, essential for gametogenesis and steroidogenesis. LH is secreted via a regulated pathway while FSH release is mostly constitutive and controlled by synthesis. Although gonadotrophs fire action potentials spontaneously, the intracellular Ca2+ rises produced do not influence secretion, which is mainly driven by Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH, a decapeptide synthesized in the hypothalamus and released in a pulsatile manner into the hypophyseal portal circulation. GnRH binding to G protein coupled receptors triggers Ca2+ mobilization from InsP3-sensitive intracellular pools, generating the global Ca2+ elevations necessary for secretion. Ca2+ signaling responses to increasing [GnRH] vary in stereotyped fashion from subthreshold to baseline spiking (oscillatory, to biphasic (spike-oscillatory or spike-plateau. This progression varies somewhat in gonadotrophs from different species and biological preparations. Both baseline spiking and biphasic GnRH-induced Ca2+ signals control LH/FSH synthesis and exocytosis. Estradiol and testosterone regulate gonadotropin secretion through feedback mechanisms, while FSH synthesis and release are influenced by activin, inhibin and follistatin. Adaptation to physiological events like the estrous cycle, involves changes in GnRH sensitivity and LH/FSH synthesis: in proestrus, estradiol feedback regulation abruptly changes from negative to positive, causing the pre-ovulatory LH surge. Similarly, when testosterone levels drop after orquiectomy the lack of negative feedback on pituitary and hypothalamus boosts both GnRH and LH secretion, gonadotrophs GnRH sensitivity increases and Ca2+ signaling patterns change. In addition, gonadotrophs proliferate and grow. These plastic changes denote a more vigorous functional adaptation in response to an extraordinary

  3. Recent Development of Non-Peptide GnRH Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Ling Tukun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone, also referred to as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone with the sequence (pGlu-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-Gly-Leu-Arg-Pro-Gly-NH2 plays an important role in regulating the reproductive system. It stimulates differential release of the gonadotropins FSH and LH from pituitary tissue. To date, treatment of hormone-dependent diseases targeting the GnRH receptor, including peptide GnRH agonist and antagonists are now available on the market. The inherited issues associate with peptide agonists and antagonists have however, led to significant interest in developing orally active, small molecule, non-peptide antagonists. In this review, we will summarize all developed small molecule GnRH antagonists along with the most recent clinical data and therapeutic applications.

  4. The luteal phase after GnRH-agonist triggering of ovulation: present and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, Peter; Papanikolaou, E G; Kyrou, D

    2012-01-01

    is the use of GnRH agonist (GnRHa) which reduces or even prevents ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Interestingly, the current regimens of luteal support after HCG triggering are not sufficient to secure the early implanting embryo after GnRHa triggering. This review discusses the luteal......-phase insufficiency seen after GnRHa triggering and the various trials that have been performed to assess the most optimal luteal support in relation to GnRHa triggering. Although more research is needed, GnRHa triggering is now an alternative to HCG triggering, combining a significant reduction in OHSS with high...... with a GnRH agonist instead of human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG). The first studies applying this concept, however, showed a very poor pregnancy rate, despite standard luteal-phase support with progesterone. This review discusses the reason for the poor results and the newest studies, using GnRH agonist...

  5. Dynamic GnRH- and hCG-testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, A Kirstine; Nordkap, Loa; Almstrup, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    1. OBJECTIVE: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation-tests may be used to evaluate the pituitary and testicular capacity. Our aim was to evaluate changes in follicular-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and Testosterone after GnRH...... and hCG stimulation in healthy men, and assess the impact of six single nucleotide polymorphisms on the responses. 2. DESIGN: GnRH- and hCG-stimulation tests were performed on 77 healthy men, 18-40 years (reference group) at a specialized andrology referral center. The potential use of the tests...... and FSH increased almost 400% and 40% during GnRH testing, stimulated levels varied from 4.4-58.8 U/L and 0.2-11.8 U/L, FSH decreased in nine men. Testosterone increased approximately 110% (range 18.7-67.6 nmol/l) during hCG-testing. None of the polymorphisms had any major impact on the test results...

  6. Prematurity in Central Hospital and GN Children's Clinic in Warri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Method: Retrieval and analysis of casenotes of all the premature babies seen between 2000 and 2007 at General Hospital Warri, a specialist hospital with referrals from surrounding General Hospitals, and GN Children's Clinic, the two major ... Kangaroo nursing was introduced very early in the management.

  7. Accelerating NASA GN&C Flight Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamblyn, Scott; Henry, Joel; Rapp, John

    2010-01-01

    When the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system for the Orion crew vehicle undergoes Critical Design Review (CDR), more than 90% of the flight software will already be developed - a first for NASA on a project of this scope and complexity. This achievement is due in large part to a new development approach using Model-Based Design.

  8. Molecular identification of StAR and 3βHSD1 and characterization in response to GnIH stimulation in protogynous hermaphroditic grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingqing; Qi, Xin; Tang, Haipei; Guo, Yin; Li, Shuisheng; Li, Gaofei; Yang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Haifa; Liu, Xiaochun; Lin, Haoran

    2017-04-01

    Gonadal steroids are critical factors in reproduction and sex reverse process. StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein), transferring the cholesterol from the outer mitochondrial membrane to the inner membrane, is the rate-limiting factor of steroidogenesis. 3βHSD (3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4 isomerase), converting Δ5-steroids into Δ4-steroids, is an important oxidoreductase in steroidogenesis. In the present study, StAR and 3βHSD1 were cloned and characterized from protogynous orange-spotted grouper. StAR cDNA contains an 861bp open reading frame (ORF), encoding a predicted protein of 286 amino acids, and the ORF of 3βHSD1 was 1125bp, encoding a predicted protein of 374 amino acids. The transcript of StAR was mainly expressed in gonad, while 3βHSD1 mRNA was predominantly detected in brain and gonad. In the previous study, we found the expression of GnIH mRNA level in male, as well as in 17 alpha-methyltestosterone (MT)-induced male fish was significantly higher than in female fish, this indicating that GnIH/GnIHR signaling might be involved in the regulation of sex reversal and male maintenance. In order to figure out the function of GnIH in steroidogenesis, the expression of StAR and 3βHSD1 regulated by GnIH was examined. In vitro study showed that treatment of cultured ovary fragments with gGnIH peptides significantly stimulated the expression of StAR and 3βHSD1. In addition, the mRNA levels of StAR and 3βHSD1 were significantly increased after intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) with gGnIH peptides. Moreover, during MT-induced sex change from female to male, the levels of StAR mRNA significantly increased by 5.2, 24.8 and 353.5 folds, and that of 3βHSD1 mRNA by 3.5, 32.5 and 55.4 folds at the 2nd, 4th and 6th week after MT implantation, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that GnIH may be involved in the regulation of sex reversal or male maintenance by stimulating the expression of StAR and 3βHSD1 in protogynous grouper

  9. Pituitary sensitizing effect of GnRH antagonists: a mechanism explaining LH escape during IVF?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banga, F.R.; Huirne, J.A.F.; Korsen, T.; Homburg, R.R.; Hompes, P.G.A.; Lambalk, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background GnRH antagonists have been introduced to induce persistent LH suppression. Many studies show a gradual increase of LH levels after several days of GnRH antagonist administration, the so-called escape or rebound effect. We hypothesize that, under chronic GnRH antagonist administration, a

  10. Effects of GnRH immunization in sexually mature pony stallions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkstra, J.A.; Meer, F.J.U.M.; Knaap, J.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Teerds, K.J.; Colenbrander, B.; Meloen, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    Immunization against gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) was studied as an alternative for the commonly used surgical castration in stallions. Two GnRH vaccines comprising non-mineral oil adjuvants were evaluated for their potential to induce high antibody titers directed against GnRH and

  11. Random-start GnRH antagonist for emergency fertility preservation: a self-controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Miguel A; Brassesco, Mario; Sastre, Margalida; Gómez, Manuel; Herrero, Julio; Marque, Laura; Brassesco, Arturo; Espinós, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for emergency fertility preservation, regardless of the phase of the menstrual cycle. A self-controlled pilot clinical trial (NCT01385332) was performed in an acute-care teaching hospital and in two private reproductive centers in Barcelona, Spain. Eleven egg donors participated in the study. Two random-start gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocols were assessed in which ganirelix was initiated on either day 10 (protocol B) or on day 20 (protocol C) of the menstrual cycle and was continued until estradiol levels were below 60 pg/dL. These protocols were compared with a standard protocol (protocol A). The main outcome of interest was the number of metaphase 2 oocytes retrieved. Results from this study show that the number of mature oocytes retrieved was comparable across the different protocols (14.3±4.6 in the standard protocol versus 13.0±9.1 and 13.2±5.2 in protocols B and C, respectively; values expressed as mean ± standard deviation). The mean number of days needed for a GnRH antagonist to lower estradiol levels, as well as the ongoing pregnancy rates, were also similar when protocols B (stimulation in follicular phase) and C (stimulation on luteal phase) were compared with protocol A (standard stimulation). GnRH antagonists can be effectively used for random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with an ovarian response similar to that of standard protocols, and the antagonists appear suitable for emergency fertility preservation in cancer patients. PMID:25709506

  12. Direct Actions of Kisspeptins on GnRH Neurons Permit Attainment of Fertility but are Insufficient to Fully Preserve Gonadotropic Axis Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Silvia; Barroso, Alexia; Vázquez, María J.; García-Galiano, David; Manfredi-Lozano, María; Ruiz-Pino, Francisco; Heras, Violeta; Romero-Ruiz, Antonio; Roa, Juan; Schutz, Günther; Kirilov, Milen; Gaytan, Francisco; Pinilla, Leonor; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins, ligands of the receptor, Gpr54, are potent stimulators of puberty and fertility. Yet, whether direct kisspeptin actions on GnRH neurons are sufficient for the whole repertoire of their reproductive effects remains debatable. To dissect out direct vs. indirect effects of kisspeptins on GnRH neurons in vivo, we report herein the detailed reproductive/gonadotropic characterization of a Gpr54 null mouse line with selective re-introduction of Gpr54 expression only in GnRH cells (Gpr54−/−Tg; rescued). Despite preserved fertility, adult rescued mice displayed abnormalities in gonadal microstructure, with signs of precocious ageing in females and elevated LH levels with normal-to-low testosterone secretion in males. Gpr54−/−Tg rescued mice showed also altered gonadotropin responses to negative feedback withdrawal, while luteinizing hormone responses to various gonadotropic regulators were variably affected, with partially blunted relative (but not absolute) responses to kisspeptin-10, NMDA and the agonist of tachykinin receptors, NK2R. Our data confirm that direct effects of kisspeptins on GnRH cells are sufficient to attain fertility. Yet, such direct actions appear to be insufficient to completely preserve proper functionality of gonadotropic axis, suggesting a role of kisspeptin signaling outside GnRH cells. PMID:26755241

  13. GnRH Agonist Trigger and LH Activity Luteal Phase Support versus hCG Trigger and Conventional Luteal Phase Support in Fresh Embryo Transfer IVF/ICSI Cycles-A Systematic PRISMA Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Thor; Roque, Matheus; Esteves, Sandro C; Humaidan, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The use of GnRH agonist (GnRHa) for final oocyte maturation trigger in oocyte donation and elective frozen embryo transfer cycles is well established due to lower ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) rates as compared to hCG trigger. A recent Cochrane meta-analysis concluded that GnRHa trigger was associated with reduced live birth rates (LBRs) in fresh autologous IVF cycles compared to hCG trigger. However, the evidence is not unequivocal, and recent trials have found encouraging reproductive outcomes among couples undergoing GnRHa trigger and individualized luteal LH activity support. Thus, the aim was to compare GnRHa trigger followed by luteal LH activity support with hCG trigger in IVF patients undergoing fresh embryo transfer. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials published until December 14, 2016. The population was infertile patients submitted to IVF/ICSI cycles with GnRH antagonist cotreatment who underwent fresh embryo transfer. The intervention was GnRHa trigger followed by LH activity luteal phase support (LPS). The comparator was hCG trigger followed by a standard LPS. The critical outcome measures were LBR and OHSS rate. The secondary outcome measures were number of oocytes retrieved, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, and miscarriage rates. A total of five studies met the selection criteria comprising a total of 859 patients. The LBR was not significantly different between the GnRHa and hCG trigger groups (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.62, 1.14). OHSS was reported in a total of 4/413 cases in the GnRHa group compared to 7/413 in the hCG group (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.15, 1.60). We observed a slight, but non-significant increase in miscarriage rate in the GnRHa triggered group compared to the hCG group (OR 1.85; 95% CI 0.97, 3.54). GnRHa trigger with LH activity LPS resulted in comparable LBRs compared to hCG trigger. The most recent trials reported LBRs close to unity indicating that individualization of the LH activity LPS

  14. Involvement of the G-protein-coupled receptor 4 in RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okito, Asuka [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Orthodontic Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Nakahama, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nakacell@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Akiyama, Masako [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ono, Takashi [Department of Orthodontic Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-03-06

    Osteoclast activity is enhanced in acidic environments following systemic or local inflammation. However, the regulatory mechanism of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts under acidic conditions is not fully understood. In the present paper, we detected the mRNA expression of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) proton sensors GPR4 and GPR65 (T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8), in osteoblasts. RANKL expression and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) level in osteoblasts were up-regulated under acidic culture conditions. Acidosis-induced up-regulation of RANKL was abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. To clarify the role of GPR4 in RANKL expression, GPR4 gain and loss of function experiments were performed. Gene knockdown and forced expression of GPR4 caused reduction and induction of RANKL expression, respectively. These results suggested that, at least in part, RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment was mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling resulting from GPR4 activation. A comprehensive microarray analysis of gene expression of osteoblasts revealed that, under acidic conditions, the phenotype of osteoblasts was that of an osteoclast supporting cell rather than that of a mineralizing cell. These findings will contribute to a molecular understanding of bone disruption in an acidic environment. - Highlights: • RANKL expression was increased in osteoblasts under acidosis via cAMP/PKA pathway. • GRP4 knockdown resulted in decrease of RANKL expression. • GRP4 overexpression resulted in increase of RANKL expression. • Osteoblast mineralization was reduced under acidic condition.

  15. LH independent testosterone production is mediated by the interaction between GnRH-II and its receptor in the boar testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The second mammalian isoform of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-II) functions quite differently from the classical form (GnRH-I), being an ineffective modulator of gonadotropin release. Not all species that produce GnRH-II maintain a full length GnRH-II receptor (GnRHR-II). Instead, GnRH-II can...

  16. Gene Expression Divergence is Coupled to Evolution of DNA Structure in Coding Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhiming; Dai, Xianhua

    2011-01-01

    Sequence changes in coding region and regulatory region of the gene itself (cis) determine most of gene expression divergence between closely related species. But gene expression divergence between yeast species is not correlated with evolution of primary nucleotide sequence. This indicates that other factors in cis direct gene expression divergence. Here, we studied the contribution of DNA three-dimensional structural evolution as cis to gene expression divergence. We found that the evolution of DNA structure in coding regions and gene expression divergence are correlated in yeast. Similar result was also observed between Drosophila species. DNA structure is associated with the binding of chromatin remodelers and histone modifiers to DNA sequences in coding regions, which influence RNA polymerase II occupancy that controls gene expression level. We also found that genes with similar DNA structures are involved in the same biological process and function. These results reveal the previously unappreciated roles of DNA structure as cis-effects in gene expression. PMID:22125484

  17. Random-start GnRH antagonist for emergency fertility preservation: a self-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Checa MA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Miguel A Checa,1,2 Mario Brassesco,2 Margalida Sastre,1 Manuel Gómez,2 Julio Herrero,3 Laura Marque,3 Arturo Brassesco,2 Juan José Espinós3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Parc de Salut Mar, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 2Centro de Infertilidad y Reproducción Humana (CIRH, 3Centro de Reproducción Asistida Sagrada Familia, Clínica Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH for emergency fertility preservation, regardless of the phase of the menstrual cycle. A self-controlled pilot clinical trial (NCT01385332 was performed in an acute-care teaching hospital and in two private reproductive centers in Barcelona, Spain. Eleven egg donors participated in the study. Two random-start gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist protocols were assessed in which ganirelix was initiated on either day 10 (protocol B or on day 20 (protocol C of the menstrual cycle and was continued until estradiol levels were below 60 pg/dL. These protocols were compared with a standard protocol (protocol A. The main outcome of interest was the number of metaphase 2 oocytes retrieved. Results from this study show that the number of mature oocytes retrieved was comparable across the different protocols (14.3±4.6 in the standard protocol versus 13.0±9.1 and 13.2±5.2 in protocols B and C, respectively; values expressed as mean ± standard deviation. The mean number of days needed for a GnRH antagonist to lower estradiol levels, as well as the ongoing pregnancy rates, were also similar when protocols B (stimulation in follicular phase and C (stimulation on luteal phase were compared with protocol A (standard stimulation. GnRH antagonists can be effectively used for random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with an ovarian response similar to that of standard protocols, and the antagonists appear suitable for emergency

  18. (Not) talking about sex: couple reports of sexual discussion and expression in Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Janna; Edmeades, Jeffrey; Krishnan, Suneeta

    2011-02-01

    Adolescent marriage is common in India, placing young women at risk of HIV, early pregnancy and poor birth outcomes. Young women's capacity to express their sexual desires is central to negotiating safe and mutually consensual sexuality. Men, too, play an important role in shaping women's sexual and reproductive health outcomes, but little research has examined how men influence women's sexual expression. Using paired husband and wife data, this paper reports on a preliminary investigation into the patterns of and concurrence between women's sexual expression and their husbands' attitudes about it, as well as the influence of men's approval of their wives' sexual expression on women's actual expression of sexual desire. The results suggest that, among this sample, men are more open to sexual expression than their wives and that, for women, expressing desire not to have sex is far more common than expressing desire to have sex. Further, men's approval of sexual expression from wives appears to positively influence women's actual expression. These findings suggest that men may be resources for women to draw upon as they negotiate sexuality in adolescence and early adulthood.

  19. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadi, Monika; Allaman, Igor; Lengacher, Sylvain; Grenningloh, Gabriele; Magistretti, Pierre J

    2015-01-01

    We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte)-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA) paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  20. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Tadi

    Full Text Available We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4, alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  1. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Tadi, Monika

    2015-10-29

    We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte)-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA) paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  2. The role of GABA in the regulation of GnRH neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho eWatanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons form the final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA has long been implicated as one of the major players in the regulation of GnRH neurons. Although GABA is typically an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature adult central nervous system, most mature GnRH neurons show the unusual characteristic of being excited by GABA. While many reports have provided much insight into the contribution of GABA to the activity of GnRH neurons, the precise physiological role of the excitatory action of GABA on GnRH neurons remains elusive. This brief review presents the current knowledge of the role of GABA signaling in GnRH neuronal activity. We also discuss the modulation of GABA signaling by neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and the functional consequence of GABAergic inputs to GnRH neurons in both the physiology and pathology of reproduction.

  3. Photoperiod regulates the differential expression of KiSS-1 and GPR54 in various tissues and sexes of striped hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S N; Xue, H L; Zhang, Q; Xu, J H; Wang, S; Chen, L; Xu, L X

    2015-10-30

    In order to investigate how photoperiod affects the expression of KiSS-1/G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54), the hypothalamus, the ovaries and testicles of the striped hamster were studied following photoperiod treatment and melatonin injection. We found that the melatonin concentration in the blood of the striped hamster was consistent with the treated photoperiods and that the photoperiod had significant effects on KiSS-1 expression, but the effect of photoperiod on GPR54 expression differed among tissues and sexes. The relative expression of KiSS-1 in the gonads of the male and female striped hamster was significantly higher than that in the hypothalamus, while the difference in GPR54 between the gonads and hypothalamus was inconsistent between the male and female striped hamster. In the striped hamster injected with melatonin, the expression level of KiSS-1 in the gonads and hypothalamus of the male and female striped hamster was significantly decreased; the expression level of GnRH in the gonads was also significantly decreased; the expression of GPR54 in the hypothalamus was increased. In the hypothalamus, a significant positive correlation existed between KiSS-1 and GnRH expression, while a negative correlation was observed between GPR54 and GnRH expression. These results suggest that the photoperiod-melatonin-KiSS-1-GnRH pathway plays an important role in the seasonal reproduction mechanism of the striped hamster. Additionally, photoperiod or melatonin may not be a direct regulatory factor of GPR54 expression.

  4. A Network Model of the Periodic Synchronization Process in the Dynamics of Calcium Concentration in GnRH Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical neuroendocrinology is a branch of mathematical neurosciences that is specifically interested in endocrine neurons, which have the uncommon ability of secreting neurohormones into the blood. One of the most striking features of neuroendocrine networks is their ability to exhibit very slow rhythms of neurosecretion, on the order of one or several hours. A prototypical instance is that of the pulsatile secretion pattern of GnRH (gonadotropin releasing hormone), the master hormone controlling the reproductive function, whose origin remains a puzzle issue since its discovery in the seventies. In this paper, we investigate the question of GnRH neuron synchronization on a mesoscopic scale, and study how synchronized events in calcium dynamics can arise from the average electric activity of individual neurons. We use as reference seminal experiments performed on embryonic GnRH neurons from rhesus monkeys, where calcium imaging series were recorded simultaneously in tens of neurons, and which have clearly shown the occurrence of synchronized calcium peaks associated with GnRH pulses, superposed on asynchronous, yet oscillatory individual background dynamics. We design a network model by coupling 3D individual dynamics of FitzHugh–Nagumo type. Using phase-plane analysis, we constrain the model behavior so that it meets qualitative and quantitative specifications derived from the experiments, including the precise control of the frequency of the synchronization episodes. In particular, we show how the time scales of the model can be tuned to fit the individual and synchronized time scales of the experiments. Finally, we illustrate the ability of the model to reproduce additional experimental observations, such as partial recruitment of cells within the synchronization process or the occurrence of doublets of synchronization. PMID:23574739

  5. Coupling sample paths to the thermodynamic limit in Monte Carlo estimators with applications to gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levien, Ethan; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2017-10-01

    Many biochemical systems appearing in applications have a multiscale structure so that they converge to piecewise deterministic Markov processes in a thermodynamic limit. The statistics of the piecewise deterministic process can be obtained much more efficiently than those of the exact process. We explore the possibility of coupling sample paths of the exact model to the piecewise deterministic process in order to reduce the variance of their difference. We then apply this coupling to reduce the computational complexity of a Monte Carlo estimator. Motivated by the rigorous results in [1], we show how this method can be applied to realistic biological models with nontrivial scalings.

  6. Orion Pad Abort 1 GN and C Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Edgar A.; Stachowiak, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    The first flight test of the Orion Abort Flight Test project is scheduled to launch in Spring 2010. This flight test is known as Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) and it is intended to accomplish a series of flight test objectives, including demonstrating the capability of the Launch Abort System (LAS) to propel the Crew Module (CM) to a safe distance from a launch vehicle during a pad abort. The PA-1 Flight Test Article (FTA) is actively controlled by a guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system for much of its flight. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design, development, and analysis of the PA-1 GN&C system. A description of the technical solutions that were developed to meet the challenge of satisfying many competing requirements is presented. A historical perspective of how the Orion LAV compares to the Apollo Launch Escape Vehicle (LEV) design will also be included.

  7. Expression profile of the entire family of Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in mouse and rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebendal Ted

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are membrane-bound receptors with long N termini. This family has 33 members in humans. Several Adhesion GPCRs are known to have important physiological functions in CNS development and immune system response mediated by large cell surface ligands. However, the majority of Adhesion GPCRs are still poorly studied orphans with unknown functions. Results In this study we performed the extensive tissue localization analysis of the entire Adhesion GPCR family in rat and mouse. By applying the quantitative real-time PCR technique we have produced comparable expression profile for each of the members in the Adhesion family. The results are compared with literature data and data from the Allen Brain Atlas project. Our results suggest that the majority of the Adhesion GPCRs are either expressed in the CNS or ubiquitously. In addition the Adhesion GPCRs from the same phylogenetic group have either predominant CNS or peripheral expression, although each of their expression profile is unique. Conclusion Our findings indicate that many of Adhesion GPCRs are expressed, and most probably, have function in CNS. The related Adhesion GPCRs are well conserved in their structure and interestingly have considerable overlap in their expression profiles, suggesting similarities among the physiological roles for members within many of the phylogenetically related clusters.

  8. Using GnRH to Improve Cow Fecundity after Calving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Păcală

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available At dairy cows, the increase in milk production is associated with the decrease of heat manifestation and conception rates. GnRH is mostly used for treatment of different problems of the reproductive function and for improving the pregnancy rates in cows. The aim of our paper was to contribute to increase of conception rates, at cows with ovarian activity, at first AI after calving. The experiments were conducted on 58 cows, from Romanian Black Spotted breed (Frezian and 53 cows from Romanian Spotted breed (Simmental. The animals were divided into lots as follows: for Romanian Black Spotted breed 33 of the cows in were in experimental lot and 25 were in control lot, for Romanian Spotted breed 29 ere in experimental lot and 24 were in control lot. The females form experimental lots were treated with 100 mcg (2ml Ovarelin (GnRH, at the first AI, after VWP. At the cows form Romanian Black Spotted, from the 33 females in experimental lot, 12 did not return into heat after insemination, which represents a conception rate of 36.4%. At the cows form Romanian Spotted, form the 29 cows in experimental lot 8 did not return into heat after insemination, representing a conception rate of 44.8%. Administration of 100 mcg GnRH (2 ml Ovarelin at the time of AI determines a significant increase of the conception rate with 8.4-11.5%, compared with control lot. It appears that the cows from Romanian Spotted reacts better at GnRH treatment (44.8% conception rate, compared with Romanian Black Spotted (36.4 % conception rate.

  9. The type of GnRH analogue used during controlled ovarian stimulation influences early embryo developmental kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Manuel; Cruz, María; Humaidan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore if the GnRH analogue used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and the ovulation triggering factor (GnRH agonist+hCG triggering versus GnRH antagonist+GnRH agonist triggering) affect embryo development and kinetics. STUDY DESIGN: In a retrospective cohort study...

  10. Pharmacological and toxicological assessment of a potential GnRH vaccine in young-adult male pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkstra, J.A.; Staay, van der F.J.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Woelders, H.; Meloen, R.H.; Schuurman, T.

    2011-01-01

    Active immunization against gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is successfully applied to prevent boar taint in pork. In men, GnRH immunization could be an alternative to hormone therapy in patients with prostate cancer. In this study, a new GnRH vaccine formulation (a modified GnRH peptide

  11. GnRH-Analoga und Add-back-Verfahren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinstein J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available GnRH-Analoga haben eine große Bedeutung in der medikamentösen Therapie der Endometriose erlangt. Sie sind in der Lage, Endometrioseassoziierte Schmerzen zu beseitigen und sind Bestandteil der Therapie der endometriosebedingten Infertilität. Aufgrund der Chronizität der Endometriose bedarf es in vielen Fällen der Prolongation der GnRH-A-Therapie über den Zeitraum von 6 Monaten hinaus. Für diese Fälle eignet sich eine Add-back- Therapie nach dem Format von Hormonersatztherapien, um vasomotorischen Nebeneffekten und dem Knochensubstanzverlust entgegenwirken zu können. Dabei wird der Estrogenanteil niedrig dosiert eingesetzt, um innerhalb eines "therapeutischen Fensters" den Hypoestrogenismus auszugleichen, ohne das Endometriosewachstum zu fördern. Prinzipiell kann dazu das Estrogen oral, aber auch transdermal appliziert werden. Die Effektivität der Kombination aus GnRH-A plus Add-back bezüglich der Knochenprotektion konnte bereits für einen Zeitraum von bis zu 10 Jahren bestätigt werden, sodass damit eine Langzeitkonzeption für Frauen mit rezidivierender Endometriose und wiederholten operativen Eingriffen existiert. Alternativen zur klassischen Add-back mit Sexualsteroiden existieren vielfältig, aber ihr Einsatz ist durch Partialwirkungen und eigene Nebenwirkungen limitiert.

  12. Increased expression of the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor Gpr65 during retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ail, D; Rüfenacht, V; Caprara, C; Samardzija, M; Kast, B; Grimm, C

    2015-08-20

    The retina is a metabolically highly active tissue that is sensitive to pH changes. Blinding diseases of the retina are often characterized by degeneration of photoreceptor cells altering the acid-base homeostasis of the tissue microenvironment and by an accompanying inflammatory response. GPR4, GPR65 and GPR68 are G protein-coupled receptors that aid cells to sense and survive conditions of acidic pH and inflammatory cells express Gpr65 enhancing their viability. Hence, we investigated expression and function of these proton-sensing GPRs in the normal and degenerating retina. We observed increased retinal expression of Gpr65, but not of Gpr4 and Gpr68, in mouse models of both inherited (rd10) and induced (light damage) retinal degeneration. Lack of GPR65 slightly accelerated photoreceptor degeneration in rd10 mice and resulted in a strong activation of microglia after light-injury. Since GPR65 was dispensable for normal retinal development, function and aging as evidenced by the evaluation of Gpr65(-/-) mice, our results indicate that the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor GPR65 may be involved in a mechanism that supports survival of photoreceptors in the degenerating retina. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Morphological analysis of the early development of telencephalic and diencephalic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal systems in enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic medaka lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akiko; Islam, M Sadiqul; Abe, Hideki; Okubo, Kataaki; Akazome, Yasuhisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Teleosts possess two or three paralogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) genes: gnrh1, gnrh2, and gnrh3. Some species have lost the gnrh1 and/or gnrh3 genes, whereas gnrh2 has been completely conserved in the teleost species analyzed to date. In most teleosts that possess gnrh1, GnRH1 peptide is the authentic GnRH that stimulates gonadotropin release, whereas GnRH2 and GnRH3, if present, are neuromodulatory. Progenitors of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons originate from olfactory placodes and migrate to their destination during early development. However, because of the relatively low affinity/specificity of generally available antibodies that recognize GnRH1 or GnRH3, labeling of these neurons has only been possible using genetic manipulation. We used a model teleost, medaka, which possesses all three paralogous gnrh genes, to analyze development of forebrain GnRH neurons composed of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons. Here, we newly generated transgenic medaka lines that express enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of promoters for gnrh1 or gnrh3, to detect GnRH neurons and facilitate immunohistochemical analysis of the neuronal morphology. We used a combination of immunohistochemistry and three-dimensional confocal microscopy image reconstructions to improve identification of neurites from GnRH1 or GnRH3 neuronal populations with greater precision. This led us to clearly identify the hypophysiotropic innervation of GnRH1 neurons residing in the ventral preoptic area (vPOA) from as early as 10 days post hatching. Furthermore, these analyses also revealed retinopetal projections of nonhypophysiotropic GnRH1 neurons in vPOA, prominent during early developmental stages, and multiple populations of GnRH3 neurons with different origins and migratory pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. (Not) Talking About Sex: Couple Reports of Sexual Discussion and Expression in Bangalore, India

    OpenAIRE

    McDougall, Janna; Edmeades, Jeffrey; Krishnan, Suneeta

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent marriage is common in India, placing young women at risk of HIV, early pregnancy, and poor birth outcomes. Young women’s capacity to express their sexual desires is central to negotiating safe and mutually consensual sexuality. Men too play an important role in shaping women’s sexual and reproductive health outcomes, but little research has examined how men influence women’s sexual expression. Using paired husband and wife data, this paper reports on a preliminary investigation int...

  15. Suppression subtractive hybridization coupled with microarray analysis to examine differential expression of genes in virus infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir Shirin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available High throughput detection of differential expression of genes is an efficient means of identifying genes and pathways that may play a role in biological systems under certain experimental conditions. There exist a variety of approaches that could be used to identify groups of genes that change in expression in response to a particular stimulus or environment. We here describe the application of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH coupled with cDNA microarray analysis for isolation and identification of chicken transcripts that change in expression on infection of host cells with a paramyxovirus. SSH was used for initial isolation of differentially expressed transcripts, a large-scale validation of which was accomplished by microarray analysis. The data reveals a large group of regulated genes constituting many biochemical pathways that could serve as targets for future investigations to explore their role in paramyxovirus pathogenesis. The detailed methods described herein could be useful and adaptable to any biological system for studying changes in gene expression.

  16. Puberty and Pubertal Growth in GH-treated SGA Children: Effects of 2 Years of GnRHa Versus No GnRHa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Manouk; Lem, Annemieke J; van der Kaay, Danielle C M; Hokken-Koèelega, Anita C S

    2016-05-01

    Most studies on puberty in children born small for gestational age (SGA) report height and age at onset of puberty. GH-treated SGA children with an adult height (AH) expectation below -2.5 SDS at onset of puberty can benefit from an additional 2 years of GnRH analog (GnRHa) treatment. There are no data on puberty and growth after discontinuation of GnRHa treatment in GH-treated SGA children. This study aimed to investigate the effects on puberty and pubertal growth of 2 years GnRHa vs no GnRHa in GH-treated SGA children. This was a GH trial involving 76 prepubertal short SGA children (36 girls) treated with GH. Thirty-two children received additional GnRHa for 2 years. Pubertal stages were 3-monthly assessed according to Tanner. Age, bone age, and median height at pubertal onset were lower in girls and boys in the GH/GnRHa group compared with the GH group. In girls and boys treated with GH/GnRHa, pubertal duration after stop of GnRHa treatment was shorter than pubertal duration in those with GH only (40.9 vs 46.7 mo; P = .044; 50.8 vs 57.5 months; P = .006; respectively). Height gain from onset of puberty until AH, including height gain during 2 years of GnRHa treatment, was 25.4 cm in girls and 33.0 cm in boys, which was 6.6 cm more than girls and boys treated with GH only. AH was similar in children treated with GH/GnRHa compared with those with GH only. GH-treated SGA children who start puberty with an AH expectation below -2.5 SDS and are treated with 2 years of GnRHa have a shorter pubertal duration after discontinuation of GnRHa compared with pubertal duration in children treated with GH only. Height gain from onset of puberty until AH is, however, more due to adequate growth during 2 years of GnRHa treatment resulting in a similar AH as children treated with GH only.

  17. Regulation of GnRH receptors by progesterone and inhibin in ovine pituitary cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of progesterone (P{sub 4}) and the gonadal protein, inhibin, on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor number and binding affinity were investigated in vitro, using ovine pituitary cells in culture. Changes in GnRH binding were correlated with GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone (LH) release following pretreatment with P{sub 4} and inhibin. Ovine pituitary cells in culture were preincubated with P{sub 4} or porcine inhibin (I{sub P}) for 24 or 48 hours (h). Cells were collected and analyzed for GnRH binding using a radioligand-receptor assay. des-Gly{sup 10}-(D-Ala{sup 6})-LHRH-ethyl-amide was used as the radiolabeled GnRh superagonist analog (mono-{sup 125}I-GnRH-A) and as competing ligand. Treatment with P{sub 4} progressively decreased GnRH-A binding capacity by 44.3% and 71.8% of the control following pretreatment for 24 or 48 h, respectively. When P{sub 4} was removed from the cultures, GnRH-A binding capacity partially returned to control levels within 24 h. Decreased GnRH-A binding was closely correlated with the reduction in GnRH-stimulated LH release which was observed following 24 or 48 h pretreatment with P{sub 4}.

  18. Involvement of glucocorticoids in testicular involution after active immunization of boars against GnRH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A; Claus, R

    2004-02-01

    Active GnRH immunization of boars inhibits LH and testicular steroids but the consequences for spermatogenesis are unknown. Six boars were immunized three times against GnRH at 20, 24 and 28 weeks. Another six boars served as controls. Plasma LH and FSH were determined at 28 and 31 weeks. Testosterone and cortisol were determined before killing the pigs at 32 weeks. Tissue samples were taken for histology and fluid from the seminiferous tubuli for steroid determination. Individual germ cells were counted in histological sections. The glucocorticoid receptor (GCR), mitosis of spermatogonia and apoptosis were characterized by immunocytochemistry. Immunization reduced LH and testosterone to base levels whereas FSH was not changed. Testis weight was reduced by 64% due to a loss of Leydig cell cytoplasm (90.3%) and a decrease of tubule diameters (60.6%). Except for A-spermatogonia, all other spermatogenic cells were reduced by about 60%. Mitosis was reduced in immunized boars. Expression of GCRs was limited to spermatogonia and differed between immunized boars (8% of spermatogonia) and controls (2%). In the controls, androgen concentrations in tubular fluid were tenfold higher compared with immunized boars. Cortisol concentrations were of the order of 40 nmol/l both in the tubular fluid and blood plasma. These concentrations did not differ between groups. Apoptosis occurred only in spermatogonia and pachytene spermatocytes and was twofold higher in immunized boars compared with controls. Thus the availability of glucocorticoids in the tubuli and the expression of GCRs initiate apoptosis, which in turn reduces sperm yield. Testosterone is known to be an inhibitor of GCR expression, thus increasing the efficiency of spermatogenesis.

  19. Development of hydrocephalus in mice expressing the G(i)-coupled GPCR Ro1 RASSL receptor in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweger, Elizabeth J; Casper, Kristen B; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Conklin, Bruce R; McCarthy, Ken D

    2007-02-28

    We developed a transgenic mouse line that expresses the G(i)-coupled RASSL (receptor activated solely by synthetic ligand) Ro1 in astrocytes to study astrocyte-neuronal communication. Surprisingly, we found that all transgenics expressing Ro1 developed hydrocephalus. We analyzed these mice in an effort to develop a new model of hydrocephalus that will further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Expression of Ro1 was restricted to astrocytes by crossing the transgenic hGFAP-tTA (tet transactivator behind the human glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter) mouse line with the transgenic tetO-Ro1/tetO-LacZ mouse line. This cross produced double-transgenic mice that expressed Ro1 in astrocytes. All double transgenics developed hydrocephalus by postnatal day 15, whereas single-transgenic littermate controls appeared normal. Hydrocephalic Ro1 mice displayed enlarged ventricles, partial denudation of the ependymal cell layer, altered subcommissural organ morphology, and obliteration of the cerebral aqueduct. Severely hydrocephalic mice also had increased levels of phospho-Erk and GFAP expression. Administration of doxycycline to breeding pairs suppressed Ro1 expression and the onset of hydrocephalus in double-transgenic offspring. Ro1 animals maintained on dox did not develop hydrocephalus; however, if taken off doxycycline at weaning, double-transgenic mice developed enlarged ventricles within 7 weeks, indicating that Ro1 expression also induces hydrocephalus in adults. This study discovered a new model of hydrocephalus in which the rate of pathogenesis can be controlled enabling the study of the pathogenesis of both juvenile and adult onset hydrocephalus.

  20. The interplay between partners' responsiveness and patients' need for emotional expression in couples coping with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagan, Meirav; Sanderman, Robbert; Hoff, Christiaan; Meijerink, W. J. H. Jeroen; Baas, Peter C.; van Haastert, Michiel; Hagedoorn, Mariët

    2014-01-01

    The central aim of this longitudinal observational study was to test whether patients with a high need for emotional expression are especially sensitive to their partners' responsive behavior, and therefore at risk for depressive symptoms when responsiveness is withheld. Patients with colorectal

  1. Functional coupling between heterologously expressed dopamine D(2) receptors and KCNQ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungstrom, Trine; Grunnet, Morten; Jensen, Bo Skaaning

    2003-01-01

    Activation of KCNQ potassium channels by stimulation of co-expressed dopamine D(2) receptors was studied electrophysiologically in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in mammalian cells. To address the specificity of the interaction between D(2)-like receptors and KCNQ channels, combinations of KCNQ1...

  2. Expression Pattern of G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor in Myometrium of Uteri with and without Adenomyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jiao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the expression of G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER in the junctional zone and outer myometrium of the proliferative and secretory phases of women with and without adenomyosis. Methods. A total of 76 women were included in this study, 42 with adenomyosis (proliferative phase, n=23; secretory phases, n=19 and 34 controls (proliferative phase, n=16; secretory phases, n=18. Protein and total RNA were extracted from the junctional zone (JZ and outer myometrium (OM. GPER protein and mRNA expression levels were evaluated by the use of western blotting and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Results. The expression of GPER protein and mRNA in women with adenomyosis was significantly higher than that of control subjects, both in the junctional zone and in the outer myometrium and both in the proliferative and in the secretory phases. Conclusion. The significant and consistent increase in GPER expression in adenomyosis compared with control subjects, regardless of whether it was in the proliferative or secretory phases and regardless of whether it was in the JZ or OM, suggests that GPER plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the adenomyosis.

  3. Citrate-release-mediated aluminum resistance is coupled to the inducible expression of mitochondrial citrate synthase gene in Paraserianthes falcataria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Hiroki; Kojima, Katsumi

    2006-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) resistance in some leguminous plants is achieved by enhanced citrate release from roots. Enhancement requires several hours for complete activation and is postulated to involve Al-responsive genes or components. We examined the mechanism of Al-induced citrate release by studying the relationship between citrate release and expression of the mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) gene in three leguminous trees. Root elongation in Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit was arrested within 24 h by 30 microM Al, whereas root elongation in Paraserianthes falcataria (L.) Neilson and Acacia mangium Willd. was inhibited mangium maintained enhanced release and accumulation of citrate for at least 28 days in response to Al treatment. Aluminum increased the accumulation of mCS transcripts in P. falcataria roots, but not in L. leucocephala roots, and thus up-regulation decreased following removal of Al. Lanthanum did not alter the expression level of mCS. Aluminum increased mCS activity concomitantly with enhanced mCS gene expression in P. falcataria, whereas it did not affect mCS activity in L. leucocephala. Aluminum content in root apices of P. falcataria was increased by cycloheximide, supporting the idea that de novo synthesis of proteins is a prerequisite for Al resistance. Our findings suggest that Al-inducible expression of mCS coupled with enhanced citrate release mediates Al resistance in P. falcataria.

  4. Homologous radioimmunoassay for salmon gonadotropin releasing hormone s-Gn-RH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, B.; Motin, A. (I.N.R.A., Campus de Beaulieu, 35 - Rennes (France)); Kah, O.; Lemenn, F.; Geoffre, S.; Precigoux, G.; Chambolle, P. (Universite de Bordeaux-I, 33 - Talence (France))

    1984-09-30

    A radioimmunoassay for Salmon Gn-RH (p-gly-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Leu-Pro-Gly) (NH/sub 2/) has been developed with a sensitivity of 7 pg/assay tube. The system allows the specific detection of an immunological GnRH related substance in the brain and pituitary of three teleost species but not in an elasmobranch the Dogfish. These results are discussed and some Gn-RH contents of the organs are proposed.

  5. GnRH agonist for triggering of final oocyte maturation: time for a change of practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, P; Kol, Stefan; Papanikolaou, E G

    2011-01-01

    GnRH agonist (GnRHa) triggering has been shown to significantly reduce the occurrence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) compared with hCG triggering; however, initially a poor reproductive outcome was reported after GnRHa triggering, due to an apparently uncorrectable luteal phase...... deficiency. Therefore, the challenge has been to rescue the luteal phase. Studies now report a luteal phase rescue, with a reproductive outcome comparable to that seen after hCG triggering....

  6. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Cortés-Campos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons.

  7. GnRHa trigger for final oocyte maturation: is HCG trigger history?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, Peter; Alsbjerg, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    gonadotrophin (HCG) trigger. Early trials showed a severe luteal phase insufficiency after GnRHa trigger despite the application of standard luteal phase support protocols. Subsequent research has led to modifications of the luteal phase support, resulting in reproductive outcome comparable to that seen after...... HCG trigger in normal- and high-responders. GnRHa trigger facilitates a tailored approach to subsequent luteal phase support, taking into account the ovarian response to stimulation. In the future, GnRHa is likely to be used for trigger in all women co-treated with GnRH antagonists....

  8. Structural and Functional Divergence of Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone (GnIH from Jawless Fish to Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eOgawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH was discovered as a novel hypothalamic peptide that inhibits gonadotropin release in the quail. The presence of GnIH-homologous peptides and its receptors (GnIHRs have been demonstrated in various vertebrate species including teleosts, suggesting that the GnIH-GnIHR family is evolutionarily conserved. In avian and mammalian brain, GnIH neurons are localised in the hypothalamic nuclei and their neural projections are widely distributed. GnIH acts on the pituitary and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons to inhibit reproductive functions by decreasing gonadotropin release and synthesis. In addition, GnIH-GnIHR signalling is regulated by various factors such as environmental cues and stress. However, the function of fish GnIH-orthologs remain inconclusive because the physiological properties of fish GnIH peptides are debatable. This review summarizes the current research progress in GnIH-GnIHR signalling and their physiological functions in vertebrates with special emphasis on non-mammalian vertebrate species.

  9. The addition of GnRH antagonists in intrauterine insemination cycles with mild ovarian hyperstimulation does not increase live birth rates--a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantineau, A E P; Cohlen, B J; Klip, H; Heineman, M J

    2011-05-01

    This multicenter, double-blinded RCT investigated the efficacy of GnRH antagonists in cycles with mild ovarian hyperstimulation (MOH) followed by IUI in subfertile women. Couples diagnosed with unexplained, male factor subfertility or associated with the presence of minimal or mild endometriosis were randomized with a computer-generated list of numbers by a third party in a double-blinded setting to receive either a GnRH antagonists or a placebo in 12 institutional or academic hospitals. All women were treated with recombinant FSH in a low-dose step-up regimen starting on Day 2-4 of the cycle. A GnRH antagonist was added when one or more follicles of 14 mm diameter or more were visualized. When at least one follicle reached a size of ≥18 mm, ovulation was induced by hCG injection. A single IUI was performed 38-40 h later. Couples were offered a maximum of three consecutive cycles. The primary outcome of the trial was live births. Secondary outcomes were pregnancy rates, multiple pregnancy rates, miscarriages and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome rate. A total of 233 couples were included from January 2006 to February 2009, starting 572 treatment cycles. Live birth rates were not significantly different between the group treated with GnRH antagonist (8.4%; 23/275) and the placebo group (12%; 36/297) (P = 0.30). Three twin pregnancies occurred in the GnRH antagonist group and two twin pregnancies in the placebo group. Adding a GnRH antagonist in cycles with MOH in an IUI program does not increase live birth rates. Dutch Trial Register no: NTR497.

  10. Irofulven cytotoxicity depends on transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair and is correlated with XPG expression in solid tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppel, Florence; Poindessous, Virginie; Lazar, Vladimir; Raymond, Eric; Sarasin, Alain; Larsen, Annette K

    2004-08-15

    Irofulven is a novel alkylating agent with promising clinical activity, particularly toward ovarian and hormone-refractory prostate cancers. To facilitate additional clinical development, we have aimed to identify biological markers associated with sensitivity to the compound. Fibroblasts derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum or Cockayne's syndrome along with a panel of 20 human cancer cell lines (eight different tumor types) were examined to establish the importance of nucleotide excision repair proteins in the sensitivity to irofulven. Human cells deficient in nucleotide excision repair are up to 30-fold more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of irofulven compared with repair-proficient controls, clearly indicating that nucleotide excision repair plays a crucial role in the sensitivity to the drug. Interestingly, our results show that irofulven-induced lesions are recognized by transcription-coupled repair but not by global genome repair. Another unique feature is the pronounced sensitivity of XPD and XPB helicase-deficient cells to the drug. Comparison of the IC50 values for irofulven, cisplatin, and ecteinascidin 743 with the expression levels of ERCC1, XPD, and XPG genes in different solid tumor cell lines shows no correlation between the expression levels of any of the three nucleotide excision repair proteins and the sensitivity to ecteinascidin 743. In contrast, expression of the XPG endonuclease was correlated with the cytotoxicity for irofulven and, to a lesser degree, for cisplatin. Importantly, XPG expression was also correlated with cellular nucleotide excision repair activity. Increasing evidence indicates that compromised nucleotide excision repair activity is frequent in several solid tumor types. The results presented here suggest that XPG expression in such tumors may be a useful marker to predict their sensitivity to irofulven.

  11. Macrocyclic chelator-coupled gastrin-based radiopharmaceuticals for targeting of gastrin receptor-expressing tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, Stephan; Wang, Xuejuan; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Walter, Martin A.; Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean-Claude [University of Berne, Department of Pathology, Bern (Switzerland); Behe, Martin P. [Philipps-University of Marburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-coupled minigastrins are unsuitable for therapeutic application with the available {beta}-emitting radiometals due to low complex stability. Low tumour-to-kidney ratio of the known radiopharmaceuticals is further limiting their potency. We used macrocyclic chelators for coupling to increase complex stability, modified the peptide sequence to enhance radiolytic stability and studied tumour-to-kidney ratio and metabolic stability using {sup 111}In-labelled derivatives. Gastrin derivatives with decreasing numbers of glutamic acids were synthesised using {sup 111}In as surrogate for therapeutic radiometals for in vitro and in vivo studies. Gastrin receptor affinities of the {sup nat}In-metallated compounds were determined by receptor autoradiography using {sup 125}I-CCK as radioligand. Internalisation was evaluated in AR4-2J cells. Enzymatic stability was determined by incubating the {sup 111}In-labelled peptides in human serum. Biodistribution was performed in AR4-2J-bearing Lewis rats. IC{sub 50} values of the {sup nat}In-metallated gastrin derivatives vary between 1.2 and 4.8 nmol/L for all methionine-containing derivatives. Replacement of methionine by norleucine, isoleucine, methionine-sulfoxide and methionine-sulfone resulted in significant decrease of receptor affinity (IC{sub 50} between 9.9 and 1,195 nmol/L). All cholecystokinin receptor affinities were >100 nmol/L. All {sup 111}In-labelled radiopeptides showed receptor-specific internalisation. Serum mean-life times varied between 2.0 and 72.6 h, positively correlating with the number of Glu residues. All {sup 111}In-labelled macrocyclic chelator conjugates showed higher tumour-to-kidney ratios after 24 h (0.37-0.99) compared to {sup 111}In-DTPA-minigastrin 0(0.05). Tumour wash out between 4 and 24 h was low. Imaging studies confirmed receptor-specific blocking of the tumour uptake. Reducing the number of glutamates increased tumour-to-kidney ratio but resulted in

  12. Stroke Increases G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor Expression in the Brain of Male but Not Female Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad R.S. Broughton

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The novel estrogen receptor, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously named GPR30, is widely distributed throughout the male and female brain and, thus, could potentially play a role in estrogen-mediated neuroprotective effects in diseases such as stroke. We hypothesized that GPER distribution and expression in the brain of male, intact female, and ovariectomized (OVX mice is increased after 0.5 h middle cerebral artery occlusion. Using immunohistochemistry, we found that ischemia reperfusion increased GPER distribution in the peri-infarct brain regions of male mice, but surprisingly not in intact females or OVX mice. Similar differences were observed in the male and female human brain after stroke. In contrast, GPER distribution was decreased in the infarct core of all mice examined. Furthermore, GPER immunofluorescence was co-localized with the endothelial cell marker, von Willebrand factor, and the neuronal marker, NeuN. Consistent with the immunohistochemical findings, Western blot analysis showed GPER expression is only elevated in the ischemic hemisphere of male mice. Moreover, GPER mRNA expression in males was elevated at 4 h but had returned to baseline by 24 h. In conclusion, these findings indicate that GPER may be a potential therapeutic target after stroke, especially in males, in whom estrogen therapy is not feasible.

  13. [Handling G-protein-coupled receptors: expression, purification and in vitro stabilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banères, Jean-Louis; Mouillac, Bernard

    2012-10-01

    Among the different classes of integral membrane proteins, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) constitute the largest family. They are involved in most essential physiological functions and particularly play a key role in cell-to-cell communication and sensory signal transduction. They represent targets for approximately 30% of currently marketed drugs. In order to better understand their functioning, define their tridimensional structure and develop novel selective and efficient therapeutic compounds, it is crucial to purify these proteins for a full characterization. However, this biochemical step is not trivial since GPCR are present in membranes at very low levels and they require detergents to be extracted from their natural lipid environment and be handled as functional proteins. No universal strategy for GPCR production, purification and stabilization is currently available; each single GPCR possesses a unique set of physicochemical characteristics, preference for some detergents upon solubilization and specific conditions for purification. During the last decade, major breakthroughs regarding overexpression, purification and above all GPCR stabilization, thanks to amphipols and nanodiscs, opened very exciting perspectives for structural and dynamic investigations of these membrane proteins. The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the different aspects of GPCR handling. © 2012 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  14. Propagating gene expression fronts in a one-dimensional coupled system of artificial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayar, Alexandra M.; Karzbrun, Eyal; Noireaux, Vincent; Bar-Ziv, Roy H.

    2015-12-01

    Living systems employ front propagation and spatiotemporal patterns encoded in biochemical reactions for communication, self-organization and computation. Emulating such dynamics in minimal systems is important for understanding physical principles in living cells and in vitro. Here, we report a one-dimensional array of DNA compartments in a silicon chip as a coupled system of artificial cells, offering the means to implement reaction-diffusion dynamics by integrated genetic circuits and chip geometry. Using a bistable circuit we programmed a front of protein synthesis propagating in the array as a cascade of signal amplification and short-range diffusion. The front velocity is maximal at a saddle-node bifurcation from a bistable regime with travelling fronts to a monostable regime that is spatially homogeneous. Near the bifurcation the system exhibits large variability between compartments, providing a possible mechanism for population diversity. This demonstrates that on-chip integrated gene circuits are dynamical systems driving spatiotemporal patterns, cellular variability and symmetry breaking.

  15. Genomic comparison between Staphylococcus aureus GN strains clinically isolated from a familial infection case: IS1272 transposition through a novel inverted repeat-replacing mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Wen Wan

    Full Text Available A bacterial insertion sequence (IS is a mobile DNA sequence carrying only the transposase gene (tnp that acts as a mutator to disrupt genes, alter gene expressions, and cause genomic rearrangements. "Canonical" ISs have historically been characterized by their terminal inverted repeats (IRs, which may form a stem-loop structure, and duplications of a short (non-IR target sequence at both ends, called target site duplications (TSDs. The IS distributions and virulence potentials of Staphylococcus aureus genomes in familial infection cases are unclear. Here, we determined the complete circular genome sequences of familial strains from a Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL-positive ST50/agr4 S. aureus (GN infection of a 4-year old boy with skin abscesses. The genomes of the patient strain (GN1 and parent strain (GN3 were rich for "canonical" IS1272 with terminal IRs, both having 13 commonly-existing copies (ce-IS1272. Moreover, GN1 had a newly-inserted IS1272 (ni-IS1272 on the PVL-converting prophage, while GN3 had two copies of ni-IS1272 within the DNA helicase gene and near rot. The GN3 genome also had a small deletion. The targets of ni-IS1272 transposition were IR structures, in contrast with previous "canonical" ISs. There were no TSDs. Based on a database search, the targets for ce-IS1272 were IRs or "non-IRs". IS1272 included a larger structure with tandem duplications of the left (IRL side sequence; tnp included minor cases of a long fusion form and truncated form. One ce-IS1272 was associated with the segments responsible for immune evasion and drug resistance. Regarding virulence, GN1 expressed cytolytic peptides (phenol-soluble modulin α and δ-hemolysin and PVL more strongly than some other familial strains. These results suggest that IS1272 transposes through an IR-replacing mechanism, with an irreversible process unlike that of "canonical" transpositions, resulting in genomic variations, and that, among the familial strains, the patient

  16. Differential effects of diazepam treatment and withdrawal on recombinant GABAA receptor expression and functional coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Vlainić, Josipa; Jazvinsćak Jembrek, Maja; Pericić, Danka

    2008-12-30

    Prolonged exposure to benzodiazepines, drugs known to produce tolerance and dependence and also to be abused, leads to adaptive changes in GABA(A) receptors. To further explore the mechanisms responsible for these phenomena, we studied the effects of prolonged diazepam treatment on the recombinant alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A) receptors, stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. The results demonstrating that long-term (48 and 72 h) exposure of cells to a high concentration of diazepam (50 microM) enhanced the maximum number (B(max)) of [(3)H]flunitrazepam, [(3)H]muscimol and [(3)H]t-butylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]TBOB) binding sites, without changing their affinity (K(d)), suggested the up-regulation of GABA(A) receptors. As demonstrated by cell counting and WST-1 proliferation assay, the observed increase in receptor expression was not a consequence of stimulated growth of cells exposed to diazepam. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, showing elevated levels of alpha(1) subunit mRNA as well as beta(2) and gamma(2) subunit proteins, respectively, suggested that prolonged high dose diazepam treatment induced de novo receptor synthesis by acting at both transcriptional and translational levels. The finding that the number of GABA(A) receptor binding sites returned to control value 24 h following diazepam withdrawal, makes this process less likely to account for the development of benzodiazepine tolerance and dependence. On the other hand, the results demonstrating that observed functional uncoupling between GABA and benzodiazepine binding sites persisted after the termination of diazepam treatment supported the hypothesis of its possible role in these phenomena.

  17. The role of coupled positive feedback in the expression of the SPI1 type three secretion system in Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Saini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common food-borne pathogen that induces inflammatory diarrhea and invades intestinal epithelial cells using a type three secretion system (T3SS encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1. The genes encoding the SPI1 T3SS are tightly regulated by a network of interacting transcriptional regulators involving three coupled positive feedback loops. While the core architecture of the SPI1 gene circuit has been determined, the relative roles of these interacting regulators and associated feedback loops are still unknown. To determine the function of this circuit, we measured gene expression dynamics at both population and single-cell resolution in a number of SPI1 regulatory mutants. Using these data, we constructed a mathematical model of the SPI1 gene circuit. Analysis of the model predicted that the circuit serves two functions. The first is to place a threshold on SPI1 activation, ensuring that the genes encoding the T3SS are expressed only in response to the appropriate combination of environmental and cellular cues. The second is to amplify SPI1 gene expression. To experimentally test these predictions, we rewired the SPI1 genetic circuit by changing its regulatory architecture. This enabled us to directly test our predictions regarding the function of the circuit by varying the strength and dynamics of the activating signal. Collectively, our experimental and computational results enable us to deconstruct this complex circuit and determine the role of its individual components in regulating SPI1 gene expression dynamics.

  18. Correction: The role of coupled positive feedback in the expression of the SPI1 type three secretion system in Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Saini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common food-borne pathogen that induces inflammatory diarrhea and invades intestinal epithelial cells using a type three secretion system (T3SS encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1. The genes encoding the SPI1 T3SS are tightly regulated by a network of interacting transcriptional regulators involving three coupled positive feedback loops. While the core architecture of the SPI1 gene circuit has been determined, the relative roles of these interacting regulators and associated feedback loops are still unknown. To determine the function of this circuit, we measured gene expression dynamics at both population and single-cell resolution in a number of SPI1 regulatory mutants. Using these data, we constructed a mathematical model of the SPI1 gene circuit. Analysis of the model predicted that the circuit serves two functions. The first is to place a threshold on SPI1 activation, ensuring that the genes encoding the T3SS are expressed only in response to the appropriate combination of environmental and cellular cues. The second is to amplify SPI1 gene expression. To experimentally test these predictions, we rewired the SPI1 genetic circuit by changing its regulatory architecture. This enabled us to directly test our predictions regarding the function of the circuit by varying the strength and dynamics of the activating signal. Collectively, our experimental and computational results enable us to deconstruct this complex circuit and determine the role of its individual components in regulating SPI1 gene expression dynamics.

  19. To say or not to say: Dyadic ambivalence over emotional expression and its associations with pain, sexuality, and distress in couples coping with provoked vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, Nayla; Bergeron, Sophie; Steben, Marc; Hainault, Victoria-Ann; McDuff, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a highly prevalent and taxing female genital pain condition. Despite the intimate nature of this pain and the fact that affective factors such as anxiety have been shown to modulate its manifestations, no study has yet explored the emotional regulation of couples in which the woman suffers from PVD. Ambivalence over emotional expression (AEE) is an emotional regulation variable that quantifies the extent to which a person is comfortable with the way she or he expresses emotions. We examined whether the dyadic AEE of couples in which the woman suffers from PVD was differentially associated with women's pain and couples' psychological, sexual, and relational functioning. Couples (N = 254), in which the woman suffered from PVD, completed the AEE questionnaire. A couple typology of dyadic AEE was created. Dependent measures for both members of the couple were the global measure of sexual satisfaction scale, the Beck depression inventory II, and the revised dyadic adjustment scale. The female sexual function index and the sexual history form were used to assess the sexual function of women and men, respectively. Women also completed the pain rating index of the McGill pain questionnaire. Couples, in which both partners were considered low on AEE, had the highest scores on sexual satisfaction (P = 0.02) and function (P sexual, and relational outcomes. Results indicate that emotional regulation may be important to consider in the assessment and treatment of couples coping with PVD. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  20. Risk of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in GnRH antagonist versus GnRH agonist protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftager, M.; Bogstad, J; Bryndorf, T

    2016-01-01

    subjects who started gonadotrophin stimulation were included. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: The incidence of severe OHSS [5.1% (27/528) versus 8.9% (44/495) (difference in proportion percentage point (Δpp) = -3.8pp; 95% CI: -7.1 to -0.4; P = 0.02)] and moderate OHSS [10.2% (54/528) versus 15.6% (77...... gonadotrophin stimulation and per embryo transfer were all similar in the two groups. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: A possible limitation is the duration of the trial, with new methods, such as 'freeze all' and 'GnRH agonist triggering', being developed during the trial, the new methods were sought avoided......, however a total number of 32 women had 'freeze all' and 'GnRH agonist triggering' was performed in three cases. Ultrasonic measurements were performed by different physicians and inter-observer bias may be present. Measures of anti-Mullerian hormone and antral follicle count, to estimate ovarian reserve...

  1. Controle sobre GnRH durante o anestro pós-parto em bovinos GnRH control during bovine postpartum anestrous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Francisco Coelho de Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O pós-parto em bovinos é caracterizado como um momento em que as fêmeas bovinas não ovulam, principalmente devido a uma inadequada liberação de gonadotrofinas. Os conceitos e os mecanismos regulatórios do hormônio liberador de gonadotrofinas (GnRH têm sido descritos isoladamente. Esta revisão aborda a influência da nutrição e amamentação, com enfoque na regulação do GnRH, e fornece conceitos atuais do controle neuroendocrinológico da secreção de GnRH durante o pós-parto em bovinos. Conhecimentos atuais das funções do hormônio inibitório de gonadotrofinas (GnIH, da leptina, dos estrógenos, da kisspeptina e da adiponectina, bem como suas complexas inter-relações durante este período estão detalhados para melhor entendimento do assunto.The bovine postpartum period is characterized as a moment when the ovulation is suppressed, mainly in consequence of insufficient release of gonadotropins. Concepts and regulatory mechanisms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH had been described independently. This review covers the influence of nutrition and suckling with emphasis on GnRH regulation, and provides up to date concepts of neuroendocrine control of GnRH secretion during postpartum in cattle. Current knowledge of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH, leptin, estrogens and kisspeptin during this period are presented in order to provide a better understanding of the subject.

  2. Pregnancy outcomes after controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in women with endometriosis-associated infertility: GnRH-agonist versus GnRH-antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolanska, K; Cohen, J; Bendifallah, S; Selleret, L; Antoine, J-M; Chabbert-Buffet, N; Darai, E; d'Argent, E-M

    2017-09-29

    Endometriosis is common in women referred for infertility. In vitro fertilization provides good results but the choice of the best-controlled ovarian hyperstimulation protocol remains a subject of debate. The objective of this retrospective study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in women with endometriosis-associated infertility after COH with a long agonist protocol or a six-week oral contraception-antagonist protocol. Retrospective analysis of a prospective database identified 284 COH cycles - 165 with GnRH-agonist protocol (GnRH-agonist group) and 119 with GnRH-antagonist protocol (GnRH-antagonist group) - in 218 women, with endometriosis from January 2013 to October 2015. No difference in the epidemiological characteristics was found between the groups. Per started cycle, pregnancy and live-birth rates after fresh embryo transfer were higher with the GnRH-agonist protocol (25% vs. 13%, P=0.02 and 18% vs. 8%, P=0.04, respectively). Considering analysis per cycle with embryo transfer, the pregnancy rate was similar in both groups while the live-birth rate was higher in the GnRH-agonist group (29% vs. 17%, P=0.053 and 22% vs. 10%, P=0.02, respectively). No difference was observed between the groups with freeze-thaw embryo transfer. Subgroup analysis (endometrioma alone, deep infiltrating endometriosis with and without endometrioma, endometriosis with and without adenomyosis) revealed no difference between the groups for either pregnancy or live-birth rates. A GnRH-agonist protocol appears to result in higher pregnancy and live-birth rates after fresh embryo transfer in women with endometriosis-associated infertility, suggesting that a GnRH-antagonist protocol might negatively impact endometrial receptivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Enzymatically modified starch up-regulates expression of incretins and sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter in jejunum of growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler-Zebeli, B U; Ertl, R; Grüll, D; Molnar, T; Zebeli, Q

    2017-07-01

    Dietary effects on the host are mediated via modulation of the intestinal mucosal responses. The present study investigated the effect of an enzymatically modified starch (EMS) product on the mucosal expression of genes related to starch digestion, sugar and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption and incretins in the jejunum and cecum in growing pigs. Moreover, the impact of the EMS on hepatic expression of genes related to glucose and lipid metabolism, and postprandial serum metabolites were assessed. Barrows (n=12/diet; initial BW 29 kg) were individually fed three times daily with free access to a diet containing either EMS or waxy corn starch as control (CON) for 10 days. The enzymatic modification led to twice as many α-1,6-glycosidic bonds (~8%) in the amylopectin fraction in the EMS in comparison with the non-modified native waxy corn starch (4% α-1,6-glycosidic bonds). Linear discriminant analysis revealed distinct clustering of mucosal gene expression for EMS and CON diets in jejunum. Compared with the CON diet, the EMS intake up-regulated jejunal expression of sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter (SMCT), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) (P<0.05) and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPI) (P=0.08), which may be related to greater luminal SCFA availability, whereas cecal gene expression was unaffected by diet. Hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) expression tended (P=0.07) to be down-regulated in pigs fed the EMS diet compared with pigs fed the CON diet, which may explain the trend (P=0.08) of 30% decrease in serum triglycerides in pigs fed the EMS diet. Furthermore, pigs fed the EMS diet had a 50% higher (P=0.03) serum urea concentration than pigs fed the CON diet potentially indicating an increased use of glucogenic amino acids for energy acquisition in these pigs. Present findings suggested the jejunum as the target site to influence the intestinal epithelium and altered lipid and

  4. Lactobacillus rhamnosus accelerates zebrafish backbone calcification and gonadal differentiation through effects on the GnRH and IGF systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo A Avella

    Full Text Available Endogenous microbiota play essential roles in the host's immune system, physiology, reproduction and nutrient metabolism. We hypothesized that a continuous administration of an exogenous probiotic might also influence the host's development. Thus, we treated zebrafish from birth to sexual maturation (2-months treatment with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a probiotic species intended for human use. We monitored for the presence of L. rhamnosus during the entire treatment. Zebrafish at 6 days post fertilization (dpf exhibited elevated gene expression levels for Insulin-like growth factors -I and -II, Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors -α and -β, VDR-α and RAR-γ when compared to untreated-10 days old zebrafish. Using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone 3 GFP transgenic zebrafish (GnRH3-GFP, higher GnRH3 expression was found at 6, 8 and 10 dpf upon L. rhamnosus treatment. The same larvae exhibited earlier backbone calcification and gonad maturation. Noteworthy in the gonad development was the presence of first testes differentiation at 3 weeks post fertilization in the treated zebrafish population -which normally occurs at 8 weeks- and a dramatic sex ratio modulation (93% females, 7% males in control vs. 55% females, 45% males in the treated group. We infer that administration of L. rhamnosus stimulated the IGF system, leading to a faster backbone calcification. Moreover we hypothesize a role for administration of L. rhamnosus on GnRH3 modulation during early larval development, which in turn affects gonadal development and sex differentiation. These findings suggest a significant role of the microbiota composition on the host organism development profile and open new perspectives in the study of probiotics usage and application.

  5. Kisspeptin signalling in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus regulates GnRH pulse generator frequency in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Feng Li

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Kisspeptin and its G protein-coupled receptor (GPR 54 are essential for activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. In the rat, the kisspeptin neurons critical for gonadotropin secretion are located in the hypothalamic arcuate (ARC and anteroventral periventricular (AVPV nuclei. As the ARC is known to be the site of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH pulse generator we explored whether kisspeptin-GPR54 signalling in the ARC regulates GnRH pulses.We examined the effects of kisspeptin-10 or a selective kisspeptin antagonist administration intra-ARC or intra-medial preoptic area (mPOA, (which includes the AVPV, on pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH secretion in the rat. Ovariectomized rats with subcutaneous 17beta-estradiol capsules were chronically implanted with bilateral intra-ARC or intra-mPOA cannulae, or intra-cerebroventricular (icv cannulae and intravenous catheters. Blood samples were collected every 5 min for 5-8 h for LH measurement. After 2 h of control blood sampling, kisspeptin-10 or kisspeptin antagonist was administered via pre-implanted cannulae. Intranuclear administration of kisspeptin-10 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in circulating levels of LH lasting approximately 1 h, before recovering to a normal pulsatile pattern of circulating LH. Both icv and intra-ARC administration of kisspeptin antagonist suppressed LH pulse frequency profoundly. However, intra-mPOA administration of kisspeptin antagonist did not affect pulsatile LH secretion.These data are the first to identify the arcuate nucleus as a key site for kisspeptin modulation of LH pulse frequency, supporting the notion that kisspeptin-GPR54 signalling in this region of the mediobasal hypothalamus is a critical neural component of the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator.

  6. PHB2_MOUSE Prohibitin-2 OS=Mus musculus GN=Phb2 PE=1 SV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandra Feijoo Bandin

    P16858|G3P_MOUSE. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase OS=Mus musculus GN=Gapdh PE=1 SV=2 sp|P19783|COX41_MOUSE. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 isoform 1, mitochondrial OS=Mus musculus GN=Cox4i1 PE=1 SV=2.

  7. Evolution of vertebrate GnRH receptors from the perspective of a basal vertebrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacia A Sower

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This minireview provides the current status on gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors (GnRH-R in vertebrates, from the perspective of a basal vertebrate, the sea lamprey, and provides an evolutionary scheme based on the recent advance of whole genome sequencing. In addition, we provide a perspective on the functional divergence and evolution of the receptors. In this review we use the phylogenetic classification of vertebrate GnRH receptors that groups them into three clusters: type I (mammalian and non-mammalian, type II, and type III GnRH receptors. New findings show that the sea lamprey has two type III-like GnRH receptors and an ancestral type GnRH receptor that is more closely related to the type II-like receptors. These two novel GnRH receptors along with lGnRH-R-1 share similar structural features and amino acid motifs common to other known gnathostome type II/III receptors. Recent data analyses of the lamprey genome provide strong evidence that 2 whole rounds of genome duplication (2R occurred prior to the gnathostome-agnathan split. Based on our current knowledge, it is proposed that lGnRH-R-1 evolved from an ancestor of the type II receptor following a vertebrate-shared genome duplication and that the two type III receptors resulted from a duplication within lamprey of a gene derived from a lineage shared by many vertebrates.

  8. Hormonal changes during GnRH analogue therapy in children with central precocious puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Juul, A; Andersson, A M

    2000-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) have been used for treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) for more than 15 years. They are generally considered safe although data on potential long-term side effects are scarce. However, GnRHa therapy has profound effects on both the hypoth...

  9. The stimulation of testosterone and LH secretion by synthetic GnRH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of GnRH stimulation on plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels in Cape porcupine males were examined by analysing plasma collected before and after an intravenous injection of GnRH. In six mature males and one subadult, which were given an intravenous injection of 0,5 ml saline, levels of ...

  10. Superovulatory response in Boer goats pre-treated with a GnRH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ovarian response and embryo recovery rates in Boer goat does superovulated with pFSH following a pre-treatment with a GnRH agonist (GnRHa) outside the natural breeding season. Oestrus was synchronised in 22 does with CIDR\\'s for 17 days, and these were superovulated with ...

  11. Low-dose add-back therapy during postoperative GnRH agonist treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Wen Tsai

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Low dose add-back therapy could effectively ameliorate hypoestrogenic side effects and simultaneously maintain the therapeutic response of GnRH agonist treatment. The treatment dropout was lower compared with a regular dose. Therefore, low dose add-back therapy can be considered a treatment choice during postoperative GnRH agonist treatment.

  12. Specification of GnRH-1 neurons by antagonistic FGF and retinoic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabado, Virginie; Barraud, Perrine; Baker, Clare V H; Streit, Andrea

    2012-02-15

    A small population of neuroendocrine cells in the rostral hypothalamus and basal forebrain is the key regulator of vertebrate reproduction. They secrete gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-1), communicate with many areas of the brain and integrate multiple inputs to control gonad maturation, puberty and sexual behavior. In humans, disruption of the GnRH-1 system leads to hypogonadotropic gonadism and Kallmann syndrome. Unlike other neurons in the central nervous system, GnRH-1 neurons arise in the periphery, however their embryonic origin is controversial, and the molecular mechanisms that control their initial specification are not clear. Here, we provide evidence that in chick GnRH-1 neurons originate in the olfactory placode, where they are specified shortly after olfactory sensory neurons. FGF signaling is required and sufficient to induce GnRH-1 neurons, while retinoic acid represses their formation. Both pathways regulate and antagonize each other and our results suggest that the timing of signaling is critical for normal GnRH-1 neuron formation. While Kallmann's syndrome has generally been attributed to a failure of GnRH-1 neuron migration due to impaired FGF signaling, our findings suggest that in at least some Kallmann patients these neurons may never be specified. In addition, this study highlights the intimate embryonic relationship between GnRH-1 neurons and their targets and modulators in the adult. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pregnancy outcome of “delayed start” GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders: A clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aflatoonian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of poor-responding patients is still major challenge in assisted reproductive techniques (ART. Delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol is recommended to these patients, but little is known in this regards. Objective: The goal of this study was assessment of delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders, and in vitro fertilization (IVF outcomes. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial included sixty infertile women with Bologna criteria for ovarian poor responders who were candidate for IVF. In case group (n=30, delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol administered estrogen priming followed by early follicular-phase GnRH antagonist treatment for 7 days before ovarian stimulation with gonadotropin. Control group (n=30 treated with estrogen priming antagonist protocol. Finally, endometrial thickness, the rates of oocytes maturation, , embryo formation, and pregnancy were compared between two groups. Results: Rates of implantation, chemical, clinical, and ongoing pregnancy in delayed-start cycles were higher although was not statistically significant. Endometrial thickness was significantly higher in case group. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of oocyte maturation, embryo formation, and IVF outcomes between two groups. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol.

  14. GnRH agonist trigger for the induction of oocyte maturation in GnRH antagonist IVF cycles: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engmann, Lawrence; Benadiva, Claudio; Humaidan, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) trigger is effective in the induction of oocyte maturation and prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome during IVF treatment. This trigger concept, however, results in early corpora lutea demise and consequently luteal phase dysfunction and impaired endometrial receptivity. The aim of this strenghths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis was to summarize the progress made over the past 15 years to optimize ongoing pregnancy rates after GnRHa trigger. The advantages and potential drawbacks of this type of triggering are reviewed. The current approach to the management of GnRHa trigger in autologous cycles is based on the peak serum oestradiol level or follicle number and aims at a fresh embryo transfer or a segmentation approach with elective cryopreservation policy. We recommend intensive luteal support with transdermal oestradiol and intramuscular progesterone alone if peak serum oestradiol is 4000 or more pg/ml after GnRHa trigger or dual trigger with GnRHa and HCG 1000 IU if peak serum oestradiol is less than 4000 pg/mL. On the contrary, we recommend HCG 1500 IU 35 h after GnRHa trigger if there are less than 25 follicles, or freeze all oocytes or embryos if there are over 25 follicles. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Alteration in contractile G-protein coupled receptor expression by moist snuff and nicotine in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, Hardip; Xu, Cang-Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    of vasocontractile G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), such as endothelin ET(B), serotonin 5-HT(1B), and thromboxane A(2) TP receptors, in rat cerebral arteries. Studies show that these vasocontractile GPCR show alterations by lipid-soluble cigarette smoke particles via activation of mitogen-activated protein...... kinases (MAPK). However, the effects of moist tobacco on the expression of GPCR are less studied. Rat middle cerebral arteries were isolated and organ cultured in serum-free medium for 24h in the presence of water-soluble snus (WSS), DMSO-soluble snus (DSS), or nicotine. The dose of snus and nicotine...... was kept at plasma level of snus users (25ng nicotine/ml). A high dose (250ng nicotine/ml) was also included due to the previous results showing alteration in the GPCR expression by nicotine at this concentration. Contractile responses to the ET(B) receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c, 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist...

  16. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of oligomeric states of the native 5HT2A G-Protein-Coupled Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Gopa; Jaiswal, Priyank; Dey, Sandip; Sengupta, Jayati; Mukherjee, Sujoy

    2018-02-06

    The serotonin 5HT2A G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) is involved in a plethora of neuromodulatory functions and its dysregulation is linked to psychiatric disorders. However, there is insufficient, direct structural evidence of the structure, dynamics and the mechanism of function of this receptor. Cholesterol plays an important role in the function of many GPCRs and reduced cholesterol levels may be linked to serotonergic pathway disruptions. But cholesterol's effect on the structure, especially the oligomeric states of the 5HT2A receptor is not well understood. Structural studies on most GPCRs typically require the substitution of the dynamic intracellular loop 3 along with other mutations and truncations for stability and hence, structural characterization of native receptor sequence is relatively rare. Here we have cloned, over-expressed and purified native sequence of rat serotonin 5HT2A GPCR using baculoviral expression system. Subsequently, we used cryo-electron microscopy to show that the 5HT2A GPCR forms a dimer in presence of cholesterol but converts to a monomer when cholesterol is depleted. Since dimer formation is necessary for signaling by 5HT2A receptors, our results also indicate the importance of cholesterol in serotonin 5HT2A receptor's function. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Long-term effects of GnRH agonists on fertility and behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    This review aimed to summarize the present knowledge about the effects of GnRH agonist slow-release implants (GnRH A-SRI) on fertility and behaviour in male and female dogs and cats with special focus on deslorelin. Following an initial stimulation of gonadotropin and testosterone secretion...... possibly associated with an improved semen quality, GnRH A-SRI induce long-term depression of fertility in male dogs and cats with, however, a large individual variation in onset and duration of efficacy especially in cats. The GnRH A-SRI furthermore interfere with testosterone-dependent/affected behaviour......; a significant positive effect in reducing sexual behaviour and libido, hypersexuality, intermale dominance and excessive territorial urine marking has been described. Rates of improvement of the respective behaviour are comparable to those after surgical castration, making GnRH A-SRI a valuable option...

  18. The Luteal Phase after GnRHa Trigger-Understanding An Enigma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Moller, Kathrine; Hammer Jagd, Sandra; Humaidan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The luteal phase of all stimulated in vitro fertilization/intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) cycles is disrupted, which makes luteal phase support (LPS) mandatory. The cause of the disruption is thought to be the multifollicular development achieved during ovarian stimulation which...... phase defect. With the intro- duction of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol, it became feasible to trigger final oocyte maturation and ovulation with a single bolus of GnRH agonist (GnRHa) as an alternative to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). GnRHa trig- gering presents...... several advantages, including the reduction in or even elimination of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Despite the potential advantages of GnRHa trig- gering, previous randomized controlled trials reported a poor clinical outcome with high rates of early pregnancy losses, despite supplementation...

  19. Rescue of corpus luteum function with peri-ovulatory HCG supplementation in IVF/ICSI GnRH antagonist cycles in which ovulation was triggered with a GnRH agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, P; Bungum, L; Bungum, M

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies found a poor clinical outcome when a GnRH agonist (GnRHa) was used to trigger ovulation in GnRH antagonist IVF/ICSI cycles. This study aimed to determine the clinical and endocrine effects as well the optimal timing of HCG supplementation. Forty-five normogonadotrophic IVF/ICSI p...

  20. Differential Ovarian Expression of KiSS-1 and GPR-54 During the Estrous Cycle and Photoperiod Induced Recrudescence in Siberian Hamsters (Phodopus sungorus)

    OpenAIRE

    Shahed, Asha; Young, Kelly A.

    2009-01-01

    Kisspeptins, coded by the KiSS-1 gene, regulate aspects of the reproductive axis by stimulating GnRH release via the G protein coupled receptor, GPR54. Recent reports show that KiSS/GPR54 may be key mediators in photoperiod-controlled reproduction in seasonal breeders, and that KiSS-1/GPR54 are expressed in the hypothalamus, ovaries, placenta, and pancreas. This study examined the expression of KiSS-1/GPR54 mRNA and protein in ovaries of Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). Ovaries from cyc...

  1. Genetics of Isolated Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism: Role of GnRH Receptor and Other Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karges Beate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH is a key player in normal puberty and sexual development and function. Genetic causes of isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH have been identified during the recent years affecting the synthesis, secretion, or action of GnRH. Developmental defects of GnRH neurons and the olfactory bulb are associated with hyposmia, rarely associated with the clinical phenotypes of synkinesia, cleft palate, ear anomalies, or choanal atresia, and may be due to mutations of KAL1, FGFR1/FGF8, PROKR2/PROK2, or CHD7. Impaired GnRH secretion in normosmic patients with IHH may be caused by deficient hypothalamic GPR54/KISS1, TACR3/TAC3, and leptinR/leptin signalling or mutations within the GNRH1 gene itself. Normosmic IHH is predominantly caused by inactivating mutations in the pituitary GnRH receptor inducing GnRH resistance, while mutations of the β-subunits of LH or FSH are very rare. Inheritance of GnRH deficiency may be oligogenic, explaining variable phenotypes. Future research should identify additional genes involved in the complex network of normal and disturbed puberty and reproduction.

  2. Changes in peripheral blood levels and pulse frequencies of GnRH in patients with hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, M; Takanashi, N; Yaoi, Y

    1998-09-01

    Pituitary dysfunction occasionally results from brain tumors or the surgical resection of brain tumors. The authors examined two patients with hypogonadotropic secondary amenorrhea, who had undergone surgical removal of brain tumors. Changes in immunoreactive gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion are of interest in patients with a gonadotropin and gonadal steroid deficit, because both steroid and pituitary feedback systems are altered by tumors or tumor resection. The authors thus measured GnRH, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels every 15 minutes for 4 hours by radioimmunoassay and investigated qualitative and quantitative changes in the pulsatile patterns of these hormones in two hypogonadotropic hypogonadism patients. They also performed similar multiple measurements of GnRH in two normal cycle women in follicular phase and two postmenopausal women. The concentration of plasma GnRH in two hypopituitarism patients was compared with that in two normal cycle women and two postmenopausal women. The study showed that the peripheral blood level of GnRH was significantly lower in two hypopituitarism patients than in both normal cycle and postmenopausal women, and that the pulsatile frequency was not different among these three groups. These findings suggest that alteration of feedback systems results in a decrease in the blood level of GnRH, and that pulses of GnRH maintain normal fluctuation despite the alteration of the hormonal circumstances in two hypogonadotropic hypogonadism patients.

  3. Regulation and Function of RFRP-3 (GnIH neurons during postnatal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C Poling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3; mammalian ortholog to GnIH potently inhibits gonadotropin secretion in mammals. Studies of RFRP-3 immunoreactivity and Rfrp expression (the gene encoding RFRP-3 in mammalian brains have uncovered several possible pathways regulating RFRP-3 neurons, shedding light on their potential role in reproduction and other processes, and pharmacological studies have probed the target sites of RFRP-3 action. Despite this, there is currently no major consensus on RFRP-3’s specific endogenous role(s in reproductive physiology. Here we discuss the latest evidence relating to RFRP-3 neuron regulation and function during development and sexual maturation, focusing on rodents. We highlight significant changes in RFRP-3 and Rfrp expression, as well as RFRP-3 neuronal activation, during key stages of postnatal and pubertal development and also discuss recent evidence testing the requisite role of RFRP-3 receptors for normal pubertal timing and developmental LH secretion. Interestingly, some findings suggest that endogenous RFRP-3 signaling may not be necessary for the puberty timing, at least in some species, forcing new hypotheses to be generated regarding this peptide’s functional significance to sexual maturation and development.

  4. Significance of neonatal testicular sex steroids to defeminize anteroventral periventricular kisspeptin neurons and the GnRH/LH surge system in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Tamami; Sakakibara, Mototsugu; Yamada, Shunji; Kinoshita, Mika; Iwata, Kinuyo; Tomikawa, Junko; Kanazawa, Tetsuhiro; Matsui, Hisanori; Takatsu, Yoshihiro; Ohtaki, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Tsukamura, Hiroko

    2009-12-01

    The brain mechanism regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinizing hormone (LH) release is sexually differentiated in rodents. Kisspeptin neurons in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) have been suggested to be sexually dimorphic and involved in the GnRH/LH surge generation. The present study aimed to determine the significance of neonatal testicular androgen to defeminize AVPV kisspeptin expression and the GnRH/LH surge-generating system. To this end, we tested whether neonatal castration feminizes AVPV kisspeptin neurons and the LH surge-generating system in male rats and whether neonatal estradiol benzoate (EB) treatment suppresses the kisspeptin expression and the LH surge in female rats. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and quantitative real-time RT-PCR were performed to investigate kisspeptin and Kiss1 mRNA expressions. Male rats were castrated immediately after birth, and females were treated with EB on postnatal Day 5. Neonatal castration caused an increase in AVPV kisspeptin expression at peptide and mRNA levels in the genetically male rats, and the animals showed surge-like LH release in the presence of the preovulatory level of estradiol (E2) at adulthood. On the other hand, neonatal EB treatment decreased the number of AVPV kisspeptin neurons and caused an absence of E2-induced LH surge in female rats. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that neonatal steroidal manipulation affects Kiss1 expression but does not significantly affect gene expressions of neuropeptides (neurotensin and galanin) and enzymes or transporter for neurotransmitters (gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and dopamine) in the AVPV, suggesting that the manipulation specifically affects Kiss1 expressions. Taken together, our present results provide physiological evidence that neonatal testicular androgen causes the reduction of AVPV kisspeptin expression and failure of LH surge in genetically male rats. Thus, it is plausible that perinatal

  5. Vitamin D is not linked to folate status and mRNA expression of intestinal proton-coupled folate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsch, C; Zibolka, J; Frommhagen, M; Lehmann, U; Dierkes, J; Kühne, H; Hirche, F; Stangl, G I

    2014-06-01

    In vitro studies discovered intestinal proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) as a vitamin D hormone-responsive gene. In vivo effects of vitamin D on PCFT and folate status are currently not available. Three experiments were conducted. At first, vitamin D receptor knockout (VDR(-/-)) mice and corresponding wild-type (WT) mice were compared for their plasma and hepatic folate concentration and PCFT mRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. In a second experiment with rats, we analyzed the folate status of offspring in response to a maternal vitamin D-adequate (1,000 IU/kg) or vitamin D-deficient (0 IU/kg) diet that was fed for 11 weeks. Finally, the plasma folate concentration of healthy individuals was studied at baseline (in winter) and in response to an oral treatment for 8 weeks with 2,000 IU vitamin D3 per day or a placebo, respectively. Here, we show that folate status and intestinal PCFT mRNA abundance did not differ between the VDR(-/-) and the WT mice. No effect of vitamin D on folate status was also found in rat dams and their offspring, and plasma folate levels of individuals did not change in response to vitamin D. Current data from studies with model animals and humans provide no indication for a vitamin D effect on intestinal uptake and status of folate.

  6. Identification and expression profiles of neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Wu, Shun-Fan; Huang, Jia; Song, Qi-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Fang, Qi

    2016-06-29

    In insects, neuropeptides play important roles in the regulation of multiple physiological processes by binding to their corresponding receptors, which are primarily G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The genes encoding neuropeptides and their associated GPCRs in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis were identified by a transcriptomic analysis and were used to identify potential targets for the disruption of physiological processes and the protection of crops. Forty-three candidate genes were found to encode the neuropeptide precursors for all known insect neuropeptides except for arginine-vasopressin-like peptide (AVLP), CNMamide, neuropeptide-like precursors 2-4 (NPLP2-4), and proctolin. In addition, novel alternative splicing variants of three neuropeptide genes (allatostatin CC, CCHamide 1, and short neuropeptide F) are reported for the first time, and 51 putative neuropeptide GPCRs were identified. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that 44 of these GPCRs belong to the A-family (or rhodopsin-like), 5 belong to the B-family (or secretin-like), and 2 are leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCRs. These GPCRs and their likely ligands were also described. qRT-PCR analyses revealed the expression profiles of the neuropeptide precursors and GPCR genes in various tissues of C. suppressalis. Our study provides fundamental information that may further our understanding of neuropeptidergic signaling systems in Lepidoptera and aid in the design of peptidomimetics, pseudopeptides or small molecules capable of disrupting the physiological processes regulated by these signaling molecules and their receptors.

  7. Quantitative expression profiling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in metastatic melanoma: the constitutively active orphan GPCR GPR18 as novel drug target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Y.; Verdegaal, E.M.E.; Siderius, M.; Bebelman, J.P.; Smit, M.J.; Leurs, R.; Willemze, R.; Tensen, C.P.; Osanto, S.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been implicated in the tumorigenesis and metastasis of human cancers and are considered amongst the most desirable targets for drug development. Utilizing a robust quantitative PCR array, we quantified expression of 94 human GPCRs, including 75 orphan GPCRs

  8. Hormonal changes during GnRH analogue therapy in children with central precocious puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Juul, A; Andersson, A M

    2000-01-01

    the hypothalamopituitary-gonadal axis as well as on growth hormone (GH) secretion. Gonadal activity is increased in children with CPP; during GnRHa therapy secretion of gonadal hormones is suppressed as reflected by measurements of LH, FSH, and estradiol/testosterone. More recently, studies of levels of inhibin A and B...... revealed a decrease in levels of free, biologically active IGF-I during GnRHa treatment. These findings are in accord with the observed decrease in height velocity in children with CPP under treatment with GnRHa, and may also play a role in the relatively small gain in final height in most patients....

  9. H2A.Z acidic patch couples chromatin dynamics to regulation of gene expression programs during ESC differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Subramanian

    . Collectively, our work suggests that the divergent residues in the H2A.Z acidic patch comprise a unique domain that couples control of chromatin dynamics to the regulation of developmental gene expression patterns during lineage commitment.

  10. Magnetoelastic plane waves in rotating media in thermoelasticity of type II (G-N model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Roychoudhuri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A study is made of the propagation of time-harmonic plane waves in an infinite, conducting, thermoelastic solid permeated by a uniform primary external magnetic field when the entire medium is rotating with a uniform angular velocity. The thermoelasticity theory of type II (G-N model (1993 is used to study the propagation of waves. A more general dispersion equation is derived to determine the effects of rotation, thermal parameters, characteristic of the medium, and the external magnetic field. If the primary magnetic field has a transverse component, it is observed that the longitudinal and transverse motions are linked together. For low frequency (χ≪1, χ being the ratio of the wave frequency to some standard frequency ω∗, the rotation and the thermal field have no effect on the phase velocity to the first order of χ and then this corresponds to only one slow wave influenced by the electromagnetic field only. But to the second order of χ, the phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and the specific energy loss are affected by rotation and depend on the thermal parameters cT, cT being the nondimensional thermal wave speed of G-N theory, and the thermoelastic coupling εT, the electromagnetic parameters εH, and the transverse magnetic field RH. Also for large frequency, rotation and thermal field have no effect on the phase velocity, which is independent of primary magnetic field to the first order of (1/χ (χ≫1, and the specific energy loss is a constant, independent of any field parameter. However, to the second order of (1/χ, rotation does exert influence on both the phase velocity and the attenuation factor, and the specific energy loss is affected by rotation and depends on the thermal parameters cT and εT, electromagnetic parameter εH, and the transverse magnetic field RH, whereas the specific energy loss is independent of any field parameters to the first order of (1/χ.

  11. Reproductive performance of dairy cows with ovarian cysts after different GnRH and cloprostenol treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gatius, F; López-Béjar, M

    2002-10-15

    Cystic ovarian disease is an important cause of reproductive failure and economic loss for the dairy industry. This report describes two consecutive studies. The objective of the first was to evaluate the response of cows with ovarian cysts to two therapeutic treatments. In the second study, we compared the effectiveness of the best treatment established in Study 1 with that of the Ovsynch protocol. For Study 1, cows were considered to have an ovarian cyst if it was possible to observe a single follicular structure with a follicular antrum diameter > 25 min in the absence of a corpus luteum in three ultrasonographic examinations performed at 7 days intervals. At diagnosis (Day 0), cows were assigned to one of two treatment groups. Cows in Group GnRH/CLP (n = 31) were treated with 100 microg GnRH i.m. and 500 microg cloprostenol (CLP) i.m. on Day 14. Cows in Group GnRH-CLP/CLP(n = 32) were treated with 100 microg GnRH i.m. plus 500 microg CLP i.m. on Day 0, and 500 microg CLP i.m. on Day 14. The animals were inseminated at observed estrus and monitored weekly by ultrasonography for 4 weeks or until Al. Cows in the GnRH-CLP/CLP group showed a lower cystic persistence rate (15.6% 41.9%; P 3%; P = 0.02) than those in the GnRH/CLP group. For the second study, 128 cows with ovarian cysts were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: cows in Group Ovsynch (n = 64) were treated with 100 microg GnRH i.m. on Day 0, 500 microg CLP on Day 7, and 100 microm GnRH i.m. 36 h later. Cows in this group were inseminated 24 h after the second GnRH dose (Ovsynch protocol). Cows in Group GnRH-CLP/CLP/GnRH (n = 64)were treated as those in the GnRH-CLP/CLP group of Study 1 but received GnRH 32 h after the second CLP treatment and were inseminated 24 h after this. A further group of cows without ovarian cysts inseminated at natural estrus served as the Group Control (n = 64). Cows in the GnRH-CLP/CLP/ GnRH group showed a lower cystic persistence rate (10.9% 17.2%; P 12.5%; P 3

  12. Super-hydrophobic graphene coated polyurethane (GN@PU) sponge with great oil-water separation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotan; Liu, Dongyan; Ma, Yuling; Nie, Jing; Sui, Guoxin

    2017-11-01

    The graphene/polyurethane (GN@PU) sponge was prepared via simple dip-coating PU sponges in graphene aqueous suspension containing cellulose nanowhiskers (CNWs), where CNWs played a vital role to facilitate the uniform graphene sheets coated on the skeletons of polyurethane sponge (PU). The super-hydrophobic GN@PU sponge was obtained by optimizing the ratio of GN and CNWs to choose the final coating suspensions of GN/CNWs mixture or pure graphene. The GN@PU sponge showed densely packed graphene sheets, contributing super-hydrophobicity to the sponge with water contact angle of 152° and a large lubricating oil absorption value of 31 g g-1. The elasticity, mechanical durability, thermal and chemical stability were all found to be improved after coating with the thin GN layers. Moreover, the GN@PU sponges possess outstanding recyclability and stability since no decline in absorption efficiency was observed after more than 100 cycles.

  13. The absence of core fucose up-regulates GnT-III and Wnt target genes: a possible mechanism for an adaptive response in terms of glycan function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, Ayako; Kitazume, Shinobu; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Nakajima, Kazuki; Oka, Ritsuko; Fujinawa, Reiko; Korekane, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Wada, Yoshinao; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2014-04-25

    Glycans play key roles in a variety of protein functions under normal and pathological conditions, but several glycosyltransferase-deficient mice exhibit no or only mild phenotypes due to redundancy or compensation of glycan functions. However, we have only a limited understanding of the underlying mechanism for these observations. Our previous studies indicated that 70% of Fut8-deficient (Fut8(-/-)) mice that lack core fucose structure die within 3 days after birth, but the remainder survive for up to several weeks although they show growth retardation as well as emphysema. In this study, we show that, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from Fut8(-/-) mice, another N-glycan branching structure, bisecting GlcNAc, is specifically up-regulated by enhanced gene expression of the responsible enzyme N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III). As candidate target glycoproteins for bisecting GlcNAc modification, we confirmed that level of bisecting GlcNAc on β1-integrin and N-cadherin was increased in Fut8(-/-) MEFs. Moreover using mass spectrometry, glycan analysis of IgG1 in Fut8(-/-) mouse serum demonstrated that bisecting GlcNAc contents were also increased by Fut8 deficiency in vivo. As an underlying mechanism, we found that in Fut8(-/-) MEFs Wnt/β-catenin signaling is up-regulated, and an inhibitor against Wnt signaling was found to abrogate GnT-III expression, indicating that Wnt/β-catenin is involved in GnT-III up-regulation. Furthermore, various oxidative stress-related genes were also increased in Fut8(-/-) MEFs. These data suggest that Fut8(-/-) mice adapted to oxidative stress, both ex vivo and in vivo, by inducing various genes including GnT-III, which may compensate for the loss of core fucose functions.

  14. Mental distress and personality in women undergoing GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist protocols for assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbæk, D. S.; Toftager, M.; Hjordt, L. V.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Do mental distress and mood fluctuations in women undergoing GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist protocols for assisted reproductive technology (ART) differ depending on protocol and the personality trait, neuroticism? SUMMARY ANSWER: ART treatment did not induce elevated levels...... of mental distress in either GnRH antagonist or agonist protocols but neuroticism was positively associated with increased mental distress, independent of protocols. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: ART treatment may increase mental distress by mechanisms linked to sex hormone fluctuations. General psychological......-reported the Profile of Mood States, the Perceived Stress Scale, the Symptom Checklist-92-Revised, and the Major Depression Inventory questionnaires, at baseline, at ART cycle day 35, on the day of oocyte pick-up, and on the day of hCG testing. Also, a series of Profile of Mood States were reported daily during...

  15. Fabrication of multifunctional SiO2@GN-serum composites for chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuwei; Bai, Jing; Jia, Xiaodan; Jiang, Xiue; Guo, Zhuo

    2015-01-14

    Recently, the chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy has become a potential method for cancer treatment. Herein, we developed a multifunctional nanomaterial for chemo-photothermal therapeutics based on silica and graphene core/shell structure (SiO2@GN) because of the ability of GN to convert light energy into heat. Serum protein was further modified onto the surface of GN (SiO2@GN-Serum) to improve the solubility and stability of GN-based nanoparticles in physiological conditions. The as-synthesized SiO2@GN-Serum nanoparticles (NPs) have been revealed to have high photothermal conversion efficiency and stability, as well as high storage and release capacity for anticancer drug doxorubicin (SiO2@GN-Serum-Dox). The therapeutic efficacy of SiO2@GN-Serum-Dox has been evaluated in vitro and in vivo for cervical cancer therapy. In vitro cytotoxicity tests demonstrate that SiO2@GN-Serum NPs have excellent biocompatibility. However, SiO2@GN-Serum-Dox NPs show higher cytotoxicity than SiO2@GN-Serum and free Dox under irradiation with NIR laser at 1.0 W/cm(2) for 5 min owing to both SiO2@GN-Serum-mediated photothermal ablation and cytotoxicity of light-triggered Dox release. In mouse models, the tumor growth is significantly inhibited by chem-photothermal effect of SiO2@GN-Serum-Dox. Overall, compared with single chemotherapy or photothermal therapy, the combined treatment demonstrates better therapeutic efficacy. Our results suggest a promising GN-based core/shell nanostructure for biomedical applications.

  16. Social Isolation Modulates CLOCK Protein and Beta-Catenin Expression Pattern in Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone Neurons in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuin Hau Teo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Postweaning social isolation reduces the amplitude of the daily variation of CLOCK protein in the brain and induces lower reproductive activity. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH acts as an inhibitor in the reproductive system and has been linked to stress. Social isolation has been shown to lower neuronal activity of GnIH-expressing neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH. The exact mechanism by which social isolation may affect GnIH is still unclear. We investigated the impact of social isolation on regulatory cellular mechanisms in GnIH neurons. We examined via immunohistochemistry the expression of CLOCK protein at four different times throughout the day in GnIH cells tagged with enhanced fluorescent green protein (EGFP-GnIH in 9-week-old adult male rats that have been raised for 6 weeks under postweaning social isolation and compared them with group-raised control rats of the same age. We also studied the expression of β-catenin—which has been shown to be affected by circadian proteins such as Bmal1—in EGFP-GnIH neurons to determine whether it could play a role in linking CLOCK in GnIH neurons. We found that social isolation modifies the pattern of CLOCK expression in GnIH neurons in the DMH. Socially isolated rats displayed greater CLOCK expression in the dark phase, while control rats displayed increased CLOCK expression in the light phase. Furthermore, β-catenin expression pattern in GnIH cells was disrupted by social isolation. This suggests that social isolation triggers changes in CLOCK and GnIH expression, which may be associated with an increase in nuclear β-catenin during the dark phase.

  17. Spaying-induced coat changes: the role of gonadotropins, GnRH and GnRH treatment on the hair cycle of female dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichler, Iris Margaret; Welle, Monika; Eckrich, Christine; Sattler, Ursula; Barth, Andrea; Hubler, Madeleine; Nett-Mettler, Claudia S; Jöchle, Wolfgang; Arnold, Susi

    2008-04-01

    Although spaying can result in qualitative hair coat changes in dogs, the influence of spaying on the hair growth cycle has never been described. The study aims were to examine the effect of spaying and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) treatment on canine hair coat, cycle stages of hair follicles, plasma gonadotropin concentrations and mRNA transcription of luteinizing hormone (LH) and GnRH receptors in hair follicles. Fifteen female dogs were examined before and 1 year after spaying and 24 spayed dogs before and after GnRH treatment. Spaying resulted in increased plasma gonadotropin concentrations and increased anagen : telogen ratio of hair follicles, but only 20% of the dogs developed coat changes. No differences were found in mRNA transcription of LH and GnRH receptors. GnRH treatment resulted in reduced plasma gonadotropin concentrations and improvement of coat changes in 79% of patients. This was associated with an increase in catagen hair follicles without changes in the anagen : telogen ratio. The present study demonstrated that spaying had an effect on the anagen : telogen ratio of hair follicles. Spaying-induced coat changes did not correlate with the anagen : telogen ratio. GnRH treatment reduced gonadotropin concentrations and reversed coat changes in some dogs, but had no effect on the hair growth cycle other than increasing the number of catagen hair follicles. A weak positive correlation between the plasma LH concentration and the anagen : telogen ratio was noted; however, our data did not suggest a direct receptor-mediated hormonal effect on the hair follicle. The present study did not identify the pathomechanism of spaying-induced coat changes.

  18. Evidence for Changes in Numbers of Synaptic Inputs onto KNDy and GnRH Neurones during the Preovulatory LH Surge in the Ewe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkley, C M; Coolen, L M; Goodman, R L; Lehman, M N

    2015-07-01

    Kisspeptin neurones located in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and preoptic area (POA) are critical mediators of gonadal steroid feedback onto gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones. ARC kisspeptin cells that co-localise neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin (Dyn), are collectively referred to as KNDy (Kisspeptin/NKB/Dyn) neurones, and have been shown in mice to also co-express the vesicular glutamate transporter, vGlut2, an established glutamatergic marker. The ARC in rodents has long been known as a site of hormone-induced neuroplasticity, and changes in synaptic inputs to ARC neurones in rodents occur over the oestrous cycle. Based on this evidence, the the present study aimed to examine possible changes across the ovine oestrous cycle in synaptic inputs onto kisspeptin cells in the ARC (KNDy) and POA, and inputs onto GnRH neurones. Gonadal-intact breeding season ewes were perfused using 4% paraformaldehyde during either the luteal or follicular phase of the oestrous cycle, with the latter group killed at the time of the luteinising hormone (LH) surge. Hypothalamic sections were processed for triple-label immunodetection of kisspeptin/vGlut2/synaptophysin or kisspeptin/vGlut2/GnRH. The total numbers of synaptophysin- and vGlut2-positive inputs to ARC KNDy neurones were significantly increased at the time of the LH surge compared to the luteal phase; because these did not contain kisspeptin, they do not arise from KNDy neurones. By contrast to the ARC, the total number of synaptophysin-positive inputs onto POA kisspeptin neurones did not differ between luteal phase and surge animals. The total number of kisspeptin and vGlut2 inputs onto GnRH neurones in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) was also increased during the LH surge, and could be attributed to an increase in the number of KNDy (double-labelled kisspeptin + vGlut2) inputs. Taken together, these results provide novel evidence of synaptic plasticity at the level of inputs onto KNDy and GnRH neurones during

  19. Evidence for changes in numbers of synaptic inpcuts onto KNDy and GnRH neurones during the preovulatory LH surge in the ewe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkley, Christina M.; Coolen, Lique M.; Goodman, Robert L.; Lehman, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin neurones located in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and preoptic area (POA) are critical mediators of gonadal steroid feedback onto GnRH neurones. ARC kisspeptin cells that co-localize neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin (Dyn), are collectively referred to as KNDy (Kisspeptin/NKB/Dyn) neurones, and have been shown to also co-express the glutamatergic marker, vGlut2, in mice. The ARC in rodents has long been known as a site of hormone-induced neuroplasticity, and changes in synaptic inputs to ARC neurones in rodents occur over the oestrous cycle. Based on this evidence, the goal of this study was to examine possible changes across the ovine oestrous cycle in synaptic inputs onto kisspeptin cells in the ARC (KNDy) and POA, and inputs onto GnRH neurones. Gonadal-intact breeding season ewes were perfused using 4% paraformaldehyde during either the luteal or follicular phase of the oestrous cycle, the latter group sacrificed at the time of the luteinising (LH) surge. Hypothalamic sections were processed for triple-label immunodetection of kisspeptin/vGlut2/synaptophysin or kisspeptin/vGlut2/GnRH. The total numbers of synaptophysin- and vGlut2-positive inputs to ARC KNDy neurones were significantly increased at the time of the LH surge compared to luteal phase; as these did not contain kisspeptin they do not arise from KNDy neurons. In contrast to the ARC, the total number of synaptophysin-positive inputs onto POA kisspeptin neurones did not differ between luteal phase and surge animals. The total number of kisspeptin and vGlut2 inputs onto GnRH neurones in both the POA and mediobasal hypothalamus was also increased during the LH surge. Taken together, these results provide novel evidence of synaptic plasticity at the level of inputs onto KNDy and GnRH neurones during the ovine oestrous cycle, changes which may contribute to the generation of the preovulatory GnRH/LH surge. PMID:25976424

  20. Integrated Collision Avoidance Enhanced GN&C System for Smart Air Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this SBIR Phase I project is to develop and demonstrate a low cost, lightweight, miniaturized Integrated Collision Avoidance Enhanced GN&C...

  1. Immunization against recombinant GnRH-I alters testicular structure in an experimental boar model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunsheng; Liu, Ya; Su, Shiping; Pu, Yong; Zhang, Xiaorong; Fang, Fugui

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and to compare testicular tissue in immunized and control boars. Eighteen male piglets, aged 12 weeks, were vaccinated twice intramuscularly with a maltose-binding protein-gonadotropin-releasing hormone I hexamer peptide (MBP-GnRH-I6). Blood samples were taken at 12, 18, 21 and 24 weeks of age. Serum concentrations of testosterone and GnRH-I antibodies were determined by radioimmunoassay. The pigs were sacrificed 6 weeks after the second immunization. Testicular weight and size were recorded and tissue samples were collected for histological examination. The results demonstrated that active immunization against MBP-GnRH-I6 increased serum GnRH-I antibody levels (P immunized pigs, and a significant reduction (P immunized boars.

  2. In vitro regulation of LH biosynthesis and release by GnRH and estradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Anterior pituitaries were taken from female rats at random stages of the estrous cycle, enzymatically dispersed, and cultured for 48h in steroid-free ..cap alpha..-modified Eagles medium followed by 24h in fresh medium +/- estradiol (E/sub 2/). The pituitary cells were then incubated in fresh medium containing radiolabeled precursors +/- gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Radioactive precursor incorporation into LH was determined by immuno-precipitation. The dose-dependent effects of E/sub 2/(10/sup -11/ to 10/sup -8/M) on /sup 3/H-glucosamine (/sup 3/H-Gln) and /sup 35/S-methionine (/sup 35/S-Met) incorporation into LH +/- 1 nM GnRH (4h) were investigated. GnRH (10/sup -9/M) and E/sub 2/ (all doses) significantly increased total /sup 3/H-Gln LH. Moreover, E/sub 2/ at 10/sup -9/M and 10/sup -8/M significantly enhanced GnRH stimulated LH glycosylation. In contrast, addition of GnRH and/or E/sub 2/ did not significantly increase /sup 35/S-Met incorporation into LH over a 4h period. The effects of various GnRH concentrations (10/sup -11/ to 10/sup -9/M; 8h) +/- E/sub 2/ (0.05 nM) on /sup 3/H-Gln LH and /sup 35/S-Met LH production were also investigated. In the absence of E/sub 2/, only 10/sup -9/M GnRH was effective in increasing total /sup 3/H-Gln LH and /sup 35/S-Met LH synthesis. However, in the presence of E/sub 2/, all concentrations of GnRH stimulated LH synthesis with /sup 3/H-Gln LH production responding in a dose related manner whereas /sup 35/S-Met LH production was maximally stimulated at all doses of GnRH. In the final series of experiments, pituitary cells previously exposed to estradiol were incubated for 4 h in normal calcium or low calcium medium containing /sup 3/H-Gln or /sup 35/S-Met +/- GnRH. Removal of extracellular calcium completely inhibited GnRH stimulated /sup 3/H-Gln LH and /sup 35/S-Met LH production.

  3. GnRH antagonist versus long agonist protocols in IVF: a systematic review and meta-analysis accounting for patient type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambalk, C B; Banga, F R; Huirne, J A; Toftager, M; Pinborg, A; Homburg, R; van der Veen, F; van Wely, M

    2017-09-01

    Most reviews of IVF ovarian stimulation protocols have insufficiently accounted for various patient populations, such as ovulatory women, women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or women with poor ovarian response, and have included studies in which the agonist or antagonist was not the only variable between the compared study arms. The aim of the current study was to compare GnRH antagonist protocols versus standard long agonist protocols in couples undergoing IVF or ICSI, while accounting for various patient populations and treatment schedules. The Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Review Group specialized register of controlled trials and Pubmed and Embase databases were searched from inception until June 2016. Eligible trials were those that compared GnRH antagonist protocols and standard long GnRH agonist protocols in couples undergoing IVF or ICSI. The primary outcome was ongoing pregnancy rate. Secondary outcomes were: live birth rate, clinical pregnancy rate, number of oocytes retrieved and safety with regard to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Separate comparisons were performed for the general IVF population, women with PCOS and women with poor ovarian response. Pre-planned subgroup analyses were performed for various antagonist treatment schedules. We included 50 studies. Of these, 34 studies reported on general IVF patients, 10 studies reported on PCOS patients and 6 studies reported on poor responders. In general IVF patients, ongoing pregnancy rate was significantly lower in the antagonist group compared with the agonist group (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96). In women with PCOS and in women with poor ovarian response, there was no evidence of a difference in ongoing pregnancy between the antagonist and agonist groups (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.84-1.11 and RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.65-1.17, respectively). Subgroup analyses for various antagonist treatment schedules compared to the long protocol GnRH agonist showed a significantly lower ongoing

  4. Evolution of International Space Station GN&C System Across ISS Assembly Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roscoe; Frank, K. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system for the International Space Station is initially implemented by the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) which was built by the Khrunichev Space Center under direct contract to Boeing. This element (Stage 1A/R) was launched on 20 November 1998 and is currently operating on-orbit. The components and capabilities of the FGB Motion Control System (MCS) are described. The next ISS element, which has GN&C functionality will be the Service Module (SM) built by Rocket Space Corporation-Energia. This module is scheduled for launch (Stage 1R) in early 2000. Following activation of the SM GN&C system, the FGB MCS is deactivated and no longer used. The components and capabilities of the SM GN&C system are described. When a Progress vehicle is attached to the ISS it can be used for reboost operations, based on commands provided by the Mission Control Center-Moscow. When a data connection is implemented between the SM and the Progress, the SM can command the Progress thrusters for attitude control and reboosts. On Stage 5A, the U.S. GN&C system will become activated when the U.S. Laboratory is de loyed and installed (launch schedule is currently TBD). The U.S. GN&C system provides non-propulsive control capabilities to support micro-gravity operations and minimize the use of propellant for attitude control, and an independent capability for determining the ISS state vector, attitude, attitude rate. and time.. The components and capabilities of the U.S. GN&C system are described and the interactions between the U.S. and Russian Segment GN&C systems are also described.

  5. Highly immunogenic and fully synthetic peptide-carrier constructs targetting GnRH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekman, N.J.C.M.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Turkstra, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    using a tandem GnRH peptide as a branched polylysine construct, a lipo-thioester, a lipo-amide or a KLH conjugate in CFA, and the lipoamide peptide in an immuno-stimulating complex (ISCOM). We found the lipo-thioester and the branched polylysine constructs to be the most effective carrier molecules...... for the induction of antibodies against GnRH and immunocastration of pigs....

  6. The effect of immunization against GnRF on nutrient requirements of male pigs: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunshea, F R; Allison, J R D; Bertram, M; Boler, D D; Brossard, L; Campbell, R; Crane, J P; Hennessy, D P; Huber, L; de Lange, C; Ferguson, N; Matzat, P; McKeith, F; Moraes, P J U; Mullan, B P; Noblet, J; Quiniou, N; Tokach, M

    2013-11-01

    In most countries, male pigs are physically castrated soon after birth to reduce the risk of boar taint and to avoid behaviours such as fighting and mounting. However, entire male pigs are more feed efficient and deposit less fat than barrows. In addition, many animal welfare organizations are lobbying for a cessation of castration, with a likelihood that this could lead to inferior pork unless an alternative method is used to control boar taint. An alternative to physical castration is immunization against gonadotrophin releasing factor (GnRF) which allows producers to capitalize on the superior feed efficiency and carcass characteristics of boars without the risk of boar taint. From a physiological perspective, immunized pigs are entire males until shortly after the second dose, typically given 4 to 6 weeks before slaughter. Following full immunization, there is a temporary suppression of testicular function and a hormonal status that resembles that of a barrow. Nutrient requirements will be different in these two phases, before and after full immunization. Given that there have been few published studies comparing the lysine requirements of entire males and barrows in contemporary genotypes, it is useful to use gilt requirements as a benchmark. A series of meta-analyses comparing anti-GnRF immunized boars and physical castrates and use of nutritional models suggest that the lysine requirement of entire males before the second immunization is 5% higher than for gilts, from 25 to 50 kg BW, and by 8% from 50 to 95 kg. Given that the penalty in growth performance for having inadequate dietary lysine is greater in males than in gilts or barrows, it is important to ensure that lysine requirements are met to obtain the maximum benefits of entire male production during this phase. After the second immunization, the lysine requirement of immunized males decreases and may become more like that of barrows. In addition, a consistent effect of full immunization is a marked

  7. Evaluation of GnRH analogue testing in diagnosis and management of children with pubertal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemchand K Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH stimulation test is pivotal in the assessment of children with pubertal disorders. However, lack of availability and high cost often result in the test falling into disfavor. We routinely use the GnRH analogue stimulation test as an alternative at our center. Aim: To present the data on children with endocrine disorders who underwent GnRH agonist stimulation test in pediatric endocrine clinic of a tertiary care referral hospital. Setting and Design: Pediatric endocrine clinic of a tertiary care referral hospital. Retrospective analysis of case records. Materials and Methods: The details pertaining to clinical and radiological parameters and hormonal tests were retrieved from case records of 15 children who underwent GnRH agonist stimulation test from May 2010 to April 2011. Results: Indications for testing with GnRH analogue were evaluation of delayed puberty, diagnosis of precocious puberty, assessment of hormonal suppression in treatment of precocious puberty and micropenis in two, nine, three and one cases, respectively. The results of the test and clinical and radiological parameters were in concordance. The test was also crucial in diagnosing the onset of central precocious puberty in two children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Conclusion: GnRH agonist test is a convenient, safe test that can be performed on an out-patient basis and can help the clinicians in the correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment of various puberty-related disorders.

  8. Reaction of cows ovaries to GnRH administration in different estrus cycle stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casiana Ciolac Șipețan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Administration of GnRH in the luteal phase of estrous in dairy cows induces an increase of LH levels, with the modification of the growth waves of the ovarian follicles. GnRH induces ovulation or atresia of the dominant follicle and the recruitment of a new wave of follicular growth. The GnRH administration in the luteal phase of the estrous cycle induces growth waves synchronization of ovarian follicles, so that, a new wave of follicles started to grow at 5-6 days after administration. In our experiments, we administered 2ml Ovarelin (100 mcg GnRH, to three groups of cows (116 cows: in early luteal phase of the estrous cycle (days 4-5, in the middle of luteal phase (days 9-12, and late luteal phase (days 15-16. The rates of cows standing heat were 91.66% when GnRH was administered in early luteal phase, 95.22% when was administrated in the middle of luteal phase, and 73.68% in late luteal phase GnRH administration. After artificial insemination, the conception rates were 48.48% in early luteal phase, 52.5% at middle luteal phase and 46.42% in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle.

  9. Individual luteolysis pattern after GnRH-agonist trigger for final oocyte maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Lawrenz

    Full Text Available Final oocyte maturation using GnRH-agonist trigger in a GnRH-antagonist protocol is increasingly common, as ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is almost completely avoided. However, this approach might lead to reduced pregnancy rates due to severe luteolysis. This proof of concept study evaluated the extend of luteolysis by measuring progesterone levels 48 hours after oocyte retrieval in 51 patients, who received GnRH-agonist trigger for final oocyte maturation in a GnRH-antagonist protocol due to the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. It was shown, that luteolysis after GnRHa-trigger differs greatly among patients, with progesterone levels ranging from 13.0 ng/ml to ≥ 60.0 ng/ml, 48 hours after oocyte retrieval. Significant positive correlations could be demonstrated between progesterone levels and the number of ovarian stimulation and suppression days (p = 0.006 and p = 0.002 respectively, the total amount of medication used for ovarian suppression (p = 0.015, the level of progesterone on the day of final oocyte maturation (p = 0.008 and the number of retrieved oocytes (p = 0.019. Therefore it was concluded, that luteolysis after GnRH-agonist trigger is patient-specific and also luteal phase support requires individualization. Longer stimulation duration as well as a higher level of progesterone on the day of final oocyte maturation and more retrieved oocytes will result in higher levels of progesterone 48 hours after oocyte retrieval.

  10. Antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in patients with diabetes mellitus is associated with lower body weight and autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntorp, Kerstin; Frid, Anders; Alm, Ragnar; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Sjöberg, Klas; Ohlsson, Bodil

    2013-08-17

    Esophageal dysmotility and gastroparesis are common secondary complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. Patients with dysmotility express antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in serum. The aim of the present study was to scrutinize patients with diabetes mellitus with regard to the presence of GnRH antibodies, and to examine associations between antibodies and clinical findings. Thirty-nine consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus were included in the study after clinical examination and examination by esophageal manometry and gastric emptying scintigraphy. Serum was analyzed for the presence of antibodies against GnRH using an ELISA, and values are expressed as relative units (RU). Two age- and gender-matched healthy subjects per each patient served as controls. The prevalence of IgM GnRH antibodies in patients was 33% compared to 14% in controls (p = 0.027), with a higher antibody titer; 1.2 (0.6-5.0) and 0.2 (0.1-0.3) RU, respectively (p = 0.000). The expression of IgG antibodies was 15% in patients and none in controls (p = 0.000). Lower body mass index was associated with the presence of IgM antibodies (OR = 0.835, 95% CI = 0.699-0.998), and autonomic neuropathy with the presence IgG antibodies (OR = 9.000, 95% CI = 1.327-61.025). Esophageal dysmotility (69%) or gastroparesis (18%) were not associated with the presence of IgM antibodies (OR = 0.589, 95% CI = 0.143-2.424 and OR = 3.407, 95% CI = 0.633-18.350, respectively). Neither was esophageal dysmotility associated with IgG antibodies (OR = 2.500, 95% CI = 0.259-24.096). Antibodies against GnRH are more common in patients with diabetes mellitus compared with healthy controls. IgM antibodies are associated with lower body mass index and IgG antibodies are associated with autonomic neuropathy.

  11. GnRH agonist trigger versus hCG trigger in GnRH antagonist in IVF/ICSI cycles: A review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Alyasin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Routinely, a bolus of 5.000-10.000 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG is used for the final follicular maturation and ovulation as a standard method. HCG has the same effect of luteinizing hormone (LH with long half-life. It has the long lutheotrophic effect which increases the risk of ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS. Recently, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a trigger has been used for the induction of final follicular maturation and ovulation with the aim of reducing the OHSS risk. Several studies have shown that the releases of endogenous follicular stimulating hormone (FSH and LH after administration of GnRH agonist in in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles are able to precede the final follicular maturation leading to removal of fertile oocyte with normal development of the embryo and ultimately pregnancy. But based on the results of some studies, using GnRH-a trigger leads to defect luteal-phase resulting to reduce the implantation and clinical pregnancy rates and also increase abortion in fresh embryo transfer cycles compared to routine IVF cycle with hCG triggering . Also, in recent years, studies have continued to modify the luteal phase support, so that the fresh embryo transfer is possible too. In this review, we examined the benefits, problems, and also ways to reform GnRH agonist triggering complications.

  12. The effect of an expressive writing intervention (EWI) on stress in infertile couples undergoing assisted reproductive technlogy (ART) treatment: A randomized controlled pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Signe Maria Schneevoigt; Klonoff-Cohen, Hillary; Zachariae, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Infertile couples undergoing fertility treatments may experience stress and could benefit from psychological intervention. Expressive Writing Intervention (EWI) has shown promising results on various psychological outcomes, yet only one study has applied the method to infertility......-related stress. Our aim was to assess feasibility and effectiveness of EWI for patients in treatment with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART). Design and participants. Patients enrolling in their first ART treatment at the fertility clinic, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark were offered to participate...

  13. Mental distress and personality in women undergoing GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist protocols for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbæk, D S; Toftager, M; Hjordt, L V; Jensen, P S; Holst, K K; Bryndorf, T; Holland, T; Bogstad, J; Pinborg, A; Hornnes, P; Frokjaer, V G

    2015-01-01

    Do mental distress and mood fluctuations in women undergoing GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist protocols for assisted reproductive technology (ART) differ depending on protocol and the personality trait, neuroticism? ART treatment did not induce elevated levels of mental distress in either GnRH antagonist or agonist protocols but neuroticism was positively associated with increased mental distress, independent of protocols. ART treatment may increase mental distress by mechanisms linked to sex hormone fluctuations. General psychological characteristics, such as personality traits indexing negative emotionality, e.g. neuroticism, are likely to affect mental distress during ART treatment. A total of 83 women undergoing their first ART cycle were consecutively randomized 1:1 to GnRH antagonist (n = 42) or GnRH agonist (n = 41) protocol. The study population was a subgroup of a larger ongoing Danish clinical randomized trial and was established as an add-on in the period 2010-2012. Women in the GnRH antagonist protocol received daily injections with recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone, Puregon(®) and subcutaneous injections with GnRH antagonist, Orgalutran(®). Women in the GnRH agonist protocol received nasal administration of the GnRH agonist, Synarela(®) and subcutaneous injections with FSH, Puregon(®). The study design did not allow for a blinding procedure. All women self-reported the Profile of Mood States, the Perceived Stress Scale, the Symptom Checklist-92-Revised, and the Major Depression Inventory questionnaires, at baseline, at ART cycle day 35, on the day of oocyte pick-up, and on the day of hCG testing. Also, a series of Profile of Mood States were reported daily during pharmacological treatment to monitor mood fluctuations. The personality trait Neuroticism was assessed at baseline by the self-reported NEO-PI-R questionnaire. ART did not induce within- or between-protocol changes in any of the applied measures of mental distress. However, the Gn

  14. Glial-gonadotrophin hormone (GnRH) neurone interactions in the median eminence and the control of GnRH secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, S R; Lomniczi, A; Sandau, U S

    2008-06-01

    A wealth of information now exists showing that glial cells are actively involved in the cell-cell communication process generating and disseminating information within the central nervous system. In the hypothalamus, two types of glial cells, astrocytes and ependymal cells lining the latero-ventral portion of the third ventricle (known as tanycytes), regulate the secretory activity of neuroendocrine neurones. This function, initially described for astrocytes apposing magnocellular neurones, has been more recently characterised for neurones secreting gonadotrophin hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH). The available evidence suggests that glial cells of the median eminence regulate GnRH secretion via two related mechanisms. One involves the production of growth factors acting via receptors with tyrosine kinase activity. The other involves plastic rearrangements of glia-GnRH neurone adhesiveness. GnRH axons reach the median eminence, at least in part, directed by basic fibroblast growth factor. Their secretory activity is facilitated by insulin-like growth factor 1 and members of the epidermal growth factor family. A structural complement to these soluble molecules is provided by at least three cell-cell adhesion systems endowed with signalling capabilities. One of them uses the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), another employs the synaptic cell adhesion molecule (SynCAM), and the third one consists of neuronal contactin interacting with glial receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase-beta. It is envisioned that, within the median eminence, soluble factors and adhesion molecules work coordinately to control delivery of GnRH to the portal vasculature.

  15. The Luteal Phase after GnRHa Trigger-Understanding An Enigma

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    Kathrine Leth-Moller

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The luteal phase of all stimulated in vitro fertilization/intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI cycles is disrupted, which makes luteal phase support (LPS mandatory. The cause of the disruption is thought to be the multifollicular development achieved during ovarian stimulation which results in supraphysiological concentrations of steroids secreted by a high number of corpora lutea during the early luteal phase. This will directly inhibit luteinizing hormone (LH secretion by the pituitary via negative feedback at the level of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, leading to a luteal phase defect. With the introduction of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist protocol, it became feasible to trigger final oocyte maturation and ovulation with a single bolus of GnRH agonist (GnRHa as an alternative to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG. GnRHa triggering presents several advantages, including the reduction in or even elimination of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Despite the potential advantages of GnRHa triggering, previous randomized controlled trials reported a poor clinical outcome with high rates of early pregnancy losses, despite supplementation with a standard LPS in the form of progesterone and estradiol. Following these disappointing results, several studies now report a luteal phase rescue after modifications of the LPS, resulting in a reproductive outcome comparable to that seen after hCG triggering. We herein review luteal phase differences between the natural cycle, hCG trigger and GnRHa trigger and present the most recent data on handling the luteal phase after GnRHa triggering.

  16. Impact of cell type and epitope tagging on heterologous expression of G protein-coupled receptor: a systematic study on angiotensin type II receptor.

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    Lili Jiang

    Full Text Available Despite heterologous expression of epitope-tagged GPCR is widely adopted for functional characterization, there is lacking of systematic analysis of the impact of expression host and epitope tag on GPCR expression. Angiotensin type II (AT2 receptor displays agonist-dependent and -independent activities, coupling to a spectrum of signaling molecules. However, consensus has not been reached on the subcellular distributions, signaling cascades and receptor-mediated actions. To examine the contributions of host cell and epitope tag on receptor expression and activity, epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were transiently or stably expressed in HEK293, CHO-K1 and PC12 cells. The epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were detected both on the cell membrane and in the perinuclear region. In transiently transfected HEK293 cells, Myc-AT2 existed predominantly as monomer. Additionally, a ladder of ubiquitinated AT2 receptor proteins was detected. By contrast, stably expressed epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants existed as both monomer and high molecular weight complexes, and the latter was enriched in cell surface. Glycosylation promoted cell surface expression of Myc-AT2 but had no effect on AT2-GFP in HEK293 cells. In cells that stably expressed Myc-AT2, serum starvation induced apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells but not in HEK293 or PC12 cells. Instead, HEK293 and PC12 cells stably expressing Myc-AT2 exhibited partial cell cycle arrest with cells accumulating at G1 and S phases, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that expression levels, subcellular distributions and ligand-independent constitutive activities of AT2 receptor were cell type-dependent while posttranslational processing of nascent AT2 receptor protein was modulated by epitope tag and mode of expression.

  17. Impact of cell type and epitope tagging on heterologous expression of G protein-coupled receptor: a systematic study on angiotensin type II receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Teng, Gladys M K; Chan, Elaine Y M; Au, Shannon W N; Wise, Helen; Lee, Susanna S T; Cheung, Wing-Tai

    2012-01-01

    Despite heterologous expression of epitope-tagged GPCR is widely adopted for functional characterization, there is lacking of systematic analysis of the impact of expression host and epitope tag on GPCR expression. Angiotensin type II (AT2) receptor displays agonist-dependent and -independent activities, coupling to a spectrum of signaling molecules. However, consensus has not been reached on the subcellular distributions, signaling cascades and receptor-mediated actions. To examine the contributions of host cell and epitope tag on receptor expression and activity, epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were transiently or stably expressed in HEK293, CHO-K1 and PC12 cells. The epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were detected both on the cell membrane and in the perinuclear region. In transiently transfected HEK293 cells, Myc-AT2 existed predominantly as monomer. Additionally, a ladder of ubiquitinated AT2 receptor proteins was detected. By contrast, stably expressed epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants existed as both monomer and high molecular weight complexes, and the latter was enriched in cell surface. Glycosylation promoted cell surface expression of Myc-AT2 but had no effect on AT2-GFP in HEK293 cells. In cells that stably expressed Myc-AT2, serum starvation induced apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells but not in HEK293 or PC12 cells. Instead, HEK293 and PC12 cells stably expressing Myc-AT2 exhibited partial cell cycle arrest with cells accumulating at G1 and S phases, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that expression levels, subcellular distributions and ligand-independent constitutive activities of AT2 receptor were cell type-dependent while posttranslational processing of nascent AT2 receptor protein was modulated by epitope tag and mode of expression.

  18. Differential expression of IL-17A and IL-17F is coupled to TCR signaling via Itk-mediated regulation of NFATc1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Sahu, Nisebita; Handon, Robin; Davidson, Todd S.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Kirby, Martha R.; August, Avery; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.

    2009-01-01

    Th17 cells play major roles in autoimmunity and bacterial infections, yet how T cell receptor (TCR) signaling affects Th17 differentiation is relatively unknown. We demonstrate that CD4+ T cells deficient in Itk, a tyrosine kinase required for full TCR-induced activation of PLC-γ, exhibit decreased IL-17A expression, yet relatively normal expression of RORγT, RORα and IL-17F. IL-17A expression was rescued by pharmacologically-induced Ca2+ influx or expression of activated NFATc1. Conversely, decreased TCR stimulation or FK506 treatment preferentially reduced expression of IL-17A. The promoter of IL-17A but not IL-17F has conserved NFAT binding sites that bind NFATc1 in WT, but not Itk-deficient cells, even though both promoters exhibit epigenetic modifications consistent with open chromatin. Finally, defective IL-17A expression and differential regulation of IL-17A and IL-17F were observed in vivo in Itk−/− mice in an allergic asthma model. Our results suggest that Itk specifically couples TCR signaling strength to IL-17A expression through NFATc1. PMID:19818650

  19. Acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in human lymphoma cells: a role for the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor TDAG8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Dong, Lixue; Dean, Eric; Yang, Li V

    2013-10-11

    Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65) is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression.

  20. Acidosis Decreases c-Myc Oncogene Expression in Human Lymphoma Cells: A Role for the Proton-Sensing G Protein-Coupled Receptor TDAG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65 is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression.

  1. Morinda Officinalis Polysaccharides Stimulate Hypothalamic GnRH Secretion in Varicocele Progression

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    Zhu Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicoceles (VCs are the predominant cause of male infertility and are a risk factor for chronic venous disease. Morinda officinalis (M. officinalis is a traditional Chinese medicine used to tonify the kidney and strengthen yang. In this study, we evaluated the effects of water-soluble polysaccharides extracted from M. officinalis (MOPs on gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH secretion in a classic experimental left VC (ELV rat model. Intragastric administration of MOPs at a dose ranging from 50 mg kg−1 to 100 mg kg−1 facilitated improvements in sperm parameters and seminiferous epithelial structures, modulated serum hormone profiles, and stimulated GnRH synthesis and release in the hypothalamus. MOPs also promoted spinogenesis and functional spine maturation in the arcuate nuclei (Arc, wherein they acted mainly on Kiss1 and GnRH neurons. Moreover, MOP-mediated Kisspeptin-GPR54 pathway upregulation and MAPK phosphorylation activation may have been responsible for increases in GnRH synthesis and release. Collectively, the findings of this study indicate that MOPs were effective in stimulating GnRH secretion, possibly by upregulating the Kiss1/GPR54 pathway and enhancing synaptic plasticity, and that MOPs can serve as a therapy for early VCs.

  2. Combined ovulation triggering with GnRH agonist and hCG in IVF patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasum, Miro; Kurdija, Kristijan; Orešković, Slavko; Čehić, Ermin; Pavičić-Baldani, Dinka; Škrgatić, Lana

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the review is to analyse the combination of a gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist with a human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) trigger, for final oocyte maturation in in vitro fertilisation (IVF) cycles. The concept being a ''dual trigger'' combines a single dose of the GnRH agonist with a reduced or standard dosage of hCG at the time of triggering. The use of a GnRH agonist with a reduced dose of hCG in high responders demonstrated luteal phase support with improved pregnancy rates, similar to those after conventional hCG and a low risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). The administration of a GnRH agonist and a standard hCG in normal responders, demonstrated significantly improved live-birth rates and a higher number of embryos of excellent quality, or cryopreserved embryos. The concept of the ''double trigger" represents a combination of a GnRH agonist and a standard hCG, when used 40 and 34 h prior to ovum pick-up, respectively. The use of the ''double trigger" has been successfully offered in the treatment of empty follicle syndrome and in patients with a history of immature oocytes retrieved or with low/poor oocytes yield. Further prospective studies are required to confirm the aforementioned observations prior to clinical implementation.

  3. ART Outcomes in GnRH Antagonist Protocol (Flexible) and Long GnRH Agonist Protocol during Early Follicular Phase in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Sara; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Zafardoust, Simin; Badenush, Bita; Fatemi, Farnaz; Nazari, Fattane; Kamali, Koorosh; Mohammadzade, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since increased LH in the early follicular phase in PCOS patients especially in GnRH antagonist protocol could be associated with reduced oocyte quality and pregnancy and impared implantation. The current study was conducted to determine ART outcomes in GnRH antagonist protocol (flexible) and long GnRH agonist protocol and compare them with adding GnRH antagonist in GnRH antagonist (flexible) protocol during early follicular phase in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing ICSI. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 150 patients with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing ICSI were enrolled from 2012 to 2014 and randomly assigned to receive either GnRH antagonist protocol during early and late follicular phase or GnRH antagonist protocol (flexible) or long GnRH agonist protocol. The clinical and laboratory pregnancy in three groups was determined and compared. In this context, the chi-square and Fisher's exact test and ANOVA were used for data analysis. Statistical significance was defined as p<0.05. Results: There was no statistically significant difference with respect to chemical pregnancy and clinical pregnancy between the three groups. Also, other indices such as number and quality of oocytes and embryos were alike. Conclusion: Totally, according to our results, GnRH antagonist protocol during early and late follicular phase and GnRH antagonist protocol (flexible) and long GnRH agonist protocol in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing ICSI are similarly effective and use of each one based on patients' condition and physicians' opinion could be considered. PMID:26913233

  4. Expression pattern of G protein‑coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) in human cumulus granulosa cells (CGCs) of patients with PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lili; Zhang, Quan; Zhou, Yi; Zhao, Yan; Lu, Linlin; Jiang, Zhou; Peng, Zhen; Zou, Shuhua

    2016-06-01

    Estradiol mediates its actions by binding to classical nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor α (ER-α) and estrogen receptor β (ER-β), and the non-classical G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1(GPER). Several gene knockdown models have shown the importance of the receptors for growth of the oocyte and for ovulation. The aim of our study was to identify the pattern of GPER expression in human cumulus granulosa cells (CGCs) from ovarian follicles at different stages of oocyte maturation, and the differences of GPER expression between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients and non-PCOS women. Thirty-eight cases of PCOS patients and a control group of thirty-two infertile women without PCOS were used in this study. GPER's location in CGCs was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative RT-PCR and western blot were used to identify the quantify GPER expression. Here we demonstrated that GPER was expressed in CGCs of both PCOS patients and non-PCOS women, and the expression of GPER was decreased significantly during oocyte maturation. But the expression levels of GPER in CGCs of PCOS patients and non-PCOS women were not significantly different. The data indicate that GPER may play a role during human oocyte maturation through its action in cumulus granulosa cells. AMHRIIs: anti-Mullerian hormone type II receptors; BMI: body mass index; CGCs: cumulus granulosa cells; COH: controlled ovarian hyperstimulation; E2: estradiol; EGFR: epidermal growth factor receptor; ER-α: estrogen receptor; ER-β: estrogen receptor β; FF: follicular fluid; FSH: follicle-stimulating hormone; GCs: granulosa cells; GPER: G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1; GV: germinal vesicle; GVBD: germinal vesicle breakdown; HCG: human chorionic gonadotropin; IRS: immunoreactive score; IVF-ET: in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer; MI: metaphase I; MII: metaphase II; MAPK: mitogen-activated protein kinase; OCCCs: oocyte corona cumulus complexes; PCOS: polycystic ovarian syndrome; q

  5. Tumor necrosis factor α decreases glucagon-like peptide-2 expression by up-regulating G-protein-coupled receptor 120 in Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, Takuya; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Toshio; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Sogawa, Mitsue; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2, secreted by L cells in the small intestine, has anti-inflammatory effects in the gastrointestinal tract. A GLP-2 analogue has been an effective treatment for Crohn disease (CD). G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 are probably involved in GLP-2 production, the mechanisms of which remain unclear. In our experiments, normal ileal mucosa expressed GPR40, but rarely expressed GPR120. However, both GPRs were overexpressed in the L cells of the inflamed ileal mucosa of CD patients. Mucosal inflammation induced the overexpression of GPR40, GPR120, and several inflammatory cytokines, with correlations between ileal concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and GPR expression levels; however, inflammation did not induce the expression of proglucagon, a precursor of GLP-2 in CD patients. In rat L cells and GLUTag cells, TNF-α treatment increased GPR120 mRNA expression without affecting GPR40 mRNA expression. Dual agonists of GPR40 and GPR120, GW9508 and linoleic acid, respectively, increased GLP-2 production from L cells, but these agonists decreased it in the presence of TNF-α. The GPR40 antagonist, GW1100, inhibited the GW9508-induced increase in GLP-2 production, and silencing GPR120 resulted in further elevation of GLP-2 production. Thus, GPR120-dependent signaling inhibited the stimulatory effects of GPR40 on GLP-2 expression, and TNF-α treatment decreased GLP-2 expression by up-regulating GPR120 expression in L cells. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. GnRH receptors in human granulosa cells: Anatomical localization and characterization by autoradiographic study

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    Latouche, J.; Crumeyrolle-Arias, M.; Jordan, D.; Kopp, N.; Augendre-Ferrante, B.; Cedard, L.; Haour, F. (Institut Pasteur, Paris (France))

    1989-09-01

    The presence of receptors for GnRH in human ovary has been investigated by quantitative autoradiography. Simultaneous visualization and characterization of specific receptors on frozen sections were obtained on six pairs of human ovaries. Among them only one exhibited a large preovulatory follicle. This dominant follicle exhibited a specific and high affinity binding capacity for {sup 125}I-GnRHa exclusively localized on the granulosa cell layer. Analysis of saturation curve indicates a Kd value of 0.22 nM and Bmax of 9.6 fmol/mg protein. In contrast LH-hCG binding sites were present in all antral follicles. These data demonstrate for the first time the presence of high affinity GnRH receptors in human granulosa cells at a late stage of follicular maturation.

  7. Pros and cons of GnRHa treatment for early puberty in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Ruben H; Elleri, Daniela; Williams, Rachel M; Ong, Ken K; Dunger, David B

    2014-06-01

    The timing of puberty has considerable biological, psychosocial and long-term health implications. Secular trends in age at pubertal development, the effects of obesity and the potential effects of environmental endocrine disruptors challenge the standard definitions of precocious puberty and the indications for intervention with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) in girls with precocious puberty. GnRHa therapy is effective in improving adult height in patients who present with classic central precocious puberty (at early puberty not driven by luteinising hormone are not well defined. The role of GnRHa in these patients and the potential benefits in terms of later growth, psychosocial functioning and long-term risk of adult diseases that are associated with early menarche, such as breast cancer and the metabolic syndrome, have not been established.

  8. The effects of a slow release GnRH agonist implant on male rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra Kathrin; Groeger, Gesa; Wehrend, Axel

    2015-01-01

    . Long-term application of a GnRH agonist implant results in a fully reversible "hormonal" castration in male dogs, cats, boars and many other species. Therefore, the present study using New Zealand White hybrid and German Giant rabbits aimed to investigate the effects of a 4.7mg deslorelin implant...... in SG and not different from CG. Application of a slow release GnRH agonist implant does not induce hormonal castration in male rabbits over a period of 90 days indicating that it is not a suitable alternative to surgical castration in this species....

  9. Empty follicle syndrome after GnRHa triggering versus hCG triggering in COS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Juan C; Garcia-Velasco, Juan; Humaidan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the incidence of empty follicle syndrome (EFS) in oocyte donors who had final oocyte maturation triggered with GnRHa and to compare the incidence of EFS in this group of patients with IVF patients who had final oocyte maturation with hCG.......This study aimed to explore the incidence of empty follicle syndrome (EFS) in oocyte donors who had final oocyte maturation triggered with GnRHa and to compare the incidence of EFS in this group of patients with IVF patients who had final oocyte maturation with hCG....

  10. Alteration in contractile G-protein coupled receptor expression by moist snuff and nicotine in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, Hardip; Xu, Cang-Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The cardiovascular risk for users of use of Swedish snus/American snuff (moist tobacco) has been debated for a long time. The present study was designed to examine the effects of water- or lipid-soluble (DMSO-soluble) snus and nicotine, the most important substance in tobacco, on the expression...... kinases (MAPK). However, the effects of moist tobacco on the expression of GPCR are less studied. Rat middle cerebral arteries were isolated and organ cultured in serum-free medium for 24h in the presence of water-soluble snus (WSS), DMSO-soluble snus (DSS), or nicotine. The dose of snus and nicotine...... by an increased mRNA expression for the receptor. Thus, snus and nicotine alter the GPCR expression in the cerebral arteries, which may be involved in cerebral vascular disease....

  11. Backbone metal cyclization: Novel {sup 99m}Tc labeled GnRH analog as potential SPECT molecular imaging agent in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barda, Yaniv; Cohen, Nasi; Lev, Vered; Ben-Aroya, Nurit; Koch, Yitzhak; Mishani, Eyal; Fridkin, Mati; Gilon, Chaim E-mail: gilon@vms.huji.ac.il

    2004-10-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a decapeptide secreted to the pituitary where it binds to specific receptors on the gonadotropes to regulate gonadotropic hormones (luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)) synthesis and secretion. Specific GnRH receptors are overexpressed in breast, prostatic, ovarian, and other tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize a cyclic GnRH analog with high affinity to GnRH receptors that can be radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc. A precyclic GnRH analog, [Cys-Gly]{sup 1}[D-Ala]{sup 6}[N{sup {alpha}}({eta}-Cys-amino hexyl)]{sup 10}GnRH (Gn-2), containing two hemi-chelator groups was synthesized. It was cyclized applying the recently reported backbone metal cyclization (BMC) approach, to obtain cyclo(Re(O)1-10)[Cys-Gly]{sup 1}[D-Ala]{sup 6}[N{sup {alpha}}({eta}-Cys-amino hexyl)]{sup 10}GnRH (cyclo[Re(O)-Gn-2]). For comparative evaluations, Gn-2 was oxidized on-resin to yield cyclo(S-S,1-10)[Cys-Gly]{sup 1}[D-Ala]{sup 6}[N{sup {alpha}}({eta}-Cys-amino hexyl)]{sup 10}GnRH, (cyclo[S-S-Gn-2]). The binding affinity of cyclo[Re(O)-Gn-2] to rat pituitary membranes showed IC{sub 50} of 50nM, compared to IC{sub 50} = 10 nM in the native GnRH. Cyclo({sup 99m}Tc(O)1-10)[Cys-Gly]{sup 1}[D-Ala]{sup 6}[N{sup {alpha}}({eta}-Cys-amino hexyl)]{sup 10}GnRH (cyclo[{sup 99m}Tc(O)-Gn-2]) was synthesized from Gn-2 and showed similar chromatographic behavior to its rhenium surrogate.

  12. Expression of mastoparan B, a venom peptide, via Escherichia coli C43 (DE3) coupled with an artificial oil body-cyanogen bromide technology platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinn, Tzyy-Rong; Hsieh, Sheng-Kuo; Yu, Yu-Jen; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lin, Jhao-Ren

    2017-07-24

    Here, we successfully use the oleosin-based fusion expression strategy coupled with the artificial oil body (AOB)-cyanogen bromide (CNBr) platform to produce bioactive MPB peptide which, in a manner identical to that of its native counterpart. In this study, the MPB peptide was interlinked with recombinant oleosin (rOle(127M→L)) by a methionine residue, a CNBr cleavage site. The recombinant rOle(127M→L)-MPB fusion gene was cloned into the pET30a(+) vector and was expressed in E. coli (DE3) after IPTG induction under optimized conditions. Furthermore, the expressed MPB was released from this AOB-CNBr platform, since AOB purification system provides a useful machinery to purify target protein. The purified MPB was identified by MALDI-MS analysis, and its bioactivity was examined by antimicrobial test. It is important to note that this study not only provides a new insight into the expression of active MPB, but also provides an alternative and reliable model to express other valuable venom peptides, such as mastoparan-II, and matoparan A, B, C, J, L, M, T, X, and melittin, which possesses important functional peptides in medical applications. Take together, in this study provides a new avenue for the production of active MPB and facilitate the studies and applications of the peptide in the future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Bead-based suspension array for simultaneous detection of antibodies against the Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid and Gn glycoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der F.J.; Achterberg, R.P.; Boer, de S.M.; Boshra, H.; Brun, A.; Maassen, C.B.M.; Kortekaas, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    A multiplex bead-based suspension array was developed that can be used for the simultaneous detection of antibodies against the surface glycoprotein Gn and the nucleocapsid protein N of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in various animal species. The N protein and the purified ectodomain of the Gn

  14. Influence of GnRH analogue on body mass index in girls with precocious puberty: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat Moaieri

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa therapy in central precocious puberty (CPP is safe for BMI and increasing of BMI is not significant, long- term follow-up study is required to elucidate whether GnRHa treatment affects adult obesity. Using growth hormone concomitantly, the effect on increasing height is significant.

  15. Evaluation of the Adsorption Performance and Sustainability of Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelets (xGnP for VOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Jin Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP, which combine the layered structure and low price of nanoclays with the superior mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of carbon nanotubes, are very cost-effective, and can simultaneously provide a multitude of physical and chemical property enhancements. In this study, we evaluated xGnP’s adsorption performance of volatile organic compounds (VOCs according to thermal extractor (TE analysis for seven days in order to use the xGnP as an adsorption material of pollutants. In addition, we carried out a sustainability evaluation in order to evaluate its adsorption capacity over 28 days. The results indicate that the adsorption performance of xGnP is higher than for other adsorption materials such as zeolite. Also, we determined that the adsorption performance of xGnP is maintained continuously for 28 days and that its adsorption capacity is large.

  16. Evaluation of the Adsorption Performance and Sustainability of Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelets (xGnP) for VOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seong Jin; Wi, Seunghwan; Jeong, Su-Gwang; Kim, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    Exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP), which combine the layered structure and low price of nanoclays with the superior mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of carbon nanotubes, are very cost-effective, and can simultaneously provide a multitude of physical and chemical property enhancements. In this study, we evaluated xGnP’s adsorption performance of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) according to thermal extractor (TE) analysis for seven days in order to use the xGnP as an adsorption material of pollutants. In addition, we carried out a sustainability evaluation in order to evaluate its adsorption capacity over 28 days. The results indicate that the adsorption performance of xGnP is higher than for other adsorption materials such as zeolite. Also, we determined that the adsorption performance of xGnP is maintained continuously for 28 days and that its adsorption capacity is large. PMID:28793664

  17. Evaluation of the Adsorption Performance and Sustainability of Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelets (xGnP) for VOCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seong Jin; Wi, Seunghwan; Jeong, Su-Gwang; Kim, Sumin

    2015-11-11

    Exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP), which combine the layered structure and low price of nanoclays with the superior mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of carbon nanotubes, are very cost-effective, and can simultaneously provide a multitude of physical and chemical property enhancements. In this study, we evaluated xGnP's adsorption performance of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) according to thermal extractor (TE) analysis for seven days in order to use the xGnP as an adsorption material of pollutants. In addition, we carried out a sustainability evaluation in order to evaluate its adsorption capacity over 28 days. The results indicate that the adsorption performance of xGnP is higher than for other adsorption materials such as zeolite. Also, we determined that the adsorption performance of xGnP is maintained continuously for 28 days and that its adsorption capacity is large.

  18. The orphan G-protein-coupled receptor-encoding gene V28 is closely related to genes for chemokine receptors and is expressed in lymphoid and neural tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raport, C J; Schweickart, V L; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B; Gray, P W

    1995-10-03

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy with degenerate primers was used to identify novel G-protein-coupled receptor-encoding genes from human genomic DNA. One of the isolated clones, termed V28, showed high sequence similarity to the genes encoding human chemokine receptors for monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha)/RANTES, and to the rat orphan receptor-encoding gene RBS11. When RNA was analyzed by Northern blot, V28 was found to be most highly expressed in neural and lymphoid tissues. Myeloid cell lines, particularly THP.1 cells, showed especially high expression of V28. We have mapped V28 to human chromosome 3p21-3pter, near the MIP-1 alpha/RANTES receptor-encoding gene.

  19. Function and expression of the proton-coupled amino acid transporter Slc36a1 along the rat gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, M. L.; Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Tønsberg, H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intestinal absorption via membrane transporters may determine the pharmacokinetics of drug compounds. The hypothesis is that oral absorption of gaboxadol (4, 5, 6, 7-tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c] pyridine-3-ol) in rats occurs via the proton-coupled amino acid transporter, r......: The absorption fraction of gaboxadol was high (81.3-91.3%) following administration in the stomach, duodenum and jejunum, but low (4.2%) after administration in the colon. The pharmacokinetics of gaboxadol was modified by the co-administration of L-tryptophan (a hPAT1 inhibitor) and L-proline (a hPAT1 substrate...

  20. Exogenous Kisspeptin Administration as a Probe of GnRH Neuronal Function in Patients With Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yee-Ming; Lippincott, Margaret F.; Butler, James P.; Sidhoum, Valerie F.; Li, Cindy X.; Plummer, Lacey

    2014-01-01

    Context: Idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) results from defective synthesis, secretion, or action of GnRH. Kisspeptin is a potent stimulus for GnRH secretion. Objective: We probed the functional capacity of the GnRH neuronal network in patients with IHH. Participants: Eleven subjects with congenital IHH (9 men and 2 women) and one male subject who underwent reversal of IHH were studied. Six of the twelve subjects had an identified genetic cause of their IHH: KAL1 (n = 1), FGFR1 (n = 3), PROKR2 (n = 1), GNRHR (n = 1). Intervention: Subjects underwent q10 min blood sampling to measure GnRH-induced LH secretion at baseline and in response to intravenous boluses of kisspeptin (0.24 nmol/kg) and GnRH (75 ng/kg) both pre- and post-six days of treatment with exogenous GnRH (25 ng/kg sc every 2 h). Results: All subjects with abiding IHH failed to demonstrate a GnRH-induced LH response to exogenous kisspeptin. In contrast, the subject who achieved reversal of his hypogonadotropism demonstrated a robust response to kisspeptin. Conclusions: The functional capacity of the GnRH neuronal network in IHH patients is impaired, as evidenced by their inability to respond to the same dose of kisspeptin that effects a robust GnRH-induced LH response in healthy men and luteal-phase women. This impairment is observed across a range of genotypes, suggesting that it reflects a fundamental property of GnRH neuronal networks that have not been properly engaged during pubertal development. In contrast, a patient who had experienced reversal of his hypogonadotropism responded to exogenous kisspeptin. PMID:25226293

  1. Generation and characterization of phage-GnRH chemical conjugates for potential use in cat and dog immunocontraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylov, A; Cox, N; Cochran, A; Wolfe, K; Donovan, C; Kutzler, M; Petrenko, V; Baker, H; Samoylova, T

    2012-12-01

    Overpopulation of cats and dogs is a serious worldwide problem that demands novel, safe and cost-effective solutions. The objective of this study was to generate and characterize phage-peptide conjugates with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) for potential use as an immunocontraceptive. A filamentous phage vector f5-8 with wild-type phage coat proteins was used as a carrier for construction of chemical conjugates with GnRH, a peptide that acts as a master reproductive hormone. In such conjugates, the phage body plays the role of a carrier protein, while multiple copies of GnRH peptide stimulate production of neutralizing anti-GnRH antibodies potentially leading to contraceptive effects. To generate the constructs, four different GnRH-based peptides were synthesized and conjugated to phage particles in a two-step procedure: (i) peptides were reacted with phage to form a conjugate using 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride chemistry (EDC) and (ii) the conjugates were separated from remaining free peptides by dialysis. Formation and specificity of phage-GnRH conjugates were confirmed by three independent methods: spectrophotometry, electron microscopy and ELISA. When the conjugates were tested for interaction with sera collected from cats and dogs immunized with GnRH-based vaccines in independent studies, strong specific ELISA signals were obtained, suggesting the potential use of the conjugates for cat and dog immunosterilization. The ability of the conjugates to stimulate production of anti-GnRH antibodies in vivo was evaluated in mice. While optimization of dose, immunization route and adjuvant still requires investigation, our preliminary results demonstrated the presence of anti-GnRH antibodies in sera of mice immunized with such conjugates. Fertility trials in cats and dogs will be needed to evaluate contraceptive potentials of the phage-GnRH peptide chemical conjugates. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Technique for evaluating antiwear properties of lubricant grease for GN and GNU drill bits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubarev, A.S.; Butovets, V.V.; Dyachenko, Yu.P.; Krasnokutskaya, M.Ye.; Nedbaylyuk, P.Ye.; Oparin, V.A.; Yeremenko, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    A technique has been developed for determining under laboratory conditions the antiwear characteristics for lubricant grease used for drill bit supports models GN and GNU. A satisfactory coincidence of test results of lubricants USsA and Uniol-1 has been derived using the given technique, as well as satisfactory results for the drill bits operating in industrial conditions.

  3. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) treatment on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... 1169-1171. Eppleston J, Roberts EM (1991). Effect of time of PMSG and GnRH on the time of ovulation, LH secretion and reproductive performance after intrauterine insemination with frozen ram semen. Anim. Reprod. Sci. 26: 227-237. Evans NP, Dahl GE, Caraty A, Padmanabhan V, Thrun LA, Karsch FJ.

  4. Social Crowding during Development Causes Changes in GnRH1 DNA Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Sebastian G; Lenkov, Kapa; Williams, Blake; Fernald, Russell D

    2015-01-01

    Gestational and developmental cues have important consequences for long-term health, behavior and adaptation to the environment. In addition, social stressors cause plastic molecular changes in the brain that underlie unique behavioral phenotypes that also modulate fitness. In the adult African cichlid, Astatotilapia burtoni, growth and social status of males are both directly regulated by social interactions in a dynamic social environment, which causes a suite of plastic changes in circuits, cells and gene transcription in the brain. We hypothesized that a possible mechanism underlying some molecular changes might be DNA methylation, a reversible modification made to cytosine nucleotides that is known to regulate gene function. Here we asked whether changes in DNA methylation of the GnRH1 gene, the central regulator of the reproductive axis, were altered during development of A. burtoni. We measured changes in methylation state of the GnRH1 gene during normal development and following the gestational and developmental stress of social crowding. We found differential DNA methylation within developing juveniles between 14-, 28- and 42-day-old. Following gestational crowding of mouth brooding mothers, we saw differential methylation and transcription of GnRH1 in their offspring. Taken together, our data provides evidence for social control of GnRH1 developmental responses to gestational cues through DNA methylation.

  5. Is the use of a GnRH antagonist effective in patients with polycystic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    offered controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) technology. Aim. The aim of this study was to assess whether there was a difference in the pregnancy outcomes of women with PCOS when a standard gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist (cetrorelix) protocol was used for ovarian ...

  6. Tsunami i 2 døgn på TV2 NEWS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kartveit, Kate

    2018-01-01

    Hvordan udvikler dækningen af en nyhedsbegivenheden sig på TV2 News over 2 døgn? Dette kapitel vil gennem tekstanalyse af centrale journalistiske parametre i et casestudie, undersøges hvordan den journalistiske formidling af tsunamien i Grønland udvikler sig over tid....

  7. Endothelial NF-κB Blockade Abrogates ANCA-Induced GN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Mira; Schreiber, Adrian; Eulenberg-Gustavus, Claudia; Scheidereit, Claus; Kamps, Jan; Kettritz, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a highly inflammatory condition in which ANCA-activated neutrophils interact with the endothelium, resulting in necrotizing vasculitis. We tested the hypothesis that endothelial NF-κB mediates necrotizing crescentic GN (NCGN) and provides a specific treatment

  8. Receptor-mediated binding and uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist by pituitary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennes, L.; Stumpf, W.E.; Conn, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular pathway of an enzyme resistant GnRH agonist (D- Lys6 -GnRH) conjugated to ferritin or to colloidal gold was followed in cultured pituitary cells. After an initial uniform distribution over the cell surface of gonadotropes, the electrondense marker was internalized, either individually or in small groups. After longer incubation times, the marker appeared in the lysosomal compartment and the Golgi apparatus, where it could be found in the vesicular as well as cisternal portion. In addition, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of the GnRH antagonist D-p-Glu1-D-Phe2-D-Trp3-D- Lys6 -GnRH was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography after 30 and 60 min of incubation to ensure uptake. At both time points, in in vitro as well as in vivo studies, silver grains were localized over cytoplasmic organelles of castration cells, including dilated endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, and clear vesicles. No consistent association with cell nuclei, mitochondria, or secretory vesicles could be observed. The results suggest that both agonist and antagonist are binding selectively to the plasma membrane of gonadotropes and subsequently are taken up via receptor-mediated endocytosis for degradation or possible action on synthetic processes.

  9. Hormonal responses to GnRH injection given at different stages of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the hormonal responses of buffaloes to GnRH injections given at different moments of the estrous cycle. The estrous cycles of 15 buffaloes were synchronized with 2 im injections of prostaglandin F2α given 11 days apart. The buffalos were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 ...

  10. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) treatment on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administration on the induction of multiple births in synchronized Afshari ewes. 16 cycling, multiparous fat-tailed Iranian Afshari ewes, weighing 66.5 ± 2.5 kg, were used in the trail. Estrus was synchronized using controlled ...

  11. EFFECT TN EWES OF OESTROGEN PRIMING AND GnRH ON LH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EFFECT TN EWES OF OESTROGEN PRIMING AND GnRH ON LH RELEASE. AND LUTEAL FUNCTION DURING EARLY LACTATION IN SPRING. Receipt of MS 22-03-1979. C.D. Hamilton*, A.W. Lishman and P.A. Lamb. Department ol Animal Science, Universitlt ol'Natol, nercrmaitzburg, 3200. (Key words. Oestrogen ...

  12. Study of Positive and Negative Consequences of Using GnRH Antagonist in Intrauterine Insemination Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bagheri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the usefulness of premature luteinization hormone (LH surge preventionin an intrauterine insemination (IUI cycle by GnRH antagonist administration.Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with unexplained or mild male infertility or minimalto mild endometriosis were enrolled in this prospective randomized controlled trial. There weretwenty patients in group A (with GnRH antagonist and 40 patients in group B (without GnRHantagonist.In all of the participants, clomiphene citrate and human menopausal gonadotropin (CC+HMG wereused for ovarian stimulation. When at least one follicle with ≥ 16 mm diameter was seen, LH surgewas checked by a urinary LH kit. In patients with negative results, human chorionic gonadotropinwas continued in both groups, but in group A 0.25 mg Ganirelix SQ was administered for two days,,then in both groups human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG was injected on the third day and IUIwas done 36-40 hours later. Ongoing pregnancy was the primary outcome.Results: Baseline characters and clinical parameters were similar in both groups with the exceptionof ≥14 mm follicles which were higher in group A (p value= 0.003. The pregnancy rate in bothgroups was not significantly different, although it was higher in group B (10% in group A and 15%in group B.Conclusion: At least in CC+HMG stimulated cycles for IUI, the occurrence of premature LHsurge could have a useful rule and GnRH antagonist administration could be an inappropriateintervention.

  13. Investigation on Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Nylon66/GnP Nano-composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankara Narayana, Kota; Suman, Koka Naga Sai; Arun Vikram, Kothapalli

    2017-04-01

    The tribological behavior of graphene nano platelets (GnP) reinforced Nylon66 polymer Nano composites were studied using a pin-on-disc apparatus under dry sliding conditions. The influence of wear control factors like applied load, velocity, sliding distance and weight percentage of GnP reinforcement on the responses like specific wear rate and frictional coefficient were investigated. Nano composites were developed by melt mixing of various weight fractions of GnP (0/0.5/1/2) with nylon 66 using twin screw extruder. A design of experiments based on the Taguchi technique was performed to acquire data in a controlled way and was successfully used to identify the optimal combinations of control factors influencing the outputs. Analysis of variance was employed to investigate the influence and contribution of control factors on the responses. The results showed that the inclusion of GnP as reinforcing material in Nylon66 Nano composites, decreases the friction coefficient and increases the wear resistance of the Nano composites significantly.

  14. Model-Based GN and C Simulation and Flight Software Development for Orion Missions beyond LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Ryan; Milenkovic, Zoran; Henry, Joel; Buttacoli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    For Orion missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO), the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) system is being developed using a model-based approach for simulation and flight software. Lessons learned from the development of GN&C algorithms and flight software for the Orion Exploration Flight Test One (EFT-1) vehicle have been applied to the development of further capabilities for Orion GN&C beyond EFT-1. Continuing the use of a Model-Based Development (MBD) approach with the Matlab®/Simulink® tool suite, the process for GN&C development and analysis has been largely improved. Furthermore, a model-based simulation environment in Simulink, rather than an external C-based simulation, greatly eases the process for development of flight algorithms. The benefits seen by employing lessons learned from EFT-1 are described, as well as the approach for implementing additional MBD techniques. Also detailed are the key enablers for improvements to the MBD process, including enhanced configuration management techniques for model-based software systems, automated code and artifact generation, and automated testing and integration.

  15. Serum levels of antimüllerian hormone in early maturing girls before, during, and after suppression with GnRH agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar; Anderson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) levels are affected in early maturing girls, and whether pituitary suppression by long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRH-a) affects AMH.......To evaluate whether serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) levels are affected in early maturing girls, and whether pituitary suppression by long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRH-a) affects AMH....

  16. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  17. Affinity Purification of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Expressed in Raji Cells by Produced scFv Antibody Coupled CNBr-Activated Sepharose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safar Farajnia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α has been utilized as an antineoplastic agent for the treatment of patients with melanoma and sarcoma. It targets tumor cell antigens by impressing tumor-associated vessels. Protein purification with affinity chromatography has been widely used in the downstream processing of pharmaceutical-grade proteins. Methods: In this study, we examined the potential of our produced anti-TNF-scFv fragments for purification of TNF-α produced by Raji cells. he Raji cells were induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS to express TNF-α. Western blotting and Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS flow cytometry analyses were used to evaluate the TNF-α expression. The anti-TNF-α scFv selected from antibody phage display library was coupled to CNBr-activated sepharose 4B beads used for affinity purification of expressed TNF-α and the purity of the protein was assessed by SDS-PAGE. Results: Western blot and FACS flow cytometry analyses showed the successful expression of TNF-α with Raji cells. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the performance of scFv for purification of TNF-α protein with purity over 95%. Conclusion: These findings confirm not only the potential of the produced scFv antibody fragments but also this highly pure recombinant TNF-α protein can be applied for various in vitro and in vivo applications.

  18. Long-term effects of GnRH agonists on fertility and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goericke-Pesch, S

    2017-04-01

    This review aimed to summarize the present knowledge about the effects of GnRH agonist slow-release implants (GnRH A-SRI) on fertility and behaviour in male and female dogs and cats with special focus on deslorelin. Following an initial stimulation of gonadotropin and testosterone secretion possibly associated with an improved semen quality, GnRH A-SRI induce long-term depression of fertility in male dogs and cats with, however, a large individual variation in onset and duration of efficacy especially in cats. The GnRH A-SRI furthermore interfere with testosterone-dependent/affected behaviour; a significant positive effect in reducing sexual behaviour and libido, hypersexuality, intermale dominance and excessive territorial urine marking has been described. Rates of improvement of the respective behaviour are comparable to those after surgical castration, making GnRH A-SRI a valuable option to predict castration-related effects on behaviour and to identify animals where surgical castration will not be beneficial. No effect has been seen in reducing aggression towards humans indicating the need for behavioural therapy to control this problem. Effects on spermatogenesis, steroidogenesis and behaviour have by now been shown to be fully reversible. Knowledge in females is more limited, and particularly, the initial induction of a possibly fertile oestrus and individual variation in duration of efficacy remain problems in bitches and queens treated for suppression of fertility. However, long-term suppression of oestrous cycle and fertility seems to be possible with induced effects shown to be reversible including restoration of normal fertility after the end of efficacy/GNRH A-SRI removal. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Evolution of ANB and SN-GoGn angles during craniofacial growth: A retrospective longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Oyonarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to describe the evolution of the ANB and SN-GoGn angles throughout development, in a longitudinal sample of Caucasian patients. Materials and Methods: Historical cephalometric records from North American individuals available at the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation Craniofacial Legacy Growth Collection website were used to carry out an exploratory longitudinal study. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of orthodontically untreated males and females were included. Individuals with three or more longitudinal cephalometric records at pre- and post-pubertal stages, with at least one postpubertal radiograph available in vertebral cervical maturation stage (cervical vertebral maturation 5 or 6, were selected. Seventy-one individuals met the inclusion criteria. ANB, SNA, SNB, and SN-GoGn angles were measured. Individuals were classified according to the latest postpubertal ANB angle available and grouped by CVM. Descriptive statistics were obtained for the cephalometric variables, and differences between genders were analyzed. Results: Forty-five individuals were classified as skeletal Class I at the end of growth, 17 as Class II, and 9 as Class III. ANB values decrease as growth occurs in every group (average ANB decrease between the stages CVM 1 and 6: Class I - 1.5°, Class II - 0.7°, and Class III - 3.1°. For SN-GoGn angle, a constant reduction was observed as skeletal maturation increased (Average SN-GoGn decrease between the stages CVM 1 and 6: Class I - 4°, Class II - 2.5°, and Class III - 4.9°. Conclusions: ANB and SN-GoGn angles decrease during growth. The magnitude varies depending on individual sagittal characteristics, Class III individuals displaying the greatest reduction, and Class II individuals the least.

  20. Biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses of a GnRH-like peptide in the neural ganglia of the Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai (Gastropoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Masafumi; Moriyama, Shunsuke; Okubo, Kataaki; Amiya, Noriko; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2010-08-01

    We examined whether gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like peptides are present in the neural ganglia of the gastropod Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (rpHPLC) combined with time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA) analysis and by immunohistochemistry. Cerebral ganglion extracts showed a similar retention time to lamprey GnRH-II (lGnRH-II) in rpHPLC combined with TR-FIA analysis. GnRH-like-immunoreactive (ir) cell bodies (which reacted with a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against the common amino acid sequence of vertebrate GnRH) were detected in the peripheral region of the cerebral ganglion, and they were observed to send fibers into the neuropil. GnRH-like-ir fibers were also detected in the neuropil of the pedal ganglion, the visceral nerve, and the nerve originating from the pedal ganglion. Chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II)-like-ir fibers (which reacted with a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against cGnRH-II) were also observed in the neuropil of the cerebral ganglion. GnRH-like-ir fibers and cGnRH-II-like-ir fibers were distinguishable in the neuropil of the cerebral ganglion by double-staining immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that multiple GnRH-like peptides exist in the neural ganglia of the Pacific abalone.

  1. Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) forms an incoherent feed-forward loop modulating follicle-stimulating hormone β-subunit (FSHβ) gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soon Gang; Wang, Qian; Jia, Jingjing; Pincas, Hanna; Turgeon, Judith L; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2014-06-06

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is secreted in brief pulses from the hypothalamus and regulates follicle-stimulating hormone β-subunit (FSHβ) gene expression in pituitary gonadotropes in a frequency-sensitive manner. The mechanisms underlying its preferential and paradoxical induction of FSHβ by low frequency GnRH pulses are incompletely understood. Here, we identify growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) as a GnRH-suppressed autocrine inducer of FSHβ gene expression. GDF9 gene transcription and expression were preferentially decreased by high frequency GnRH pulses. GnRH regulation of GDF9 was concentration-dependent and involved ERK and PKA. GDF9 knockdown or immunoneutralization reduced FSHβ mRNA expression. Conversely, exogenous GDF9 induced FSHβ expression in immortalized gonadotropes and in mouse primary pituitary cells. GDF9 exposure increased FSH secretion in rat primary pituitary cells. GDF9 induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation, which was impeded by ALK5 knockdown and by activin receptor-like kinase (ALK) receptor inhibitor SB-505124, which also suppressed FSHβ expression. Smad2/3 knockdown indicated that FSHβ induction by GDF9 involved Smad2 and Smad3. FSHβ mRNA induction by GDF9 and GnRH was synergistic. We hypothesized that GDF9 contributes to a regulatory loop that tunes the GnRH frequency-response characteristics of the FSHβ gene. To test this, we determined the effects of GDF9 knockdown on FSHβ induction at different GnRH pulse frequencies using a parallel perifusion system. Reduction of GDF9 shifted the characteristic pattern of GnRH pulse frequency sensitivity. These results identify GDF9 as contributing to an incoherent feed-forward loop, comprising both intracellular and secreted components, that regulates FSHβ expression in response to activation of cell surface GnRH receptors. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. A randomized prospective trial comparing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist/recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH) versus GnRH-agonist/rFSH in women pretreated with oral contraceptives before in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmat, Larry I; Chantilis, Samuel J; Hurst, Bradley S; Dickey, Richard P

    2005-02-01

    To compare the effects of oral contraceptive (OC) pill pretreatment in recombinant FSH/GnRH-antagonist versus recombinant FSH/GnRH-agonist stimulation in in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients, and to evaluate optimization of retrieval day. Prospective, randomized, multicenter study. Private practice and university centers. Eighty patients undergoing IVF who met the appropriate inclusion criteria. Four study centers recruited 80 patients. The OC regimen began on cycle days 2 to 4 and was discontinued on a Sunday after 14 to 28 days. The recombinant FSH regimen was begun on the following Friday. The GnRH-agonist group was treated with a long protocol; the GnRH-antagonist was initiated when the lead follicle reached 12 to 14 mm. When two follicles had reached 16 to 18 mm, hCG was administered. The primary outcome measures were the number of cumulus-oocyte complexes, day of the week for oocyte retrieval, and total dose and days of stimulation of recombinant FSH. Secondary efficacy variables included pregnancy and implantation rate; serum E(2) levels on stimulation day 1; serum E(2), P, and LH levels on the day of hCG administration; follicle size on day 6 and day of hCG administration; the total days of GnRH-analogue treatment; total days on OC; total days from end of OC to oocyte retrieval; and the cycle cancellation rate. Patient outcomes were similar for the days of stimulation, total dose of gonadotropin used, two-pronuclei embryos, pregnancy (44.4% GnRH-antagonist vs. 45.0% GnRH-agonist, P=.86) and implantation rates (22.2% GnRH-antagonist vs. 26.4% GnRH-agonist, P=.71). Oral contraceptive cycle scheduling resulted in 78% and 90% of retrievals performed Monday through Friday for GnRH-antagonist and GnRH-agonist. A one day delay in OC discontinuation and recombinant FSH start would result in over 90% of oocyte retrievals occurring Monday through Friday in both groups. The OC pretreatment in recombinant FSH/GnRH-antagonist protocols provides a patient

  3. Ectopic pregnancy risk factors for ART patients undergoing the GnRH antagonist protocol: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A; Beck-Fruchter, R; Golan, J; Lavee, M; Geslevich, Y; Shalev, E

    2016-03-23

    In-vitro fertilization is a known risk factor for ectopic pregnancies. We sought to establish the risk factors for ectopic pregnancy in GnRH antagonist cycles examining patient and stimulation parameters with an emphasis on ovulation trigger. We conducted a retrospective, cohort study of 343 patients undergoing 380 assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles with the GnRH antagonist protocol and achieving a clinical pregnancy from November 2010 through December 2015. Significant risk factors for ectopic pregnancy in the univariate analysis included prior Cesarean section (CS), endometriosis, mechanical factor infertility, longer stimulation, elevated estradiol and progesterone levels, GnRH agonist trigger, higher number of oocytes aspirated, and insemination technique. Independent risk factors for ectopic pregnancy in the multivariate analysis included GnRH agonist trigger, higher number of oocytes aspirated, insemination technique, and prior Cesarean section. Excessive ovarian response, IVF (as opposed to ICSI), prior Cesarean section and GnRH agonist trigger were found to be independent risk factors for ectopic pregnancy. Caution should be exercised before incorporating the GnRH agonist trigger for indications other than preventing OHSS. When excessive ovarian response leads to utilization of GnRH agonist trigger, strategies for preventing ectopic pregnancy, such as a freeze all policy or blastocyst transfer, should be considered. Further studies should elucidate whether adjusting the luteal support can reduce the ectopic pregnancy risk.

  4. Experimental Study on the CHF Enhancement of the Nanofluids containing Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelets(xGnP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eun Ju; Park, Sung Dae; Bang, In Cheol; Park, Hyung Wook [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The enhancement of the critical heat flux (CHF) contributes to increasing the safety margin of the thermal system. Nanofluids, stably dispersed nano-sized particles in base fluids, have been drawing attention as heat transfer fluids due to the CHF enhancement. The CHF enhancement can be explained by changing the morphology of the heater surface during the pool boiling. However, there are many factors to affect the CHF of the nanofluids, including the nanomaterials, the particle concentration and size, thermophysical properties of the nanofluids (surface tension, thermal conductivity and specific heat), and dispersibility. Carbon based nanomaterials have drawn the tremendous interest from various areas due to their superior thermal and electrical properties. Among them, The exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) are the candidate to enhance the CHF of nanofluids due to the economical benefits compared to CNTs and grapheme. The xGnPs have layered structure with an average thickness of approximately 6-8nm. Since the manufacturing cost of xGnPs is much lower than that of CNTs and graphene, they can be the effective alternative. In this study, nanofluids containing xGnP and xGnP oxide are prepared. We carried out the pool boiling experiments using xGnP and xGnP oxide nanofluids with different concentrations to examine the CHF enhancement

  5. Afferent neuronal control of type-I gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH neurons in the human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eHrabovszky

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation of the human menstrual cycle represents an important ultimate challenge of reproductive neuroendocrine research. However, direct translation of information from laboratory animal experiments to the human is often complicated by strikingly different and unique reproductive strategies and central regulatory mechanisms that can be present in even closely related animal species. In all mammals studied so far, type-I gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH synthesizing neurons form the final common output way from the hypothalamus in the neuroendocrine control of the adenohypophysis. Under various physiological and pathological conditions, hormonal and metabolic signals either regulate GnRH neurons directly or act on upstream neuronal circuitries to influence the pattern of pulsatile GnRH secretion into the hypophysial portal circulation. Neuronal afferents to GnRH cells convey important metabolic-, stress-, sex steroid-, lactational- and circadian signals to the reproductive axis, among other effects. This article gives an overview of the available neuroanatomical literature that described the afferent regulation of human GnRH neurons by peptidergic, monoaminergic and amino acidergic neuronal systems. Recent studies of human genetics provided evidence that central peptidergic signaling by kisspeptins and neurokinin B play particularly important roles in puberty onset and later, in the sex steroid-dependent feedback regulation of GnRH neurons. This review article places special emphasis on the topographic distribution, sexual dimorphism, aging-dependent neuroanatomical changes and plastic connectivity to GnRH neurons of the critically important human hypothalamic kisspeptin and neurokinin B systems.

  6. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S. [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  7. Developmental and adult expression patterns of the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR88 in the rat: Establishment of a dual nuclear-cytoplasmic localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, Renaud; Mignon, Virginie; Stanic, Jennifer; Munoz-Tello, Paola; Becker, Jerôme A J; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Darmon, Michèle; Sokoloff, Pierre; Diaz, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    GPR88 is a neuronal cerebral orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been linked to various psychiatric disorders. However, no extensive description of its localization has been provided so far. Here, we investigate the spatiotemporal expression of the GPR88 in prenatal and postnatal rat tissues by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. GPR88 protein was initially detected at embryonic day 16 (E16) in the striatal primordium. From E16-E20 to adulthood, the highest expression levels of both protein and mRNA were observed in striatum, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and neocortex, whereas in spinal cord, pons, and medulla GPR88 expression remains discrete. We observed an intracellular redistribution of GPR88 during cortical lamination. In the cortical plate of the developing cortex, GPR88 presents a classical GPCR plasma membrane/cytoplasmic localization that shifts, on the day of birth, to nuclei of neurons progressively settling in layers V to II. This intranuclear localization remains throughout adulthood and was also detected in monkey and human cortex as well as in the amygdala and hypothalamus of rats. Apart from the central nervous system, GPR88 was transiently expressed at high levels in peripheral tissues, including adrenal cortex (E16-E21) and cochlear ganglia (E19-P3), and also at moderate levels in retina (E18-E19) and spleen (E21-P7). The description of the GPR88 anatomical expression pattern may provide precious functional insights into this novel receptor. Furthermore, the GRP88 nuclear localization suggests nonclassical GPCR modes of action of the protein that could be relevant for cortical development and psychiatric disorders. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2776-2802, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Replicable and Coupled Changes in Innate and Adaptive Immune Gene Expression in Two Case-Control Studies of Blood Microarrays in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leday, Gwenaël G R; Vértes, Petra E; Richardson, Sylvia; Greene, Jonathan R; Regan, Tim; Khan, Shahid; Henderson, Robbie; Freeman, Tom C; Pariante, Carmine M; Harrison, Neil A; Perry, V Hugh; Drevets, Wayne C; Wittenberg, Gayle M; Bullmore, Edward T

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation is often associated with major depressive disorder (MDD), and immunological biomarkers of depression remain a focus of investigation. We used microarray data on whole blood from two independent case-control studies of MDD: the GlaxoSmithKline-High-Throughput Disease-specific target Identification Program [GSK-HiTDiP] study (113 patients and 57 healthy control subjects) and the Janssen-Brain Resource Company study (94 patients and 100 control subjects). Genome-wide differential gene expression analysis (18,863 probes) resulted in a p value for each gene in each study. A Bayesian method identified the largest p-value threshold (q = .025) associated with twice the number of genes differentially expressed in both studies compared with the number of coincidental case-control differences expected by chance. A total of 165 genes were differentially expressed in both studies with concordant direction of fold change. The 90 genes overexpressed (or UP genes) in MDD were significantly enriched for immune response to infection, were concentrated in a module of the gene coexpression network associated with innate immunity, and included clusters of genes with correlated expression in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and neutrophils. In contrast, the 75 genes underexpressed (or DOWN genes) in MDD were associated with the adaptive immune response and included clusters of genes with correlated expression in T cells, natural killer cells, and erythroblasts. Consistently, the MDD patients with overexpression of UP genes also had underexpression of DOWN genes (correlation > .70 in both studies). MDD was replicably associated with proinflammatory activation of the peripheral innate immune system, coupled with relative inactivation of the adaptive immune system, indicating the potential of transcriptional biomarkers for immunological stratification of patients with depression. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier

  9. Differential expression of three types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone genes during the spawning season in grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahan, Md; Hamabata, Tomoko; Motohashi, Eiji; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2010-05-15

    Grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles, has unique spawning behavior; spawning occurs on beach only for several days around new moon and full moon from spring to early summer. To investigate the role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the reproductive function, genes encoding three types of GnRHs, namely seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and salmon GnRH (sGnRH), were cloned and changes in their mRNA amounts were examined over the spawning season. In addition, changes in the pituitary gonadotropin subunit mRNAs and the plasma steroid hormones were examined over the spawning season. Fishes were assessed at four reproductive stages, i.e., in December (early maturation), in April (maturing), in May (spawning), and in July (post-spawning). Moreover, spawning fish just after releasing eggs and sperm were taken at a spawning bed. The amounts of sbGnRH mRNA were substantially elevated in May and the spawning fish in both sexes, concomitant with considerable elevations of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone beta subunit mRNAs and plasma estradiol-17beta (E(2)) and testosterone (T) levels. There were strong positive correlations between the sbGnRH mRNA and the plasma E(2) and T levels over the spawning season in both sexes. The amounts of cGnRH-II mRNA showed no noticeable changes except for an increase in the post-spawning females. The amounts of sGnRH mRNA in the males were significantly increased in May, but they were low in the spawning males. In the females, sGnRH mRNA increased from the maturing stage and reached a maximum in the post-spawning stage, in which a positive correlation with the plasma cortisol levels was observed. These specific changes suggest that the expression of three types of GnRH genes is differentially regulated during the spawning season, and sex steroids may be important for the differential expression of GnRH genes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of clozapine on mRNA expression for genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors and the protein components of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; Weymer, Jon F.; Rizig, Mie; McQuillin, Andrew; Hunt, Stephen P.; Gurling, Hugh M.D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is an intracellular trafficking mechanism for packaging cargo, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), into clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The antipsychotic chlorpromazine inhibits CCV assembly of adaptor protein AP2 whereas clozapine increases serotonin2A receptor internalization. We hypothesized that clozapine alters the expression of CME genes modulating vesicle turnover and GPCR internalization. Materials and methods SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells were incubated with clozapine (1–20 µmol/l) for 24–72 h. GPCR and CME-related gene mRNA expression was measured using RT-PCR. We quantified changes in the same genes using expression data from a microarray study of mice brains after 12 weeks of treatment with 12 mg/kg/day clozapine. Results The expression of genes encoding adaptor and clathrin assembly proteins, AP2A2, AP2B1, AP180, CLINT1, HIP1, ITSN2, and PICALM, increased relative to the control in SH-SY5Y cells incubated with 5–10 µmol/l clozapine for 24–72 h. The microarray study showed significantly altered expression of the above CME-related genes, with a marked 641-fold and 17-fold increase in AP180 and the serotonin1A GPCR, respectively. The expression of three serotonergic receptor and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 2 (EDG4) GPCR genes was upregulated in SH-SY5Y cells incubated with 5 µmol/l clozapine for 24 h. EDG4 expression was also increased with 10–20 µmol/l clozapine treatment at 48–72 h. Clozapine significantly decreased the expression of β-arrestin, involved in GPCR desensitization, both in vitro and vivo. Conclusion The changes we report in CME and GPCR mRNAs implicate CCV-mediated internalization of GPCRs and the serotonergic system in clozapine’s mechanism of action, which may be useful in the design of more effective and less toxic antipsychotic therapies. PMID:23811784

  11. G Protein–Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Expression in Native Cells: “Novel” endoGPCRs as Physiologic Regulators and Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilderman, Andrea; Zambon, Alexander C.; Snead, Aaron N.; Murray, Fiona; Aroonsakool, Nakon; McDonald, Daniel S.; Zhou, Shu; McCann, Thalia; Zhang, Lingzhi; Sriram, Krishna; Chinn, Amy M.; Michkov, Alexander V.; Lynch, Rebecca M.; Overland, Aaron C.; Corriden, Ross

    2015-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of signaling receptors in the human genome, are also the largest class of targets of approved drugs. Are the optimal GPCRs (in terms of efficacy and safety) currently targeted therapeutically? Especially given the large number (∼120) of orphan GPCRs (which lack known physiologic agonists), it is likely that previously unrecognized GPCRs, especially orphan receptors, regulate cell function and can be therapeutic targets. Knowledge is limited regarding the diversity and identity of GPCRs that are activated by endogenous ligands and that native cells express. Here, we review approaches to define GPCR expression in tissues and cells and results from studies using these approaches. We identify problems with the available data and suggest future ways to identify and validate the physiologic and therapeutic roles of previously unrecognized GPCRs. We propose that a particularly useful approach to identify functionally important GPCRs with therapeutic potential will be to focus on receptors that show selective increases in expression in diseased cells from patients and experimental animals. PMID:25737495

  12. Novel G Protein-Coupled Oestrogen Receptor GPR30 Shows Changes in mRNA Expression in the Rat Brain over the Oestrous Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. Spary

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oestrogen influences autonomic function via actions at classical nuclear oestrogen receptors α and β in the brain, and recent evidence suggests the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 may also function as a cytoplasmic oestrogen receptor. We investigated the expression of GPR30 in female rat brains throughout the oestrous cycle and after ovariectomy to determine whether GPR30 expression in central autonomic nuclei is correlated with circulating oestrogen levels. In the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, ventrolateral medulla (VLM and periaqueductal gray (PAG GPR30 mRNA, quantified by real-time PCR, was increased in proestrus and oestrus. In ovariectomised (OVX rats, expression in NTS and VLM appeared increased compared to metoestrus, but in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and PAG lower mRNA levels were seen in OVX. GPR30-like immunoreactivity (GPR30-LI colocalised with Golgi in neurones in many brain areas associated with autonomic pathways, and analysis of numbers of immunoreactive neurones showed differences consistent with the PCR data. GPR30-LI was found in a variety of transmitter phenotypes, including cholinergic, serotonergic, catecholaminergic and nitrergic neurones in different neuronal groups. These observations support the view that GPR30 could act as a rapid transducer responding to oestrogen levels and thus modulate the activity of central autonomic pathways.

  13. GnRH neurons on LSD: a year of rejecting hypotheses that may have made Karl Popper proud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenter, Suzanne M

    2017-11-08

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are critical to many aspects of fertility regulation, from producing episodic release critical to both sexes, to providing a central signal to induce the ovulatory cascade in females. This year saw progress through the rejection, and occasional support, of hypotheses in understanding how GnRH neurons contribute to these processes. This brief review provides one laboratory's view of new insights into possible roles for these cells in development, adult reproductive function, and what may go wrong with GnRH neurons in some cases of infertility. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  14. Bisphenol A at a low concentration boosts mouse spermatogonial cell proliferation by inducing the G protein-coupled receptor 30 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Huang, Wei [Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100091 (China); Liu, Yu-Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu, Ben-Zhan, E-mail: bzhu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most prevalent chemicals in daily-use materials, therefore, human exposure to BPA is ubiquitous. We found that low concentrations of BPA stimulate the spermatogonial GC-1 cells proliferation by G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30)-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-c-Fos pathway. However, through the same pathway GPR30 expression has been shown to be induced by EGF, an EGFR ligand. Thus, we want to know if low concentrations of BPA are able to induce the GPR30 expression and the possible mechanism(s) in GC-1 cells. By transient transfection with expression plasmids, 10{sup −9} M BPA significantly transactivates the Gpr30-5′-flanking region through activating the GPR30, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), and EFGR-ERK pathways. Furthermore, an activator protein-1 (AP-1) site located within this region is found to be responsible for the transactivation of BPA. Expectedly, through the same pathways, BPA significantly induces the gene and protein expression of GPR30. c-Fos is further observed to be strongly recruited to the AP-1 site in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and its dysfunction on the AP-1 site markedly suppresses the expression of GPR30, p-ERK1/2, p-Ser118-ER-α and cell proliferation by BPA. Our results demonstrate that a low-concentration BPA induces GPR30 expression through the GPR30-EFGR-ERK-c-Fos, ER-α, and PKG pathways, presumably boosting the cells proliferation via a regulatory loop. The present study provides a novel insight into the potential role of GPR30 in the initiation and progression of male germ cell cancer induced by environmentally relevant BPA. - Highlights: ► Low concentrations of BPA activate the PKG and GPR30-EFGR-ERK-ER-α pathways. ► Low concentrations of BPA activate the AP-1 site of Gpr30-5′-flanking region. ► Low concentrations of BPA induce the expression of GPR30 gene and protein. ► Low

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 excites firing and increases GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons of the male mice via activation of nitric oxide (NO and suppression of endocannabinoid signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Farkas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9-39 (1 μM. Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-beta-S (2 mM impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO synthesis by L-NAME (100 μM or NPLA (1 μM or intracellular scavenging of NO by CPTIO (1 mM partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using CB1 inverse-agonist AM251 (1 μM. Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the TRPV1-antagonist AMG9810 (10 μM or the FAAH-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid pathway indicating an anandamide-TRPV1-sensitive control of 2-AG production. Furthermore, GLP-1 immunoreactive axons innervated GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus suggesting that GLP-1 of both peripheral and neuronal sources can modulate GnRH neurons. RT-qPCR study confirmed the expression of GLP-1R and nNOS mRNAs in GnRH-GFP neurons. Immuno-electron microscopic analysis revealed the presence of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS protein in Gn

  16. Radioimmunoassay in Ascidiella aspersa of a gonadoliberin (GnRH)-like factor with an apparent molecular weight higher than that of mammalian decapeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, S.; Monniot, F.; Monniot, C. and others

    1988-02-21

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for mammalian gonadoliberin (mGnRH) showed the presence of a GnRH-like factor in the neural complex of a Protochordate, Ascidiella aspersa (about 0.6 pg eq mGnRH/complex). The slope of the displacement curves was slightly lower than with mGnRH indicating antigene differences. No cross reactive material was found in mantle and siphonal area. The KD on Sephadex G25 was 0.45 versus 0.90 with mGnRH. That suggests that the molecular weight of the Ascidian GnRH-like factor is higher than that of known Vertebrate GnRH's, possibly due to a different processing of the precursor.

  17. Hydrothermal treatment coupled with mechanical expression at increased temperature for excess sludge dewatering: influence of operating conditions and the process energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2014-11-15

    Dewatering is very important for excess sludge treatment and disposal. Hydrothermal treatment coupled with mechanical expression is a novel technology, in which a conventional pressure dewatering is combined with hydrothermal effect to realize an improved liquid/solids separation with low energy consumption. In this study, the process was performed by way of that the excess sludge was hydrothermally treated first and then the mechanical expression was employed immediately at increased temperature in two separate cells respectively. The results demonstrated that the mechanical expression employed at increased temperature showed a significant advantage than that at room temperature, given a further reduction of 19-47% of the moisture content. The dewatering process at room temperature was mostly depended on the effect of mechanical expression. Hydrothermal process, more importantly than mechanical effect at increased temperatures, seemed to govern the extent to which the dewatering process occurred. The dewatering began to show a positive effect when the temperature was exceeded the threshold temperature (between 120 and 150 °C). The residence time of 30 min promoted a substantial conversion in the sludge surface properties. After dewatering at temperatures of 180-210 °C, the moisture content decreased from 52 to 20% and the corresponding total water removal as filtrate was between 81 and 93%. It was observed that the moisture content of filter cake correlated with surface charge (Rp = -0.93, p < 0.05) and relative hydrophobicity (Rp = -0.99, p < 0.05). The calculated energy balance suggested that no additional external energy input is needed to support the dewatering process for excess sludge. The dewatering process needs an obviously lower energy input compared to thermal drying and electro-dewatering to produce a higher solids content cake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gene expression in mdx mouse muscle in relation to age and exercise: aberrant mechanical-metabolic coupling and implications for pre-clinical studies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerino, Giulia Maria; Cannone, Maria; Giustino, Arcangela; Massari, Ada Maria; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Cozzoli, Anna; De Luca, Annamaria

    2014-11-01

    Weakness and fatigability are typical features of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and are aggravated in dystrophic mdx mice by chronic treadmill exercise. Mechanical activity modulates gene expression and muscle plasticity. Here, we investigated the outcome of 4 (T4, 8 weeks of age) and 12 (T12, 16 weeks of age) weeks of either exercise or cage-based activity on a large set of genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of mdx and wild-type (WT) mice using quantitative real-time PCR. Basal expression of the exercise-sensitive genes peroxisome-proliferator receptor γ coactivator 1α (Pgc-1α) and Sirtuin1 (Sirt1) was higher in mdx versus WT mice at both ages. Exercise increased Pgc-1α expression in WT mice; Pgc-1α was downregulated by T12 exercise in mdx muscles, along with Sirt1, Pparγ and the autophagy marker Bnip3. Sixteen weeks old mdx mice showed a basal overexpression of the slow Mhc1 isoform and Serca2; T12 exercise fully contrasted this basal adaptation as well as the high expression of follistatin and myogenin. Conversely, T12 exercise was ineffective in WT mice. Damage-related genes such as gp91-phox (NADPH-oxidase2), Tgfβ, Tnfα and c-Src tyrosine kinase were overexpressed in mdx muscles and not affected by exercise. Likewise, the anti-inflammatory adiponectin was lower in T12-exercised mdx muscles. Chronic exercise with minor adaptive effects in WT muscles leads to maladaptation in mdx muscles with a disequilibrium between protective and damaging signals. Increased understanding of the pathways involved in the altered mechanical-metabolic coupling may help guide appropriate physical therapies while better addressing pharmacological interventions in translational research. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Cholesterol Removal from Adult Skeletal Muscle impairs Excitation-Contraction Coupling and Aging reduces Caveolin-3 and alters the Expression of other Triadic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genaro eBarrientos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol and caveolin are integral membrane components that modulate the function/location of many cellular proteins. Skeletal muscle fibers, which have unusually high cholesterol levels in transverse tubules, express the caveolin-3 isoform but its association with transverse tubules remains contentious. Cholesterol removal impairs excitation-contraction coupling in amphibian and mammalian fetal skeletal muscle fibers. Here, we show that treating single muscle fibers from adult mice with the cholesterol removing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased fiber cholesterol by 26%, altered the location pattern of caveolin-3 and of the voltage dependent calcium channel Cav1.1, and suppressed or reduced electrically evoked Ca2+ transients without affecting membrane integrity or causing sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium depletion. We found that transverse tubules from adult muscle and triad fractions that contain ~10% attached transverse tubules, but not sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, contained caveolin-3 and Cav1.1; both proteins partitioned into detergent-resistant membrane fractions highly enriched in cholesterol. Aging entails significant deterioration of skeletal muscle function. We found that triad fractions from aged rats had similar cholesterol and RyR1 protein levels compared to triads from young rats, but had lower caveolin-3 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and increased Na+/K+-ATPase protein levels. Both triad fractions had comparable NADPH oxidase (NOX activity and protein content of NOX2 subunits (p47phox and gp91phox, implying that NOX activity does not increase during aging. These findings show that partial cholesterol removal impairs excitation-contraction coupling and alters caveolin-3 and Cav1.1 location pattern, and that aging reduces caveolin-3 protein content and modifies the expression of other triadic proteins. We discuss the possible implications of these findings for skeletal muscle function in young and aged

  20. A novel ubiquitously expressed alpha-latrotoxin receptor is a member of the CIRL family of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichtchenko, K; Bittner, M A; Krasnoperov, V; Little, A R; Chepurny, O; Holz, R W; Petrenko, A G

    1999-02-26

    Poisoning with alpha-latrotoxin, a neurotoxic protein from black widow spider venom, results in a robust increase of spontaneous synaptic transmission and subsequent degeneration of affected nerve terminals. The neurotoxic action of alpha-latrotoxin involves extracellular binding to its high affinity receptors as a first step. One of these proteins, CIRL, is a neuronal G-protein-coupled receptor implicated in the regulation of secretion. We now demonstrate that CIRL has two close homologs with a similar domain structure and high degree of overall identity. These novel receptors, which we propose to name CIRL-2 and CIRL-3, together with CIRL (CIRL-1) belong to a recently identified subfamily of large orphan receptors with structural features typical of both G-protein-coupled receptors and cell adhesion proteins. Northern blotting experiments indicate that CIRL-2 is expressed ubiquitously with highest concentrations found in placenta, kidney, spleen, ovary, heart, and lung, whereas CIRL-3 is expressed predominantly in brain similarly to CIRL-1. It appears that CIRL-2 can also bind alpha-latrotoxin, although its affinity to the toxin is about 14 times less than that of CIRL-1. When overexpressed in chromaffin cells, CIRL-2 increases their sensitivity to alpha-latrotoxin stimulation but also inhibits Ca2+-regulated secretion. Thus, CIRL-2 is a functionally competent receptor of alpha-latrotoxin. Our findings suggest that although the nervous system is the primary target of low doses of alpha-latrotoxin, cells of other tissues are also susceptible to the toxic effects of alpha-latrotoxin because of the presence of CIRL-2, a low affinity receptor of the toxin.

  1. Treatment of Ovarian Cysts in Dairy Cows with Simultaneous Administration of GnRH and PGF2α has no Clear Advantage Over the Use of GnRH Alone

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    Rudowska Małgorzata

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the therapeutic efficacy o f simultaneous administration of GnRH and PGF2α in dairy cows with ovarian cysts. Ovarian cyst-affected dairy cows were divided into two experimental groups: 54 cows treated with GnRH and PGF2α, and 42 cows treated with GnRH alone, whereas 22 untreated cows served as the control group. Clinical response and reproductive performance were evaluated. The cumulative disappearance was better in treated cows than in the control group; however, there were no differences between the treatment groups (92.6; 95.2% vs. 72.3%. The mean interval from calving to conception was not significantly shorter (being so by 29 d in the GnRH/PGF2α group than in the cows treated with GnRH alone (P > 0.05. The intervals from treatment to conception were also similar in these groups. The pregnancy rate in both treated groups was similar (62% and higher than in the control cows (53%. In the cows with luteal cysts, the total pregnancy rate was higher in all experimental groups; however, only in GnRH-treated cows was this difference statistically significant (77.8% vs. 50.0%, P < 0.05. With time after parturition, the pregnancy rate decreased in all groups. In general, the cows treated with GnRH and PGF2α simultaneously displayed a good clinical response and slight improvement in reproductive performance compared to the single-therapy GnRH group; however, this was not fully convincing.

  2. Enhanced incorporation of nonhydrolyzable tritium in GnRH and TRF by catalytic exchange labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehlke, J.; Bienert, M.; Niedrich, H.; Mittag, E.; Toth, G.

    1987-12-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), D-Phe/sub 6/-GnRH and thyro-tropin releasing factor (TRF) were tritiated by direct catalytic exchange using RhA1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ + HT under conditions which lead in model deuterations of N..cap alpha..-acetylhistidine amide to a high incorporation of deuterium into position 5 of the histidine ring. Specific activities up to a range of 400 GBqmmol in form of nonhydrolyzable tritium are attainable after removal of the label incorporated into position 2 of the histidine ring. A crucial reason for diminished specific activities was found to be a catalyst mediated hydrogen transfer between the peptides and traces of water, contained in the reaction mixture, competing with the tritiation.

  3. Functional coupling between human E-type Ca2+ channels and mu opioid receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolia, M; Platano, D; Qin, N; Noceti, F; Birnbaumer, M; Toro, L; Birnbaumer, L; Stefani, E; Olcese, R

    1998-05-01

    Neuronal alpha1E Ca2+ channels were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes alone and in combination with the mu opioid receptor. Macroscopic currents were recorded under voltage clamp conditions. The stimulation of the morphine receptor by the synthetic [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5] enkephalin (DAMGO) produced a 20% reduction in the alpha1E ionic current. This effect was associated with a large change in the decay phase of the Ba2+ current. The effect of 1 microM DAMGO was fully antagonized by the universal mu opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and by the selective antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. The ionic current inhibition induced by DAMGO was partially recovered by preceding strong depolarizations. The injection of the catalytic subunit of pertussis toxin (A-protomer) abolished the effect of DAMGO, suggesting the involvement of a GTP binding protein in the alpha1E modulation. The coexpression of the regulatory beta2a Ca2a channel subunit, together with the alpha1E subunit and the mu opioid receptor, prevented the reduction of the ionic current following the receptor stimulation with DAMGO, whereas the coexpression with the beta3 subunit reduced by approximately 50% the modulatory effect of DAMGO. The effect produced by the stimulation of the opioid receptor could be mimicked by coexpressing the alpha1E channel with the G-protein betagamma subunits.

  4. Membrane stress is coupled to a rapid translational control of gene expression in chlorpromazine-treated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippi, Loic; Fournier, Margot; Cameroni, Elisabetta; Linder, Patrick; De Virgilio, Claudio; Foti, Michelangelo; Deloche, Olivier

    2007-09-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) is a small permeable cationic amphiphilic molecule that inserts into membrane bilayers and binds to anionic lipids such as poly-phosphoinositides (PIs). Since PIs play important roles in many cellular processes, including signaling and membrane trafficking pathways, it has been proposed that CPZ affects cellular growth functions by preventing the recruitment of proteins with specific PI-binding domains. In this study, we have investigated the biological effects of CPZ in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We screened a collection of approximately 4,800 gene knockout mutants, and found that mutants defective in membrane trafficking between the late-Golgi and endosomal compartments are highly sensitive to CPZ. Microscopy and transport analyses revealed that CPZ affects membrane structure of organelles, blocks membrane transport and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). In addition, CPZ-treatment induces phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor (eIF2alpha), which reduces the general rate of protein synthesis and stimulates the production of Gcn4p, a major transcription factor that is activated in response to environmental stresses. Altogether, our results reveal that membrane stress within the cells rapidly activates an important gene expression program, which is followed by a general inhibition of protein synthesis. Remarkably, the increase of phosphorylated eIF2alpha and protein synthesis inhibition were also detected in CPZ-treated NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, suggesting the existence of a conserved mechanism of translational regulation that operates during a membrane stress.

  5. Effectivness of the GnRH analogue deslorelin as a reversible contraceptive in a neotropical primate, the Common Marmoset Callithrix Jacchus (Mammalia: Primates: Callitrichidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A. Rosenfield

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Deslorelin is a synthetic GnRH analogue, which is being used as a contraceptive in animals by acting as a gonadal suppressant.  The product Suprelorin (Virbac, Australia contains deslorelin as a biocompatible, slow release subcutaneous implant. The continuous release of deslorelin provokes a down-regulation of GnRH receptors, and subsequently, inhibition of the synthesis and release of the gonadotropins FSH and LH, necessary for gonadal activities.  The intention of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a subcutaneous deslorelin acetate implant (2,35mg in suppressing ovarian cyclic activity and inhibiting ovulation in captive Common Marmoset Callithrix jacchus, and investigate the reversibility of the treatment.  Two experimental groups were formed, group deslorelin (D with three couples and control group (C with two couples.  To monitor the effect of the implants, hormones indicating ovarian cyclic activity were monitored non-invasively by enzyme immunoassay (fecal monoclonal antibody anti-progesterone CL 425.  Fecal samples were collected three times a week from all females during three trial phases (phase I: month 1,2,3 and 4; phase II: month: 5,6 and 7 and phase III: month 8,9 and 10.  In contrast to expectations the results of this trial indicated that there was no suppression of the ovarian cyclic activity, nor inhibition of the ovulation after the application of the implants.  The outcome of our trial can possibly be explained by the fact that the dosage of 2.35mg of deslorelin is not effective in C. jacchus.  We confirmed significant changes (p<0.05 of P4 metabolites from phase I to phase II due to the treatment after the implantation of the GnRH analogue Deslorelin.  The employed non-invasive fecal progesterone monitoring could be biologically validated and proved to be efficient in the detection of ovarian cyclic activity in this neotropical primate species, C. jacchus. 

  6. Corifollitropin alfa in a long GnRH agonist protocol: proof of concept trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Human M; Oberyé, Janine; Popovic-Todorovic, Biljana; Witjes, Han; Mannaerts, Bernadette; Devroey, Paul

    2010-10-01

    Fifty healthy women, aged 18-39 years with no known risk of ovarian hyperstimulation were treated with 100 or 150 μg corifollitropin alfa (dependent on body weight) in a long GnRH agonist protocol. At these doses, corifollitropin alfa initiated and supported growth of a large cohort of follicles during the first week of ovarian stimulation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The GnRH analogue triptorelin confers ovarian radio-protection to adult female rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, N. [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, F. [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, J.J. [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, J. [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin-Mateo, M. [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, M. Garcia, E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-10-02

    There is a controversy regarding the effects of the analogues of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in radiotherapy. This has led us to study the possible radio-protection of the ovarian function of a GnRH agonist analogue (GnRHa), triptorelin, in adult, female rats (Rattus norvegicus sp.). The effects of the X-irradiation on the oocytes of ovarian primordial follicles, with and without GnRHa treatment, were compared, directly in the female rats (F{sub 0}) with reproductive parameters, and in the somatic cells of the resulting foetuses (F{sub 1}) with cytogenetical parameters. In order to do this, the ovaries and uteri from 82 females were extracted for the reproductive analysis and 236 foetuses were obtained for cytogenetical analysis. The cytogenetical study was based on the data from 22,151 metaphases analysed. The cytogenetical parameters analysed to assess the existence of chromosomal instability were the number of aberrant metaphases (2234) and the number (2854) and type of structural chromosomal aberrations, including gaps and breaks. Concerning the reproductive analysis of the ovaries and the uteri, the parameters analysed were the number of corpora lutea, implantations, implantation losses and foetuses. Triptorelin confers radio-protection of the ovaries in front of chromosomal instability, which is different, with respect to the single and fractioned dose. The cytogenetical analysis shows a general decrease in most of the parameters of the triptorelin-treated groups, with respect to their controls, and some of these differences were considered to be statistically significant. The reproductive analysis indicates that there is also radio-protection by the agonist, although minor to the cytogenetical one. Only some of the analysed parameters show a statistically significant decrease in the triptorelin-treated groups.

  8. Evaluation of the effect of GnRH on follicular ovarian cysts in dairy cows using trans-rectal ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, P; Buckrell, B C; Liptrap, R M; Summerlee, A J; Johnson, W H

    1999-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate ovarian changes in cows with follicular ovarian cysts following treatment with either GnRH or saline. The parameters determined were the intervals from treatment to observation of a CL and from treatment to disappearance of the cyst, and the association between serum concentrations of LH, FSH and the LH/FSH ratio, before and after treatment, with the test intervals. Thirty-nine cows were identified as having follicular cysts. The GnRH treatment induced a significant increase in LH and the LH/FSH ratio. The gonadotropin response was not associated with the intervals from treatment to CL detection or to disappearance of the cyst. Survival curves for the intervals from treatment to CL detection and cyst disappearance indicate that treatment with GnRH or saline did not yield significantly different results for either parameter. The results question the efficacy of treating cystic ovarian disease with GnRH.

  9. Bovine ovarian follicular cysts: in vitro effects of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Cosola, Claudia; Mutinati, Maddalena; Spedicato, Massimo; Minoia, Giuseppe; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms of action by which a GnRH analogue may modulate the contractility of the bovine ovarian follicular wall. The in vitro evaluation of the spontaneous basal contractility of bovine preovulatory and cystic follicles was performed, followed by testing the effects of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue, on their basal contractility. Strips of tissue in isolated organ bath were employed. In addition, to better investigate the mechanism of action of lecirelin, the study of the effects of cumulative doses of nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker), phentolamine (an α-adrenoceptor antagonist) and reserpine (an inhibitor of the vesicular up-take of catecholamines) alone and, at the highest doses employed, associated to lecirelin, was set up. The results demonstrate that in basal conditions and after the addition of lecirelin, the strips from preovulatory follicles contract significantly more than strips from cysts. Furthermore, among the patterns of contractility evoked by the three drugs employed, the one induced by nifedipine was the only one unaffected by the addition of lecirelin. The data obtained provide the hypothesis that one of the main mechanisms of action of GnRH, could involve calcium channels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembowski, Jill A; Dremel, Sarah E; DeLuca, Neal A

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4-6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulates expression of the anti-lipolytic G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81/Gpr81)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeninga, Ellen H; Bugge, Anne Skovsø; Nielsen, Ronni

    2009-01-01

    target genes that may contribute to the reduction of circulating free fatty acids after TZD treatment have been identified, the relevant PPARgamma target genes that may exert the anti-lipolytic effect of TZDs are unknown. Here we identified the anti-lipolytic human G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81......), GPR109A, and the (human-specific) GPR109B genes as well as the mouse Gpr81 and Gpr109A genes as novel TZD-induced genes in mature adipocytes. GPR81/Gpr81 is a direct PPARgamma target gene, because mRNA expression of GPR81/Gpr81 (and GPR109A/Gpr109A) increased in mature human and murine adipocytes...... as well as in vivo in epididymal fat pads of mice upon rosiglitazone stimulation, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PPARgamma in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes showed a significant decrease in Gpr81 protein expression. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis...

  12. Reduced levels of GH during GnRH analogue treatment in pubertal short girls born small for gestational age (SGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kaay, Daniëlle C M; Rose, Susan R; van Dijk, Marije; Noordam, Cees; van Rheenen, Eva; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2009-06-01

    Several studies showed a decrease in height velocity during GnRH analogue (GnRHa) treatment. No information is available on GH levels during GnRHa treatment in short SGA girls. To study overnight GH profiles and IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels in girls with Tanner stage 2 and stage 3, before and after 3 months of GnRHa treatment, and to compare levels with those found in prepubertal short SGA girls. Twenty-four pubertal and 16 prepubertal short SGA girls. After baseline overnight GH profiles, pubertal girls received leuprorelide acetate depots of 3.75 mg subcutaneously every 4 weeks. GH, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels. At baseline, GH levels were comparable to levels found in prepubertal short SGA girls and IGF-I and IGFBP-3 SDS were significantly below the population mean. After 3 months of GnRHa treatment, AUC(0) (P = 0.02), mean (P = 0.02) and maximum GH levels (P = 0.008) had significantly decreased. Mean GH levels were significantly lower than in prepubertal short SGA girls (P = 0.03). Eight girls with more than 40% decrease in mean GH levels also had a significantly greater decrease in IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels. Mean and maximum GH levels at baseline correlated significantly with those after 3 months of GnRHa treatment. Short SGA girls lack the normal increase in GH levels seen in puberty and have reduced IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels, which might explain their reduced pubertal growth spurt. GnRHa treatment led to a significant reduction in GH levels. Therefore, combining GnRHa treatment with GH treatment might improve adult height of short SGA girls.

  13. Leptin and adiponectin levels in girls with central precocious puberty before and during GnRH agonist treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Yoo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa treatment on the energy metabolism in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP are controversial. We focused the changes and related factors of serum levels of leptin and adiponectin in girls with CPP before and during GnRHa treatment.MethodsThirty girls with idiopathic CPP were enrolled in the study. Their auxological data and fasting blood were collected at the baseline and after six months of GnRHa treatment.ResultsAfter treatment, height (P<0.001, weight (P<0.001, and serum leptin levels (P=0.033 were significantly increased, whereas body mass index (BMI, homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance, serum adiponectin levels, and adiponectin/leptin ratio exhibited no significant changes. A Pearson correlation analysis showed that height, weight, BMI, and their standard deviation scores (SDSs, but not basal LH, FSH, and estradiol, were significantly correlated with serum leptin levels before and after GnRHa treatment. After a multiple linear regression analysis, only BMI was associated with serum leptin levels. Moreover, leptin SDSs adjusted for BMI were not significantly different before and after GnRHa. The Δ leptin levels (r2=0.207, P=0.012, but not with Δ leptin SDS (r2=0.019, P=0.556, during GnRHa treatment were positively correlated with Δ BMI.ConclusionThese results suggest that GnRHa treatment in girls with CPP does not affect serum levels of leptin and adiponectin and insulin resistance. Serum leptin levels were depend on the changes in BMI during GnRHa treatment.

  14. Administration of single-dose GnRH agonist in the luteal phase in ICSI cycles: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira João

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a administered in the luteal phase remains controversial. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effect of the administration of a single-dose of GnRH-a in the luteal phase on ICSI clinical outcomes. Methods The research strategy included the online search of databases. Only randomized studies were included. The outcomes analyzed were implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate (CPR per transfer and ongoing pregnancy rate. The fixed effects model was used for odds ratio. In all trials, a single dose of GnRH-a was administered at day 5/6 after ICSI procedures. Results All cycles presented statistically significantly higher rates of implantation (P Conclusions These findings demonstrate that the luteal-phase single-dose GnRH-a administration can increase implantation rate in all cycles and CPR per transfer and ongoing pregnancy rate in cycles with GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol. Nevertheless, by considering the heterogeneity between the trials, it seems premature to recommend the use of GnRH-a in the luteal phase. Additional randomized controlled trials are necessary before evidence-based recommendations can be provided.

  15. Use of GnRH to induce an accessory corpus luteum in buffaloes fixed time artificially inseminated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Baruselli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to induce an accessory corpus luteum (CL in buffaloes fixed time artificially inseminated. Two hundred and forty buffaloes received the treatment sequence GnRH/PGF2α/GnRH after which were inseminated artificially. Six days after the insemination, the animals were divided in two groups (G1 = Control and G2 = GnRH and received 0 μg or 25 μg of GnRH to induce an accessory CL. After twenty four days (D40, pregnancy diagnosis was performed by ultrasonography and 79 buffalo (G1, n = 39; G2, n = 40 were randomly selected to verify the ovary status by ultrasound. Fifty three pregnant buffaloes (G1, n = 32; G2, n = 21 were followed to verify the birth rate. Data were analyzed by Chi-square test. The conception rate, the accessory CL rate and the birth rate were higher in G2 than in G1 (P<0.05. The use of GnRH to induce an accessory CL in buffaloes increased the conception and birth rates. Thus, the increase of the cost of Ovsynch protocol with the thirty dose of GnRH is rewarded by the increment on conception and birth rates and reduction of days open.

  16. Immunization against recombinant GnRH-I alters ultrastructure of gonadotropin cell in an experimental boar model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fugui; Su, Shiping; Liu, Ya; Zhang, Yunhai; Pu, Yong; Zhao, Xijie; Li, Yunsheng; Cao, Hongguo; Wang, Juhua; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Xiaorong

    2013-07-15

    Gonadotropin cell is the main responsible for the secretion of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), and immunocastration reduces the concentrations of serum FSH and LH. A few studies have reported the histological structure of gonadotropin cells obtained from immunocastration animals at the light microscopy level. However, the ultrastructure of gonadotropin cells remains largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to evaluate and to compare ultrastructure of gonadotropin cell in gonadally intact boars and immunologically castrated male animals. In this study, serum and adenohypophysis tissue were collected from nine gonadally intact boars and nine male pigs treated with recombinant gonadotropin releasing hormone I (GnRH-I). Anti-GnRH-I antibodies in serum and the ultrastructure of gonadotropin cell in adenohypophysis were determined by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay and electron microscopy, respectively. The results demonstrated that active immunization against recombinant GnRH-I increased serum GnRH-I antibody levels (Pimmunized animals. We conclude that immunization against recombinant GnRH-I induces severe atrophy of granules in gonadotropin cell of boars, possibly reflecting GnRH-I regulation of gonadotropin cell.

  17. Transrectal ultrasonic diagnosis of ovarian follicular cysts in goats and treatment with GnRH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medan, M S; Watanabe, G; Sasaki, K; Taya, K

    2004-08-01

    Cystic ovarian disease is an important cause of reproductive failure. The objective of this study was to evaluate transrectal ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) as a therapeutic approach for ovarian follicular cysts in goats. Goats were considered to have a follicular cyst(s) if a non-echoic structure >10 mm in diameter was detected in the absence of corpora lutea (CL) in three ultrasonic examinations performed at 5-day intervals. After diagnosis (Day 0), goats with ovarian follicular cysts (n = 5) were treated with a single bolus injection of 10.5 microg synthetic GnRH followed by administration of 125 microg prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) 10 days later. Five blood samples were collected at 5-day intervals for determination of progesterone and estradiol-17beta. For detection of LH surge, blood samples were collected every 2 h. Ovulation rate was determined and pregnancy was confirmed by transrectal ultrasonography. The results showed that transrectal ultrasonography is reliable for diagnosis of ovarian follicular cysts and the mean diameter of the follicular cysts was 12.6 +/- 0.4 mm. Plasma concentrations of progesterone and estradiol-17beta at the time of diagnosis of follicular cysts (Day 0) were 0.7 +/- 0.2 ng/ml and 12.7 +/- 0.9 pg/ml, respectively. The concentration of progesterone increased to 4.0 +/- 0.5 ng/ml 10 days after administration of GnRH indicating luteinization of the ovarian follicular cysts concomitant with a decrease in the concentration of estradiol-17beta (3.5 +/- 0.4 pg/ml). Administration of GnRH to cystic goats resulted in a surge of LH within 2 h of treatment. The interval from PGF2alpha injection to the preovulatory LH surge was 62.8 +/- 1.4 h. All goats exhibited estrus 55.2 +/- 2.3 h after PGF2alpha injection and four goats out of the five ovulated. The ovulation rate was 1.5 +/- 0.3. In conclusion, results of this study suggest that transrectal ultrasonography is a reliable tool for

  18. Statistical methods for launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system design and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Michael Benjamin

    A novel trajectory and attitude control and navigation analysis tool for powered ascent is developed. The tool is capable of rapid trade-space analysis and is designed to ultimately reduce turnaround time for launch vehicle design, mission planning, and redesign work. It is streamlined to quickly determine trajectory and attitude control dispersions, propellant dispersions, orbit insertion dispersions, and navigation errors and their sensitivities to sensor errors, actuator execution uncertainties, and random disturbances. The tool is developed by applying both Monte Carlo and linear covariance analysis techniques to a closed-loop, launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system. The nonlinear dynamics and flight GN&C software models of a closed-loop, six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF), Monte Carlo simulation are formulated and developed. The nominal reference trajectory (NRT) for the proposed lunar ascent trajectory is defined and generated. The Monte Carlo truth models and GN&C algorithms are linearized about the NRT, the linear covariance equations are formulated, and the linear covariance simulation is developed. The performance of the launch vehicle GN&C system is evaluated using both Monte Carlo and linear covariance techniques and their trajectory and attitude control dispersion, propellant dispersion, orbit insertion dispersion, and navigation error results are validated and compared. Statistical results from linear covariance analysis are generally within 10% of Monte Carlo results, and in most cases the differences are less than 5%. This is an excellent result given the many complex nonlinearities that are embedded in the ascent GN&C problem. Moreover, the real value of this tool lies in its speed, where the linear covariance simulation is 1036.62 times faster than the Monte Carlo simulation. Although the application and results presented are for a lunar, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), ascent vehicle, the tools, techniques, and mathematical

  19. Peri-pubertal gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment affects sex biased gene expression of amygdala in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuruddin, Syed; Krogenæs, Anette; Brynildsrud, Ola Brønstad; Verhaegen, Steven; Evans, Neil P; Robinson, Jane E; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit Hebold; Ropstad, Erik

    2013-12-01

    The nature of hormonal involvement in pubertal brain development has attracted wide interest. Structural changes within the brain that occur during pubertal development appear mainly in regions closely linked with emotion, motivation and cognitive functions. Using a sheep model, we have previously shown that peri-pubertal pharmacological blockade of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors, results in exaggerated sex-differences in cognitive executive function and emotional control, as well as sex and hemisphere specific patterns of expression of hippocampal genes associated with synaptic plasticity and endocrine signaling. In this study, we explored effects of this treatment regime on the gene expression profile of the ovine amygdala. The study was conducted with 30 same-sex twin lambs (14 female and 16 male), half of which were treated with the GnRH agonist (GnRHa) goserelin acetate every 4th week, beginning before puberty, until approximately 50 weeks of age. Gene expression profiles of the left and right amygdala were measured using 8×15 K Agilent ovine microarrays. Differential expression of selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR (Quantitative real time PCR). Networking analyses and Gene Ontology (GO) Term analyses were performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), version 7.5 and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and integrated Discovery) version 6.7 software packages, respectively. GnRHa treatment was associated with significant sex- and hemisphere-specific differential patterns of gene expression. GnRHa treatment was associated with differential expression of 432 (|logFC|>0.3, adj. p value expressed as a result of GnRHa treatment in the male animals. The results indicated that GnRH may, directly and/or indirectly, be involved in the regulation of sex- and hemisphere-specific differential expression of genes in the amygdala. This finding should be considered when long-term peri-pubertal GnRHa treatment is used in children. Copyright

  20. Cumulative live birth rates after one ART cycle including all subsequent frozen-thaw cycles in 1050 women: secondary outcome of an RCT comparing GnRH-antagonist and GnRH-agonist protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toftager, M; Bogstad, J; Løssl, K; Prætorius, L; Zedeler, A; Bryndorf, T; Nilas, L; Pinborg, A

    2017-03-01

    Are cumulative live birth rates (CLBRs) similar in GnRH-antagonist and GnRH-agonist protocols for the first ART cycle including all subsequent frozen-thaw cycles from the same oocyte retrieval? The chances of at least one live birth following utilization of all fresh and frozen embryos after the first ART cycle are similar in GnRH-antagonist and GnRH-agonist protocols. Reproductive outcomes of ART treatment are traditionally reported as pregnancies per cycle or per embryo transfer. However, the primary concern is the overall chance of a live birth. After the first ART cycle with fresh embryo transfer, we found live birth rates (LBRs) of 22.8% and 23.8% (P = 0.70) for the GnRH-antagonist and GnRH-agonist protocols, respectively. But with CLBRs including both fresh and frozen embryos from the first oocyte retrieval, chances of at least one live birth increases. There are no previous randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing CLBRs in GnRH-antagonist versus GnRH-agonist protocols. Previous studies on CLBR are either retrospective cohort studies including multiple fresh cycles or RCTs comparing single embryo transfer (SET) with double embryo transfer (DET). CLBR was a secondary outcome in a Phase IV, dual-center, open-label, RCT including 1050 women allocated to a short GnRH-antagonist or a long GnRH-agonist protocol in a 1:1 ratio over a 5-year period using a web-based concealed randomization code. The minimum follow-up time from the first IVF cycle was 2 years. The aim was to compare CLBR between the two groups following utilization of all fresh and frozen embryos from the first ART cycle. All women referred for their first ART cycle at two public fertility clinics, live birth was irrespective of the duration of gestation. CLBR was defined as at least one live birth per allocated woman after fresh and frozen cycles. Subjects were censored out after the first live birth. Cox proportional hazard model was used to evaluate the relative prognostic significance of

  1. Heterosis expression in crosses between maize populations: ear yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Ricardo Machado da

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of heterosis has been exploited extensively in maize (Zea mays L. breeding. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic potential of ten maize populations for ear yield following the diallel mating scheme. Six parental populations were obtained through phenotypic selection of open-pollinated ears in Rio Verde, GO, Brazil, (GO populations and four parental populations were synthesized in Piracicaba, SP, Brazil (GN populations: GO-D (DENTADO, GO- F (FLINT, GO-A (AMARELO, GO-B (BRANCO, GO-L (LONGO, GO-G (GROSSO, GN-01, GN-02, GN-03 and GN-04. Experiments were carried out in three environments: Anhembi (SP and Rio Verde (GO in 1998/99 (normal season crop and Piracicaba (SP in 1999 (off-season crop. All experiments were in completely randomized blocks with six replications. Analysis of variance grouped over environments showed high significance for heterosis and its components, although mid-parent heterosis and average heterosis were of low expression. The interaction treatments x environments was not significant. Total mid-parent heterosis effects ranged from de -4.3% to 17.3% with an average heterosis of 3.37%. Population with the highest yield (7.4 t ha-1 and with the highest effect of population (v i = 0.746 was GN-03, while the highest yielding cross was GO-B x GN-03 with 7,567 t ha-1. The highest specific heterosis effect (s ii' = 0.547 was observed in the cross GO-B x GN-03.

  2. Photoaffinity labeling of pituitary GnRH receptors: significance of the position of photolabel on the ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolics, K.; Szonyi, E.; Ramachandran, J.

    1988-03-08

    Photoreactive derivatives of GnRH and its analogues were prepared by incorporation of the 2-nitro-4(5)-azidophenylsulfenyl (2,4(5)-NAPS) group into amino acid residues at position 1, 3, 6, or 8 of the decapeptide sequence. The modification of Trp/sup 3/ by the 2,4-NAPS group led to a complete loss of the luteinizing hormone (LH) releasing as well as LH-release-inhibiting activity of the peptide. The (D-Lys(2,4-NAPS))/sup 6/ analog was a very potent agonist that, after covalent attachment by photoaffinity labeling, caused prolonged LH secretion at a submaximal rate. (Orn(2,4-NAPS))/sup 8/-GnRH, a full agonist with a relative potency of 7% of GnRH, after photoaffinity labeling caused prolonged maximal LH release from cultured pituitary cells. In contrast, (Orn(2,5-NAPS))/sup 8/-GnRH, although being equipotent with the 2,4-NAPS isomer in terms of LH releasing ability, was unable to cause prolonged LH release after photoaffinity labeling. Thus, (Orn(2,4-NAPS))/sup 8/GnRH is very effective photolabeling ligand of the functionally significant pituitary GnRH receptor. Based on this compound, a pituitary peptidase resistant derivative, D-Phe/sup 6/, (Orn(2,4-NAPS))/sup 8/-GnRH-(1-9)-ethylamide, was synthesized. This derivative showed high-affinity binding to pituitary membranes with a K/sub d/ comparable to those of other GnRH analogues. A radioiodinated form of this peptide was used for pituitary GnRH-receptor labeling. This derivative labeled 59- and 57-kDa proteins in rat and 58- and 56-kDa proteins in bovine pituitary membrane preparations, respectively. This peptide also labeled pituitary GnRH receptors in the solubilized state and therefore appears to be a suitable ligand for the isolation and further characterization of the receptor.

  3. Glomerulonephritis-induced changes in kidney gene expression in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Pavkovic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a glomerulonephritis (GN model in rats induced by nephrotoxic serum (NTS which contains antibodies against the glomerular basement membrane (GBM. The anti-GBM GN model in rats is widely used since its biochemical and histopathological characteristics are similar to crescentic nephritis and Goodpasture's disease in humans (Pusey, 2003 [2]. Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY and Sprague–Dawley (SD rats were dosed once with 1, 2.5 and 5 ml/kg nephrotoxic serum (NTS or 1.5 and 5 ml/kg NTS, respectively. GN and tubular damage were observed histopathologically in all treated rats after 14 days. To obtain insight into molecular processes during GN pathogenesis, mRNA expression was investigated in WKY and SD kidneys using Affymetrix's GeneChip Rat genome 230_2.0 arrays (GSE64265. The immunopathological processes during GN are still not fully understood and likely involve both innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, several hundred mRNAs were found deregulated, which functionally were mostly associated with inflammation and regeneration. The β-chain of the major histocompatibility complex class II RT1.B (Rt1-Bb and complement component 6 (C6 were identified as two mRNAs differentially expressed between WKY and SD rat strains which could be related to known different susceptibilities to NTS of different rat strains; both were increased in WKY and decreased in SD rats (Pavkovic et al., 2015 [1]. Increased Rt1-Bb expression in WKY rats could indicate a stronger and more persistent cellular reaction of the adaptive immune system in this strain, in line with findings indicating adaptive immune reactions during GN. The complement cascade is also known to be essential for GN development, especially terminal cascade products like C6.

  4. Efficient production of 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate from glucose and acetaldehyde by coupling of the alcoholic fermentation system of Baker's yeast and deoxyriboaldolase-expressing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinouchi, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Jun; Kawano, Takako; Sakai, Takafumi; Saito, Kyota; Matsumoto, Seiichiro; Sasaki, Mie; Mikami, Yoichi; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2006-06-01

    2-Deoxyribose 5-phosphate production through coupling of the alcoholic fermentation system of baker's yeast and deoxyriboaldolase-expressing Escherichia coli was investigated. In this process, baker's yeast generates fructose 1,6-diphosphate from glucose and inorganic phosphate, and then the E. coli convert the fructose 1,6-diphosphate into 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate via D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. Under the optimized conditions with toluene-treated yeast cells, 356 mM (121 g/l) fructose 1,6-diphosphate was produced from 1,111 mM glucose and 750 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 6.4) with a catalytic amount of AMP, and the reaction supernatant containing the fructose 1,6-diphosphate was used directly as substrate for 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate production with the E. coli cells. With 178 mM enzymatically prepared fructose 1,6-diphosphate and 400 mM acetaldehyde as substrates, 246 mM (52.6 g/l) 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate was produced. The molar yield of 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate as to glucose through the total two step reaction was 22.1%. The 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate produced was converted to 2-deoxyribose with a molar yield of 85% through endogenous or exogenous phosphatase activity.

  5. Non-classical testosterone signaling in spermatogenic GC-2 cells is mediated through ZIP9 interacting with Gnα11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihan, Mazen; Chan, Kai-Hui; Konrad, Lutz; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2015-10-01

    Although classical and non-classical signaling of testosterone has been documented in several investigations, the nature of the receptor involved in the non-classical pathway remains a source of controversy. While some investigators favor the exclusive participation of the cytosolic/nuclear androgen receptor (AR) in both pathways, others propose a membrane-bound receptor as the mediator of the non-classical testosterone signaling. Evidence is provided here that in the spermatogenic cell line GC-2 the non-classical signaling pathway of testosterone, characterized through the activation of Erk1/2 and transcription factors like CREB or ATF-1, is not mediated through the classical nuclear androgen receptor (AR) but rather by a membrane-associated receptor. This receptor is ZIP9, a Zn(2+) transporter from the family of the ZRT, IRT-like proteins (ZRT=zinc-regulated transporter; IRT=iron-regulated transporter), which directly interacts with the G-protein Gnα11. siRNA-induced abrogation of the expression of either of these two proteins, whose close contacts are demonstrated by an in situ proximity assay, completely prevents all non-classical signaling effects of testosterone addressed. In contrast, silencing of AR expression does not influence the same signaling events. The identification of ZIP9/Gnα11 interactions as the mediators of the non-classical testosterone signaling cascade in spermatogenic GC-2 cells might help to supplement our knowledge concerning the role of testosterone in male fertility and reproduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Behavior of feral horses in response to culling and GnRH immunocontraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jason I.; Powers, Jenny G.; Garbe, Heidi M.; Oehler, Michael W.; Nett, Terry M.; Baker, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife management actions can alter fundamental behaviors of individuals and groups,which may directly impact their life history parameters in unforeseen ways. This is especially true for highly social animals because changes in one individual’s behavior can cascade throughout its social network. When resources to support populations of social animals are limited and populations become locally overabundant, managers are faced with the daunting challenge of decreasing population size without disrupting core behavioral processes. Increasingly, managers are turning to fertility control technologies to supplement culling in efforts to suppress population growth, but little is quantitatively known about how either of these management tools affects behavior. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a small neuropeptide that performs an obligatory role in mammalian reproduction and has been formulated into the immunocontraceptive GonaCon-BTM. We investigated the influences of this vaccine on behavior of feral horses (Equus caballus) at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota, USA, for a year preceding and a year following nonlethal culling and GnRH-vaccine treatment. We observed horses during the breeding season and found only minimal differences in time budget behaviors of free-ranging female feral horses treated with GnRH and those treated with saline. The differences observed were consistent with the metabolic demands of pregnancy and lactation. We observed similar social behaviors between treatment groups, reflecting limited reproductive behavior among control females due to high rates of pregnancy and suppressed reproductive behavior among treated females due to GnRH-inhibited ovarian activity. In the treatment year, band stallion age was the only supported factor influencing herding behavior (P stallions decreased 50.7% following treatment and culling (P reproductive, and agonistic behavior in the year following culling and treatment (P < 0.04). These

  7. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of a subcutaneous depot for GnRH antagonist degarelix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg

    Purpose. The objective of this study is to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model that describes the subcutaneous (SC) depot formation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist degarelix, which is being developed for treatment of prostate cancer, exhibiting dose-volume and dose......-concentration dependent absorption. Methods. The PK analysis is made in NONMEM through joint analysis of data from two phase I clinical studies; an intravenous infusion study and a single SC dose escalation study. The SC absorption is modeled using an approximation to Ficks' second law of diffusion out of a spherical...

  8. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of a Subcutaneous Depot for GnRH Antagonist Degarelix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The objective of this study is to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model that describes the subcutaneous (SC) depot formation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone ( GnRH) antagonist degarelix, which is being developed for treatment of prostate cancer, exhibiting dose-volume and dose......-concentration dependent absorption. Methods. The PK analysis is made in NONMEM through joint analysis of data from two phase I clinical studies; an intravenous infusion study and a single SC dose escalation study. The SC absorption is modeled using an approximation to Ficks' second law of diffusion out of a spherical...

  9. Ovarian cysts in lactating dairy cows: incidence, response to GnRH, and reproductive performance

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, R.M.; Démetrio, D.G.B.; Vasconcelos, J.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A incidência de cistos ovarianos, a resposta ao tratamento com GnRH e os efeitos da ocorrência de cisto no desempenho reprodutivo e na taxa de descarte foram determinados em vacas lactantes da raça Holandesa. Vacas lactantes (n=333) foram avaliadas semanalmente por ultrassonografia a partir da quarta semana pós-parto, visando à detecção de corpos lúteos (CL) e de folículos ovarianos maiores que 10mm. Na sétima semana pós-parto, as vacas foram classificadas: em ciclando (n=248; presença de CL ...

  10. Effect of estradiol on hypothalamic GnRH and pituitary and serum LH and FSH in ovariectomized pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, N M; Britt, J H

    1982-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to measure pituitary gonadotropins, hypothalamic-gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and pituitary response to GnRH during periods when serum luteinizing hormone (LH) was suppressed by estradiol-17 beta (e2) in ovariectomized pigs. In the first experiment, 10 ovariectomized gilts were assigned to two groups of five each according to time of slaughter (24 or 36 h after injection). Within each group, gilts were given corn oil (n = 2) or 400 micrograms E2 (n = 3). Neither serum nor anterior pituitary (AP) concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were affected by E2. Serum LH was suppressed from 12 to 26 h after E2. Concentrations of LH in AP were unchanged at 24 h, but increased at 36 h after E2 injection. Concentrations of GnRH in medial basal hypothalamus (MBH), stalk-median eminence (SME) and hypophyseal portal area (HPA) were lower at 24 h after E2 than in oil-treated gilts. At 36 h after E2, suppressive effects of E2 on LH in serum had subsided and concentrations of LH in AP and GnRH in MBH and SME were greater than in oil-treated controls. The observation that E2 suppressed LH in serum without a detectable suppression of LH in AP led to the hypothesis that E2 had caused the suppression of serum LH by suppression of GnRH release. In a second experiment, 12 ovariectomized gilts were assigned to receive corn oil (n = 4), 400 micrograms E2 (n = 4) or 400 micrograms E2 plus GnRH (1.5 micrograms/h; n = 4). Patterns of LH in sera of E2-treated animals were similar to those in the first experiment, with serum LH in E2-treated gilts suppressed from 4 to 32 h after treatment. However, in gilts receiving GnRH in addition to E2, serum LH concentrations during 20 to 32 h after treatment were intermediate between gilts receiving E2 alone and controls. Thus the pituitary of the pig is capable of responding to GnRH when LH is normally suppressed by E2. These experiments provide two lines of evidence that suppression of serum LH by E2

  11. Impact of GnRH agonist triggering and intensive luteal steroid support on live-birth rates and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iliodromiti, Stamatina; Lan, Vuong Thi Ngoc; Tuong, Ho Manh

    2013-01-01

    Conventional luteal support packages are inadequate to facilitate a fresh transfer after GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger in patients at high risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). By providing intensive luteal-phase support with oestradiol and progesterone satisfactory implanta......Conventional luteal support packages are inadequate to facilitate a fresh transfer after GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger in patients at high risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). By providing intensive luteal-phase support with oestradiol and progesterone satisfactory...

  12. Hysteroscopic myomectomy outcomes after 3-month treatment with either Ulipristal Acetate or GnRH analogues: a retrospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Javier Monleón; Delgado, Verónica Serrano de la Cruz; Valero, Maria José Nuñez; Soteras, Marta Gurrea; Amate, Vicente Payá; Carrascosa, Antonio Abad

    2016-03-01

    Ulipristal Acetate (UPA) modifies the endometrium, as well as fibroids, and therefore it might make hysteroscopic surgery more difficult. To confirm that pre-treatment with UPA is as safe and effective an option as pre-treatment with GnRH analogues, considered the gold standard. We present the first series of 26 hysteroscopic myomectomies after 3 months treatment with UPA and we compare the results with a series of 24 cases pretreated with GnRH analogues. This was a retrospective cohort study between July 2013 and May 2015. We analyszed patients with submucous myomas >2.5 in diameter. Hysteroscopic myomectomy was performed after 3 months of treatment with either UPA (5mg daily) or the GnRH agonist (3.75mg/month). Both groups were similar in age, myoma initial size and classification. There were no significant differences between UPA and GnRHa treated groups in terms of percentage of myomas resected (93% vs 98%), duration of surgery (38 vs 37min), fluid deficit (200 vs 350ml) and complications. In the surgeon's subjective opinion, UPA treatment was associated with an easier resection. Based on our experience, previous treatment with UPA does not difficult Hhysteroscopic myomectomy. Endometrial changes have no impact on surgery. Safety and feasibility are comparable to hysteroscopic myomectomies with previous treatment with GnRH analogues. This allows us to take advantage of the reduction in size of fibroids before surgery with less side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Active immunization against GnRH in ovine (Ovis aries: testicular morphometry, histopathology and endocrine responses in prepubertal ram lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutierrez-Reinoso MA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present research was to assess the effects of an active immunization against GnRH on male reproductive function as an alternative to surgical sterilization evaluating testicular morphometry, histopathological alterations and plasma gonadotropin levels in prepubertal ram lambs. Dorper ram lambs (age= 2 months; control group, n= 5; treatment group, n=15 were immunised by using an anti-GnRH vaccine (two administrations spaced 15d developed by linking a GnRH homologous molecule to tetanus toxoid (clostridial toxoid with aluminum hydroxide as coadjuvant. To determine the effectiveness of the vaccination protocol, testicular morphometry was evaluated (length, width, mean volume and total volume together with histopathological alterations in testicular tissue samples (seminiferous tubule diameters, spermatogonia per testis and sperm presence and endocrine responses (ELISA from blood samples (FSH, LH, testosterone and cortisol plasma levels. Morphometric parameters (testicular length, width and volume were significantly reduced in vaccinated animals with respect to the control group (p0.05. In conclusion, prepubertal active immunization against GnRH led to marked differences on testes morphometry and activity in ovine species, however, it did not affect endocrine levels nor spermatogenesis in all individuals studied showing a partial vaccination effect in some of them. Thus, taking into account the heterogeneous dysfunctional responses obtained, different vaccination assays and strategies should be tested before active immunization against GnRH is considered as a viable alternative to conventional surgical sterilization.

  14. Annual gonadal cycles in birds: modeling the effects of photoperiod on seasonal changes in GnRH-1 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Alistair

    2015-04-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge of photoperiod control of GnRH-1 secretion and proposes a model in which two processes act together to regulate GnRH1 secretion. Photo-induction controls GnRH1 secretion and is directly related to prevailing photoperiod. Photo-inhibition, a longer term process, acts through GnRH1 synthesis. It progresses each day during daylight hours, but reverses during darkness. Thus, photo-inhibition gradually increases when photoperiods exceed 12h, and reverses under shorter photoperiods. GnRH1 secretion on any particular day is the net result of these two processes acting in tandem. The only difference between species is their sensitivity to photo-inhibition. This can potentially explain differences in timing and duration of breeding seasons between species, why some species become absolutely photorefractory and others relatively photorefractory, why breeding seasons end at the same time at different latitudes within species, and why experimental protocols sometimes produce results that appear counter to what happens naturally. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. GnRHa trigger and individualized luteal phase hCG support according to ovarian response to stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, Peter; Polyzos, N P; Alsbjerg, B

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Does a GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger followed by a bolus of 1.500 IU hCG in a group of patients at risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) reduce the OHSS incidence compared with hCG trigger? SUMMARY ANSWER: A GnRHa trigger followed by early luteal hCG support with one bolus...... of 1.500 IU hCG appears to reduce OHSS in patients at risk of OHSS; however, in a low-risk group a second bolus of 1.500 IU hCG induced two cases of late onset OHSS. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: A GnRHa trigger is an alternative to hCG in GnRH antagonist co-treated cycles. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: Two......RHa) s.c. followed by a single bolus of 1.500 IU hCG s.c. after the oocyte retrieval-or: Group B (n = 58): 5.000 IU hCG. Similarly, women at low risk of OHSS were allocated (RCT 2) to receive either: Group C (n = 125), a bolus of 0.5 mg buserelin s.c., followed by a bolus of 1.500 IU hCG s.c. after...

  16. [The neuroendocrinological and histopathological assessment of normogonadotropic azoospermic patients: the usefulness of the GnRH stimulation test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosete Rossetti, R; Alvarado García, A; Bustos López, H H; Barrón Vallejo, J; Sinibaldi Gómez, J

    1994-10-01

    This study evaluates the effect of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) administration on serum levels of FSH and LH. Also, relate those results with histopathologic findings of testicular biopsies. This was a prospective, clinical trial with a control group. It was done at Department of Reproductive Biology "20 de Noviembre" Hospital, ISSSTE, México City. Fifteen azoospermic, normogonadotropic patients without testicular atrophy and ten normal men use as control group. A GnRH challenge test was made in both groups, two days after we perform a testicular biopsy in patients with azoospermia. There was no significant difference in serum LH concentrations between the two groups, neither before or after GnRH challenge test. There was a statistical difference between serum FSH values of azoospermic patients, than those of control group, the former with higher values than those of the latter. As worst testicular damage was, we found also a higher FSH value on the GnRH challenge test. The GnRH challenge test perform in azoospermic, normogonadotropic patients is very helpful to detect those patients with gonadal damage. As higher the FSH values were, we found that an abnormal testicular biopsy was also more common.

  17. Circulating Estradiol Regulates Brain-Derived Estradiol via Actions at GnRH Receptors to Impact Memory in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Britta S; Black, Katelyn L; Daniel, Jill M

    2016-01-01

    Systemic estradiol treatment enhances hippocampus-dependent memory in ovariectomized rats. Although these enhancements are traditionally thought to be due to circulating estradiol, recent data suggest these changes are brought on by hippocampus-derived estradiol, the synthesis of which depends on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) activity. The goal of the current work is to test the hypothesis that peripheral estradiol affects hippocampus-dependent memory through brain-derived estradiol regulated via hippocampal GnRH receptor activity. In the first experiment, intracerebroventricular infusion of letrozole, which prevents the synthesis of estradiol, blocked the ability of peripheral estradiol administration in ovariectomized rats to enhance hippocampus-dependent memory in a radial-maze task. In the second experiment, hippocampal infusion of antide, a long-lasting GnRH receptor antagonist, blocked the ability of peripheral estradiol administration in ovariectomized rats to enhance hippocampus-dependent memory. In the third experiment, hippocampal infusion of GnRH enhanced hippocampus-dependent memory, the effects of which were blocked by letrozole infusion. Results indicate that peripheral estradiol-induced enhancement of cognition is mediated by brain-derived estradiol via hippocampal GnRH receptor activity.

  18. Pharmacological and toxicological assessment of a potential GnRH vaccine in young-adult male pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkstra, J A; van der Staay, F J; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Woelders, H; Meloen, R H; Schuurman, T

    2011-05-12

    Active immunization against gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is successfully applied to prevent boar taint in pork. In men, GnRH immunization could be an alternative to hormone therapy in patients with prostate cancer. In this study, a new GnRH vaccine formulation (a modified GnRH peptide conjugate formulated with CoVaccine adjuvant) was investigated for its pharmacological efficacy and safety in young-adult male pigs. Immunization resulted in castrate-like plasma testosterone levels in all treated pigs from week 8 until the end of the study, 30 weeks after the first immunization. Testosterone depletion retarded testes growth, reduced the relative weight of the testes and accessory sex organs, and reduced sperm counts and motility. There was no clinically relevant toxicity. Typical vaccination-related adverse reactions, such as swelling at the injection site and fever, were considered acceptable. We conclude that this GnRH vaccine efficiently and rapidly reduced serum testosterone levels, without inducing chronic toxic effects, and therefore could be applicable in both veterinary and human medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acceptance Versus Change Interventions in Behavioral Couple Therapy: Impact on Couples' In-Session Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, James V.; Jacobson, Neil S.; Christensen, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    Examines couples' communication through Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy (IBCT) and Traditional Behavioral Couple Therapy (TBCT). Results show that IBCT couples expressed more nonblaming descriptions of problems and more soft emotions than TBCT couples during late stages of therapy. IBCT couples increased their nonblaming description of…

  20. Protective Role of GnRH Antagonist on Chemotherapy-induced Spermatogenesis Disorder: A Morphological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryosh Mohammadnejad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anti cancer drugs is one of the most important chemotherapeutic factors which can influence spermatogenesis process and germinal epithelium. Since dividing cells are mainly affected by anticancer drugs, the aim of the present study is to investigate thepreventive effect of GnRH antagonist on spermatogenic defect produced by anticancer drugs. Methods: In the present study thirty adult male mice aging 6-8 weeks were divided into 3 groups as: Control, Experimental 1 and Experimental 2. Experimental 1 group received Cisplatin for 5 days as 2.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally and Experimental 2group received 0.25 mg/kg cetrorelix (GnRH antagonist one week before cisplatin treatment and continued for 3 weeks. The mice in all groups were sacrificed 35 days after the last injection and testis specimens were fixed in boueins, formaldehyde fixativeand 2.5% Glutaraldehide then prepared for light and electron microscopic examination. Results: Light microscopy (LM study showed that the number of spermatogonial cells, thickness of germinal epithelium, was decreased in Experimental 1group. Electronmicroscopy revealed that in this group several intercellular spaces appeared between spermatogenic cells and secretory granules in interstitial cells was increased. There were several vacuolated mitochondria and destroyed organelles in spermatogonial cells but inExperimental 2 group condition was similar to control group. Conclusion: These results indicate that the cetrorelix administration before cancer treatment may protect germinal epithelium against side effects of cisplatin.

  1. Preliminary GN&C Design for the On-Orbit Autonomous Assembly of Nanosatellite Demonstration Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jing; Walsh, Matt; Roithmayr, Carlos; Karlgaard, Chris; Peck, Mason; Murchison, Luke

    2017-01-01

    Small spacecraft autonomous rendezvous and docking (ARD) is an essential technology for future space structure assembly missions. The On-orbit Autonomous Assembly of Nanosatellites (OAAN) team at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) intends to demonstrate the technology to autonomously dock two nanosatellites to form an integrated system. The team has developed a novel magnetic capture and latching mechanism that allows for docking of two CubeSats without precise sensors and actuators. The proposed magnetic docking hardware not only provides the means to latch the CubeSats, but it also significantly increases the likelihood of successful docking in the presence of relative attitude and position errors. The simplicity of the design allows it to be implemented on many CubeSat rendezvous missions. Prior to demonstrating the docking subsystem capabilities on orbit, the GN&C subsystem should have a robust design such that it is capable of bringing the CubeSats from an arbitrary initial separation distance of as many as a few thousand kilometers down to a few meters. The main OAAN Mission can be separated into the following phases: 1) Launch, checkout, and drift, 2) Far-Field Rendezvous or Drift Recovery, 3) Proximity Operations, 4) Docking. This paper discusses the preliminary GN&C design and simulation results for each phase of the mission.

  2. Development of a Ga-68 labeled triptorelin analog for GnRH receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoghi, Masoumeh; Niazi, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Jalilian, Amir R.; Johari-daha, Fariba; Alirezapour, Behrouz [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI) (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Ramezanpour, Sorour [K.N. Toosi Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Peptide Chemistry Research Center

    2016-08-01

    Optimized total synthesis, radiolabeling and quality control of [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTA-Hyd-TRP as an efficient and possible PET radiotracer for GnRH receptor imaging in various tumors is of great interest. DOTA-Hyd-TRP was synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis followed by conjugation to DOTA using pSCN-Bn-DOTA. [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTA-Hyd-TRP was prepared using generator-based [{sup 68}Ga]GaCl{sub 3} and DOTA-Hyd-TRP under optimized conditions for time, temperature, ligand amount, gallium content and column cartridge purification followed by proper formulation. The biodistribution of the tracer in rats was studied using tissue counting up to 120 min. [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTA-Hyd-TRP was prepared at optimized conditions in 5-7 min at 95 C followed by separation using C{sub 18} cartridge (radiochemical purity ∼99 ± 0.88% ITLC, > 99% HPLC, specific activity: 300 ± 15 MBq/nM). The biodistribution of the tracer demonstrated high kidney uptake of the tracer in 10-20 min as well as significant testicular uptake consistent with reported GnRH receptor mappings. Block test studies by triptorelin pretreatment of the animals prior to tracer administration demonstrated significant specific uptake in receptor rich organs including testes and stomach.

  3. The correlation between GnRH stimulation testing and obstetric ultrasonographic parameters in precocious puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binay, Cigdem; Simsek, Enver; Bal, Cengiz

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine reliable cut-off levels of basal gonadotropin and to assess the correlation of obstetric ultrasound parameters with the GnRH stimulation test. The GnRH stimulation test was performed in a cohort of young female patients who presented at our hospital for the evaluation of early signs of puberty. Using receiver operating curves (ROCs), the sensitivity and specificity of basal luteinising hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), basal and stimulated LH/FSH ratio, oestradiol levels and ultrasonographic parameters were evaluated at each level, and the area under curve (AUC) was measured. One hundred female children were assessed. We found that LH levels, peak LH/FSH ratio, fundal/cervical ratio, uterus length, and ovarian volume were reliable predictors of central precocious puberty (CPP). Cut-off levels of basal LH and the peak LH/FSH ratio had high specificity in our cohort. In addition, obstetric ultrasound parameters represent reliable predictors for the diagnosis of CPP.

  4. The control of reproduction in finfish species through GnRH treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Rainis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish in captivity can show some dysfunctions, at different levels, in the physiological processes of reproduction, due to  the lack of synthesis or release of gonadotropins (GtHs by hypophysis. As a consequence, a worsening of quality and  quantity of spawned gametes, or a lack of egg and sperm spawning, can be observed. The farmers can act on fish repro-  ductive cycle manipulating the environmental parameters of rearing, the diet, the genetics or using GnRH treatments.  Nowadays, they are used mainly GnRH, synthesized in laboratory as analogues. These releasing factors, naturally pro-  duced by hypothalamus, let to overcome the technological and biological limits of the “traditional” hormonal treatments  with hCG, being more effective, cheaper and easily available on market. This article makes a historical survey of the con-  ditioning treatments for fish reproduction and also considers the future perspectives of these treatments, examining the  topics that research will have to focus, in order to make these treatments common worldwide, in any hatchery and for  each farmed  species of finfish. 

  5. Orion GN&C Fault Management System Verification: Scope And Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Denise; Weiler, David; Flanary, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure long-term ability to meet mission goals and to provide for the safety of the public, ground personnel, and any crew members, nearly all spacecraft include a fault management (FM) system. For a manned vehicle such as Orion, the safety of the crew is of paramount importance. The goal of the Orion Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) fault management system is to detect, isolate, and respond to faults before they can result in harm to the human crew or loss of the spacecraft. Verification of fault management/fault protection capability is challenging due to the large number of possible faults in a complex spacecraft, the inherent unpredictability of faults, the complexity of interactions among the various spacecraft components, and the inability to easily quantify human reactions to failure scenarios. The Orion GN&C Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) team has developed a methodology for bounding the scope of FM system verification while ensuring sufficient coverage of the failure space and providing high confidence that the fault management system meets all safety requirements. The methodology utilizes a swarm search algorithm to identify failure cases that can result in catastrophic loss of the crew or the vehicle and rare event sequential Monte Carlo to verify safety and FDIR performance requirements.

  6. Corifollitropin alfa followed by rFSH in a GnRH antagonist protocol for poor ovarian responder patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Devos, Michel; Humaidan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify whether women with poor ovarian response may benefit from treatment with corifollitropin alfa in a GnRH antagonist protocol. DESIGN: Retrospective pilot study. SETTING: University-based tertiary care center. PATIENT(S): Poor ovarian responders fulfilling the Bologna criteria...... developed by European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology Consensus Group. INTERVENTION(S): Corifollitropin alfa (150 μg) followed by 300 IU rFSH in a GnRH antagonist protocol. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Endocrinologic profile and ongoing pregnancy rates. RESULT(S): Among 43 women treated...... compared with a cohort of patients treated during 2011 with the standard protocol for poor responders in our center (short agonist-hMG) (7% vs. 6.3%). CONCLUSION(S): Treatment of poor ovarian responders, as described by the Bologna criteria, with corifollitropin alfa in a GnRH antagonist protocol results...

  7. The Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Raloxifene Regulates Arginine-Vasopressin Gene Expression in Human Female Neuroblastoma Cells Through G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor and ERK Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Daniela; Ghorbanpoor, Samar; Acaz-Fonseca, Estefania; Ruiz-Palmero, Isabel; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2015-10-01

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene reduces blood pressure in hypertensive postmenopausal women. In the present study we have explored whether raloxifene regulates gene expression of arginine vasopressin (AVP), which is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The effect of raloxifene was assessed in human female SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which have been recently identified as a suitable cellular model to study the estrogenic regulation of AVP. Raloxifene, within a concentration ranging from 10(-10) M to 10(-6) M, decreased the mRNA levels of AVP in SH-SY5Y cells with maximal effect at 10(-7) M. This effect of raloxifene was imitated by an agonist (±)-1-[(3aR*,4S*,9bS*)-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-8-yl]-ethanone of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER) and blocked by an antagonist (3aS*,4R*,9bR*)-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline of GPER and by GPER silencing. Raloxifene induced a time-dependent increase in the level of phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2, by a mechanism blocked by the GPER antagonist. The treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with either a MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2-specific inhibitor (1,4-diamino-2, 3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadine) or a protein kinase C inhibitor (sotrastaurin) blocked the effects of raloxifene on the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and the regulation of AVP mRNA levels. These results reveal a mechanism mediating the regulation of AVP expression by raloxifene, involving the activation of GPER, which in turn activates protein kinase C, MAPK/ERK kinase, and ERK. The regulation of AVP by raloxifene and GPER may have implications for the treatment of blood hypertension(.).

  8. Serum Anti-Müllerian Hormone Levels in Precocious Puberty Girls according to Stage of GnRH Agonist Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo Kyoung; Kim, Hye Ryun; Rhie, Young Jun; Lee, Kee Hyoung

    2017-03-01

    Few studies have investigated the long-term effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist treatment on the reproductive function of central precocious puberty (CPP) girls. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the ovarian function by analyzing the serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels of CPP girls. Our study included 505 CPP girls subdivided into 5 groups according to the GnRH agonist treatment stage: group A (before treatment, n = 98), group B (3 months after initiation, n = 103), group C (12 months after initiation, n = 101), group D (24 months after initiation, n = 101), and group E (6 months after discontinuation, n = 102). We compared the serum AMH levels of the CPP girls with those of 100 bone age-matched controls (before treatment: n = 55; after discontinuation: n = 45). At baseline, the mean AMH level of the CPP girls was 5.9 ± 3.6 ng/mL. The mean AMH level after 3 months of the GnRH agonist treatment was lower (4.7 ± 3.2 ng/mL, P = 0.047) than that at baseline and recovered after 12 months of treatment. Six months after discontinuation, the AMH levels were similar to those at pre-treatment. Before and after the GnRH agonist treatment, the AMH levels were similar to those of the bone age-matched controls. In the precocious puberty girls, the AMH levels based on the GnRH agonist treatment stage were all within the normal reference range. The results of this study suggest that GnRH agonist treatment has no adverse effects on the reproductive function.

  9. Consistent individual variation in day, night, and GnRH-induced testosterone concentrations in house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Katie B; Dochtermann, Ned A; Greives, Timothy J

    2017-05-15

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) initiating the endocrine cascade, regulates testosterone secretion. Testosterone, through its pleiotropic effects, plays a crucial role in coordinating morphology, physiology and behavior in a reproductive context. The concentration of circulating testosterone, however, varies over the course of the day and in response to other internal or external stimuli, potentially making it difficult to relate testosterone sampled at one time point with traits of interest. Many researchers now utilize the administration of exogenous GnRH to elicit a standardized stimulation of testosterone secretion. However, it has remained unclear if and how this exogenously stimulated activation of the HPG axis is related with endogenously regulated testosterone that is capable of influencing testosterone related traits. Repeated measures of a hormone can uncover consistent individual variation in hormonal differences at the HPG axis level, variation that potentially stems from underlying genetic variation in a population experiencing identical environmental cues. Thus, we asked, using the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), how daily endogenous variation in testosterone profiles relates to GnRH-induced testosterone secretion. Further, we explore the relationship between endogenous daily testosterone peaks and GnRH-induced testosterone with badge size, a morphological trait related with status within a social group. We found that GnRH-induced testosterone levels reflect a highly repeatable hormonal phenotype that is strongly correlated with nighttime testosterone levels. The results demonstrate the usefulness of GnRH-induced testosterone in studies aimed at understanding individual variation and selection on endogenously regulated testosterone levels and the potential importance of nighttime testosterone levels to physiology and behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 'Luteal coasting' after GnRH agonist trigger - individualized, HCG-based, progesterone-free luteal support in 'high responders'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Breyzman, Tatiana; Segal, Linoy

    2015-01-01

    This study reports 21 IVF cases with excessive ovarian response, who received gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) triggering for final oocyte maturation, followed by a human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG)-based, progesterone-free, luteal support, individually timed ('luteal coasting...... post GnRHa trigger, the same principle that holds for follicular coasting, used in the context of OHSS prevention, may be valid. Monitoring luteal progesterone concentrations from the day of oocyte retrieval, and administering a bolus of HCG (1500 IU) when the concentration drops significantly, seems...

  11. Maximal expression of Foxl2 in pituitary gonadotropes requires ovarian hormones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria K Herndon

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH and activin regulate synthesis of FSH and ultimately fertility. Recent in vivo studies cast SMAD4 and FOXL2 as master transcriptional mediators of activin signaling that act together and independently of GnRH to regulate Fshb gene expression and female fertility. Ovarian hormones regulate GnRH and its receptor (GNRHR through negative and positive feedback loops. In contrast, the role of ovarian hormones in regulating activin, activin receptors, and components of the activin signaling pathway, including SMAD4 and FOXL2, remains understudied. The widespread distribution of activin and many of its signaling intermediates complicates analysis of the effects of ovarian hormones on their synthesis in gonadotropes, one of five pituitary cell types. We circumvented this complication by using a transgenic model that allows isolation of polyribosomes selectively from gonadotropes of intact females and ovariectomized females treated with or without a GnRH antagonist. This paradigm allows assessment of ovarian hormonal feedback and distinguishes responses that are either independent or dependent on GnRH. Surprisingly, our results indicate that Foxl2 levels in gonadotropes decline significantly in the absence of ovarian input and independently of GnRH. Expression of the genes encoding other members of the activin signaling pathway are unaffected by loss of ovarian hormonal feedback, highlighting their selective effect on Foxl2. Expression of Gnrhr, a known target of FOXL2, also declines upon ovariectomy consistent with reduced expression of Foxl2 and loss of ovarian hormones. In contrast, Fshb mRNA increases dramatically post-ovariectomy due to increased compensatory input from GnRH. Together these data suggest that ovarian hormones regulate expression of Foxl2 thereby expanding the number of genes controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that ultimately dictate reproductive fitness.

  12. A preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic approach to determine a dose of GnRH, for treatment of ovarian follicular cyst in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnoyer, S; Guyonnet, J; Toutain, P L

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the value of a preclinical PK/PD approach to determine a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) dose in cows using the pituitary LH response as a surrogate endpoint. Using an indirect effect model with stimulation of the LH entry rate, the in vivo basic pharmacodynamic parameters of GnRH were determined. The EC(50) of GnRH was 51 +/- 16 pg/mL, the EC(50) being the GnRH plasma concentration able to produce 50% of the maximum possible stimulation (S(max)) of the hypophysis (S(max) = 48 +/- 13). From individual PK/PD parameters, the ED(50) of GnRH, i.e. the estimated dose of GnRH required to determine half the maximum possible stimulating effect on LH release, was calculated to 62 microg/h per cow. Using the PK/PD model, the GnRH dose required to achieve a selected breakpoint value of 5 ng/mL for maximum LH concentration (surrogate value for LH concentration predicting clinical efficacy for cystic conditions), was 52 +/- 18 microg and for a standard GnRH dose of 100 microg, the mean maximum plasma LH concentration predicted by the model was 7.22 +/- 0.98 ng/mL.

  13. Treatment of Ovarian Cysts in Dairy Cows with Simultaneous Administration of GnRH and PGF2α has no Clear Advantage Over the Use of GnRH Alone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Małgorzata Rudowska; Wojciech Barański; Piotr Socha; Sławomir Zduńczyk; Tomasz Janowski

    2015-01-01

    ...; however, there were no differences between the treatment groups (92.6; 95.2% 72.3%). The mean interval from calving to conception was not significantly shorter (being so by 29 d) in the GnRH/PGF2α...

  14. Endocrine profiles after triggering of final oocyte maturation with GnRH agonist after cotreatment with the GnRH antagonist ganirelix during ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); D. de Jong (Danielle); F. Olivennes; H. Wramsby; C. Tay; J. Itskovitz-Eldor; H.G. van Hooren

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn a randomized multicenter study, the efficacies of two different GnRH agonists were compared with that of hCG for triggering final stages of oocyte maturation after ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization. Ovarian stimulation was conducted by recombinant

  15. Use of GnRH-agonists for medical management of reproductive disorders in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Christoph; Pilny, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Pet birds suffer from a wide range of reproductive conditions and diseases. Chronic egg laying, egg binding, and excessive reproductive activities are common problems. Veterinarians may prescribe behavior modification, changes in captive care, and medical therapy to curb these behaviors. Surgical removal of the oviduct is effective at stopping egg production; however, it is a specialized surgery that carries surgical and anesthetic-related risks. The inability to surgically remove the ovary in birds may result in persistent ovarian activity and secondary complications. Therefore, hormone therapy as an adjunct or main therapeutic approach, using sustained-release GnRH agonists, shows promise in pet birds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experience with the once-yearly histrelin (GnRHa subcutaneous implant in the treatment of central precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Lewis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Katherine A Lewis, Erica A EugsterDepartment of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, USAAbstract: In 2007, a hydrogel histrelin implant was approved for the treatment of children with central precocious puberty (CPP. Children with CPP commonly have reduced height potential due to premature closure of the epiphyseal growth plates from exposure to sex steroids. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa treatment halts puberty and allows for improvement of adult height. A hydrogel implant delivery system utilizing the potent GnRHa, histrelin, was first developed for use in men with prostate cancer. A once yearly histrelin subcutaneous implant was subsequently developed for the treatment of children with CPP. Studies to date have demonstrated safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of this treatment option in patients treated up to 2 years. The most common adverse effects of the implant relate to implant site pain or bruising. Cost of this treatment seems comparable to somewhat higher than the commonly used GnRHa treatment option, depot leuprolide. While long term studies are needed to establish continued efficacy and safety beyond 2 years of treatment, the histrelin implant appears to be an attractive option for GnRHa treatment in patients with CPP.Keywords: central precocious puberty, histrelin, implant, gonadotropin-releasing-hormone analogs

  17. Methodology for appraising anti-wear properties in plastic lubricants for GN- and GNU-type drilling bits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubarev, A.S.; Butovets, V.V.; Dyachenko, Yu.P.; Krasnyukutskaya, M.Ye.; Nedbaylyuk, P.Ye.; Oparin, V.A.; Yeremenko, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    A methodology is developed for the laboratory appraisal of anti-wear properties in plastic lubricants for GN- and GNU-type drilling bits. Industrial test results for USsA and Uniol-1 lubricants used with GNU-series drilling bits corresponded closely to the laboratory results.

  18. Final height in central precocious puberty after long term treatment with a slow release GnRH agonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostdijk, W; Rikken, B; Schreuder, S; Otten, Barto; Odink, R; Rouwe, C; Jansen, M; Gerver, WJ; Waelkens, J; Drop, S

    1996-01-01

    Objective-To study the resumption of puberty and the final height achieved in children with central precocious puberty (CPP) treated with the GnRH agonist triptorelin. Patients-31 girls and five boys with CPP who were treated with triptorelin 3.75 mg intramuscularly every four weeks. Girls were

  19. Effects of GnRHa treatment during vitellogenesis on the reproductive physiology of thermally challenged female Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli Anderson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tasmanian Atlantic salmon (S. salar broodstock can experience temperatures above 20 °C, which impairs reproductive development and inhibits ovulation. The present study investigated the prolonged use of gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa during vitellogenesis as a means of maintaining endocrine function and promoting egg quality at elevated temperature in maiden and repeat spawning S. salar. GnRHa-treatment during vitellogenesis did not compensate for the negative effects of thermal challenge on the timing of ovulation, egg size, egg fertility or embryo survival in any fish maintained at 22 °C relative to 14 °C. The lack of effectiveness was reflected by the endocrine data, as plasma follicle stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone levels were not different between treated and untreated groups at 22 °C. Furthermore, plasma testosterone and E2 levels were unchanged in GnRHa-treated fish at 22 °C, and plasma levels were generally lower in both groups maintained at 22 °C relative to 14 °C. Transcription of vitellogenin, and zona pellucida B and C was not enhanced in GnRHa-treated fish relative to untreated fish at 22 °C, presumably due to observed suppression of plasma E2. These results indicate that thermal impairment of reproduction is likely to occur on multiple levels, and is difficult to overcome via hormonal manipulation.

  20. 'Luteal coasting' after GnRH agonist trigger - individualized, HCG-based, progesterone-free luteal support in 'high responders'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Breyzman, Tatiana; Segal, Linoy

    2015-01-01

    This study reports 21 IVF cases with excessive ovarian response, who received gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) triggering for final oocyte maturation, followed by a human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG)-based, progesterone-free, luteal support, individually timed ('luteal coasting') ...

  1. Prostate specific antigen in boys with precocious puberty before and during gonadal suppression by GnRH agonist treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Müller, J; Skakkebaek, N E

    1997-01-01

    antigen (PSA) is a marker of the androgen-dependent prostatic epithelial cell activity and it is used in the diagnosis and surveillance of adult patients with prostatic cancer. We have measured PSA concentrations in serum from boys with precocious puberty before and during gonadal suppression with GnRH...

  2. FSH inhibits the augmentation by oestradiol of the pituitary responsiveness to GnRH in the female rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, GA; Valkhof, N; Koiter, TR

    The effect of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) treatment on the pituitary response to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was studied in rats in various reproductive conditions. A 3-day treatment of cycling rats with FSH (Metrodin(R); 10 IU/injection) lowered the spontaneous pre-ovulatory

  3. Effects of GnRHa treatment during vitellogenesis on the reproductive physiology of thermally challenged female Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kelli; Pankhurst, Ned; King, Harry; Elizur, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    Tasmanian Atlantic salmon (S. salar) broodstock can experience temperatures above 20 °C, which impairs reproductive development and inhibits ovulation. The present study investigated the prolonged use of gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa) during vitellogenesis as a means of maintaining endocrine function and promoting egg quality at elevated temperature in maiden and repeat spawning S. salar. GnRHa-treatment during vitellogenesis did not compensate for the negative effects of thermal challenge on the timing of ovulation, egg size, egg fertility or embryo survival in any fish maintained at 22 °C relative to 14 °C. The lack of effectiveness was reflected by the endocrine data, as plasma follicle stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone levels were not different between treated and untreated groups at 22 °C. Furthermore, plasma testosterone and E2 levels were unchanged in GnRHa-treated fish at 22 °C, and plasma levels were generally lower in both groups maintained at 22 °C relative to 14 °C. Transcription of vitellogenin, and zona pellucida B and C was not enhanced in GnRHa-treated fish relative to untreated fish at 22 °C, presumably due to observed suppression of plasma E2. These results indicate that thermal impairment of reproduction is likely to occur on multiple levels, and is difficult to overcome via hormonal manipulation.

  4. Histamine-induced paradoxical GH response to TRH/GnRH in men and women: dependence on gonadal steroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U; Thuesen, B; Dejgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    A stimulatory GH response to TRH and GnRH occurs frequently in patients with various pathological conditions, but is absent in normal subjects. We have previously shown that histamine induced a paradoxical GH response to TRH in normal men. Since gonadal steroids influence GH secretion, we...

  5. Perspectives on the co-treatment with GnRHa in female patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita Nicoleta Cima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT for patients with both malignant and nonmalignant diseases have improved significantly in recent years. However, the endocrine system is highly susceptible to damage by the high-dose chemotherapy and/or irradiation used in the conditioning regimen before HSCT. Ovarian failure and subsequent infertility are frequent complications that long-term HSCT survivors and their partners face with a negative impact on their QoL. Several meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials showed that gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa administration in advance of starting standard chemotherapy decreases the risk of gonadal dysfunction and infertility in cancer patients, but GnRHa use for ovarian protection in HSCT patients is not fully determined. In this review, we are discussing the potential preservation of ovarian function and fertility in pubertal girls/premenopausal women who undergo HSCT using GnRHa in parallel with conditioning chemotherapy, focusing on the current data available and making some special remarks regarding the use of GnRHa.

  6. A comparative therapeutic management of anoestrus in buffaloes using insulin and GnRH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Purkayastha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Anoestrus is one of the most common functional disorders of the reproductive cycle in buffaloes. In spite of technical advancement, there is no single cure for the management of anoestrus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of gonadotropic releasing hormone (GnRH and metabolic hormone for the management of true anoestrus in buffaloes. Materials and Methods: The experimental animals were selected on the basis of history, gyneco-clinical examinations and progesterone estimation. Deworming was done with Fenbendazole and thereafter mineral mixture was given @ 50 g per animal per day for 10 days in all the selected buffaloes before the start of treatment. The selected buffaloes were randomly divided into four groups (n=25. In Group I, buffaloes were administered 20 μg of buserelin intramuscularly. Buffaloes of Group II were administered long-acting insulin @ 0.25 IU/Kg body weight subcutaneously for 5 consecutive days. In Group III, buffaloes were treated with a combination of insulin and buserelin in the above-mentioned doses whereas buffaloes of Group IV were kept as untreated control. Results: The higher oestrus induction (64% vs. 28% was found in Group III and differed significantly (p<0.05 as compared to control group. The conception rate (69.23% vs. 66.66% was also found higher in Group III but did not differ significantly among the treated groups. The mean time taken for the onset of oestrus was recorded significantly shorter in insulin (8.80±0.69 and GnRH (7.60±0.92 days alone and as compared to other (Group III, 14.43±0.83 and Group IV, 20.57±1.69 days groups. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated better fertility response using Insulin plus Buserelin in true anoestrus buffaloes under field conditions.

  7. Use of an anti-GnRF vaccine to suppress estrus in crossbred Iberian female pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau, A; Velarde, A; Rodríguez, P; Pedernera, C; Llonch, P; Fàbrega, E; Casal, N; Mainau, E; Gispert, M; King, V; Slootmans, N; Thomas, A; Mombarg, M

    2015-08-01

    Antibodies against GnRF elicited by vaccination with Improvac are expected to have the same effects on the gonads of female pigs as those observed in males and thus suppress estrus. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a 3- or a 4-dose regimen of Improvac was effective in inducing and maintaining suppression of estrus in intact Iberian female pigs through 14 months of age. Sixty 18-week-old gilts were randomly assigned to one of the following three treatment groups: control (PBS injected), V3 (3-dose Improvac regimen), and V4 (4-dose Improvac regimen). Animals were tested for the presence of standing estrus in the presence of a boar three times per week until study completion at 60 weeks of age. Blood samples were regularly collected to determine the serum levels of anti-GnRF antibodies and progesterone. The weight and size of the uterus and the weight and activity of the ovaries were assessed at the time of euthanasia. For both treatment groups V3 and V4, a large reduction in the incidence of standing estrus was observed when compared to the control group (P immunity of 2 weeks after the second vaccination and a long-lasting immunity of at least 20 weeks after the third vaccination were observed. In summary, both the 3-and 4-dose Improvac regimens were efficacious in reducing the incidence of standing estrus, serum progesterone levels, and the development of the uterus and ovaries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. EFFECT OF GnRH AND PHOSPHORUS IN DELAYED PUBERTAL SURTI BUFFALO HEIFERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.B. Dhamsaniya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted on eighteen delayed pubertal Surti buffalo heifers, divided into three equal groups (6 in each to evaluate the efficacy of GnRH alone and in combination of phosphorus. The buffalo heifers in Group-I and Group-II were treated with Buserelin acetate (5 ml, IM. Buffalo heifers in Group-II also received additional injection of Toldimphos sodium (10 ml, IM at 3 day interval for 4 times, while buffalo heifers in Group-III served as control. The percentage of induced estrus was highest (83.33% in each treated groups as compared to control group (50%. The mean estrus induction intervals were significantly (P<0.05 shorter in Group-I (20.20 ± 2.18 days and Group-II (18.80 ± 2.32 days as compared to control group (30.24 ± 0.81 days. The conception rate at induced estrus was highest in Group-II (50% followed by Group-I (33.33%. The plasma progesterone levels being significantly lowest on the day of estrus (less than 0.5 ng/ml as compared to pre-treatment days in all groups. The mean total protein and triglycerides levels were differed significantly between the groups on the day of estrus and being significantly higher in Group-II as compared to Group-I and III on that day. A significantly higher level of cholesterol in both treatment groups as compared to the control group during different intervals and also being higher on the day of estrus as compared to pre-treatment days. The mean plasma glucose levels were differed nonsignificantly between and within the treatment and control groups. It is concluded that estrus can be successfully induced in delayed pubertal heifers with the use of GnRH alone and in combination with phosphorus.

  9. Effect of ovarian activity and endogenous reproductive hormones on GnRH-induced ovarian cycles in postpartum dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaied, A A; Garverick, H A; Bierschwal, C J; Elmore, R G; Youngquist, R S; Sharp, A J

    1980-03-01

    The objective was to determine the relationship of prior follicular development to GnRH-induced cyclic ovarian activity in dairy cows postpartum. Sixty lactating Holstein and Guernsey cows from the University of Missouri dairy herds were assigned at random to one of two groups. Group I consisted of 20 cows (control) given a single intramuscular (IM) injection of saline. Group II consisted of 40 cows given a single injection of 100 micrograms gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) IM. Treatments were administered 12 to 14 days postpartum. All cows were palpated per rectum to monitor ovarian activity prior to treatment (time 0) and 2 to 3 and 7 to 9 days post-treatment. Blood was collected via tail vessel puncture at time 0 and 7 to 9 days post-treatment. The percentage of cows exhibiting a follicle 10 mm or greater in diameter prior to treatment was not different between Group I (50%) and Group II (43%). However, twenty (50%) of the GnRH-treated cows initiated cyclic ovarian activity following treatment as evidenced by palpable CL and plasma progesterone greater than or equal to 1.0 ng/ml on day 9 post-treatment in contrast to only four (20%) saline-treated cows (P less than 0.05). Seventeen of 20 cows ovulating in Group II exhibited a palpable follicle greater than or equal to 10 mm in diameter prior to treatment compared to 3 of 4 cows in Group I. Prior to treatment, plasma concentrations of LH, estradiol-17 beta and progesterone were not different (P less than .05) between cows in Groups I and II. In Group II, preinjection levels of estradiol-17 beta and LH for cows ovulating in response to GnRH were higher (P less than .01) than in cows not ovulating. Postinjection concentrations of progesterone in plasma on days 7 to 9 were higher (P less than .01) in cows ovulating than in cows not ovulating. Six (30%) cows in Group I developed ovarian cysts prior to conception as compared to 12.5% (5) of the cows in Group II (P less than .05). The present study suggests: (1

  10. Regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) subunit biosynthesis in cultured male anterior pituitary cells: effects of GnRH and testosterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummen, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the direct effects of testosterone (T) on LH subunit apoprotein synthesis, glycosylation and release by the male pituitary. Cells from 1 wk castrate rats were cultured for 48 h in steroid-free medium followed by 48h in media /+-/10nM T. The cells were then incubated for 2, 4, 6, 8, or 12h in media containing (/sup 35/S)-methionine (/sup 35/S-Met) or (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine (/sup 3/H-Gln), /+-/1nM GnRH (exp 1) or in media containing precursors /+-/ 10nM T and/or 1nM GnRH (exp 2). Radiolabeled precursor incorporation into LH subunits was determined by immunoprecipitation followed by SDS-PAGE. In experiment 1, precursor incorporation into total protein (TP) and LH subunits increased linearly with time for at least 8h. GnRH did not effect precursor incorporation in to TP or /sup 35/S-Met labeling of LH subunits, but stimulated a linear, time-dependent accumulation of /sup 3/H-Gln into total LH subunits and the release of RIA-LH and radiolabeled subunits into media. Based on these results, the effects of T on LH subunit biosynthesis were studied during an 8h incubation. In experiment 2, GnRH enhanced the total /sup 3/H-Gln incorporation (but not /sup 35/S-Met incorporation) into both LH subunits. GnRH stimulated the release of /sup 35/S-Met LH..cap alpha.. and /sup 3/H-Gln LH subunits into media and increased the relative glycosylation of secreted LH subunits without altering the relative glycosylation of intracellular LH subunits. T inhibited RIA-LH release and incorporation of both precursors into total and secreted LH subunits (/+-/GnRH). However, only the relative glycosylation of secreted LH..cap alpha.. was reduced by T (/+-/GnRh).

  11. Pulsatile GnRH Is Superior to hCG in Therapeutic Efficacy in Adolescent Boys With Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadodism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chunxiu; Liu, Ying; Qin, Miao; Wu, Di; Wang, Xiaoling

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of two different treatments that have not been evaluated in peripuberty boys with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). The objective of the study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of GnRH or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) treatment in adolescent boys with HH. Twelve patients received 8-10 μg of GnRH, sc injected every 90 minutes using a pump. Another 22 patients received hCG, injected im as follows: for the first 3 months, 1000 IU of hCG was injected two times per week and then once every other day for the next 3 months. The dose of hCG was increased to 2000 IU after a 6-month treatment and the above cycle was repeated for another 6 months. All patients were treated for 12-14 months and followed up every 3 months. Thirty-five participants were chosen from Beijing Children's Hospital from 2008 to 2014. Twenty-three patients with Kallmann syndrome and 12 with normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The age ranged from 10 to 16 years. Twelve patients were treated with pulsatile pump GnRH (group 1), and 22 patients were treated with im hCG (group 2). One patient was treated successively with hCG and GnRH, which was removed in data analysis. Testicular volume was measured by an orchidometer. The levels of T, LH, and FSH serum were measured with a chemiluminesent immunoassay. Bone age was measured by x-ray. Patients treated with GnRH showed larger testes than those treated with hCG. Patients in both groups showed a significantly increased length of penis and T levels. But the difference of the two groups was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference in side effects in both groups. Boys with HH may be effectively treated with GnRH. We suggested that GnRH exhibits higher efficacy in treating adolescent boys with HH than hCG.

  12. Add-back therapy with GnRH analogues for uterine fibroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Rafael M; Martins, Wellington P; Ferriani, Rui A; Vieira, Carolina S; Nastri, Carolina O; Candido Dos Reis, Francisco José; Brito, Luiz Gustavo

    2015-03-20

    Uterine fibroids (also known as leiomyomas) are the most common benign pelvic tumours among women. They may be asymptomatic, or may be associated with pelvic symptoms such as bleeding and pain. Medical treatment of this condition is limited and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues are the most effective agents. Long-term treatment with such agents, however, is restricted due to their adverse effects. The addition of other medications during treatment with GnRH analogues, a strategy known as add-back therapy, may limit these side effects. There is concern, however, that add-back therapy may also limit the efficacy of the GnRH analogues and that it may not be able to completely prevent their adverse effects. To assess the short-term (within 12 months) effectiveness and safety of add-back therapy for women using GnRH analogues for uterine fibroids associated with excessive uterine bleeding, pelvic pain, or urinary symptoms. We searched electronic databases including the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (MDSG) Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, LILACS, CINAHL, PsycINFO; and electronic registries of ongoing trials including ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. All searches were from database inception to 16 June 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that included women with uterine fibroids experiencing irregular or intense uterine bleeding, cyclic or non-cyclic pelvic pain, or urinary symptoms, and that compared treatment with a GnRH analogue plus add-back therapy versus a GnRH analogue alone or combined with placebo were eligible for inclusion. Two authors independently reviewed the identified titles and abstracts for potentially eligible records. Two review authors reviewed eligible studies and independently extracted data. Two authors independently assessed the studies' risk of bias. They assessed the quality of the

  13. GnRH antagonist and letrozole co-treatment in diminished ovarian reserve patients: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgan, Safak; Humaidan, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the effects of luteal gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist pretreatment on the outcomes of diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) patients who were treated using a FSH/letrozole/GnRH antagonist (FLA) protocol. Thus, patients who had luteal GnRH antagonist pretreatment (AFLA) prior to stimulation were compared to patients who had the FLA protocol, only. An electronic database was used to identify patients and stimulation characteristics. Women who had a total antral follicle count (AFC) of protocol were compared to 76 cycles using a FLA protocol, only. The total gonadotropin dose, duration of stimulation, and peak estradiol levels were comparable between the groups (p>0.05). However, the AFLA group had significantly more metaphase-2 (MII) oocytes (p=0.009), a higher oocyte maturity rate (MII/total oocytes) (p=0.029), and a higher mature oocyte yield (MII/AFC) (p=0.020) with more cleaved embryos (p=0.036), and a significantly reduced number of canceled cycles (26.7% vs. 44.7%; p=0.048). The clinical pregnancy rate per cycle was 22.2% vs. 13.2% (p=0.195) in the AFLA and FLA groups, respectively. Interestingly, a subgroup analysis including ESHRE Bologna criteria poor responder patients showed that the luteal administration of GnRH antagonist resulted in better outcomes when compared with the FLA protocol alone. In conclusion, luteal GnRH antagonist pretreatment improves ovarian stimulation parameters and reproductive outcomes in poor ovarian reserve IVF patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  14. Epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue, for the resolution of follicular cysts in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Annalisa, Rizzo; Campanile, Debora; Debora, Campanile; Mutinati, Maddalena; Maddalena, Mutinati; Minoia, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Minoia; Spedicato, Massimo; Massimo, Spedicato; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi; Luigi, Sciorsci Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Bovine follicular cysts are an ovarian disorder of dairy cows associated with abnormal estrous behaviour and infertility. The treatment of choice is intramuscular administration of a GnRH analogue, which acts by triggering pituitary release of LH. However, the presence of GnRH and GnRH receptors on spinal cord and ovary in some species, and the kind of innervation of the ovary, let us hypothesize that GnRH and its analogues may also act when administered by epidural route, as happens for other drugs. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare the effects of epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin (a GnRH analogue) on FC regression, estrus detection and pregnancy outcomes. The study was conducted on 220 Friesian cows affected by follicular cysts, divided among 4 groups: Group L(epid) and Group L(im) received, respectively 50 μg of lecirelin in the epidural space and intramuscular; Group C(epid) and Group C(im) were used as control groups. In Group L(epid), estrus induction and pregnancy rates were significantly higher than in Group L(im). The results of this study show that the epidural administration of lecirelin promoted the remission of follicular cysts and an improvement of reproductive parameters compared to intramuscular administration. Thus, an alternative therapeutical approach is available for FC treatment, in order to obtain an easier restoration of the ovarian activity, especially in those cases refractory to classical therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of protein secondary structures by laser induced autofluorescence: A study of urea and GnHCl induced protein denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddaramaiah, Manjunath; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Roy, Suparna; Chandra, Subhash; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2017-03-01

    In the present study an attempt has been made to interrogate the bulk secondary structures of some selected proteins (BSA, HSA, lysozyme, trypsin and ribonuclease A) under urea and GnHCl denaturation using laser induced autofluorescence. The proteins were treated with different concentrations of urea (3 M, 6 M, 9 M) and GnHCl (2 M, 4 M, 6 M) and the corresponding steady state autofluorescence spectra were recorded at 281 nm pulsed laser excitations. The recorded fluorescence spectra of proteins were then interpreted based on the existing PDB structures of the proteins and the Trp solvent accessibility (calculated using "Scratch protein predictor" at 30% threshold). Further, the influence of rigidity and conformation of the indole ring (caused by protein secondary structures) on the intrinsic fluorescence properties of proteins were also evaluated using fluorescence of ANS-HSA complexes, CD spectroscopy as well as with trypsin digestion experiments. The outcomes obtained clearly demonstrated GnHCl preferably disrupt helix as compared to the beta β-sheets whereas, urea found was more effective in disrupting β-sheets as compared to the helices. The other way round the proteins which have shown detectable change in the intrinsic fluorescence at lower concentrations of GnHCl were rich in helices whereas, the proteins which showed detectable change in the intrinsic fluorescence at lower concentrations of urea were rich in β-sheets. Since high salt concentrations like GnHCl and urea interfere in the secondary structure analysis by circular dichroism Spectrometry, the present method of analyzing secondary structures using laser induced autofluorescence will be highly advantageous over existing tools for the same.

  16. Oestrogen induces rhythmic expression of the Kisspeptin-1 receptor GPR54 in hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone-secreting GT1-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonsfeldt, K J; Goodall, C P; Latham, K L; Chappell, P E

    2011-09-01

    Oestrogen-stimulated preovulatory gonadotrophin surges are temporally regulated in a way that remains not fully understood. Mammalian ovulation requires surges of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), released from specialised neurones in the hypothalamus. Surge regulation is mediated by ovarian oestrogen (17 β-oestradiol; E(2) ) feedback-acting as a negative signal until the early afternoon of the pro-oestrous phase, at which point it stimulates robust increases in GnRH release. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a role for the circadian clock in surge generation, although the presence of endogenous oscillators in several neuronal populations throughout the mediobasal hypothalamus complicates an elucidation of the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation. In the present study, we propose that endogenous oscillators within GnRH neurones are modulated by oestrogen to elicit GnRH surge secretion. One mechanism by which this may occur is through the up-regulation of receptors of known stimulators of GnRH, such as kisspeptin's cognate receptor, GPR54. Through analysis of mRNA and protein abundance patterns, we found that high levels of E(2) elicit circadian expression profiles of GPR54 in vitro, and that disruption of endogenous GnRH oscillators of the clock dampens this effect. Additionally, although kisspeptin administration to GT1-7 cells does not result in surge-level secretion, we observed increased GnRH secretion from GT1-7 cells treated with positive feedback levels of E(2) . These results in this in vitro neuronal model system suggest a possible mechanism whereby receptor expression levels, and thus GnRH sensitivity to kisspeptin, may change dramatically over the pro-oestrous day. In this way, elevated ovarian E(2) may increase kisspeptidergic tone at the same time as increasing GnRH neuronal sensitivity to this neuropeptide for maximal surge release. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Effect of GnRH and hCG on progesterone concentration and ovarian and luteal blood flow in diestrous mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, L F C; Baldrighi, J M; Wolf, C A; Ginther, O J

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of reproductive hormones (GnRH, hCG, LH and progesterone) on the regulation of corpus luteum (CL) and ovarian blood flow. Diestrous mares received a single treatment of saline, 100μg gonadorelin (GnRH), or 1500IU hCG 10days after ovulation. Plasma LH and progesterone concentrations, resistance index (RI) for ovarian artery blood-flow, and percentage of corpus luteum (CL) with color-Doppler signals of blood flow were determined immediately before treatment (hour 0) and at hours 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. In the GnRH group, LH increased (PhCG groups. Progesterone concentration was not different among groups. In the GnRH group, RI tended (PhCG group, two transient RI decreases (PhCG group. The similarity among groups in progesterone concentration indicated that changes in progesterone were not involved in the GnRH and hCG stimulation of ovarian vascular perfusion. Effects of treatment might have been mediated through LH; however, since hCG biological activity is primarily LH-like, the differences in timing and degree of ovarian and luteal blood flow changes after GnRH or hCG administration in the present study suggest that GnRH might have a direct effect on ovarian blood vessels and vascular control. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Influence of estradiol, progesterone, and nutrition on concentrations of gonadotropins and GnRH receptors, and abundance of mRNA for GnRH receptors and gonadotropin subunits in pituitary glands of beef cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looper, M L; Vizcarra, J A; Wettemann, R P; Malayer, J R; Braden, T D; Geisert, R D; Morgan, G L

    2003-01-01

    Nutritionally induced anovulatory cows (n = 28) were used to determine the effect of steroids on regulation of synthesis and secretion of gonadotropins. Anovulatory cows were ovariectomized and received intravaginal inserts containing estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), E2 and P4 (E2P4), or a sham intravaginal insert (C) for 7 d. Concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were quantified in serum and E2 and P4 were quantified in plasma. Cows were exsanguinated within 1 to 2 h after removal of intravaginal inserts and pituitary glands were collected and stored at -80 degrees C until messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) for gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) and gonadotropin subunits, pituitary content of GnRH-R, and LH and FSH were quantified. Pituitary glands from five proestrous cows were harvested to compare gonadotropin characteristics between ovariectomized, anovulatory cows and intact cows. Plasma concentrations of E2 were greater (P cows than in sham-treated cows. Concentrations of P4 were greater (P cows treated with P4 than in sham-treated cows. Mean serum concentrations of LH and FSH were not significantly influenced by steroid treatments. However, frequency of LH pulses of ovariectomized, nutritionally induced anovulatory cows was increased (P cows treated with E2 or P4 than in cows treated with E2P4 or sham-treated. Quantity of mRNA for LHbeta in the pituitary gland was greater when cows were treated with P4. Concentrations of LH in the pituitary gland were not affected by steroid treatments; however, pituitary concentrations of FSH were less (P cows than in sham-treated cows. The number of GnRH-R was increased (P cows treated with E2, but P4 treatment did not influence the number of GnRH-R. Abundance of mRNA for GnRH-R, common alpha-subunit, and FSHbeta were not affected by treatments. Pituitary concentrations of LH were greater (P cows than in ovariectomized, anovulatory cows treated with or without

  19. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate augments blood-brain barrier and tight junction protein expression in brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2017-08-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) between brain endothelial cells are essential for formation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although loss of BBB integrity is associated with several neuropathological disorders, treatments that augment or stabilise the BBB are scarce. Here we show that physiological concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) stimulate the expression of the TJ proteins zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-3 in the brain-derived endothelial cell line bEnd.3 and promote TJ formation between neighbouring cells, demonstrated by augmented transendothelial resistance across cell monolayers. Silencing androgen receptor expression by siRNA does not prevent DHEAS-induced stimulation of ZO-1 expression, indicating that conversion of DHEAS into testosterone is not required for its actions. Suppression of Gnα11 expression by siRNA prevents DHEAS actions, pointing towards a G-protein-coupled receptor as being a mediator of the DHEAS effects. These results are consistent with the idea that DHEAS, acting as a hormone in its own right, supports the integrity of the BBB. The current findings might help in developing new strategies for the prevention or treatment of neurological disorders associated with BBB defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Impact of Pituitary Blockage with GnRH Antagonist and Gonadotrophin Stimulation Length on The Outcome of ICSI Cycles in Women Older than 36 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Santana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate whether the length of pituitary blockage with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonists or the stimulation period influence intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI outcomes in patients older than 36 years of age. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, a total of 138 couples with maternal age >36 years undergoing ICSI with an antagonist protocol were included. The influences of stimulation and suppression length on the response to ovarian stimulation and ICSI outcomes were investigated. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC analysis was performed to assess the predictive value of the stimulation period for achievement of implantation and pregnancy. Results: The gonadotrophin stimulation length negatively influenced the implantation rate (RC: -4.200; p=0.023. The area under ROC curve (AUC could distinguish between women with positive and negative implantation (AUC: 0.611; CI: 0.546-0.673 and pregnancy (AUC: 0.593; CI: 0.528-0.656. The threshold value demonstrated a high negative predictive value on likelihood of implantation (p=0.0032, 90% sensitivity and pregnancy (p=0.0147, 87.1% sensitivity when patients underwent more than 10 days of stimulation. Conclusion: The stimulation period negatively influences the implantation rate in women older than 36 years. A stimulation interval greater than 10 days is associated with a negative predictive value for the chance of implantation and pregnancy.

  1. Dynamics of GnRH Neuron Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Synaptic Receptors Are Unchanged during Estrogen Positive and Negative Feedback in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhuai; Porteous, Robert; Herbison, Allan E

    2017-01-01

    Inputs from GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons are suspected to play an important role in regulating the activity of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. The GnRH neurons exhibit marked plasticity to control the ovarian cycle with circulating estradiol concentrations having profound "feedback" effects on their activity. This includes "negative feedback" responsible for suppressing GnRH neuron activity and "positive feedback" that occurs at mid-cycle to activate the GnRH neurons to generate the preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge. In the present study, we employed brain slice electrophysiology to question whether synaptic ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor signaling at the GnRH neuron changed at times of negative and positive feedback. We used a well characterized estradiol (E)-treated ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model to replicate negative and positive feedback. Miniature and spontaneous postsynaptic currents (mPSCs and sPSCs) attributable to GABA A and glutamatergic receptor signaling were recorded from GnRH neurons obtained from intact diestrous, OVX, OVX + E (negative feedback), and OVX + E+E (positive feedback) female mice. Approximately 90% of GnRH neurons exhibited spontaneous GABA A -mPSCs in all groups but no significant differences in the frequency or kinetics of mPSCs were found at the times of negative or positive feedback. Approximately 50% of GnRH neurons exhibited spontaneous glutamate mPSCs but again no differences were detected. The same was true for spontaneous PSCs in all cases. These observations indicate that the kinetics of ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor synaptic transmission to GnRH neurons remain stable across the different estrogen feedback states.

  2. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, E Scott; Collins, Gary S; Salem, Shala A; Jones, Christopher A; Peck, Alison C; Salem, Rifaat D

    2012-08-30

    During in vitro fertilization (IVF), fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Completed questionnaires (n = 71) revealed a mean +/- SD patient age of 34 +/- 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1%) had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s). When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/- 11.75 and $654.55 +/- 106.34, respectively (p medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist) was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs reach a critical level.

  3. Foetal hypothalamic and pituitary expression of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone and galanin systems is disturbed by exposure to sewage sludge chemicals via maternal ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellingham, M; Fowler, P A; Amezaga, M R; Whitelaw, C M; Rhind, S M; Cotinot, C; Mandon-Pepin, B; Sharpe, R M; Evans, N P

    2010-06-01

    Animals and humans are chronically exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that are ubiquitous in the environment. There are strong circumstantial links between environmental EDC exposure and both declining human/wildlife reproductive health and the increasing incidence of reproductive system abnormalities. The verification of such links, however, is difficult and requires animal models exposed to 'real life', environmentally relevant concentrations/mixtures of environmental contaminants (ECs), particularly in utero, when sensitivity to EC exposure is high. The present study aimed to determine whether the foetal sheep reproductive neuroendocrine axis, particularly gondotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and galaninergic systems, were affected by maternal exposure to a complex mixture of chemicals, applied to pasture, in the form of sewage sludge. Sewage sludge contains high concentrations of a spectrum of EDCs and other pollutants, relative to environmental concentrations, but is frequently recycled to land as a fertiliser. We found that foetuses exposed to the EDC mixture in utero through their mothers had lower GnRH mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and lower GnRH receptor (GnRHR) and galanin receptor (GALR) mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. Strikingly, this, treatment had no significant effect on maternal GnRH or GnRHR mRNA expression, although GALR mRNA expression within the maternal hypothalamus and pituitary gland was reduced. The present study clearly demonstrates that the developing foetal neuroendocrine axis is sensitive to real-world mixtures of environmental chemicals. Given the important role of GnRH and GnRHR in the regulation of reproductive function, its known role programming role in utero, and the role of galanin in the regulation of many physiological/neuroendocrine systems, in utero changes in the activity of these systems are likely to have long-term consequences in adulthood and represent a novel pathway through

  4. Genetic Variations in the Human G Protein-coupled Receptor Class C, Group 6, Member A (GPRC6A) Control Cell Surface Expression and Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Stine; Have, Christian Theil; Underwood, Christina Rye

    2017-01-01

    GPRC6A is a G protein-coupled receptor activated by l-amino acids, which, based on analyses of knock-out mice, has been suggested to have physiological functions in metabolism and testicular function. The human ortholog is, however, mostly retained intracellularly in contrast to the cell surface-...

  5. EFECTO DE LA GnRH EN EL PROCESO DEL RECONOCIMIENTO MATERNAL DE LA PREÑEZ SOBRE LA SUPERVIVENCIA EMBRIONARIA EN ALPACAS

    OpenAIRE

    Araínga R., Mariluz; Práctica privada; Leyva V., Víctor; Laboratorio de Reproducción y Obstetricia Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima Perú.; García V., Wilber; Estación Experimental del Centro de Investigación IVITA-Maranganí, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima Perú.; Franco Ll., Enrique; Estación Experimental del Centro de Investigación IVITA-Maranganí, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima Perú.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of GnRH administered around the time of maternal recognition of prenancy on the embryonic survival rate was studied. It was used 67 adult female alpacas sexually receptive to the male, and bearing a preovulatory follicle ≥7mm, detected by rectal ultrasonography. Animals were distributed in three groups: G0 (n=23) as control; G1 (n=22) received 6 µg GnRH on day 4 after ovulation; and G2 (n=22) received 4 µg GnRH on days 8 and 9 after ovulation. The ocurrence of ovulation was confirm...

  6. Efficiency of fixed-time artificial insemination using a progesterone device combined with GnRH or estradiol benzoate in Nellore heifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Antônio Pelissari Poncio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available he use of estrogens in artificial insemination protocols for cattle is the least expensive and most efficient method currently available. However, the trend to prohibit the use of estrogens for this purpose has made it necessary to find alternatives that replace estrogens without compromising the reproductive performance of the animals. The objective of this study was to evaluate conception rates in Bos indicus beef heifers treated with a progesterone device (P4 combined with GnRH or an estradiol ester. On day 0, pubertal Nellore heifers (n = 100 received an intravaginal device containing 1 g P4 and were randomly divided into two groups. The GnRH group (n = 49 received an intramuscular injection of 100 µg GnRH, while the E2 group (n = 51 received 2 mg estradiol benzoate (EB. The P4 device was removed after 5 (GnRH group or 8 days (E2 group, followed by an injection of 125 µg of the PGF2α, analog cloprostenol. On that occasion, the E2 group received an additional injection of 300 IU eCG. Twenty-four hours later, the GnRH group received a second injection of 125 µg cloprostenol, while the E2 group received 1 mg EB. The heifers were inseminated 72 (GnRH group or 54 hours (E2 group after removal of the P4 device. At the time of insemination, the GnRH group received additionally an injection of 100 µg GnRH. Estrus was monitored during the period of cloprostenol injection until the time of artificial insemination and pregnancy was diagnosed 40 days after insemination by transrectal ultrasonography. The data were analyzed by Fisher’s exact test. The pregnancy rate was 38.8% and 31.4% in the GnRH and E2 groups, respectively (P>0.05. The ovarian condition of the heifers (estrus or anestrus tended to influence (P=0.07 pregnancy rates in the GnRH group, but not in the E2 group. At the time of artificial insemination, 33.3% of heifers in the GnRH group showed signs of estrus versus 88.2% in the E2 group (P<0.05. However, the time of estrus

  7. Entrepreneurial Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Van Praag, Mirjam; Thompson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We study possible motivations for co-entreprenurial couples to start up a joint firm, using a sample of 1,069 Danish couples that established a joint enterprise between 2001 and 2010. We compare their pre-entry characteristics, firm performance and post-dissolution private and financial outcomes...... with a selected set of comparable firms and couples. We find evidence that couples often establish a business together because one spouse – most commonly the female – has limited outside opportunities in the labor market. However, the financial benefits for each of the spouses, and especially the female...

  8. Influence of bovine LH tracer quality on levels of LH in GnRH-treated cows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madej, A.; Hallin, P.; Madej, M.; Seguin, B.; Edqvist, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Chromatography of 125I-bovine LH (LER-1716-2 and USDA-I-1) by means of anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed two main peaks of radioactivity regardless as to whether or not the tracer was initially purified on cellulose CF11. The content of radioactivity in the first peak tended to increase as the storage time of the bLH preparation, either before or after iodination, increased. The first peak of radioactivity after HPLC fractionation either with or without cellulose adsorption consisted of material with low binding ability to bLH antiserum (6.9% +/- 0.5 and 13.0% +/- 1.0, respectively) and high binding ability to ovine LH alpha antiserum (51.0% +/- 2.7 and 35.2% +/- 3.6, respectively). The average ratio of alpha-subunit immuno-reactivity to 125I-bLH immunoreactivity in this material was 7.4 +/- 0.1 and 2.7 +/- 0.2, respectively (P less than 0.001). Peaks in 125I-bLH radioactivity and 125I-bLH immunoreactivity had different elution times. Radioimmunoassays with tracers obtained from fractions derived from the first radioactive peak after HPLC chromatography (i.e. 125I-bLH-LER-1716-2) both with and without cellulose adsorption, yielded significantly lower mean plasma LH levels in GnRH-treated cows compared with the control tracer routinely purified only on cellulose CF11 (e.g. 5.7 vs. 8.2 micrograms/; 4.6 vs. 8.2 micrograms/l). Plasma LH levels in GnRH-treated cows were significantly (P less than 0.001) lower as measured by radioimmunoassay utilizing 125I-USDA-blH-I-1 tracers than by radioimmunoassays utilizing 125I-blH-LER-1716-2 tracers (i.e. either Y = 0.17 + 0.75X or Y = 1.18 + 0.60X).

  9. GnRH-dependent precocious puberty manifested at the age of 14 months in a girl with 47,XXX karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skordis, Nicos; Ferrari, Eleana; Antoniadou, Aria; Phylactou, Leonidas A; Fanis, Pavlos; Neocleous, Vassos

    2017-07-01

    This case report describes a 47,XXX girl who presented very early, at the age of 14 months, with signs of sexual precocity (breast and pubic hair development, menarche) and was finally diagnosed with GnRH dependent precocious puberty with no evidence of underlying central nervous system pathology. Molecular testing did not identify any genetic defect in any of the genes tested (KISS1, KISS1R, DLK1 and the intronless MKRN3). Though previous studies have shown a link between karyotype 47,XXX and precocious puberty, this is the youngest patient reported so far. Treatment with GnRH analog was commenced and proved to be effective, indicating a successful suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

  10. Guanylin and uroguanylin mRNA expression is increased following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, but guanylins do not play a significant role in body weight regulation and glycemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Cachon, María L; Pedersen, Søren L; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T

    2017-01-01

    for potentially contributing to the beneficial metabolic effects of RYGB. METHODS: Enteroendocrine cells were harvested peri- and post-RYGB, and GUCA2A/GUCA2B mRNA expression was compared. GN, UGN and their prohormones (proGN, proUGN) were administered subcutaneously in normal-weight mice to evaluate effects......: GN and UGN, as well as their prohormones, do not seem to play a significant role in body weight regulation and glycemic control, suggesting that guanylin-family peptides do not show promise as targets for the treatment of obesity or diabetes....

  11. GN and C Design Overview and Flight Test Results from NASA's Max Launch Abort System (MLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Lanzi, Ryamond J.; Ward, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) designed, developed and flew the alternative Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) as risk mitigation for the baseline Orion spacecraft launch abort system (LAS) already in development. The NESC was tasked with both formulating a conceptual objective system (OS) design of this alternative MLAS as well as demonstrating this concept with a simulated pad abort flight test. The goal was to obtain sufficient flight test data to assess performance, validate models/tools, and to reduce the design and development risks for a MLAS OS. Less than 2 years after Project start the MLAS simulated pad abort flight test was successfully conducted from Wallops Island on July 8, 2009. The entire flight test duration was 88 seconds during which time multiple staging events were performed and nine separate critically timed parachute deployments occurred as scheduled. Overall, the as-flown flight performance was as predicted prior to launch. This paper provides an overview of the guidance navigation and control (GN&C) technical approaches employed on this rapid prototyping activity. This paper describes the methodology used to design the MLAS flight test vehicle (FTV). Lessons that were learned during this rapid prototyping project are also summarized.

  12. Open-Loop Flight Testing of COBALT GN&C Technologies for Precise Soft Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M., III; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Seubert, Carl R.; Restrepo, Carolina I.

    2017-01-01

    A terrestrial, open-loop (OL) flight test campaign of the NASA COBALT (CoOperative Blending of Autonomous Landing Technologies) platform was conducted onboard the Masten Xodiac suborbital rocket testbed, with support through the NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES), Game Changing Development (GCD), and Flight Opportunities (FO) Programs. The COBALT platform integrates NASA Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) sensing technologies for autonomous, precise soft landing, including the Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) velocity and range sensor and the Lander Vision System (LVS) Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) system. A specialized navigation filter running onboard COBALT fuzes the NDL and LVS data in real time to produce a precise navigation solution that is independent of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and suitable for future, autonomous planetary landing systems. The OL campaign tested COBALT as a passive payload, with COBALT data collection and filter execution, but with the Xodiac vehicle Guidance and Control (G&C) loops closed on a Masten GPS-based navigation solution. The OL test was performed as a risk reduction activity in preparation for an upcoming 2017 closed-loop (CL) flight campaign in which Xodiac G&C will act on the COBALT navigation solution and the GPS-based navigation will serve only as a backup monitor.

  13. COBALT: Development of a Platform to Flight Test Lander GN&C Technologies on Suborbital Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M., III; Seubert, Carl R.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Bergh, Chuck; Kourchians, Ara; Restrepo, Carolina I.; Villapando, Carlos Y.; O'Neal, Travis V.; Robertson, Edward A.; Pierrottet, Diego; hide

    2017-01-01

    The NASA COBALT Project (CoOperative Blending of Autonomous Landing Technologies) is developing and integrating new precision-landing Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) technologies, along with developing a terrestrial fight-test platform for Technology Readiness Level (TRL) maturation. The current technologies include a third- generation Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) sensor for ultra-precise velocity and line- of-site (LOS) range measurements, and the Lander Vision System (LVS) that provides passive-optical Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) estimates of map-relative position. The COBALT platform is self contained and includes the NDL and LVS sensors, blending filter, a custom compute element, power unit, and communication system. The platform incorporates a structural frame that has been designed to integrate with the payload frame onboard the new Masten Xodiac vertical take-o, vertical landing (VTVL) terrestrial rocket vehicle. Ground integration and testing is underway, and terrestrial fight testing onboard Xodiac is planned for 2017 with two flight campaigns: one open-loop and one closed-loop.

  14. Kisspeptin/Gpr54-independent GnRH activity in Kiss1 and Gpr54 mutant mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Yee-Ming; Broder-Fingert, Sarabeth; Wong, Kai Mee; Seminara, Stephanie B.

    2009-01-01

    The kisspeptin/Gpr54 signaling pathway plays a critical role in reproduction by stimulating the secretion of GnRH, yet mice carrying mutations in Kiss1 (which encodes kisspeptin) or Gpr54 exhibit partial sexual maturation. For instance, a proportion of female Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− mice exhibit vaginal oestrus, and some male Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− mice exhibit spermatogenesis.

  15. Initiation of GnRH agonist treatment on 3-5 days postoperatively in endometriosis patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lili; Zhang, Shaofen; Han, Yi; Long, Qiqi; Zou, Shien; Cao, Yuankui

    2015-08-01

    Seventy patients with stage III or IV endometriosis were randomly assigned to 2 groups after conservative surgery. Group O (n = 35) received 3 cycles of a 28-day gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) treatment (goserelin, 3.6 mg) starting 3-5 days postoperatively. Group M (n = 35) received the same treatment starting on days 1-5 of menstruation. Groups were further subdivided according to add-back treatment. Pre- and posttreated levels of estradiol (E2 ), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) and visual analog scale (VAS), Kupperman menopausal index (KMI), and bone mineral density (BMD) scores were recorded. The incidence of uterine bleeding was assessed. In both groups, serum levels of E2 , FSH, and LH and VAS scores decreased significantly after treatment. Spotting was the most frequent bleeding pattern. During cycle 1, the bleeding time in group M was much longer that than that in group O (P =.001), and the bleeding rate in group M was significantly higher than that in group O (P =.024, RR = 1.185). In patients with stage III or IV endometriosis, the efficacy of GnRH-a initiated 3-5 days postoperatively was equivalent to that of GnRH-a initiated on days 1-5 of menstruation. Female patients who initiated GnRH-a treatment 3-5 days postoperatively experienced less uterine bleeding during the first cycle of treatment. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  16. Endocrine archeology: do insects retain ancestrally inherited counterparts of the vertebrate releasing hormones GnRH, GHRH, TRH, and CRF?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Loof, Arnold; Lindemans, Marleen; Liu, Feng; De Groef, Bert; Schoofs, Liliane

    2012-05-15

    Vertebrate releasing hormones include gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), corticotropin releasing hormone (CRF), and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). They are synthesized in the hypothalamus and stimulate the release of pituitary hormones. Here we review the knowledge on hormone releasing systems in the protostomian lineage. We address the question: do insects have peptides that may be phylogenetically related to an ancestral GnRH, GHRH, TRH, and CRF? Such endocrine archeology has become possible thanks to the growing list of fully sequenced genomes as well as to the continuously improving bioinformatic tool set. It has recently been shown that the ecdysozoan (nematodes and arthropods) adipokinetic hormones (AKHs), the lophotrochozoan (annelids and mollusks) GnRHs as well as the protochordate GnRHs are structurally related. The adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptides (APRPs), in locusts encoded by the same gene that contains the AKH-coding region, have been forwarded as the structural counterpart of GHRH of vertebrates. CRF is relatively well conserved in insects, in which it functions as a diuretic hormone. Members of TRH-receptor family seem to have been conserved in some arthropods, but other elements of the thyroid hormone signaling system are not. A challenging idea is that in insects the functions of the thyroid hormones were taken over by juvenile hormone (JH). Our reconstruction suggests that, perhaps, the ancestral releasing hormone precursors played a role in controlling energy metabolism and water balance, and that releasing hormone functions as present in extant vertebrates were probably secondarily acquired. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Circadian Control of the Estrogenic Circuits Regulating GnRH Secretion and the Preovulatory Luteinizing Hormone Surge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance J Kriegsfeld

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Female reproduction requires the precise temporal organization of interacting, estradiol-sensitive neural circuits that converge to optimally drive hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis functioning. In mammals, the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN of the anterior hypothalamus coordinates reproductively-relevant neuroendocrine events necessary to maximize reproductive success. Likewise, in species where periods of fertility are brief, circadian oversight of reproductive function ensures that estradiol-dependent increases in sexual motivation coincide with ovulation. Across species, including humans, disruptions to circadian timing (e.g., through rotating shift work, night shift work, poor sleep hygiene lead to pronounced deficits in ovulation and fecundity. Despite the well-established roles for the circadian system in female reproductive functioning, the specific neural circuits and neurochemical mediators underlying these interactions are not fully understood. Most work to date has focused on the direct and indirect communication from the SCN to the GnRH system in control of the preovulatory LH surge. However, the same clock genes underlying circadian rhythms at the cellular level in SCN cells are also common to target cell populations of the SCN, including the GnRH neuronal network. Exploring the means by which the master clock synergizes with subordinate clocks in GnRH cells and its upstream modulatory systems represents an exciting opportunity to further understand the role of endogenous timing systems in female reproduction. Herein we provide an overview of the state of knowledge regarding interactions between the circadian timing system and estradiol-sensitive neural circuits driving GnRH secretion and the preovulatory LH surge.

  18. Combined down-regulation by aromatase inhibitor and GnRH-agonist in IVF patients with endometriomas-A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lossl, Kristine; Loft, Anne; Freiesleben, Nina L C

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The key enzyme in the biosynthesis of estradiol, aromatase, has been demonstrated within endometriosis. Combined administration of aromatase inhibitor and GnRH-agonist may efficiently suppress estrogen biosynthesis through a combined pituitary, ovarian, peripheral and "in situ" action...

  19. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis following treatment with GnRH analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Senderovitz, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Aims To develop a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis describing the changes in luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone concentrations following treatment with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist triptorelin...... and the GnRH receptor blocker degarelix. Methods Fifty-eight healthy subjects received single subcutaneous or intramuscular injections of 3.75 mg of triptorelin and 170 prostate cancer patients received multiple subcutaneous doses of degarelix of between 120 and 320 mg. All subjects were pooled...... for the different dynamic responses observed after administration of both GnRH agonists and GnRH receptor blockers, suggesting that the model adequately characterizes the underlying physiology of the endocrine system....

  20. 'An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure': the case for and against GnRH-agonist for fertility preservation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumenfeld, Z; Katz, G; Evron, A

    2014-01-01

    ... infertility caused by chemotherapy assumes a high priority. Here, we summarize the case for and against using GnRH-agonist for fertility preservation and minimizing chemotherapy-induced gonadotoxicity...

  1. A mathematical model for LH release in response to continuous and pulsatile exposure of gonadotrophs to GnRH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Michael C

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a previous study, a model was developed to investigate the release of luteinizing hormone (LH from pituitary cells in response to a short pulse of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH. The model included: binding of GnRH to its receptor (R, dimerization and internalization of the hormone receptor complex, interaction with a G protein, production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3, release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, entrance of calcium into the cytosol via voltage gated membrane channels, pumping of calcium out of the cytosol via membrane and ER pumps, and release of LH. The extended model, presented in this paper, also includes the following physiologically important phenomena: desensitization of calcium channels; internalization of the dimerized receptors and recycling of some of the internalized receptors; an increase in Gq concentration near the plasma membrane in response to receptor dimerization; and basal rates of synthesis and degradation of the receptors. With suitable choices of the parameters, good agreement with a variety of experimental data of the LH release pattern in response to pulses of various durations, repetition rates, and concentrations of GnRH were obtained. The mathematical model allows us to assess the effects of internalization and desensitization on the shapes and time courses of LH response curves.

  2. Consistent high clinical pregnancy rates and low ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome rates in high-risk patients after GnRH agonist triggering and modified luteal support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iliodromiti, Stamatina; Blockeel, Christophe; Tremellen, Kelton P

    2013-01-01

    Are clinical pregnancy rates satisfactory and the incidence of OHSS low after GnRH agonist trigger and modified intensive luteal support in patients with a high risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS)?......Are clinical pregnancy rates satisfactory and the incidence of OHSS low after GnRH agonist trigger and modified intensive luteal support in patients with a high risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS)?...

  3. Effects of Kamdhenu Ark and Active Immunization by Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Conjugate (GnRH-BSA) on Gonadosomatic Indices (GSI) and Sperm Parameters in Male Mus musculus

    OpenAIRE

    Ganaie, Javid Ahmad; Gautam, Varsha; Shrivastava, Vinoy Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Background Active immunization against GnRH decreases the secretion of gonadotropins and causes cessation of gonadal function, thereby, inducing infertility. Based on the immunoenhancing activity of Kamdhenu ark (distilled cow urine), this study was performed to evaluate its effects on the gonadosomatic indices (GSI) and sperm parameters in male mice receiving a GnRH contraceptive vaccine. Methods Sixty adult male mice of Parke's strain were divided into three groups of twenty. Group I served...

  4. The Minnesota Couples Communication Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnally, Elam W.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This article describes the Minnesota Couples Communication Program which offers a structured educational experience directed toward equipping couples with skills for (1) heightening awareness of self and self's contributions to interaction, (2) effectively expressing self-awareness, (3) accurately understanding partner's communications, and (4)…

  5. A comparative study of luteal estradiol pre-treatment in GnRH antagonist protocols and in micro dose flare protocols for poor-responding patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davar, Robab; Rahsepar, Mozhgan; Rahmani, Elham

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to verify if luteal estradiol pre-treatment improves IVF/ICSI outcomes in a GnRH antagonist protocol as compared with a micro dose GnRH agonist protocol in poor-responding patients. A total of 116 IVF/ICSI cycles were included in this prospective randomized single blind clinical trial. The selected women were randomly assigned to receive an estradiol pre-treatment in a GnRH antagonist protocol (daily oral Estradiol Valerate 4 mg preceding the IVF cycle from the 21st day until the first day of the next cycle) or in oral contraceptive pill micro dose GnRH agonist protocol. The patients in the luteal estradiol protocol required more days of stimulation (10.9 ± 1.6 vs. 10.2 ± 1.8) and a greater gonadotropin requirement (3,247.8 ± 634.6 vs. 2,994.8 ± 611 IU), yet similar numbers of oocytes were retrieved and fertilized. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of the implantation rates (9.8 vs. 7.9 %) and the clinical pregnancy rates per transfer (16.3 vs. 15.6 %). This study demonstrates that the use of estradiol during a preceding luteal phase in a GnRH antagonist protocol can provide similar IVF outcomes when compared to a micro dose GnRH agonist protocol.

  6. Entrepreneurial Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Van Praag, Mirjam; Thompson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    a labor market position for (female) spouses with limited alternative opportunities. This decision has positive effects: the financial benefits for each of the spouses, and especially the fe-male, are larger in co-entrepreneurial firms, both during the life of the business and post-dissolution. This also......We study motivations for and outcomes of couples starting up a joint firm, using a sample of 1,069 Danish couples that established a joint enterprise between 2001 and 2010, while comparing them to a set of comparable firms and couples. The main motivation for joint entrepreneurship is to create...

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of a novel low-temperature-active xylanase from Arthrobacter sp. GN16 isolated from the feces of Grus nigricollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junpei; Liu, Yu; Shen, Jidong; Zhang, Rui; Tang, Xianghua; Li, Junjun; Wang, Yiyan; Huang, Zunxi

    2015-01-01

    We previously presented the cloning, heterologous expression, and characterization of a novel multidomain endoxylanase from Arthrobacter sp. GN16 isolated from the feces of Grus nigricollis. Molecular and biochemical characterization studies indicate that the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 domain at the N-terminus of the multidomain xylanase (rXynAGN16L) is a low-temperature-active endoxylanase. Many low-temperature-active enzymes contain regions of high local flexibility related to their kinetic and thermodynamic properties compared with mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. However, the thermodynamic property of low-temperature-active xylanases, including rXynAGN16L, has rarely been reported. In this study, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of rXynAGN16L were determined using different substrates and temperature conditions to completely characterize its activity properties. The kinetic property of rXynAGN16L is similar to some low-temperature-active GH 10 endoxylanases. Moreover, the thermodynamic property indicates that rXynAGN16L is typically characterized as a low-temperature-active enzyme.

  8. Kisspeptin/Gpr54-independent GnRH activity in Kiss1 and Gpr54 mutant mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yee-Ming; Broder-Fingert, Sarabeth; Wong, Kai Mee; Seminara, Stephanie B.

    2009-01-01

    The kisspeptin/Gpr54 signaling pathway plays a critical role in reproduction by stimulating the secretion of GnRH, yet mice carrying mutations in Kiss1 (which encodes kisspeptin) or Gpr54 exhibit partial sexual maturation. For instance, a proportion of female Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− mice exhibit vaginal oestrus, and some male Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− mice exhibit spermatogenesis. To characterise this partial sexual maturation, we examined the vaginal cytology of female Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− mice over time. Nearly all mutant mice eventually enter oestrus, then spontaneously transition from oestrus to dioestrus and back to oestrus again. These transitions are not associated with ovulation, and the frequency of these transitions increases with age. The oestrus exhibited by female Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− mice was disrupted by administration of the competitive GnRH antagonist acyline, which also resulted in lower uterine weights and, in Kiss1−/− mice, lower serum FSH and LH concentrations. Similarly, male Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− mice treated with acyline had smaller testicular sizes and absence of mature sperm. In addition to examining intact Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− mice, we also assessed the effects of acyline on gonadotrophin concentrations in gonadectomised mice. Gonadectomy resulted in a significant increase in serum FSH concentrations in male Gpr54−/− and Kiss1−/− mice. Acyline administration to gonadectomised Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− male mice lowered serum FSH and LH concentrations significantly. In contrast to males, gonadectomy did not result in significant gonadotrophin changes in female Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− mice, but acyline administration was followed by a decrease in LH concentrations. These results demonstrate that, while kisspeptin signaling is critical for the high levels of GnRH activity required for normal sexual maturation and for ovulation, Kiss1−/− and Gpr54−/− mice retain some

  9. Entrepreneurial Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Van Praag, Mirjam; Thompson, Peter

    with a selected set of comparable firms and couples. We find evidence that couples often establish a business together because one spouse - most commonly the female - has limited outside opportunities in the labor market. However, the financial benefits for each of the spouses, and especially the female......We study possible motivations for co-entrepenurial couples to start up a joint firm, us-ing a sample of 1,069 Danish couples that established a joint enterprise between 2001 and 2010. We compare their pre-entry characteristics, firm performance and post-dissolution private and financial outcomes......, are larger in co-entrepreneurial firms, both during the life of the business and post-dissolution. The start-up of co-entrepreneurial firms seems therefore a sound in-vestment in the human capital of both spouses as well as in the reduction of income inequality in the household. We find no evidence of non...

  10. Entrepreneurial Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Van Praag, Mirjam; Thompson, Peter

    with a selected set of comparable firms and couples. We find evidence that couples often establish a business together because one spouse – most commonly the female – has limited outside opportunities in the labor market. However, the financial benefits for each of the spouses, and especially the female......We study possible motivations for co-entrepenurial couples to start up a joint firm, using a sample of 1,069 Danish couples that established a joint enterprise between 2001 and 2010. We compare their pre-entry characteristics, firm performance and postdissolution private and financial outcomes......, are larger in co-entrepreneurial firms, both during the life of the business and post-dissolution. The start-up of co-entrepreneurial firms seems therefore a sound investment in the human capital of both spouses as well as in the reduction of income inequality in the household. We find no evidence of non...

  11. Inhibitory effects of two G protein-coupled receptor kinases on the cell surface expression and signaling of the human adrenomedullin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwasako, Kenji, E-mail: kuwasako@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Toshio [Noto Marine Laboratory, Division of Marine Environmental Studies, Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, 927-0553 (Japan); Nagata, Sayaka [Division of Circulatory and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Jiang, Danfeng; Hayashi, Hidetaka [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Murakami, Manabu [Department of Pharmacology, Hirosaki University, Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, 036-8562 (Japan); Hattori, Yuichi [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, 930-0194 (Japan); Kitamura, Kazuo [Division of Circulatory and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Kato, Johji [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan)

    2016-02-19

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, a family B GPCR) to form the type 1 adrenomedullin receptor (AM{sub 1} receptor). Here, we investigated the effects of the five non-visual GPCR kinases (GRKs 2 through 6) on the cell surface expression of the human (h)AM{sub 1} receptor by cotransfecting each of these GRKs into HEK-293 cells that stably expressed hRAMP2. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that when coexpressed with GRK4 or GRK5, the cell surface expression of the AM{sub 1} receptor was markedly decreased prior to stimulation with AM, thereby attenuating both the specific [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-induced cAMP production. These inhibitory effects of both GRKs were abolished by the replacement of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of CLR with that of the calcitonin receptor (a family B GPCR) or β{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor (a family A GPCR). Among the sequentially truncated CLR C-tail mutants, those lacking the five residues 449–453 (Ser-Phe-Ser-Asn-Ser) abolished the inhibition of the cell surface expression of CLR via the overexpression of GRK4 or GRK5. Thus, we provided new insight into the function of GRKs in agonist-unstimulated GPCR trafficking using a recombinant AM{sub 1} receptor and further determined the region of the CLR C-tail responsible for this GRK function. - Highlights: • We discovered a novel function of GRKs in GPCR trafficking using human CLR/RAMP2. • GRKs 4 and 5 markedly inhibited the cell surface expression of human CLR/RAMP2. • Both GRKs exhibited highly significant receptor signaling inhibition. • Five residues of the C-terminal tail of CLR govern this function of GRKs.

  12. Characterisation of recombinant serotonin 5-HT1A receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells: the agonist [3H]lisuride labels free receptor and receptor coupled to G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, H; Turner, J D; Strange, P G

    1995-11-01

    Serotonin 5-HT1A receptors expressed stably in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells have been studied using radioligand binding with the radiolabelled agonist [3H]lisuride. Competition studies with a range of antagonists versus [3H]lisuride confirmed that all of the specific [3H]lisuride binding was to 5-HT1A receptors on the cells. Competition studies with the antagonist spiperone and several agonists gave data that fitted best to two-binding-site models. The affinities of these competing ligands at the two classes of sites were generally in agreement with their corresponding affinities determined in previous work with either 8-[3H]hydroxydipropylaminotetralin ([3H]8-OH-DPAT; labels receptor coupled to G protein) or [3H]spiperone (labels free receptor). Saturation analyses with [3H]lisuride showed that this radioligand labels a single class of binding sites, but the level of radioligand binding was approximately twice that seen when either [3H]8-OH-DPAT or [3H]spiperone was used. [3H]Lisuride binding was partially inhibited by addition of guanine nucleotides, and the extent of inhibition decreased as the [3H]lisuride concentration was increased. This inhibition was due to the effect of guanine nucleotide to decrease slightly the affinity of [3H]lisuride for binding to the 5-HT1A receptors on the cells. It is concluded that [3H]lisuride can label both the free receptor and the receptor coupled to G proteins but with slightly different affinities and that these two states of the receptor exist in roughly equal amounts in the cells. Agonists generally have a higher affinity for the receptor coupled to G protein, whereas antagonists, with the exception of spiperone (which has a higher affinity for the free receptor), have roughly equal affinities for the free receptor and the receptor coupled to G proteins.

  13. A differential pattern of gene expression in skeletal muscle of tumor-bearing rats reveals dysregulation of excitation–contraction coupling together with additional muscle alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely Cristine; Busquets, Sílvia; Fuster, Gemma; Ametller, Elisabet; Figueras, Maite; Olivan, Mireia; Toledo, Míriam; López-Soriano, Francisco J; Qu, Xiaoyan; Demuth, Jeffrey; Stevens, Paula; Varbanov, Alex; Wang, Feng; Isfort, Robert J; Argilés, Josep M

    2014-02-01

    Cachexia is a wasting condition that manifests in several types of cancer. The main characteristic of this condition is a profound loss of muscle mass. By using a microarray system, expression of several hundred genes was screened in skeletal muscle of rats bearing a cachexia-inducing tumor, the AH-130 Yoshida ascites hepatoma. This model induced a strong decrease in muscle mass in the tumor-bearing animals, as compared with their healthy counterparts. The results show important differences in gene expression in EDL skeletal muscle between tumor-bearing animals with cachexia and control animals. The differences observed pertain to genes related to intracellular calcium homeostasis and genes involved in the control of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and protein turnover, both at the level of protein synthesis and proteolysis. Assessment of these differences may be a useful tool for the design of novel therapeutic strategies to fight this devastating syndrome.

  14. Sequence and expression pattern of a novel human orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, GPRC5B, a family C receptor with a short amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2000-01-01

    Query of GenBank with the amino acid sequence of human metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 (mGluR2) identified a predicted gene product of unknown function on BAC clone CIT987SK-A-69G12 (located on chromosome band 16p12) as a homologous protein. The transcript, entitled GPRC5B, was cloned......-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPRC5B displays homology to retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RAIG1, 33% sequence identity) and to several family C (mGluR-like) GPCRs (20-25% sequence identity). Both RAIG1 and GPRC5B have short extracellular amino-terminal domains (ATDs) that contrast the very long ATDs characterizing...

  15. Expression of orphan G-protein coupled receptor GPR174 in CHO cells induced morphological changes and proliferation delay via increasing intracellular cAMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, Kazuya; Yamamura, Chiaki; Tabata, Ken-ichi [Laboratory of Pharmacoinformatics, Graduate School of Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Fujita, Norihisa, E-mail: nori@ph.ritsumei.ac.jp [Laboratory of Pharmacoinformatics, Graduate School of Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); School of Pharmacy, Ristumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of GPR174 in CHO cells induces morphological changes and proliferation delay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These are due to increase in intracellular cAMP concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lysophosphatidylserine was identified to stimulate GPR174 leading to activate ACase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potencies of fatty acid moiety on LysoPS were oleoyl Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To stearoyl > palmitoyl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose that GPR174 is a lysophosphatidylserine receptor. -- Abstract: We established cell lines that stably express orphan GPCR GPR174 using CHO cells, and studied physiological and pharmacological features of the receptor. GPR174-expressing cells showed cell-cell adhesion with localization of actin filaments to cell membrane, and revealed significant delay of cell proliferation. Since the morphological changes of GPR174-cells were very similar to mock CHO cells treated with cholera toxin, we measured the concentration of intracellular cAMP. The results showed the concentration was significantly elevated in GPR174-cells. By measuring intracellular cAMP concentration in GPR174-cells, we screened lipids and nucleotides to identify ligands for GPR174. We found that lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) stimulated increase in intracellular cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, phosphorylation of Erk was elevated by LysoPS in GPR174 cells. These LysoPS responses were inhibited by NF449, an inhibitor of G{alpha}{sub s} protein. These results suggested that GPR174 was a putative LysoPS receptor conjugating with G{alpha}{sub s}, and its expression induced morphological changes in CHO cells by constitutively activating adenylyl cycles accompanied with cell conjunctions and delay of proliferation.

  16. Kisspeptin-gpr54 signaling at the GnRH neuron is necessary for negative feedback regulation of luteinizing hormone secretion in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Shel-Hwa; Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin-Gpr54 signaling is critical for regulating the activity of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in mammals. Previous studies have shown that the negative feedback mechanism is disrupted in global Gpr54-null mutants. The present investigation aimed to determine (1) if a lack of cyclical estrogen exposure of the GnRH neuronal network in the life-long hypogonadotropic Gpr54-null mice contributed to their failed negative feedback mechanism and (2) the cellular location of disrupted kisspeptin-Gpr54 signaling. Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations were determined in individual adult female mice when intact, following ovariectomy (OVX) and in response to an acute injection of 17β-estradiol (E2). Control mice exhibited a characteristic rise in LH after OVX that was suppressed by acute E2. Global Gpr54-null mice failed to exhibit any post-OVX increase in LH or response to E2. Adult female global Gpr54-null mice given a cyclical regimen of estradiol for three cycles prior to OVX also failed to exhibit any post-OVX increase in LH or response to E2. To address whether Gpr54 signaling at the GnRH neuron itself was necessary for the failed response to OVX in global Gpr54-null animals, adult female mice with a GnRH neuron-selective deletion of Gpr54 were examined. These mice also failed to exhibit any post-OVX increase in LH or response to E2. These experiments demonstrate defective negative feedback in global Gpr54-null mice that cannot be attributed to a lack of prior exposure of the GnRH neuronal network to cyclical estradiol. The absence of negative feedback in GnRH neuron-selective Gpr54-null mice demonstrates the necessity of direct kisspeptin signaling at the GnRH neuron for this mechanism to occur. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Comparative Expression Study of the Endo–G Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Repertoire in Human Glioblastoma Cancer Stem-like Cells, U87-MG Cells and Non Malignant Cells of Neural Origin Unveils New Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Sarah; Carapito, Christine; Dong, Jihu; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Cianférani, Sarah; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are highly aggressive, invasive brain tumors with bad prognosis and unmet medical need. These tumors are heterogeneous being constituted by a variety of cells in different states of differentiation. Among these, cells endowed with stem properties, tumor initiating/propagating properties and particularly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapies are designed as the real culprits for tumor maintenance and relapse after treatment. These cells, termed cancer stem-like cells, have been designed as prominent targets for new and more efficient cancer therapies. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a family of membrane receptors, play a prominent role in cell signaling, cell communication and crosstalk with the microenvironment. Their role in cancer has been highlighted but remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a descriptive study of the differential expression of the endo-GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells (GSCs), U-87 MG cells, human astrocytes and fetal neural stem cells (f-NSCs). The endo-GPCR transcriptome has been studied using Taqman Low Density Arrays. Of the 356 GPCRs investigated, 138 were retained for comparative studies between the different cell types. At the transcriptomic level, eight GPCRs were specifically expressed/overexpressed in GSCs. Seventeen GPCRs appeared specifically expressed in cells with stem properties (GSCs and f-NSCs). Results of GPCR expression at the protein level using mass spectrometry and proteomic analysis are also presented. The comparative GPCR expression study presented here gives clues for new pathways specifically used by GSCs and unveils novel potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24662753

  18. Effect of Tianqi antitremor granules on behavioral manifestations and expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 and β-arrestin1 in levodopa-induced dyskinesia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Na Wu,1 Xinxin Yang,1 Lu Song,1 Jianglei Wei,2 Zhenguo Liu1 1Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2Shuguang Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Background: Recent studies have shown that expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 (GRK6 and β-arrestin1 in the striatum is closely associated with hyperactive dopamine receptors in rats with levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID. Our research group has shown that Tianqi antitremor granules have a significant effect on the motor complications of Parkinson's disease (PD. However, whether Tianqi antitremor granules have an effect on the behavioral manifestations and expression of GRK6 and β-arrestin1 in rats with LID is unknown. Methods: Rats with PD received twice daily intraperitoneal injections of levodopa for 4 weeks to induce dyskinesia. Rats with LID were randomly divided into five groups: an LID-control group, an LID group, a levodopa plus Tianqi antitremor granules as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM-low group, a levodopa plus TCM-medium group, and levodopa plus TCM-high group. Peak intensity of rotations was measured. GRK6 and β-arrestin1 expression in the striatum of the dyskinetic rats was observed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results: Pulsatile treatment with levodopa induced abnormal involuntary movements in rats with PD similar to LID in patients with PD. We found that repeated levodopa administration increased peak rotations in dyskinetic rats. However, peak rotations were decreased in rats given levodopa plus the different doses of Tianqi antitremor granules. In accordance with changed behavior, GRK6 and β-arrestin1 expression was decreased in rats with PD and was persistently low in rats with LID, but this decrease was prevented by coadministration of levodopa and Tianqi antitremor granules. Conclusion: Tianqi antitremor granules ameliorated

  19. Cloning of a novel orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR-2037): in situ hybridization reveals high mRNA expression in rat brain restricted to neurons of the habenular complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, M; Collin, M; Sejlitz, T; Meister, B; Lind, P

    2003-12-12

    The family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the largest protein families in the mammalian genome. Receptors belonging to this class mediate the effects of very diverse ligands and are responsible for signaling events by affecting the activities of enzymes and ion channels. Here we describe the cloning and identification of GPCR-2037, a novel and previously not identified member of the large family of GPCRs. This orphan GPCR displays several typical features of family A type of GPCRs and shows highest homology with the galanin receptors 2 and 3. In rat brain, in situ hybridization showed that expression of GPCR-2037 mRNA was exclusively localized to neurons of the habenular complex. The expression was particularly prominent in the medial habenular nucleus, whereas the lateral habenular nucleus exhibited a lower number of labeled cells. The restricted and unique expression pattern of GPCR-2037 in the rat brain suggests a role for this orphan GPCR in the habenular complex, a brain structure implicated in the modulation of various physiological functions. Further studies involving the identification of the GPCR ligand will enable the functional characterization of this orphan receptor and its role in regulating the habenular complex.

  20. Foetal Hypothalamic and Pituitary Expression of Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone and Galanin Systems is Disturbed by Exposure to Sewage Sludge Chemicals via Maternal Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellingham, Michelle; Fowler, Paul A.; Amezaga, Maria R.; Whitelaw, Christine M.; Rhind, Stewart M.; Cotinot, Corinne; Mandon-Pepin, Beatrice; Sharpe, Richard M.; Evans, Neil P.

    2016-01-01

    Animals and humans are chronically exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) which are ubiquitous in the environment. There are strong circumstantial links between environmental EDC exposure and both declining human/wildlife reproductive health and the increasing incidence of reproductive system abnormalities. Verification of such links, however, is difficult and requires animal models exposed to 'real life', environmentally relevant concentrations/mixtures of environmental contaminants (ECs), particularly in- utero, when sensitivity to EC exposure is high. The aim of this study was to determine whether the fetal sheep reproductive neuroendocrine axis, particularly GnRH and galaninergic systems were affected by maternal exposure to a complex mixture of chemicals, applied to pasture, in the form of sewage sludge. Sewage sludge contains high concentrations of a spectrum of EDCs and other pollutants, relative to environmental concentrations but is frequently recycled to land as a fertiliser. We found that foetuses exposed, to the EDC mixture in-utero through their mothers, had lower GnRH mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and lower GnRHR and galanin receptor (GALR) mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. Strikingly, this, treatment had no significant effect on maternal GnRH or GnRHR mRNA expression although GALR mRNA expression within the maternal hypothalamus and pituitary gland was reduced. This study clearly demonstrates that the developing foetal neuroendocrine axis is sensitive to real-world mixtures of environmental chemicals. Given the important role of GnRH and GnRHR in the regulation of reproductive function, its known in-utero programming role, and the role of galanin in the regulation of many physiological/neuroendocrine systems, in-utero changes in the activity of these systems are likely to have long term consequences in adulthood and represent a novel pathway through which EC mixtures could perturb normal reproductive function

  1. Predicting the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue treatment on uterine leiomyomas based on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuno, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Takahashi, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine, Kumamoto (Japan); Katabuchi, H.; Okamura, H. [Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine, Kumamoto (Japan); Kitano, Y.; Shimamura, T. [Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Amakusa Chuou General Hospital, Hondo (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the simple assessment of signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images is predictive of the effect of hormonal treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Material and methods: The correlation between T2-weighted MR imaging of uterine leiomyomas and histologic findings was evaluated using 85 leiomyomas from 62 females who underwent myomectomy or hysterectomy. We also correlated the pretreatment MR images features obtained in 110 women with 143 leiomyomas with the effect of GnRH analogue treatment. The size (length x width x depth) of the leiomyoma was evaluated before and at 6 months after treatment by ultrasound. Results: The proportion of leiomyoma cell fascicles and that of extracellular matrix affected signal intensities of uterine leiomyomas on T2-weighted MR images. The amount of extracellular matrix was predominant in hypointense leiomyomas on T2-weighted images, while diffuse intermediate signal leiomyomas were predominantly composed of leiomyoma cell fascicles. Marked degenerative changes were noted in leiomyomas with heterogenous hyperintensity. The homogeneously intermediate signal intensity leiomyomas showed significant size reduction after treatment (size ratio; posttreatment volume/pretreatment volume 0.29{+-}0.11). The size ratio for the hypointense tumors was 0.82{+-}0.14, and 0.82{+-}0.18 for the heterogeneously hyperintense tumors. There was a significant difference in the response to treatment between the homogeneously intermediate signal intensity leiomyomas and the hypointense or heterogeneously hyperintense leiomyomas (both p<0.01). Conclusion: Signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images depends on the amount of leiomyoma cell fascicles and extracellular matrix. Simple assessment of the MR signal intensity is useful in predicting the effect of GnRH analogue on uterine leiomyomas. (orig.)

  2. Testosterone production in response to exogenous gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH challenge) depends on social environment and color polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Kristal E; Pryke, Sarah R

    2017-04-01

    Testosterone is an important mediator of behavior, morphology and physiology. A cascade of signals regulates the amount of testosterone (T) circulating in the plasma; in response to stimulus the hypothalamus releases gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which triggers secretion of gonadotropins from the pituitary, stimulating the synthesis and release of T from the gonads. Previous work has shown that changes to the social environment can alter circulating T-levels, which may have important fitness consequences, but it is currently unclear whether these changes are due to alterations in the signal from the brain, or changes in the ability of the pituitary and gonads to respond to this signal. Further, the strength and direction of response to a changing environment may differ according to life-history strategy. Species with genetically determined alternative strategies offer a pathway for examining these differences. Here we use a finch with a genetically determined polymorphism, the Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae), to determine whether T-levels change in response to social environment. We also use injections of GnRH to determine whether these changes are due to alterations in the ability of the pituitary and gonads to respond to this signal. We found that social environment (presence of females) had a rapid effect on male circulating T-levels, and that this difference was reflected in responsiveness to GnRH. We observed no overall morph differences in T-levels, but we did observe morph differences in the pattern of T secretion across environments, and morph differences in the repeatability of T-levels across time and environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of a GnRH analogue (Maprelin) on the reproductive performance of gilts and sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Ellen; Kauffold, Johannes; Engl, Silke; Jourquin, Jan; Maes, Dominiek

    2013-11-01

    The ability of peforelin (l-GnRH-III) to stimulate follicular growth, FSH release, and estrus in gilts after altrenogest treatment and in sows after weaning was investigated. In three farrow-to-wean herds, with at least 600 sows and average production performance, 216 gilts, 335 primiparous, and 1299 pluriparous sows were randomly allocated to three treatments: peforelin (M group: Maprelin), eCG (F group: Folligon), and physiological saline solution (C group). Animals were treated 48 hours after their last altrenogest treatment (gilts) or 24 hours after weaning (sows). The weaning-to-estrus interval, estrus duration, estrus rate (ER), pregnancy rate, and total born (TB), live born, and stillborn (SB) numbers were recorded and compared between treatments for the different parity groups (gilts and primiparous and pluriparous sows). Follicle sizes were measured in representative animals from each group on the occasion of their last altrenogest treatment or at weaning, and also on the occasions of their first (FS1) and second (FS2) attempted inseminations. Blood samples were taken to determine FSH concentrations at weaning and 2 hours after injection, and progesterone concentrations 10 days after the first insemination attempt. The relative change in FSH concentrations was calculated. Significant differences were found for ER within 7 days of weaning in pluriparous sows (95%, 91%, and 90% for the M, F, and C groups, respectively, P = 0.005). Gilts in the F-group had high TB numbers, and pluriparous sows in the M group had high SB numbers (TB gilts = 13.6, 15.4, and 14.9 [P = 0.02] and SB pluriparous sows = 1.8, 1.4, and 1.7 [P = 0.05] for the M, F, and C groups, respectively). The M group had the highest FS1 (for gilts) and FS2 (for pluriparous sows) values: FS1 = 5.4, 4.9, and 4.9 mm [P = 0.02] and FS2 = 6.8, 5.3, and 6.3 mm [P = 0.03] for the M, F, and C groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between the different treatments within each parity

  4. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During in vitro fertilization (IVF, fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Methods Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Results Completed questionnaires (n = 71 revealed a mean +/− SD patient age of 34 +/− 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1% had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s. When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/− 11.75 and $654.55 +/− 106.34, respectively (p  Conclusions This investigation found consistently higher non-reimbursed direct medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs

  5. Redução da primeira dose de GnRH em vacas holandesas de alta produção sincronizadas com Ovsynch ou Heatsynch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Aragon Lima

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of treatment with 10 or 20 µg of GnRH and type of FTAI protocols (Ovsynch and Heatsynch on pregnancy rate of lactating dairy cows submitted to the synchronization at FTAI (n = 581. The animals were distributed among four treatments, allocated factorial design 2x2: Treat 1- Ovsynch (20 µg GnRH on D0; PGF on D7; 10 µg GnRH on D9 and FTAI on D10; n = 141, Treat 2- ½ Ovsynch (10 µg GnRH on D0; PGF on D7; 10 µg GnRH on D9 and FTAI on D10; n = 159, Treat 3- Heatsynch (20 µg GnRH on D0; PGF on D7; 1 mg EB on D8 and FTAI on D10; n = 147 and Treat 4- ½ Heatsynch (10 µg GnRH on D0; PGF on D7; 1 mg EB on D8 and FTAI on D10; n = 134. The Group Ovsynch (Treat 1 and 2 presented greater pregnancy rate than Group Heatsynch (Treat 3 and 4 at 28 days (45.7% (137/300 and 39.9% (112/281, respectively; P = 0.07 and at 56 days of gestation (41.0% (123/300 and 34.2% (96/281, respectively; P = 0.06. There were no statistical difference (P >; 0.10 on pregnancy rate at 28 (44.4% (128/288 vs 41.3% (121/293; P = 0.50 and 56 days (38.2% (110/288 vs 37.2% (109/293; P = 0.68 between the dosages of the GnRH. The pregnancies losses (between 28 and 56 days were not different between the FTAI protocols and GnRH dosage (P >; 0.10. We concluded that the Ovsynch protocol presented greater pregnancy rate at FTAI than Heatsynch protocol and the administration of 10 µg of buserelin Acetate, at the beginning of these protocols did not decrease the efficiency of FTAI protocols in high-yielding Holstein cows.

  6. Purification of family B G protein-coupled receptors using nanodiscs: Application to human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Cai

    Full Text Available Family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs play vital roles in hormone-regulated homeostasis. They are drug targets for metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. Despite their importance, the signaling mechanisms for family B GPCRs at the molecular level remain largely unexplored due to the challenges in purification of functional receptors in sufficient amount for biophysical characterization. Here, we purified the family B GPCR human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R, whose agonists, e.g. exendin-4, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The receptor was expressed in HEK293S GnTl- cells using our recently developed protocol. The protocol incorporates the receptor into the native-like lipid environment of reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL particles, also known as nanodiscs, immediately after the membrane solubilization step followed by chromatographic purification, minimizing detergent contact with the target receptor to reduce denaturation and prolonging stabilization of receptor in lipid bilayers without extra steps of reconstitution. This method yielded purified GLP1R in nanodiscs that could bind to GLP-1 and exendin-4 and activate Gs protein. This nanodisc purification method can potentially be a general strategy to routinely obtain purified family B GPCRs in the 10s of microgram amounts useful for spectroscopic analysis of receptor functions and activation mechanisms.

  7. Global gene expression analysis in the mouse brainstem after hyperalgesia induced by facial carrageenan injection--evidence for a form of neurovascular coupling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Kay-Wee; Lutfun, Nahar; Manikandan, Jayapal; Ong, Wei-Yi; Yeo, Jin-Fei

    2009-03-01

    The present study was carried out to examine global gene expression in the brainstem, in a mouse facial carrageenan injection model of orofacial pain. Mice that received facial carrageenan injection showed increased mechanical allodynia, demonstrated by increased responses to von Frey hair stimulation of the face. The brainstem was harvested at 3 days post-injection, corresponding to the time of peak responses, and analyzed by Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 microarrays. We sought to identify common genes that are changed in the respective sides of the brainstem after either right- or left-sided facial carrageenan injection. The result is a relatively small list of genes (22 genes), which were then classified using DAVID software. Many of them fell into the categories of "response to stress", "defence response", "response to biotic stimulus", "cell adhesion" and "leukocyte adhesion". Of these, increased expression of P-selectin, ICAM-1 and CCL12 after carrageenan injection could be verified by real-time RT-PCR on both the right and left sides, and increased in P-selectin and ICAM-1 further verified by Western blot analysis. P-selectin and ICAM-1 were immunolocalized to endothelial cells, and were double labelled with von Willebrand factor. Intraperitoneal injection of the P-selectin inhibitor KF38789 significantly reduced mechanical allodynia in the facial carrageenan-injected mice. P-selectin mediates the capturing of leukocytes from the bloodstream and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelial surface. We hypothesize that increased nociceptive input to the brainstem could attract circulating macrophages into the brain, resulting in neuroinflammation and pain.

  8. Suppression of the Arboviruses Dengue and Chikungunya Using a Dual-Acting Group-I Intron Coupled with Conditional Expression of the Bax C-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Carter

    Full Text Available In portions of South Asia, vectors and patients co-infected with dengue (DENV and chikungunya (CHIKV are on the rise, with the potential for this occurrence in other regions of the world, for example the United States. Therefore, we engineered an antiviral approach that suppresses the replication of both arboviruses in mosquito cells using a single antiviral group I intron. We devised unique configurations of internal, external, and guide sequences that permit homologous recognition and splicing with conserved target sequences in the genomes of both viruses using a single trans-splicing Group I intron, and examined their effectiveness to suppress infections of DENV and CHIKV in mosquito cells when coupled with a proapoptotic 3' exon, ΔN Bax. RT-PCR demonstrated the utility of these introns in trans-splicing the ΔN Bax sequence downstream of either the DENV or CHIKV target site in transformed Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells, independent of the order in which the virus specific targeting sequences were inserted into the construct. This trans-splicing reaction forms DENV or CHIKV ΔN Bax RNA fusions that led to apoptotic cell death as evidenced by annexin V staining, caspase, and DNA fragmentation assays. TCID50-IFA analyses demonstrate effective suppression of DENV and CHIKV infections by our anti-arbovirus group I intron approach. This represents the first report of a dual-acting Group I intron, and demonstrates that we can target DENV and CHIKV RNAs in a sequence specific manner with a single, uniquely configured CHIKV/DENV dual targeting group I intron, leading to replication suppression of both arboviruses, and thus providing a promising single antiviral for the transgenic suppression of multiple arboviruses.

  9. Endogenous expression of histamine H1 receptors functionally coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis in C6 glioma cells: regulation by cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peakman, M C; Hill, S J

    1994-12-01

    1. The effects of histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on phospholipid hydrolysis in rat-derived C6 glioma cells have been investigated. 2. Histamine H1 receptor-stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of total [3H]-inositol phosphates in cells prelabelled with [3H]-myo-inositol. The rank order of agonist potencies was histamine (EC50 = 24 microM) > N alpha-methylhistamine (EC50 = 31 microM) > 2-thiazolylethylamine (EC50 = 91 microM). 3. The response to 0.1 mM histamine was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by the H1-antagonists, mepyramine (apparent Kd = 1 nM) and (+)-chlorpheniramine (apparent Kd = 4 nM). In addition, (-)-chlorpheniramine was more than two orders of magnitude less potent than its (+)-stereoisomer. 4. Elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation with forskolin (10 microM, EC50 = 0.3 microM), isoprenaline (1 microM, EC50 = 4 nM) or rolipram (0.5 mM), significantly reduced the histamine-mediated (0.1 mM) inositol phosphate response by 37%, 43% and 26% respectively. In contrast, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin did not increase cyclic AMP accumulation and had no effect on the phosphoinositide response to histamine. 5. These data indicate the presence of functionally coupled, endogenous histamine H1 receptors in C6 glioma cells. Furthermore, the results also indicate that H1 receptor-mediated phospholipid hydrolysis is inhibited by the elevation of cyclic AMP levels in these cells.

  10. Expression and role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 2 and its receptor in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH1) and its receptor (GnRHR1) drive mammalian reproduction via regulation of the gonadotropins. Yet, a second form of GnRH (GnRH2) and its receptor (GnRHR2) also exist in some mammals. GnRH2 has been completely conserved throughout 500 million years of evolution, s...

  11. Active immunization against GnRH in pre-pubertal domestic mammals: testicular morphometry, histopathology and endocrine responses in rabbits, guinea pigs and ram lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, P M; Gutierrez-Reinoso, M A; Sanchez-Cepeda, E G; Garcia-Herreros, M

    2017-08-24

    Effective tools for male contraception are important in the control of reproduction in animal populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of active immunization against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) on male reproductive function assessing testicular morphological changes and serum-gonadotropin levels in pre-pubertal rabbits, guinea pigs and ram lambs. An anti-GnRH vaccine was developed by linking a GnRH-homologous molecule to a tetanus clostridial toxoid (Al(OH)3 coadjuvant). After vaccination protocols testicular morphometry, histopathological alterations and endocrine responses (FSH, LH, testosterone and cortisol serum levels) were evaluated. Testicular volume was significantly reduced in vaccinated animals with respect to the control group in rabbits, guinea pigs and ram lambs (Pguinea pigs and ram lambs (Pguinea pigs (80%) and ram lambs (60%). No significant differences were observed between vaccinated and control groups regarding FSH and LH during the experiments in the three experimental species/models used. Testosterone, however, was only significantly lower (~22-fold, P<0.01) in vaccinated rabbits. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that pre-pubertal active immunization against GnRH leads to endocrine disruption and marked differences on testicular morphometry, development and activity among lagomorphs, hystricomorphs and ovine species with species-specific sensitivity regarding the anti-GnRH immune response.

  12. Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine fibroids-The tissue effects of GnRH agonist pre-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, O.C. [Department of Academic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Mary' s Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine, Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom); Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, St. Mary' s Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine, Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom); Hindley, J.T. [Department of Academic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Mary' s Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine, Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom); Regan, L. [Department of Academic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Mary' s Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine, Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom); Gedroyc, W.M.W. [Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, St. Mary' s Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine, Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: w.gedroyc@imperial.ac.uk

    2006-08-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the ablative effect of magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) on fibroid tissue following the administration of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist. Study design: Fifty women with clinically symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated. Those with uterine diameter of 10 cm or greater were given 3 months pre-treatment with GnRH agonists. Data regarding number of ultrasound sonications, Joules of energy delivered and volume of thermal destruction was recorded. Results: Twenty-seven subjects were given GnRH agonist therapy before MRgFUS and 23 women underwent MRgFUS without pre-treatment. All patients in both study groups completed MR guided FUS as an outpatient procedure with no device related adverse events reported. In the group of women who received GnRH agonists, the volume of ablation was significantly larger than that in the control group (0.06 cm{sup 3} versus 0.03 cm{sup 3}, P < 0.05), per Joule of energy applied. Conclusion: The use of GnRH agonists potentiates the thermal effects of MRgFUS in women undergoing treatment of uterine fibroids.

  13. The benefit of individualized low-dose hCG support for high responders in GnRHa-triggered IVF/ICSI cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Shieh, Miawh-Lirng; Li, Hsin-Yang

    2016-07-01

    To assess the pregnancy outcome and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) incidence in high responders receiving gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) trigger plus individualized support of low-dose human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Such support includes 500-1000 IU hCG given at trigger and, if serum estradiol (E2) dropped to below 800 pg/mL before the 6(th) day after oocyte retrieval, an additional rescue dose of 300 IU hCG. This was a retrospective study of potential high responders aged from 28 years to 40 years at a tertiary fertility center in Taiwan. By means of chart review, we assessed the pregnancy outcome and OHSS incidence in high responders receiving GnRHa trigger plus individualized low-dose hCG support. The main outcomes were measured by ongoing pregnancy rate and OHSS incidence (SPSS), in which statistical significance was determined by Chi-square test. Moderate to severe OHSS did not develop in any patient receiving GnRHa trigger plus individualized low-dose hCG support. In fact, a satisfactory ongoing pregnancy rate (46.9%) was noted in patients receiving GnRHa trigger plus individualized low-dose hCG support. Our study suggested that GnRHa trigger combined with individualized low-dose hCG support appears to be a safe approach with a satisfactory pregnancy outcome. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  14. Anatomical characterization of bombesin receptor subtype-3 mRNA expression in the rodent central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Parks, Gregory S; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Lien; Lew, Michelle; Civelli, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Mice deficient in BRS-3 develop late-onset mild obesity with metabolic defects, while synthetic agonists activating BRS-3 show antiobesity profiles by inhibiting food intake and increasing metabolic rate in rodent models. The molecular mechanisms and the neural circuits responsible for these effects, however, remain elusive and demand better characterization. We report here a comprehensive mapping of BRS-3 mRNA in the rat and mouse brain through in situ hybridization. Furthermore, to investigate the neurochemical characteristics of the BRS-3-expressing neurons, double in situ hybridization was performed to determine whether BRS-3 colocalizes with other neurotransmitters or neuropeptides. Many, but not all, of the BRS-3-expressing neurons were found to be glutamatergic, while few were found to be cholinergic or GABAergic. BRS-3-containing neurons do not express some of the well-characterized neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), orexin/hypocretin, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and kisspeptin. Interestingly, BRS-3 mRNA was found to partially colocalize with corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), suggesting novel interactions of BRS-3 with stress- and growth-related endocrine systems. Our study provides important information for evaluating BRS-3 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cisto ovariano em vacas de leite: incidência, resposta à aplicação de GnRH e desempenho reprodutivo Ovarian cysts in lactating dairy cows: incidence, response to GnRH, and reproductive performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Santos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A incidência de cistos ovarianos, a resposta ao tratamento com GnRH e os efeitos da ocorrência de cisto no desempenho reprodutivo e na taxa de descarte foram determinados em vacas lactantes da raça Holandesa. Vacas lactantes (n=333 foram avaliadas semanalmente por ultrassonografia a partir da quarta semana pós-parto, visando à detecção de corpos lúteos (CL e de folículos ovarianos maiores que 10mm. Na sétima semana pós-parto, as vacas foram classificadas: em ciclando (n=248; presença de CL em um dos exames ultrassonográficos; em anestro (n=54; ausência de CL e de folículos >25mm e com cisto (n=31; ausência de CL e presença de estruturas >25mm, quando foram distribuídas em: grupo-controle (n=16; sem tratamento e grupo-tratamento (n=15; vacas que receberam uma aplicação de GnRH. A taxa de cura foi de 60,0% no grupo das vacas tratadas e de 87,5% no grupo-controle. As vacas com cistos apresentaram maior intervalo parto-primeira inseminação artificial (PThe incidence of ovarian cysts, response to GnRH treatment, and effects on reproductive performance and culling rate of Holstein cows were determined. Ovaries of lactating cows (n=333, were weekly monitored by ultrasound, beginning at fourth week postpartum, to determine the presence of corpus luteum (CL and follicles greater than 10mm. In the seventh week the cows were classified as cycling (n=248; presence of corpus luteum (CL in one of the ultrasound evaluations; anovulatory (n=54; absence of CL and follicles less than 25mm, and cystic (n=31; absence of CL and presence of structures greater than 25mm. The cysts cows were distributed in two groups in the seventh week: control group (n=16; without treatment and treatment group (n=15; cows received one GnRH injection. The recovery rate was 60.0% in treated cows and 87.5% in control cows. The cystic cows had longer average interval from parturition to first AI (P<0.05; 91.4±8.3 vs. 77.8±2.5, higher number of services per

  16. 髄膜腫におけるゴナドトロピン放出ホルモン受容体(GnRH-R)およびゴナドトロピン放出ホルモン(GnRH)の発現と細胞増殖に対するGnRHの効果 : 臨床病理学的ならびに培養細胞を用いた検討

    OpenAIRE

    廣田, 雄一

    2004-01-01

    髄膜腫82例を対象にゴナドトロピン放出ホルモン受容体(GnRH-R)及びゴナドトロピン放出ホルモン(GnRH)の発現を免疫組織化学法とRT-PCR法を用いて検討し,同時にプロゲステロン受容体(PgR),エストロゲン受容体(ER)と増殖能の指標であるKi-67の免疫組織化学的検討及び臨床病理学的事項との相関についても併せて検討した.髄膜腫におけるGnRH-Rの機能を評価するため,髄膜腫6例を細胞培養し,GnRHのアゴニスト及びアンタゴニスト投与による細胞増殖解析を行った.多くの髄膜腫はGnRH-Rを発現し,GnRHが細胞増殖の調節因子の一つとして働いており,一部に自巳分泌機構が存在することが示唆された...

  17. Peri-pubertal gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog treatment affects hippocampus gene expression without changing spatial orientation in young sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuruddin, Syed; Wojniusz, Slawomir; Ropstad, Erik; Krogenæs, Anette; Evans, Neil P; Robinson, Jane E; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit Hebold

    2013-04-01

    Normal brain maturation is the result of molecular changes that can be modulated by endocrine variables associated with brain plasticity and results in sex- and age specific changes in cognitive performance. Using a sheep model, we have previously shown that peri-pubertal pharmacological blockade of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors results in increased sex-differences in cognitive executive function and emotional control. In this study we explore effects of this treatment regime on hippocampal gene expression and spatial orientation. The study was conducted with 30 same-sex twin lambs, half of which were treated with the GnRH analog (GnRHa) goserelin acetate every 4th week, beginning before puberty, until 50 weeks of age. Animals were tested in their spatial orientation ability at 48 weeks of age. Quantitative real time PCR analysis was conducted to examine effects of treatment on the expression of genes associated with synaptic plasticity and endocrine signaling. GnRHa treatment was associated with significant sex- and hemisphere specific changes in mRNA expression for some of the genes studied. The treatment had no significant effect on spatial orientation. However, there was a tendency that females performed better than males in spatial orientation. Our results indicate that GnRH directly and/or indirectly, is involved in the regulation of sex- and side-specific expression patterns of genes. Hence, these results should be considered when long-term peri-pubertal GnRHa treatment is used in children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Developmental exposure to ethinylestradiol affects reproductive physiology, the GnRH neuroendocrine network and behaviors in female mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyes eDerouiche

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During development, environmental estrogens are able to induce an estrogen mimetic action that may interfere with endocrine and neuroendocrine systems. The present study investigated the effects on the reproductive function in female mice following developmental exposure to pharmaceutical ethinylestradiol (EE2, the most widespread and potent synthetic steroid present in aquatic environments. EE2 was administrated in drinking water at environmentally relevant (ENVIR or pharmacological (PHARMACO doses (0.1 and 1 µg/kg (body weight/day respectively, from embryonic day 10 until postnatal day 40. Our results show that both groups of EE2-exposed females had advanced vaginal opening and shorter estrus cycles, but a normal fertility rate compared to CONTROL females. The hypothalamic population of GnRH neurons was affected by EE2 exposure with a significant increase in the number of perikarya in the preoptic area of the PHARMACO group and a modification in their distribution in the ENVIR group, both associated with a marked decrease in GnRH fibers immunoreactivity in the median eminence. In EE2-exposed females, behavioral tests highlighted a disturbed maternal behavior, a higher lordosis response, a lack of discrimination between gonad-intact and castrated males in sexually experienced females, and an increased anxiety-related behavior. Altogether, these results put emphasis on the high sensitivity of sexually dimorphic behaviors and neuroendocrine circuits to disruptive effects of EDCs.

  19. GN and C Subsystem Concept for Safe Precision Landing of the Proposed Lunar MARE Robotic Science Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M., III; Johnson, Andrew E.; Anderson, F. Scott; Condon, Gerald L.; Nguyen, Louis H.; Olansen, Jon B.; Devolites, Jennifer L.; Harris, William J.; Hines, Glenn D.; Lee, David E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Lunar MARE (Moon Age and Regolith Explorer) Discovery Mission concept targets delivery of a science payload to the lunar surface for sample collection and dating. The mission science is within a 100-meter radius region of smooth lunar maria terrain near Aristarchus crater. The location has several small, sharp craters and rocks that present landing hazards to the spacecraft. For successful delivery of the science payload to the surface, the vehicle Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) subsystem requires safe and precise landing capability, so design infuses the NASA Autonomous precision Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) and a gimbaled, throttleable LOX/LCH4 main engine. The ALHAT system implemented for Lunar MARE is a specialization of prototype technologies in work within NASA for the past two decades, including a passive optical Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) sensor, a Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) velocity and range sensor, and a Lidar-based Hazard Detection (HD) sensor. The landing descent profile is from a retrograde orbit over lighted terrain with landing near lunar dawn. The GN&C subsystem with ALHAT capabilities will deliver the science payload to the lunar surface within a 20-meter landing ellipse of the target location and at a site having greater than 99% safety probability, which minimizes risk to safe landing and delivery of the MARE science payload to the intended terrain region.

  20. [Orientation studies of ovulation release in mice to test gonadotropic preparations. 2. FSH, PMSG and Gn-RH activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeld, J; Fliess, F R

    1981-01-01

    The doses of FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone), PMSG (pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin), and gn-RH (gonadotrophin-releasing hormone) effective in terms of triggering ovulation were determined in a mouse ovulation test. Varying doses of the above preparations were subcutaneously injected, 48 hours after overstimulation by injection of 0.5 or 1.0 IU of PMSG. The animals were sacrificed for examination, after another 18-20 hours had passed. Roughly 50 per cent of all animals treated (threshold) in one and the same dosage group (n = 5) had ovulated in response to 0.02-0.1 IU of FSH per animal. The following FSH and PMSG dosages are recommended: 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.1 IU of FSH, 0.6, 1.0, 1.4, 1.8, 2.2, 2.6, 3.0 IU of PMSG. When mouse ovulation tests were used in orientation studies, ovulation was regularly induced by Gn-RH doses per animal between 0.01 and 1.0 micrograms. Dosage spacings or increments should be specified with higher accuracy by further studies.

  1. Risk of recurrent menorrhagia after hydrothermoablation: role of GnRH analogues neoadjuvant treatment in long-term successful rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litta, P; Saccardi, C; Tommasi, L; Di Giuseppe, J; Delli Carpini, G; Ciavattini, A

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of presurgical therapy with GnRH analogues in patients who underwenthydrothermal endometrial ablation (HTA) for menorrhagia and assess the relationship between sonographically measured myometrium thickness and pelvic pain. A prospective randomized control study comparing 15 women (Group A) with presurgical subcutaneous triptorelin depot injection before HTA with controls (Group B, n = 15). Inclusion criteria were: recurrent menorrhagia, uterus length < 12 cm, no previous hormonal therapy for at least six month, and family plan completed. Student's t test was applied, as appropriate, to compare continuous variables. Proportion were compared with chi-squared. After 12 months of follow-up, Group A showed a significantly lower (0% vs 20%; p = 0.03) failure rate after hydrothermoablation than the Group B and a generally higher successful rate at 24 and 48 months. The discomfort, evaluated with VAS, showed a mean value of 47.6 +/- 15.9 +/- SD); 96.7% of women reported a mild-moderate postoperative pain. No perioperative and late complications were recorded. Presurgical treatment with GnRH analogues seems to improve long-term efficacy of HTA. Perioperative pelvic pain seems to not be affected by myometrium thickness.

  2. Gay and lesbian couples in Italy: comparisons with heterosexual couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Paolo; Dèttore, Davide; Lasagni, Irene; Snyder, Douglas K; Balderrama-Durbin, Christina

    2014-12-01

    Assessing couple relationships across diverse languages and cultures has important implications for both clinical intervention and prevention. This is especially true for nontraditional relationships potentially subject to various expressions of negative societal evaluation or bias. Few empirically validated measures of relationship functioning have been developed for cross-cultural applications, and none have been examined for their psychometric sufficiency for evaluating same-sex couples across different languages and cultures. The current study examined the psychometric properties of an Italian translation of the Marital Satisfaction Inventory - Revised (MSI-R), a 150-item 13-scale measure of couple relationship functioning, for its use in assessing the intimate relationships of gay and lesbian couples in Italy. Results for these couples were compared to data from heterosexual married and unmarried cohabiting couples from the same geographical region, as well as to previously published data for gay, lesbian, and unmarried heterosexual couples from the United States. Findings suggest that, despite unique societal pressures confronting Italian same-sex couples, these relationships appear resilient and fare well both overall and in specific domains of functioning compared to heterosexual couples both in Italy and the United States. © 2014 Family Process Institute.

  3. The relationship between HBV serum markers and the clinicopathological characteristics of hepatitis B virus-associated glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN in the northeastern chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effect of HBV markers on HBV-GN. Methods The immunohistochemistry was used to detect HBsAg and HBcAg in frozen sections of renal biopsy, the changes in HBV serum markers, renal functional parameters and clinical manifestations or symptoms were observed to analyze renal damage. Results Using renal biopsy data from 329 cases, this study found that the most common pathological subtype in HBV-GN was mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN (24.9%, P P P P Conclusion Examination of HBV markers in serum and renal biopsy will be useful for clinicians to predict the renal damage in early stage when it is reversible in HBV-GN.

  4. 'An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure': the case for and against GnRH-agonist for fertility preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Z; Katz, G; Evron, A

    2014-09-01

    The late effects of cancer treatment have recently gained a worldwide interest among reproductive endocrinologists, oncologists, and all health-care providers, and the protection against iatrogenic infertility caused by chemotherapy assumes a high priority. Here, we summarize the case for and against using GnRH-agonist for fertility preservation and minimizing chemotherapy-induced gonadotoxicity. The rationale and philosophy supporting its use is that preventing premature ovarian failure (POF) is preferable to treating it, following the dictum: 'an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure'. Despite many publications on this subject, there are many equivocal issues necessitating summary. Until now, 20 studies (15 retrospective and 5 randomized, controlled trials) have reported on 1837 patients treated with GnRH-a in parallel to chemotherapy, showing a significant decrease in POF rate in survivors versus 9 studies reporting on 593 patients, with results not supporting GnRH-a use. Patients treated with GnRH-a in parallel to chemotherapy preserved their cyclic ovarian function in 91% of cases when compared with 41% of controls, with a pregnancy rate of 19-71% in the treated patients. Furthermore, seven meta-analyses have concluded that GnRH-a are beneficial and may decrease the risk of POF in survivors. However, controversy still remains regarding the efficiency of GnRH-a in preserving fertility. Since not all the methods involving fertility preservation are unequivocally successful and safe, these young patients deserve to be informed of all the various modalities to minimize gonadal damage and preserve ovarian function and future fertility. Combining several methods for a specific patient may increase the odds for minimally invasive fertility preservation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Spatially Selective, Testosterone-Independent Remodeling of Dendrites in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons Prepubertally in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Natividad; Hemond, Peter J.; O'Boyle, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Adult GnRH neurons exhibit a stereotypic morphology with a small soma, single axon, and single dendrite arising from the soma with little branching. The adult morphology of GnRH neurons in mice reflects an anatomical consolidation of dendrites over postnatal development. We examined this issue in rat GnRH neurons with biocytin filling in live hypothalamic slices from infant males, as adult littermates and in gonad-intact males, castrated males, and in males with one of three levels of testosterone (T) treatment. Somatic area and total dendritic length were significantly greater in infant males than in adults. Moreover, total numbers of dendrite branches were greater in infant males as compared with adults. The number of higher order branches and the lengths of higher order branches were also greater in infant males than in adults. Most interestingly, in adults a single dendrite arose from the somata, consistently at 180° from the axon. In contrast, prepubertal animals had an average of 2.2 ± 0.2 primary dendrites arising from somata (range, one to seven primary dendrites). Angles relative to the axon at which dendrites in prepubertal males emanated from GnRH somata were highly variable. Castration at 25 d of age and castration at 25 d of age with one of three levels of T treatment did not influence morphological parameters when GnRH neurons were examined between 40 d and 48 d of age. Thus, a spatially selective remodeling of primary dendrites and consolidation of distal GnRH dendritic arbors occurs during postnatal development and is largely independent of T. PMID:21343259

  6. GnRH antagonist rescue protocol combined with cabergoline versus cabergoline alone in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Usama M; Sayed, Ahmed M; Elshaer, Hesham S; Hammad, Bahaa Eldin M; Shaban, Mona M; Elsetohy, Khaled A; Youssef, Mohamed A

    2016-05-17

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of antagonist rescue protocol (replacing GnRH agonist with GnRH antagonist and reducing the dose of gonadotropins) combined with cabergoline versus cabergoline alone in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) in patients pretreated with GnRH agonist long protocol who were at high risk for OHSS. Two hundred and thirty six patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to the cabergoline group or the antagonist rescue combined with cabergoline group. Both groups received oral cabergoline (0.5 mg/day) for eight days beginning on the day of HCG administration. In the antagonist rescue combined with cabergoline group, when the leading follicle reached 16 mm, GnRH agonist (triptorelin) was replaced with GnRH antagonist (cetrorelix acetate) and the dose of HP-uFSH was reduced to 75 IU/day. HCG (5,000 IU/I.M) was administered when the serum estradiol level dropped below 3500 pg/ml. The study was open label and the outcome assessors (laboratory staff and the doctor who performed oocyte retrieval) were blind to treatment allocation. The incidence of moderate/severe OHSS was significantly lower in the antagonist rescue combined with cabergoline group [5.08 % Vs 13.56 %, P value =0.025, OR = 0.342, 95 % CI, 0.129-0.906]. Four cycles were cancelled in the cabergoline group. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to the number of retrieved oocytes, metaphase II oocytes, high quality embryos and fertilization rate. Moreover, the implantation and pregnancy rates were comparable between both groups. GnRH antagonist rescue protocol combined with cabergoline is more effective than cabergoline alone in the prevention of OHSS. Clinical trial.gov ( NCT02461875 ).

  7. Microarray analysis of Foxl2 mediated gene regulation in the mouse ovary derived KK1 granulosa cell line: Over-expression of Foxl2 leads to activation of the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor gene promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The Foxl2 transcription factor is required for ovarian function during follicular development. The mechanism of Foxl2 regulation of this process has not been elucidated. Our approach to begin to understand Foxl2 function is through the identification of Foxl2 regulated genes in the ovary. Methods Transiently transfected KK1 mouse granulosa cells were used to identify genes that are potentially regulated by Foxl2. KK1 cells were transfected in three groups (mock, activated, and repressed) and twenty-four hours later RNA was isolated and submitted for Affymetrix microarray analysis. Genesifter software was used to carry out analysis of microarray data. One identified target, the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) gene, was chosen for further study and validation of Foxl2 responsiveness. Transient transfection analyses were carried out to study the effect of Foxl2 over-expression on GnRHR gene promoter-luciferase fusion activity. Data generated was analyzed with GraphPad Prism software. Results Microarray analysis identified 996 genes of known function that are potentially regulated by Foxl2 in mouse KK1 granulosa cells. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene that has been identified as Foxl2 responsive by others was identified in this study also, thereby supporting the effectiveness of our strategy. The GnRHR gene was chosen for further study because it is known to be expressed in the ovary and the results of previous work has indicated that Foxl2 may regulate GnRHR gene expression. Cellular levels of Foxl2 were increased via transient co-transfection of KK1 cells using a Foxl2 expression vector and a GnRHR promoter-luciferase fusion reporter vector. The results of these analyses indicate that over-expression of Foxl2 resulted in a significant increase in GnRHR promoter activity. Therefore, these transfection data validate the microarray data which suggest that Foxl2 regulates GnRHR and demonstrate that Foxl2 acts as an

  8. Microarray analysis of Foxl2 mediated gene regulation in the mouse ovary derived KK1 granulosa cell line: Over-expression of Foxl2 leads to activation of the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor gene promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escudero Jean M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Foxl2 transcription factor is required for ovarian function during follicular development. The mechanism of Foxl2 regulation of this process has not been elucidated. Our approach to begin to understand Foxl2 function is through the identification of Foxl2 regulated genes in the ovary. Methods Transiently transfected KK1 mouse granulosa cells were used to identify genes that are potentially regulated by Foxl2. KK1 cells were transfected in three groups (mock, activated, and repressed and twenty-four hours later RNA was isolated and submitted for Affymetrix microarray analysis. Genesifter software was used to carry out analysis of microarray data. One identified target, the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR gene, was chosen for further study and validation of Foxl2 responsiveness. Transient transfection analyses were carried out to study the effect of Foxl2 over-expression on GnRHR gene promoter-luciferase fusion activity. Data generated was analyzed with GraphPad Prism software. Results Microarray analysis identified 996 genes of known function that are potentially regulated by Foxl2 in mouse KK1 granulosa cells. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR gene that has been identified as Foxl2 responsive by others was identified in this study also, thereby supporting the effectiveness of our strategy. The GnRHR gene was chosen for further study because it is known to be expressed in the ovary and the results of previous work has indicated that Foxl2 may regulate GnRHR gene expression. Cellular levels of Foxl2 were increased via transient co-transfection of KK1 cells using a Foxl2 expression vector and a GnRHR promoter-luciferase fusion reporter vector. The results of these analyses indicate that over-expression of Foxl2 resulted in a significant increase in GnRHR promoter activity. Therefore, these transfection data validate the microarray data which suggest that Foxl2 regulates GnRHR and demonstrate

  9. Photoperiod-independent changes in immunoreactive brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in a free-living, tropical bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ignacio T; Bentley, George E; Wotus, Cheryl; Wingfield, John C

    2006-01-01

    Timing of seasonal reproduction in high latitude vertebrates is generally regulated by photoperiodic cues. Increasing day length in the spring is associated with changes in the brain that are responsible for mediating reproductive activities. A primary example of this is the increased content of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus in birds as they enter the spring breeding season. Increased GnRH activity stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the anterior pituitary. These gonadotropins induce growth of the gonads and release of sex steroids which act on the brain to mediate reproductive behaviors. By contrast, seasonal breeding in the tropics can occur in the absence of significant changes in photoperiod. To our knowledge, no studies have investigated whether seasonal breeding in free-living tropical vertebrates is associated with seasonal changes in the GnRH system. We studied two populations of rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis) at the equator, separated by only 25 km, but with asynchronous reproductive phenologies associated with local climate and independent of photoperiodic cues. We collected brains and measured GnRH immunoreactivity (GnRH-ir) during each population's breeding and non-breeding periods. Breeding males had larger, but not more, GnRH-ir cells than non-breeding birds. The plasticity of the GnRH system was associated with local climate, such that the two populations exhibited asynchronous changes in GnRH-ir despite experiencing identical photoperiod conditions. Our results demonstrate that tropical birds can exhibit neural changes similar to those exhibited in higher latitude birds. However, these tropical populations appear to be using supplementary cues (e.g., rainfall, temperature, food availability) in a similar way to higher latitude species using an initial predictive cue (photoperiod). These results raise questions about the evolution of

  10. [EFECTOS NEUROENDOCRINOS DE INSULINA, IGF-I Y LEPTINA SOBRE LA SECRECIÓN DE HORMONA LIBERADORA DE GONADOTROPINAS (GnRH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Rosales-Torres

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available El balance energético del individuo determina en gran medida su eficiencia reproductiva. Bajo condiciones de balance negativo de energía, en la mayoría de los mamíferos, hay una reducción en la síntesis de hormona liberadora de gonadotropinas (GnRH, lo cual disminuye la actividad del eje hipotálamo-hipófisis-gónadas. Cuando el balance energético es revertido, el hipotálamo puede monitorear este cambio y restablecer la secreción de GnRH. La Insulina, el Factor de Crecimiento similar a la Insulina I (IGF-I y Leptina parecen ser los principales mensajeros que informan al hipotálamo sobre el estado energético del animal puesto que las concentraciones periféricas de estas hormonas en situaciones energéticas negativas o positivas, se han asociado con los cambios en la secreción de GnRH. En la presente revisión se muestra como IGF-I actúa directamente sobre neuronas secretoras de GnRH, afectando su síntesis, en tanto que insulina y leptina actúan sobre neuronas en el núcleo arcuato, las cuales hacen sinapsis con neuronas GnRH en el área preóptica medial. Sobre neuronas productoras de neuropéptido Y (NPY insulina y leptina reducen su expresión y por lo tanto el efecto negativo del NPY sobre neuronas GnRH. En cambio insulina y leptina estimulan la síntesis de péptido similar a la galanina (GLAP y propiomelanocortina (POMC. Tanto GALP como los metabolitos de POMC (hormona estimulante de melanocitos principalmente incrementan la síntesis de GnRH. Finalmente, la leptina, incrementa la expresión de kispeptina en neuronas del núcleo ARC. Kispeptina por su parte también tiene un efecto positivo sobre la síntesis y secreción de GnRH.

  11. Quality of life and psychosocial and physical well-being among 1,023 women during their first assisted reproductive technology treatment: secondary outcome to a randomized controlled trial comparing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist and GnRH agonist protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toftager, Mette; Sylvest, Randi; Schmidt, Lone; Bogstad, Jeanette; Løssl, Kristine; Prætorius, Lisbeth; Zedeler, Anne; Bryndorf, Thue; Pinborg, Anja

    2018-01-01

    To compare self-reported quality of life, psychosocial well-being, and physical well-being during assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment in 1,023 women allocated to either a short GnRH antagonist or long GnRH agonist protocol. Secondary outcome of a prospective phase 4, open-label, randomized controlled trial. Four times during treatment a questionnaire on self-reported physical well-being was completed. Further, a questionnaire on self-reported quality of life and psychosocial well-being was completed at the day of hCG testing. Fertility clinics at university hospitals. Women referred for their first ART treatment were randomized in a 1:1 ratio and started standardized ART protocols. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue; 528 women allocated to a short GnRH antagonist protocol and 495 women allocated to a long GnRH agonist protocol. Self-reported quality of life, psychosocial well-being, and physical well-being based on questionnaires developed for women receiving ART treatment. Baseline characteristics were similar, and response rates were 79.4% and 74.3% in the GnRH antagonist and GnRH agonist groups, respectively. Self-reported quality of life during ART treatment was rated similar and slightly below normal in both groups. However, women in the GnRH antagonist group felt less emotional (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.69), less limited in their everyday life (AOR 0.74), experienced less unexpected crying (AOR 0.71), and rated quality of sleep better (AOR 1.55). Further, women receiving GnRH agonist treatment felt worse physically. Women in a short GnRH antagonist protocol rated psychosocial and physical well-being during first ART treatment better than did women in a long GnRH agonist protocol. However, the one item on self-reported general quality of life was rated similarly. NCT00756028. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. GPR54 regulates ERK1/2 activity and hypothalamic gene expression in a Gα(q/11) and β-arrestin-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szereszewski, Jacob M; Pampillo, Macarena; Ahow, Maryse R; Offermanns, Stefan; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Babwah, Andy V

    2010-09-23

    G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) is a G(q/11)-coupled 7 transmembrane-spanning receptor (7TMR). Activation of GPR54 by kisspeptin (Kp) stimulates PIP(2) hydrolysis, Ca(2+) mobilization and ERK1/2 MAPK phosphorylation. Kp and GPR54 are established regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and loss-of-function mutations in GPR54 are associated with an absence of puberty and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, thus defining an important role of the Kp/GPR54 signaling system in reproductive function. Given the tremendous physiological and clinical importance of the Kp/GPR54 signaling system, we explored the contributions of the GPR54-coupled G(q/11) and β-arrestin pathways on the activation of a major downstream signaling molecule, ERK, using G(q/11) and β-arrestin knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Our study revealed that GPR54 employs the G(q/11) and β-arrestin-2 pathways in a co-dependent and temporally overlapping manner to positively regulate ERK activity and pERK nuclear localization. We also show that while β-arrestin-2 potentiates GPR54 signaling to ERK, β-arrestin-1 inhibits it. Our data also revealed that diminished β-arrestin-1 and -2 expression in the GT1-7 GnRH hypothalamic neuronal cell line triggered distinct patterns of gene expression following Kp-10 treatment. Thus, β-arrestin-1 and -2 also regulate distinct downstream responses in gene expression. Finally, we showed that GPR54, when uncoupled from the G(q/11) pathway, as is the case for several naturally occurring GPR54 mutants associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, continues to regulate gene expression in a G protein-independent manner. These new and exciting findings add significantly to our mechanistic understanding of how this important receptor signals intracellularly in response to kisspeptin stimulation.

  13. GPR54 Regulates ERK1/2 Activity and Hypothalamic Gene Expression in a Gαq/11 and β-Arrestin-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szereszewski, Jacob M.; Pampillo, Macarena; Ahow, Maryse R.; Offermanns, Stefan; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Babwah, Andy V.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) is a Gq/11-coupled 7 transmembrane-spanning receptor (7TMR). Activation of GPR54 by kisspeptin (Kp) stimulates PIP2 hydrolysis, Ca2+ mobilization and ERK1/2 MAPK phosphorylation. Kp and GPR54 are established regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and loss-of-function mutations in GPR54 are associated with an absence of puberty and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, thus defining an important role of the Kp/GPR54 signaling system in reproductive function. Given the tremendous physiological and clinical importance of the Kp/GPR54 signaling system, we explored the contributions of the GPR54-coupled Gq/11 and β-arrestin pathways on the activation of a major downstream signaling molecule, ERK, using Gq/11 and β-arrestin knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Our study revealed that GPR54 employs the Gq/11 and β-arrestin-2 pathways in a co-dependent and temporally overlapping manner to positively regulate ERK activity and pERK nuclear localization. We also show that while β-arrestin-2 potentiates GPR54 signaling to ERK, β-arrestin-1 inhibits it. Our data also revealed that diminished β-arrestin-1 and -2 expression in the GT1-7 GnRH hypothalamic neuronal cell line triggered distinct patterns of gene expression following Kp-10 treatment. Thus, β-arrestin-1 and -2 also regulate distinct downstream responses in gene expression. Finally, we showed that GPR54, when uncoupled from the Gq/11 pathway, as is the case for several naturally occurring GPR54 mutants associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, continues to regulate gene expression in a G protein-independent manner. These new and exciting findings add significantly to our mechanistic understanding of how this important receptor signals intracellularly in response to kisspeptin stimulation. PMID:20886089

  14. GPR54 regulates ERK1/2 activity and hypothalamic gene expression in a Gα(q/11 and β-arrestin-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M Szereszewski

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54 is a G(q/11-coupled 7 transmembrane-spanning receptor (7TMR. Activation of GPR54 by kisspeptin (Kp stimulates PIP(2 hydrolysis, Ca(2+ mobilization and ERK1/2 MAPK phosphorylation. Kp and GPR54 are established regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis and loss-of-function mutations in GPR54 are associated with an absence of puberty and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, thus defining an important role of the Kp/GPR54 signaling system in reproductive function. Given the tremendous physiological and clinical importance of the Kp/GPR54 signaling system, we explored the contributions of the GPR54-coupled G(q/11 and β-arrestin pathways on the activation of a major downstream signaling molecule, ERK, using G(q/11 and β-arrestin knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Our study revealed that GPR54 employs the G(q/11 and β-arrestin-2 pathways in a co-dependent and temporally overlapping manner to positively regulate ERK activity and pERK nuclear localization. We also show that while β-arrestin-2 potentiates GPR54 signaling to ERK, β-arrestin-1 inhibits it. Our data also revealed that diminished β-arrestin-1 and -2 expression in the GT1-7 GnRH hypothalamic neuronal cell line triggered distinct patterns of gene expression following Kp-10 treatment. Thus, β-arrestin-1 and -2 also regulate distinct downstream responses in gene expression. Finally, we showed that GPR54, when uncoupled from the G(q/11 pathway, as is the case for several naturally occurring GPR54 mutants associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, continues to regulate gene expression in a G protein-independent manner. These new and exciting findings add significantly to our mechanistic understanding of how this important receptor signals intracellularly in response to kisspeptin stimulation.

  15. Gene expression of transcription factor NFATc1 in periodontal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Belibasakis, G N; Emingil, G; Saygan, B; Turkoglu, O; Atilla, G; Bostanci, N

    2011-01-01

    Belibasakis GN, Emingil G, Saygan B, Turkoglu O, Atilla G, Bostanci N. Gene expression of transcription factor NFATc1 in periodontal diseases. APMIS 2011; 119: 167-172. Periodontitis is a disease of infectious aetiology that causes inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. Activated T cells are central to the pathogenesis of the disease, by producing receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) that stimulates bone resorption. Antigenic activation of T cells ...

  16. The role of the individual amino acids of a GnRH-tandem-dimer peptide used as an antigen for immunocastration of male piglets determined with systematic alanine replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkstra, J A; Oonk, H B; Schaaper, W M; Meloen, R H

    2001-11-12

    Immunocastration targeting gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) can be obtained in male piglets using native GnRH conjugates. However, due to insufficient efficacy of these conjugates, improved GnRH antigens, like peptides existing of repeats of the GnRH amino acid sequence, have been designed. We previously reported about a dimerised GnRH-tandem peptide with a D-Lys at position 6 of the native GnRH sequence (G6k-TD) being highly effective. To evaluate the contribution of each individual amino acid of the GnRH decapeptide to the efficacy of the G6k-TD peptide, each amino acid was replaced consecutively by alanine (Ala-scan). The G6k-TD peptides were conjugated to ovalbumin, used for immunisation and tested for their ability to elicit GnRH antibodies and to immunocastrate male piglets. The results show that four out of nine amino acids (pGlu-1, Ser-4, Arg-8 and Gly-10) can be replaced by alanine without negatively affecting immunocastration efficacy. Replacement of amino acids in other positions (Tyr-5, Leu-7 and Pro-9) gave partial decrease of efficacy, respectively, five, six and six out of seven piglets were immunocastrated. Replacements at two other positions (His-2 and Trp-3) completely negated immunocastration activity. Thus, seven out of nine amino acid positions in the basic unit of G6k-TD can be substituted by alanine without affecting immunocastration efficacy.

  17. Nuclear respiratory factor 2 regulates the expression of the same NMDA receptor subunit genes as NRF-1: both factors act by a concurrent and parallel mechanism to couple energy metabolism and synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Anusha; Johar, Kaid; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal activity and energy metabolism are tightly coupled processes. Previously, we found that nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) transcriptionally co-regulates energy metabolism and neuronal activity by regulating all 13 subunits of the critical energy generating enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), as well as N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits 1 and 2B, GluN1 (Grin1) and GluN2B (Grin2b). We also found that another transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2 or GA-binding protein) regulates all subunits of COX as well. The goal of the present study was to test our hypothesis that NRF-2 also regulates specific subunits of NMDA receptors, and that it functions with NRF-1 via one of three mechanisms: complementary, concurrent and parallel, or a combination of complementary and concurrent/parallel. By means of multiple approaches, including in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation of mouse neuroblastoma cells and rat visual cortical tissue, promoter mutations, real-time quantitative PCR, and western blot analysis, NRF-2 was found to functionally regulate Grin1 and Grin2b gene