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Sample records for exploring alternative parameterizations

  1. Exploring Alternate Parameterizations for Snowfall with Validation from Satellite and Terrestrial Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Petersen, Walter A.; Case, Jonathan L.; Dembek, Scott R.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    Increases in computational resources have allowed operational forecast centers to pursue experimental, high resolution simulations that resolve the microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. These experiments are motivated by a desire to improve the representation of weather and climate, but will also benefit current and future satellite campaigns, which often use forecast model output to guide the retrieval process. Aircraft, surface and radar data from the Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project are used to check the validity of size distribution and density characteristics for snowfall simulated by the NASA Goddard six-class, single-moment bulk water microphysics scheme, currently available within the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) Model. Widespread snowfall developed across the region on January 22, 2007, forced by the passing of a midlatitude cyclone, and was observed by the dual-polarimetric, C-band radar King City, Ontario, as well as the NASA 94 GHz CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Combined, these data sets provide key metrics for validating model output: estimates of size distribution parameters fit to the inverse-exponential equations prescribed within the model, bulk density and crystal habit characteristics sampled by the aircraft, and representation of size characteristics as inferred by the radar reflectivity at C- and W-band. Specified constants for distribution intercept and density differ significantly from observations throughout much of the cloud depth. Alternate parameterizations are explored, using column-integrated values of vapor excess to avoid problems encountered with temperature-based parameterizations in an environment where inversions and isothermal layers are present. Simulation of CloudSat reflectivity is performed by adopting the discrete-dipole parameterizations and databases provided in literature, and demonstrate an improved capability in simulating radar reflectivity at W-band versus Mie scattering

  2. Exploring Alternative Parameterizations for Snowfall with Validation from Satellite and Terrestrial Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Petersen, Walter A.; Case, Jonathan L.; Dembek, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    Increases in computational resources have allowed operational forecast centers to pursue experimental, high resolution simulations that resolve the microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. These experiments are motivated by a desire to improve the representation of weather and climate, but will also benefit current and future satellite campaigns, which often use forecast model output to guide the retrieval process. The combination of reliable cloud microphysics and radar reflectivity may constrain radiative transfer models used in satellite simulators during future missions, including EarthCARE and the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement. Aircraft, surface and radar data from the Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project are used to check the validity of size distribution and density characteristics for snowfall simulated by the NASA Goddard six-class, single moment bulk water microphysics scheme, currently available within the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) Model. Widespread snowfall developed across the region on January 22, 2007, forced by the passing of a mid latitude cyclone, and was observed by the dual-polarimetric, C-band radar King City, Ontario, as well as the NASA 94 GHz CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Combined, these data sets provide key metrics for validating model output: estimates of size distribution parameters fit to the inverse-exponential equations prescribed within the model, bulk density and crystal habit characteristics sampled by the aircraft, and representation of size characteristics as inferred by the radar reflectivity at C- and W-band. Specified constants for distribution intercept and density differ significantly from observations throughout much of the cloud depth. Alternate parameterizations are explored, using column-integrated values of vapor excess to avoid problems encountered with temperature-based parameterizations in an environment where inversions and isothermal layers are present. Simulation of

  3. Preferences for tap water attributes within couples: An exploration of alternative mixed logit parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Riccardo; Thiene, Mara; Hensher, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Preferences for attributes of complex goods may differ substantially among members of households. Some of these goods, such as tap water, are jointly supplied at the household level. This issue of jointness poses a series of theoretical and empirical challenges to economists engaged in empirical nonmarket valuation studies. While a series of results have already been obtained in the literature, the issue of how to empirically measure these differences, and how sensitive the results are to choice of model specification from the same data, is yet to be clearly understood. In this paper we use data from a widely employed form of stated preference survey for multiattribute goods, namely choice experiments. The salient feature of the data collection is that the same choice experiment was applied to both partners of established couples. The analysis focuses on models that simultaneously handle scale as well as preference heterogeneity in marginal rates of substitution (MRS), thereby isolating true differences between members of couples in their MRS, by removing interpersonal variation in scale. The models employed are different parameterizations of the mixed logit model, including the willingness to pay (WTP)-space model and the generalized multinomial logit model. We find that in this sample there is some evidence of significant statistical differences in values between women and men, but these are of small magnitude and only apply to a few attributes.

  4. The exploration of nonlinear elasticity and its efficient parameterization for crystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John C.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2017-10-01

    Conventional approaches to analyzing the very large coherency strains that can occur during solid-state phase transformations are founded in linear elasticity and rely on infinitesimal strain metrics. Despite this, there are many technologically important examples where misfit strains of multi-phase mixtures are very large during their synthesis and/or application. In this paper, we present a framework for constructing strain-energy expressions and stress-strain relationships beyond the linear-elastic limit for crystalline solids. This approach utilizes group theoretical concepts to minimize both the number of free parameters in the strain-energy expression and amount of first-principles training data required to parameterize strain-energy models that are invariant to all crystal symmetries. Within this framework, the strain-energy and elastic stiffness can be described to high accuracy in terms of a set of conventional symmetry-adapted finite strain metrics that we define independent of crystal symmetry. As an illustration, we use first-principles electronic structure data to parameterize strain energy polynomials and employ them to explore the strain-energy surfaces of HCP Zr and Mg, as well as several important Zr-H and Mg-Nd phases that are known to precipitate coherently within the HCP matrices of Zr and Mg.

  5. Exploring alternative routes for oxygen administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Elisa; Dyson, Alex; Zacchetti, Lucia; Donati, Abele; Singer, Mervyn

    2016-12-01

    Hypoxemia may compromise cell metabolism and organ function. Supplemental oxygen (O2) at high concentrations may prove ineffective, and issues relating to hyperoxia, barotrauma, mechanical ventilation, and extracorporeal oxygenation are well documented. Old reports suggest the potential safety and efficacy of alternative routes for O2 administration, such as intravenous or intestinal. We re-explored these routes in rat models of hypoxemia. Hypoxemia was induced in spontaneously breathing, anesthetized rats by breathing a hypoxic gas mix (FiO2 0.1). Pilot studies infusing pure O2 gas caused early death, likely due to pulmonary embolism. Instead, rats (n = 6/group) were given intravenous O2 via a continuous infusion of pre-oxygenated Hartmann's solution (10 ml/kg/h) for 3 h with normal Ringer's lactate used in control animals. In separate experiments (n = 8/group), bowel intraluminal oxygenation was assessed with pure O2 administered through a cannula placed into the jejunal lumen at a dose of a 15 ml/kg bolus followed by a continuous infusion of 50 ml/kg/h; no treatment was given to controls. Echocardiography, arterial blood gas analysis, mean arterial pressure, muscle and liver tPO2, muscle microvascular perfused vessel density, and urine output were measured. Administration of oxygenated Hartmann's solution (PO2 of solution at end-experiment = 87.5 ± 1.7 kPa) was safe but did not increase either systemic or tissue oxygenation. Similarly, the administration of bowel O2 was safe but did not improve neither systemic nor liver oxygenation. In this rat model of hypoxemia, the intravenous infusion of gaseous O2 was unfeasible as it induced early mortality. Although safe, both intravenous infusion of oxygenated Hartmann's solution and bowel O2 administration were unable to improve arterial or tissue oxygenation.

  6. An alternative parameterization of the general linear mixture model for longitudinal data with non-ignorable drop-outs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, G M; Laird, N M; Shneyer, L

    2001-04-15

    This paper considers the mixture model methodology for handling non-ignorable drop-outs in longitudinal studies with continuous outcomes. Recently, Hogan and Laird have developed a mixture model for non-ignorable drop-outs which is a standard linear mixed effects model except that the parameters which characterize change over time depend also upon time of drop-out. That is, the mean response is linear in time, other covariates and drop-out time, and their interactions. One of the key attractions of the mixture modelling approach to drop-outs is that it is relatively easy to explore the sensitivity of results to model specification. However, the main drawback of mixture models is that the parameters that are ordinarily of interest are not immediately available, but require marginalization of the distribution of outcome over drop-out times. Furthermore, although a linear model is assumed for the conditional mean of the outcome vector given time of drop out, after marginalization, the unconditional mean of the outcome vector is not, in general, linear in the regression parameters. As a result, it is not possible to parsimoniously describe the effects of covariates on the marginal distribution of the outcome in terms of regression coefficients. The need to explicitly average over the distribution of the drop-out times and the absence of regression coefficients that describe the effects of covariates on the outcome are two unappealing features of the mixture modelling approach. In this paper we describe a particular parameterization of the general linear mixture model that circumvents both of these problems. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A liquid metal-based structurally embedded vascular antenna: II. Multiobjective and parameterized design exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, D. J.; Frank, G. J.; Malak, R. J.; Baur, J. W.

    2017-02-01

    Research on the structurally embedded vascular antenna concept leverages past efforts on liquid metal (LM) reconfigurable electronics, microvascular composites, and structurally integrated and reconfigurable antennas. Such a concept has potential for reducing system weight or volume while simultaneously allowing in situ adjustment of resonant frequencies and/or changes in antenna directivity. This work considers a microvascular pattern embedded in a laminated composite and filled with LM. The conductive liquid provides radio frequency (RF) functionality while also allowing self-cooling. Models describing RF propagation and heat transfer, in addition to the structural effects of both the inclusion of channels and changes in temperature, were described in part 1 of this two-part work. In this part 2, the engineering models developed and demonstrated in part 1 toward the initial exploration of design trends are implemented into multiple optimization frameworks for more detailed design studies, one of which being novel and particularly applicable to this class of problem. The computational expense associated with the coupled multiphysical analysis of the structurally embedded LM transmitting antenna motivates the consideration of surrogate-based optimization methods. Both static and adaptive approaches are explored; it is shown that iteratively correcting the surrogate leads to more accurate optimized design predictions. The expected strong dependence of antenna performance on thermal environment motivates the consideration of a novel ‘parameterized’ optimization approach that simultaneously calculates whole families of optimal designs based on changes in design or operational variables generally beyond the control of the designer. The change in Pareto-optimal response with evolution in operating conditions is clearly demonstrated.

  8. Exploring alternative treatments for Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Hinojosa, Wendy Itzel; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos Felipe; Romero, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a successful pathogen that can persist in the stomach of an infected person for their entire life. It provokes chronic gastric inflammation that leads to the development of serious gastric diseases such as peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. It is known that these ailments can be avoided if the infection by the bacteria can be prevented or eradicated. Currently, numerous antibiotic-based therapies are available. However, these therapies have several inherent problems, including the appearance of resistance to the antibiotics used and associated adverse effects, the risk of re-infection and the high cost of antibiotic therapy. The delay in developing a vaccine to prevent or eradicate the infection has furthered research into new therapeutic approaches. This review summarises the most relevant recent studies on vaccine development and new treatments using natural resources such as plants, probiotics and nutraceuticals. In addition, novel alternatives based on microorganisms, peptides, polysaccharides, and intragastric violet light irradiation are presented. Alternative therapies have not been effective in eradicating the bacteria but have been shown to maintain low bacterial levels. Nevertheless, some of them are useful in preventing the adverse effects of antibiotics, modulating the immune response, gastroprotection, and the general promotion of health. Therefore, those agents can be used as adjuvants of allopathic anti-H. pylori eradication therapy. PMID:24587621

  9. Exploring alternative assessment strategies in science classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Stears

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge children bring to the classroom or construct in the classroom may find expression in a variety of activities and is often not measurable with the traditional assessment instruments used in science classrooms. Different approaches to assessment are required to accommodate the various ways in which learners construct knowledge in social settings. In our research we attempted to determine the types of outcomes achieved in a Grade 6 classroom where alternative strategies such as interactive assessments were implemented. Analyses of these outcomes show that the learners learned much more than the tests indicate, although what they learnt was not necessarily science. The implications for assessment are clear: strategies that assess knowledge of science concepts, as well as assessment of outcomes other than science outcomes, are required if we wish to gain a holistic understanding of the learning that occurs in science classrooms.

  10. Alternative parameterizations of relatedness in whole genome association analysis of pre-weaning traits of Nelore-Angus calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Riley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gestation length, birth weight, and weaning weight of F2 Nelore-Angus calves (n = 737 with designed extensive full-sibling and half-sibling relatedness were evaluated for association with 34,957 SNP markers. In analyses of birth weight, random relatedness was modeled three ways: 1 none, 2 random animal, pedigree-based relationship matrix, or 3 random animal, genomic relationship matrix. Detected birth weight-SNP associations were 1,200, 735, and 31 for those parameterizations respectively; each additional model refinement removed associations that apparently were a result of the built-in stratification by relatedness. Subsequent analyses of gestation length and weaning weight modeled genomic relatedness; there were 40 and 26 trait-marker associations detected for those traits, respectively. Birth weight associations were on BTA14 except for a single marker on BTA5. Gestation length associations included 37 SNP on BTA21, 2 on BTA27 and one on BTA3. Weaning weight associations were on BTA14 except for a single marker on BTA10. Twenty-one SNP markers on BTA14 were detected in both birth and weaning weight analyses.

  11. Alternative search strategies to explore ATLAS diboson excess

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charanjit K Khosa

    Alternative search strategies to explore ATLAS diboson excess. CHARANJIT K KHOSA. Centre for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, India. E-mail: khosacharanjit@chep.iisc.ernet.in. Published online 5 October 2017. Abstract. We consider the s-channel resonance to fit the 2 TeV ATLAS ...

  12. Exploring alternative ovarian cancer biomarkers using innovative nanotechnology strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Cesar M; Im, Hyungsoon; Le, Christine; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph; Birrer, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Our increased understanding of ovarian cancer's blueprints (mediated by DNA and RNA) and behavior (mediated by proteins) points to wide differences across patients that cannot be depicted by histology alone. Conventional diagnosis usually entails an adequate tissue biopsy, which limits serial testing. There is thus a motivation to shift towards easier to obtain clinical samples (e.g., ascites or blood). In response, investigators are increasingly leveraging alternative circulating biomarkers in blood or proximal fluids and harnessing novel profiling platforms to help explore treatment-related effects on such biomarkers in serial fashion. In this review, we discuss how new nanotechnologies we developed intersect with alternative ovarian cancer biomarkers for improved understanding of metastases and therapeutic response.

  13. Exploring No-SQL alternatives for ALMA monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tzu-Chiang; Soto, Ruben; Merino, Patricio; Peña, Leonel; Bartsch, Marcelo; Aguirre, Alvaro; Ibsen, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter /submillimeter Array (ALMA) will be a unique research instrument composed of at least 66 reconfigurable high-precision antennas, located at the Chajnantor plain in the Chilean Andes at an elevation of 5000 m. This paper describes the experience gained after several years working with the monitoring system, which has a strong requirement of collecting and storing up to 150K variables with a highest sampling rate of 20.8 kHz. The original design was built on top of a cluster of relational database server and network attached storage with fiber channel interface. As the number of monitoring points increases with the number of antennas included in the array, the current monitoring system demonstrated to be able to handle the increased data rate in the collection and storage area (only one month of data), but the data query interface showed serious performance degradation. A solution based on no-SQL platform was explored as an alternative to the current long-term storage system. Among several alternatives, mongoDB has been selected. In the data flow, intermediate cache servers based on Redis were introduced to allow faster streaming of the most recently acquired data to web based charts and applications for online data analysis.

  14. Building a Structural Model: Parameterization and Structurality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Mouchart

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A specific concept of structural model is used as a background for discussing the structurality of its parameterization. Conditions for a structural model to be also causal are examined. Difficulties and pitfalls arising from the parameterization are analyzed. In particular, pitfalls when considering alternative parameterizations of a same model are shown to have lead to ungrounded conclusions in the literature. Discussions of observationally equivalent models related to different economic mechanisms are used to make clear the connection between an economically meaningful parameterization and an economically meaningful decomposition of a complex model. The design of economic policy is used for drawing some practical implications of the proposed analysis.

  15. Exploring an Alternate Approach to Q =10 in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, T. C.; Turco, F.

    2017-10-01

    The ITER Research Plan envisions a stepwise approach in B and I due to heating system constraints to the objective of 500 MW fusion power with Q =10 for >300 s, but always reaching q95 = 3 at each B. An alternate approach goes directly to 5.3 T, then raises I. This approach reduces disruption risk because q is higher and perhaps the goal is realized at lower I. DIII-D experiments explored this path with co-NBI heating and NBI heating with 0 Nm applied torque. For the first time, stable plasmas in the ITER shape (including aspect ratio) at the ITER baseline scenario conditions (q95 3, βN 2) have been obtained with 0 Nm applied torque. At equivalent currents to 9-17 MA in ITER (q95 5.7-2.8), the maximum stable β and the τE have been measured as a function of applied torque. The equivalent β for 500 MW of fusion power is obtained at about 13.5 MA for 0 Nm, indicating significant stability margin. However, confinement is less than predicted by the H-mode scaling at 15 MA because linear confinement scaling with I is not seen above 12.5 MA at all levels of applied torque, indicating this is not due to ExB shearing effects. These results indicate that the risk of operation in ITER at low q95 and specifically at 15 MA may not be warranted. Work supported under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-04ER54761.

  16. Bacteriocins: exploring alternatives to antibiotics in mastitis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reneé Pieterse

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Management strategies involve the extensive use of antibiotics to treat and prevent this disease. Prophylactic dosages of antibiotics used in mastitis control programmes could select for strains with resistance to antibiotics. In addition, a strong drive towards reducing antibiotic residues in animal food products has lead to research in finding alternative antimicrobial agents. In this review we have focus on the pathogenesis of the mastitis in dairy cows, existing antibiotic treatments and possible alternative for application of bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of this disease.

  17. Supporting Exploration of Design Alternatives using Multivariate Analysis Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Šileryte, R.; D'Aquilio, A.; Di Stefano, D.; Yang, D.; Turrin, M.; Attar, Ramtin; Chronis, Angelos; Hanna, Sean; Turrin, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Parametric modelling allows quick generation of a large number of design alternatives. Ultimately, it can be combined with optimization algorithms for obtaining optimal performance-driven design. However, setup of design space for optimization is a very complex task requiring designer’s a priori

  18. Exploring alternatives for financing health care in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The strz egy encompasses alternatives that include: improving the. efficiency of allocation and utilization of public resources, expanding the role of the private sector, and encouraging the development of risk sharing mechanisms. Conclusion: Lookingat the adoption and implementation the health care financing strategy with.

  19. Bacteriocins ? Exploring Alternatives to Antibiotics in Mastitis Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Pieterse, Rene?; Todorov, Svetoslav D.

    2010-01-01

    Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Management strategies involve the extensive use of antibiotics to treat and prevent this disease. Prophylactic dosages of antibiotics used in mastitis control programmes could select for strains with resistance to antibiotics. In addition, a strong drive towards reducing antibiotic residues in animal food products has lead to research in finding alternative antimicrobial agents. In this review we have focus on ...

  20. Alternative search strategies to explore ATLAS diboson excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosa, Charanjit K.

    2017-10-01

    We consider the s-channel resonance to fit the 2 TeV ATLAS diboson excess. We address the production mechanism of the resonance, its decay and coupling measurement. In order to explain only the hadronic channel excess, we consider the scenario where resonance decays to two new beyond Standard Model (BSM) particles (in the mass range of W / Z boson) and also explore the possibility of three-particle BSM final state mimicking diboson excess. Techniques suggested in this work are generic and could be used for heavy BSM resonance searches.

  1. SU-F-T-147: An Alternative Parameterization of Scatter Behavior Allows Significant Reduction of Beam Characterization for Pencil Beam Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Heuvel, F; Fiorini, F; George, B [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: 1) To describe the characteristics of pencil beam proton dose deposition kernels in a homogenous medium using a novel parameterization. 2) To propose a method utilizing this novel parametrization to reduce the measurements and pre-computation required in commissioning a pencil beam proton therapy system. Methods: Using beam data from a clinical, pencil beam proton therapy center, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to characterize the dose depositions at a range of energies from 100.32 to 226.08 MeV in 3.6MeV steps. At each energy, the beam is defined at the surface of the phantom by a two-dimensional Normal distribution. Using FLUKA, the in-medium dose distribution is calculated in 200×200×350 mm cube with 1 mm{sup 3} tally volumes. The calculated dose distribution in each 200×200 slice perpendicular to the beam axis is then characterized using a symmetric alpha-stable distribution centered on the beam axis. This results in two parameters, α and γ, that completely describe shape of the distribution. In addition, the total dose deposited on each slice is calculated. The alpha-stable parameters are plotted as function of the depth in-medium, providing a representation of dose deposition along the pencil beam. We observed that these graphs are isometric through a scaling of both abscissa and ordinate map the curves. Results: Using interpolation of the scaling factors of two source curves representative of different beam energies, we predicted the parameters of a third curve at an intermediate energy. The errors are quantified by the maximal difference and provide a fit better than previous methods. The maximal energy difference between the source curves generating identical curves was 21.14MeV. Conclusion: We have introduced a novel method to parameterize the in-phantom properties of pencil beam proton dose depositions. For the case of the Knoxville IBA system, no more than nine pencil beams have to be fully characterized.

  2. Exploring naturally occurring ivy nanoparticles as an alternative biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yi-Jun; Wang, Yongzhong; Yi, Sijia; Fan, Zhen; Sun, Leming; Lin, Derrick; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Zhu, Hua; Schmidt, Michael; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-10-01

    nanomaterials have drawn increasing interest for their potential biomedical applications in recent years. In this study, a new type of naturally occurring nanoparticles obtained from the sticky exudates on the adventitious roots of English ivy (H. helix), was explored for its potential biomedical application. In particular, the feasibilities of utilizing ivy nanoparticles (INPs) as nano-carriers for delivering chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer therapy and as nano-fillers to develop novel scaffolds for tissue engineering in regenerative medicine were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Overall, the results obtained from the present study suggest the great potential of the INPs to be used as biocompatible nanomaterials in nanomedicine. This study may open a totally new frontier for exploring the biomedical application of naturally occurring nanomaterials. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploring Dimensions of Social Inclusion among Alternative Learning Centres in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Dawn X.; Barnes, Rachelle Redmond

    2016-01-01

    Increasing disparities in out-of-school suspension and dropout rates have led a number of school districts to develop alternative models of education to include alternative learning centres (ALCs). Using an exploratory mixed methods design, this study explores dimensions of social inclusion among ALCs, located in the southeastern region of the…

  4. Parametric design of the Vela roof : A case study on performance oriented exploration of design alternatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turrin, M.; Stouffs, R.M.F.; Sariyildiz, I.S.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a case study, in which parametric modeling has been used to explore the geometrical design alternatives of a large span roof. Explorative criteria are oriented to the use of on site energy resources, with specific focus on the mitigation of summer discomfort. After broadly

  5. Parameterization of extended systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The YJBK parameterization (of all stabilizing controllers) is extended to handle systems with additional sensors and/or actuators. It is shown that the closed loop transfer function is still an affine function in the YJBK parameters in the nominal case. Further, some closed-loop stability results...

  6. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  7. Understanding Alternative Food Networks: Exploring the Role of Food Supply Chains in Rural Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renting, H.; Marsden, T.; Banks, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we explore the development and incidence of alternative food networks within a European-wide context. By developing a consistent definition of short food supply chains, we address both the morphology and the dynamics of these, and then examine empirical evidence concerning their

  8. An Alternative Approach to Large Historical Databases; Exploring Best Practices with Collaboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormans, S.E.M.; Kok, J.

    2010-01-01

    In their exploration of an alternative approach to large historical databases, the authors aim to bridge the gap between the anticipations regarding Web-based collaborative work and the prevailing practices and academic culture in social and economic history. Until now, the collaboratory model

  9. Parameterized Post-Newtonian Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Sanghai, Viraj A A

    2016-01-01

    Einstein's theory of gravity has been extensively tested on solar system scales, and for isolated astrophysical systems, using the perturbative framework known as the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. This framework is designed for use in the weak-field and slow-motion limit of gravity, and can be used to constrain a large class of metric theories of gravity with data collected from the aforementioned systems. Given the potential of future surveys to probe cosmological scales to high precision, it is a topic of much contemporary interest to construct a similar framework to link Einstein's theory of gravity and its alternatives to observations on cosmological scales. Our approach to this problem is to adapt and extend the existing PPN formalism for use in cosmology. We derive a set of equations that use the same parameters to consistently model both weak fields and cosmology. This allows us to parameterize a large class of modified theories of gravity and dark energy models on cosmological scales, ...

  10. Human exploration of space: A review of NASA's 90-day study and alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stever, H. Guyford; Cannon, Robert H., Jr.; Gavin, Joseph G.; Kerrebrock, Jack L.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Levinthal, Elliott C.; Mar, James W.; Mcelroy, John H.; Mcruer, Duane T.; Merrell, William J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The National Research Council (NRC) examines the NASA Report of the 90-Day Study on Human Exploration of the Moon and Mars, and alternative concepts. Included in this paper, prepared for the National Space Council, are the answers to a challenging set of questions posed by the Vice President. Concerns addressed include: the appropriate pace, the scope of human exploration, the level of long-term support required, the technology development available and needed, the feasibility of long-duration human spaceflight in a low-gravity environment, scientific objectives, and other considerations such as costs and risks.

  11. Parameterized examination in econometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Anna; Kyurkchiev, Vesselin; Spasov, Georgi

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents a parameterization of basic types of exam questions in Econometrics. This algorithm is used to automate and facilitate the process of examination, assessment and self-preparation of a large number of students. The proposed parameterization of testing questions reduces the time required to author tests and course assignments. It enables tutors to generate a large number of different but equivalent dynamic questions (with dynamic answers) on a certain topic, which are automatically assessed. The presented methods are implemented in DisPeL (Distributed Platform for e-Learning) and provide questions in the areas of filtering and smoothing of time-series data, forecasting, building and analysis of single-equation econometric models. Questions also cover elasticity, average and marginal characteristics, product and cost functions, measurement of monopoly power, supply, demand and equilibrium price, consumer and product surplus, etc. Several approaches are used to enable the required numerical computations in DisPeL - integration of third-party mathematical libraries, developing our own procedures from scratch, and wrapping our legacy math codes in order to modernize and reuse them.

  12. Exploring alternative models of rostral-caudal patterning in the zebrafish neurectoderm with computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, Ajay B; Itoh, Motoyuki

    2004-08-01

    The StarLogo and NetLogo programming environments allow developmental biologists to build computer models of cell-cell interactions in an epithelium and visualize emergent properties of hypothetical genetic regulatory networks operating in the cells. These environments were used to explore alternative models that show how a posteriorizing morphogen gradient might define gene-expression domains along the rostral-caudal axis in the zebrafish neurectoderm. The models illustrate how a hypothetical genetic network based on auto-activation and cross-repression could lead to establishment of discrete non-overlapping gene-expression domains. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. A multiresolution spatial parameterization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ray

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2 emissions is paramount to carbon cycle studies, but the use of atmospheric inverse modeling approaches for this purpose has been limited by the highly heterogeneous and non-Gaussian spatiotemporal variability of emissions. Here we explore the feasibility of capturing this variability using a low-dimensional parameterization that can be implemented within the context of atmospheric CO2 inverse problems aimed at constraining regional-scale emissions. We construct a multiresolution (i.e., wavelet-based spatial parameterization for ffCO2 emissions using the Vulcan inventory, and examine whether such a~parameterization can capture a realistic representation of the expected spatial variability of actual emissions. We then explore whether sub-selecting wavelets using two easily available proxies of human activity (images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas yields a low-dimensional alternative. We finally implement this low-dimensional parameterization within an idealized inversion, where a sparse reconstruction algorithm, an extension of stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP, is used to identify the wavelet coefficients. We find that (i the spatial variability of fossil-fuel emission can indeed be represented using a low-dimensional wavelet-based parameterization, (ii that images of lights at night can be used as a proxy for sub-selecting wavelets for such analysis, and (iii that implementing this parameterization within the described inversion framework makes it possible to quantify fossil-fuel emissions at regional scales if fossil-fuel-only CO2 observations are available.

  14. What Is the Difference between a Calorie and a Carbohydrate?--Exploring Nutrition Education Opportunities in Alternative School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norquest, Michele; Phelps, Josh; Hermann, Janice; Kennedy, Tay

    2015-01-01

    Extension-based nutrition educators have indicated current curricula do not engage alternative school students' interests. The study reported here explored nutrition education opportunities at alternative schools in Oklahoma. Data collection involved focus groups gathering student perspectives regarding preferred teaching and learning styles, and…

  15. Exploring an alternative metaphor for nursing: relinquishing military images and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gail; Ferguson-Paré, Mary; Richards, Joy

    2003-01-01

    The language used to describe nursing practice and nursing leadership has a profound influence on how nurses think about themselves, their work relationships, and indeed the very essence of their reason for being. Language often includes metaphor in order to help capture the complexities and layers of meaning that establish contexts for action. Nurses and others have relied on various metaphors to describe nursing work. However, there is one metaphor that, more than any other, has shaped the context of nursing work and formed the images and the meanings that nurses have of themselves and their purposes in practice. The privileged one is the military metaphor. This article explores the notion of metaphor, and its usefulness and potential to help nurses change their work patterns. The traditions and history of the military metaphor are examined and an alternative notion of the "frontier" is proposed in order to enhance understanding of the potential for change.

  16. Exploring factors in the decision to choose sterilization vs alternatives in rural El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Miriam L; Holland, Erica; Monterroza, Maritza; Duran, Sonia; Singh, Rameet; Terbell, Heather; Edelman, Alison

    2008-01-01

    To explore the factors that influence rural Salvadoran women to undergo tubal sterilization versus opting for alternative methods of family planning. A moderator fluent in English and Spanish conducted eleven 90-minute focus groups consisting of 5-10 women each. Eligible women in the municipality of San Pedro Perulapan, El Salvador, were identified and recruited by local health workers. Participant demographics and information about family planning decisions were collected through detailed notes and tape-recorded sessions. The tapes were transcribed verbatim, and all data were analyzed using grounded theory procedures to identify common themes. Eighty women aged 24-45 years who had previously been sterilized participated in the study. Three major themes influenced a woman's decision to undergo sterilization instead of opting for alternative forms of family planning: (1) availability: tubal sterilization is readily available, (2) fears about side effects of other methods: these women associated negative side effects with other forms of family planning, (3) effectiveness: the women in these focus groups thought sterilization was more effective than other forms of family planning. This study shows that there is a lack of information, and misinformation, about other effective methods of contraception, especially the intrauterine device and oral contraceptives. Reproductive health education projects, especially those providing services in locations similar to rural El Salvador, should focus on providing accurate information about all forms of contraception, including tubal sterilization.

  17. Results of the Alternative Water Processor Test, A Novel Technology for Exploration Wastewater Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Leticia; Meyer, Caitlin

    2016-01-01

    Biologically-based water recovery systems are a regenerative, low energy alternative to physiochemical processes to reclaim water from wastewater. This paper summarizes the results of the Alternative Water Processor (AWP) test conducted over one year. The AWP recovered 90% of water from four crewmembers using (4) membrane aerated bioreactors (MABRs) to remove carbon and nitrogen from an exploration mission wastewater, including urine, hygiene, laundry and humidity condensate. Downstream, a coupled forward and reverse osmosis system removed large organics and inorganic salts from the biological system effluent. The system exceeded the overall objectives of the test by recovering 90% of the influent wastewater processed and a 29% reduction of consumables from the current state of the art water recovery system on the International Space Station (ISS). However the biological system fell short of its test goals, failing to remove 75% and 90% of the influent ammonium and organic carbon, respectively. Despite not meeting its test goals, the BWP demonstrated the feasibility of an attached-growth biological system for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, an innovative, volume and consumable-saving design that doesn't require toxic pretreatment. This paper will explain the reasons for this and will discuss steps to optimize each subsystem to increase effluent quality from the MABRs and the FOST to advance the system.

  18. Transformative Learning for a Sustainable Future: An Exploration of Pedagogies for Change at an Alternative College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Blake

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Educators and policy makers have long recognised the central role that education can play in creating a more sustainable and equitable world. Yet some question whether current processes across mainstream higher education prepare learners sufficiently to graduate with the capabilities or motivation to shape and create a future that is life-sustaining. This paper presents findings from a qualitative research project carried out by Plymouth University in association with Schumacher College, Devon, UK. Schumacher College is an alternative, civil society college, owned by the Dartington Hall Trust that claims to provide transformative learning opportunities within a broad context of sustainability. The study explored the nature and application of transformative learning as a pedagogical approach to advance change towards sustainability. If learners claimed transformational learning experiences, the research asked whether, and to what extent, this transformation could be attributed to the pedagogies employed at the College. The paper begins by setting out the broad background to the relationship between marginal and mainstream educational settings, and definitions and theoretical underpinnings of transformative learning, and then leads into the research design and findings. The potential for transformative pedagogies to be applied to and employed within the wider higher education (HE sector is then discussed, and the overall findings and conclusions are presented.

  19. Riverine Landscapes: Exploring Connectivity, Extinction Risk, and Biogeography in an Alternative Geometry (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, W.

    2010-12-01

    Riverine landscapes differ in fundamental ways from terrestrial ones. In particular, the branching hierarchical geometry and downstream flow of river systems lead to a suite of network properties rarely considered in 2-dimensional systems that have long been the mainstay of landscape ecology. Intrinsic effects of configuration, directional biases, transient connectivity, and opportunities for ‘out of network’ movement may all lead to inherently asymmetrical opportunities for connections among parts of a riverine landscape thereby influencing ecological processes and biogeographic patterns. This ‘alternative geometry’ of riverine networks provides excellent opportunities for scientists to explore how network connectivity shapes habitat occupancy, metacommunity dynamics, and biogeographic patterns. Using examples involving fish communities that inhabit the river networks of North America and India, I will discuss here how human modifications to the spatial characteristics of river systems, such as habitat fragmentation and interbasin water transfer projects, influence ecological dynamics and biogeographic patterns. Taken together these research projects illustrate the important contributions that riverine geometry makes to our understanding of interspecific variation in extinction risks and the potentially broad relevance of the neutral theory of biodiversity.

  20. Elastic orthorhombic anisotropic parameter inversion: An analysis of parameterization

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2016-09-15

    The resolution of a multiparameter full-waveform inversion (FWI) is highly influenced by the parameterization used in the inversion algorithm, as well as the data quality and the sensitivity of the data to the elastic parameters because the scattering patterns of the partial derivative wavefields (PDWs) vary with parameterization. For this reason, it is important to identify an optimal parameterization for elastic orthorhombic FWI by analyzing the radiation patterns of the PDWs for many reasonable model parameterizations. We have promoted a parameterization that allows for the separation of the anisotropic properties in the radiation patterns. The central parameter of this parameterization is the horizontal P-wave velocity, with an isotropic scattering potential, influencing the data at all scales and directions. This parameterization decouples the influence of the scattering potential given by the P-wave velocity perturbation fromthe polar changes described by two dimensionless parameter perturbations and from the azimuthal variation given by three additional dimensionless parameters perturbations. In addition, the scattering potentials of the P-wave velocity perturbation are also decoupled from the elastic influences given by one S-wave velocity and two additional dimensionless parameter perturbations. The vertical S-wave velocity is chosen with the best resolution obtained from S-wave reflections and converted waves, little influence on P-waves in conventional surface seismic acquisition. The influence of the density on observed data can be absorbed by one anisotropic parameter that has a similar radiation pattern. The additional seven dimensionless parameters describe the polar and azimuth variations in the P- and S-waves that we may acquire, with some of the parameters having distinct influences on the recorded data on the earth\\'s surface. These characteristics of the new parameterization offer the potential for a multistage inversion from high symmetry

  1. Alternative measures to BMI: Exploring income-related inequalities in adiposity in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davillas, Apostolos; Benzeval, Michaela

    2016-10-01

    Socio-economic inequalities in adiposity are of particular interest themselves but also because they may be associated with inequalities in overall health status. Using cross-sectional representative data from Great Britain (1/2010-3/2012) for 13,138 adults (5652 males and 7486 females) over age 20, we aimed to explore the presence of income-related inequalities in alternative adiposity measures by gender and to identify the underlying factors contributing to these inequalities. For this reason, we employed concentration indexes and regression-based decomposition techniques. To control for non-homogeneity in body composition, we employed a variety of adiposity measures including body fat (absolute and percentage) and central adiposity (waist circumference) in addition to the conventional body mass index (BMI). The body fat measures allowed us to distinguish between the fat- and lean-mass components of BMI. We found that the absence of income-related obesity inequalities for males in the existing literature may be attributed to their focus on BMI-based measures. Pro-rich inequalities were evident for the fat-mass and central adiposity measures for males, while this was not the case for BMI. Irrespective of the adiposity measure applied, pro-rich inequalities were evident for females. The decomposition analysis showed that these inequalities were mainly attributable to subjective financial well-being measures (perceptions of financial strain and material deprivation) and education, with the relative contribution of the former being more evident in females. Our findings have important implications for the measurement of socio-economic inequalities in adiposity and indicate that central adiposity and body composition measures should be included health policy agendas. Psycho-social mechanisms, linked to subjective financial well-being, and education -rather than income itself-are more relevant for tackling inequalities. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by

  2. LISA technologies in new light: exploring alternatives for charge management and optical bench construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Chilton, Andrew; Olatunde, Taiwo; Apple, Stephen; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-08-01

    A LISA-like gravitational wave observatory is the choice candidate for ESA's L3 large mission scheduled to launch in 2034. The LISA Test Package (LTP) mission will launch later this year and test many critical technologies needed for such an observatory, among which are picometer interferometry in space and UV charge management of the Test Mass (TM). The design of these subsystems has been frozen many years ago during the final formulation of the LTP mission; since then, the LISA mission concept has evolved and new technologies have become available, making it possible to re-think the way these subsystem are implemented. With the final formulation of the L3 mission still years in the future and the LTP results expected in about one year, now is an ideal time look for areas of possible improvement and explore alternative implementations that can enhance performance, reduce costs or mitigate risks.Recently developed UV LED are lighter, cheaper and more powerful than traditional mercury lamps; in addition, their fast response time can be used to implement AC discharge techniques that can save even more space and power, and provide a more precise control of the charge.The most recent iteration of the mission baseline design allows for eliminating some of the optical components initially deemed essential; paired with the use of polarization multiplexing, this permits a redesign of the optical bench that simplifies the layout and enables a modular approach to machining and assembly, thus reducing the risks and costs associated with the current monolithic design without compromising the picometer stability of the optical path.Leveraging on extensive previous experience with LISA interferometry and the availability of a torsion pendulum-based LISA test-bed, the University of Florida LISA group is working at developing, demonstrating and optimizing both these technologies. I will describe the most recent advancements and results.

  3. Seeking Educational Excellence Everywhere: An Exploration into the Impact of Academisation on Alternative Education Provision in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a policy analysis of the UK Government's Academies programme and explores the impact that this might have on young people who have become disengaged from the mainstream education system and are thus educated in "alternative provision" (AP) settings. It argues that the academisation proposals curtail some of the…

  4. Parameterized Complexity of Firefighting Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Cygan, Marek; van Leeuwen, Erik Jan

    2011-01-01

    The Firefighter problem is to place firefighters on the vertices of a graph to prevent a fire with known starting point from lighting up the entire graph. In each time step, a firefighter may be permanently placed on an unburned vertex and the fire spreads to its neighborhood in the graph in so far no firefighters are protecting those vertices. The goal is to let as few vertices burn as possible. This problem is known to be NP-complete, even when restricted to bipartite graphs or to trees of maximum degree three. Initial study showed the Firefighter problem to be fixed-parameter tractable on trees in various parameterizations. We complete these results by showing that the problem is in FPT on general graphs when parameterized by the number of burned vertices, but has no polynomial kernel on trees, resolving an open problem. Conversely, we show that the problem is W[1]-hard when parameterized by the number of unburned vertices, even on bipartite graphs. For both parameterizations, we additionally give refined ...

  5. Alternatives to evacuation during wildland fire: Exploring adaptive capacity in one Idaho community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis B. Paveglio; Matthew S. Caroll; Pamela J. Jakes

    2010-01-01

    The use of alternatives to evacuation during wildfire events continues to be an intensely debated strategy in the professional and policy circles of numerous fire-prone countries. The most recent chapter comes in response to the Black Saturday Fires in Australia, which has led to policy changes concerning alternatives to evacuation in both Australia and USA. This study...

  6. Parameterization of oceanic whitecap fraction based on satellite observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albert, M.F.M.A.; Anguelova, M.D.; Manders, A.M.M.; Schaap, M.; Leeuw, G. de

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the utility of satellite-based whitecap fraction (W) data for the prediction of sea spray aerosol (SSA) emission rates is explored. More specifically, the study aims at evaluating how an account for natural variability of whitecaps in the W parameterization would affect

  7. Application of the dual Youla parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Different applications of the parameterization of all systems stabilized by a given controller, i.e. the dual Youla parameterization, are considered in this paper. It will be shown how the parameterization can be applied in connection with controller design, adaptive controllers, model validation...

  8. Exploring pharmacists' perceived job alternatives: Results from the 2014 National Pharmacist Workforce Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanasarot, Sirikan; Gaither, Caroline A; Schommer, Jon C; Doucette, William R; Kreling, David H; Mott, David A

    To examine the association between pharmacists' demographics, practice variables, worklife attitudes (e.g., work environment stress, control in the work environment, professional commitment, work-home conflict, and organizational commitment), and their perceived job alternatives. Cross-sectional descriptive study. A representative nationwide sample of licensed pharmacists in the United States, 2014. A total of 1574 practicing pharmacists. A previously validated Likert-type scale was used to measure perceived job alternatives. Pharmacists reported their perception on how easy it would be to find a better job with the use of 17 common organizational characteristics. The higher the score, the easier they perceived it would be to find a new job. The perceived job alternatives scale manifested 4 constructs: environmental conditions, professional opportunities, compensation, and coworkers. Multivariate regression analysis showed that organizational commitment was the most influential worklife attitude and was negatively associated with all constructs except better compensation. The higher professional commitment and environmental stress, the easier pharmacists perceive it would be to find a new job with better environmental conditions, such as better professional treatment by management. Younger pharmacists indicated higher perceived levels of ease in finding a job with better environmental conditions and professional opportunities. Male pharmacists also reported a higher perceived level of ease in finding an alternate job with better professional opportunities. White pharmacists perceived it would be easier to find a new job with better environmental aspects and compensation. No statistical significance was observed in perceived job alternatives among pharmacists practicing in different primary work settings after adjusting for other variables. Demographics and worklife attitudes were found to affect perceived availability of job alternatives. Organizational commitment

  9. Developing Alternative Frameworks for Exploring Intercultural Learning: A Critique of Hofstede's Cultural Difference Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, Paola; Wiesemes, Rolf; Murphy, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Hofstede's model of cultural difference has been used widely for exploring aspects of culture in educational settings. In this paper, we review Hofstede's model and explore some of its limitations, particularly in relation to the field of higher education. These limitations include an oversimplification of cultural differences, inconsistencies…

  10. Land-Rich Colleges Explore Opportunities to Create Alternative-Energy Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    In a time of expensive energy and concerns about climate change, land may be a major asset for colleges, providing a vastly different opportunity than it did in the past, when it was merely a place to set down new buildings, new campuses, or research parks. Since new alternative-energy technologies like wind and solar demand a lot of land--along…

  11. Alternative Food Networks (AFNs) in Calabria : a sociological exploration of interaction dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    amico, D' S.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis aims to advance the understanding of identities and roles of Alternative Food Networks (AFNs). It focusses on AFNs which operate in contexts where traditional aspects are still dominant within the local agrifood systems, and which act on both food provisioning and raising awareness about

  12. The Ethanol Project: Exploring Alternative Energy with Role-Play and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a project that includes a two-week series of researching, essay writing, and speaking lessons exploring the broader implications of using ethanol as a fuel. The author, a chemistry teacher, describes how she uses a senate hearing discussion of ethanol fuel subsidies as the forum for a role-play. The four components of the…

  13. Exploring the Role of Alternative Break Programs in Students' Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Elizabeth; Kurotsuchi Inkelas, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Higher education institutions play a key role in helping to shape students' interests and career plans; as such, student affairs practitioners should understand how the co-curricular environments in their domain contribute to students' career development. The purpose of this study is to explore how one specific co-curricular experience,…

  14. Exploring the use of systems thinking approaches in the management of alternative food networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena

    . The analysis shows that the expert and the novices behave differently, as well as similarly while facilitating the workshop, thus supporting and contrasting the explored claim. In identifying differences this research contributes to PSM theory by extending the definition of ‘expert vs. novice’ PSM facilitator...

  15. Alternative theoretical and methodological approaches for exploring higher education in Art and Crafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte Sørebø Gulliksen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents and discusses approaches for exploring higher education in Art and Crafts. The concepts exploring versus research and the different foci in an insider perspective versus an outsider perspective introduces the theme. An insider perspective is said to be a useful starting point for inquiry, referring to Frayling’s trichotomy research into, research on and research through from 1993. The field of higher education in Art and Crafts education is shortly presented as comprising two main areas of knowledge: knowledge of education, and knowledge about the different subject areas within Art and Crafts. Both theory and practice are a part of these areas of knowledge. As higher education in Art and Crafts is a making profession, the most prominent challenge when exploring this today is thus said to be to develop research based knowledge on Education in Art and Crafts as a making discipline.  Two keywords are deemed to be useful in approaching this theme: Mode 2 knowledge production and transdisciplinarity. The article concludes with describing specific ways of doing this today from within the context of application. Two examples of large research projects in Scandinavia are presented as examples of such projects.

  16. Exploring frontiers: use of complementary and alternative medicine among patients with early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghatchian, Mahasti; Bihan, Céline; Chenailler, Catherine; Mazouni, Chafika; Dauchy, Sarah; Delaloge, Suzette

    2014-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly popular among cancer patients but can interfere with conventional therapies; timely data are needed to adapt current patients' care. This transversal, prospective study evaluated the use of CAM among patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy or endocrine therapy for early stage breast cancer. We assessed the prevalence of use, the motivations and predictive factors for use, as well as patients' information needs over a three months period. 69/184 responders (37.5%) reported using at least one CAM. CAM use was associated with younger age (p = 0.03) and higher education level (p cancer patients are common users of CAM concomitantly to their conventional cancer treatments and should be investigated regarding their current consumption of CAM. Furthermore, they need advice evidence-based data on these treatments and potential interactions with on-going treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alternation frequency thresholds for stereopsis as a technique for exploring stereoscopic difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychkova, Svetlana; Ninio, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    When stereoscopic images are presented alternately to the two eyes, stereopsis occurs at F ≥ 1 Hz full-cycle frequencies for very simple stimuli, and F ≥ 3 Hz full-cycle frequencies for random-dot stereograms (eg Ludwig I, Pieper W, Lachnit H, 2007 “Temporal integration of monocular images separated in time: stereopsis, stereoacuity, and binocular luster” Perception & Psychophysics 69 92–102). Using twenty different stereograms presented through liquid crystal shutters, we studied the transition to stereopsis with fifteen subjects. The onset of stereopsis was observed during a stepwise increase of the alternation frequency, and its disappearance was observed during a stepwise decrease in frequency. The lowest F values (around 2.5 Hz) were observed with stimuli involving two to four simple disjoint elements (circles, arcs, rectangles). Higher F values were needed for stimuli containing slanted elements or curved surfaces (about 1 Hz increment), overlapping elements at two different depths (about 2.5 Hz increment), or camouflaged overlapping surfaces (> 7 Hz increment). A textured cylindrical surface with a horizontal axis appeared easier to interpret (5.7 Hz) than a pair of slanted segments separated in depth but forming a cross in projection (8 Hz). Training effects were minimal, and F usually increased as disparities were reduced. The hierarchy of difficulties revealed in the study may shed light on various problems that the brain needs to solve during stereoscopic interpretation. During the construction of the three-dimensional percept, the loss of information due to natural decay of the stimuli traces must be compensated by refreshes of visual input. In the discussion an attempt is made to link our results with recent advances in the comprehension of visual scene memory. PMID:23145225

  18. The Codacs™ direct acoustic cochlear implant actuator: exploring alternative stimulation sites and their stimulation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Grossöhmichen

    Full Text Available This work assesses the efficiency of the Codacs system actuator (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney Australia in different inner ear stimulation modalities. Originally the actuator was intended for direct perilymph stimulation after stapedotomy using a piston prosthesis. A possible alternative application is the stimulation of middle ear structures or the round window (RW. Here the perilymph stimulation with a K-piston through a stapes footplate (SFP fenestration (N = 10 as well as stimulation of the stapes head (SH with a Bell prosthesis (N = 9, SFP stimulation with an Omega/Aerial prosthesis (N = 8 and reverse RW stimulation (N = 10 were performed in cadaveric human temporal bones (TBs. Codacs actuator output is expressed as equivalent sound pressure level (eq. SPL using RW and SFP displacement responses, measured by Laser Doppler velocimetry as reference. The axial actuator coupling force in stimulation of stapes and RW was adjusted to ~5 mN. The Bell prosthesis and Omega/Aerial prosthesis stimulation generated similar mean eq. SPLs (Bell: 127.5-141.8 eq. dB SPL; Omega/Aerial: 123.6-143.9 eq. dB SPL, being significantly more efficient than K-piston perilymph stimulation (108.6-131.6 eq. dB SPL and RW stimulation (108.3-128.2 eq. dB SPL. Our results demonstrate that SH, SFP and RW are adequate alternative stimulation sites for the Codacs actuator using coupling prostheses and an axial coupling force of ~5 mN. Based on the eq. SPLs, all investigated methods were adequate for in vivo hearing aid applications, provided that experimental conditions including constant coupling force will be implemented.

  19. The Codacs™ direct acoustic cochlear implant actuator: exploring alternative stimulation sites and their stimulation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossöhmichen, Martin; Salcher, Rolf; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    This work assesses the efficiency of the Codacs system actuator (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney Australia) in different inner ear stimulation modalities. Originally the actuator was intended for direct perilymph stimulation after stapedotomy using a piston prosthesis. A possible alternative application is the stimulation of middle ear structures or the round window (RW). Here the perilymph stimulation with a K-piston through a stapes footplate (SFP) fenestration (N = 10) as well as stimulation of the stapes head (SH) with a Bell prosthesis (N = 9), SFP stimulation with an Omega/Aerial prosthesis (N = 8) and reverse RW stimulation (N = 10) were performed in cadaveric human temporal bones (TBs). Codacs actuator output is expressed as equivalent sound pressure level (eq. SPL) using RW and SFP displacement responses, measured by Laser Doppler velocimetry as reference. The axial actuator coupling force in stimulation of stapes and RW was adjusted to ~5 mN. The Bell prosthesis and Omega/Aerial prosthesis stimulation generated similar mean eq. SPLs (Bell: 127.5-141.8 eq. dB SPL; Omega/Aerial: 123.6-143.9 eq. dB SPL), being significantly more efficient than K-piston perilymph stimulation (108.6-131.6 eq. dB SPL) and RW stimulation (108.3-128.2 eq. dB SPL). Our results demonstrate that SH, SFP and RW are adequate alternative stimulation sites for the Codacs actuator using coupling prostheses and an axial coupling force of ~5 mN. Based on the eq. SPLs, all investigated methods were adequate for in vivo hearing aid applications, provided that experimental conditions including constant coupling force will be implemented.

  20. Alternation Frequency Thresholds for Stereopsis as a Technique for Exploring Stereoscopic Difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Rychkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When stereoscopic images are presented alternately to the two eyes, stereopsis occurs at F ⩾ 1 Hz full-cycle frequencies for very simple stimuli, and F ⩾ 3 Hz full-cycle frequencies for random-dot stereograms (eg Ludwig I, Pieper W, Lachnit H, 2007 “Temporal integration of monocular images separated in time: stereopsis, stereoacuity, and binocular luster” Perception & Psychophysics 69 92–102. Using twenty different stereograms presented through liquid crystal shutters, we studied the transition to stereopsis with fifteen subjects. The onset of stereopsis was observed during a stepwise increase of the alternation frequency, and its disappearance was observed during a stepwise decrease in frequency. The lowest F values (around 2.5 Hz were observed with stimuli involving two to four simple disjoint elements (circles, arcs, rectangles. Higher F values were needed for stimuli containing slanted elements or curved surfaces (about 1 Hz increment, overlapping elements at two different depths (about 2.5 Hz increment, or camouflaged overlapping surfaces (> 7 Hz increment. A textured cylindrical surface with a horizontal axis appeared easier to interpret (5.7 Hz than a pair of slanted segments separated in depth but forming a cross in projection (8 Hz. Training effects were minimal, and F usually increased as disparities were reduced. The hierarchy of difficulties revealed in the study may shed light on various problems that the brain needs to solve during stereoscopic interpretation. During the construction of the three-dimensional percept, the loss of information due to natural decay of the stimuli traces must be compensated by refreshes of visual input. In the discussion an attempt is made to link our results with recent advances in the comprehension of visual scene memory.

  1. Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Part of an annual review of mines and mineral resources in the U.S. An overview of nonfuel-mineral exploration in 2000 is presented. Principal exploration target was gold exploration in Latin America, Australia, and the U.S. There was a decrease of 18 percent in the exploration budget for gold as compared with the budget for 1999. Statistical information on nonfuel-mineral exploration worldwide is presented, analyzed, and interpreted.

  2. Neutrosophic Parameterized Soft Relations and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Deli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce the concept of relation on neutrosophic parameterized soft set (NP- soft sets theory. We have studied some related properties and also put forward some propositions on neutrosophic parameterized soft relation with proofs and examples. Finally the notions of symmetric, transitive, reflexive, and equivalence neutrosophic parameterized soft set relations have been established in our work. Finally a decision making method on NP-soft sets is presented.

  3. Ensemble superparameterization versus stochastic parameterization: A comparison of model uncertainty representation in tropical weather prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Aneesh C.; Palmer, Tim N.

    2017-06-01

    Stochastic schemes to represent model uncertainty in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ensemble prediction system has helped improve its probabilistic forecast skill over the past decade by both improving its reliability and reducing the ensemble mean error. The largest uncertainties in the model arise from the model physics parameterizations. In the tropics, the parameterization of moist convection presents a major challenge for the accurate prediction of weather and climate. Superparameterization is a promising alternative strategy for including the effects of moist convection through explicit turbulent fluxes calculated from a cloud-resolving model (CRM) embedded within a global climate model (GCM). In this paper, we compare the impact of initial random perturbations in embedded CRMs, within the ECMWF ensemble prediction system, with stochastically perturbed physical tendency (SPPT) scheme as a way to represent model uncertainty in medium-range tropical weather forecasts. We especially focus on forecasts of tropical convection and dynamics during MJO events in October-November 2011. These are well-studied events for MJO dynamics as they were also heavily observed during the DYNAMO field campaign. We show that a multiscale ensemble modeling approach helps improve forecasts of certain aspects of tropical convection during the MJO events, while it also tends to deteriorate certain large-scale dynamic fields with respect to stochastically perturbed physical tendencies approach that is used operationally at ECMWF.Plain Language SummaryProbabilistic weather forecasts, especially for tropical weather, is still a significant challenge for global weather forecasting systems. Expressing uncertainty along with weather forecasts is important for informed decision making. Hence, we explore the use of a relatively new approach in using super-parameterization, where a cloud resolving model is embedded within a global model, in probabilistic

  4. An Explorative Study Examining Augmentative and Alternative Communication Training in the Field of Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadberry, Anita L; Sweeney, Alison

    2017-07-01

    Music therapists work with many people who require Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). As communication goals are central to music therapy practice, many music therapists would benefit from training in AAC. The purpose of this survey study was to determine the state of AAC education for music therapists at the university level, how AAC is being used in music therapy sessions, and how practicing music therapists are trained in AAC. Music therapy faculty and credentialed music therapists in North America and Europe were invited to complete an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze survey data from each group of respondents. With regard to training in AAC at the university level, results indicate that almost half of music therapy faculty (44.66%) provided some training. The primary reason given for not providing training was a lack of educator knowledge in this area. Results indicate that a majority (81.77%) of music therapy clinicians are familiar with AAC and slightly over half (55.08%) reported that they work with clients who use AAC. Sixty-two percent of music therapists reported using AAC to promote expressive language, and 49% to increase receptive language. Over 80% of clinicians stated they would benefit from additional AAC training. Although a majority of music therapists are familiar with ACC, results indicate that ACC competency could be enhanced through university-level instruction and continuing professional development courses.

  5. CULTURAL EXPLORATION AS ALTER/NATIVE1 ROUTE TO NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: INSIGHTS FROM YORUBA VERBAL ARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLUWOLE COKER

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper interrogates Yoruba verbal arts and situates culture as a catalyst for development. It is suggested that the intricate resources of oral art, exemplified by Yoruba textual references, are viable ingredients for socio-cultural empowerment. To fully comprehend the dynamics of a society in constant change due to external and internal realities, one must reconsider culture in order to reposition the society. The multidimensional and multidisciplinary significance of Yoruba verbal art demonstrate that culture has a vital role to play in any meaningful socio-political advancement in the Nigerian body polity. The ideas conveyed in proverbial expressions, representing key cultural realities of the Yoruba people, offer insights and ideas for development and social good. The paper submits that a deeper exploration of the intricate resources of verbal art is a viable route to development.

  6. Parallel symbolic state-space exploration is difficult, but what is the alternative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Ciardo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available State-space exploration is an essential step in many modeling and analysis problems. Its goal is to find the states reachable from the initial state of a discrete-state model described. The state space can used to answer important questions, e.g., "Is there a dead state?" and "Can N become negative?", or as a starting point for sophisticated investigations expressed in temporal logic. Unfortunately, the state space is often so large that ordinary explicit data structures and sequential algorithms cannot cope, prompting the exploration of (1 parallel approaches using multiple processors, from simple workstation networks to shared-memory supercomputers, to satisfy large memory and runtime requirements and (2 symbolic approaches using decision diagrams to encode the large structured sets and relations manipulated during state-space generation. Both approaches have merits and limitations. Parallel explicit state-space generation is challenging, but almost linear speedup can be achieved; however, the analysis is ultimately limited by the memory and processors available. Symbolic methods are a heuristic that can efficiently encode many, but not all, functions over a structured and exponentially large domain; here the pitfalls are subtler: their performance varies widely depending on the class of decision diagram chosen, the state variable order, and obscure algorithmic parameters. As symbolic approaches are often much more efficient than explicit ones for many practical models, we argue for the need to parallelize symbolic state-space generation algorithms, so that we can realize the advantage of both approaches. This is a challenging endeavor, as the most efficient symbolic algorithm, Saturation, is inherently sequential. We conclude by discussing challenges, efforts, and promising directions toward this goal.

  7. Exploration of alternate catalytic mechanisms and optimization strategies for retroaldolase design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelic, Sinisa; Kipnis, Yakov; Wang, Ling; Pianowski, Zbigniew; Vorobiev, Sergey; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Kornhaber, Gregory; Hunt, John F; Tong, Liang; Hilvert, Donald; Baker, David

    2014-01-09

    Designed retroaldolases have utilized a nucleophilic lysine to promote carbon-carbon bond cleavage of β-hydroxy-ketones via a covalent Schiff base intermediate. Previous computational designs have incorporated a water molecule to facilitate formation and breakdown of the carbinolamine intermediate to give the Schiff base and to function as a general acid/base. Here we investigate an alternative active-site design in which the catalytic water molecule was replaced by the side chain of a glutamic acid. Five out of seven designs expressed solubly and exhibited catalytic efficiencies similar to previously designed retroaldolases for the conversion of 4-hydroxy-4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone to 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde and acetone. After one round of site-directed saturation mutagenesis, improved variants of the two best designs, RA114 and RA117, exhibited among the highest kcat (>10(-3)s(-1)) and kcat/KM (11-25M(-1)s(-1)) values observed for retroaldolase designs prior to comprehensive directed evolution. In both cases, the >10(5)-fold rate accelerations that were achieved are within 1-3 orders of magnitude of the rate enhancements reported for the best catalysts for related reactions, including catalytic antibodies (kcat/kuncat=10(6) to 10(8)) and an extensively evolved computational design (kcat/kuncat>10(7)). The catalytic sites, revealed by X-ray structures of optimized versions of the two active designs, are in close agreement with the design models except for the catalytic lysine in RA114. We further improved the variants by computational remodeling of the loops and yeast display selection for reactivity of the catalytic lysine with a diketone probe, obtaining an additional order of magnitude enhancement in activity with both approaches. © 2013.

  8. Tuning controllers using the dual Youla parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Youla parameterization of all stabilizing controllers and the dual Youla parameterization of all systems stabilized by a given controller in connection with tuning of controllers. In the uncertain case, it is shown that the use of the Youla parameteriza...

  9. Exploring Critical Alternatives for Youth Development through Lifestyle Sport: Surfing and Community Development in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Wheaton

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available While competition-based team sports remain dominant in community and sport-for-development programs, researchers are exploring the value of alternative, less “sportized” activities such as lifestyle/action sports. In this paper, we explore the ways in which surfing is being used in development programs in Aotearoa/New Zealand, examining the perceived social benefits and impact. Our methods involved: (a mapping the range of surfing projects; and (b 8 in-depth interviews with program personnel. Widespread conviction in the positive developmental benefits of surfing was evident, and that surfing had a “special” capacity to reform or heal those who participate in it. However, the ways in which individuals’ self-developments were promoted appear to be following the traditional sport/youth development path. They focus on policies aimed at improved life chances, equipping youth with the tools for self-improvement and self-management, inculcating self-governance and self-reliance. However, a counter narrative co-existed, highlighting surfing as a freeing experience, which, rather than restoring social order, works to instigate a personal transformation or awakening. Despite the range of challenges presented by surfing as a tool for positive development, surfing presents a potentially “critical alternative” which if sport-for-development programs are to be a form of social change, we should remain open to exploring.

  10. Architecture-Level Exploration of Alternative Interconnection Schemes Targeting 3D FPGAs: A Software-Supported Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Siozios

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In current reconfigurable architectures, the interconnection structures increasingly contribute more to the delay and power consumption. The demand for increased clock frequencies and logic density (smaller area footprint makes the problem even more important. Three-dimensional (3D architectures are able to alleviate this problem by accommodating a number of functional layers, each of which might be fabricated in different technology. However, the benefits of such integration technology have not been sufficiently explored yet. In this paper, we propose a software-supported methodology for exploring and evaluating alternative interconnection schemes for 3D FPGAs. In order to support the proposed methodology, three new CAD tools were developed (part of the 3D MEANDER Design Framework. During our exploration, we study the impact of vertical interconnection between functional layers in a number of design parameters. More specifically, the average gains in operation frequency, power consumption, and wirelength are 35%, 32%, and 13%, respectively, compared to existing 2D FPGAs with identical logic resources. Also, we achieve higher utilization ratio for the vertical interconnections compared to existing approaches by 8% for designing 3D FPGAs, leading to cheaper and more reliable devices.

  11. Understanding unexpected courses of multiple sclerosis among patients using complementary and alternative medicine: A travel from recipient to explorer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Salamonsen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is frequently used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Some MS patients experience unexpected improvements of symptoms, which they relate to their use of CAM. The aim of this study was to obtain knowledge and develop understandings of such self-defined unexpected improvement of MS symptoms. Two cases were constructed based on documents and 12 qualitative interviews. Our aim was not to make generalisations from the cases, but to transfer knowledge as working hypotheses. We identified four health-related change processes: the process of losing bodily competence; the process of developing responsibility; the process of taking control; and the process of choosing CAM. The patients explained unexpected improvements in their MS symptoms as results of their own efforts including their choice and use of CAM. In our theoretical interpretations, we found the patients’ redefinition of history, the concept of treatment and the importance of conventional health care to be essential, and leading to a change of patients’ position towards conventional health care from recipients to explorers. The explorers can be perceived as boundary walkers reflecting limitations within the conventional health care system and as initiators regarding what MS patients find useful in CAM.

  12. Promise and Limitations of PDF Based Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.; Firl, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Several global modeling centers are using or testing parameterizations of small-scale transports based on probability density functions (PDFs) with assumed distributions. The parameterizations are applied to turbulence and small-scale convection, and sometimes deep convection. Two issues are discussed in this talk. The first is the degree to which the proposed PDFs can accurately represent quantities of interest. The second is how to determine the numerous parameters needed to describe the PDFs.

  13. Parameterized String Matching Algorithms with Application to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the parameterized string matching problem, a given pattern P is said to match with a sub-string t of the text T, if there exist a bijection from the symbols of P to the symbols of t. Salmela and Tarhio solve the parameterized string matching problem in sub-linear time by applying the concept of q-gram in the Horspool algorithm ...

  14. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera L Silva

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line- 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 -CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2-EVQSSKFPAHVS were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy.

  15. Parameterization Method on B-Spline Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Haron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computer graphics in many areas allows a real object to be transformed into a three-dimensional computer model (3D by developing tools to improve the visualization of two-dimensional (2D and 3D data from series of data point. The tools involved the representation of 2D and 3D primitive entities and parameterization method using B-spline interpolation. However, there is no parameterization method which can handle all types of data points such as collinear data points and large distance of two consecutive data points. Therefore, this paper presents a new parameterization method that is able to solve those drawbacks by visualizing the 2D primitive entity of scanned data point of a real object and construct 3D computer model. The new method has improved a hybrid method by introducing exponential parameterization method in the beginning of the reconstruction process, followed by computing B-spline basis function to find maximum value of the function. The improvement includes solving a linear system of the B-spline basis function using numerical method. Improper selection of the parameterization method may lead to the singularity matrix of the system linear equations. The experimental result on different datasets show that the proposed method performs better in constructing the collinear and two consecutive data points compared to few parameterization methods.

  16. From Surviving to Thriving: Exploring Alternatively Certified Teachers? Perceptions of First-Year Support from School-Level Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Anne

    2010-01-01

    To capture multiple perspectives regarding the first-year experiences of alternatively certified teachers, a series of in-depth, qualitative interviews was conducted with five teachers from South Carolina's Program of Alternative Certification for Educators. Data provided insight into alternatively certified teachers. perceptions of the challenges…

  17. Parameterizing Stellar Spectra Using Deep Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Ru; Pan, Ru-Yang; Duan, Fu-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale sky surveys are observing massive amounts of stellar spectra. The large number of stellar spectra makes it necessary to automatically parameterize spectral data, which in turn helps in statistically exploring properties related to the atmospheric parameters. This work focuses on designing an automatic scheme to estimate effective temperature ({T}{eff}), surface gravity ({log}g) and metallicity [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. A scheme based on three deep neural networks (DNNs) is proposed. This scheme consists of the following three procedures: first, the configuration of a DNN is initialized using a series of autoencoder neural networks; second, the DNN is fine-tuned using a gradient descent scheme; third, three atmospheric parameters {T}{eff}, {log}g and [Fe/H] are estimated using the computed DNNs. The constructed DNN is a neural network with six layers (one input layer, one output layer and four hidden layers), for which the number of nodes in the six layers are 3821, 1000, 500, 100, 30 and 1, respectively. This proposed scheme was tested on both real spectra and theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models. Test errors are measured with mean absolute errors (MAEs). The errors on real spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are 0.1477, 0.0048 and 0.1129 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (64.85 K for {T}{eff}), respectively. Regarding theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models, the MAE of the test errors are 0.0182, 0.0011 and 0.0112 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (14.90 K for {T}{eff}), respectively.

  18. Australian women's use of complementary and alternative medicines to enhance fertility: exploring the experiences of women and practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forster Della A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies exploring the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM to enhance fertility are limited. While Australian trends indicate that women are using CAM during pregnancy, little is known about women's use of CAM for fertility enhancement. With the rising age of women at first birth, couples are increasingly seeking assisted reproductive technologies (ART to achieve parenthood. It is likely that CAM use for fertility enhancement will also increase, however this is not known. This paper reports on an exploratory study of women's use of CAM for fertility enhancement. Methods Three focus groups were conducted in Melbourne, Australia in 2007; two with women who used CAM to enhance their fertility and one with CAM practitioners. Participants were recruited from five metropolitan Melbourne CAM practices that specialise in women's health. Women were asked to discuss their views and experiences of both CAM and ART, and practitioners were asked about their perceptions of why women consult them for fertility enhancement. Groups were digitally recorded (audio and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed thematically. Results Focus groups included eight CAM practitioners and seven women. Practitioners reported increasing numbers of women consulting them for fertility enhancement whilst also using ART. Women combined CAM with ART to maintain wellbeing and assist with fertility enhancement. Global themes emerging from the women's focus groups were: women being willing to 'try anything' to achieve a pregnancy; women's negative experiences of ART and a reluctance to inform their medical specialist of their CAM use; and conversely, women's experiences with CAM being affirming and empowering. Conclusions The women in our study used CAM to optimise their chances of achieving a pregnancy. Emerging themes suggest the positive relationships achieved with CAM practitioners are not always attained with orthodox medical providers

  19. Theoretical aspects of the internal element connectivity parameterization approach for topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Gil Ho; Kim, Y.Y.; Langelaar, M.

    2008-01-01

    The internal element connectivity parameterization (I-ECP) method is an alternative approach to overcome numerical instabilities associated with low-stiffness element states in non-linear problems. In I-ECP, elements are connected by zero-length links while their link stiffness values are varied....

  20. POET: Parameterized Optimization for Empirical Tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Q; Seymour, K; You, H; Vuduc, R; Quinlan, D

    2007-01-29

    The excessive complexity of both machine architectures and applications have made it difficult for compilers to statically model and predict application behavior. This observation motivates the recent interest in performance tuning using empirical techniques. We present a new embedded scripting language, POET (Parameterized Optimization for Empirical Tuning), for parameterizing complex code transformations so that they can be empirically tuned. The POET language aims to significantly improve the generality, flexibility, and efficiency of existing empirical tuning systems. We have used the language to parameterize and to empirically tune three loop optimizations-interchange, blocking, and unrolling-for two linear algebra kernels. We show experimentally that the time required to tune these optimizations using POET, which does not require any program analysis, is significantly shorter than that when using a full compiler-based source-code optimizer which performs sophisticated program analysis and optimizations.

  1. Exploring the persistence of stream-dwelling trout populations under alternative real-world turbidity regimes with an individual-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret C. Harvey; Steven F. Railsback

    2009-01-01

    We explored the effects of elevated turbidity on stream-resident populations of coastal cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii using a spatially explicit individual-based model. Turbidity regimes were contrasted by means of 15-year simulations in a third-order stream in northwestern California. The alternative regimes were based on multiple-year, continuous...

  2. Constraints to Dark Energy Using PADE Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M.; Malekjani, M.; Basilakos, S.; Mehrabi, A.; Mota, D. F.

    2017-07-01

    We put constraints on dark energy (DE) properties using PADE parameterization, and compare it to the same constraints using Chevalier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) and ΛCDM, at both the background and the perturbation levels. The DE equation of the state parameter of the models is derived following the mathematical treatment of PADE expansion. Unlike CPL parameterization, PADE approximation provides different forms of the equation of state parameter that avoid the divergence in the far future. Initially we perform a likelihood analysis in order to put constraints on the model parameters using solely background expansion data, and we find that all parameterizations are consistent with each other. Then, combining the expansion and the growth rate data, we test the viability of PADE parameterizations and compare them with CPL and ΛCDM models, respectively. Specifically, we find that the growth rate of the current PADE parameterizations is lower than ΛCDM model at low redshifts, while the differences among the models are negligible at high redshifts. In this context, we provide for the first time a growth index of linear matter perturbations in PADE cosmologies. Considering that DE is homogeneous, we recover the well-known asymptotic value of the growth index (namely {γ }∞ =\\tfrac{3({w}∞ -1)}{6{w}∞ -5}), while in the case of clustered DE, we obtain {γ }∞ ≃ \\tfrac{3{w}∞ (3{w}∞ -5)}{(6{w}∞ -5)(3{w}∞ -1)}. Finally, we generalize the growth index analysis in the case where γ is allowed to vary with redshift, and we find that the form of γ (z) in PADE parameterization extends that of the CPL and ΛCDM cosmologies, respectively.

  3. Parameterizing the SFC Baryogenesis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Kirilova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have numerically explored the scalar field condensate baryogenesis model for numerous sets of model’s parameters, within their natural range of values. We have investigated the evolution of the baryon charge carrying field, the evolution of the baryon charge contained in the scalar field condensate, and the final value of the generated baryon charge on the model’s parameters: the gauge coupling constant α, the Hubble constant at the inflationary stage HI, the mass m, and the self-coupling constants λi.

  4. Gain scheduling using the Youla parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    1999-01-01

    Gain scheduling controllers are considered in this paper. The gain scheduling problem where the scheduling parameter vector cannot be measured directly, but needs to be estimated is considered. An estimation of the scheduling vector has been derived by using the Youla parameterization. The use of...

  5. Gain scheduling using the youla parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, H.H.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    1999-01-01

    Gain scheduling controllers are considered in this paper. The gain scheduling problem where the scheduling parameter vector theta cannot be measured directly, but needs to be estimated is considered. An estimation of the scheduling vector theta has been derived by using the Youla parameterization...

  6. evaluation of land surface temperature parameterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Surface temperature (Ts) is vital to the study of land-atmosphere interactions and climate variabilities. However, observed Ts data are still very scarce in humid tropical region. There is therefore a need to parameterize and improve the representation of Ts in Global Climate Models using available meteorological data.

  7. Development and Application of Spatially Parameterized Depth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development and Application of Spatially Parameterized Depth Duration Frequency Model for Estimation of Design Rainfall for Oromia State, Ethiopia. ... improve the reliability and robustness of design storm predictions as compared with those achievable by interpolating the quantile predictions of extreme rainfall data for ...

  8. Parameterizing time in electronic health record studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J; Perotte, Adler

    2015-07-01

    Fields like nonlinear physics offer methods for analyzing time series, but many methods require that the time series be stationary-no change in properties over time.Objective Medicine is far from stationary, but the challenge may be able to be ameliorated by reparameterizing time because clinicians tend to measure patients more frequently when they are ill and are more likely to vary. We compared time parameterizations, measuring variability of rate of change and magnitude of change, and looking for homogeneity of bins of temporal separation between pairs of time points. We studied four common laboratory tests drawn from 25 years of electronic health records on 4 million patients. We found that sequence time-that is, simply counting the number of measurements from some start-produced more stationary time series, better explained the variation in values, and had more homogeneous bins than either traditional clock time or a recently proposed intermediate parameterization. Sequence time produced more accurate predictions in a single Gaussian process model experiment. Of the three parameterizations, sequence time appeared to produce the most stationary series, possibly because clinicians adjust their sampling to the acuity of the patient. Parameterizing by sequence time may be applicable to association and clustering experiments on electronic health record data. A limitation of this study is that laboratory data were derived from only one institution. Sequence time appears to be an important potential parameterization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reproduction and distribution of the work, in any medium, provided the original work is not altered or transformed in any way, and

  9. Parameterizing the interstellar dust temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocuk, S.; Szűcs, L.; Caselli, P.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Esplugues, G. B.

    2017-08-01

    The temperature of interstellar dust particles is of great importance to astronomers. It plays a crucial role in the thermodynamics of interstellar clouds, because of the gas-dust collisional coupling. It is also a key parameter in astrochemical studies that governs the rate at which molecules form on dust. In 3D (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations often a simple expression for the dust temperature is adopted, because of computational constraints, while astrochemical modelers tend to keep the dust temperature constant over a large range of parameter space. Our aim is to provide an easy-to-use parametric expression for the dust temperature as a function of visual extinction (AV) and to shed light on the critical dependencies of the dust temperature on the grain composition. We obtain an expression for the dust temperature by semi-analytically solving the dust thermal balance for different types of grains and compare to a collection of recent observational measurements. We also explore the effect of ices on the dust temperature. Our results show that a mixed carbonaceous-silicate type dust with a high carbon volume fraction matches the observations best. We find that ice formation allows the dust to be warmer by up to 15% at high optical depths (AV> 20 mag) in the interstellar medium. Our parametric expression for the dust temperature is presented as Td = [ 11 + 5.7 × tanh(0.61 - log 10(AV) ]χuv1/5.9, where χuv is in units of the Draine (1978, ApJS, 36, 595) UV field.

  10. Exploring the Assessment of the DSM-5 Alternative Model for Personality Disorders With the Personality Assessment Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Alexander J; Morey, Leslie C; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Section III of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed. [DSM-5]; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) contains an alternative model for the diagnosis of personality disorder involving the assessment of 25 traits and a global level of overall personality functioning. There is hope that this model will be increasingly used in clinical and research settings, and the ability to apply established instruments to assess these concepts could facilitate this process. This study sought to develop scoring algorithms for these alternative model concepts using scales from the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI). A multiple regression strategy used to predict scores in 2 undergraduate samples on DSM-5 alternative model instruments: the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 (PID-5) and the General Personality Pathology scale (GPP; Morey et al., 2011 ). These regression functions resulted in scores that demonstrated promising convergent and discriminant validity across the alternative model concepts, as well as a factor structure in a cross-validation sample that was congruent with the putative structure of the alternative model traits. Results were linked to the PAI community normative data to provide normative information regarding these alternative model concepts that can be used to identify elevated traits and personality functioning level scores.

  11. A Subjective Assessment of Alternative Mission Architecture Operations Concepts for the Human Exploration of Mars at NASA Using a Three-Dimensional Multi-Criteria Decision Making Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Madjid

    2003-01-01

    The primary driver for developing missions to send humans to other planets is to generate significant scientific return. NASA plans human planetary explorations with an acceptable level of risk consistent with other manned operations. Space exploration risks can not be completely eliminated. Therefore, an acceptable level of cost, technical, safety, schedule, and political risks and benefits must be established for exploratory missions. This study uses a three-dimensional multi-criteria decision making model to identify the risks and benefits associated with three alternative mission architecture operations concepts for the human exploration of Mars identified by the Mission Operations Directorate at Johnson Space Center. The three alternatives considered in this study include split, combo lander, and dual scenarios. The model considers the seven phases of the mission including: 1) Earth Vicinity/Departure; 2) Mars Transfer; 3) Mars Arrival; 4) Planetary Surface; 5) Mars Vicinity/Departure; 6) Earth Transfer; and 7) Earth Arrival. Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and subjective probability estimation are used to captures the experts belief concerning the risks and benefits of the three alternative scenarios through a series of sequential, rational, and analytical processes.

  12. Dielectric function parameterization by penalized splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhachev, Dmitriy V.

    2017-06-01

    In this article, we investigate the penalized spline (P-spline) approach to restrict flexibility of dielectric function parameterization by B-splines and prevent overfitting of the ellipsometric data. The penalty degree is easily controlled by a certain smoothing parameter. The P-spline approach offers a number of advantages over well-established B-spline parameterization. First of all, it typically uses an equidistant knot arrangement which simplifies the construction of the roughness penalties and makes it computationally efficient. Since P-splines possess the "power of the penalty" property, a selection of the number of knots is no longer crucial, as long as there is a minimum knot number to capture all significant spatial variability of the data curves. We demonstrate the proposed approach by real-data application with ellipsometric spectra from aluminum-coated sample.

  13. Parameterized Concurrent Multi-Party Session Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Charalambides

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Session types have been proposed as a means of statically verifying implementations of communication protocols. Although prior work has been successful in verifying some classes of protocols, it does not cope well with parameterized, multi-actor scenarios with inherent asynchrony. For example, the sliding window protocol is inexpressible in previously proposed session type systems. This paper describes System-A, a new typing language which overcomes many of the expressiveness limitations of prior work. System-A explicitly supports asynchrony and parallelism, as well as multiple forms of parameterization. We define System-A and show how it can be used for the static verification of a large class of asynchronous communication protocols.

  14. Using a Multi-Tier Diagnostic Test to Explore the Nature of Students' Alternative Conceptions on Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yaw Kai; Subramaniam, R.

    2018-01-01

    This study focused on grade 12 students' understanding of reaction kinetics. A 4-tier diagnostic instrument was developed for this purpose and administered to 137 students in the main study. Findings showed that reaction kinetics is a difficult topic for these students, with a total of 25 alternative conceptions (ACs) being uncovered. Except for…

  15. Solvability regions of affinely parameterized quadratic equations

    OpenAIRE

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Nguyen, Hung; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Quadratic systems of equations appear in several applications. The results in this paper are motivated by quadratic systems of equations that describe equilibrium behavior of physical infrastructure networks like the power and gas grids. The quadratic systems in infrastructure networks are parameterized- the parameters can represent uncertainty (estimation error in resistance/inductance of a power transmission line, for example)or controllable decision variables (power outputs of generators,f...

  16. Wave-Related Reynolds Number Parameterizations of CO2 and DMS Transfer Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumer, Sophia E.; Zappa, Christopher J.; Blomquist, Byron W.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Cifuentes-Lorenzen, Alejandro; Edson, James B.; Brooks, Ian M.; Huebert, Barry J.

    2017-10-01

    Predicting future climate hinges on our understanding of and ability to quantify air-sea gas transfer. The latter relies on parameterizations of the gas transfer velocity k, which represents physical mass transfer mechanisms and is usually parameterized as a nonlinear function of wind forcing. In an attempt to reduce uncertainties in k, this study explores empirical parameterizations that incorporate both wind speed and sea state dependence via wave-wind and breaking Reynolds numbers, RH and RB. Analysis of concurrent eddy covariance gas transfer and measured wavefield statistics supplemented by wave model hindcasts shows for the first time that wave-related Reynolds numbers collapse four open ocean data sets that have a wind speed dependence of CO2 transfer velocity ranging from lower than quadratic to cubic. Wave-related Reynolds number and wind speed show comparable performance for parametrizing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) which, because of its higher solubility, is less affected by bubble-mediated exchange associated with wave breaking.

  17. On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalsky, M. B.; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Commer, Michael; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Englert, Andreas L.; Steefel, Carl I.; Hubbard, Susan

    2012-06-11

    We consider a field-scale tracer experiment conducted in 2007 in a shallow uranium-contaminated aquifer at Rifle, Colorado. In developing a reliable approach for inferring hydrological properties at the site through inverse modeling of the tracer data, decisions made on how to parameterize heterogeneity (i.e., how to represent a heterogeneous distribution using a limited number of parameters that are amenable to estimation) are of paramount importance. We present an approach for hydrological inversion of the tracer data and explore, using a 2D synthetic example at first, how parameterization affects the solution, and how additional characterization data could be incorporated to reduce uncertainty. Specifically, we examine sensitivity of the results to the configuration of pilot points used in a geostatistical parameterization, and to the sampling frequency and measurement error of the concentration data. A reliable solution of the inverse problem is found when the pilot point configuration is carefully implemented. In addition, we examine the use of a zonation parameterization, in which the geometry of the geological facies is known (e.g., from geophysical data or core data), to reduce the non-uniqueness of the solution and the number of unknown parameters to be estimated. When zonation information is only available for a limited region, special treatment in the remainder of the model is necessary, such as using a geostatistical parameterization. Finally, inversion of the actual field data is performed using 2D and 3D models, and results are compared with slug test data.

  18. Parameterized study of the test cover problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crowston, Robert; Gutin, Gregory; Jones, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we carry out a systematic study of a natural covering problem, used for identification across several areas, in the realm of parameterized complexity. In the Test Cover problem we are given a set [n] = {1,...,n} of items together with a collection, , of distinct subsets of these items...... called tests. We assume that is a test cover, i.e., for each pair of items there is a test in containing exactly one of these items. The objective is to find a minimum size subcollection of , which is still a test cover. The generic parameterized version of Test Cover is denoted by -Test Cover. Here, we...... are given and a positive integer parameter k as input and the objective is to decide whether there is a test cover of size at most . We study four parameterizations for Test Cover and obtain the following: (a) k-Test Cover, and (n - k)-Test Cover are fixed-parameter tractable (FPT), i.e., these problems can...

  19. Parameterization Impacts on Linear Uncertainty Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienen, M. N.; Doherty, J.; Reeves, H. W.; Hunt, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Efficient linear calculation of model prediction uncertainty can be an insightful diagnostic metric for decision-making. Specifically, the contributions of parameter uncertainty or the location and type of data to prediction uncertainty can be used to evaluate which types of information are most valuable. Information that most significantly reduces prediction uncertainty can be considered to have greater worth. Prediction uncertainty is commonly calculated including or excluding specific information and compared to a base scenario. The quantitative difference in uncertainty with or without the information is indicative of that information's worth in the decision-making process. These results can be calculated at many hypothetical locations to guide network design (i.e., where to install new wells/stream gages/etc.) or used to indicate which parameters are the most important to understand thus likely candidates for future characterization work. We examine a hypothetical case in which an inset model is created from a large regional model in order to better represent a surface stream network and make predictions of head near and flux in a stream due to installation and pumping of a large well near a stream headwater. Parameterization and edge boundary conditions are inherited from the regional model, the simple act of refining discretization and stream geometry shows improvement in the representation of the streams. Even visual inspection of the simulated head field highlights the need to recalibrate and potentially re-parametrize the inset model. A network of potential head observations is evaluated and contoured in the shallowest two layers of the six-layer model to assess their worth in both predicting flux at a specific gage, and head at a specific location near the stream. Three hydraulic conductivity parameterization scenarios are evaluated: using a single multiplier on hydraulic conductivity acting on the inherited hydraulic conductivity zonation using; the

  20. A Review of Chemical Bonding Studies: Needs, Aims, Methods of Exploring Students' Conceptions, General Knowledge Claims and Students' Alternative Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Suat; Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper presents a detailed thematic review of chemical bonding studies. To achieve this, a matrix is developed to summarize and present the findings by focusing on insights derived from the related studies. The matrix incorporates the following themes: needs, aims, methods of exploring students' conceptions, general knowledge claims,…

  1. Why alternative teenagers self-harm: exploring the link between non-suicidal self-injury, attempted suicide and adolescent identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert; Sproeber, Nina; Groschwitz, Rebecca C; Preiss, Marthe; Plener, Paul L

    2014-05-22

    The term 'self-harm' encompasses both attempted suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Specific adolescent subpopulations such as ethnic or sexual minorities, and more controversially, those who identify as 'Alternative' (Goth, Emo) have been proposed as being more likely to self-harm, while other groups such as 'Jocks' are linked with protective coping behaviours (for example exercise). NSSI has autonomic (it reduces negative emotions) and social (it communicates distress or facilitates group 'bonding') functions. This study explores the links between such aspects of self-harm, primarily NSSI, and youth subculture. An anonymous survey was carried out of 452 15 year old German school students. Measures included: identification with different youth cultures, i.e. Alternative (Goth, Emo, Punk), Nerd (academic) or Jock (athletic); social background, e.g. socioeconomic status; and experience of victimisation. Self-harm (suicide and NSSI) was assessed using Self-harm Behavior Questionnaire and the Functional Assessment of Self-Mutilation (FASM). An "Alternative" identity was directly (r ≈ 0.3) and a "Jock" identity inversely (r ≈ -0.1) correlated with self-harm. "Alternative" teenagers self-injured more frequently (NSSI 45.5% vs. 18.8%), repeatedly self-injured, and were 4-8 times more likely to attempt suicide (even after adjusting for social background) than their non-Alternative peers. They were also more likely to self-injure for autonomic, communicative and social reasons than other adolescents. About half of 'Alternative' adolescents' self-injure, primarily to regulate emotions and communicate distress. However, a minority self-injure to reinforce their group identity, i.e. 'To feel more a part of a group'.

  2. Lightning parameterization in a storm electrification model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Farley, Richard D.; Wu, Gang

    1988-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in our Storm Electrification Model. The initiation, propagation direction, termination and charge redistribution of the discharge are approximated assuming overall charge neutrality. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred have been done. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges, electric field components and electrical energy depend strongly on the charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge show favorable agreement.

  3. A General Framework for Thermodynamically Consistent Parameterization and Efficient Sampling of Enzymatic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saa, Pedro; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic models provide the means to understand and predict the dynamic behaviour of enzymes upon different perturbations. Despite their obvious advantages, classical parameterizations require large amounts of data to fit their parameters. Particularly, enzymes displaying complex reaction and regulatory (allosteric) mechanisms require a great number of parameters and are therefore often represented by approximate formulae, thereby facilitating the fitting but ignoring many real kinetic behaviours. Here, we show that full exploration of the plausible kinetic space for any enzyme can be achieved using sampling strategies provided a thermodynamically feasible parameterization is used. To this end, we developed a General Reaction Assembly and Sampling Platform (GRASP) capable of consistently parameterizing and sampling accurate kinetic models using minimal reference data. The former integrates the generalized MWC model and the elementary reaction formalism. By formulating the appropriate thermodynamic constraints, our framework enables parameterization of any oligomeric enzyme kinetics without sacrificing complexity or using simplifying assumptions. This thermodynamically safe parameterization relies on the definition of a reference state upon which feasible parameter sets can be efficiently sampled. Uniform sampling of the kinetics space enabled dissecting enzyme catalysis and revealing the impact of thermodynamics on reaction kinetics. Our analysis distinguished three reaction elasticity regions for common biochemical reactions: a steep linear region (0> ΔGr >-2 kJ/mol), a transition region (-2> ΔGr >-20 kJ/mol) and a constant elasticity region (ΔGr model more complex kinetic behaviours such as the monomeric cooperativity of the mammalian glucokinase and the ultrasensitive response of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase of Escherichia coli. In both cases, our approach described appropriately not only the kinetic behaviour of these enzymes, but it also provided

  4. A general framework for thermodynamically consistent parameterization and efficient sampling of enzymatic reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Saa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic models provide the means to understand and predict the dynamic behaviour of enzymes upon different perturbations. Despite their obvious advantages, classical parameterizations require large amounts of data to fit their parameters. Particularly, enzymes displaying complex reaction and regulatory (allosteric mechanisms require a great number of parameters and are therefore often represented by approximate formulae, thereby facilitating the fitting but ignoring many real kinetic behaviours. Here, we show that full exploration of the plausible kinetic space for any enzyme can be achieved using sampling strategies provided a thermodynamically feasible parameterization is used. To this end, we developed a General Reaction Assembly and Sampling Platform (GRASP capable of consistently parameterizing and sampling accurate kinetic models using minimal reference data. The former integrates the generalized MWC model and the elementary reaction formalism. By formulating the appropriate thermodynamic constraints, our framework enables parameterization of any oligomeric enzyme kinetics without sacrificing complexity or using simplifying assumptions. This thermodynamically safe parameterization relies on the definition of a reference state upon which feasible parameter sets can be efficiently sampled. Uniform sampling of the kinetics space enabled dissecting enzyme catalysis and revealing the impact of thermodynamics on reaction kinetics. Our analysis distinguished three reaction elasticity regions for common biochemical reactions: a steep linear region (0> ΔGr >-2 kJ/mol, a transition region (-2> ΔGr >-20 kJ/mol and a constant elasticity region (ΔGr <-20 kJ/mol. We also applied this framework to model more complex kinetic behaviours such as the monomeric cooperativity of the mammalian glucokinase and the ultrasensitive response of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase of Escherichia coli. In both cases, our approach described appropriately not only

  5. Exploration of peptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K protease by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Eighteen tripeptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K were discovered by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation. The 18 tripeptides fit the active site better than the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, and a better inhibitor of cathepsin K could be designed considering these tripeptides. Among the 18 tripeptides, Phe-Arg-Asp and Tyr-Arg-Asp fit the active site the best and their structural similarity should be considered in the design process. Interesting factors emerged from the structure of the decision tree, and its structural information will guide exploration of potential inhibitor molecules for proteases.

  6. A subgrid parameterization scheme for precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Turner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With increasing computing power, the horizontal resolution of numerical weather prediction (NWP models is improving and today reaches 1 to 5 km. Nevertheless, clouds and precipitation formation are still subgrid scale processes for most cloud types, such as cumulus and stratocumulus. Subgrid scale parameterizations for water vapor condensation have been in use for many years and are based on a prescribed probability density function (PDF of relative humidity spatial variability within the model grid box, thus providing a diagnosis of the cloud fraction. A similar scheme is developed and tested here. It is based on a prescribed PDF of cloud water variability and a threshold value of liquid water content for droplet collection to derive a rain fraction within the model grid. Precipitation of rainwater raises additional concerns relative to the overlap of cloud and rain fractions, however. The scheme is developed following an analysis of data collected during field campaigns in stratocumulus (DYCOMS-II and fair weather cumulus (RICO and tested in a 1-D framework against large eddy simulations of these observed cases. The new parameterization is then implemented in a 3-D NWP model with a horizontal resolution of 2.5 km to simulate real cases of precipitating cloud systems over France.

  7. A natural spline interpolation and exponential parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozera, R.; Wilkołazka, M.

    2016-06-01

    We consider here a natural spline interpolation based on reduced data and the so-called exponential parameterization (depending on parameter λ ∈ [0, 1]). In particular, the latter is studied in the context of the trajectory approximation in arbitrary euclidean space. The term reduced data refers to an ordered collection of interpolation points without provision of the corresponding knots. The numerical verification of the intrinsic asymptotics α(λ) in γ approximation by natural spline γ^3'N is conducted here for regular and sufficiently smooth curve γ sampled more-or-less uniformly. We select in this paper the substitutes for the missing knots according to the exponential parameterization. The outcomes of the numerical tests manifest sharp linear convergence orders α(λ) = 1, for all λ ∈ [0, 1). In addition, the latter results in unexpected left-hand side dis-continuity at λ = 1, since as shown again here a sharp quadratic order α(1) = 2 prevails. Remarkably, the case of α(1)=2 (derived for reduced data) coincides with the well-known asymptotics established for a natural spline to fit non-reduced data determined by the sequence of interpolation points supplemented with the corresponding knots (see e.g. [1]).

  8. Parameterized Metatheory for Continuous Markovian Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim G. Larsen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that a classic metalogical framework, including all Boolean operators, can be used to support the development of a metric behavioural theory for Markov processes. Previously, only intuitionistic frameworks or frameworks without negation and logical implication have been developed to fulfill this task. The focus of this paper is on continuous Markovian logic (CML, a logic that characterizes stochastic bisimulation of Markov processes with an arbitrary measurable state space and continuous-time transitions. For a parameter epsilon>0 interpreted as observational error, we introduce an epsilon-parameterized metatheory for CML: we define the concepts of epsilon-satisfiability and epsilon-provability related by a sound and complete axiomatization and prove a series of "parameterized" metatheorems including decidability, weak completeness and finite model property. We also prove results regarding the relations between metalogical concepts defined for different parameters. Using this framework, we can characterize both the stochastic bisimulation relation and various observational preorders based on behavioural pseudometrics. The main contribution of this paper is proving that all these analyses can actually be done using a unified complete Boolean framework. This extends the state of the art in this field, since the related works only propose intuitionistic contexts that limit, for instance, the use of the Boolean logical implication.

  9. A new parameterization of spectral and broadband ocean surface albedo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Qiao, Yanli; Wang, Yingjian; Fang, Yonghua; Yi, Weining

    2011-12-19

    A simple yet accurate parameterization of spectral and broadband ocean surface albedo has been developed. To facilitate the parameterization and its applications, the albedo is parameterized for the direct and diffuse incident radiation separately, and then each of them is further divided into two components: the contributions from surface and water, respectively. The four albedo components are independent of each other, hence, altering one will not affect the others. Such a designed parameterization scheme is flexible for any future update. Users can simply replace any of the adopted empirical formulations (e.g., the relationship between foam reflectance and wind speed) as desired without a need to change the parameterization scheme. The parameterization is validated by in situ measurements and can be easily implemented into a climate or radiative transfer model.

  10. Sustainable Ammonia Synthesis – Exploring the scientific challenges associated with discovering alternative, sustainable processes for ammonia production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nørskov, Jens [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); ; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Miranda, Raul [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science; Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science; Stack, Robert [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2016-02-18

    Ammonia (NH3) is essential to all life on our planet. Until about 100 years ago, NH3 produced by reduction of dinitrogen (N2) in air came almost exclusively from bacteria containing the enzyme nitrogenase.. DOE convened a roundtable of experts on February 18, 2016. Participants in the Roundtable discussions concluded that the scientific basis for sustainable processes for ammonia synthesis is currently lacking, and it needs to be enhanced substantially before it can form the foundation for alternative processes. The Roundtable Panel identified an overarching grand challenge and several additional scientific grand challenges and research opportunities: -Discovery of active, selective, scalable, long-lived catalysts for sustainable ammonia synthesis. -Development of relatively low pressure (<10 atm) and relatively low temperature (<200 C) thermal processes. -Integration of knowledge from nature (enzyme catalysis), molecular/homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. -Development of electrochemical and photochemical routes for N2 reduction based on proton and electron transfer -Development of biochemical routes to N2 reduction -Development of chemical looping (solar thermochemical) approaches -Identification of descriptors of catalytic activity using a combination of theory and experiments -Characterization of surface adsorbates and catalyst structures (chemical, physical and electronic) under conditions relevant to ammonia synthesis.

  11. Exploring the use of two-dimensional piecewise-linear functions as an alternative model for representing and processing grayscale-images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Manuel Jimenez-Fernandez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, a grayscale image is represented as a rectangular array whose internal values describe a discrete level of intensity or luminance denoted as pixel. Due to its structure and complete compatibility with matrix operators, this representation is the most widely used in image processing. Although the strong robustness of this standard is not in question, it is always enriching to have an alternative description format in order to provide not only a different image representation scheme but also an additional approach to image processing. Motivated by this fact, in this paper the viability of using continuous piecewise-linear functions of two spatial variables as an alternative model description of grayscale images is explored. Moreover, the possibility of applying this type of representation in image processing is also examined by using mapping variable transformations, here denominated as functional filters. Furthermore, it is also shown that such alternative image model can also be used in more complex tasks like tridimensional volume estimation. To verify this proposal, illustrative examples are reported, showing not only an inherent improvement in the visual perception of image, but also a practical image processing capability.

  12. Examining Chaotic Convection with Super-Parameterization Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Todd R.

    This study investigates a variety of features present in a new configuration of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) variant, SP-CAM 2.0. The new configuration (multiple-parameterization-CAM, MP-CAM) changes the manner in which the super-parameterization (SP) concept represents physical tendency feedbacks to the large-scale by using the mean of 10 independent two-dimensional cloud-permitting model (CPM) curtains in each global model column instead of the conventional single CPM curtain. The climates of the SP and MP configurations are examined to investigate any significant differences caused by the application of convective physical tendencies that are more deterministic in nature, paying particular attention to extreme precipitation events and large-scale weather systems, such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). A number of small but significant changes in the mean state climate are uncovered, and it is found that the new formulation degrades MJO performance. Despite these deficiencies, the ensemble of possible realizations of convective states in the MP configuration allows for analysis of uncertainty in the small-scale solution, lending to examination of those weather regimes and physical mechanisms associated with strong, chaotic convection. Methods of quantifying precipitation predictability are explored, and use of the most reliable of these leads to the conclusion that poor precipitation predictability is most directly related to the proximity of the global climate model column state to atmospheric critical points. Secondarily, the predictability is tied to the availability of potential convective energy, the presence of mesoscale convective organization on the CPM grid, and the directive power of the large-scale.

  13. Exploring the Predictive Validity of the Susceptibility to Smoking Construct for Tobacco Cigarettes, Alternative Tobacco Products, and E-Cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Adam G; Kennedy, Ryan David; Chaurasia, Ashok; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2017-12-06

    Within tobacco prevention programming, it is useful to identify youth that are at risk for experimenting with various tobacco products and e-cigarettes. The susceptibility to smoking construct is a simple method to identify never-smoking students that are less committed to remaining smoke-free. However, the predictive validity of this construct has not been tested within the Canadian context or for the use of other tobacco products and e-cigarettes. This study used a large, longitudinal sample of secondary school students that reported never using tobacco cigarettes and non-current use of alternative tobacco products or e-cigarettes at baseline in Ontario, Canada. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the susceptibility construct for predicting tobacco cigarette, e-cigarette, cigarillo or little cigar, cigar, hookah, and smokeless tobacco use one and two years after baseline measurement were calculated. At baseline, 29.4% of the sample was susceptible to future tobacco product or e-cigarette use. The sensitivity of the construct ranged from 43.2% (smokeless tobacco) to 59.5% (tobacco cigarettes), the specificity ranged from 70.9% (smokeless tobacco) to 75.9% (tobacco cigarettes), and the positive predictive value ranged from 2.6% (smokeless tobacco) to 32.2% (tobacco cigarettes). Similar values were calculated for each measure of the susceptibility construct. A significant number of youth that did not currently use tobacco products or e-cigarettes at baseline reported using tobacco products and e-cigarettes over a two-year follow-up period. The predictive validity of the susceptibility construct was high and the construct can be used to predict other tobacco product and e-cigarette use among youth. This study presents the predictive validity of the susceptibility construct for the use of tobacco cigarettes among secondary school students in Ontario, Canada. It also presents a novel use of the susceptibility construct for

  14. Evaluation of cloudiness and snowfall simulated by a semi-spectral and a bulk-parameterization scheme of cloud microphysics for the passage of a Baltic heat cyclone

    OpenAIRE

    Raabe, Armin; Mölders, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The differences in the concepts of two different parameterizations of cloud microphysics are analyzed. Simulations alternatively applying these parameterizations are performed for a Baltic heat cyclone event. The results of the simulations are compared to each other as well as to observed distributions of cloudiness and snowfall. The main differences between the simulated distributions result from the assumptions on ice, the ice classes, and size distributions of the cloud and precipitating p...

  15. Exploration and validation of alternate sensing methods for wearable continuous pulse transit time measurement using optical and bioimpedance modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Bassem; Nathan, Viswam; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2017-07-01

    In this work we explore the viability of a multimodal sensing device that can be integrated in a wearable form factor for daily, non-invasive ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring. A common approach in previous research has been to rely on measuring the pulse transit time (PTT), which has been shown to be correlated with the BP. In this work, we look into the feasibility of measuring PTT using sensors separated by a small distance on one arm so that any eventual realization of the system is convenient to wear and use over long periods of time. Moreover, we investigate the combined use of two different modalities for cardiovascular measurement: the optical photoplethysmogram (PPG) as well as the bio-potential based impedance (Bio-Z) measurement. These two modalities have been previously only studied on their own or in conjunction with the electrocardiogram (ECG) for the purpose of estimating PTT. We measure the PTT from the wrist to the finger using Bio-Z and PPG sensors, and compare it to the conventional PTT measured from the ECG to PPG at the finger, in order to prove that it can be an effective replacement for existing PTT measurement strategies. Moreover, successful measurement of PTT with two different modalities of sensors at close proximity will allow designs with multiple heterogeneous sensors on a more versatile wearable sensing platform that is optimized for power and is more robust to environmental or skin contact changes. This will enable the next generation of smart watches that capture PTT and BP. Experiments were conducted in vivo with simultaneous ECG, Bio-Z and PPG sensors, and results indicate that the PTT calculated from the Bio-Z and PPG sensors placed at a close distance correlates well with the more established PTT measurement using the ECG in conjunction with PPG, with correlation coefficient as high as 0.92.

  16. Climate impacts of parameterized Nordic Sea overflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Large, William G.; Briegleb, Bruce P.

    2010-11-01

    A new overflow parameterization (OFP) of density-driven flows through ocean ridges via narrow, unresolved channels has been developed and implemented in the ocean component of the Community Climate System Model version 4. It represents exchanges from the Nordic Seas and the Antarctic shelves, associated entrainment, and subsequent injection of overflow product waters into the abyssal basins. We investigate the effects of the parameterized Denmark Strait (DS) and Faroe Bank Channel (FBC) overflows on the ocean circulation, showing their impacts on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and the North Atlantic climate. The OFP is based on the Marginal Sea Boundary Condition scheme of Price and Yang (1998), but there are significant differences that are described in detail. Two uncoupled (ocean-only) and two fully coupled simulations are analyzed. Each pair consists of one case with the OFP and a control case without this parameterization. In both uncoupled and coupled experiments, the parameterized DS and FBC source volume transports are within the range of observed estimates. The entrainment volume transports remain lower than observational estimates, leading to lower than observed product volume transports. Due to low entrainment, the product and source water properties are too similar. The DS and FBC overflow temperature and salinity properties are in better agreement with observations in the uncoupled case than in the coupled simulation, likely reflecting surface flux differences. The most significant impact of the OFP is the improved North Atlantic Deep Water penetration depth, leading to a much better comparison with the observational data and significantly reducing the chronic, shallow penetration depth bias in level coordinate models. This improvement is due to the deeper penetration of the southward flowing Deep Western Boundary Current. In comparison with control experiments without the OFP, the abyssal ventilation rates increase in the North

  17. Optika : a GUI framework for parameterized applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusbaum, Kurtis L.

    2011-06-01

    In the field of scientific computing there are many specialized programs designed for specific applications in areas such as biology, chemistry, and physics. These applications are often very powerful and extraordinarily useful in their respective domains. However, some suffer from a common problem: a non-intuitive, poorly-designed user interface. The purpose of Optika is to address this problem and provide a simple, viable solution. Using only a list of parameters passed to it, Optika can dynamically generate a GUI. This allows the user to specify parameters values in a fashion that is much more intuitive than the traditional 'input decks' used by some parameterized scientific applications. By leveraging the power of Optika, these scientific applications will become more accessible and thus allow their designers to reach a much wider audience while requiring minimal extra development effort.

  18. Cumulus parameterizations in chemical transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahowald, Natalie M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1995-12-01

    Global three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs) are valuable tools for studying processes controlling the distribution of trace constituents in the atmosphere. A major uncertainty in these models is the subgrid-scale parametrization of transport by cumulus convection. This study seeks to define the range of behavior of moist convective schemes and point toward more reliable formulations for inclusion in chemical transport models. The emphasis is on deriving convective transport from meteorological data sets (such as those from the forecast centers) which do not routinely include convective mass fluxes. Seven moist convective parameterizations are compared in a column model to examine the sensitivity of the vertical profile of trace gases to the parameterization used in a global chemical transport model. The moist convective schemes examined are the Emanuel scheme [Emanuel, 1991], the Feichter-Crutzen scheme [Feichter and Crutzen, 1990], the inverse thermodynamic scheme (described in this paper), two versions of a scheme suggested by Hack [Hack, 1994], and two versions of a scheme suggested by Tiedtke (one following the formulation used in the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting) and ECHAM3 (European Centre and Hamburg Max-Planck-Institut) models [Tiedtke, 1989], and one formulated as in the TM2 (Transport Model-2) model (M. Heimann, personal communication, 1992). These convective schemes vary in the closure used to derive the mass fluxes, as well as the cloud model formulation, giving a broad range of results. In addition, two boundary layer schemes are compared: a state-of-the-art nonlocal boundary layer scheme [Holtslag and Boville, 1993] and a simple adiabatic mixing scheme described in this paper. Three tests are used to compare the moist convective schemes against observations. Although the tests conducted here cannot conclusively show that one parameterization is better than the others, the tests are a good measure of the

  19. Parameterization of MARVELS Spectra Using Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilda, Sankalp; Ge, Jian; MARVELS

    2018-01-01

    Like many large-scale surveys, the Multi-Object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) was designed to operate at a moderate spectral resolution ($\\sim$12,000) for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar parameterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Two extant solutions to deal with this issue are to utilize spectral synthesis, and to utilize spectral indices [Ghezzi et al. 2014]. While the former is a powerful and tested technique, it can often yield strongly coupled atmospheric parameters, and often requires high spectral resolution (Valenti & Piskunov 1996). The latter, though a promising technique utilizing measurements of equivalent widths of spectral indices, has only been employed with respect to FKG dwarfs and sub-giants and not red-giant branch stars, which constitute ~30% of MARVELS targets. In this work, we tackle this problem using a convolution neural network (CNN). In particular, we train a one-dimensional CNN on appropriately processed PHOENIX synthetic spectra using supervised training to automatically distinguish the features relevant for the determination of each of the three atmospheric parameters – T_eff, log(g), [Fe/H] – and use the knowledge thus gained by the network to parameterize 849 MARVELS giants. When tested on the synthetic spectra themselves, our estimates of the parameters were consistent to within 11 K, .02 dex, and .02 dex (in terms of mean absolute errors), respectively. For MARVELS dwarfs, the accuracies are 80K, .16 dex and .10 dex, respectively.

  20. Exploration of a capability-focused aerospace system of systems architecture alternative with bilayer design space, based on RST-SOM algorithmic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhifei; Qin, Dongliang; Yang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    In defense related programs, the use of capability-based analysis, design, and acquisition has been significant. In order to confront one of the most challenging features of a huge design space in capability based analysis (CBA), a literature review of design space exploration was first examined. Then, in the process of an aerospace system of systems design space exploration, a bilayer mapping method was put forward, based on the existing experimental and operating data. Finally, the feasibility of the foregoing approach was demonstrated with an illustrative example. With the data mining RST (rough sets theory) and SOM (self-organized mapping) techniques, the alternative to the aerospace system of systems architecture was mapping from P-space (performance space) to C-space (configuration space), and then from C-space to D-space (design space), respectively. Ultimately, the performance space was mapped to the design space, which completed the exploration and preliminary reduction of the entire design space. This method provides a computational analysis and implementation scheme for large-scale simulation.

  1. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice

  2. Parameterized logarithmic framework for image enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos; Zhou, Yicong; Wharton, Eric J

    2011-04-01

    Image processing technologies such as image enhancement generally utilize linear arithmetic operations to manipulate images. Recently, Jourlin and Pinoli successfully used the logarithmic image processing (LIP) model for several applications of image processing such as image enhancement and segmentation. In this paper, we introduce a parameterized LIP (PLIP) model that spans both the linear arithmetic and LIP operations and all scenarios in between within a single unified model. We also introduce both frequency- and spatial-domain PLIP-based image enhancement methods, including the PLIP Lee's algorithm, PLIP bihistogram equalization, and the PLIP alpha rooting. Computer simulations and comparisons demonstrate that the new PLIP model allows the user to obtain improved enhancement performance by changing only the PLIP parameters, to yield better image fusion results by utilizing the PLIP addition or image multiplication, to represent a larger span of cases than the LIP and linear arithmetic cases by changing parameters, and to utilize and illustrate the logarithmic exponential operation for image fusion and enhancement.

  3. Phenomenology of convection-parameterization closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-I. Yano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Closure is a problem of defining the convective intensity in a given parameterization. In spite of many years of efforts and progress, it is still considered an overall unresolved problem. The present article reviews this problem from phenomenological perspectives. The physical variables that may contribute in defining the convective intensity are listed, and their statistical significances identified by observational data analyses are reviewed. A possibility is discussed for identifying a correct closure hypothesis by performing a linear stability analysis of tropical convectively coupled waves with various different closure hypotheses. Various individual theoretical issues are considered from various different perspectives. The review also emphasizes that the dominant physical factors controlling convection differ between the tropics and extra-tropics, as well as between oceanic and land areas. Both observational as well as theoretical analyses, often focused on the tropics, do not necessarily lead to conclusions consistent with our operational experiences focused on midlatitudes. Though we emphasize the importance of the interplays between these observational, theoretical and operational perspectives, we also face challenges for establishing a solid research framework that is universally applicable. An energy cycle framework is suggested as such a candidate.

  4. Stellar Atmospheric Parameterization Based on Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ru-yang; Li, Xiang-ru

    2017-07-01

    Deep learning is a typical learning method widely studied in the fields of machine learning, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence. This work investigates the problem of stellar atmospheric parameterization by constructing a deep neural network with five layers, and the node number in each layer of the network is respectively 3821-500-100-50-1. The proposed scheme is verified on both the real spectra measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the theoretic spectra computed with the Kurucz's New Opacity Distribution Function (NEWODF) model, to make an automatic estimation for three physical parameters: the effective temperature (Teff), surface gravitational acceleration (lg g), and metallic abundance (Fe/H). The results show that the stacked autoencoder deep neural network has a better accuracy for the estimation. On the SDSS spectra, the mean absolute errors (MAEs) are 79.95 for Teff/K, 0.0058 for (lg Teff/K), 0.1706 for lg (g/(cm·s-2)), and 0.1294 dex for the [Fe/H], respectively; On the theoretic spectra, the MAEs are 15.34 for Teff/K, 0.0011 for lg (Teff/K), 0.0214 for lg(g/(cm · s-2)), and 0.0121 dex for [Fe/H], respectively.

  5. Approximability and Parameterized Complexity of Minmax Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2008-01-01

    We consider approximating the minmax value of a multi player game in strategic form. Tightening recent bounds by Borgs et al., we observe that approximating the value with a precision of ε log n digits (for any constant ε > 0) is NP-hard, where n is the size of the game. On the other hand......, approximating the value with a precision of c log log n digits (for any constant c ≥ 1) can be done in quasi-polynomial time. We consider the parameterized complexity of the problem, with the parameter being the number of pure strategies k of the player for which the minmax value is computed. We show...... that if there are three players, k = 2 and there are only two possible rational payoffs, the minmax value is a rational number and can be computed exactly in linear time. In the general case, we show that the value can be approximated wigh any polynomial number of digits of accuracy in time n^O(k) . On the other hand, we...

  6. Parameterizing loop fusion for automated empirical tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Y; Yi, Q; Kennedy, K; Quinlan, D; Vuduc, R

    2005-12-15

    Traditional compilers are limited in their ability to optimize applications for different architectures because statically modeling the effect of specific optimizations on different hardware implementations is difficult. Recent research has been addressing this issue through the use of empirical tuning, which uses trial executions to determine the optimization parameters that are most effective on a particular hardware platform. In this paper, we investigate empirical tuning of loop fusion, an important transformation for optimizing a significant class of real-world applications. In spite of its usefulness, fusion has attracted little attention from previous empirical tuning research, partially because it is much harder to configure than transformations like loop blocking and unrolling. This paper presents novel compiler techniques that extend conventional fusion algorithms to parameterize their output when optimizing a computation, thus allowing the compiler to formulate the entire configuration space for loop fusion using a sequence of integer parameters. The compiler can then employ an external empirical search engine to find the optimal operating point within the space of legal fusion configurations and generate the final optimized code using a simple code transformation system. We have implemented our approach within our compiler infrastructure and conducted preliminary experiments using a simple empirical search strategy. Our results convey new insights on the interaction of loop fusion with limited hardware resources, such as available registers, while confirming conventional wisdom about the effectiveness of loop fusion in improving application performance.

  7. Brain Surface Conformal Parameterization Using Riemann Surface Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalin; Lui, Lok Ming; Gu, Xianfeng; Hayashi, Kiralee M.; Chan, Tony F.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2011-01-01

    In medical imaging, parameterized 3-D surface models are useful for anatomical modeling and visualization, statistical comparisons of anatomy, and surface-based registration and signal processing. Here we introduce a parameterization method based on Riemann surface structure, which uses a special curvilinear net structure (conformal net) to partition the surface into a set of patches that can each be conformally mapped to a parallelogram. The resulting surface subdivision and the parameterizations of the components are intrinsic and stable (their solutions tend to be smooth functions and the boundary conditions of the Dirichlet problem can be enforced). Conformal parameterization also helps transform partial differential equations (PDEs) that may be defined on 3-D brain surface manifolds to modified PDEs on a two-dimensional parameter domain. Since the Jacobian matrix of a conformal parameterization is diagonal, the modified PDE on the parameter domain is readily solved. To illustrate our techniques, we computed parameterizations for several types of anatomical surfaces in 3-D magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampi, and lateral ventricles. For surfaces that are topologically homeomorphic to each other and have similar geometrical structures, we show that the parameterization results are consistent and the subdivided surfaces can be matched to each other. Finally, we present an automatic sulcal landmark location algorithm by solving PDEs on cortical surfaces. The landmark detection results are used as constraints for building conformal maps between surfaces that also match explicitly defined landmarks. PMID:17679336

  8. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dana E. Veron

    2012-04-09

    This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

  9. Why alternative teenagers self-harm: exploring the link between non-suicidal self-injury, attempted suicide and adolescent identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The term ‘self-harm’ encompasses both attempted suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Specific adolescent subpopulations such as ethnic or sexual minorities, and more controversially, those who identify as ‘Alternative’ (Goth, Emo) have been proposed as being more likely to self-harm, while other groups such as ‘Jocks’ are linked with protective coping behaviours (for example exercise). NSSI has autonomic (it reduces negative emotions) and social (it communicates distress or facilitates group ‘bonding’) functions. This study explores the links between such aspects of self-harm, primarily NSSI, and youth subculture. Methods An anonymous survey was carried out of 452 15 year old German school students. Measures included: identification with different youth cultures, i.e. Alternative (Goth, Emo, Punk), Nerd (academic) or Jock (athletic); social background, e.g. socioeconomic status; and experience of victimisation. Self-harm (suicide and NSSI) was assessed using Self-harm Behavior Questionnaire and the Functional Assessment of Self-Mutilation (FASM). Results An “Alternative” identity was directly (r ≈ 0.3) and a “Jock” identity inversely (r ≈ -0.1) correlated with self-harm. “Alternative” teenagers self-injured more frequently (NSSI 45.5% vs. 18.8%), repeatedly self-injured, and were 4–8 times more likely to attempt suicide (even after adjusting for social background) than their non-Alternative peers. They were also more likely to self-injure for autonomic, communicative and social reasons than other adolescents. Conclusions About half of ‘Alternative’ adolescents’ self-injure, primarily to regulate emotions and communicate distress. However, a minority self-injure to reinforce their group identity, i.e. ‘To feel more a part of a group’. PMID:24885081

  10. Comparative study of transient hydraulic tomography with varying parameterizations and zonations: Laboratory sandbox investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ning; Zhao, Zhanfeng; Illman, Walter A.; Berg, Steven J.

    2017-11-01

    Transient hydraulic tomography (THT) is a robust method of aquifer characterization to estimate the spatial distributions (or tomograms) of both hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss). However, the highly-parameterized nature of the geostatistical inversion approach renders it computationally intensive for large-scale investigations. In addition, geostatistics-based THT may produce overly smooth tomograms when head data used to constrain the inversion is limited. Therefore, alternative model conceptualizations for THT need to be examined. To investigate this, we simultaneously calibrated different groundwater models with varying parameterizations and zonations using two cases of different pumping and monitoring data densities from a laboratory sandbox. Specifically, one effective parameter model, four geology-based zonation models with varying accuracy and resolution, and five geostatistical models with different prior information are calibrated. Model performance is quantitatively assessed by examining the calibration and validation results. Our study reveals that highly parameterized geostatistical models perform the best among the models compared, while the zonation model with excellent knowledge of stratigraphy also yields comparable results. When few pumping tests with sparse monitoring intervals are available, the incorporation of accurate or simplified geological information into geostatistical models reveals more details in heterogeneity and yields more robust validation results. However, results deteriorate when inaccurate geological information are incorporated. Finally, our study reveals that transient inversions are necessary to obtain reliable K and Ss estimates for making accurate predictions of transient drawdown events.

  11. Parameterization of cirrus optical depth and cloud fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soden, B. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This research illustrates the utility of combining satellite observations and operational analysis for the evaluation of parameterizations. A parameterization based on ice water path (IWP) captures the observed spatial patterns of tropical cirrus optical depth. The strong temperature dependence of cirrus ice water path in both the observations and the parameterization is probably responsible for the good correlation where it exists. Poorer agreement is found in Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes where the temperature dependence breaks down. Uncertainties in effective radius limit quantitative validation of the parameterization (and its inclusion into GCMs). Also, it is found that monthly mean cloud cover can be predicted within an RMS error of 10% using ECMWF relative humidity corrected by TOVS Upper Troposphere Humidity. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  12. Parameterization adaption for 3D shape optimization in aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badr Abou El Majd

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available When solving a PDE problem numerically, a certain mesh-refinement process is always implicit, and very classically, mesh adaptivity is a very effective means to accelerate grid convergence. Similarly, when optimizing a shape by means of an explicit geometrical representation, it is natural to seek for an analogous concept of parameterization adaptivity. We propose here an adaptive parameterization for three-dimensional optimum design in aerodynamics by using the so-called “Free-Form Deformation” approach based on 3D tensorial Bézier parameterization. The proposed procedure leads to efficient numerical simulations with highly reduced computational costs.[How to cite this article:  Majd, B.A.. 2014. Parameterization adaption for 3D shape optimization in aerodynamics. International Journal of Science and Engineering, 6(1:61-69. Doi: 10.12777/ijse.6.1.61-69

  13. Refreezing on the Greenland ice sheet: a comparison of parameterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Reijmer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Retention and refreezing of meltwater are acknowledged to be important processes for the mass budget of polar glaciers and ice sheets. Several parameterizations of these processes exist for use in energy and mass balance models. Due to a lack of direct observations, validation of these parameterizations is difficult. In this study we compare a set of 6 refreezing parameterizations against output of two Regional Climate Models (RCMs coupled to an energy balance snow model, the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO2 and the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR, applied to the Greenland ice sheet. In both RCMs, refreezing is explicitly calculated in a snow model that calculates vertical profiles of temperature, density and liquid water content. Between RACMO2 and MAR, the ice sheet-integrated amount of refreezing differs by only 4.9 mm w.e yr−1 (4.5 %, and the temporal and spatial variability are very similar. For consistency, the parameterizations are forced with output (surface temperature, precipitation and melt of the RCMs. For the ice sheet-integrated amount of refreezing and its inter-annual variations, all parameterizations give similar results, especially after some tuning. However, the spatial distributions differ significantly and the spatial correspondence between the RCMs is better than with any of the parameterizations. Results are especially sensitive to the choice of the depth of the thermally active layer, which determines the cold content of the snow in most parameterizations. These results are independent of which RCM is used to force the parameterizations.

  14. Exploring Alternative Radiolabeling Strategies for Sialic Acid-Binding Immunoglobulin-Like Lectin 9 Peptide: [68Ga]Ga- and [18F]AlF-NOTA-Siglec-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olli Moisio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid residues 283–297 from sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9 form a cyclic peptide ligand targeting vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1. VAP-1 is associated with the transfer of leukocytes from blood to tissues upon inflammation. Therefore, analogs of Siglec-9 peptide are good candidates for visualizing inflammation non-invasively using positron emission tomography (PET. Gallium-68-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N′,N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA-conjugated Siglec-9 has been evaluated extensively for this purpose. Here, we explored two alternative strategies for radiolabeling Siglec-9 peptide using a 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-triacetic acid (NOTA-chelator to bind [68Ga]Ga or [18F]AlF. The radioligands were evaluated by in vivo PET imaging and ex vivo γ-counting of turpentine-induced sterile skin/muscle inflammation in Sprague-Dawley rats. Both tracers showed clear accumulation in the inflamed tissues. The whole-body biodistribution patterns of the tracers were similar.

  15. Symmetrical Parameterization of Rigid Body Transformations for Biomolecular Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Seob; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2018-01-01

    Assessing preferred relative rigid body position and orientation is important in the description of biomolecular structures (such as proteins) and their interactions. In this article, we extend and apply the "symmetrical parameterization," which we recently introduced in the kinematics community, to address problems in structural biology. We also review parameterization methods that are widely used in structural biology to describe relative rigid body motions (in particular, orientations) as a basis for comparison. The new symmetrical parameterization is useful in describing the relative biomolecular rigid body motions, where the parameters are symmetrical in the sense that the subunits of a complex biomolecular structure are described in the same way for the corresponding motion and its inverse. The properties of this new parameterization, singularity analysis, and inverse kinematics are also investigated in more detail. Finally, parameterization is applied to real biomolecular structures and a potential application to structure modeling of symmetric macromolecules to show the efficacy of the symmetrical parameterization in the field of computational structural biology.

  16. Algorithmic parameterization of mixed treatment comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Valkenhoef, Gert; Tervonen, Tommi; de Brock, Bert; Hillege, Hans

    Mixed Treatment Comparisons (MTCs) enable the simultaneous meta-analysis (data pooling) of networks of clinical trials comparing a parts per thousand yen2 alternative treatments. Inconsistency models are critical in MTC to assess the overall consistency between evidence sources. Only in the absence

  17. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclones to Parameterized Convection in the NASA GEOS5 Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Reale, Oreste; Lee, Myong-In; Molod, Andrea M.; Suarez, Max J.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of tropical cyclones (TCs) to changes in parameterized convection is investigated to improve the simulation of TCs in the North Atlantic. Specifically, the impact of reducing the influence of the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert (RAS) scheme-based parameterized convection is explored using the Goddard Earth Observing System version5 (GEOS5) model at 0.25 horizontal resolution. The years 2005 and 2006 characterized by very active and inactive hurricane seasons, respectively, are selected for simulation. A reduction in parameterized deep convection results in an increase in TC activity (e.g., TC number and longer life cycle) to more realistic levels compared to the baseline control configuration. The vertical and horizontal structure of the strongest simulated hurricane shows the maximum lower-level (850-950hPa) wind speed greater than 60 ms and the minimum sea level pressure reaching 940mb, corresponding to a category 4 hurricane - a category never achieved by the control configuration. The radius of the maximum wind of 50km, the location of the warm core exceeding 10 C, and the horizontal compactness of the hurricane center are all quite realistic without any negatively affecting the atmospheric mean state. This study reveals that an increase in the threshold of minimum entrainment suppresses parameterized deep convection by entraining more dry air into the typical plume. This leads to cooling and drying at the mid- to upper-troposphere, along with the positive latent heat flux and moistening in the lower-troposphere. The resulting increase in conditional instability provides an environment that is more conducive to TC vortex development and upward moisture flux convergence by dynamically resolved moist convection, thereby increasing TC activity.

  18. A Flexible Parameterization for Shortwave Optical Properties of Ice Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDiedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Cairns, Brian; Fridlind, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    A parameterization is presented that provides extinction cross section sigma (sub e), single-scattering albedo omega, and asymmetry parameter (g) of ice crystals for any combination of volume, projected area, aspect ratio, and crystal distortion at any wavelength in the shortwave. Similar to previous parameterizations, the scheme makes use of geometric optics approximations and the observation that optical properties of complex, aggregated ice crystals can be well approximated by those of single hexagonal crystals with varying size, aspect ratio, and distortion levels. In the standard geometric optics implementation used here, sigma (sub e) is always twice the particle projected area. It is shown that omega is largely determined by the newly defined absorption size parameter and the particle aspect ratio. These dependences are parameterized using a combination of exponential, lognormal, and polynomial functions. The variation of (g) with aspect ratio and crystal distortion is parameterized for one reference wavelength using a combination of several polynomials. The dependences of g on refractive index and omega are investigated and factors are determined to scale the parameterized (g) to provide values appropriate for other wavelengths. The parameterization scheme consists of only 88 coefficients. The scheme is tested for a large variety of hexagonal crystals in several wavelength bands from 0.2 to 4 micron, revealing absolute differences with reference calculations of omega and (g) that are both generally below 0.015. Over a large variety of cloud conditions, the resulting root-mean-squared differences with reference calculations of cloud reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance are 1.4%, 1.1%, and 3.4%, respectively. Some practical applications of the parameterization in atmospheric models are highlighted.

  19. An analysis of MM5 sensitivity to different parameterizations for high-resolution climate simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüeso, D.; Hidalgo-Muñoz, J. M.; Gámiz-Fortis, S. R.; Esteban-Parra, M. J.; Castro-Díez, Y.

    2009-04-01

    An evaluation of MM5 mesoscale model sensitivity to different parameterizations schemes is presented in terms of temperature and precipitation for high-resolution integrations over Andalusia (South of Spain). As initial and boundary conditions ERA-40 Reanalysis data are used. Two domains were used, a coarse one with dimensions of 55 by 60 grid points with spacing of 30 km and a nested domain of 48 by 72 grid points grid spaced 10 km. Coarse domain fully covers Iberian Peninsula and Andalusia fits loosely in the finer one. In addition to parameterization tests, two dynamical downscaling techniques have been applied in order to examine the influence of initial conditions on RCM long-term studies. Regional climate studies usually employ continuous integration for the period under survey, initializing atmospheric fields only at the starting point and feeding boundary conditions regularly. An alternative approach is based on frequent re-initialization of atmospheric fields; hence the simulation is divided in several independent integrations. Altogether, 20 simulations have been performed using varying physics options, of which 4 were fulfilled applying the re-initialization technique. Surface temperature and accumulated precipitation (daily and monthly scale) were analyzed for a 5-year period covering from 1990 to 1994. Results have been compared with daily observational data series from 110 stations for temperature and 95 for precipitation Both daily and monthly average temperatures are generally well represented by the model. Conversely, daily precipitation results present larger deviations from observational data. However, noticeable accuracy is gained when comparing with monthly precipitation observations. There are some especially conflictive subregions where precipitation is scarcely captured, such as the Southeast of the Iberian Peninsula, mainly due to its extremely convective nature. Regarding parameterization schemes performance, every set provides very

  20. The parameterization of wave-particle interactions in the Outer Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Clare E. J.; Rae, I. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Anekallu, C.; Bentley, S. N.; Forsyth, C.

    2017-09-01

    We explore the use of mean value empirical wave models in diffusion models of the Outer Radiation Belt. We show that magnetospheric wave power is not normally distributed in time and that geomagnetic activity does not provide a deterministic proxy for the temporal variability of wave activity. Our findings indicate that current diffusion models significantly overestimate the action of wave-particle interactions due to extremely low frequency and very low frequency waves in the magnetosphere. We suggest that other techniques such as stochastic parameterization will lead to a better characterization of subgrid diffusion physics in the Outer Radiation Belt.

  1. Parameterizing the power spectrum: Beyond the truncated Taylor expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazajian, Kevork; /Los Alamos; Kadota, Kenji; /Fermilab; Stewart, Ewan D.; /KAIST, Taejon /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.

    2005-07-01

    The power spectrum is traditionally parameterized by a truncated Taylor series: ln P(k) = ln P{sub *} + (n{sub *} - 1) ln(k/k{sub *}) + 1/2 n'{sub *} ln{sup 2} (k/k{sub *}). It is reasonable to truncate the Taylor series if |n'{sub *} ln(k/k{sub *})| << |n{sub *} - 1|, but it is not if |n'{sub *} ln(k/k{sub *})| {approx}> |n{sub *} - 1|. We argue that there is no good theoretical reason to prefer |n'{sub *}| << |n{sub *} - 1|, and show that current observations are consistent with |n*{sub *} ln(k/k{sub *})| {approx} |n{sub *} - 1| even for |ln(k/k{sub *})| {approx} 1. Thus, there are regions of parameter space, which are both theoretically and observationally relevant, for which the traditional truncated Taylor series parameterization is inconsistent, and hence it can lead to incorrect parameter estimations. Motivated by this, we propose a simple extension of the traditional parameterization, which uses no extra parameters, but that, unlike the traditional approach, covers well motivated inflationary spectra with |n'{sub *}| {approx} |n{sub *} - 1|. Our parameterization therefore covers not only standard-slow-roll inflation models but also a much wider class of inflation models. We use this parameterization to perform a likelihood analysis for the cosmological parameters.

  2. Cloud-radiation interactions and their parameterization in climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This report contains papers from the International Workshop on Cloud-Radiation Interactions and Their Parameterization in Climate Models met on 18--20 October 1993 in Camp Springs, Maryland, USA. It was organized by the Joint Working Group on Clouds and Radiation of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences. Recommendations were grouped into three broad areas: (1) general circulation models (GCMs), (2) satellite studies, and (3) process studies. Each of the panels developed recommendations on the. themes of the workshop. Explicitly or implicitly, each panel independently recommended observations of basic cloud microphysical properties (water content, phase, size) on the scales resolved by GCMs. Such observations are necessary to validate cloud parameterizations in GCMs, to use satellite data to infer radiative forcing in the atmosphere and at the earth`s surface, and to refine the process models which are used to develop advanced cloud parameterizations.

  3. Parameterized Analysis of Paging and List Update Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorrigiv, Reza; Ehmsen, Martin R.; López-Ortiz, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    set model and express the performance of well known algorithms in terms of this parameter. This explicitly introduces parameterized-style analysis to online algorithms. The idea is that rather than normalizing the performance of an online algorithm by an (optimal) offline algorithm, we explicitly...... that a larger cache leads to a better performance. We also apply the parameterized analysis framework to list update and show that certain randomized algorithms which are superior to MTF in the classical model are not so in the parameterized case, which matches experimental results.......It is well-established that input sequences for paging and list update have locality of reference. In this paper we analyze the performance of algorithms for these problems in terms of the amount of locality in the input sequence. We define a measure for locality that is based on Denning’s working...

  4. Adaptive Output Feedback Stabilization of Nonholonomic Systems with Nonlinear Parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Shang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the problem of adaptive output feedback stabilization for a class of nonholonomic systems with nonlinear parameterization and strong nonlinear drifts. A parameter separation technique is introduced to transform nonlinearly parameterized system into a linear-like parameterized system. Then, by using the integrator backstepping approach based on observer and parameter estimator, a constructive design procedure for output feedback adaptive control is given. And a switching strategy is developed to eliminate the phenomenon of uncontrollability. It is shown that, under some conditions, the proposed controller can guarantee that all the system states globally converge to the origin, while other signals remain bounded. An illustrative example is also provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  5. Dynamic speech parameterization for text-independent phone segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniz, Analía S; Torres, María E; Rufiner, Hugo L

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a dynamic speech parameterization based on the continuous multiresolution divergence is used to modify a text-independent phone segmentation algorithm. This encoding is employed as input and also replaces an stage of the segmentation procedure responsible for the estimation of the intensity of changes in signal features. The segmentation performance of this representation has been compared with the original algorithm using as input a classical Melbank parameterization and speech representation based on the continuous multiresolution divergence. The results indicate that the modification here proposed increases the ability of the algorithm to perform the segmentation task. This suggests that continuous multiresolution divergence provides valuable information related to acoustic features that take into account phoneme transitions. Moreover, this parameterization gives enough information for its direct use without further processing.

  6. Droplet activation parameterization: the population-splitting concept revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Morales Betancourt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we postulate, implement and evaluate modifications to the "population-splitting" concept, introduced by Nenes and Seinfeld (2003, for calculation of water-condensation rates in droplet-activation parameterizations. The population-splitting approximation consists of dividing the population of growing droplets into two categories: those that experience significant growth after exposed to a supersaturation larger than their critical supersaturation, and those that do not grow much larger than their critical diameter. The modifications introduced here lead to an improved accuracy and precision of the parameterization-derived maximum supersaturation, smax, and droplet-number concentration, Nd, as determined by comparing against those of detailed numerical simulations of the activation process. A numerical computation of the first-order derivatives ∂ Nd/∂ χj of the parameterized Nd to input variables χi was performed and compared against the corresponding parcel-model-derived sensitivities, providing a thorough evaluation of the impacts of the introduced modifications in the parameterization ability to respond to aerosol characteristics. An evaluation of the parameterization computation of Nd and smax against detailed numerical simulations of the activation process showed a relative error of −6.0% ± 6.2% for smax, and −2.7% ± 4.8% for Nd, which represents a considerable reduction in prediction bias when compared to earlier versions of the parameterization. The proposed modifications require only minor changes for their numerical implementation in existing codes based on the population-splitting concept.

  7. Droplet Nucleation: Physically-Based Parameterizations and Comparative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Ghan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in simulations of climate and climate change is the influence of aerosols on the optical properties of clouds. The root of this influence is the droplet nucleation process, which involves the spontaneous growth of aerosol into cloud droplets at cloud edges, during the early stages of cloud formation, and in some cases within the interior of mature clouds. Numerical models of droplet nucleation represent much of the complexity of the process, but at a computational cost that limits their application to simulations of hours or days. Physically-based parameterizations of droplet nucleation are designed to quickly estimate the number nucleated as a function of the primary controlling parameters: the aerosol number size distribution, hygroscopicity and cooling rate. Here we compare and contrast the key assumptions used in developing each of the most popular parameterizations and compare their performances under a variety of conditions. We find that the more complex parameterizations perform well under a wider variety of nucleation conditions, but all parameterizations perform well under the most common conditions. We then discuss the various applications of the parameterizations to cloud-resolving, regional and global models to study aerosol effects on clouds at a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. We compare estimates of anthropogenic aerosol indirect effects using two different parameterizations applied to the same global climate model, and find that the estimates of indirect effects differ by only 10%. We conclude with a summary of the outstanding challenges remaining for further development and application.

  8. Parameterizing Plasmaspheric Hiss Wave Power by Plasmapause Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, D.; Jaynes, A. N.; Boule, C.; Bortnik, J.; Thaller, S. A.; Ergun, R.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is a superposition of electromagnetic whistler-mode waves largely confined within the plasmasphere, the cold plasma torus surrounding Earth. Hiss plays an important role in radiation belt dynamics by pitch angle scattering electrons for a wide range of electron energies (10's of keV to > 1 MeV) which can result in their loss to the atmosphere. This interaction is often included in predictive models of radiation belt dynamics using statistical hiss wave power distributions derived from observations. However, the traditional approach to creating these distributions parameterizes hiss power by L-parameter (e.g. MacIlwain L, dipole L, or L*) and a geomagnetic index (e.g. DST or AE). Such parameterization introduces spatial averaging of dissimilar wave power radial profiles, resulting in heavily smoothed wave power distributions. This work instead parameterizes hiss wave power distributions using plasmapause location and distance from the plasmapause. Using Van Allen Probes data and these new parameterizations, previously unreported and highly repeatable features of the hiss wave power distribution become apparent. These features include: (1) The highest amplitude hiss wave power is concentrated over a narrower range of L than previous studies have indicated, and (2) the location of the peak in hiss wave power is determined by the plasmapause location, occurring at a consistent standoff distance Earthward of the plasmapause. Based on these features, parameterizing hiss using the plasmapause location and distance from the plasmapause may shed new light on hiss generation and propagation physics, as well as serve to improve the parameterization of hiss in predictive models of the radiation belts.

  9. A new parameterization for waveform inversion in acoustic orthorhombic media

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Nabil

    2016-05-26

    Orthorhombic anisotropic model inversion is extra challenging because of the multiple parameter nature of the inversion problem. The high number of parameters required to describe the medium exerts considerable trade-off and additional nonlinearity to a full-waveform inversion (FWI) application. Choosing a suitable set of parameters to describe the model and designing an effective inversion strategy can help in mitigating this problem. Using the Born approximation, which is the central ingredient of the FWI update process, we have derived radiation patterns for the different acoustic orthorhombic parameterizations. Analyzing the angular dependence of scattering (radiation patterns) of the parameters of different parameterizations starting with the often used Thomsen-Tsvankin parameterization, we have assessed the potential trade-off between the parameters and the resolution in describing the data and inverting for the parameters. The analysis led us to introduce new parameters ϵd, δd, and ηd, which have azimuthally dependent radiation patterns, but keep the scattering potential of the transversely isotropic parameters stationary with azimuth (azimuth independent). The novel parameters ϵd, δd, and ηd are dimensionless and represent a measure of deviation between the vertical planes in orthorhombic anisotropy. Therefore, these deviation parameters offer a new parameterization style for an acoustic orthorhombic medium described by six parameters: three vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) parameters, two deviation parameters, and one parameter describing the anisotropy in the horizontal symmetry plane. The main feature of any parameterization based on the deviation parameters, is the azimuthal independency of the modeled data with respect to the VTI parameters, which allowed us to propose practical inversion strategies based on our experience with the VTI parameters. This feature of the new parameterization style holds for even the long-wavelength components of

  10. Laboratory simulations and parameterization of the primary marine aerosol production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martensson, E.M.; Nilsson, E.D.; Leeuw, G. de; Cohen, L.H.; Hansson, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    A major source of the primary marine aerosol is the bursting of air bubbles produced by breaking waves. Several source parameterizations are available from the literature, usually limited to particles with a dry diameter Dp > 1 μm. The objective of this work is to extend the current knowledge to

  11. Parameterizations of Test Cover with Bounded Test Sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crowston, R.; Gutin, G.; Jones, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the Test Cover problem we are given a hypergraph H=(V,E) with |V|=n,|E|=m, and we assume that E is a test cover, i.e. for every pair of vertices (Formula Presented), there exists an edge (Formula Presented) such that (Formula Presented). The objective is to find a minimum subset of E which...... is a test cover. The problem is used for identification across many areas, and is NP-complete. From a parameterized complexity standpoint, many natural parameterizations of Test Cover are either W[1]-complete or have no polynomial kernel unless coNP⊆NP/poly, and thus are unlikely to be solveable efficiently....... However, in practice the size of the edges is often bounded. In this paper we study the parameterized complexity of Test-r-Cover, the restriction of Test Cover in which each edge contains at most r≥2 vertices. In contrast to the unbounded case, we show that the following below-bound parameterizations...

  12. CLOUD PARAMETERIZATIONS, CLOUD PHYSICS, AND THEIR CONNECTIONS: AN OVERVIEW.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIU,Y.; DAUM,P.H.; CHAI,S.K.; LIU,F.

    2002-02-12

    This paper consists of three parts. The first part is concerned with the parameterization of cloud microphysics in climate models. We demonstrate the crucial importance of spectral dispersion of the cloud droplet size distribution in determining radiative properties of clouds (e.g., effective radius), and underline the necessity of specifying spectral dispersion in the parameterization of cloud microphysics. It is argued that the inclusion of spectral dispersion makes the issue of cloud parameterization essentially equivalent to that of the droplet size distribution function, bringing cloud parameterization to the forefront of cloud physics. The second part is concerned with theoretical investigations into the spectral shape of droplet size distributions in cloud physics. After briefly reviewing the mainstream theories (including entrainment and mixing theories, and stochastic theories), we discuss their deficiencies and the need for a paradigm shift from reductionist approaches to systems approaches. A systems theory that has recently been formulated by utilizing ideas from statistical physics and information theory is discussed, along with the major results derived from it. It is shown that the systems formalism not only easily explains many puzzles that have been frustrating the mainstream theories, but also reveals such new phenomena as scale-dependence of cloud droplet size distributions. The third part is concerned with the potential applications of the systems theory to the specification of spectral dispersion in terms of predictable variables and scale-dependence under different fluctuating environments.

  13. Parameterization of rainfall microstructure for radar meteorology and hydrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijlenhoet, R.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive general framework for the description and analysis of the microstructure of rainfall is presented. The microstructure of rainfall is parameterized in terms of the raindrop size distribution, which determines both the macroscopic physical properties of rainfall relevant for

  14. A Novel Scheme for Parameterizing Aerosol Processing in Warm Clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lebo, Zachary J; Morrison, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    ..., in a kinematic model with a specified flow field. Hybrid simulations in which the explicit activation formulation is coupled to the scaling parameterization are also performed. Model results demonstrate the significance of including a physically realistic representation of aerosols contained in haze, cloud droplets, and rain. It is shown that the expli...

  15. Fixed-parameter decidability : Extending parameterized complexity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, J.; Torenvliet, L.

    2016-01-01

    We extend the reach of fixed-parameter analysis by introducing classes of parameterized sets defined based on decidability instead of complexity. Known results in computability theory can be expressed in the language of fixed-parameter analysis, making use of the landscape of these new classes. On

  16. LANDSCAPE VARIABILITY AND SURFACE FLUX PARAMETERIZATION IN CLIMATE MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLAASSEN, W; CLAUSSEN, M

    The Earth's surface shows variability at the landscape scale (1-10 km); the influence of surface variability at this scale has been analysed to provide a parameterization for use in large-scale atmospheric models with a grid size unable to solve the landscape scale explicitly. Landscape variations

  17. Hydrodynamic roughness of floodplain vegetation : Airborne parameterization and field validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straatsma, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    The parameterization of hydrodynamic roughness of floodplains is a key component in the assessment of the safety levels of the fluvial area. Roughness describes the amount of friction that is exerted on the water by the vegetation and the ground surface. Menno Straatsma studied new ways to quantify

  18. Importance of convective parameterization in ENSO predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jieshun; Kumar, Arun; Wang, Wanqiu; Hu, Zeng-Zhen; Huang, Bohua; Balmaseda, Magdalena A.

    2017-06-01

    This letter explored the influence of atmospheric convection scheme on El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) predictions using a set of hindcast experiments. Specifically, a low-resolution version of the Climate Forecast System version 2 is used for 12 month hindcasts starting from each April during 1982-2011. The hindcast experiments are repeated with three atmospheric convection schemes. All three hindcasts apply the identical initialization with ocean initial conditions taken from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and atmosphere/land initial states from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. Assessments indicate a substantial sensitivity of the sea surface temperature prediction skill to the different convection schemes, particularly over the eastern tropical Pacific. For the Niño 3.4 index, the anomaly correlation skill can differ by 0.1-0.2 at lead times longer than 2 months. Long-term simulations are further conducted with the three convection schemes to understand the differences in prediction skill. By conducting heat budget analyses for the mixed-layer temperature anomalies, it is suggested that the convection scheme having the highest skill simulates stronger and more realistic coupled feedbacks related to ENSO. Particularly, the strength of the Ekman pumping feedback is better represented, which is traced to more realistic simulation of surface wind stress. Our results imply that improving the mean state simulations in coupled (ocean-atmosphere) general circulation model (e.g., ameliorating the Intertropical Convergence Zone simulation) might further improve our ENSO prediction capability.

  19. Spline Parameterization of Complex Planar Domains for Isogeometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondegaon, Sangamesh; Voruganti, Hari K.

    2017-03-01

    Isogeometric Analysis (IGA) involves unification of modelling and analysis by adopting the same basis functions (splines), for both. Hence, spline based parametric model is the starting step for IGA. Representing a complex domain, using parametric geometric model is a challenging task. Parameterization problem can be defined as, finding an optimal set of control points of a B-spline model for exact domain modelling. Also, the quality of parameterization, too has significant effect on IGA. Finding the B-spline control points for any given domain, which gives accurate results is still an open issue. In this paper, a new planar B-spline parameterization technique, based on domain mapping method is proposed. First step of the methodology is to map an input (non-convex) domain onto a unit circle (convex) with the use of harmonic functions. The unique properties of harmonic functions: global minima and mean value property, ensures the mapping is bi-jective and with no self-intersections. Next step is to map the unit circle to unit square to make it apt for B-spline modelling. Square domain is re-parameterized by using conventional centripetal method. Once the domain is properly parameterized, the required control points are computed by solving the B-spline tensor product equation. The proposed methodology is validated by applying the developed B-spline model for a static structural analysis of a plate, using isogeometric analysis. Different domains are modelled to show effectiveness of the given technique. It is observed that the proposed method is versatile and computationally efficient.

  20. Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix: rephasing invariants and parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez R, H.; Kielanowski, P.; Juárez W, S. R.

    2014-03-01

    In this work we study two topics: the first one considers the general phase invariant monomials built out of the CKM matrix elements and their conjugates. We show, that there exist 30 fundamental phase invariant monomials and 18 of them are a product of 4 CKM matrix elements and 12 are a product of 6 CKM matrix elements. In our main result we show that all rephasing invariant monomials can be expressed as a product of at most 5 factors with positive powers. Next, we propose a general method of a recursive construction of the CKM matrix for any number of generations. This allows to construct a parameterization with desired properties. As an application we generalize the Wolfenstein parameterization to the case of 4 generations and obtain restrictions on the CKM suppression of the fourth generation.

  1. Depth Edge Filtering Using Parameterized Structured Light Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ziqi; Bae, Seho; Yi, Juneho

    2017-04-03

    This research features parameterized depth edge detection using structured light imaging that exploits a single color stripes pattern and an associated binary stripes pattern. By parameterized depth edge detection, we refer to the detection of all depth edges in a given range of distances with depth difference greater or equal to a specific value. While previous research has not properly dealt with shadow regions, which result in double edges, we effectively remove shadow regions using statistical learning through effective identification of color stripes in the structured light images. We also provide a much simpler control of involved parameters. We have compared the depth edge filtering performance of our method with that of the state-of-the-art method and depth edge detection from the Kinect depth map. Experimental results clearly show that our method finds the desired depth edges most correctly while the other methods cannot.

  2. An intracloud lightning parameterization scheme for a storm electrification model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Wu, Gang; Farley, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in the present storm electrification model. The initiation, propagation direction, and termination of the discharge are computed using the magnitude and direction of the electric field vector as the determining criteria. The charge redistribution due to the lightning is approximated assuming the channel to be an isolated conductor with zero net charge over its entire length. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred and distribution of charges have been done. Values of charge transfer, dipole moment change, and electrical energy dissipation computed in the model are consistent with observations. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges and electric field components depend strongly on the amount of charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge shows favorable agreement. Limitations of the parameterization scheme are discussed.

  3. submitter Data-driven RBE parameterization for helium ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Dokic, I; Valle, S M; Tessonnier, T; Galm, R; Ciocca, M; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Jäkel, O; Haberer, T; Pedroni, P; Böhlen, T T

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion beams are expected to be available again in the near future for clinical use. A suitable formalism to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for treatment planning (TP) studies is needed. In this work we developed a data-driven RBE parameterization based on published in vitro experimental values. The RBE parameterization has been developed within the framework of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model as a function of the helium linear energy transfer (LET), dose and the tissue specific parameter ${{(\\alpha /\\beta )}_{\\text{ph}}}$ of the LQ model for the reference radiation. Analytic expressions are provided, derived from the collected database, describing the $\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}_{\\alpha}}={{\\alpha}_{\\text{He}}}/{{\\alpha}_{\\text{ph}}}$ and ${{\\text{R}}_{\\beta}}={{\\beta}_{\\text{He}}}/{{\\beta}_{\\text{ph}}}$ ratios as a function of LET. Calculated RBE values at 2 Gy photon dose and at 10% survival ($\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}_{10}}$ ) are compared with the experimental ones. Pearson's correlati...

  4. Parameterized neural networks for high-energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Pierre; Cranmer, Kyle; Faucett, Taylor; Sadowski, Peter; Whiteson, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    We investigate a new structure for machine learning classifiers built with neural networks and applied to problems in high-energy physics by expanding the inputs to include not only measured features but also physics parameters. The physics parameters represent a smoothly varying learning task, and the resulting parameterized classifier can smoothly interpolate between them and replace sets of classifiers trained at individual values. This simplifies the training process and gives improved performance at intermediate values, even for complex problems requiring deep learning. Applications include tools parameterized in terms of theoretical model parameters, such as the mass of a particle, which allow for a single network to provide improved discrimination across a range of masses. This concept is simple to implement and allows for optimized interpolatable results.

  5. Parameterized Machine Learning for High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Pierre; Faucett, Taylor; Sadowski, Peter; Whiteson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a new structure for machine learning classifiers applied to problems in high-energy physics by expanding the inputs to include not only measured features but also physics parameters. The physics parameters represent a smoothly varying learning task, and the resulting parameterized classifier can smoothly interpolate between them and replace sets of classifiers trained at individual values. This simplifies the training process and gives improved performance at intermediate values, even for complex problems requiring deep learning. Applications include tools parameterized in terms of theoretical model parameters, such as the mass of a particle, which allow for a single network to provide improved discrimination across a range of masses. This concept is simple to implement and allows for optimized interpolatable results.

  6. Parameterized neural networks for high-energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, Pierre; Sadowski, Peter [University of California, Department of Computer Science, Irvine, CA (United States); Cranmer, Kyle [NYU, Department of Physics, New York, NY (United States); Faucett, Taylor; Whiteson, Daniel [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We investigate a new structure for machine learning classifiers built with neural networks and applied to problems in high-energy physics by expanding the inputs to include not only measured features but also physics parameters. The physics parameters represent a smoothly varying learning task, and the resulting parameterized classifier can smoothly interpolate between them and replace sets of classifiers trained at individual values. This simplifies the training process and gives improved performance at intermediate values, even for complex problems requiring deep learning. Applications include tools parameterized in terms of theoretical model parameters, such as the mass of a particle, which allow for a single network to provide improved discrimination across a range of masses. This concept is simple to implement and allows for optimized interpolatable results. (orig.)

  7. Parameterized Complexity of k-Anonymity: Hardness and Tractability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Dondi, Riccardo; Pirola, Yuri

    The problem of publishing personal data without giving up privacy is becoming increasingly important. A precise formalization that has been recently proposed is the k-anonymity, where the rows of a table are partitioned in clusters of size at least k and all rows in a cluster become the same tuple after the suppression of some entries. The natural optimization problem, where the goal is to minimize the number of suppressed entries, is hard even when the stored values are over a binary alphabet or the table consists of a bounded number of columns. In this paper we study how the complexity of the problem is influenced by different parameters. First we show that the problem is W[1]-hard when parameterized by the value of the solution (and k). Then we exhibit a fixed-parameter algorithm when the problem is parameterized by the number of columns and the number of different values in any column.

  8. Elastic FWI for VTI media: A synthetic parameterization study

    KAUST Repository

    Kamath, Nishant

    2016-09-06

    A major challenge for multiparameter full-waveform inversion (FWI) is the inherent trade-offs (or cross-talk) between model parameters. Here, we perform FWI of multicomponent data generated for a synthetic VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) model based on a geologic section of the Valhall field. A horizontal displacement source, which excites intensive shear waves in the conventional offset range, helps provide more accurate updates to the SV-wave vertical velocity. We test three model parameterizations, which exhibit different radiation patterns and, therefore, create different parameter trade-offs. The results show that the choice of parameterization for FWI depends on the availability of long-offset data, the quality of the initial model for the anisotropy coefficients, and the parameter that needs to be resolved with the highest accuracy.

  9. Multichannel FES parameterization for controlling foot motion in paretic gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seel Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke and other neurological disorders often lead to reduced motor function and to pathological foot motion during gait. We consider Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES of the shank muscles that control dorsiflexion (related to pitch and eversion (related to roll of the foot. We describe the nonlinear domain of stimulation intensities that are tolerated by subjects in combined two-channel FES via surface electrodes. Two piecewise linear parameterizations of this domain are suggested and compared in terms of the cross-couplings between the newly defined stimulation intensity coordinates and the foot motion caused during swing phase in drop foot patients walking on a treadmill. Both parameterizations are found to yield almost monotonous input-output behavior and therefore facilitate decentralized control of the foot pitch and roll angle.

  10. New Parameterizations for Understanding Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Isoprene under Anthropogenic Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Wernis, R. A.; Kreisberg, N. M.; de Sá, S. S.; Martin, S. T.; Alexander, L.; Palm, B. B.; Hu, W.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Artaxo, P.; Manzi, A. O.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have focused on elucidating the chemical mechanisms responsible for isoprene photochemistry leading to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. While isoprene oxidation is the source of a large fraction of the organic mass in biogenic SOA formation over forested regions, few ambient measurements of the isoprene-derived products exist at sufficient time-resolution to fully parameterize the dynamic reactions in the particle phase. We deployed the Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SV-TAG) during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in the Southeastern U.S. in summer 2013 and during the wet and dry seasons of the Green Ocean Amazon experiment (GoAmazon 2014/5) in central Amazonia. Both field campaigns were located in isoprene-rich forested regions under the varying influence of anthropogenic pollution. We measured oxidation products at the molecular level, including 2-methyl tetrols, C5-alkene triols, and 2-methyl glyceric acid in the gas and particle phases at hourly time resolution. Using supporting measurements of particle composition (e.g. sulfate) and modelled liquid water content, we compare the relative contribution of these tracers to the particle-phase across these regions and explore possible parameterizations that can be used for modeling SOA formation from isoprene.

  11. A framework for understanding drag parameterizations for coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Johanna H.; Hench, James L.

    2011-08-01

    In a hydrodynamic sense, a coral reef is a complex array of obstacles that exerts a net drag force on water moving over the reef. This drag is typically parameterized in ocean circulation models using drag coefficients (CD) or roughness length scales (z0); however, published CD for coral reefs span two orders of magnitude, posing a challenge to predictive modeling. Here we examine the reasons for the large range in reported CD and assess the limitations of using CD and z0 to parameterize drag on reefs. Using a formal framework based on the 3-D spatially averaged momentum equations, we show that CD and z0 are functions of canopy geometry and velocity profile shape. Using an idealized two-layer model, we illustrate that CD can vary by more than an order of magnitude for the same geometry and flow depending on the reference velocity selected and that differences in definition account for much of the range in reported CD values. Roughness length scales z0 are typically used in 3-D circulation models to adjust CD for reference height, but this relies on spatially averaged near-bottom velocity profiles being logarithmic. Measurements from a shallow backreef indicate that z0 determined from fits to point measurements of velocity profiles can be very different from z0 required to parameterize spatially averaged drag. More sophisticated parameterizations for drag and shear stresses are required to simulate 3-D velocity fields over shallow reefs; in the meantime, we urge caution when using published CD and z0 values for coral reefs.

  12. Improved Climate Simulations through a Stochastic Parameterization of Ocean Eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul; Howe, Nicola; Gregory, Jonathan; Smith, Robin; Joshi, Manoj

    2017-04-01

    In climate simulations, the impacts of the subgrid scales on the resolved scales are conventionally represented using deterministic closure schemes, which assume that the impacts are uniquely determined by the resolved scales. Stochastic parameterization relaxes this assumption, by sampling the subgrid variability in a computationally inexpensive manner. This study shows that the simulated climatological state of the ocean is improved in many respects by implementing a simple stochastic parameterization of ocean eddies into a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. Simulations from a high-resolution, eddy-permitting ocean model are used to calculate the eddy statistics needed to inject realistic stochastic noise into a low-resolution, non-eddy-permitting version of the same model. A suite of four stochastic experiments is then run to test the sensitivity of the simulated climate to the noise definition by varying the noise amplitude and decorrelation time within reasonable limits. The addition of zero-mean noise to the ocean temperature tendency is found to have a nonzero effect on the mean climate. Specifically, in terms of the ocean temperature and salinity fields both at the surface and at depth, the noise reduces many of the biases in the low-resolution model and causes it to more closely resemble the high-resolution model. The variability of the strength of the global ocean thermohaline circulation is also improved. It is concluded that stochastic ocean perturbations can yield reductions in climate model error that are comparable to those obtained by refining the resolution, but without the increased computational cost. Therefore, stochastic parameterizations of ocean eddies have the potential to significantly improve climate simulations. Reference Williams PD, Howe NJ, Gregory JM, Smith RS, and Joshi MM (2016) Improved Climate Simulations through a Stochastic Parameterization of Ocean Eddies. Journal of Climate, 29, 8763-8781. http://dx.doi.org/10

  13. Statistical dynamical subgrid-scale parameterizations for geophysical flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Kane, T J; Frederiksen, J S [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Bureau of Meteorology, 700 Collins St, Docklands, Melbourne, VIC (Australia) and CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale, VIC (Australia)], E-mail: t.okane@bom.gov.au

    2008-12-15

    Simulations of both atmospheric and oceanic circulations at given finite resolutions are strongly dependent on the form and strengths of the dynamical subgrid-scale parameterizations (SSPs) and in particular are sensitive to subgrid-scale transient eddies interacting with the retained scale topography and the mean flow. In this paper, we present numerical results for SSPs of the eddy-topographic force, stochastic backscatter, eddy viscosity and eddy-mean field interaction using an inhomogeneous statistical turbulence model based on a quasi-diagonal direct interaction approximation (QDIA). Although the theoretical description on which our model is based is for general barotropic flows, we specifically focus on global atmospheric flows where large-scale Rossby waves are present. We compare and contrast the closure-based results with an important earlier heuristic SSP of the eddy-topographic force, based on maximum entropy or statistical canonical equilibrium arguments, developed specifically for general ocean circulation models (Holloway 1992 J. Phys. Oceanogr. 22 1033-46). Our results demonstrate that where strong zonal flows and Rossby waves are present, such as in the atmosphere, maximum entropy arguments are insufficient to accurately parameterize the subgrid contributions due to eddy-eddy, eddy-topographic and eddy-mean field interactions. We contrast our atmospheric results with findings for the oceans. Our study identifies subgrid-scale interactions that are currently not parameterized in numerical atmospheric climate models, which may lead to systematic defects in the simulated circulations.

  14. A Thermal Infrared Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Yan, Michael M.-H.; Cote, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This technical memorandum documents the longwave radiation parameterization developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for a wide variety of weather and climate applications. Based on the 1996-version of the Air Force Geophysical Laboratory HITRAN data, the parameterization includes the absorption due to major gaseous absorption (water vapor, CO2, O3) and most of the minor trace gases (N2O, CH4, CFCs), as well as clouds and aerosols. The thermal infrared spectrum is divided into nine bands. To achieve a high degree of accuracy and speed, various approaches of computing the transmission function are applied to different spectral bands and gases. The gaseous transmission function is computed either using the k-distribution method or the table look-up method. To include the effect of scattering due to clouds and aerosols, the optical thickness is scaled by the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor. The parameterization can accurately compute fluxes to within 1% of the high spectral-resolution line-by-line calculations. The cooling rate can be accurately computed in the region extending from the surface to the 0.01-hPa level.

  15. Median ellipse parameterization for robust measurement of fuel droplet size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greminger, Michael; Hoxie, Alison

    2016-02-01

    The combustion properties of blended fuel combinations can be characterized by performing single droplet fuel combustion experiments. These combustion experiments are visualized using high speed image acquisition. Once the high speed images are obtained, the burn rate and other characteristics of combustion, such as the occurrence of microexplosions, can be characterized. Currently these quantities are either measured manually or are measured using automated software. However, the current software packages used for this task are limited in that they can only measure droplets that are elliptical in shape and manual corrections often have to be made to avoid significant errors in the measurement. An automated droplet tracking algorithm is presented that can automatically track droplet size without manual intervention due to its robustness to the presence of missing or extra edges in the images. In addition, the proposed method can track shapes more general than ellipses, which is required in order to track the droplet during microexplosions. The proposed algorithm starts by fitting ellipses to numerous five point subsets from the droplet edge data. The closed contour is parameterized by determining the median perimeter of the set of ellipses. The resulting curve is not an ellipse, allowing arbitrary closed contours to be parameterized. The performance of the proposed algorithm and the performance of existing algorithms are compared to a ground truth segmentation of the fuel droplet images. This comparison demonstrates that the median ellipse parameterization algorithm has improved performance for both area quantification and edge deviation.

  16. Improvement in the Modeled Representation of North American Monsoon Precipitation Using a Modified Kain–Fritsch Convective Parameterization Scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Thang

    2018-01-22

    A commonly noted problem in the simulation of warm season convection in the North American monsoon region has been the inability of atmospheric models at the meso-β scales (10 s to 100 s of kilometers) to simulate organized convection, principally mesoscale convective systems. With the use of convective parameterization, high precipitation biases in model simulations are typically observed over the peaks of mountain ranges. To address this issue, the Kain–Fritsch (KF) cumulus parameterization scheme has been modified with new diagnostic equations to compute the updraft velocity, the convective available potential energy closure assumption, and the convective trigger function. The scheme has been adapted for use in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF). A numerical weather prediction-type simulation is conducted for the North American Monsoon Experiment Intensive Observing Period 2 and a regional climate simulation is performed, by dynamically downscaling. In both of these applications, there are notable improvements in the WRF model-simulated precipitation due to the better representation of organized, propagating convection. The use of the modified KF scheme for atmospheric model simulations may provide a more computationally economical alternative to improve the representation of organized convection, as compared to convective-permitting simulations at the kilometer scale or a super-parameterization approach.

  17. Becoming a Place-Responsive Practitioner: Exploration of an Alternative Conception of "Friluftsliv" in the Swedish Physical Education and Health Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikaels, Jonas

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the educational potential of a place-responsive pedagogy to teaching and learning in "friluftsliv" within the Swedish physical education and health (PEH) curriculum. The study draws on qualitative empirical materials from a yearlong research project, together with a group of high school PEH teachers working in seventh…

  18. Cheminformatics and Data Mining Approaches for Exploring the Alternatives Testing Landscsape: Case Studies in ToxCast and Skin Sensitization (BOSC CSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheminformatics approaches and structure-based rules are being used to evaluate and explore the ToxCast chemical landscape and associated high-throughput screening (HTS) data. We have shown that the library provides comprehensive coverage of the knowledge domains and target inven...

  19. 20161116 - Cheminformatics and Data Mining Approaches for Exploring the Alternatives Testing Landscsape: Case Studies in ToxCast and Skin Sensitization (BOSC CSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheminformatics approaches and structure-based rules are being used to evaluate and explore the ToxCast chemical landscape and associated high-throughput screening (HTS) data. We have shown that the library provides comprehensive coverage of the knowledge domains and target inven...

  20. Parameterization of single-scattering properties of snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, Petri; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Guyot, Gwennole; Jourdan, Olivier; Nousiainen, Timo

    2015-04-01

    Snow consists of non-spherical ice grains of various shapes and sizes, which are surrounded by air and sometimes covered by films of liquid water. Still, in many studies, homogeneous spherical snow grains have been assumed in radiative transfer calculations, due to the convenience of using Mie theory. More recently, second-generation Koch fractals have been employed. While they produce a relatively flat scattering phase function typical of deformed non-spherical particles, this is still a rather ad-hoc choice. Here, angular scattering measurements for blowing snow conducted during the CLimate IMpacts of Short-Lived pollutants In the Polar region (CLIMSLIP) campaign at Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, are used to construct a reference phase function for snow. Based on this phase function, an optimized habit combination (OHC) consisting of severely rough (SR) droxtals, aggregates of SR plates and strongly distorted Koch fractals is selected. The single-scattering properties of snow are then computed for the OHC as a function of wavelength λ and snow grain volume-to-projected area equivalent radius rvp. Parameterization equations are developed for λ=0.199-2.7 μm and rvp = 10-2000 μm, which express the single-scattering co-albedo β, the asymmetry parameter g and the phase function as functions of the size parameter and the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index. Compared to the reference values computed for the OHC, the accuracy of the parameterization is very high for β and g. This is also true for the phase function parameterization, except for strongly absorbing cases (β > 0.3). Finally, we consider snow albedo and reflected radiances for the suggested snow optics parameterization, making comparisons with spheres and distorted Koch fractals. Further evaluation and validation of the proposed approach against (e.g.) bidirectional reflectance and polarization measurements for snow is planned. At any rate, it seems safe to assume that the OHC selected here

  1. A parameterization method and application in breast tomosynthesis dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To present a parameterization method based on singular value decomposition (SVD), and to provide analytical parameterization of the mean glandular dose (MGD) conversion factors from eight references for evaluating breast tomosynthesis dose in the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) protocol and in the UK, European, and IAEA dosimetry protocols.Methods: MGD conversion factor is usually listed in lookup tables for the factors such as beam quality, breast thickness, breast glandularity, and projection angle. The authors analyzed multiple sets of MGD conversion factors from the Hologic Selenia Dimensions quality control manual and seven previous papers. Each data set was parameterized using a one- to three-dimensional polynomial function of 2–16 terms. Variable substitution was used to improve accuracy. A least-squares fit was conducted using the SVD.Results: The differences between the originally tabulated MGD conversion factors and the results computed using the parameterization algorithms were (a) 0.08%–0.18% on average and 1.31% maximum for the Selenia Dimensions quality control manual, (b) 0.09%–0.66% on average and 2.97% maximum for the published data by Dance et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 35, 1211–1219 (1990); ibid. 45, 3225–3240 (2000); ibid. 54, 4361–4372 (2009); ibid. 56, 453–471 (2011)], (c) 0.74%–0.99% on average and 3.94% maximum for the published data by Sechopoulos et al. [Med. Phys. 34, 221–232 (2007); J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 9, 161–171 (2008)], and (d) 0.66%–1.33% on average and 2.72% maximum for the published data by Feng and Sechopoulos [Radiology 263, 35–42 (2012)], excluding one sample in (d) that does not follow the trends in the published data table.Conclusions: A flexible parameterization method is presented in this paper, and was applied to breast tomosynthesis dosimetry. The resultant data offer easy and accurate computations of MGD conversion factors for evaluating mean glandular breast dose in the MQSA

  2. Exploring O2 diffusion in A-type cytochrome c oxidases: molecular dynamics simulations uncover two alternative channels towards the binuclear site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sofia F Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c oxidases (Ccoxs are the terminal enzymes of the respiratory chain in mitochondria and most bacteria. These enzymes couple dioxygen (O2 reduction to the generation of a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. Despite decades of research and the availability of a large amount of structural and biochemical data available for the A-type Ccox family, little is known about the channel(s used by O2 to travel from the solvent/membrane to the heme a3-CuB binuclear center (BNC. Moreover, the identification of all possible O2 channels as well as the atomic details of O2 diffusion is essential for the understanding of the working mechanisms of the A-type Ccox. In this work, we determined the O2 distribution within Ccox from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, in the fully reduced state, in order to identify and characterize all the putative O2 channels leading towards the BNC. For that, we use an integrated strategy combining atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations (with and without explicit O2 molecules and implicit ligand sampling (ILS calculations. Based on the 3D free energy map for O2 inside Ccox, three channels were identified, all starting in the membrane hydrophobic region and connecting the surface of the protein to the BNC. One of these channels corresponds to the pathway inferred from the X-ray data available, whereas the other two are alternative routes for O2 to reach the BNC. Both alternative O2 channels start in the membrane spanning region and terminate close to Y288I. These channels are a combination of multiple transiently interconnected hydrophobic cavities, whose opening and closure is regulated by the thermal fluctuations of the lining residues. Furthermore, our results show that, in this Ccox, the most likely (energetically preferred routes for O2 to reach the BNC are the alternative channels, rather than the X-ray inferred pathway.

  3. Exploring Several Methods of Groundwater Model Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Saeideh; Ye, Ming; Asghari Moghaddam, Asghar

    2017-04-01

    Selecting reliable models for simulating groundwater flow and solute transport is essential to groundwater resources management and protection. This work is to explore several model selection methods for avoiding over-complex and/or over-parameterized groundwater models. We consider six groundwater flow models with different numbers (6, 10, 10, 13, 13 and 15) of model parameters. These models represent alternative geological interpretations, recharge estimates, and boundary conditions at a study site in Iran. The models were developed with Model Muse, and calibrated against observations of hydraulic head using UCODE. Model selection was conducted by using the following four approaches: (1) Rank the models using their root mean square error (RMSE) obtained after UCODE-based model calibration, (2) Calculate model probability using GLUE method, (3) Evaluate model probability using model selection criteria (AIC, AICc, BIC, and KIC), and (4) Evaluate model weights using the Fuzzy Multi-Criteria-Decision-Making (MCDM) approach. MCDM is based on the fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and fuzzy technique for order performance, which is to identify the ideal solution by a gradual expansion from the local to the global scale of model parameters. The KIC and MCDM methods are superior to other methods, as they consider not only the fit between observed and simulated data and the number of parameter, but also uncertainty in model parameters. Considering these factors can prevent from occurring over-complexity and over-parameterization, when selecting the appropriate groundwater flow models. These methods selected, as the best model, one with average complexity (10 parameters) and the best parameter estimation (model 3).

  4. Exploring haem-based alternatives for oxygen reduction catalysis in fuel cells-a status report of our first principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dy, E S [Department of Precision Science and Technology and Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Roman, T A [Department of Precision Science and Technology and Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Kubota, Y [Department of Precision Science and Technology and Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Miyamoto, K [Department of Precision Science and Technology and Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Kasai, H [Department of Precision Science and Technology and Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan)

    2007-11-07

    For hydrogen fuel cells to become commercially viable, an alternative catalyst to platinum surfaces that is both efficient and affordable must be discovered. We consider haem and haem derivatives as potentials substitutes. In this paper, we discuss the oxygen reduction reaction on both the platinum surface and on haem. We then introduce our suggestions based on density-functional studies on how to improve haem's oxygen-reduction capabilities, which can be summarized as follows: inducing the singlet state, inducing side-on interaction, mimicking cytochrome c oxidase by adding a copper-imidazole complex, using platinum deposited on tin porphyrin instead of haem, and using oxomolybdenum porphyrin instead of haem. We shall focus on the last three methods because of their experimental practicability.

  5. Effects of Explicit Convection on Land-Atmosphere Coupling in GLACE-Type Experiments Using the SuperParameterized CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, H.; Pritchard, M. S.; Parishani, H.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding and realistically simulating the coupling between land and atmosphere in global climate models (GCMs) is an ongoing research frontier. We explore the hypothesis that past attempts to investigate these physics using GCM mechanism denial experiments may have suffered systematic limitations stemming from an overly strong sensitivity of deep convection parameterizations to surface conditions. Taking the philosophy of the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE), we therefore compare the effects of breaking the soil-atmosphere feedback mechanism in the Super-Parameterized Community Atmosphere Model version 3.5 (SPCAM3.5) - which uses O(10k) embedded cloud resolving models to explicitly resolve moist convection - against the conventionally parameterized CAM3.5. This helps isolate the influence of explicit convection on land-atmosphere coupling. We find that soil moisture - precipitation coupling strength is reduced over northern Africa, northern South America and Arabian Peninsula due to superparameterization. Several geographically distinct coupling "hotspots" emerge in SPCAM3.5 located upstream of major topographic features in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes.

  6. "They're made in factories and not by witches on the allotment": a qualitative study of midlife women in the united kingdom, exploring their approaches to complementary and alternative medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmeyer, Antje; Jamie, Kimberly; Griffiths, Frances; Légaré, France

    2011-12-01

    This article explores midlife women's experiences and approaches related to complementary and alternative therapies (CAMS). Ninety-six midlife women were asked about their use of CAMs as part of their overall approach to midlife health. Qualitative thematic analysis was combined with a case-based approach. Women set their experience of CAMs in the context of conventional medicine taking and discussed their safety and different uses. For treatments requiring direct contact with a practitioner, accessibility and quality of the relationship were crucial. Four overall approaches could be discerned (political-critical, pragmatic, careful and wellbeing-oriented) that dynamically interacted with women's experiences.

  7. Alternative additives; Alternative additiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-08-15

    In this project a number of industrial and agricultural waste products have been characterised and evaluated in terms of alkali-getter performance. The intended use is for biomass-fired power stations aiming at reducing corrosion or slagging related problems. The following products have been obtained, characterised and evaluated: 1) Brewery draff 2) Danish de-gassed manure 3) Paper sludge 4) Moulding sand 5) Spent bleaching earth 6) Anorthosite 7) Sand 8) Clay-sludge. Most of the above alternative additive candidates are deemed unsuitable due to insufficient chemical effect and/or expensive requirements for pre-treatment (such as drying and transportation). 3 products were selected for full-scale testing: de-gassed manure, spent bleaching earth and clay slugde. The full scale tests were undertaken at the biomass-fired power stations in Koege, Slagelse and Ensted. Spent bleaching earth (SBE) and clay sludge were the only tested additive candidates that had a proven ability to react with KCl, to thereby reduce Cl-concentrations in deposits, and reduce the deposit flux to superheater tubes. Their performance was shown to nearly as good as commercial additives. De-gassed manure, however, did not evaluate positively due to inhibiting effects of Ca in the manure. Furthermore, de-gassed manure has a high concentration of heavy metals, which imposes a financial burden with regard to proper disposal of the ash by-products. Clay-sludge is a wet clay slurring, and drying and transportation of this product entails substantial costs. Spent bleaching does not require much pre-treatment and is therefore the most promising alternative additive. On the other hand, bleaching earth contains residual plant oil which means that a range of legislation relating to waste combustion comes into play. Not least a waste combustion fee of 330 DKK/tonne. For all alternative (and commercial) additives disposal costs of the increase ash by-products represents a significant cost. This is

  8. Systematic Parameterization of Lignin for the CHARMM Force Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Joshua; Petridis, Loukas; Beckham, Gregg; Crowley, Michael

    2017-07-06

    Plant cell walls have three primary components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, the latter of which is a recalcitrant, aromatic heteropolymer that provides structure to plants, water and nutrient transport through plant tissues, and a highly effective defense against pathogens. Overcoming the recalcitrance of lignin is key to effective biomass deconstruction, which would in turn enable the use of biomass as a feedstock for industrial processes. Our understanding of lignin structure in the plant cell wall is hampered by the limitations of the available lignin forcefields, which currently only account for a single linkage between lignins and lack explicit parameterization for emerging lignin structures both from natural variants and engineered lignin structures. Since polymerization of lignin occurs via radical intermediates, multiple C-O and C-C linkages have been isolated , and the current force field only represents a small subset of lignin the diverse lignin structures found in plants. In order to take into account the wide range of lignin polymerization chemistries, monomers and dimer combinations of C-, H-, G-, and S-lignins as well as with hydroxycinnamic acid linkages were subjected to extensive quantum mechanical calculations to establish target data from which to build a complete molecular mechanics force field tuned specifically for diverse lignins. This was carried out in a GPU-accelerated global optimization process, whereby all molecules were parameterized simultaneously using the same internal parameter set. By parameterizing lignin specifically, we are able to more accurately represent the interactions and conformations of lignin monomers and dimers relative to a general force field. This new force field will enables computational researchers to study the effects of different linkages on the structure of lignin, as well as construct more accurate plant cell wall models based on observed statistical distributions of lignin that differ between

  9. Model parameterization as method for data analysis in dendroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tychkov, Ivan; Shishov, Vladimir; Popkova, Margarita

    2017-04-01

    There is no argue in usefulness of process-based models in ecological studies. Only limitations is how developed algorithm of model and how it will be applied for research. Simulation of tree-ring growth based on climate provides valuable information of tree-ring growth response on different environmental conditions, but also shares light on species-specifics of tree-ring growth process. Visual parameterization of the Vaganov-Shashkin model, allows to estimate non-linear response of tree-ring growth based on daily climate data: daily temperature, estimated day light and soil moisture. Previous using of the VS-Oscilloscope (a software tool of the visual parameterization) shows a good ability to recreate unique patterns of tree-ring growth for coniferous species in Siberian Russia, USA, China, Mediterranean Spain and Tunisia. But using of the models mostly is one-sided to better understand different tree growth processes, opposite to statistical methods of analysis (e.g. Generalized Linear Models, Mixed Models, Structural Equations.) which can be used for reconstruction and forecast. Usually the models are used either for checking of new hypothesis or quantitative assessment of physiological tree growth data to reveal a growth process mechanisms, while statistical methods used for data mining assessment and as a study tool itself. The high sensitivity of the model's VS-parameters reflects the ability of the model to simulate tree-ring growth and evaluates value of limiting growth climate factors. Precise parameterization of VS-Oscilloscope provides valuable information about growth processes of trees and under what conditions these processes occur (e.g. day of growth season onset, length of season, value of minimal/maximum temperature for tree-ring growth, formation of wide or narrow rings etc.). The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (RSF # 14-14-00219)

  10. Parameterized analysis of paging and list update algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorrigiv, Reza; Ehmsen, Martin R.; López-Ortiz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    It is well-established that input sequences for paging and list update have locality of reference. In this paper we analyze the performance of algorithms for these problems in terms of the amount of locality in the input sequence. We define a measure for locality that is based on Denning's working...... to a better performance. We obtain similar separation for list update algorithms. Lastly, we show that, surprisingly, certain randomized algorithms which are superior to MTF in the classical model are not so in the parameterized case, which matches experimental results....

  11. Adapting Parameterized Motions using Iterative Learning and Online Collision Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Johan Sund; Sørensen, Lars Carøe; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    2018-01-01

    Achieving both the flexibility and robustness required to advance the use of robotics in small and medium-sized productions is an essential but difficult task. A fundamental problem is making the robot run blindly without additional sensors while still being robust to uncertainties and variations...... in the assembly processes. In this paper, we address the use of parameterized motions suitable for blind execution and robust to uncertainties in the assembly process. Collisions and incorrect assemblies are detected based on robot motor currents while motion parameters are updated based on Bayesian Optimization...

  12. Lethal doses of oxbile, peptones and thiosulfate-citrate-bile-sucrose agar (TCBS) for Acanthaster planci; exploring alternative population control options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Posada, Jairo; Caballes, Ciemon F; Pratchett, Morgan S

    2013-10-15

    Effective control of outbreaks of Acanthaster planci represents the most immediate and practical intervention to reverse sustained declines in coral cover on reefs in the Indo-Pacific. This study explored the minimum doses of oxbile, oxgall, and thiosulfate-citrate-bile-sucrose agar (TCBS) that result in reliable and comprehensive mortality when injected into adult A. planci. The minimum doses required to induce 100% mortality among starfish (n=10) were 4 g l(-1) of oxbile, 8 g l(-1) of oxgall and 22 g l(-1) of TCBS. Moreover, there was no evidence of unintended side effects for other coral reef organisms (e.g., scleractinian corals, echinoderms and fishes) when using oxbile, oxgall, or TCBS at minimum doses. The effectiveness of peptones in killing crown-of-thorns starfish was also tested, but inconsistency in the results revealed that these proteins are unreliable. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effects of cumulus parameterization closures on simulations of summer precipitation over the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Fengxue; Liang, Xin-Zhong

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the effects of five cumulus closure assumptions on simulations of summer precipitation in the continental U.S. by utilizing an ensemble cumulus parameterization (ECP) that incorporates multiple alternate closure schemes into a single cloud model formulation. Results demonstrate that closure algorithms significantly affect the summer mean, daily frequency and intensity, and diurnal variation of precipitation, with strong regional dependence. Overall, the vertical velocity (W) closure produces the smallest summer mean biases, while the moisture convergence (MC) closure most realistically reproduces daily variability. Both closures have advantages over others in simulating U.S. daily rainfall frequency distribution, though both slightly overestimate intense rain events. The MC closure is superior at capturing summer rainfall amount, daily variability, and heavy rainfall frequency over the Central U.S., but systematically produces wet biases over the North American Monsoon (NAM) region and Southeast U.S., which can be reduced by using the W closure. The instability tendency (TD) and the total instability adjustment (KF) closures are better at capturing observed diurnal signals over the Central U.S. and the NAM, respectively. The results reasonably explain the systematic behaviors of several major cumulus parameterizations. A preliminary experiment combining two optimal closures (averaged moisture convergence and vertical velocity) in the ECP scheme significantly reduced the wet (dry) biases over the Southeast U.S. in the summer of 1993 (2003), and greatly improved daily rainfall correlations over the NAM. Further improved model simulation skills may be achieved in the future if optimal closures and their appropriate weights can be derived at different time scales based on specific climate regimes.

  14. Improving microphysics in a convective parameterization: possibilities and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbouz, Laurent; Heikenfeld, Max; Stier, Philip; Morrison, Hugh; Milbrandt, Jason; Protat, Alain; Kipling, Zak

    2017-04-01

    The convective cloud field model (CCFM) is a convective parameterization implemented in the climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2. It represents a population of clouds within each ECHAM-HAM model column, simulating up to 10 different convective cloud types with individual radius, vertical velocities and microphysical properties. Comparisons between CCFM and radar data at Darwin, Australia, show that in order to reproduce both the convective cloud top height distribution and the vertical velocity profile, the effect of aerodynamic drag on the rising parcel has to be considered, along with a reduced entrainment parameter. A new double-moment microphysics (the Predicted Particle Properties scheme, P3) has been implemented in the latest version of CCFM and is compared to the standard single-moment microphysics and the radar retrievals at Darwin. The microphysical process rates (autoconversion, accretion, deposition, freezing, …) and their response to changes in CDNC are investigated and compared to high resolution CRM WRF simulations over the Amazon region. The results shed light on the possibilities and limitations of microphysics improvements in the framework of CCFM and in convective parameterizations in general.

  15. Transient Storage Parameterization of Wetland-dominated Stream Reaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilderotter, S. M.; Lightbody, A.; Kalnejais, L. H.; Wollheim, W. M.

    2014-12-01

    Current understanding of the importance of transient storage in fluvial wetlands is limited. Wetlands that have higher connectivity to the main stream channel are important because they have the potential to retain more nitrogen within the river system than wetlands that receive little direct stream discharge. In this study, we investigated how stream water accesses adjacent fluvial wetlands in New England coastal watersheds to improve parameterization in network-scale models. Break through curves of Rhodamine WT were collected for eight wetlands in the Ipswich and Parker (MA) and Lamprey River (NH) watersheds, USA. The curves were inverse modeled using STAMMT-L to optimize the connectivity and size parameters for each reach. Two approaches were tested, a single dominant storage zone and a range of storage zones represented using a power-law distribution of storage zone connectivity. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to relate transient storage parameters to stream discharge, area, length-to-width ratio, and reach slope. Resulting regressions will enable more accurate parameterization of surface water transient storage in network-scale models.

  16. A Solar Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies. Volume 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The solar radiation parameterization (CLIRAD-SW) developed at the Goddard Climate and Radiation Branch for application to atmospheric models are described. It includes the absorption by water vapor, O3, O2, CO2, clouds, and aerosols and the scattering by clouds, aerosols, and gases. Depending upon the nature of absorption, different approaches are applied to different absorbers. In the ultraviolet and visible regions, the spectrum is divided into 8 bands, and single O3 absorption coefficient and Rayleigh scattering coefficient are used for each band. In the infrared, the spectrum is divided into 3 bands, and the k-distribution method is applied for water vapor absorption. The flux reduction due to O2 is derived from a simple function, while the flux reduction due to CO2 is derived from precomputed tables. Cloud single-scattering properties are parameterized, separately for liquid drops and ice, as functions of water amount and effective particle size. A maximum-random approximation is adopted for the overlapping of clouds at different heights. Fluxes are computed using the Delta-Eddington approximation.

  17. The Reduced RUM as a Logit Model: Parameterization and Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chia-Yi; Köhn, Hans-Friedrich

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs) for educational assessment are constrained latent class models. Examinees are assigned to classes of intellectual proficiency defined in terms of cognitive skills called attributes, which an examinee may or may not have mastered. The Reduced Reparameterized Unified Model (Reduced RUM) has received considerable attention among psychometricians. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) or Expectation Maximization (EM) are typically used for estimating the Reduced RUM. Commercial implementations of the EM algorithm are available in the latent class analysis (LCA) routines of Latent GOLD and Mplus, for example. Fitting the Reduced RUM with an LCA routine requires that it be reparameterized as a logit model, with constraints imposed on the parameters. For models involving two attributes, these have been worked out. However, for models involving more than two attributes, the parameterization and the constraints are nontrivial and currently unknown. In this article, the general parameterization of the Reduced RUM as a logit model involving any number of attributes and the associated parameter constraints are derived. As a practical illustration, the LCA routine in Mplus is used for fitting the Reduced RUM to two synthetic data sets and to a real-world data set; for comparison, the results obtained by using the MCMC implementation in OpenBUGS are also provided.

  18. Parameterization of ionization rate by auroral electron precipitation in Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hiraki

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We simulate auroral electron precipitation into the Jovian atmosphere in which electron multi-directional scattering and energy degradation processes are treated exactly with a Monte Carlo technique. We make a parameterization of the calculated ionization rate of the neutral gas by electron impact in a similar way as used for the Earth's aurora. Our method allows the altitude distribution of the ionization rate to be obtained as a function of an arbitrary initial energy spectrum in the range of 1–200 keV. It also includes incident angle dependence and an arbitrary density distribution of molecular hydrogen. We show that there is little dependence of the estimated ionospheric conductance on atomic species such as H and He. We compare our results with those of recent studies with different electron transport schemes by adapting our parameterization to their atmospheric conditions. We discuss the intrinsic problem of their simplified assumption. The ionospheric conductance, which is important for Jupiter's magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system, is estimated to vary by a factor depending on the electron energy spectrum based on recent observation and modeling. We discuss this difference through the relation with field-aligned current and electron spectrum.

  19. Parameterization of ionization rate by auroral electron precipitation in Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hiraki

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We simulate auroral electron precipitation into the Jovian atmosphere in which electron multi-directional scattering and energy degradation processes are treated exactly with a Monte Carlo technique. We make a parameterization of the calculated ionization rate of the neutral gas by electron impact in a similar way as used for the Earth's aurora. Our method allows the altitude distribution of the ionization rate to be obtained as a function of an arbitrary initial energy spectrum in the range of 1–200 keV. It also includes incident angle dependence and an arbitrary density distribution of molecular hydrogen. We show that there is little dependence of the estimated ionospheric conductance on atomic species such as H and He. We compare our results with those of recent studies with different electron transport schemes by adapting our parameterization to their atmospheric conditions. We discuss the intrinsic problem of their simplified assumption. The ionospheric conductance, which is important for Jupiter's magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system, is estimated to vary by a factor depending on the electron energy spectrum based on recent observation and modeling. We discuss this difference through the relation with field-aligned current and electron spectrum.

  20. Parameterization of surface irradiance and primary production in Århus Bay, SW Kattegat, Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, Lars Chresten; Sørensen, Helene Munk

    2009-01-01

    on the present PAR parameterization combined with the simple primary production relation. The developed PAR parameterization, which calculates total daily surface irradiance per day (M photons m-2 d-1), can be applied in any ecological application taking into account that it was developed for the latitude of 56......The aims of the present study were to develop a parameterization of a one-year-long observed PAR time-series, apply the PAR parameterization in a primary production relation, and compare calculated and observed time-series of primary production. The PAR parameterization was applied in the generally...... used relation for the primary production (P d): P d = a(BI 0 Z 0) + b with observed photic depth (Z 0) and Chl-a concentrations (B). It was tested whether the PAR parameterization in combination with this simple relation for primary production was able to describe the actual measured primary production...

  1. A clinically parameterized mathematical model of Shigella immunity to inform vaccine design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney L Davis

    Full Text Available We refine and clinically parameterize a mathematical model of the humoral immune response against Shigella, a diarrheal bacteria that infects 80-165 million people and kills an estimated 600,000 people worldwide each year. Using Latin hypercube sampling and Monte Carlo simulations for parameter estimation, we fit our model to human immune data from two Shigella EcSf2a-2 vaccine trials and a rechallenge study in which antibody and B-cell responses against Shigella's lipopolysaccharide (LPS and O-membrane proteins (OMP were recorded. The clinically grounded model is used to mathematically investigate which key immune mechanisms and bacterial targets confer immunity against Shigella and to predict which humoral immune components should be elicited to create a protective vaccine against Shigella. The model offers insight into why the EcSf2a-2 vaccine had low efficacy and demonstrates that at a group level a humoral immune response induced by EcSf2a-2 vaccine or wild-type challenge against Shigella's LPS or OMP does not appear sufficient for protection. That is, the model predicts an uncontrolled infection of gut epithelial cells that is present across all best-fit model parameterizations when fit to EcSf2a-2 vaccine or wild-type challenge data. Using sensitivity analysis, we explore which model parameter values must be altered to prevent the destructive epithelial invasion by Shigella bacteria and identify four key parameter groups as potential vaccine targets or immune correlates: 1 the rate that Shigella migrates into the lamina propria or epithelium, 2 the rate that memory B cells (BM differentiate into antibody-secreting cells (ASC, 3 the rate at which antibodies are produced by activated ASC, and 4 the Shigella-specific BM carrying capacity. This paper underscores the need for a multifaceted approach in ongoing efforts to design an effective Shigella vaccine.

  2. Wind speed dependent size-resolved parameterization for the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available For oceans to be a significant source of primary organic aerosol (POA, sea spray aerosol (SSA must be highly enriched with organics relative to the bulk seawater. We propose that organic enrichment at the air-sea interface, chemical composition of seawater, and the aerosol size are three main parameters controlling the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol (OMSSA. To test this hypothesis, we developed a new marine POA emission function based on a conceptual relationship between the organic enrichment at the air-sea interface and surface wind speed. The resulting parameterization is explored using aerosol chemical composition and surface wind speed from Atlantic and Pacific coastal stations, and satellite-derived ocean concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic carbon, and particulate organic carbon. Of all the parameters examined, a multi-variable logistic regression revealed that the combination of 10 m wind speed and surface chlorophyll-a concentration ([Chl-a] are the most consistent predictors of OMSSA. This relationship, combined with the published aerosol size dependence of OMSSA, resulted in a new parameterization for the organic mass fraction of SSA. Global emissions of marine POA are investigated here by applying this newly-developed relationship to existing sea spray emission functions, satellite-derived [Chl-a], and modeled 10 m winds. Analysis of model simulations shows that global annual submicron marine organic emission associated with sea spray is estimated to be from 2.8 to 5.6 Tg C yr−1. This study provides additional evidence that marine primary organic aerosols are a globally significant source of organics in the atmosphere.

  3. Collaborative Research: Reducing tropical precipitation biases in CESM — Tests of unified parameterizations with ARM observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Vincent [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Gettelman, Andrew [Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Morrison, Hugh [Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Bacmeister, Julio [Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Feingold, Graham [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Lee, Seoung-soo [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Williams, Christopher [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-09-14

    In state-of-the-art climate models, each cloud type is treated using its own separate cloud parameterization and its own separate microphysics parameterization. This use of separate schemes for separate cloud regimes is undesirable because it is theoretically unfounded, it hampers interpretation of results, and it leads to the temptation to overtune parameters. In this grant, we are creating a climate model that contains a unified cloud parameterization and a unified microphysics parameterization. This model will be used to address the problems of excessive frequency of drizzle in climate models and excessively early onset of deep convection in the Tropics over land. The resulting model will be compared with ARM observations.

  4. Central Africa Energy: Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Explore Flared Gas as an Energy Source Alternative to Biomass in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amber; White, Charles; Castillo, Christopher; Hitimana, Emmanuel; Nguyen, Kenny; Mishra, Shikher; Clark, Walt

    2014-01-01

    significant number rely on oil production as their primary source of revenue. Relative to its size and population density, the continent has a wealth of natural resources, including oil and natural gas deposits. The exploration of these resources is not a new endeavor, but rather one that spans decades, up to a century in some places. Their resources, if realized, could provide a great means of economic and social mobility for the people of Africa. Currently, Africa represents about 12 % of the energy market, yet at the same time, consumes only 3 % of the world's energy (Kasekende 2009). The higher

  5. Alternating Hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as alternating hemiplegia, with the goals of learning more about these disorders and finding ways to prevent, treat and, ultimately cure them. Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Alternating ...

  6. On the parameterized complexity of the workflow satisfiability problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crampton, Jason; Gutin, Gregory; Yeo, Anders

    2012-01-01

    an assignment of users to workflow steps that satisfies all the constraints. An algorithm for determining whether such an assignment exists is important, both as a static analysis tool for workflow specifications, and for the construction of run-time reference monitors for workflow management systems. Finding......A workflow specification defines a set of steps and the order in which those steps must be executed. Security requirements may impose constraints on which groups of users are permitted to perform subsets of those steps. A workflow specification is said to be satisfiable if there exists...... such an assignment is a hard problem in general, but work by Wang and Li in 2010 using the theory of parameterized complexity suggests that efficient algorithms exist under reasonable assumptions about workflow specifications. In this paper, we improve the complexity bounds for the workflow satisfiability problem...

  7. FSP (Full Space Parameterization), Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, G.A.; Hacker, C.J.; Pin, F.G.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes the modifications made to FSPv1.0 for the Full Space Parameterization (FSP) method, a new analytical method used to resolve underspecified systems of algebraic equations. The optimized code recursively searches for the necessary number of linearly independent vectors that are necessary to form the solution space. While doing this, it ensures that all possible combinations of solutions are checked, if needed, and handles complications which arise due to particular cases. In addition, two particular cases which cause failure of the FSP algorithm were discovered during testing of this new code. These cases are described in the context of how they are recognized and how they are handled by the new code. Finally, testing was performed on the new code using both isolated movements and complex trajectories for various mobile manipulators.

  8. Parameterized Facial Expression Synthesis Based on MPEG-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouzaiou Amaryllis

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of MPEG-4, one can include applications where virtual agents, utilizing both textual and multisensory data, including facial expressions and nonverbal speech help systems become accustomed to the actual feelings of the user. Applications of this technology are expected in educational environments, virtual collaborative workplaces, communities, and interactive entertainment. Facial animation has gained much interest within the MPEG-4 framework; with implementation details being an open research area (Tekalp, 1999. In this paper, we describe a method for enriching human computer interaction, focusing on analysis and synthesis of primary and intermediate facial expressions (Ekman and Friesen (1978. To achieve this goal, we utilize facial animation parameters (FAPs to model primary expressions and describe a rule-based technique for handling intermediate ones. A relation between FAPs and the activation parameter proposed in classical psychological studies is established, leading to parameterized facial expression analysis and synthesis notions, compatible with the MPEG-4 standard.

  9. New particle dependant parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Karoline; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    For detailed investigations of cloud microphysical processes an adiabatic air parcel model with entrainment is used. It represents a spectral bin model which explicitly solves the microphysical equations. The initiation of the ice phase is parameterized and describes the effects of different types of ice nuclei (mineral dust, soot, biological particles) in immersion, contact, and deposition modes. As part of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT), existing parameterizations have been modified for the present studies and new parameterizations have been developed mainly on the basis of the outcome of INUIT experiments. Deposition freezing in the model is dependant on the presence of dry particles and on ice supersaturation. The description of contact freezing combines the collision kernel of dry particles with the fraction of frozen drops as function of temperature and particle size. A new parameterization of immersion freezing has been coupled to the mass of insoluble particles contained in the drops using measured numbers of ice active sites per unit mass. Sensitivity studies have been performed with a convective temperature and dew point profile and with two dry aerosol particle number size distributions. Single and coupled freezing processes are studied with different types of ice nuclei (e.g., bacteria, illite, kaolinite, feldspar). The strength of convection is varied so that the simulated cloud reaches different levels of temperature. As a parameter to evaluate the results the ice water fraction is selected which is defined as the relation of the ice water content to the total water content. Ice water fractions between 0.1 and 0.9 represent mixed-phase clouds, larger than 0.9 ice clouds. The results indicate the sensitive parameters for the formation of mixed-phase and ice clouds are: 1. broad particle number size distribution with high number of small particles, 2. temperatures below -25°C, 3. specific mineral dust particles as ice nuclei such

  10. Resource-Parameterized Timing Analysis of Real-Time Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Legay, Axel; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2015-01-01

    Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are subject to platform-given resource constraints upon such resources as CPU, memory, and bus, in executing their functionalities. This causes the behavior of a verified application to deviate from its intended timing behavior when the application is integrated...... but also the platform once verfiied can be exploited by various applications. The dependent behaviors of application and platform are also analyzed by exploiting their individual models transformed from their independent models. To the end, we provide a highly configurable platform model that can...... be parameterized by various resource congurations. For analysis of application and platform models, we use two model checking techniques: symbolic and statistical model checking techniques of Uppaal. Our framework is demonstrated by a case study where a turn indicator system is analyzed with respect to various...

  11. Use of Cloud Computing to Calibrate a Highly Parameterized Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayley, K. H.; Schumacher, J.; MacMillan, G.; Boutin, L.

    2012-12-01

    We present a case study using cloud computing to facilitate the calibration of a complex and highly parameterized model of regional groundwater flow. The calibration dataset consisted of many (~1500) measurements or estimates of static hydraulic head, a high resolution time series of groundwater extraction and disposal rates at 42 locations and pressure monitoring at 147 locations with a total of more than one million raw measurements collected over a ten year pumping history, and base flow estimates at 5 surface water monitoring locations. This modeling project was undertaken to assess the sustainability of groundwater withdrawal and disposal plans for insitu heavy oil extraction in Northeast Alberta, Canada. The geological interpretations used for model construction were based on more than 5,000 wireline logs collected throughout the 30,865 km2 regional study area (RSA), and resulted in a model with 28 slices, and 28 hydro stratigraphic units (average model thickness of 700 m, with aquifers ranging from a depth of 50 to 500 m below ground surface). The finite element FEFLOW model constructed on this geological interpretation had 331,408 nodes and required 265 time steps to simulate the ten year transient calibration period. This numerical model of groundwater flow required 3 hours to run on a on a server with two, 2.8 GHz processers and 16 Gb. RAM. Calibration was completed using PEST. Horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity as well as specific storage for each unit were independent parameters. For the recharge and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the three aquifers with the most transient groundwater use, a pilot point parameterization was adopted. A 7*7 grid of pilot points was defined over the RSA that defined a spatially variable horizontal hydraulic conductivity or recharge field. A 7*7 grid of multiplier pilot points that perturbed the more regional field was then superimposed over the 3,600 km2 local study area (LSA). The pilot point

  12. Parameterization of wind turbine impacts on hydrodynamics and sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivier, Aurélie; Bennis, Anne-Claire; Pinon, Grégory; Magar, Vanesa; Gross, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Monopile foundations of offshore wind turbines modify the hydrodynamics and sediment transport at local and regional scales. The aim of this work is to assess these modifications and to parameterize them in a regional model. In the present study, this is achieved through a regional circulation model, coupled with a sediment transport module, using two approaches. One approach is to explicitly model the monopiles in the mesh as dry cells, and the other is to parameterize them by adding a drag force term to the momentum and turbulence equations. Idealised cases are run using hydrodynamical conditions and sediment grain sizes typical from the area located off Courseulles-sur-Mer (Normandy, France), where an offshore windfarm is under planning, to assess the capacity of the model to reproduce the effect of the monopile on the environment. Then, the model is applied to a real configuration on an area including the future offshore windfarm of Courseulles-sur-Mer. Four monopiles are represented in the model using both approaches, and modifications of the hydrodynamics and sediment transport are assessed over a tidal cycle. In relation to local hydrodynamic effects, it is observed that currents increase at the side of the monopile and decrease in front of and downstream of the monopile. In relation to sediment transport effect, the results show that resuspension and erosion occur around the monopile in locations where the current speed increases due to the monopile presence, and sediments deposit downstream where the bed shear stress is lower. During the tidal cycle, wakes downstream of the monopile reach the following monopile and modify the velocity magnitude and suspended sediment concentration patterns around the second monopile.

  13. Parameterization of tree-ring growth in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tychkov, Ivan; Popkova, Margarita; Shishov, Vladimir; Vaganov, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    No doubt, climate-tree growth relationship is an one of the useful and interesting subject of studying in dendrochronology. It provides an information of tree growth dependency on climatic environment, but also, gives information about growth conditions and whole tree-ring growth process for long-term periods. New parameterization approach of the Vaganov-Shashkin process-based model (VS-model) is developed to described critical process linking climate variables with tree-ring formation. The approach (co-called VS-Oscilloscope) is presented as a computer software with graphical interface. As most process-based tree-ring models, VS-model's initial purpose is to describe variability of tree-ring radial growth due to variability of climatic factors, but also to determinate principal factors limiting tree-ring growth. The principal factors affecting on the growth rate of cambial cells in the VS-model are temperature, day light and soil moisture. Detailed testing of VS-Oscilloscope was done for semi-arid area of southern Siberia (Khakassian region). Significant correlations between initial tree-ring chronologies and simulated tree-ring growth curves were obtained. Direct natural observations confirm obtained simulation results including unique growth characteristic for semi-arid habitats. New results concerning formation of wide and narrow rings under different climate conditions are considered. By itself the new parameterization approach (VS-oscilloscope) is an useful instrument for better understanding of various processes in tree-ring formation. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (RSF # 14-14-00219).

  14. Preprocessing and parameterizing bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements by singular value decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadgholi, Isar; Caytak, Herschel; Bolic, Miodrag; Batkin, Izmail; Shirmohammadi, Shervin

    2015-05-01

    In several applications of bioimpedance spectroscopy, the measured spectrum is parameterized by being fitted into the Cole equation. However, the extracted Cole parameters seem to be inconsistent from one measurement session to another, which leads to a high standard deviation of extracted parameters. This inconsistency is modeled with a source of random variations added to the voltage measurement carried out in the time domain. These random variations may originate from biological variations that are irrelevant to the evidence that we are investigating. Yet, they affect the voltage measured by using a bioimpedance device based on which magnitude and phase of impedance are calculated.By means of simulated data, we showed that Cole parameters are highly affected by this type of variation. We further showed that singular value decomposition (SVD) is an effective tool for parameterizing bioimpedance measurements, which results in more consistent parameters than Cole parameters. We propose to apply SVD as a preprocessing method to reconstruct denoised bioimpedance measurements. In order to evaluate the method, we calculated the relative difference between parameters extracted from noisy and clean simulated bioimpedance spectra. Both mean and standard deviation of this relative difference are shown to effectively decrease when Cole parameters are extracted from preprocessed data in comparison to being extracted from raw measurements.We evaluated the performance of the proposed method in distinguishing three arm positions, for a set of experiments including eight subjects. It is shown that Cole parameters of different positions are not distinguishable when extracted from raw measurements. However, one arm position can be distinguished based on SVD scores. Moreover, all three positions are shown to be distinguished by two parameters, R0/R∞ and Fc, when Cole parameters are extracted from preprocessed measurements. These results suggest that SVD could be considered as an

  15. Sensitivity of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation to different gravity wave parameterizations in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirber, Sebastian; Manzini, Elisa; Krismer, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The stratospheric Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) of equatorial zonal winds is driven to by a wide range of waves originating from the troposphere. Due to the limited spatial resolution of general circulation models (GCM), unresolved waves like gravity waves (GW) need to be parameterized in order that GCMs can simulate the QBO. Only a fraction of GCMs which took part in the climate-model intercomparison project phase 5 (CMIP5) produce a QBO. Under climate change conditions, those models reveal diverging behaviour in various QBO characteristics, most notably the QBO period. While some models show a shortening of the QBO period, others produce a longer period in a future climate. In this work, we address this unconformity in QBO characteristics predicted in climate models by exploring the sensitivity of simulated QBO characteristics to different parameterizations of gravity waves, leaving all remaining influential factors like model resolution and experimental setup untouched. Using the atmospheric GCM ECHAM6 we perform AMIP style simulations of both present and warming climate, by increasing sea surface temperatures (SST) uniformely by 4K, with three different set-ups of GW parameterizations: (1) GWs are treated via the Hines parameterization (HINES) which launches a constant, prescribed spectrum of GWs. (2) A specific source spectrum of GW is prescribed, which the GW propagation scheme after Alexander and Dunkerton (AD) maps to momentum deposition in the regions of GW breaking. (3) A GW spectrum dependent on the background wind and heating characteristics of a convectively active gridcell is coupled to the propagation scheme of Alexander and Dunkerton (BERES+AD). While HINES and AD generate constant wave sources in both present and warmer climate, GW properties in BERES+AD change according to the simulated climatic conditions. All three GW setups are tuned to reproduce QBO characteristics of present day climate, including a QBO period of roughly 28 months. Under

  16. Stochastic Parameterization: Towards a new view of Weather and Climate Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.T. Crommelin (Daan); not CWI et al

    2017-01-01

    htmlabstractThe last decade has seen the success of stochastic parameterizations in short-term, medium-range and seasonal ensembles: operational weather centers now routinely use stochastic parameterization schemes to better represent model inadequacy and improve the quantification of forecast

  17. Distance parameterization for efficient seismic history matching with the ensemble Kalman Filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, O.; Arts, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), in combination with travel-time parameterization, provides a robust and flexible method for quantitative multi-model history matching to time-lapse seismic data. A disadvantage of the parameterization in terms of travel-times is that it requires simulation of

  18. A shallow convection parameterization for the non-hydrostatic MM5 mesoscale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaman, N.L.; Kain, J.S.; Deng, A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A shallow convection parameterization suitable for the Pennsylvannia State University (PSU)/National Center for Atmospheric Research nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) is being developed at PSU. The parameterization is based on parcel perturbation theory developed in conjunction with a 1-D Mellor Yamada 1.5-order planetary boundary layer scheme and the Kain-Fritsch deep convection model.

  19. On the Dependence of Cloud Feedbacks on Physical Parameterizations in WRF Aquaplanet Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, Grégory; Suselj, Kay; Brient, Florent

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the effects of physical parameterizations on cloud feedback uncertainty in response to climate change. For this purpose, we construct an ensemble of eight aquaplanet simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In each WRF-derived simulation, we replace only one parameterization at a time while all other parameters remain identical. By doing so, we aim to (i) reproduce cloud feedback uncertainty from state-of-the-art climate models and (ii) understand how parametrizations impact cloud feedbacks. Our results demonstrate that this ensemble of WRF simulations, which differ only in physical parameterizations, replicates the range of cloud feedback uncertainty found in state-of-the-art climate models. We show that microphysics and convective parameterizations govern the magnitude and sign of cloud feedbacks, mostly due to tropical low-level clouds in subsidence regimes. Finally, this study highlights the advantages of using WRF to analyze cloud feedback mechanisms owing to its plug-and-play parameterization capability.

  20. Exploring Alternative Assessment Strategies in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stears, Michèle; Gopal, Nirmala

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge children bring to the classroom or construct in the classroom may find expression in a variety of activities and is often not measurable with the traditional assessment instruments used in science classrooms. Different approaches to assessment are required to accommodate the various ways in which learners construct knowledge in…

  1. Exploring alternative assessment strategies in science classrooms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The knowledge children bring to the classroom or construct in the classroom may find expression in a variety of activities and is often not measurable with the traditional assessment instruments used in science classrooms. Different approaches to assessment are required to accommodate the various ways in which learners ...

  2. Convective Self-Aggregation in the Super-Parameterized CAM: Implications for the MJO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, N.

    2014-12-01

    Mesoscale aggregation of convection has been reported in cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations with relatively small (100-1000km), non-rotating domains. This aggregation is thought to be driven by feedbacks between convection, radiation and tropospheric moisture. It has been suggested that the observed Madden- Julian Oscillation (MJO) is a "moisture mode" driven by physics similar to that of the simulated small-scale aggregation, but alternative theories of the MJO remain viable. Here we show that a super-parameterized global model run with uniform sea surface temperature and no rotation also produces convective aggregation, with a characteristic scale of 2000-5000km. Moisture and moist static energy budgets indicate that the mechanisms driving this large-scale aggregation are similar to those driving aggregation in CRMs. When rotation is added, the model simulates robust MJO activity. A set of mechanism-denial experiments and runs with intermediate rotation are used to link the non-rotating aggregation to the MJO. Implications for MJO theories will be discussed.

  3. Experimental Validation of Depth Cameras for the Parameterization of Functional Balance of Patients in Clinical Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco-Ángel Moreno

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, patients’ balance can be assessed using standard scales. Two of the most validated clinical tests for measuring balance are the Timed Up and Go (TUG test and the MultiDirectional Reach Test (MDRT. Nowadays, inertial sensors (IS are employed for kinematic analysis of functional tests in the clinical setting, and have become an alternative to expensive, 3D optical motion capture systems. In daily clinical practice, however, IS-based setups are yet cumbersome and inconvenient to apply. Current depth cameras have the potential for such application, presenting many advantages as, for instance, being portable, low-cost and minimally-invasive. This paper aims at experimentally validating to what extent this technology can substitute IS for the parameterization and kinematic analysis of the TUG and the MDRT tests. Twenty healthy young adults were recruited as participants to perform five different balance tests while kinematic data from their movements were measured by both a depth camera and an inertial sensor placed on their trunk. The reliability of the camera’s measurements is examined through the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC, whilst the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r is computed to evaluate the correlation between both sensor’s measurements, revealing excellent reliability and strong correlations in most cases.

  4. Parameterization of photon beam dosimetry for a linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebron, Sharon; Barraclough, Brendan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 and J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Lu, Bo; Yan, Guanghua; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan G.; Liu, Chihray, E-mail: liucr@shands.ufl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, accurate data acquisition of photon beam dosimetric quantities is important for (1) beam modeling data input into a treatment planning system (TPS), (2) comparing measured and TPS modeled data, (3) the quality assurance process of a linear accelerator’s (Linac) beam characteristics, (4) the establishment of a standard data set for comparison with other data, etcetera. Parameterization of the photon beam dosimetry creates a data set that is portable and easy to implement for different applications such as those previously mentioned. The aim of this study is to develop methods to parameterize photon beam dosimetric quantities, including percentage depth doses (PDDs), profiles, and total scatter output factors (S{sub cp}). Methods: S{sub cp}, PDDs, and profiles for different field sizes, depths, and energies were measured for a Linac using a cylindrical 3D water scanning system. All data were smoothed for the analysis and profile data were also centered, symmetrized, and geometrically scaled. The S{sub cp} data were analyzed using an exponential function. The inverse square factor was removed from the PDD data before modeling and the data were subsequently analyzed using exponential functions. For profile modeling, one halfside of the profile was divided into three regions described by exponential, sigmoid, and Gaussian equations. All of the analytical functions are field size, energy, depth, and, in the case of profiles, scan direction specific. The model’s parameters were determined using the minimal amount of measured data necessary. The model’s accuracy was evaluated via the calculation of absolute differences between the measured (processed) and calculated data in low gradient regions and distance-to-agreement analysis in high gradient regions. Finally, the results of dosimetric quantities obtained by the fitted models for a different machine were also assessed. Results: All of the differences in the PDDs’ buildup and the

  5. Reduced efficacy of marine cloud brightening geoengineering due to in-plume aerosol coagulation: parameterization and global implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The intentional enhancement of cloud albedo via controlled sea-spray injection from ships (marine cloud brightening has been proposed as a possible method to control anthropogenic global warming; however, there remains significant uncertainty in the efficacy of this method due to, amongst other factors, uncertainties in aerosol and cloud microphysics. A major assumption used in recent cloud- and climate-modeling studies is that all sea spray was emitted uniformly into some oceanic grid boxes, and thus these studies did not account for subgrid aerosol coagulation within the sea-spray plumes. We explore the evolution of these sea-salt plumes using a multi-shelled Gaussian plume model with size-resolved aerosol coagulation. We determine how the final number of particles depends on meteorological conditions, including wind speed and boundary-layer stability, as well as the emission rate and size distribution of aerosol emitted. Under previously proposed injection rates and typical marine conditions, we find that the number of aerosol particles is reduced by over 50%, but this reduction varies from under 10% to over 90% depending on the conditions. We provide a computationally efficient parameterization for cloud-resolving and global-scale models to account for subgrid-scale coagulation, and we implement this parameterization in a global-scale aerosol-climate model. While designed to address subgrid-scale coagulation of sea-salt particles, the parameterization is generally applicable for coagulation of subgrid-scale aerosol from point sources. We find that accounting for this subgrid-scale coagulation reduces cloud droplet number concentrations by 46% over emission regions, and reduces the global mean radiative flux perturbation from −1.5 W m−2 to −0.8 W m−2.

  6. Parameterization of orthonormal third-order matrices for linear calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Moll

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper derives a parametric definition of the set of third-order orthonormal real matrices.The derivation is done in several partial steps. First a generalized unit matrix is introduced as the simplest case of an orthonormal matrix along with some of its properties and, subsequently, the properties of orthonormal matrices are proved that will be needed.The derivation itself of a parametric definition of third-order orthonormal matrices is based on the numbers of zero entries that are theoretically possible. Therefore, it is first proved that a third-order square matrix with the number of non-zero entries different from nine, eight, five, or three cannot be orthonormal.The number of different ways in which the set of third-order orthonormal matrices can be pa­ra­me­te­ri­zed is greater than one. The concepts of a rotation matrix and a flop-enabling rotation matrix are introduced to motivate the parameterization chosen.Given the product of two rotation matrices and one flop-enabling rotation matrix, it is first proved that it is a third-order orthonormal matrix. In the last part of the paper, it is then proved that such a product already includes, as special cases, all the third-order orthonormal matrices. It is thus a parametric definition of all third-order orthonormal matrices.

  7. Parameterization-based tracking for the P2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Iurii

    2017-08-01

    The P2 experiment in Mainz aims to determine the weak mixing angle θW at low momentum transfer by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry of elastic electronproton scattering. In order to achieve the intended precision of Δ(sin2 θW)/sin2θW = 0:13% within the planned 10 000 hours of running the experiment has to operate at the rate of 1011 detected electrons per second. Although it is not required to measure the kinematic parameters of each individual electron, every attempt is made to achieve the highest possible throughput in the track reconstruction chain. In the present work a parameterization-based track reconstruction method is described. It is a variation of track following, where the results of the computation-heavy steps, namely the propagation of a track to the further detector plane, and the fitting, are pre-calculated, and expressed in terms of parametric analytic functions. This makes the algorithm extremely fast, and well-suited for an implementation on an FPGA. The method also takes implicitly into account the actual phase space distribution of the tracks already at the stage of candidate construction. Compared to a simple algorithm, that does not use such information, this allows reducing the combinatorial background by many orders of magnitude, down to O(1) background candidate per one signal track. The method is developed specifically for the P2 experiment in Mainz, and the presented implementation is tightly coupled to the experimental conditions.

  8. Water activity in polyol/water systems: new UNIFAC parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolli, C.; Peter, Th.

    2005-06-01

    Water activities of a series of polyol/water systems were measured with an AquaLab dew point water activity meter at 298K. The investigated polyols with carbon numbers from n=2-7 are all in liquid state at room temperature and miscible at any molar ratio with water. In aqueous solutions with the same molar concentration, the diols with lower molecular weight lead to lower water activities than those with higher molecular weights. For diols with four or more carbon atoms, the hydrophilicity shows considerable differences between isomers: The 1,2-isomers - consisting of a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic part - bind less strongly to water than isomers with a more balanced distribution of the hydroxyl groups. The experimental water activities were compared with the predictions of the group contribution method UNIFAC: the model predictions overestimate the water activity of water/polyol systems of substances with two or more hydroxyl groups and can not describe the decreased binding to water of isomers with hydrophobic tails. To account for the differences between isomers, a modified UNIFAC parameterization was developed, that allows to discriminate between three types of alkyl groups depending on their position in the molecule. These new group interaction parameters were calculated using water activities of alcohol/water mixtures. This leads to a distinctly improved agreement of model predictions with experimental results while largely keeping the simplicity of the functional group approach.

  9. Water activity in polyol/water systems: new UNIFAC parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Marcolli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Water activities of a series of polyol/water systems were measured with an AquaLab dew point water activity meter at 298K. The investigated polyols with carbon numbers from n=2-7 are all in liquid state at room temperature and miscible at any molar ratio with water. In aqueous solutions with the same molar concentration, the diols with lower molecular weight lead to lower water activities than those with higher molecular weights. For diols with four or more carbon atoms, the hydrophilicity shows considerable differences between isomers: The 1,2-isomers - consisting of a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic part - bind less strongly to water than isomers with a more balanced distribution of the hydroxyl groups. The experimental water activities were compared with the predictions of the group contribution method UNIFAC: the model predictions overestimate the water activity of water/polyol systems of substances with two or more hydroxyl groups and can not describe the decreased binding to water of isomers with hydrophobic tails. To account for the differences between isomers, a modified UNIFAC parameterization was developed, that allows to discriminate between three types of alkyl groups depending on their position in the molecule. These new group interaction parameters were calculated using water activities of alcohol/water mixtures. This leads to a distinctly improved agreement of model predictions with experimental results while largely keeping the simplicity of the functional group approach.

  10. Bifurcation of solutions of separable parameterized equations into lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Qiu Shen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Many applications give rise to separable parameterized equations of the form $A(y, muz+b(y, mu=0$, where $y in mathbb{R}^n$, $z in mathbb{R}^N$ and the parameter $mu in mathbb{R}$; here $A(y, mu$ is an $(N+n imes N$ matrix and $b(y, mu in mathbb{R}^{N+n}$. Under the assumption that $A(y,mu$ has full rank we showed in [21] that bifurcation points can be located by solving a reduced equation of the form $f(y, mu=0$. In this paper we extend that method to the case that $A(y,mu$ has rank deficiency one at the bifurcation point. At such a point the solution curve $(y,mu,z$ branches into infinitely many additional solutions, which form a straight line. A numerical method for reducing the problem to a smaller space and locating such a bifurcation point is given. Applications to equilibrium solutions of nonlinear ordinary equations and solutions of discretized partial differential equations are provided.

  11. Frozen soil parameterization in a distributed biosphere hydrological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a frozen soil parameterization has been modified and incorporated into a distributed biosphere hydrological model (WEB-DHM. The WEB-DHM with the frozen scheme was then rigorously evaluated in a small cold area, the Binngou watershed, against the in-situ observations from the WATER (Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research. First, by using the original WEB-DHM without the frozen scheme, the land surface parameters and two van Genuchten parameters were optimized using the observed surface radiation fluxes and the soil moistures at upper layers (5, 10 and 20 cm depths at the DY station in July. Second, by using the WEB-DHM with the frozen scheme, two frozen soil parameters were calibrated using the observed soil temperature at 5 cm depth at the DY station from 21 November 2007 to 20 April 2008; while the other soil hydraulic parameters were optimized by the calibration of the discharges at the basin outlet in July and August that covers the annual largest flood peak in 2008. With these calibrated parameters, the WEB-DHM with the frozen scheme was then used for a yearlong validation from 21 November 2007 to 20 November 2008. Results showed that the WEB-DHM with the frozen scheme has given much better performance than the WEB-DHM without the frozen scheme, in the simulations of soil moisture profile at the cold regions catchment and the discharges at the basin outlet in the yearlong simulation.

  12. A trans-dimensional polynomial-spline parameterization for gradient-based geoacoustic inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Gavin; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W; Dettmer, Jan

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a polynomial spline-based parameterization for trans-dimensional geoacoustic inversion. The parameterization is demonstrated for both simulated and measured data and shown to be an effective method of representing sediment geoacoustic profiles dominated by gradients, as typically occur, for example, in muddy seabeds. Specifically, the spline parameterization is compared using the deviance information criterion (DIC) to the standard stack-of-homogeneous layers parameterization for the inversion of bottom-loss data measured at a muddy seabed experiment site on the Malta Plateau. The DIC is an information criterion that is well suited to trans-D Bayesian inversion and is introduced to geoacoustics in this paper. Inversion results for both parameterizations are in good agreement with measurements on a sediment core extracted at the site. However, the spline parameterization more accurately resolves the power-law like structure of the core density profile and provides smaller overall uncertainties in geoacoustic parameters. In addition, the spline parameterization is found to be more parsimonious, and hence preferred, according to the DIC. The trans-dimensional polynomial spline approach is general, and applicable to any inverse problem for gradient-based profiles. [Work supported by ONR.].

  13. Assessment of Noah land surface model with various runoff parameterizations over a Tibetan river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Donghai; Van Der Velde, Rogier; Su, Zhongbo; Wen, Jun; Wang, Xin

    2017-02-01

    Runoff parameterizations currently adopted by the (i) Noah-MP model, (ii) Community Land Model (CLM), and (iii) CLM with variable infiltration capacity hydrology (CLM-VIC) are incorporated into the structure of Noah land surface model, and the impact of these parameterizations on the runoff simulations is investigated for a Tibetan river. Four numerical experiments are conducted with the default Noah and three aforementioned runoff parameterizations. Each experiment is forced with the same set of atmospheric forcing, vegetation, and soil parameters. In addition, the Community Earth System Model database provides the maximum surface saturated area parameter for the Noah-MP and CLM parameterizations. A single-year recurrent spin-up is adopted for the initialization of each model run to achieve equilibrium states. Comparison with discharge measurements shows that each runoff parameterization produces significant differences in the separation of total runoff into surface and subsurface components and that the soil water storage-based parameterizations (Noah and CLM-VIC) outperform the groundwater table-based parameterizations (Noah-MP and CLM) for the seasonally frozen and high-altitude Tibetan river. A parameter sensitivity experiment illustrates that this underperformance of the groundwater table-based parameterizations cannot be resolved through calibration. Further analyses demonstrate that the simulations of other surface water and energy budget components are insensitive to the selected runoff parameterizations, due to the strong control of the atmosphere on simulated land surface fluxes induced by the diurnal dependence of the roughness length for heat transfer and the large water retention capacity of the highly organic top soils over the plateau.

  14. Development and testing of an aerosol-stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, P.Q.; Meyers, M.P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Cotton, W.R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The aim of this new project is to develop an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary layer clouds. Our approach is to create, test, and implement a bulk-microphysics/aerosol model using data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites and large-eddy simulation (LES) explicit bin-resolving aerosol/microphysics models. The primary objectives of this work are twofold. First, we need the prediction of number concentrations of activated aerosol which are transferred to the droplet spectrum, so that the aerosol population directly affects the cloud formation and microphysics. Second, we plan to couple the aerosol model to the gas and aqueous-chemistry module that will drive the aerosol formation and growth. We begin by exploring the feasibility of performing cloud-resolving simulations of Arctic stratus clouds over the North Slope CART site. These simulations using Colorado State University`s regional atmospheric modeling system (RAMS) will be useful in designing the structure of the cloud-resolving model and in interpreting data acquired at the North Slope site.

  15. Using Remote Sensing Data to Parameterize Ice Jam Modeling for a Northern Inland Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Slave River is a northern river in Canada, with ice being an important component of its flow regime for at least half of the year. During the spring breakup period, ice jams and ice-jam flooding can occur in the Slave River Delta, which is of benefit for the replenishment of moisture and sediment required to maintain the ecological integrity of the delta. To better understand the ice jam processes that lead to flooding, as well as the replenishment of the delta, the one-dimensional hydraulic river ice model RIVICE was implemented to simulate and explore ice jam formation in the Slave River Delta. Incoming ice volume, a crucial input parameter for RIVICE, was determined by the novel approach of using MODIS space-born remote sensing imagery. Space-borne and air-borne remote sensing data were used to parameterize the upstream ice volume available for ice jamming. Gauged data was used to complement modeling calibration and validation. HEC-RAS, another one-dimensional hydrodynamic model, was used to determine ice volumes required for equilibrium jams and the upper limit of ice volume that a jam can sustain, as well as being used as a threshold for the volumes estimated by the dynamic ice jam simulations using RIVICE. Parameter sensitivity analysis shows that morphological and hydraulic properties have great impacts on the ice jam length and water depth in the Slave River Delta.

  16. Richly parameterized linear models additive, time series, and spatial models using random effects

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges, James S

    2013-01-01

    A First Step toward a Unified Theory of Richly Parameterized Linear ModelsUsing mixed linear models to analyze data often leads to results that are mysterious, inconvenient, or wrong. Further compounding the problem, statisticians lack a cohesive resource to acquire a systematic, theory-based understanding of models with random effects.Richly Parameterized Linear Models: Additive, Time Series, and Spatial Models Using Random Effects takes a first step in developing a full theory of richly parameterized models, which would allow statisticians to better understand their analysis results. The aut

  17. Physical and Numerical Model Studies of Cross-flow Turbines Towards Accurate Parameterization in Array Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-flow turbines, often referred to as vertical-axis turbines, show potential for success in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications, ranging from small- to utility-scale installations in tidal/ocean currents and offshore wind. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices to the optimization of turbine arrays. It would be expensive and time-consuming to conduct physical model studies of large arrays at large model scales (to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers), and hence numerical techniques are generally better suited to explore the array design parameter space. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries (e.g., grid resolution into the viscous sublayer on turbine blades), the turbines' interaction with the energy resource (water current or wind) needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Models used today--a common model is the actuator disk concept--are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. This wake structure has been shown to create "constructive" interference in some cases, improving turbine performance in array configurations, in contrast with axial-flow, or horizontal axis devices. Towards a more accurate parameterization of cross-flow turbines, an extensive experimental study was carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed with wake measurement capability in a large cross-section tow tank. The experimental results were then "interpolated" using high-fidelity Navier--Stokes simulations, to gain insight into the turbine's near-wake. The study was designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. The end product of

  18. Natural Ocean Carbon Cycle Sensitivity to Parameterizations of the Recycling in a Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanou, A.; Romanski, J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivities of the oceanic biological pump within the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies ) climate modeling system are explored here. Results are presented from twin control simulations of the air-sea CO2 gas exchange using two different ocean models coupled to the same atmosphere. The two ocean models (Russell ocean model and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM) use different vertical coordinate systems, and therefore different representations of column physics. Both variants of the GISS climate model are coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model, NOBM), which computes prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2 and the deep ocean carbon transport and storage. In particular, the model differences due to remineralization rate changes are compared to differences attributed to physical processes modeled differently in the two ocean models such as ventilation, mixing, eddy stirring and vertical advection. GISSEH(GISSER) is found to underestimate mixed layer depth compared to observations by about 55% (10 %) in the Southern Ocean and overestimate it by about 17% (underestimate by 2%) in the northern high latitudes. Everywhere else in the global ocean, the two models underestimate the surface mixing by about 12-34 %, which prevents deep nutrients from reaching the surface and promoting primary production there. Consequently, carbon export is reduced because of reduced production at the surface. Furthermore, carbon export is particularly sensitive to remineralization rate changes in the frontal regions of the subtropical gyres and at the Equator and this sensitivity in the model is much higher than the sensitivity to physical processes such as vertical mixing, vertical advection and mesoscale eddy transport. At depth, GISSER, which has a significant warm bias, remineralizes nutrients and carbon faster thereby producing more nutrients and carbon at depth, which

  19. Towards a parameterization of convective wind gusts in Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largeron, Yann; Guichard, Françoise; Bouniol, Dominique; Couvreux, Fleur; Birch, Cathryn; Beucher, Florent

    2014-05-01

    ] who focused on the wet tropical Pacific region, and linked wind gusts to convective precipitation rates alone, here, we also analyse the subgrid wind distribution during convective events, and quantify the statistical moments (variance, skewness and kurtosis) in terms of mean wind speed and convective indexes such as DCAPE. Next step of the work will be to formulate a parameterization of the cold pool convective gust from those probability density functions and analytical formulaes obtained from basic energy budget models. References : [Carslaw et al., 2010] A review of natural aerosol interactions and feedbacks within the earth system. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10(4):1701{1737. [Engelstaedter et al., 2006] North african dust emissions and transport. Earth-Science Reviews, 79(1):73{100. [Knippertz and Todd, 2012] Mineral dust aerosols over the sahara: Meteorological controls on emission and transport and implications for modeling. Reviews of Geophysics, 50(1). [Marsham et al., 2011] The importance of the representation of deep convection for modeled dust-generating winds over west africa during summer.Geophysical Research Letters, 38(16). [Marticorena and Bergametti, 1995] Modeling the atmospheric dust cycle: 1. design of a soil-derived dust emission scheme. Journal of Geophysical Research, 100(D8):16415{16. [Menut, 2008] Sensitivity of hourly saharan dust emissions to ncep and ecmwf modeled wind speed. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984{2012), 113(D16). [Pierre et al., 2012] Impact of vegetation and soil moisture seasonal dynamics on dust emissions over the sahel. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984{2012), 117(D6). [Redelsperger et al., 2000] A parameterization of mesoscale enhancement of surface fluxes for large-scale models. Journal of climate, 13(2):402{421.

  20. Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket (APTR) is a novel concept for propulsion of space exploration or orbit transfer vehicles. APTR propulsion is provided by...

  1. 3D Triangular Mesh Parameterization with Semantic Features Based on Competitive Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Shun; Aoki, Kota; Nagahashi, Hiroshi

    In 3D computer graphics, mesh parameterization is a key technique for digital geometry processings such as morphing, shape blending, texture mapping, re-meshing and so on. Most of the previous approaches made use of an identical primitive domain to parameterize a mesh model. In recent works of mesh parameterization, more flexible and attractive methods that can create direct mappings between two meshes have been reported. These mappings are called “cross-parameterization” and typically preserve semantic feature correspondences between target meshes. This paper proposes a novel approach for parameterizing a mesh into another one directly. The main idea of our method is to combine a competitive learning and a least-square mesh techniques. It is enough to give some semantic feature correspondences between target meshes, even if they are in different shapes or in different poses.

  2. Improving Convection and Cloud Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The fundamental scientific objectives of our research are to use ARM observations and the NCAR CAM5 to understand the large-scale control on convection, and to develop improved convection and cloud parameterizations for use in GCMs.

  3. $J_{C}(B,T,\\epsilon)$ Parameterization for the ITER $Nb_{3}Sn$ Production

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; 10.1109/TASC.2009.2018278

    2009-01-01

    A number of models for the critical surface of Nb3Sn, and in general A15 superconductors, have been developed in the past years. This paper compares the most common parameterizations using consistent notation. Although the parameterizations appear dissimilar at first sight, they are in reality all based on a fit of the normalised pinning force vs. the reduced field, and have similar scalings for the critical field and critical temperature based on a Unified Scaling Law. In this paper we take the various parameterizations as a basis for a generic scaling proposed for the characterization and production follow-up of the ITER Nb3Sn strands. The accuracy of the scaling is estimated using the fitting residuals on various sets of Ic(B,T,e) data available in literature. We discuss the results, and give our view of the work towards a unified, practical parameterization.

  4. Parameterization of atmosphere–surface exchange of CO2 over sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Jensen, Bjarne; Glud, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    We suggest the application of a flux parameterization commonly used over terrestrial areas for calculation of CO2 fluxes over sea ice surfaces. The parameterization is based on resistance analogy.We present a concept for parameterization of the CO2 fluxes over sea ice suggesting to use properties...... of the atmosphere and sea ice surface that can be measured or calculated on a routine basis. Parameters, which can be used in the conceptual model, are analysed based on data sampled from a seasonal fast-ice area, and the different variables influencing the exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and ice...... chemistry in the ice are essential to estimate the partial pressure of pCO2 and CO2 flux. Further investigations of surface structure and snow cover and driving parameters such as heat flux, radiation, ice temperature and brine processes are required to adequately parameterize the surface resistance....

  5. Potential Vorticity based parameterization for specification of Upper troposphere/lower stratosphere ozone in atmospheric models

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Potential Vorticity based parameterization for specification of Upper troposphere/lower stratosphere ozone in atmospheric models - the data set consists of 3D O3...

  6. Parameterizing the competition between homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing in cirrus cloud formation – monodisperse ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Barahona

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a parameterization of cirrus cloud formation that computes the ice crystal number and size distribution under the presence of homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing. The parameterization is very simple to apply and is derived from the analytical solution of the cloud parcel equations, assuming that the ice nuclei population is monodisperse and chemically homogeneous. In addition to the ice distribution, an analytical expression is provided for the limiting ice nuclei number concentration that suppresses ice formation from homogeneous freezing. The parameterization is evaluated against a detailed numerical parcel model, and reproduces numerical simulations over a wide range of conditions with an average error of 6±33%. The parameterization also compares favorably against other formulations that require some form of numerical integration.

  7. A Generalized Simple Formulation of Convective Adjustment Timescale for Cumulus Convection Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convective adjustment timescale (τ) for cumulus clouds is one of the most influential parameters controlling parameterized convective precipitation in climate and weather simulation models at global and regional scales. Due to the complex nature of deep convection, a pres...

  8. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Biofuel Crops and Parameterization in the EPIC Biogeochemical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation describes year 1 field measurements of N2O fluxes and crop yields which are used to parameterize the EPIC biogeochemical model for the corresponding field site. Initial model simulations are also presented.

  9. Monomy National Wildlife Refuge Alternative Transportation Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) Alternative Transportation Study is to explore potential alternative transportation options that can...

  10. Marital Alternatives and Marital Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udry, J. Richard

    1981-01-01

    Explores the usefulness of "marital alternatives" as a dimension in explaining marital stability, using longitudinal data from a panel of married, White, urban couples from 16 urban areas. Results indicated the dimension of marital alternatives appeared to be a better predictor of marital disruption than marital satisfaction. (Author/RC)

  11. Towards improved parameterization of a macroscale hydrologic model in a discontinuous permafrost boreal forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endalamaw, Abraham; Bolton, W. Robert; Young-Robertson, Jessica M.; Morton, Don; Hinzman, Larry; Nijssen, Bart

    2017-09-01

    Modeling hydrological processes in the Alaskan sub-arctic is challenging because of the extreme spatial heterogeneity in soil properties and vegetation communities. Nevertheless, modeling and predicting hydrological processes is critical in this region due to its vulnerability to the effects of climate change. Coarse-spatial-resolution datasets used in land surface modeling pose a new challenge in simulating the spatially distributed and basin-integrated processes since these datasets do not adequately represent the small-scale hydrological, thermal, and ecological heterogeneity. The goal of this study is to improve the prediction capacity of mesoscale to large-scale hydrological models by introducing a small-scale parameterization scheme, which better represents the spatial heterogeneity of soil properties and vegetation cover in the Alaskan sub-arctic. The small-scale parameterization schemes are derived from observations and a sub-grid parameterization method in the two contrasting sub-basins of the Caribou Poker Creek Research Watershed (CPCRW) in Interior Alaska: one nearly permafrost-free (LowP) sub-basin and one permafrost-dominated (HighP) sub-basin. The sub-grid parameterization method used in the small-scale parameterization scheme is derived from the watershed topography. We found that observed soil thermal and hydraulic properties - including the distribution of permafrost and vegetation cover heterogeneity - are better represented in the sub-grid parameterization method than the coarse-resolution datasets. Parameters derived from the coarse-resolution datasets and from the sub-grid parameterization method are implemented into the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) mesoscale hydrological model to simulate runoff, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture in the two sub-basins of the CPCRW. Simulated hydrographs based on the small-scale parameterization capture most of the peak and low flows, with similar accuracy in both sub-basins, compared to

  12. Towards improved parameterization of a macroscale hydrologic model in a discontinuous permafrost boreal forest ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Endalamaw

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Modeling hydrological processes in the Alaskan sub-arctic is challenging because of the extreme spatial heterogeneity in soil properties and vegetation communities. Nevertheless, modeling and predicting hydrological processes is critical in this region due to its vulnerability to the effects of climate change. Coarse-spatial-resolution datasets used in land surface modeling pose a new challenge in simulating the spatially distributed and basin-integrated processes since these datasets do not adequately represent the small-scale hydrological, thermal, and ecological heterogeneity. The goal of this study is to improve the prediction capacity of mesoscale to large-scale hydrological models by introducing a small-scale parameterization scheme, which better represents the spatial heterogeneity of soil properties and vegetation cover in the Alaskan sub-arctic. The small-scale parameterization schemes are derived from observations and a sub-grid parameterization method in the two contrasting sub-basins of the Caribou Poker Creek Research Watershed (CPCRW in Interior Alaska: one nearly permafrost-free (LowP sub-basin and one permafrost-dominated (HighP sub-basin. The sub-grid parameterization method used in the small-scale parameterization scheme is derived from the watershed topography. We found that observed soil thermal and hydraulic properties – including the distribution of permafrost and vegetation cover heterogeneity – are better represented in the sub-grid parameterization method than the coarse-resolution datasets. Parameters derived from the coarse-resolution datasets and from the sub-grid parameterization method are implemented into the variable infiltration capacity (VIC mesoscale hydrological model to simulate runoff, evapotranspiration (ET, and soil moisture in the two sub-basins of the CPCRW. Simulated hydrographs based on the small-scale parameterization capture most of the peak and low flows, with similar accuracy in both sub

  13. Efficient Parameterization for Grey-box Model Identification of Complex Physical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Knudsen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    Grey box model identification preserves known physical structures in a model but with limits to the possible excitation, all parameters are rarely identifiable, and different parametrizations give significantly different model quality. Convenient methods to show which parameterizations are the be......Grey box model identification preserves known physical structures in a model but with limits to the possible excitation, all parameters are rarely identifiable, and different parametrizations give significantly different model quality. Convenient methods to show which parameterizations...

  14. A review of the theoretical basis for bulk mass flux convective parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Plant

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Most parameterizations for precipitating convection in use today are bulk schemes, in which an ensemble of cumulus elements with different properties is modelled as a single, representative entraining-detraining plume. We review the underpinning mathematical model for such parameterizations, in particular by comparing it with spectral models in which elements are not combined into the representative plume. The chief merit of a bulk model is that the representative plume can be described by an equation set with the same structure as that which describes each element in a spectral model. The equivalence relies on an ansatz for detrained condensate introduced by Yanai et al. (1973 and on a simplified microphysics. There are also conceptual differences in the closure of bulk and spectral parameterizations. In particular, we show that the convective quasi-equilibrium closure of Arakawa and Schubert (1974 for spectral parameterizations cannot be carried over to a bulk parameterization in a straightforward way. Quasi-equilibrium of the cloud work function assumes a timescale separation between a slow forcing process and a rapid convective response. But, for the natural bulk analogue to the cloud-work function, the relevant forcing is characterised by a different timescale, and so its quasi-equilibrium entails a different physical constraint. Closures of bulk parameterizations that use a parcel value of CAPE do not suffer from this timescale issue. However, the Yanai et al. (1973 ansatz must be invoked as a necessary ingredient of those closures.

  15. A simple parameterization for the rising velocity of bubbles in a liquid pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Hoon [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Hwan; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Byung Chul [FNC Technology, Co., Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The determination of the shape and rising velocity of gas bubbles in a liquid pool is of great importance in analyzing the radioactive aerosol emissions from nuclear power plant accidents in terms of the fission product release rate and the pool scrubbing efficiency of radioactive aerosols. This article suggests a simple parameterization for the gas bubble rising velocity as a function of the volume-equivalent bubble diameter; this parameterization does not require prior knowledge of bubble shape. This is more convenient than previously suggested parameterizations because it is given as a single explicit formula. It is also shown that a bubble shape diagram, which is very similar to the Grace's diagram, can be easily generated using the parameterization suggested in this article. Furthermore, the boundaries among the three bubble shape regimes in the E{sub o}–R{sub e} plane and the condition for the bypass of the spheroidal regime can be delineated directly from the parameterization formula. Therefore, the parameterization suggested in this article appears to be useful not only in easily determining the bubble rising velocity (e.g., in postulated severe accident analysis codes) but also in understanding the trend of bubble shape change due to bubble growth.

  16. An airfoil parameterization method for the representation and optimization of wind turbine special airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Song, Xiancheng

    2015-04-01

    A new airfoil shape parameterization method is developed, which extended the Bezier curve to the generalized form with adjustable shape parameters. The local control parameters at airfoil leading and trailing edge regions are enhanced, where have significant effect on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine. The results show this improved parameterization method has advantages in the fitting characteristics of geometry shape and aerodynamic performance comparing with other three common airfoil parameterization methods. The new parameterization method is then applied to airfoil shape optimization for wind turbine using Genetic Algorithm (GA), and the wind turbine special airfoil, DU93-W-210, is optimized to achieve the favorable Cl/Cd at specified flow conditions. The aerodynamic characteristic of the optimum airfoil is obtained by solving the RANS equations in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method, and the optimization convergence curves show that the new parameterization method has good convergence rate in less number of generations comparing with other methods. It is concluded that the new method not only has well controllability and completeness in airfoil shape representation and provides more flexibility in expressing the airfoil geometry shape, but also is capable to find efficient and optimal wind turbine airfoil. Additionally, it is shown that a suitable parameterization method is helpful for improving the convergence rate of the optimization algorithm.

  17. Climate Simulations from Super-parameterized and Conventional General Circulation Models with a Third-order Turbulence Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan-Man; Cheng, Anning

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution cloud-resolving model (CRM) embedded in a general circulation model (GCM) is an attractive alternative for climate modeling because it replaces all traditional cloud parameterizations and explicitly simulates cloud physical processes in each grid column of the GCM. Such an approach is called "Multiscale Modeling Framework." MMF still needs to parameterize the subgrid-scale (SGS) processes associated with clouds and large turbulent eddies because circulations associated with planetary boundary layer (PBL) and in-cloud turbulence are unresolved by CRMs with horizontal grid sizes on the order of a few kilometers. A third-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) has been implemented in the CRM component of the super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SPCAM). IPHOC is used to predict (or diagnose) fractional cloudiness and the variability of temperature and water vapor at scales that are not resolved on the CRM's grid. This model has produced promised results, especially for low-level cloud climatology, seasonal variations and diurnal variations (Cheng and Xu 2011, 2013a, b; Xu and Cheng 2013a, b). Because of the enormous computational cost of SPCAM-IPHOC, which is 400 times of a conventional CAM, we decided to bypass the CRM and implement the IPHOC directly to CAM version 5 (CAM5). IPHOC replaces the PBL/stratocumulus, shallow convection, and cloud macrophysics parameterizations in CAM5. Since there are large discrepancies in the spatial and temporal scales between CRM and CAM5, IPHOC used in CAM5 has to be modified from that used in SPCAM. In particular, we diagnose all second- and third-order moments except for the fluxes. These prognostic and diagnostic moments are used to select a double-Gaussian probability density function to describe the SGS variability. We also incorporate a diagnostic PBL height parameterization to represent the strong inversion above PBL. The goal of this study is to compare the simulation of the climatology from these three

  18. Mantle Dynamics Studied with Parameterized Prescription From Mineral Physics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, N.; Yuen, D.; Wentzcovich, R.; deKoker, N.

    2012-04-01

    The incorporation of important thermodynamic and transport properties into mantle convection models has taken a long time for the community to appreciate, even though it was first spurred by the high-pressure experimental work at Mainz a quarter of a century ago and the experimental work at Bayreuth and St. Louis. The two quantities whose effects have yet to be widely appreciated are thermal expansivity α and thermal conductivity k, which are shown to impact mantle dynamics and thermal history in more ways than geoscientists have previously imagined. We have constructed simple parameterization schemes, which are cast analytically for describing α and k over a wide range of temperatures and pressures corresponding to the Earth's mantle. This approach employs the thermodynamics data set drawn from the VLAB at the University of Minnesota based on first-principles density functional theory [1] and also recent laboratory data from the Bayreuth group [2]. Using analytical formulae to determine α and k increases the computational speed of the convection code with respect to employing pre-calculated look-up tables and allows us to sweep out a wide parameter space. Our results, which also incorporate temperature and pressure dependent viscosity show the following prominent features: 1) The temperature-dependence of α is important in the upper mantle. It enhances strongly the rising hot plumes and inhibits the cold downwellings, thus making subduction more difficult for young slabs. 2) The pressure dependence of α is dominant in the lower mantle. It focuses upwellings and speeds them up during their upward rise. 3) The temperature-dependence of the thermal conductivity helps to homogenize the lateral thermal anomalies in cold downwellings and helps to maintain the heat in the upwellings, thus, in concert with alpha, helps to encourage fast hot plumes. 4) The lattice thermal conductivity of post-perovskite plays an important role in heat-transfer in the lower mantle and

  19. Parameterization and validation of an ungulate-pasture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkarinen, Antti-Juhani; Kumpula, Jouko; Tahvonen, Olli

    2017-10-01

    Ungulate grazing and trampling strongly affect pastures and ecosystems throughout the world. Ecological population models are used for studying these systems and determining the guidelines for sustainable and economically viable management. However, the effect of trampling and other resource wastage is either not taken into account or quantified with data in earlier models. Also, the ability of models to describe the herbivore impact on pastures is usually not validated. We used a detailed model and data to study the level of winter- and summertime lichen wastage by reindeer and the effects of wastage on population sizes and management. We also validated the model with respect to its ability of predicting changes in lichen biomass and compared the actual management in herding districts with model results. The modeling efficiency value (0.75) and visual comparison between the model predictions and data showed that the model was able to describe the changes in lichen pastures caused by reindeer grazing and trampling. At the current lichen biomass levels in the northernmost Finland, the lichen wastage varied from 0 to 1 times the lichen intake during winter and from 6 to 10 times the intake during summer. With a higher value for wastage, reindeer numbers and net revenues were lower in the economically optimal solutions. Higher wastage also favored the use of supplementary feeding in the optimal steady state. Actual reindeer numbers in the districts were higher than in the optimal steady-state solutions for the model in 18 herding districts out of 20. Synthesis and applications . We show that a complex model can be used for analyzing ungulate-pasture dynamics and sustainable management if the model is parameterized and validated for the system. Wastage levels caused by trampling and other causes should be quantified with data as they strongly affect the results and management recommendations. Summertime lichen wastage caused by reindeer is higher than expected, which

  20. Growing Alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Mai Corlin

    2014-01-01

    From 2014, Anhui Province will pilot a reform of the residential land market in China, thus integrating rural Anhui in the national housing market. In contrast, artist and activist Ou Ning has proposed the Bishan time money currency, intending to establish an alternative economic circuit in Bishan...

  1. Coupled economic-ecological models for ecosystem-based fishery management: Exploration of trade-offs between model complexity and management needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunberg, Eric; Holland, Dan; Nielsen, J. Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    and parameterize them is greater and these models tend to require trade-offs such as the inability to quantify uncertainty or model human behaviour as accurately as can be done with models of individual fisheries. The theme session was organized as a moderated panel format representing a progression of economic......Ecosystem based fishery management has moved beyond rhetorical statements calling for a more holistic approach to resource management, to implementing decisions on resource use that are compatible with goals of maintaining ecosystem health and resilience. Coupled economic-ecological models...... are a primary tool for informing these decisions. Recognizing the importance of these models, the International Council for the Exploration of the Seas (ICES) formed a Study Group on Integration of Economics, Stock Assessment and Fisheries Management (SGIMM) to explore alternative modelling approaches...

  2. Impact of cloud parameterization on the numerical simulation of a super cyclone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, M.S.; Pattnaik, S.; Salvekar, P.S. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune (India)

    2012-07-01

    This study examines the role of parameterization of convection and explicit moisture processes on the simulated track, intensity and inner core structure of Orissa super cyclone (1999) in Bay of Bengal (north Indian Ocean). Sensitivity experiments are carried out to examine the impact of cumulus parameterization schemes (CPS) using MM5 model (Version 3.7) in a two-way nested domain (D1 and D2) configuration at horizontal resolutions (45-15 km). Three different cumulus parameterization schemes, namely Grell (Gr), Betts-Miller (BM) and updated Kain Fritsch (KF2), are tested. It is noted that track and intensity both are very sensitive to CPS and comparatively, KF2 predicts them reasonably well. Particularly, the rapid intensification phase of the super cyclone is best simulated by KF2 compared to other CPS. To examine the effect of the cumulus parameterization scheme at high resolution (5 km), the three-domain configuration (45-15-5 km resolution) is utilized. Based on initial results, KF2 scheme is used for both the domains (D1 and D2). Two experiments are conducted: one in which KF2 is used as CPS and another in which no CPS is used in the third domain. The intensity is well predicted when no CPS is used in the innermost domain. The sensitivity experiments are also carried out to examine the impact from microphysics parameterization schemes (MPS). Four cloud microphysics parameterization schemes, namely mixed phase (MP), Goddard microphysics with Graupel (GG), Reisner Graupel (RG) and Schultz (Sc), are tested in these experiments. It is noted that the tropical cyclone tracks and intensity variation have considerable sensitivity to the varying cloud microphysical parameterization schemes. The MPS of MP and Sc could very well capture the rapid intensification phase. The final intensity is well predicted by MP, which is overestimated by Sc. The MPS of GG and RG underestimates the intensity. (orig.)

  3. Impact of cloud parameterization on the numerical simulation of a super cyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Deshpande

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the role of parameterization of convection and explicit moisture processes on the simulated track, intensity and inner core structure of Orissa super cyclone (1999 in Bay of Bengal (north Indian Ocean. Sensitivity experiments are carried out to examine the impact of cumulus parameterization schemes (CPS using MM5 model (Version 3.7 in a two-way nested domain (D1 and D2 configuration at horizontal resolutions (45–15 km. Three different cumulus parameterization schemes, namely Grell (Gr, Betts-Miller (BM and updated Kain Fritsch (KF2, are tested. It is noted that track and intensity both are very sensitive to CPS and comparatively, KF2 predicts them reasonably well. Particularly, the rapid intensification phase of the super cyclone is best simulated by KF2 compared to other CPS. To examine the effect of the cumulus parameterization scheme at high resolution (5 km, the three-domain configuration (45-15-5 km resolution is utilized. Based on initial results, KF2 scheme is used for both the domains (D1 and D2. Two experiments are conducted: one in which KF2 is used as CPS and another in which no CPS is used in the third domain. The intensity is well predicted when no CPS is used in the innermost domain. The sensitivity experiments are also carried out to examine the impact from microphysics parameterization schemes (MPS. Four cloud microphysics parameterization schemes, namely mixed phase (MP, Goddard microphysics with Graupel (GG, Reisner Graupel (RG and Schultz (Sc, are tested in these experiments. It is noted that the tropical cyclone tracks and intensity variation have considerable sensitivity to the varying cloud microphysical parameterization schemes. The MPS of MP and Sc could very well capture the rapid intensification phase. The final intensity is well predicted by MP, which is overestimated by Sc. The MPS of GG and RG underestimates the intensity.

  4. Parameterizing deep water percolation improves subsurface temperature simulations by a multilayer firn model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, Sergey; van Pelt, Ward J. J.; Claremar, Björn; Pohjola, Veijo; Pettersson, Rickard; Machguth, Horst; Reijmer, Carleen

    2017-03-01

    Deep preferential percolation of melt water in snow and firn brings water lower along the vertical profile than a laterally homogeneous wetting front. This widely recognized process is an important source of uncertainty in simulations of subsurface temperature, density and water content in seasonal snow and in firn packs on glaciers and ice sheets. However, observation and quantification of preferential flow is challenging and therefore it is not accounted for by most of the contemporary snow/firn models. Here we use temperature measurements in the accumulation zone of Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, done in April 2012 - 2015 using multiple thermistor strings to describe the process of water percolation in snow and firn. Effects of water flow through the snow and firn profile are further explored using a coupled surface energy balance - firn model forced by the output of the regional climate model WRF. In situ air temperature, radiation and surface height change measurements are used to constrain the surface energy and mass fluxes. To account for the effects of preferential water flow in snow and firn we test a set of depth-dependent functions allocating a certain fraction of the melt water available at the surface to each snow/firn layer. Experiments are performed for a range of characteristic percolation depths and results indicate a reduction in root mean square difference between the modeled and measured temperature by up to a factor of two compared to the results from the default water infiltration scheme. This illustrates the significance of accounting for preferential water percolation to simulate subsurface conditions. The suggested approach to parameterization of the preferential water flow requires low additional computational cost and can be implemented in layered snow/firn models applied both at local and regional scales, for distributed domains with multiple mesh points.

  5. Interactions of river discharge parameterizations with the Madden Julian oscillation in the CESM

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, C. A.; Tseng, Y. H.; Bryan, F.

    2016-12-01

    River discharge in the tropical Warm Pool is a source of fresh water to the upper ocean, which can help stabilize the upper ocean, reduce ocean mixing, and promote radiation-driven surface warming. Large rivers, such as the Ganges, that drain large land masses provide quasi-steady freshening during certain seasons. Freshening from rivers that drain smaller land masses, such as islands within the Maritime Continent, is more regulated by rainfall. The Madden Julian oscillation (MJO) regulates instraseasonal rainfall, SST, and surface salinity across the Warm Pool, and is sensitive to the ocean response to this forcing. The effects of estuarine river discharge on upper ocean stratification and interactions with the MJO are explored using two different estuary parameterizations in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). In the control simulation (CTR), river discharge is spread uniformly onto the ocean surface over an artificially chosen length scale using the virtual salt flux approach. In the experimental configuration, river discharge is confined to the ocean model grid point containing the river delta, and mixed vertically with a two-layer estuary box model (EBM). In EBM, the temperature and salinity distribution is driven mainly by oceanic mixing and advection without ad-hoc horizontal spreading. Compared to EBM, over-dispersal of river runoff in CTR leads to fresher surface waters, shallower ocean mixed layers, and more variable SSTs throughout the Warm Pool. In CTR, river discharge is transported to a larger area by surface currents. Specifically, fresh water from the Ganges contributes to a low salinity, warm SST band near 10N in the central Indian Ocean; in the Indonesian Seas, overly dispersed runoff contributes to a shallower mixed layer and larger SST increases during the MJO suppressed phase. MJO convection and propagation characteristics suggest that the MJO in CTR benefits from the overly dispersed river discharge, while the MJO in EBM is less impacted.

  6. The importance of parameterization when simulating the hydrologic response of vegetative land-cover change

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jeremy; Stengel, Victoria G.; Rendon, Samuel H.; Banta, John

    2017-01-01

    Computer models of hydrologic systems are frequently used to investigate the hydrologic response of land-cover change. If the modeling results are used to inform resource-management decisions, then providing robust estimates of uncertainty in the simulated response is an important consideration. Here we examine the importance of parameterization, a necessarily subjective process, on uncertainty estimates of the simulated hydrologic response of land-cover change. Specifically, we applied the soil water assessment tool (SWAT) model to a 1.4 km2 watershed in southern Texas to investigate the simulated hydrologic response of brush management (the mechanical removal of woody plants), a discrete land-cover change. The watershed was instrumented before and after brush-management activities were undertaken, and estimates of precipitation, streamflow, and evapotranspiration (ET) are available; these data were used to condition and verify the model. The role of parameterization in brush-management simulation was evaluated by constructing two models, one with 12 adjustable parameters (reduced parameterization) and one with 1305 adjustable parameters (full parameterization). Both models were subjected to global sensitivity analysis as well as Monte Carlo and generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) conditioning to identify important model inputs and to estimate uncertainty in several quantities of interest related to brush management. Many realizations from both parameterizations were identified as behavioral in that they reproduce daily mean streamflow acceptably well according to Nash–Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient, percent bias, and coefficient of determination. However, the total volumetric ET difference resulting from simulated brush management remains highly uncertain after conditioning to daily mean streamflow, indicating that streamflow data alone are not sufficient to inform the model inputs that influence the simulated outcomes of brush

  7. Parameterization of sea-salt optical properties and physics of the associated radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of sea-salt aerosol have been parameterized at shortwave and longwave wavelengths. The optical properties were parameterized in a simple functional form in terms of the ambient relative humidity based on Mie optical property calculations. The proposed parameterization is tested relative to Mie calculations and is found to be accurate to within a few percent. In the parameterization, the effects of the size distribution on the optical properties are accounted for in terms of effective radius of the sea-salt size distribution. This parameterization differs from previous works by being formulated directly with the wet sea-salt size distribution and, to our knowledge, this is the first published sea-salt parameterization to provide a parameterization for both shortwave and longwave wavelengths.

    We have used this parameterization in a set of idealized 1-D radiative transfer calculations to investigate the sensitivity of various attributes of sea-salt forcing, including the dependency on sea-salt column loading, effective variance, solar angle, and surface albedo. From these sensitivity tests, it is found that sea-salt forcings for both shortwave and longwave spectra are linearly related to the sea-salt loading for realistic values of loadings. The radiative forcing results illustrate that the shortwave forcing is an order of magnitude greater than the longwave forcing results and opposite in sign, for various loadings. Forcing sensitivity studies show that the influence of effective variance for sea-salt is minor; therefore, only one value of effective variance is used in the parameterization. The dependence of sea-salt forcing with solar zenith angle illustrates an interesting result that sea-salt can generate a positive top-of-the-atmosphere result (i.e. warming when the solar zenith angle is relatively small (i.e. <30°. Finally, it is found that the surface albedo significantly affects the shortwave radiative

  8. The importance of parameterization when simulating the hydrologic response of vegetative land-cover change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. White

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Computer models of hydrologic systems are frequently used to investigate the hydrologic response of land-cover change. If the modeling results are used to inform resource-management decisions, then providing robust estimates of uncertainty in the simulated response is an important consideration. Here we examine the importance of parameterization, a necessarily subjective process, on uncertainty estimates of the simulated hydrologic response of land-cover change. Specifically, we applied the soil water assessment tool (SWAT model to a 1.4 km2 watershed in southern Texas to investigate the simulated hydrologic response of brush management (the mechanical removal of woody plants, a discrete land-cover change. The watershed was instrumented before and after brush-management activities were undertaken, and estimates of precipitation, streamflow, and evapotranspiration (ET are available; these data were used to condition and verify the model. The role of parameterization in brush-management simulation was evaluated by constructing two models, one with 12 adjustable parameters (reduced parameterization and one with 1305 adjustable parameters (full parameterization. Both models were subjected to global sensitivity analysis as well as Monte Carlo and generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE conditioning to identify important model inputs and to estimate uncertainty in several quantities of interest related to brush management. Many realizations from both parameterizations were identified as behavioral in that they reproduce daily mean streamflow acceptably well according to Nash–Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient, percent bias, and coefficient of determination. However, the total volumetric ET difference resulting from simulated brush management remains highly uncertain after conditioning to daily mean streamflow, indicating that streamflow data alone are not sufficient to inform the model inputs that influence the simulated outcomes

  9. The importance of parameterization when simulating the hydrologic response of vegetative land-cover change

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jeremy; Stengel, Victoria; Rendon, Samuel; Banta, John

    2017-08-01

    Computer models of hydrologic systems are frequently used to investigate the hydrologic response of land-cover change. If the modeling results are used to inform resource-management decisions, then providing robust estimates of uncertainty in the simulated response is an important consideration. Here we examine the importance of parameterization, a necessarily subjective process, on uncertainty estimates of the simulated hydrologic response of land-cover change. Specifically, we applied the soil water assessment tool (SWAT) model to a 1.4 km2 watershed in southern Texas to investigate the simulated hydrologic response of brush management (the mechanical removal of woody plants), a discrete land-cover change. The watershed was instrumented before and after brush-management activities were undertaken, and estimates of precipitation, streamflow, and evapotranspiration (ET) are available; these data were used to condition and verify the model. The role of parameterization in brush-management simulation was evaluated by constructing two models, one with 12 adjustable parameters (reduced parameterization) and one with 1305 adjustable parameters (full parameterization). Both models were subjected to global sensitivity analysis as well as Monte Carlo and generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) conditioning to identify important model inputs and to estimate uncertainty in several quantities of interest related to brush management. Many realizations from both parameterizations were identified as behavioral in that they reproduce daily mean streamflow acceptably well according to Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient, percent bias, and coefficient of determination. However, the total volumetric ET difference resulting from simulated brush management remains highly uncertain after conditioning to daily mean streamflow, indicating that streamflow data alone are not sufficient to inform the model inputs that influence the simulated outcomes of brush management

  10. A Two-Habit Ice Cloud Optical Property Parameterization for GCM Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Minnis, Patrick; Loeb, Norman; Kato, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel ice cloud optical property parameterization based on a two-habit ice cloud model that has been proved to be optimal for remote sensing applications. The two-habit ice model is developed with state-of-the-art numerical methods for light scattering property calculations involving individual columns and column aggregates with the habit fractions constrained by in-situ measurements from various field campaigns. Band-averaged bulk ice cloud optical properties including the single-scattering albedo, the mass extinction/absorption coefficients, and the asymmetry factor are parameterized as functions of the effective particle diameter for the spectral bands involved in the broadband radiative transfer models. Compared with other parameterization schemes, the two-habit scheme generally has lower asymmetry factor values (around 0.75 at the visible wavelengths). The two-habit parameterization scheme was widely tested with the broadband radiative transfer models (i.e. Rapid Radiative Transfer Model, GCM version) and global circulation models (GCMs, i.e. Community Atmosphere Model, version 5). Global ice cloud radiative effects at the top of the atmosphere are also analyzed from the GCM simulation using the two-habit parameterization scheme in comparison with CERES satellite observations.

  11. New particle-dependent parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing processes: sensitivity studies of convective clouds with an air parcel model

    OpenAIRE

    K. Diehl; Mitra, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the outcome of laboratory results, new particle-dependent parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing were derived and used to improve and extend a two-dimensional spectral microphysics scheme. They include (1) a particle-type dependent parameterization of immersion freezing using the numbers of active sites per mass, (2) a particle-type and size-resolved parameterization of contact freezing, and (3) a particle-type dependent description of depositi...

  12. New particle-dependent parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing processes: sensitivity studies of convective clouds with an air parcel model

    OpenAIRE

    K. Diehl; Mitra, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the outcome of laboratory results, new particle-dependent parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing were derived and used to improve and extend a two-dimensional spectral microphysics scheme. They include (1) a particle-type-dependent parameterization of immersion freezing using the numbers of active sites per mass, (2) a particle-type and size-resolved parameterization of contact freezing, and (3) a particle-type-dependent description of deposition freezing. The ...

  13. Development of a PBL Parameterization Scheme for the Tropical Cyclone Model and an Improved Magnetospheric Model for Magic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-25

    AD-AO98 635 .JAYCOR ALEXANDRIA VA F/6 4/2 DEVELOPMENTO A PBL PARAMETERIZATION SCHEME FOR THE TROPICAL C--ETC(U) MAR al S A CHANG. C AGRITELLIS...PERIOD COVERED Final Report DEVELOPMENT OF A PBL PARAMETERIZATION SCHEME 9/07/79 - 9/08/80 FOR THE TROPICAL CYCLONE MODEL AND AN IMPROVED G. PERFORMING...dimensional, multi-layer PBL model, the GST parameterization yields accurate moisture fluxes, but slightly over- estimates the momentum flux and

  14. Assessment of the GECKO-A Modeling Tool and Simplified 3D Model Parameterizations for SOA Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumont, B.; Hodzic, A.; La, S.; Camredon, M.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Madronich, S.

    2014-12-01

    Explicit chemical mechanisms aim to embody the current knowledge of the transformations occurring in the atmosphere during the oxidation of organic matter. These explicit mechanisms are therefore useful tools to explore the fate of organic matter during its tropospheric oxidation and examine how these chemical processes shape the composition and properties of the gaseous and the condensed phases. Furthermore, explicit mechanisms provide powerful benchmarks to design and assess simplified parameterizations to be included 3D model. Nevertheless, the explicit mechanism describing the oxidation of hydrocarbons with backbones larger than few carbon atoms involves millions of secondary organic compounds, far exceeding the size of chemical mechanisms that can be written manually. Data processing tools can however be designed to overcome these difficulties and automatically generate consistent and comprehensive chemical mechanisms on a systematic basis. The Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) has been developed for the automatic writing of explicit chemical schemes of organic species and their partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. GECKO-A can be viewed as an expert system that mimics the steps by which chemists might develop chemical schemes. GECKO-A generates chemical schemes according to a prescribed protocol assigning reaction pathways and kinetics data on the basis of experimental data and structure-activity relationships. In its current version, GECKO-A can generate the full atmospheric oxidation scheme for most linear, branched and cyclic precursors, including alkanes and alkenes up to C25. Assessments of the GECKO-A modeling tool based on chamber SOA observations will be presented. GECKO-A was recently used to design a parameterization for SOA formation based on a Volatility Basis Set (VBS) approach. First results will be presented.

  15. A review of recent research on improvement of physical parameterizations in the GLA GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic assessment of the effect of a series of improvements in physical parameterizations of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) general circulation model (GCM) are summarized. The implementation of the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) in the GCM is followed by a comparison of SiB GCM simulations with that of the earlier slab soil hydrology GCM (SSH-GCM) simulations. In the Sahelian context, the biogeophysical component of desertification was analyzed for SiB-GCM simulations. Cumulus parameterization is found to be the primary determinant of the organization of the simulated tropical rainfall of the GLA GCM using Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization. A comparison of model simulations with station data revealed excessive shortwave radiation accompanied by excessive drying and heating to the land. The perpetual July simulations with and without interactive soil moisture shows that 30 to 40 day oscillations may be a natural mode of the simulated earth atmosphere system.

  16. Parameterized LMI Based Diagonal Dominance Compensator Study for Polynomial Linear Parameter Varying System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaobao; Li, Huacong; Jia, Qiusheng

    2017-12-01

    For dynamic decoupling of polynomial linear parameter varying(PLPV) system, a robust dominance pre-compensator design method is given. The parameterized precompensator design problem is converted into an optimal problem constrained with parameterized linear matrix inequalities(PLMI) by using the conception of parameterized Lyapunov function(PLF). To solve the PLMI constrained optimal problem, the precompensator design problem is reduced into a normal convex optimization problem with normal linear matrix inequalities (LMI) constraints on a new constructed convex polyhedron. Moreover, a parameter scheduling pre-compensator is achieved, which satisfies robust performance and decoupling performances. Finally, the feasibility and validity of the robust diagonal dominance pre-compensator design method are verified by the numerical simulation on a turbofan engine PLPV model.

  17. Organic Aerosol Volatility Parameterizations and Their Impact on Atmospheric Composition and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigaridis, Konsta; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their importance and ubiquity in the atmosphere, organic aerosols are still very poorly parameterized in global models. This can be explained by two reasons: first, a very large number of unconstrained parameters are involved in accurate parameterizations, and second, a detailed description of semi-volatile organics is computationally very expensive. Even organic aerosol properties that are known to play a major role in the atmosphere, namely volatility and aging, are poorly resolved in global models, if at all. Studies with different models and different parameterizations have not been conclusive on whether the additional complexity improves model simulations, but the added diversity of the different host models used adds an unnecessary degree of variability in the evaluation of results that obscures solid conclusions.

  18. Parameterizing the competition between homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing in ice cloud formation – polydisperse ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Barahona

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a comprehensive ice cloud formation parameterization that computes the ice crystal number, size distribution, and maximum supersaturation from precursor aerosol and ice nuclei. The parameterization provides an analytical solution of the cloud parcel model equations and accounts for the competition effects between homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing, and, between heterogeneous freezing in different modes. The diversity of heterogeneous nuclei is described through a nucleation spectrum function which is allowed to follow any form (i.e., derived from classical nucleation theory or from observations. The parameterization reproduces the predictions of a detailed numerical parcel model over a wide range of conditions, and several expressions for the nucleation spectrum. The average error in ice crystal number concentration was −2.0±8.5% for conditions of pure heterogeneous freezing, and, 4.7±21% when both homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing were active. The formulation presented is fast and free from requirements of numerical integration.

  19. Parameterization of a surface drag coefficient in conventionally neutral planetary boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esau, I.N. [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen (Norway)

    2004-07-01

    Modern large-scale models (LSMs) rely on surface drag coefficients to parameterize turbulent exchange between surface and the first computational level in the atmosphere. A classical parameterization in an Ekman boundary layer is rather simple. It is based on a robust concept of a layer of constant fluxes. In such a layer (log-layer), the mean velocity profile is logarithmic. It results in an universal dependence of the surface drag coefficient on a single internal non-dimensional parameter, namely the ratio of a height within this layer to a surface roughness length scale. A realistic near-neutral planetary boundary layer (PBL) is usually much more shallow than the idealized Ekman layer. The reason is that the PBL is developing against a stably stratified free atmosphere. The ambient atmospheric stratification reduces the PBL depth and simultaneously the depth of the log-layer. Therefore, the first computational level in the LSMs may be placed above the log-layer. In such a case, the classical parameterization is unjustified and inaccurate. The paper proposes several ways to improve the classical parameterization of the surface drag coefficient for momentum. The discussion is focused on a conventionally neutral PBL, i.e. on the neutrally stratified PBL under the stably stratified free atmosphere. The analysis is based on large eddy simulation (LES) data. This data reveals that discrepancy between drag coefficients predicted by the classical parameterization and the actual drag coefficients can be very large in the shallow PBL. The improved parameterizations provide a more accurate prediction. The inaccuracy is reduced to one-tenth of the actual values of the coefficients. (orig.)

  20. Parameterization of a surface drag coefficient in conventionally neutral planetary boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Esau

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern large-scale models (LSMs rely on surface drag coefficients to parameterize turbulent exchange between surface and the first computational level in the atmosphere. A classical parameterization in an Ekman boundary layer is rather simple. It is based on a robust concept of a layer of constant fluxes. In such a layer (log-layer, the mean velocity profile is logarithmic. It results in an universal dependence of the surface drag coefficient on a single internal non-dimensional parameter, namely the ratio of a height within this layer to a surface roughness length scale. A realistic near-neutral planetary boundary layer (PBL is usually much more shallow than the idealized Ekman layer. The reason is that the PBL is developing against a stably stratified free atmosphere. The ambient atmospheric stratification reduces the PBL depth and simultaneously the depth of the log-layer. Therefore, the first computational level in the LSMs may be placed above the log-layer. In such a case, the classical parameterization is unjustified and inaccurate.

    The paper proposes several ways to improve the classical parameterization of the surface drag coefficient for momentum. The discussion is focused on a conventionally neutral PBL, i.e. on the neutrally stratified PBL under the stably stratified free atmosphere. The analysis is based on large eddy simulation (LES data. This data reveals that discrepancy between drag coefficients predicted by the classical parameterization and the actual drag coefficients can be very large in the shallow PBL. The improved parameterizations provide a more accurate prediction. The inaccuracy is reduced to one-tenth of the actual values of the coefficients.

  1. Neutrons in proton pencil beam scanning: parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uwe; Hälg, Roger A; Baiocco, Giorgio; Lomax, Tony

    2016-08-21

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons produced during proton therapy in inducing cancer is unknown, but potentially large. In particular, since neutron biological effectiveness is energy dependent, it is necessary to estimate, besides the dose, also the energy spectra, in order to obtain quantities which could be a measure of the biological effectiveness and test current models and new approaches against epidemiological studies on cancer induction after proton therapy. For patients treated with proton pencil beam scanning, this work aims to predict the spatially localized neutron energies, the effective quality factor, the weighting factor according to ICRP, and two RBE values, the first obtained from the saturation corrected dose mean lineal energy and the second from DSB cluster induction. A proton pencil beam was Monte Carlo simulated using GEANT. Based on the simulated neutron spectra for three different proton beam energies a parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE was calculated. The pencil beam algorithm used for treatment planning at PSI has been extended using the developed parameterizations in order to calculate the spatially localized neutron energy, quality factors and RBE for each treated patient. The parameterization represents the simple quantification of neutron energy in two energy bins and the quality factors and RBE with a satisfying precision up to 85 cm away from the proton pencil beam when compared to the results based on 3D Monte Carlo simulations. The root mean square error of the energy estimate between Monte Carlo simulation based results and the parameterization is 3.9%. For the quality factors and RBE estimates it is smaller than 0.9%. The model was successfully integrated into the PSI treatment planning system. It was found that the parameterizations for neutron energy, quality factors and RBE were independent of proton energy in the investigated energy range of interest for proton therapy. The pencil beam algorithm has

  2. Impact of urban parameterization on high resolution air quality forecast with the GEM – AQ model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Struzewska

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess the impact of urban cover on high-resolution air quality forecast simulations with the GEM-AQ (Global Environmental Multiscale and Air Quality model. The impact of urban area on the ambient atmosphere is non-stationary, and short-term variability of meteorological conditions may result in significant changes of the observed intensity of urban heat island and pollutant concentrations. In this study we used the Town Energy Balance (TEB parameterization to represent urban effects on modelled meteorological and air quality parameters at the final nesting level with horizontal resolution of ~5 km over Southern Poland. Three one-day cases representing different meteorological conditions were selected and the model was run with and without the TEB parameterization. Three urban cover categories were used in the TEB parameterization: mid-high buildings, very low buildings and low density suburbs. Urban cover layers were constructed based on an area fraction of towns in a grid cell. To analyze the impact of urban parameterization on modelled meteorological and air quality parameters, anomalies in the lowest model layer for the air temperature, wind speed and pollutant concentrations were calculated. Anomalies of the specific humidity fields indicate that the use of the TEB parameterization leads to a systematic reduction of moisture content in the air. Comparison with temperature and wind speed measurements taken at urban background monitoring stations shows that application of urban parameterization improves model results. For primary pollutants the impact of urban areas is most significant in regions characterized with high emissions. In most cases the anomalies of NO2 and CO concentrations were negative. This reduction is most likely caused by an enhanced vertical mixing due to elevated surface temperature and modified vertical stability.

  3. Deriving effective atomic numbers from DECT based on a parameterization of the ratio of high and low linear attenuation coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Seco, Joao; Gaudreault, Mathieu; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-07

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) can provide simultaneous estimation of relative electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff. The ability to obtain these quantities (ρe, Zeff) has been shown to benefit selected radiotherapy applications where tissue characterization is required. The conventional analysis method (spectral method) relies on knowledge of the CT scanner photon spectra which may be difficult to obtain accurately. Furthermore an approximate empirical attenuation correction of the photon spectrum through the patient is necessary. We present an alternative approach based on a parameterization of the measured ratio of low and high kVp linear attenuation coefficients for deriving Zeff which does not require the estimation of the CT scanner spectra. In a first approach, the tissue substitute method (TSM), the Rutherford parameterization of the linear attenuation coefficients was employed to derive a relation between Zeff and the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients measured at the low and high kVp of the CT scanner. A phantom containing 16 tissue mimicking inserts was scanned with a dual source DECT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp. The data from the 16 inserts phantom was used to obtain model parameters for the relation between Zeff and [Formula: see text]. The accuracy of the method was evaluated with a second phantom containing 4 tissue mimicking inserts. The TSM was compared to a more complex approach, the reference tissue method (RTM), which requires the derivation of stoichiometric fit parameters. These were derived from the 16 inserts phantom scans and used to calculate CT numbers at 80 and 140 kVp for a set of tabulated reference human tissues. Model parameters for the parameterization of [Formula: see text] were estimated for this reference tissue dataset and compared to the results of the TSM. Residuals on Zeff for the reference tissue dataset for both TSM and RTM were compared to those obtained from the spectral method. The

  4. Parameterized post-Newtonian approximation in a teleparallel model of dark energy with a boundary term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadjadi, H.M. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We study the parameterized post-Newtonian approximation in teleparallel model of gravity with a scalar field. The scalar field is non-minimally coupled to the scalar torsion as well as to the boundary term introduced in Bahamonde and Wright (Phys Rev D 92:084034 arXiv:1508.06580v4 [gr-qc], 2015). We show that, in contrast to the case where the scalar field is only coupled to the scalar torsion, the presence of the new coupling affects the parameterized post-Newtonian parameters. These parameters for different situations are obtained and discussed. (orig.)

  5. Alternative Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planting, A.; De saint Jacob, Y.; Verwijs, H.; Belin, H.; Preesman, L.

    2009-03-15

    In two articles, one interview and one column attention is paid to alternative energies. The article 'A new light on saving energy' discusses the option to save energy by modernising lighting systems in urban areas. The column 'View from Paris' focuses on investment decisions in France with regard to renewable energy and energy savings. The article 'Europe turns a blind eye to big battery' discusses developments in batteries to store energy. The interview concerns fuel cell expert and formerly President of UTC Power Jan van Dokkum. The last article gives a brief overview of the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA) and the challenges this alliance will have to face with regard to climate change and energy security.

  6. Advances in understanding, models and parameterizations of biosphere-atmosphere ammonia exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Flechard

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric ammonia (NH3 dominates global emissions of total reactive nitrogen (Nr, while emissions from agricultural production systems contribute about two-thirds of global NH3 emissions; the remaining third emanates from oceans, natural vegetation, humans, wild animals and biomass burning. On land, NH3 emitted from the various sources eventually returns to the biosphere by dry deposition to sink areas, predominantly semi-natural vegetation, and by wet and dry deposition as ammonium (NH4+ to all surfaces. However, the land/atmosphere exchange of gaseous NH3 is in fact bi-directional over unfertilized as well as fertilized ecosystems, with periods and areas of emission and deposition alternating in time (diurnal, seasonal and space (patchwork landscapes. The exchange is controlled by a range of environmental factors, including meteorology, surface layer turbulence, thermodynamics, air and surface heterogeneous-phase chemistry, canopy geometry, plant development stage, leaf age, organic matter decomposition, soil microbial turnover, and, in agricultural systems, by fertilizer application rate, fertilizer type, soil type, crop type, and agricultural management practices. We review the range of processes controlling NH3 emission and uptake in the different parts of the soil-canopy-atmosphere continuum, with NH3 emission potentials defined at the substrate and leaf levels by different [NH4+] / [H+] ratios (Γ. Surface/atmosphere exchange models for NH3 are necessary to compute the temporal and spatial patterns of emissions and deposition at the soil, plant, field, landscape, regional and global scales, in order to assess the multiple environmental impacts of airborne and deposited NH3 and NH4+. Models of soil/vegetation/atmosphere NH3 exchange are reviewed from the substrate and leaf scales to the global scale. They range from simple steady-state, "big leaf" canopy resistance models, to dynamic, multi-layer, multi-process, multi

  7. There Is Always an Alternative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Emil

    This doctoral study explores the case of The Alternative, a recently elected party in Denmark, by utilizing concepts and methods from organization studies in an effort to understand how a political party manages the process of entering parliament without losing political support. The Alternative...... was founded in late 2013 as a movement against the unsustainable program of neoliberal capitalism and the ‘old political culture’. However, instead of presenting a list of tangible demands and trademark issues, The Alternative was launches without a political program. During the course of only half a year...

  8. Developing a parameterization approach of soil erodibility for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil erodibility is a key factor for estimating soil erosion using physically based models. In this study, a new parameterization approach for estimating erodibility was developed for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM). The approach uses empirical equations that were developed by apply...

  9. Integrated cumulus ensemble and turbulence (ICET): An integrated parameterization system for general circulation models (GCMs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.L.; Frank, W.M.; Young, G.S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Successful simulations of the global circulation and climate require accurate representation of the properties of shallow and deep convective clouds, stable-layer clouds, and the interactions between various cloud types, the boundary layer, and the radiative fluxes. Each of these phenomena play an important role in the global energy balance, and each must be parameterized in a global climate model. These processes are highly interactive. One major problem limiting the accuracy of parameterizations of clouds and other processes in general circulation models (GCMs) is that most of the parameterization packages are not linked with a common physical basis. Further, these schemes have not, in general, been rigorously verified against observations adequate to the task of resolving subgrid-scale effects. To address these problems, we are designing a new Integrated Cumulus Ensemble and Turbulence (ICET) parameterization scheme, installing it in a climate model (CCM2), and evaluating the performance of the new scheme using data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites.

  10. A Dynamically Computed Convective Time Scale for the Kain–Fritsch Convective Parameterization Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many convective parameterization schemes define a convective adjustment time scale τ as the time allowed for dissipation of convective available potential energy (CAPE). The Kain–Fritsch scheme defines τ based on an estimate of the advective time period for deep con...

  11. Hyper-temporal SPOT-NDVI dataset parameterization captures species distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girma Gebrekidan, A.; de Bie, C.A.J.M.; Skidmore, A.K.; Venus, V.; Bongers, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Hyper-temporal SPOT NDVI images contain useful information about the environment in which a species occurs, including information such as the beginning, end, peak, and curvature of photosynthetically active vegetation (PAV) greenness signatures. This raises the question: can parameterization of

  12. Hyper-temporal SPOT-NDVI dataset parameterization captures species distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girma, Atkilt; Bie, de C.A.J.M.; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Venus, Valentijn; Bongers, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Hyper-temporal SPOT NDVI images contain useful information about the environment in which a species occurs, including information such as the beginning, end, peak, and curvature of photosynthetically active vegetation (PAV) greenness signatures. This raises the question: can parameterization of

  13. On the parameterization of all admissible pairs in a class of CCF-ILC algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwoerd, M.H.A.; Meinsma, Gjerrit; de Vries, Theodorus J.A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper extends some recent results on the parameterization of all admissible pairs in a class of 2-parameter current-cycle-feedback ILC algorithms. In addition, a necessary and sufficient condition is given under which the associated set of equivalent controllers coincides with the set of all

  14. Parameterizing, evaluating and comparing metapopulation models with data from individual-based simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilker, Frank M.; Hinsch, Martin; Poethke, Hans Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Due to the lack of sufficient data and appropriate ecological information parameterizing predictive population dynamical models usually is a difficult task. The approach proposed in this study is meant to overcome this problem by using detailed individual-based simulations to generate artificial

  15. A parameterization of size resolved below cloud scavenging of aerosols by rain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henzing, J.S.; Olivié, D.J.L.; Velthoven, P.F.J. van

    2006-01-01

    A size dependent parameterization for the removal of aerosol particles by falling rain droplets is developed. Scavenging coefficients are calculated explicitly as a function of aerosol particle size and precipitation intensity including the full interaction of rain droplet size distribution and

  16. Parameterization of ion-induced nucleation rates based on ambient observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nieminen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric ions participate in the formation of new atmospheric aerosol particles, yet their exact role in this process has remained unclear. Here we derive a new simple parameterization for ion-induced nucleation or, more precisely, for the formation rate of charged 2-nm particles. The parameterization is semi-empirical in the sense that it is based on comprehensive results of one-year-long atmospheric cluster and particle measurements in the size range ~1–42 nm within the EUCAARI (European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions project. Data from 12 field sites across Europe measured with different types of air ion and cluster mobility spectrometers were used in our analysis, with more in-depth analysis made using data from four stations with concomitant sulphuric acid measurements. The parameterization is given in two slightly different forms: a more accurate one that requires information on sulfuric acid and nucleating organic vapor concentrations, and a simpler one in which this information is replaced with the global radiation intensity. These new parameterizations are applicable to all large-scale atmospheric models containing size-resolved aerosol microphysics, and a scheme to calculate concentrations of sulphuric acid, condensing organic vapours and cluster ions.

  17. Efficient parameterization of cardiac action potential models using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Darby I.; Fenton, Flavio H.; Cherry, E. M.

    2017-09-01

    Finding appropriate values for parameters in mathematical models of cardiac cells is a challenging task. Here, we show that it is possible to obtain good parameterizations in as little as 30-40 s when as many as 27 parameters are fit simultaneously using a genetic algorithm and two flexible phenomenological models of cardiac action potentials. We demonstrate how our implementation works by considering cases of "model recovery" in which we attempt to find parameter values that match model-derived action potential data from several cycle lengths. We assess performance by evaluating the parameter values obtained, action potentials at fit and non-fit cycle lengths, and bifurcation plots for fidelity to the truth as well as consistency across different runs of the algorithm. We also fit the models to action potentials recorded experimentally using microelectrodes and analyze performance. We find that our implementation can efficiently obtain model parameterizations that are in good agreement with the dynamics exhibited by the underlying systems that are included in the fitting process. However, the parameter values obtained in good parameterizations can exhibit a significant amount of variability, raising issues of parameter identifiability and sensitivity. Along similar lines, we also find that the two models differ in terms of the ease of obtaining parameterizations that reproduce model dynamics accurately, most likely reflecting different levels of parameter identifiability for the two models.

  18. Ocean's response to Hurricane Frances and its implications for drag coefficient parameterization at high wind speeds

    KAUST Repository

    Zedler, S. E.

    2009-04-25

    The drag coefficient parameterization of wind stress is investigated for tropical storm conditions using model sensitivity studies. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Ocean General Circulation Model was run in a regional setting with realistic stratification and forcing fields representing Hurricane Frances, which in early September 2004 passed east of the Caribbean Leeward Island chain. The model was forced with a NOAA-HWIND wind speed product after converting it to wind stress using four different drag coefficient parameterizations. Respective model results were tested against in situ measurements of temperature profiles and velocity, available from an array of 22 surface drifters and 12 subsurface floats. Changing the drag coefficient parameterization from one that saturated at a value of 2.3 × 10 -3 to a constant drag coefficient of 1.2 × 10-3 reduced the standard deviation difference between the simulated minus the measured sea surface temperature change from 0.8°C to 0.3°C. Additionally, the standard deviation in the difference between simulated minus measured high pass filtered 15-m current speed reduced from 15 cm/s to 5 cm/s. The maximum difference in sea surface temperature response when two different turbulent mixing parameterizations were implemented was 0.3°C, i.e., only 11% of the maximum change of sea surface temperature caused by the storm. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Ocean's response to Hurricane Frances and its implications for drag coefficient parameterization at high wind speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedler, S. E.; Niiler, P. P.; Stammer, D.; Terrill, E.; Morzel, J.

    2009-04-01

    The drag coefficient parameterization of wind stress is investigated for tropical storm conditions using model sensitivity studies. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Ocean General Circulation Model was run in a regional setting with realistic stratification and forcing fields representing Hurricane Frances, which in early September 2004 passed east of the Caribbean Leeward Island chain. The model was forced with a NOAA-HWIND wind speed product after converting it to wind stress using four different drag coefficient parameterizations. Respective model results were tested against in situ measurements of temperature profiles and velocity, available from an array of 22 surface drifters and 12 subsurface floats. Changing the drag coefficient parameterization from one that saturated at a value of 2.3 × 10-3 to a constant drag coefficient of 1.2 × 10-3 reduced the standard deviation difference between the simulated minus the measured sea surface temperature change from 0.8°C to 0.3°C. Additionally, the standard deviation in the difference between simulated minus measured high pass filtered 15-m current speed reduced from 15 cm/s to 5 cm/s. The maximum difference in sea surface temperature response when two different turbulent mixing parameterizations were implemented was 0.3°C, i.e., only 11% of the maximum change of sea surface temperature caused by the storm.

  20. Multi-Scale Modeling and the Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux (EDMF) Parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence and convection play a fundamental role in many key weather and climate science topics. Unfortunately, current atmospheric models cannot explicitly resolve most turbulent and convective flow. Because of this fact, turbulence and convection in the atmosphere has to be parameterized - i.e. equations describing the dynamical evolution of the statistical properties of turbulence and convection motions have to be devised. Recently a variety of different models have been developed that attempt at simulating the atmosphere using variable resolution. A key problem however is that parameterizations are in general not explicitly aware of the resolution - the scale awareness problem. In this context, we will present and discuss a specific approach, the Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux (EDMF) parameterization, that not only is in itself a multi-scale parameterization but it is also particularly well suited to deal with the scale-awareness problems that plague current variable-resolution models. It does so by representing small-scale turbulence using a classic Eddy-Diffusivity (ED) method, and the larger-scale (boundary layer and tropospheric-scale) eddies as a variety of plumes using the Mass-Flux (MF) concept.

  1. Parameterization of norfolk sandy loam properties for stochastic modeling of light in-wheel motor UGV

    Science.gov (United States)

    To accurately develop a mathematical model for an In-Wheel Motor Unmanned Ground Vehicle (IWM UGV) on soft terrain, parameterization of terrain properties is essential to stochastically model tire-terrain interaction for each wheel independently. Operating in off-road conditions requires paying clos...

  2. Parameterization of wave run-up on beaches in Yucatan, Mexico: a numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkkemper, J.A.; Torres-Freyermuth, A.; Mendoza, E.T.; Salles, P.; Ruessink, B.G.

    2013-01-01

    Run-up parameterization is an important tool for conducting vulnerability studies on flooding and erosion in coastal areas. This study makes use of a coupling between the SWAN and SWASH models, to investigate the influence of beach morphology and tidal water level on run-up statistics. Furthermore

  3. A new albedo parameterization for use in climate models over the Antarctic ice sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831891; van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; Lenaerts, J.T.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314850163; Flanner, M.G.; Gardner, A.S.; van de Berg, W.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831611

    2011-01-01

    A parameterization for broadband snow surface albedo, based on snow grain size evolution, cloud optical thickness, and solar zenith angle, is implemented into a regional climate model for Antarctica and validated against field observations of albedo for the period 1995–2004. Over the Antarctic

  4. A level-set based topology optimization using the element connectivity parameterization method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, N.P.; Yoon, G.H.; Van Keulen, F.; Langelaar, M.

    2010-01-01

    This contribution presents a novel and versatile approach to geometrically nonlinear topology optimization by combining the level-set method with the element connectivity parameterization method or ECP. The combined advantages of both methods open up the possibility to treat a wide range of

  5. Impact of different parameterization schemes on simulation of mesoscale convective system over south-east India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhulatha, A.; Rajeevan, M.

    2018-02-01

    Main objective of the present paper is to examine the role of various parameterization schemes in simulating the evolution of mesoscale convective system (MCS) occurred over south-east India. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, numerical experiments are conducted by considering various planetary boundary layer, microphysics, and cumulus parameterization schemes. Performances of different schemes are evaluated by examining boundary layer, reflectivity, and precipitation features of MCS using ground-based and satellite observations. Among various physical parameterization schemes, Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) boundary layer scheme is able to produce deep boundary layer height by simulating warm temperatures necessary for storm initiation; Thompson (THM) microphysics scheme is capable to simulate the reflectivity by reasonable distribution of different hydrometeors during various stages of system; Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ) cumulus scheme is able to capture the precipitation by proper representation of convective instability associated with MCS. Present analysis suggests that MYJ, a local turbulent kinetic energy boundary layer scheme, which accounts strong vertical mixing; THM, a six-class hybrid moment microphysics scheme, which considers number concentration along with mixing ratio of rain hydrometeors; and BMJ, a closure cumulus scheme, which adjusts thermodynamic profiles based on climatological profiles might have contributed for better performance of respective model simulations. Numerical simulation carried out using the above combination of schemes is able to capture storm initiation, propagation, surface variations, thermodynamic structure, and precipitation features reasonably well. This study clearly demonstrates that the simulation of MCS characteristics is highly sensitive to the choice of parameterization schemes.

  6. Evaluating parameterizations of aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer using field measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, S.; Lu, L.; Mao, D.; Jia, L.

    2007-01-01

    Parameterizations of aerodynamic resistance to heat and water transfer have a significant impact on the accuracy of models of land - atmosphere interactions and of estimated surface fluxes using spectro-radiometric data collected from aircrafts and satellites. We have used measurements from an eddy

  7. Evaluating parameterizations of aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer using field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaomin Liu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Parameterizations of aerodynamic resistance to heat and water transfer have a significant impact on the accuracy of models of land – atmosphere interactions and of estimated surface fluxes using spectro-radiometric data collected from aircrafts and satellites. We have used measurements from an eddy correlation system to derive the aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer over a bare soil surface as well as over a maize canopy. Diurnal variations of aerodynamic resistance have been analyzed. The results showed that the diurnal variation of aerodynamic resistance during daytime (07:00 h–18:00 h was significant for both the bare soil surface and the maize canopy although the range of variation was limited. Based on the measurements made by the eddy correlation system, a comprehensive evaluation of eight popularly used parameterization schemes of aerodynamic resistance was carried out. The roughness length for heat transfer is a crucial parameter in the estimation of aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer and can neither be taken as a constant nor be neglected. Comparing with the measurements, the parameterizations by Choudhury et al. (1986, Viney (1991, Yang et al. (2001 and the modified forms of Verma et al. (1976 and Mahrt and Ek (1984 by inclusion of roughness length for heat transfer gave good agreements with the measurements, while the parameterizations by Hatfield et al. (1983 and Xie (1988 showed larger errors even though the roughness length for heat transfer has been taken into account.

  8. Comparison of different objective functions for parameterization of simple respiration models

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.T. van Wijk; B. van Putten; D.Y. Hollinger; A.D. Richardson

    2008-01-01

    The eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes collected around the world offer a rich source for detailed data analysis. Simple, aggregated models are attractive tools for gap filling, budget calculation, and upscaling in space and time. Key in the application of these models is their parameterization and a robust estimate of the uncertainty and reliability...

  9. Influence of canopy seasonal changes on turbulence parameterization within the roughness sublayer over an orchard canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapkalijevski, M.; Moene, A.F.; Ouwersloot, Huug; Patton, E.G.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this observational study, the role of tree phenology on the atmospheric turbulence parameterization over 10-m-tall and relatively sparse deciduous vegetation is quantified. Observations from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) field experiment are analyzed to establish the

  10. An Evaluation of Lightning Flash Rate Parameterizations Based on Observations of Colorado Storms during DC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarab, B.; Fuchs, B.; Rutledge, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting lightning activity in thunderstorms is important in order to accurately quantify the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) by lightning (LNOx). Lightning is an important global source of NOx, and since NOx is a chemical precursor to ozone, the climatological impacts of LNOx could be significant. Many cloud-resolving models rely on parameterizations to predict lightning and LNOx since the processes leading to charge separation and lightning discharge are not yet fully understood. This study evaluates predicted flash rates based on existing lightning parameterizations against flash rates observed for Colorado storms during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3). Evaluating lightning parameterizations against storm observations is a useful way to possibly improve the prediction of flash rates and LNOx in models. Additionally, since convective storms that form in the eastern plains of Colorado can be different thermodynamically and electrically from storms in other regions, it is useful to test existing parameterizations against observations from these storms. We present an analysis of the dynamics, microphysics, and lightning characteristics of two case studies, severe storms that developed on 6 and 7 June 2012. This analysis includes dual-Doppler derived horizontal and vertical velocities, a hydrometeor identification based on polarimetric radar variables using the CSU-CHILL radar, and insight into the charge structure using observations from the northern Colorado Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). Flash rates were inferred from the LMA data using a flash counting algorithm. We have calculated various microphysical and dynamical parameters for these storms that have been used in empirical flash rate parameterizations. In particular, maximum vertical velocity has been used to predict flash rates in some cloud-resolving chemistry simulations. We diagnose flash rates for the 6 and 7 June storms using this parameterization and compare

  11. Future high-mountain hydrology: a new parameterization of glacier retreat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huss

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is expected to significantly affect the runoff regime of mountainous catchments. Simple methods for calculating future glacier change in hydrological models are required in order to reliably assess economic impacts of changes in the water cycle over the next decades. Models for temporal and spatial glacier evolution need to describe the climate forcing acting on the glacier, and ice flow dynamics. Flow models, however, demand considerable computational resources and field data input and are moreover not applicable on the regional scale. Here, we propose a simple parameterization for calculating the change in glacier surface elevation and area, which is mass conserving and suited for hydrological modelling. The Δh-parameterization is an empirical glacier-specific function derived from observations in the past that can easily be applied to large samples of glaciers. We compare the Δh-parameterization to results of a 3-D finite-element ice flow model. As case studies, the evolution of two Alpine glaciers of different size over the period 2008–2100 is investigated using regional climate scenarios. The parameterization closely reproduces the distributed ice thickness change, as well as glacier area and length predicted by the ice flow model. This indicates that for the purpose of transient runoff forecasts, future glacier geometry change can be approximated using a simple parameterization instead of complex ice flow modelling. Furthermore, we analyse alpine glacier response to 21st century climate change and consequent shifts in the runoff regime of a highly glacierized catchment using the proposed methods.

  12. Effects of convective parameterization schemes on estimation of the annual wet deposition over Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Rae; Kim, Yun-Jong; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents technique used to estimate annual total wet depositions of NO 3- and SO 42-, and describes their sensitivities arising from various convective parameterization schemes over Northeast Asia. The representative synoptic meteorological conditions for the precipitation were identified by employing a cluster analysis technique, and four cumulus convective parameterization schemes, the Anthes-Kuo (AK), Betts-Miller (BM), Grell (GR), and Kain-Fritsch 2 (KF2) schemes, were applied to estimate annual wet deposition simulations. The four convective parameterization schemes were found to reproduce the overall observed precipitation band for each of the classified synoptic patterns. When cluster analysis was used with these four schemes, the estimated annual total wet depositions of SO 42- and NO 3- over South Korea were found to reach 184-197 and 277-337 kton year -1, respectively, with the highest estimation found with the KF2 scheme. These estimates were higher than the results of the continuous full year-long simulations by three dimensional comprehensive acid deposition model, which found values of 130 kton year -1 for SO 42- and 270 kton year -1 for NO 3-. There was a 15.2% variability in the annual total precipitation from the use of the different convective parameterizations of the four schemes, but the annual total wet depositions of the four cloud parameterization schemes were in good agreement, with estimated variabilities of approximately 9.1 and 8.8% for SO 42- and NO 3-, respectively. At less than ˜10%, these variations were small and negligible in an estimation of the long-term depositions over the region of Korean Peninsula.

  13. Plant water-stress parameterization determines the strength of land-atmosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Marie; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Ouwersloot, Huug G.; Peters, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Land-surface models that are currently used in numerical weather predictions models and earth system models all assume various plant water-stress parameterizations. We investigate the impact of this variety of parametrizations on the performance of atmospheric models. For this, we use a conceptual framework where a convective atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) model is coupled to a daytime model for the land surface fluxes of carbon, water, and energy. We first validate our coupled model for a set of surface and upper-atmospheric diurnal observations over a grown maize field in the Netherlands. We then perform a sensitivity analysis of this coupled land-atmosphere system by varying the modeled plant water-stress response from a very insensitive to a sensitive response during dry soil conditions. We first propose and verify a feedback diagram that ties plant water-stress response and large-scale atmospheric conditions to the diurnal cycles of ABL CO2, humidity and temperature. Based on our undertanstanding of the diurnal coupled system, we then explore the impact of the assumed water-stress reponse for the development of a dry spell on a synoptic time scale. We find that during a progressive 3-week soil drying caused by evapotranspiration, an insensitive plant will dampen atmospheric heating because the vegetation continues to transpire while soil moisture is available. In contrast, the sensitive plant reduces its transpiration to prevent soil moisture depletion. But when absolute soil moisture comes close to wilting point, the insensitive plant will suddenly close its stomata causing a switch to a land-atmosphere coupling regime dominated by sensible heat exchange. We find that in both cases, our modeled progressive soil moisture depletion contributes to further atmospheric warming up to 6 K, reduced photosynthesis up to 89 %, and CO2 enrichment up to 30 ppm, but the full impact is strongly delayed for the insensitive plant. Finally, we demonstrate that the assumed

  14. A proposed parameterization of interface discontinuity factors depending on neighborhood for pin-by-pin diffusion computations for LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero, Jose Javier; Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Ahnert, Carol, E-mail: herrero@din.upm.es, E-mail: nuria@din.upm.es, E-mail: carol@din.upm.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    There exists an interest in performing full core pin-by-pin computations for present nuclear reactors. In such type of problems the use of a transport approximation like the diffusion equation requires the introduction of correction parameters. Interface discontinuity factors can improve the diffusion solution to nearly reproduce a transport solution. Nevertheless, calculating accurate pin-by-pin IDF requires the knowledge of the heterogeneous neutron flux distribution, which depends on the boundary conditions of the pin-cell as well as the local variables along the nuclear reactor operation. As a consequence, it is impractical to compute them for each possible configuration. An alternative to generate accurate pin-by-pin interface discontinuity factors is to calculate reference values using zero-net-current boundary conditions and to synthesize afterwards their dependencies on the main neighborhood variables. In such way the factors can be accurately computed during fine-mesh diffusion calculations by correcting the reference values as a function of the actual environment of the pin-cell in the core. In this paper we propose a parameterization of the pin-by-pin interface discontinuity factors allowing the implementation of a cross sections library able to treat the neighborhood effect. First results are presented for typical PWR configurations. (author)

  15. Philosophical explorations on energy transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Robert-Jan

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation explores energy transition from a philosophical perspective. It puts forward the thesis that energy production and consumption are so intimately intertwined with society that the transition towards a sustainable alternative will involve more than simply implementing novel

  16. Dissecting the accountability of parameterized and parameter-free single-hybrid and double-hybrid functionals for photophysical properties of TADF-based OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Mojtaba; Karimi, Niloofar

    2017-06-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters are an attractive category of materials that have witnessed a booming development in recent years. In the present contribution, we scrutinize the accountability of parameterized and parameter-free single-hybrid (SH) and double-hybrid (DH) functionals through the two formalisms, full time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA), for the estimation of photophysical properties like absorption energy, emission energy, zero-zero transition energy, and singlet-triplet energy splitting of TADF molecules. According to our detailed analyses on the performance of SHs based on TD-DFT and TDA, the TDA-based parameter-free SH functionals, PBE0 and TPSS0, with one-third of exact-like exchange turned out to be the best performers in comparison to other functionals from various rungs to reproduce the experimental data of the benchmarked set. Such affordable SH approximations can thus be employed to predict and design the TADF molecules with low singlet-triplet energy gaps for OLED applications. From another perspective, considering this point that both the nonlocal exchange and correlation are essential for a more reliable description of large charge-transfer excited states, applicability of the functionals incorporating these terms, namely, parameterized and parameter-free DHs, has also been evaluated. Perusing the role of exact-like exchange, perturbative-like correlation, solvent effects, and other related factors, we find that the parameterized functionals B2π-PLYP and B2GP-PLYP and the parameter-free models PBE-CIDH and PBE-QIDH have respectable performance with respect to others. Lastly, besides the recommendation of reliable computational protocols for the purpose, hopefully this study can pave the way toward further developments of other SHs and DHs for theoretical explorations in the field of OLEDs technology.

  17. An Alternative Triangle Area Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockey, T. L.; Zhang, P.; Brosnan, P.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the mathematics engagement of a group of mathematics coaches, working in k-12 mathematics education. The incenter of a triangle is used to derive an alternative formula for the area of a triangle inspired by Usiskin, Peressini, Marhisotto, and Stanley (2002).

  18. Impact of model structure and parameterization on Penman-Monteith type evaporation models

    KAUST Repository

    Ershadi, A.

    2015-04-12

    The impact of model structure and parameterization on the estimation of evaporation is investigated across a range of Penman-Monteith type models. To examine the role of model structure on flux retrievals, three different retrieval schemes are compared. The schemes include a traditional single-source Penman-Monteith model (Monteith, 1965), a two-layer model based on Shuttleworth and Wallace (1985) and a three-source model based on Mu et al. (2011). To assess the impact of parameterization choice on model performance, a number of commonly used formulations for aerodynamic and surface resistances were substituted into the different formulations. Model response to these changes was evaluated against data from twenty globally distributed FLUXNET towers, representing a cross-section of biomes that include grassland, cropland, shrubland, evergreen needleleaf forest and deciduous broadleaf forest. Scenarios based on 14 different combinations of model structure and parameterization were ranked based on their mean value of Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency. Results illustrated considerable variability in model performance both within and between biome types. Indeed, no single model consistently outperformed any other when considered across all biomes. For instance, in grassland and shrubland sites, the single-source Penman-Monteith model performed the best. In croplands it was the three-source Mu model, while for evergreen needleleaf and deciduous broadleaf forests, the Shuttleworth-Wallace model rated highest. Interestingly, these top ranked scenarios all shared the simple lookup-table based surface resistance parameterization of Mu et al. (2011), while a more complex Jarvis multiplicative method for surface resistance produced lower ranked simulations. The highly ranked scenarios mostly employed a version of the Thom (1975) formulation for aerodynamic resistance that incorporated dynamic values of roughness parameters. This was true for all cases except over deciduous broadleaf

  19. Exploration Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, D.R.; Stanley, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2012 draws upon information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities performed by the mineral industry. Three sources of information are reported and analyzed in this annual review of international exploration for 2012: 1) budgetary statistics expressed in U.S. nominal dollars provided by SNL Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia; 2) regional and site-specific exploration activities that took place in 2012 as compiled by the USGS and 3) regional events including economic, social and political conditions that affected exploration activities, which were derived from published sources and unpublished discussions with USGS and industry specialists.

  20. Exploration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennevik, H.C. [Saga Petroleum A/S, Forus (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    The paper evaluates exploration technology. Topics discussed are: Visions; the subsurface challenge; the creative tension; the exploration process; seismic; geology; organic geochemistry; seismic resolution; integration; drilling; value creation. 4 refs., 22 figs.

  1. Development of a cloud microphysical model and parameterizations to describe the effect of CCN on warm cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kuba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available First, a hybrid cloud microphysical model was developed that incorporates both Lagrangian and Eulerian frameworks to study quantitatively the effect of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN on the precipitation of warm clouds. A parcel model and a grid model comprise the cloud model. The condensation growth of CCN in each parcel is estimated in a Lagrangian framework. Changes in cloud droplet size distribution arising from condensation and coalescence are calculated on grid points using a two-moment bin method in a semi-Lagrangian framework. Sedimentation and advection are estimated in the Eulerian framework between grid points. Results from the cloud model show that an increase in the number of CCN affects both the amount and the area of precipitation. Additionally, results from the hybrid microphysical model and Kessler's parameterization were compared. Second, new parameterizations were developed that estimate the number and size distribution of cloud droplets given the updraft velocity and the number of CCN. The parameterizations were derived from the results of numerous numerical experiments that used the cloud microphysical parcel model. The input information of CCN for these parameterizations is only several values of CCN spectrum (they are given by CCN counter for example. It is more convenient than conventional parameterizations those need values concerned with CCN spectrum, C and k in the equation of N=CSk, or, breadth, total number and median radius, for example. The new parameterizations' predictions of initial cloud droplet size distribution for the bin method were verified by using the aforesaid hybrid microphysical model. The newly developed parameterizations will save computing time, and can effectively approximate components of cloud microphysics in a non-hydrostatic cloud model. The parameterizations are useful not only in the bin method in the regional cloud-resolving model but also both for a two-moment bulk microphysical model and

  2. Lidar observations of mixed layer dynamics - Tests of parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.; Coulter, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric mixed layer depth, the entrainment zone depth and the wind speed and wind direction were used to test various parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under clear air convective conditions over flat terrain in central Illinois are presented. It is shown that surface heating alone accounts for a major portion of the rise of the mixed layer on all days. A new set of entrainment model constants was determined which optimized height predictions for the dataset. Under convective conditions, the shape of the mixed layer height prediction curves closely resembled the observed shapes. Under conditions when significant wind shear was present, the shape of the height prediction curve departed from the data suggesting deficiencies in the parameterization of shear production. Development of small cumulus clouds on top of the layer is shown to affect mixed layer depths in the afternoon growth phase.

  3. The interpretation of remotely sensed cloud properties from a model parameterization perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The goals of ISCCP and FIRE are, broadly speaking, to provide methods for the retrieval of cloud properties from satellites, and to improve cloud radiation models and the parameterization of clouds in GCMs. This study suggests a direction for GCM cloud parameterizations based on analysis of Landsat and ISCCP satellite data. For low level single layer clouds it is found that the mean retrieved liquid water pathe in cloudy pixels is essentially invariant to the cloud fraction, at least in the range 0.2 - 0.8. This result is very important since it allows the cloud fraction to be estimated if the mean liquid water path of cloud in a general circulation model gridcell is known. 3 figs.

  4. A novel parameterization method for the topology optimization of metallic antenna design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Gao, Renjing; Liu, Shutian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, based on a tangential interpolation function and an adaptively increasing penalty-factor strategy (TIPS), a novel parameterization method with a self-penalization scheme aimed for the topology optimization of metallic antenna design is proposed. The topology description is based on the material distribution approach. The proposed tangential interpolation function aims to associate the material resistance with design variables, in which the material resistance is expressed in the arctangent scale and the arctangent resistance is interpolated with the design variables using the rational approximation of material properties. During the optimization process, a strategy with an adaptively increasing penalty factor is used to eliminate the remaining gray scale elements, as illustrated in examples, in the topology optimization based on the proposed tangential interpolation function. Design results of typical examples express the effectiveness of the proposed TIPS parameterization.

  5. On quaternion based parameterization of orientation in computer vision and robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Terzakis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of orientation parameterization for applications in computer vision and robotics is examined in detail herein. The necessary intuition and formulas are provided for direct practical use in any existing algorithm that seeks to minimize a cost function in an iterative fashion. Two distinct schemes of parameterization are analyzed: The first scheme concerns the traditional axis-angle approach, while the second employs stereographic projection from unit quaternion sphere to the 3D real projective space. Performance measurements are taken and a comparison is made between the two approaches. Results suggests that there exist several benefits in the use of stereographic projection that include rational expressions in the rotation matrix derivatives, improved accuracy, robustness to random starting points and accelerated convergence.

  6. Evaluation and Improvement of Cloud and Convective Parameterizations from Analyses of ARM Observations and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Genio, Anthony D. [NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies (GISS), New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Over this period the PI and his performed a broad range of data analysis, model evaluation, and model improvement studies using ARM data. These included cloud regimes in the TWP and their evolution over the MJO; M-PACE IOP SCM-CRM intercomparisons; simulations of convective updraft strength and depth during TWP-ICE; evaluation of convective entrainment parameterizations using TWP-ICE simulations; evaluation of GISS GCM cloud behavior vs. long-term SGP cloud statistics; classification of aerosol semi-direct effects on cloud cover; depolarization lidar constraints on cloud phase; preferred states of the winter Arctic atmosphere, surface, and sub-surface; sensitivity of convection to tropospheric humidity; constraints on the parameterization of mesoscale organization from TWP-ICE WRF simulations; updraft and downdraft properties in TWP-ICE simulated convection; insights from long-term ARM records at Manus and Nauru.

  7. High-order parameterization of (un)stable manifolds for hybrid maps: Implementation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudot, Vincent; Mireles James, J. D.; Lu, Qiuying

    2017-12-01

    In this work we study, from a numerical point of view, the (un)stable manifolds of a certain class of dynamical systems called hybrid maps. The dynamics of these systems are generated by a two stage procedure: the first stage is continuous time advection under a given vector field, the second stage is discrete time advection under a given diffeomorphism. Such hybrid systems model physical processes where a differential equation is occasionally kicked by a strong disturbance. We propose a numerical method for computing local (un)stable manifolds, which leads to high order polynomial parameterization of the embedding. The parameterization of the invariant manifold is not the graph of a function and can follow folds in the embedding. Moreover we obtain a representation of the dynamics on the manifold in terms of a simple conjugacy relation. We illustrate the utility of the method by studying a planar example system.

  8. Final Technical Report for Department of Energy Award DE-SC0010857, “Towards parameterization of root-rock hydrologic interactions in the Earth System Model”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Inez [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-12-05

    The goal of the project is to understand how plants survive droughts, as the decimation of transpiration could shift the surface energy balance from latent heat to sensible heat, leading to warming of the lower atmosphere and amplification of drought. The hypothesis we investigated is that there is a store of moisture in the weathered bedrock below the organic soil mantle, so that plants that have roots deep enough to access this moisture reservoir could survive drought. We developed a new stochastic parameterization of hydraulic conductivity that introduces heterogeneity into the traditional formulation and captures the preferential flow through the weathered bedrock (Vrettas and Fung, 2015). With the new parameterization in the Richards equation, we succeeded in reproducing the fluctuations of the water table in seven well locations over six years. We also and carried out a series of model experiments that explore how subsurface properties impact evapotranspiration (ET) in a Mediterranean climate where a significant portion of ET is observed to take place in the dry and sunny summer when the precipitation is insufficient to meet the demand. Our results show that hydraulic redistribution is important for sustaining ET in the dry seasons when the vertical gradient in water potential is large. The results highlight the importance of lithology, species composition and root function for ET, especially under dry conditions.

  9. Parameterization of light absorption by components of seawater in optically complex coastal waters of the Crimea Peninsula (Black Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Egor V; Khomenko, Georges; Chami, Malik; Sokolov, Anton A; Churilova, Tatyana Y; Korotaev, Gennady K

    2009-03-01

    The absorption of sunlight by oceanic constituents significantly contributes to the spectral distribution of the water-leaving radiance. Here it is shown that current parameterizations of absorption coefficients do not apply to the optically complex waters of the Crimea Peninsula. Based on in situ measurements, parameterizations of phytoplankton, nonalgal, and total particulate absorption coefficients are proposed. Their performance is evaluated using a log-log regression combined with a low-pass filter and the nonlinear least-square method. Statistical significance of the estimated parameters is verified using the bootstrap method. The parameterizations are relevant for chlorophyll a concentrations ranging from 0.45 up to 2 mg/m(3).

  10. Parameterization of cloud droplet formation for global and regional models: including adsorption activation from insoluble CCN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kumar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Dust and black carbon aerosol have long been known to exert potentially important and diverse impacts on cloud droplet formation. Most studies to date focus on the soluble fraction of these particles, and overlook interactions of the insoluble fraction with water vapor (even if known to be hydrophilic. To address this gap, we developed a new parameterization that considers cloud droplet formation within an ascending air parcel containing insoluble (but wettable particles externally mixed with aerosol containing an appreciable soluble fraction. Activation of particles with a soluble fraction is described through well-established Köhler theory, while the activation of hydrophilic insoluble particles is treated by "adsorption-activation" theory. In the latter, water vapor is adsorbed onto insoluble particles, the activity of which is described by a multilayer Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH adsorption isotherm modified to account for particle curvature. We further develop FHH activation theory to i find combinations of the adsorption parameters AFHH, BFHH which yield atmospherically-relevant behavior, and, ii express activation properties (critical supersaturation that follow a simple power law with respect to dry particle diameter.

    The new parameterization is tested by comparing the parameterized cloud droplet number concentration against predictions with a detailed numerical cloud model, considering a wide range of particle populations, cloud updraft conditions, water vapor condensation coefficient and FHH adsorption isotherm characteristics. The agreement between parameterization and parcel model is excellent, with an average error of 10% and R2~0.98. A preliminary sensitivity study suggests that the sublinear response of droplet number to Köhler particle concentration is not as strong for FHH particles.

  11. Parameterization of the Stomatal Component of the DO3SE Model for Mediterranean Evergreen Broadleaf Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roccío Alonso

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An ozone (O3 deposition model (DO3SE is currently used in Europe to define the areas where O3 concentrations lead to absorbed O3 doses that exceed the flux-based critical levels above which phytotoxic effects would be likely recorded. This mapping exercise relies mostly on the accurate estimation of O3 flux through plant stomata. However, the present parameterization of the modulation of stomatal conductance (gs behavior by different environmental variables needs further adjustment if O3 phytotoxicity is to be assessed accurately at regional or continental scales. A new parameterization of the model is proposed for Holm oak (Quercus ilex, a tree species that has been selected as a surrogate for all Mediterranean evergreen broadleaf species. This parameterization was based on a literature review, and was calibrated and validated using experimentally measured data of gs and several atmospheric and soil parameters recorded at three sites of the Iberian Peninsula experiencing long summer drought, and very cold and dry winter air (El Pardo and Miraflores or milder conditions (Tietar. A fairly good agreement was found between modeled and measured data (R2 = 0.64 at Tietar. However, a reasonable performance (R2 = 0.47–0.62 of the model was only achieved at the most continental sites when gs and soil moisture deficit relationships were considered. The influence of root depth on gs estimation is discussed and recommendations are made to build up separate parameterizations for continental and marine-influenced Holm oak sites in the future.

  12. Parameterized Automated Generic Model for Aircraft Wing Structural Design and Mesh Generation for Finite Element Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sohaib, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    This master thesis work presents the development of a parameterized automated generic model for the structural design of an aircraft wing. Furthermore, in order to perform finite element analysis on the aircraft wing geometry, the process of finite element mesh generation is automated. Aircraft conceptual design is inherently a multi-disciplinary design process which involves a large number of disciplines and expertise. In this thesis work, it is investigated how high-end CAD software‟s can b...

  13. Evaluation of a wetland methane emission parameterization for present-day and Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, A.; Schultz, M. G.; Francois, L.

    2012-04-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of atmospheric methane and presumably contribute ~25-40% to its annual budget (~500 Tg). However, there remain considerable uncertainties in estimation of global wetlands and their methane emissivity, given the large domain of their vegetation and hydrological characteristics. In this study, we describe the development of a wetland methane emission model in conjunction with global wetland parameterization at seasonal resolution. Contrary to most of the other modeling studies, our model is based on a simple parameterization and also readily adaptable to different paleo climatic scenarios, in which the role of methane is still largely unexplored. Wetlands with a strong climatic sensitivity are perceived to be a key factor in past changes of atmospheric methane concentration, e.g. the double fold increase since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The present parameterization is primarily based on CARAIB, a large scale dynamic vegetation model designed to study the role of vegetation in the global carbon cycle. Its hydrological module is adept at simulating soil water and several associated hydrological fluxes over various biome types. Our model parameterization uses three basic drivers from CARAIB: soil water, soil temperature and soil carbon content along with high resolution terrain slope data. The emission model is included in the chemistry climate model ECHAM5-MOZ for present day and also used in LGM methane simulations. The model results are evaluated in comparison with atmospheric methane observations from the NOAA-CMDL flask network and ice core records for LGM. We obtained the present day wetland methane source to be 153 Tg/year, which lies near the lower edge of model assumptions. We also discuss the uncertainties of the present day simulation and the impact of emission scaling on atmospheric concentration. The latitudinal distribution of other major methane sources, uncertainties in their budget and their potential role in

  14. An explicit parameterization for casting constraints in gradient driven topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg, Allan Roulund; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2011-01-01

    From a practical point of view it is often desirable to limit the complexity of a topology optimization design such that casting/milling type manufacturing techniques can be applied. In the context of gradient driven topology optimization this work studies how castable designs can be obtained...... by use of a Heaviside design parameterization in a specified casting direction. This reduces the number of design variables considerably and the approach is simple to implement....

  15. Uncertainty assessment of current size-resolved parameterizations for below-cloud particle scavenging by rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Current theoretical and empirical size-resolved parameterizations of the scavenging coefficient (Λ, a parameter commonly used in aerosol transport models to describe below-cloud particle scavenging by rain, have been reviewed in detail and compared with available field and laboratory measurements. Use of different formulations for raindrop-particle collection efficiency can cause uncertainties in size-resolved Λ values of one to two orders of magnitude for particles in the 0.01–3 μm diameter range. Use of different formulations of raindrop number size distribution can cause Λ values to vary by a factor of 3 to 5 for all particle sizes. The uncertainty in Λ caused by the use of different droplet terminal velocity formulations is generally small than a factor of 2. The combined uncertainty due to the use of different formulations of raindrop-particle collection efficiency, raindrop size spectrum, and raindrop terminal velocity in the current theoretical framework is not sufficient to explain the one to two order of magnitude under-prediction of Λ for the theoretical calculations relative to the majority of field measurements. These large discrepancies are likely caused by additional known physical processes (i.e, turbulent transport and mixing, cloud and aerosol microphysics that influence field data but that are not considered in current theoretical Λ parameterizations. The predicted size-resolved particle concentrations using different theoretical Λ parameterization can differ by up to a factor of 2 for particles smaller than 0.01 μm and by a factor of >10 for particles larger than 3 μm after 2–5 mm of rain. The predicted bulk mass and number concentrations (integrated over the particle size distribution can differ by a factor of 2 between theoretical and empirical Λ parameterizations after 2–5 mm of moderate intensity rainfall.

  16. Robust H∞ Control for Singular Time-Delay Systems via Parameterized Lyapunov Functional Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-li Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new version of delay-dependent bounded real lemma for singular systems with state delay is established by parameterized Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach. In order to avoid generating nonconvex problem formulations in control design, a strategy that introduces slack matrices and decouples the system matrices from the Lyapunov-Krasovskii parameter matrices is used. Examples are provided to demonstrate that the results in this paper are less conservative than the existing corresponding ones in the literature.

  17. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENCY OF SURFACE EMISSIVITY ON HEAT TRANSFER USING THE PARAMETERIZED PERTURBATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Jalaal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the temperature dependence of the physical properties such surface emissivity, which controls the radiative problem, is fundamental for determining the thermal balance of many scientific and industrial processes. The current work studies the ability of a strong analytical method called parameterized perturbation method (PPM, which unlike classic perturbation method do not need small parameter, for nonlinear heat transfer equations. The results are compared with the numerical Runge-Kutta method showed good agreement.

  18. Optimisation of an idealised primitive equation ocean model using stochastic parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Fenwick C.

    2017-05-01

    Using a simple parameterization, an idealised low resolution (biharmonic viscosity coefficient of 5 × 1012 m4s-1 , 128 × 128 grid) primitive equation baroclinic ocean gyre model is optimised to have a much more accurate climatological mean, variance and response to forcing, in all model variables, with respect to a high resolution (biharmonic viscosity coefficient of 8 × 1010 m4s-1 , 512 × 512 grid) equivalent. For example, the change in the climatological mean due to a small change in the boundary conditions is more accurate in the model with parameterization. Both the low resolution and high resolution models are strongly chaotic. We also find that long timescales in the model temperature auto-correlation at depth are controlled by the vertical temperature diffusion parameter and time mean vertical advection and are caused by short timescale random forcing near the surface. This paper extends earlier work that considered a shallow water barotropic gyre. Here the analysis is extended to a more turbulent multi-layer primitive equation model that includes temperature as a prognostic variable. The parameterization consists of a constant forcing, applied to the velocity and temperature equations at each grid point, which is optimised to obtain a model with an accurate climatological mean, and a linear stochastic forcing, that is optimised to also obtain an accurate climatological variance and 5 day lag auto-covariance. A linear relaxation (nudging) is not used. Conservation of energy and momentum is discussed in an appendix.

  19. The effects of surface evaporation parameterizations on climate sensitivity to solar constant variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, S.-H.; Curran, R. J.; Ohring, G.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of two different evaporation parameterizations on the sensitivity of simulated climate to solar constant variations are investigated by using a zonally averaged climate model. One parameterization is a nonlinear formulation in which the evaporation is nonlinearly proportional to the sensible heat flux, with the Bowen ratio determined by the predicted vertical temperature and humidity gradients near the earth's surface (model A). The other is the formulation of Saltzman (1968) with the evaporation linearly proportional to the sensible heat flux (model B). The computed climates of models A and B are in good agreement except for the energy partition between sensible and latent heat at the earth's surface. The difference in evaporation parameterizations causes a difference in the response of temperature lapse rate to solar constant variations and a difference in the sensitivity of longwave radiation to surface temperature which leads to a smaller sensitivity of surface temperature to solar constant variations in model A than in model B. The results of model A are qualitatively in agreement with those of the general circulation model calculations of Wetherald and Manabe (1975).

  20. Near-glacier surveying of a subglacial discharge plume: Implications for plume parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. H.; Shroyer, E. L.; Nash, J. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Carroll, D.; Fried, M. J.; Catania, G. A.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Stearns, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    At tidewater glaciers, plume dynamics affect submarine melting, fjord circulation, and the mixing of meltwater. Models often rely on buoyant plume theory to parameterize plumes and submarine melting; however, these parameterizations are largely untested due to a dearth of near-glacier measurements. Here we present a high-resolution ocean survey by ship and remotely operated boat near the terminus of Kangerlussuup Sermia in west Greenland. These novel observations reveal the 3-D structure and transport of a near-surface plume, originating at a large undercut conduit in the glacier terminus, that is inconsistent with axisymmetric plume theory, the most common representation of plumes in ocean-glacier models. Instead, the observations suggest a wider upwelling plume—a "truncated" line plume of ˜200 m width—with higher entrainment and plume-driven melt compared to the typical axisymmetric representation. Our results highlight the importance of a subglacial outlet's geometry in controlling plume dynamics, with implications for parameterizing the exchange flow and submarine melt in glacial fjord models.

  1. Parameterized data-driven fuzzy model based optimal control of a semi-batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamesh, Reddi; Rani, K Yamuna

    2016-09-01

    A parameterized data-driven fuzzy (PDDF) model structure is proposed for semi-batch processes, and its application for optimal control is illustrated. The orthonormally parameterized input trajectories, initial states and process parameters are the inputs to the model, which predicts the output trajectories in terms of Fourier coefficients. Fuzzy rules are formulated based on the signs of a linear data-driven model, while the defuzzification step incorporates a linear regression model to shift the domain from input to output domain. The fuzzy model is employed to formulate an optimal control problem for single rate as well as multi-rate systems. Simulation study on a multivariable semi-batch reactor system reveals that the proposed PDDF modeling approach is capable of capturing the nonlinear and time-varying behavior inherent in the semi-batch system fairly accurately, and the results of operating trajectory optimization using the proposed model are found to be comparable to the results obtained using the exact first principles model, and are also found to be comparable to or better than parameterized data-driven artificial neural network model based optimization results. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Refinement, Validation and Application of Cloud-Radiation Parameterization in a GCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Graeme L. Stephens

    2009-04-30

    The research performed under this award was conducted along 3 related fronts: (1) Refinement and assessment of parameterizations of sub-grid scale radiative transport in GCMs. (2) Diagnostic studies that use ARM observations of clouds and convection in an effort to understand the effects of moist convection on its environment, including how convection influences clouds and radiation. This aspect focuses on developing and testing methodologies designed to use ARM data more effectively for use in atmospheric models, both at the cloud resolving model scale and the global climate model scale. (3) Use (1) and (2) in combination with both models and observations of varying complexity to study key radiation feedback Our work toward these objectives thus involved three corresponding efforts. First, novel diagnostic techniques were developed and applied to ARM observations to understand and characterize the effects of moist convection on the dynamical and thermodynamical environment in which it occurs. Second, an in house GCM radiative transfer algorithm (BUGSrad) was employed along with an optimal estimation cloud retrieval algorithm to evaluate the ability to reproduce cloudy-sky radiative flux observations. Assessments using a range of GCMs with various moist convective parameterizations to evaluate the fidelity with which the parameterizations reproduce key observable features of the environment were also started in the final year of this award. The third study area involved the study of cloud radiation feedbacks and we examined these in both cloud resolving and global climate models.

  3. Explicit simulation and parameterization of mesoscale convective systems. Final report, November 1, 1993--April 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, W.R.

    1997-08-12

    This research has focused on the development of a parameterization scheme for mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), to be used in numerical weather prediction models with grid spacing too coarse to explicitly simulate such systems. This is an extension to cumulus parameterization schemes, which have long been used to account for the unresolved effects of convection in numerical models. Although MCSs generally require an extended sequence of numerous deep convective cells in order to develop into their characteristic sizes and to persist for their typical durations, their effects on the large scale environment are significantly different than that due to the collective effects of numerous ordinary deep convective cells. These differences are largely due to a large stratiform cloud that develops fairly early in the MCS life-cycle, where mesoscale circulations and dynamics interact with the environment in ways that call for a distinct MCS parameterization. Comparing an MCS and a collection of deep convection that ingests the same amount of boundary layer air and moisture over an extended several hour period, the MCS will generally generates more stratiform rainfall, produce longer-lasting and optically thicker cirrus, and result in different vertical distributions of large-scale tendencies due to latent heating and moistening, momentum transfers, and radiational heating.

  4. A Heuristic Parameterization for the Integrated Vertical Overlap of Cumulus and Stratus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungsu

    2017-10-01

    The author developed a heuristic parameterization to handle the contrasting vertical overlap structures of cumulus and stratus in an integrated way. The parameterization assumes that cumulus is maximum-randomly overlapped with adjacent cumulus; stratus is maximum-randomly overlapped with adjacent stratus; and radiation and precipitation areas at each model interface are grouped into four categories, that is, convective, stratiform, mixed, and clear areas. For simplicity, thermodynamic scalars within individual portions of cloud, radiation, and precipitation areas are assumed to be internally homogeneous. The parameterization was implemented into the Seoul National University Atmosphere Model version 0 (SAM0) in an offline mode and tested over the globe. The offline control simulation reasonably reproduces the online surface precipitation flux and longwave cloud radiative forcing (LWCF). Although the cumulus fraction is much smaller than the stratus fraction, cumulus dominantly contributes to precipitation production in the tropics. For radiation, however, stratus is dominant. Compared with the maximum overlap, the random overlap of stratus produces stronger LWCF and, surprisingly, more precipitation flux due to less evaporation of convective precipitation. Compared with the maximum overlap, the random overlap of cumulus simulates stronger LWCF and weaker precipitation flux. Compared with the control simulation with separate cumulus and stratus, the simulation with a single-merged cloud substantially enhances the LWCF in the tropical deep convection and midlatitude storm track regions. The process-splitting treatment of convective and stratiform precipitation with an independent precipitation approximation (IPA) simulates weaker surface precipitation flux than the control simulation in the tropical region.

  5. Capturing the interplay of dynamics and networks through parameterizations of Laplacian operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoran Yan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the interplay between a dynamical process and the structure of the network on which it unfolds using the parameterized Laplacian framework. This framework allows for defining and characterizing an ensemble of dynamical processes on a network beyond what the traditional Laplacian is capable of modeling. This, in turn, allows for studying the impact of the interaction between dynamics and network topology on the quality-measure of network clusters and centrality, in order to effectively identify important vertices and communities in the network. Specifically, for each dynamical process in this framework, we define a centrality measure that captures a vertex’s participation in the dynamical process on a given network and also define a function that measures the quality of every subset of vertices as a potential cluster (or community with respect to this process. We show that the subset-quality function generalizes the traditional conductance measure for graph partitioning. We partially justify our choice of the quality function by showing that the classic Cheeger’s inequality, which relates the conductance of the best cluster in a network with a spectral quantity of its Laplacian matrix, can be extended to the parameterized Laplacian. The parameterized Laplacian framework brings under the same umbrella a surprising variety of dynamical processes and allows us to systematically compare the different perspectives they create on network structure.

  6. Evaluation of Parameterization Schemes in the WRF Model for Estimation of Mixing Height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shrivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the evaluation of parameterization schemes in the WRF model for estimation of mixing height. Numerical experiments were performed using various combinations of parameterization schemes and the results were compared with the mixing height estimated using the radiosonde observations taken by the India Meteorological Department (IMD at Mangalore site for selected days of the warm and cold season in the years 2004–2007. The results indicate that there is a large variation in the mixing heights estimated by the model using various combinations of parameterization schemes. It was seen that the physics option consisting of Mellor Yamada Janjic (Eta as the PBL scheme, Monin Obukhov Janjic (Eta as the surface layer scheme, and Noah land surface model performs reasonably well in reproducing the observed mixing height at this site for both the seasons as compared to the other combinations tested. This study also showed that the choice of the land surface model can have a significant impact on the simulation of mixing height by a prognostic model.

  7. Intercomparison of Martian Lower Atmosphere Simulated Using Different Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterization Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Murali; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Smith, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    We use the mesoscale modeling capability of Mars Weather Research and Forecasting (MarsWRF) model to study the sensitivity of the simulated Martian lower atmosphere to differences in the parameterization of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Characterization of the Martian atmosphere and realistic representation of processes such as mixing of tracers like dust depend on how well the model reproduces the evolution of the PBL structure. MarsWRF is based on the NCAR WRF model and it retains some of the PBL schemes available in the earth version. Published studies have examined the performance of different PBL schemes in NCAR WRF with the help of observations. Currently such assessments are not feasible for Martian atmospheric models due to lack of observations. It is of interest though to study the sensitivity of the model to PBL parameterization. Typically, for standard Martian atmospheric simulations, we have used the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) PBL scheme, which considers a correction term to the vertical gradients to incorporate nonlocal effects. For this study, we have also used two other parameterizations, a non-local closure scheme called Yonsei University (YSU) PBL scheme and a turbulent kinetic energy closure scheme called Mellor- Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) PBL scheme. We will present intercomparisons of the near surface temperature profiles, boundary layer heights, and wind obtained from the different simulations. We plan to use available temperature observations from Mini TES instrument onboard the rovers Spirit and Opportunity in evaluating the model results.

  8. Tsunami damping by mangrove forest: a laboratory study using parameterized trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Strusińska-Correia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Tsunami attenuation by coastal vegetation was examined under laboratory conditions for mature mangroves Rhizophora sp. The developed novel tree parameterization concept, accounting for both bio-mechanical and structural tree properties, allowed to substitute the complex tree structure by a simplified tree model of identical hydraulic resistance. The most representative parameterized mangrove model was selected among the tested models with different frontal area and root density, based on hydraulic test results. The selected parameterized tree models were arranged in a forest model of different width and further tested systematically under varying incident tsunami conditions (solitary waves and tsunami bores. The damping performance of the forest models under these two flow regimes was compared in terms of wave height and force envelopes, wave transmission coefficient as well as drag and inertia coefficients. Unlike the previous studies, the results indicate a significant contribution of the foreshore topography to solitary wave energy reduction through wave breaking in comparison to that attributed to the forest itself. A similar rate of tsunami transmission (ca. 20% was achieved for both flow conditions (solitary waves and tsunami bores and the widest forest (75 m in prototype investigated. Drag coefficient CD attributed to the solitary waves tends to be constant (CD = 1.5 over the investigated range of the Reynolds number.

  9. EMIC wave parameterization in the long-term VERB code simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, A. Y.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Usanova, M. E.; Aseev, N. A.; Kellerman, A. C.; Zhu, H.

    2017-08-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in the dynamics of ultrarelativistic electron population in the radiation belts. However, as EMIC waves are very sporadic, developing a parameterization of such wave properties is a challenging task. Currently, there are no dynamic, activity-dependent models of EMIC waves that can be used in the long-term (several months) simulations, which makes the quantitative modeling of the radiation belt dynamics incomplete. In this study, we investigate Kp, Dst, and AE indices, solar wind speed, and dynamic pressure as possible parameters of EMIC wave presence. The EMIC waves are included in the long-term simulations (1 year, including different geomagnetic activity) performed with the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt code, and we compare results of the simulation with the Van Allen Probes observations. The comparison shows that modeling with EMIC waves, parameterized by solar wind dynamic pressure, provides a better agreement with the observations among considered parameterizations. The simulation with EMIC waves improves the dynamics of ultrarelativistic fluxes and reproduces the formation of the local minimum in the phase space density profiles.

  10. Impact of Urban Surface Roughness Length Parameterization Scheme on Urban Atmospheric Environment Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meichun Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the impact of urban surface roughness length z0 parameterization scheme on the atmospheric environment simulation over Beijing has been investigated through two sets of numerical experiments using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with the Urban Canopy Model. For the control experiment (CTL, the urban surface z0 parameterization scheme used in UCM is the model default one. For another experiment (EXP, a newly developed urban surface z0 parameterization scheme is adopted, which takes into account the comprehensive effects of urban morphology. The comparison of the two sets of simulation results shows that all the roughness parameters computed from the EXP run are larger than those in the CTL run. The increased roughness parameters in the EXP run result in strengthened drag and blocking effects exerted by buildings, which lead to enhanced friction velocity, weakened wind speed in daytime, and boosted turbulent kinetic energy after sunset. Thermal variables (sensible heat flux and temperature are much less sensitive to z0 variations. In contrast with the CTL run, the EXP run reasonably simulates the observed nocturnal low-level jet. Besides, the EXP run-simulated land surface-atmosphere momentum and heat exchanges are also in better agreement with the observation.

  11. AUTOMATED FORCE FIELD PARAMETERIZATION FOR NON-POLARIZABLE AND POLARIZABLE ATOMIC MODELS BASED ONAB INITIOTARGET DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Roux, Benoît

    2013-08-13

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on atomistic models are increasingly used to study a wide range of biological systems. A prerequisite for meaningful results from such simulations is an accurate molecular mechanical force field. Most biomolecular simulations are currently based on the widely used AMBER and CHARMM force fields, which were parameterized and optimized to cover a small set of basic compounds corresponding to the natural amino acids and nucleic acid bases. Atomic models of additional compounds are commonly generated by analogy to the parameter set of a given force field. While this procedure yields models that are internally consistent, the accuracy of the resulting models can be limited. In this work, we propose a method, General Automated Atomic Model Parameterization (GAAMP), for generating automatically the parameters of atomic models of small molecules using the results from ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) calculations as target data. Force fields that were previously developed for a wide range of model compounds serve as initial guess, although any of the final parameter can be optimized. The electrostatic parameters (partial charges, polarizabilities and shielding) are optimized on the basis of QM electrostatic potential (ESP) and, if applicable, the interaction energies between the compound and water molecules. The soft dihedrals are automatically identified and parameterized by targeting QM dihedral scans as well as the energies of stable conformers. To validate the approach, the solvation free energy is calculated for more than 200 small molecules and MD simulations of 3 different proteins are carried out.

  12. Analysis of Different Freezing/Thawing Parameterizations using the UTOPIA Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Cassardo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture changes are generally due to external factors (precipitation, evaporation, etc. and internal forces (gravitational force, capillarity, transpiration, etc.. When soil temperatures remain below 0 °C for a long time (hours or even entire consecutive days, part of the liquid water content of the soil can freeze, thus freezing/thawing effects must be taken into account in those conditions. The present work is devoted to the numerical modeling of the water phase change in the soil. The model used in this study for the land surface processes is UTOPIA (University of TOrino land Process Interaction in Atmosphere model, which is the updated version of LSPM (Land Surface Process Model. Scientific literature proposes some formulations to account for freezing/thawing processes. Three different parameterizations have been compared using a synthetic dataset in order to assess which one performs best from a physical point of view. Parameterizing freezing/thawing processes creates numerical instability and water overproduction in the UTOPIA model. These problems have been solved and described in the paper by means of synthetic data created to test the new parameterizations. The results show that UTOPIA is able to capture the freezing/thawing physical processes.

  13. Parameterization of a Hydrological Model for a Large, Ungauged Urban Catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Krebs

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization leads to the replacement of natural areas by impervious surfaces and affects the catchment hydrological cycle with adverse environmental impacts. Low impact development tools (LID that mimic hydrological processes of natural areas have been developed and applied to mitigate these impacts. Hydrological simulations are one possibility to evaluate the LID performance but the associated small-scale processes require a highly spatially distributed and explicit modeling approach. However, detailed data for model development are often not available for large urban areas, hampering the model parameterization. In this paper we propose a methodology to parameterize a hydrological model to a large, ungauged urban area by maintaining at the same time a detailed surface discretization for direct parameter manipulation for LID simulation and a firm reliance on available data for model conceptualization. Catchment delineation was based on a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM and model parameterization relied on a novel model regionalization approach. The impact of automated delineation and model regionalization on simulation results was evaluated for three monitored study catchments (5.87–12.59 ha. The simulated runoff peak was most sensitive to accurate catchment discretization and calibration, while both the runoff volume and the fit of the hydrograph were less affected.

  14. The exploration metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    NASA's experience in planetary exploration has demonstrated that the desktop workstation is inadequate for many visualization situations. The primary mission displays for the unmanned Surveyor missions to the moon during the mid-1960's, for example, were environmental images assembled on the inside surfaces of spherical shells. Future exploration missions will greatly benefit from advances in digital computer and display technology, but there remain unmet user interface needs. Alternative user interfaces and metaphors are needed for planetary exploration and other interactions with complex spatial environments. These interfaces and metaphors would enable the user to directly explore environments and naturally manipulate objects in those environments. Personal simulators, virtual workstations, and telepresence user interfaces are systems capable of providing this integration of user space and task space. The Exploration Metaphor is a useful concept for guiding the design of user interfaces for virtual environments and telepresence. To apply the Exploration Metaphor is to assert that computing is like exploration, and to support objects, operations, and contexts comparable to those encountered in the exploration of natural environments. The Exploration Metaphor, under development for user interfaces in support of NASA's planetary exploration missions and goals, will also benefit other applications where complex spatial information must be visualized. Visualization methods and systems for planetary exploration are becoming increasingly integrated and interactive as computing technology improves. These advances will benefit from virtual environment and telepresence interface technology. A key development has been the processing of multiple images and other sensor data to create detailed digital models of the planets and moons. Data from images of the Earth, Mars, and Miranda, for example, have been converted into 3D models, and dynamic virtual fly-overs have been

  15. A Subgrid Parameterization for Wind Turbines in Weather Prediction Models with an Application to Wind Resource Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Fiedler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A subgrid parameterization is offered for representing wind turbines in weather prediction models. The parameterization models the drag and mixing the turbines cause in the atmosphere, as well as the electrical power production the wind causes in the wind turbines. The documentation of the parameterization is complete; it does not require knowledge of proprietary data of wind turbine characteristics. The parameterization is applied to a study of wind resource limits in a hypothetical giant wind farm. The simulated production density was found not to exceed 1 W m−2, peaking at a deployed capacity density of 5 W m−2 and decreasing slightly as capacity density increased to 20 W m−2.

  16. Parameterization of Organic-covered Permafrost Soils in Land Surface and Hydrological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Carey, S. K.; Quinton, W. L.; Janowicz, R.

    2009-05-01

    Close to one-third of the earth's surface is underlain with permafrost and much of the permafrost terrain is covered with a surface organic layer of various depths. The need to improve mathematical representation and parameterization of cold region processes in land surface and hydrological models have been well recognized in recent decades. However, progress has been hindered by (a) the complexity and variability of the soil system associated with thawing/freezing processes and organic cover and (b) the shortage of high quality field data due to the technical and logistic difficulties imposed by the harsh environments. Large variations exist in the parameterizations of thermal and hydrological processes in current land surface and hydrological models. Many of them were developed and validated in soil and climate conditions different from those in permafrost regions. In this study, efforts have been made to examine the most important thermal and hydraulic parameterizations and their effects on the simulations of ground thawing/freezing and infiltration/runoff processes against detailed measurements obtained at six field sites in Canada's discontinuous permafrost region. The tested parameterizations include (a) three methods for thermal conductivity, (b) three methods for hydraulic conductivity and soil water retention, (c) three methods for unfrozen water content, (d) six algorithms for thawing/freezing simulation and (e) five algorithms for infiltration simulation. The field sites cover various vegetation types including boreal forest, alpine tundra and wetland peat plateau. The soil organic depth ranges from 0.0 to 3 m. Field data used include daily meteorological variables (solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, precipitation and wind speed), daily liquid soil water content and soil temperature at various depths, and daily snow depth. Total soil water content (frozen and liquid) was monitored using twin probe gamma attenuation at three sites

  17. Uncertainties of parameterized surface downward clear-sky shortwave and all-sky longwave radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gubler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As many environmental models rely on simulating the energy balance at the Earth's surface based on parameterized radiative fluxes, knowledge of the inherent model uncertainties is important. In this study we evaluate one parameterization of clear-sky direct, diffuse and global shortwave downward radiation (SDR and diverse parameterizations of clear-sky and all-sky longwave downward radiation (LDR. In a first step, SDR is estimated based on measured input variables and estimated atmospheric parameters for hourly time steps during the years 1996 to 2008. Model behaviour is validated using the high quality measurements of six Alpine Surface Radiation Budget (ASRB stations in Switzerland covering different elevations, and measurements of the Swiss Alpine Climate Radiation Monitoring network (SACRaM in Payerne. In a next step, twelve clear-sky LDR parameterizations are calibrated using the ASRB measurements. One of the best performing parameterizations is elected to estimate all-sky LDR, where cloud transmissivity is estimated using measured and modeled global SDR during daytime. In a last step, the performance of several interpolation methods is evaluated to determine the cloud transmissivity in the night.

    We show that clear-sky direct, diffuse and global SDR is adequately represented by the model when using measurements of the atmospheric parameters precipitable water and aerosol content at Payerne. If the atmospheric parameters are estimated and used as a fix value, the relative mean bias deviance (MBD and the relative root mean squared deviance (RMSD of the clear-sky global SDR scatter between between −2 and 5%, and 7 and 13% within the six locations. The small errors in clear-sky global SDR can be attributed to compensating effects of modeled direct and diffuse SDR since an overestimation of aerosol content in the atmosphere results in underestimating the direct, but overestimating the diffuse SDR. Calibration of LDR parameterizations

  18. Parameterization of aerosol scavenging due to atmospheric ionization under varying relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Tinsley, Brian A.

    2017-05-01

    Simulations and parameterizations of the modulation of aerosol scavenging by electric charges on particles and droplets for different relative humidities have been made for 3 μm radii droplets and a wide range of particle radii. For droplets and particles with opposite-sign charges, the attractive Coulomb force increases the collision rate coefficients above values due to other forces. With same-sign charges, the repulsive Coulomb force decreases the rate coefficients, and the short-range attractive image forces become important. The phoretic forces are attractive for relative humidity less than 100% and repulsive for relative humidity greater than 100% and have increasing overall effect for particle radii up to about 1 μm. There is an analytic solution for rate coefficients if only inverse square forces are present, but due to the presence of image forces, and for larger particles the intercept, weight, and the flow around the particle affecting the droplet trajectory, the simulated results usually depart far from the analytic solution. We give simple empirical parameterization formulas for some cases and more complex parameterizations for more exact fits to the simulated results. The results can be used in cloud models with growing droplets, as in updrafts, as well as with evaporating droplets in downdrafts. There is considered to be little scavenging of uncharged ice-forming nuclei in updrafts, but with charged ice-forming nuclei it is possible for scavenging in updrafts in cold clouds to produce contact ice nucleation. Scavenging in updrafts below the freezing level produces immersion nuclei that promote enhanced freezing as droplets rise above it.

  19. Albedo-corrected Parameterized Equivalence Constants for Cross-section Update in Nodal Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woosong; Kim, Yonghee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The main idea of the theory is to preserve the equivalency between an original heterogeneous assembly and a simplified homogenized assembly in terms of their reaction rates and node interface currents. Nowadays, simplified equivalence theory (SET) is one of the most widely used techniques due to its computational efficiency. However, the SET efficiency on a single assembly homogenization is quite limited when the node interface current is not close to zero and the neighborhood effect is rather strong. To overcome this limitation, several approaches to functionalize the equivalence constants have been suggested in order to achieve more accurate whole-core solution while maintaining the advantage of the conventional two-step procedure, such as boundary perturbation theory and functional interface discontinuity factors. In a recent study by W. Kim and Y. Kim, the albedo-corrected parameterized equivalence constants (APEC) method was proposed, in which fuel assembly two-group cross-sections are parameterized as a function of a node-average current-to-flux ratio (CFR), a unique way to represent the spatial leakage of node. In the two-group homogenization of PWR fuel assembly, both thermal-group and down-scattering cross sections can be well functionalized as a function of an albedo information on the boundary. The APEC method can be very effectively utilized in adjusting the thermal-group cross sections and improving the accuracy of the conventional nodal analysis for PWR cores. For accurate parameterization of the cross section, a color-set configuration should be also analyzed, and the additional computational cost is rather marginal.

  20. Testing longwave radiation parameterizations under clear and overcast skies at Storglaciären, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sedlar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy balance based glacier melt models require accurate estimates of incoming longwave radiation but direct measurements are often not available. Multi-year near-surface meteorological data from Storglaciären, Northern Sweden, were used to evaluate commonly used longwave radiation parameterizations in a glacier environment under clear-sky and all-sky conditions. Parameterizations depending solely on air temperature performed worse than those which include water vapor pressure. All models tended to overestimate incoming longwave radiation during periods of low longwave radiation, while incoming longwave was underestimated when radiation was high. Under all-sky conditions root mean square error (RMSE and mean bias error (MBE were 17 to 20 W m−2 and −5 to 1 W m−2, respectively. Two attempts were made to circumvent the need of cloud cover data. First cloud fraction was parameterized as a function of the ratio, τ, of measured incoming shortwave radiation and calculated top of atmosphere radiation. Second, τ was related directly to the cloud factor (i.e. the increase in sky emissivity due to clouds. Despite large scatter between τ and both cloud fraction and the cloud factor, resulting calculations of hourly incoming longwave radiation for both approaches were only slightly more variable with RMSE roughly 3 W m−2 larger compared to using cloud observations as input. This is promising for longwave radiation modeling in areas where shortwave radiation data are available but cloud observations are not.

  1. Impact of atmospheric and oceanic form drag parameterization on simulations of Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamados, Michel; Feltham, Daniel L.; Schroeder, David. F.; Farrell, Sinead L.; Kurtz, Nathan T.; Laxon, Seymour W.

    2013-04-01

    Pressure ridges, keels, floe edges and melt pond edges all introduce discrete obstructions to the flow of the air or ocean over the ice, and are a source of form drag. For typical ice covers the form drag contribution to the total drag is of comparable or greater magnitude to the surface or skin drag. In current climate models form drag is only accounted for by tuning of the air-ice and air-ocean drag coefficients, i.e. by altering the roughness length in a surface drag parameterization. The existing approach of skin drag parameter tuning, while numerically convenient, is poorly constrained by observations and fails to describe correctly the physics associated with the air-ice and ocean-ice drag. Here we combine recent theoretical developments to deduce the total neutral form drag coefficients from the key parameters of the ice cover such as ice concentration, size and area of the ridges and keels, freeboard and floe draft and size of melt ponds. We incorporate the drag coefficients into the sea ice component of a climate model (the CICE model). This stage necessitates that the sea ice characteristics obtained locally from observations are mapped to the averaged sea ice quantities provided by the sea ice model at the larger grid cell length scale. We present results over the Arctic of a stand-alone version of the model and show the influence of the new drag parameterization on the motion and mass of the ice cover. The new parameterization allows the drag coefficients to be coupled to the sea ice state and therefore to evolve spatially and temporally. We test the predictions of the model against measured drag coefficients in several regions of the Arctic and find good agreement between model and observations.

  2. Subgrid Parameterization of the Soil Moisture Storage Capacity for a Distributed Rainfall-Runoff Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijian Guo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variability plays an important role in nonlinear hydrologic processes. Due to the limitation of computational efficiency and data resolution, subgrid variability is usually assumed to be uniform for most grid-based rainfall-runoff models, which leads to the scale-dependence of model performances. In this paper, the scale effect on the Grid-Xinanjiang model was examined. The bias of the estimation of precipitation, runoff, evapotranspiration and soil moisture at the different grid scales, along with the scale-dependence of the effective parameters, highlights the importance of well representing the subgrid variability. This paper presents a subgrid parameterization method to incorporate the subgrid variability of the soil storage capacity, which is a key variable that controls runoff generation and partitioning in the Grid-Xinanjiang model. In light of the similar spatial pattern and physical basis, the soil storage capacity is correlated with the topographic index, whose spatial distribution can more readily be measured. A beta distribution is introduced to represent the spatial distribution of the soil storage capacity within the grid. The results derived from the Yanduhe Basin show that the proposed subgrid parameterization method can effectively correct the watershed soil storage capacity curve. Compared to the original Grid-Xinanjiang model, the model performances are quite consistent at the different grid scales when the subgrid variability is incorporated. This subgrid parameterization method reduces the recalibration necessity when the Digital Elevation Model (DEM resolution is changed. Moreover, it improves the potential for the application of the distributed model in the ungauged basin.

  3. Ensemble formulation of surface fluxes and improvement in evapotranspiration and cloud parameterizations in a GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Smith, W. E.

    1984-06-01

    The influence of some simple modifications to the physical parameterizations in the current GLAS climate GCM is examined. The aim of these modifications was to eliminate strong occasional bursts of 2 - δ t oscillations in the PBL fluxes. The PBL of the current GLAS climate model was modified by invoking concepts of ensemble averaging of PBL eddies in a grid cell of the GCM. This resulted in smoothly varying bulk aerodynamic friction and heat transport coefficients. An arbitrary function to account for diffusion of moisture from stomatal cavities found in vegetation was also incorporated. Simultaneously some modifications to the cloud parameterizations were made. Two integrations, one with the old model and the other with the modified model, were made to simulate 47 days, starting from the NMC analysis for June 15, 1979. Their comparisons showed that the surface fluxes and cloudiness in the modified model simulations are far better. The planetary albedo in the modified model is also realistic. However, some weaknesses still persist, including an ITCZ (Inter-tropical convergence zone) that is too far northward in Sahelian Africa, polar regions that are too cold, and a rather strong ITCZ. It is pointed out that these weaknesses are primarily caused by model deficiencies, e.g., the cloud parameterization and the uniformly prescribed land surface roughness height. In another simulation with the modified model using a realistic value of surface roughness for deserts, the precipitation in the Sahara Desert reduced significantly, which effectively pushed the ITCZ southward to a more realistic location as compared to observations.

  4. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU's shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75-2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  5. Design space exploration of a particle filter using higher-0rder functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wester, Rinse; Kuper, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a design space exploration methodology based on higher-order functions to facilitate the tradeoff between execution time and area usage on FPGAs. Higher-order function are transformed, resulting in parameterized nodes where the amount of parallelism and thereby performance, can

  6. All ternary permutation constraint satisfaction problems parameterized above average have kernels with quadratic numbers of variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutin, Gregory; Van Iersel, Leo; Mnich, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    A ternary Permutation-CSP is specified by a subset Π of the symmetric group S3. An instance of such a problem consists of a set of variables V and a multiset of constraints, which are ordered triples of distinct variables of V. The objective is to find a linear ordering α of V that maximizes...... the number of triples whose rearrangement (under α) follows a permutation in Π. We prove that all ternary Permutation-CSPs parameterized above average have kernels with quadratic numbers of variables....

  7. Models parameterization for SWE retrievals from passive microwave over Canadian boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Royer, A.; Langlois, A.; Montpetit, B.

    2012-12-01

    Boreal forest is the world largest northern land biome and has important impact and feedback on climate. Snow in this ecosystem changed drastically surface energy balance (albedo, turbulent fluxes). Furthermore, snow is a freshwater reservoir influencing hydrological regime and is an important source of energy through hydroelectricity. Passive microwave remote sensing is an appealing approach for characterizing the properties of snow at the synoptic scale; images are available at least twice a day for northern regions where meteorological stations and networks are generally sparse. However, major challenge such as forest canopy contribution and snow grain size within the snowpack, which have both huge impact on passive microwave signature from space-born sensors, must be well parameterized to retrieve variables of interest like Snow water equivalent (SWE). In this presentation, we show advances made in boreal forest τ-ω (forest transmissivity and scattering) and QH (soil reflectivity) models parameterization, as well as snow grains consideration development in the microwave snow emission. In the perspective of AMSR-E brightness temperature (Tb) assimilation in the Canadian Land surface scheme (CLASS), we used a new version of a multi-layer snow emission model: DMRT-ML. First, based on two distinct Tb datasets (winter airborne and summer space-borne), τ-ω and QH models are parameterized at 4 frequencies (6.9, 10.7, 18.7 and 36.5 GHz) for dense boreal forest sites. The forest transmissivity is then spatialized by establishing a relationship with forest structure parameters (LAI and stem volume). Secondly, snow surface specific area (SSA) was parameterized in DMRT-ML based on SWIR reflectance measurements for SSA calculation, as well as snow characteristics (temperature, density, height) and radiometric (19 & 37 GHz) measurements conducted on 20 snowpits in different open environments (grass, tundra, dry fen). Analysis shows that a correction factor must be

  8. Equatorial oscillations maintained by gravity waves as described with the Doppler Spread Parameterization: II. Heuristic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Hartle, R. E.; Chan, K. L.

    1998-01-01

    The Doppler Spread Parameterization (DSP) for gravity waves (GW) developed by Hines is applied to the zonal momentum budget at the equator. For sufficiently large oscillation amplitudes in the background zonal winds, comparable to the GW induced wind variability, the momentum source is intermittent and as such it represents a nonlinearity of third or generally odd order. This kind of nonlinearity generates, besides higher harmonics, the fundamental harmonic itself which is retained in a simplified analytical solution that can describe self-sustained oscillations without invoking external, time dependent forcing. The formulation is discussed to provide some understanding of the numerical results presented in the companion paper.

  9. The parameterization method for invariant manifolds from rigorous results to effective computations

    CERN Document Server

    Haro, Àlex; Figueras, Jordi-Lluis; Luque, Alejandro; Mondelo, Josep Maria

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents some theoretical and computational aspects of the parameterization method for invariant manifolds, focusing on the following contexts: invariant manifolds associated with fixed points, invariant tori in quasi-periodically forced systems, invariant tori in Hamiltonian systems and normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds. This book provides algorithms of computation and some practical details of their implementation. The methodology is illustrated with 12 detailed examples, many of them well known in the literature of numerical computation in dynamical systems. A public version of the software used for some of the examples is available online. The book is aimed at mathematicians, scientists and engineers interested in the theory and applications of computational dynamical systems.

  10. Impact mitigation using kinematic constraints and the full space parameterization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgansen, K.A.; Pin, F.G.

    1996-02-01

    A new method for mitigating unexpected impact of a redundant manipulator with an object in its environment is presented. Kinematic constraints are utilized with the recently developed method known as Full Space Parameterization (FSP). System performance criterion and constraints are changed at impact to return the end effector to the point of impact and halt the arm. Since large joint accelerations could occur as the manipulator is halted, joint acceleration bounds are imposed to simulate physical actuator limitations. Simulation results are presented for the case of a simple redundant planar manipulator.

  11. Parameterization of electrical equivalent circuits for pem fuel cells; Parametrierung elektrischer Aequivalentschaltbilder von PEM Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubrock, J.

    2007-12-13

    Fuel cells are a very promising technology for energy conversion. For optimization purpose, useful simulation tools are needs. Simulation tools should simulate the static and dynamic electrical behaviour and the models should parameterized by measurment results which should be done easily. In this dissertation, a useful model for simulating a pem fuel cell is developed. the model should parametrizes by V-I curve measurment and by current step respond. The model based on electrical equivalent circuits and it is shown, that it is possible to simulate the dynamic behaviour of a pem fuel cell stack. The simulation results are compared by measurment results. (orig.)

  12. Empirical parameterization of the K±→π±π0π0 decay Dalitz plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batley, J. R.; Culling, A. J.; Kalmus, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Munday, D. J.; Slater, M. W.; Wotton, S. A.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bocquet, G.; Cabibbo, N.; Ceccucci, A.; Cundy, D.; Falaleev, V.; Fidecaro, M.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Kubischta, W.; Norton, A.; Maier, A.; Patel, M.; Peters, A.; Balev, S.; Frabetti, P. L.; Goudzovski, E.; Hristov, P.; Kekelidze, V.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Madigozhin, D.; Marinova, E.; Molokanova, N.; Polenkevich, I.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Stoynev, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Monnier, E.; Swallow, E.; Winston, R.; Rubin, P.; Walker, A.; Baldini, W.; Ramusino, A. Cotta; Dalpiaz, P.; Damiani, C.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Martini, M.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Scarpa, M.; Wahl, H.; Calvetti, M.; Iacopini, E.; Ruggiero, G.; Bizzeti, A.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Behler, M.; Eppard, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Marouelli, P.; Masetti, L.; Moosbrugger, U.; Morales, C. Morales; Renk, B.; Wache, M.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Coward, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Martin, T. Fonseca; Shieh, M.; Szleper, M.; Velasco, M.; Wood, M. D.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Nappi, A.; Piccini, M.; Raggi, M.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Petrucci, M. C.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Michetti, A.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Fiorini, L.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Cheshkov, C.; Chèze, J. B.; De Beer, M.; Derré, J.; Marel, G.; Mazzucato, E.; Peyaud, B.; Vallage, B.; Holder, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Marchetto, F.; Bifani, S.; Clemencic, M.; Lopez, S. Goy; Dibon, H.; Jeitler, M.; Markytan, M.; Mikulec, I.; Neuhofer, G.; Widhalm, L.; NA48/2 Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    As first observed by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS, the ππ invariant mass (M00) distribution from K→πππ decay shows a cusp-like anomaly at M00=2m+, where m+ is the charged pion mass. An analysis to extract the ππ scattering lengths in the isospin I=0 and I=2 states, a0 and a2, respectively, has been recently reported. In the present work the Dalitz plot of this decay is fitted to a new empirical parameterization suitable for practical purposes, such as Monte Carlo simulations of K→πππ decays.

  13. Physically sound parameterization of incomplete ionization in aluminum-doped silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Steinkemper

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Incomplete ionization is an important issue when modeling silicon devices featuring aluminum-doped p+ (Al-p+ regions. Aluminum has a rather deep state in the band gap compared to boron or phosphorus, causing strong incomplete ionization. In this paper, we considerably improve our recent parameterization [Steinkemper et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 074504 (2015]. On the one hand, we found a fundamental criterion to further reduce the number of free parameters in our fitting procedure. And on the other hand, we address a mistake in the original publication of the incomplete ionization formalism in Altermatt et al., J. Appl. Phys. 100, 113715 (2006.

  14. Understanding the Impact of Ground Water Treatment and Evapotranspiration Parameterizations in the NCEP Climate Forecast System (CFS) on Warm Season Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, M. B.; Yang, R.

    2016-12-01

    Skillful short-term weather forecasts, which rely heavily on quality atmospheric initial conditions, have a fundamental limit of about two weeks owing to the chaotic nature of the atmosphere. Useful forecasts at sub-seasonal to seasonal time scales, on the other hand, require well-simulated large-scale atmospheric response to slowly varying lower boundary forcings from both the ocean and land surface. The critical importance of ocean has been recognized, where the ocean indices have been used in a variety of climate applications. In contrast, the impact of land surface anomalies, especially soil moisture and associated evaporation, has been proven notably difficult to demonstrate. The Noah Land Surface Model (LSM) is the land component of NCEP CFS version 2 (CFSv2) used for seasonal predictions. The Noah LSM originates from the Oregon State University (OSU) LSM. The evaporation control in the Noah LSM is based on the Penman-Monteith equation, which takes into account the solar radiation, relative humidity, air temperature, and soil moisture effects. The Noah LSM is configured with four soil layers with a fixed depth of 2 meters and free drainage at the bottom soil layer. This treatment assumes that the soil water table depth is well within the specified range, and also potentially misrepresents the soil moisture memory effects at seasonal time scales. To overcome the limitation, an unconfined aquifer is attached to the bottom of the soil to allow the water table to move freely up and down. In addition, in conjunction with the water table, an alternative Ball-Berry photosynthesis-based evaporation parameterization is examined to evaluate the impact from using a different evaporation control methodology. Focusing on the 2011 and 2012 intense summer droughts in the central US, seasonal ensemble forecast experiments with early May initial conditions are carried out for the two years using an enhanced version of CFSv2, where the atmospheric component of the CFSv2 is

  15. Space exploration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chris Moore

    2012-01-01

      Here, Moore presents a year in review on space exploration programs. This 2012 NASA's strategy of stimulating the development of commercial capabilities to launch crew and cargo to the ISS began to pay off...

  16. Investigation of vegetation-induced drag parameterizations for natural and nature-based extreme events coastal protection in the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, S.; Suckale, J.; Ferreira, C.; Arkema, K.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing intensity and frequency of extreme meteorological events around the world highlight the need for resilient coastal defenses. For more than a century, it has been recognized that coastal ecosystems such as marshes and mangroves may mitigate the damage caused by natural hazards such as storms. Aquatic vegetation can potentially attenuate waves and currents through drag forces, with strong implications for sediment transport processes and hence morphological evolution. However, although observations exist that support such a theory, an accurate quantification of the protective role of coastal ecosystems remains a standing challenge for the scientific community, which manifests itself in the large, diverse set of available empirical expressions for parameterizing the fluid-vegetation interaction. We propose a comparison of different state-of-the-art parameterizations for the effect of vegetation on hydrodynamics (particularly, the drag coefficient), with varying degrees of complexity and number of required input variables. The inter-comparison of such alternatives, when validated against field data, can lead to a modeling framework that optimizes the trade-offs between complexity, input requirements and uncertainty in the results. We focus our numerical study on storm events in the marshes and wetlands of Chesapeake Bay. We simulate the hydrodynamics via the Non-Linear Shallow Water Equations, which are in turn solved numerically through a Finite Volume scheme. The simulations are complemented by an ongoing 2-years field campaign, where we continuously collect hydrodynamic measurements such as free surface elevation and vertical velocity profiles, biophysical characteristics of the vegetation and high-resolution topo-bathymetric data of the site. Field measurements are used for calibration and validation purposes. We also investigate some implications on sediment transport processes. We expect that results from our study can support policy makers and

  17. Using the Weak-Temperature Gradient Approximation to Evaluate Parameterizations: An Example of the Transition From Suppressed to Active Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daleu, C. L.; Plant, R. S.; Woolnough, S. J.

    2017-10-01

    Two single-column models are fully coupled via the weak-temperature gradient approach. The coupled-SCM is used to simulate the transition from suppressed to active convection under the influence of an interactive large-scale circulation. The sensitivity of this transition to the value of mixing entrainment within the convective parameterization is explored. The results from these simulations are compared with those from equivalent simulations using coupled cloud-resolving models. Coupled-column simulations over nonuniform surface forcing are used to initialize the simulations of the transition, in which the column with suppressed convection is forced to undergo a transition to active convection by changing the local and/or remote surface forcings. The direct contributions from the changes in surface forcing are to induce a weakening of the large-scale circulation which systematically modulates the transition. In the SCM, the contributions from the large-scale circulation are dominated by the heating effects, while in the CRM the heating and moistening effects are about equally divided. A transition time is defined as the time when the rain rate in the dry column is halfway to the value at equilibrium after the transition. For the control value of entrainment, the order of the transition times is identical to that obtained in the CRM, but the transition times are markedly faster. The locally forced transition is strongly delayed by a higher entrainment. A consequence is that for a 50% higher entrainment the transition times are reordered. The remotely forced transition remains fast while the locally forced transition becomes slow, compared to the CRM.

  18. Parameterizing the Effects of Finite Crested Wave Breaking in Wave-Averaged Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; Suanda, S. H.; Feddersen, F.

    2016-02-01

    Finite crested breaking waves generate a rotational body force that creates two-dimensional turbulent eddies with strong rotational velocities, capable of tracer exchange (sediment, pathogens, contaminants) between the surfzone and the inner shelf. This eddy generation mechanism is strongly tied to the wave directional spread. Wave-resolving Boussinesq models like funwaveC include finite crest length breaking and accurately simulate surfzone eddy generation. However, this surfzone eddy generation mechanism is not included in existing wave-averaged models (e.g., Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport Modeling System, COAWST), leading to an incomplete representation of exchange between the surf zone and the inner shelf. In this study 250 funwaveC simulations with random, directionally spread waves spanning a range of beach slopes and wave conditions are used to simulate surfzone eddies. With these simulations, the stream function associated with breaking wave eddy forcing is isolated and quantified in the form of intensity, cross- and alongshore widths and propagation rates, followed by parameterization as a function of wave parameters and the beach slope. Parameterized stream function is implemented into COAWST as a stochastic surf zone eddy module which is used to study vorticity evolution from the surfzone to the inner-shelf, interaction between stratified water column and surfzone eddies, and overall provides a more complete representation of surfzone eddy induced cross-shore exchange. Funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  19. A 3D parameterization of iron atmospheric deposition to the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Krol, Maarten C.; van Noije, Twan P. C.; Le Sager, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition of trace constituents, both of natural and anthropogenic origin, can act as a nutrient source into the open ocean and affect marine ecosystem functioning and subsequently the exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and the global ocean. Dust is known as a major source of nutrients to the global ocean, but only a fraction of these nutrients is released in soluble form that can be assimilated by the ecosystems. Iron (Fe) is a key micronutrient that significantly modulates gross primary production in High-Nutrient-Low-Chlorophyll (HNLC) oceans, where macronutrients like nitrate are abundant but primary production is limited by Fe scarcity. The global atmospheric Fe cycle is here parameterized in the state-of-the-art global Earth System Model EC-Earth. The model takes into account the primary emissions of both insoluble and soluble Fe, associated with dusts and combustion processes. The impact of atmospheric acidity on mineral solubility is parameterized based on updated experimental and theoretical findings, and model results are evaluated against available observations. The link between the soluble Fe atmospheric deposition and anthropogenic sources is also investigated. Overall, the response of the chemical composition of nutrient containing aerosols to atmospheric composition changes is demonstrated and quantified. This work has been financed by the Marie-Curie H2020-MSCA-IF-2015 grant (ID 705652) ODEON (Online DEposition over OceaNs: Modeling the effect of air pollution on ocean bio-geochemistry in an Earth System Model).

  20. Stochastic parameterizing manifolds and non-Markovian reduced equations stochastic manifolds for nonlinear SPDEs II

    CERN Document Server

    Chekroun, Mickaël D; Wang, Shouhong

    2015-01-01

    In this second volume, a general approach is developed to provide approximate parameterizations of the "small" scales by the "large" ones for a broad class of stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs). This is accomplished via the concept of parameterizing manifolds (PMs), which are stochastic manifolds that improve, for a given realization of the noise, in mean square error the partial knowledge of the full SPDE solution when compared to its projection onto some resolved modes. Backward-forward systems are designed to give access to such PMs in practice. The key idea consists of representing the modes with high wave numbers as a pullback limit depending on the time-history of the modes with low wave numbers. Non-Markovian stochastic reduced systems are then derived based on such a PM approach. The reduced systems take the form of stochastic differential equations involving random coefficients that convey memory effects. The theory is illustrated on a stochastic Burgers-type equation.

  1. Bridging the Gap Between Experimental Data and Model Parameterization for Chikungunya Virus Transmission Predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Rebecca C; Mores, Christopher N; Wearing, Helen J

    2016-12-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has experienced 2 major expansion events in the last decade. The most recently emerged sublineage (ECSA-V) was shown to have increased efficiency in a historically secondary vector, Aedes albopictus, leading to speculation that this was a major factor in expansion. Subsequently, a number of experimental studies focused on the vector competence of CHIKV, as well as transmission modeling efforts. Mathematical models have used these data to inform their own investigations, but some have incorrectly parameterized the extrinsic incubation period (EIP) of the mosquitoes, using vector competence data. Vector competence and EIP are part of the same process but are not often correctly reported together. Thus, the way these metrics are used for model parameterization can be problematic. We offer suggestions for bridging this gap for the purpose of standardization of reporting and to promote appropriate use of experimental data in modeling efforts. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Developmentof improved basal friction parameterizations using ISSM: Preliminary results for Greenland's Jakobshavn Ice Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkides, D. J.; Larour, E.; Morlighem, M.; Seroussi, H.

    2012-04-01

    In ice flow models, the basal friction law links velocity at the ice-bed interface to drag at the glacial base. Accurate ice stream simulation relies on parameterization of this relationship, but basal drag cannot be measured observationally, remaining a key unknown in ice flow modeling. The Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), developed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in collaboration with UC Irvine, is a state of the art, finite-element model capable of simulating 3-D transient ice flow on an anisotropic mesh and incorporating data assimilation through use of inverse control methods. As part of a larger development effort to improve simulation/understanding of ice sheet evolution in Greenland and Antarctica, we present preliminary results from ISSM for the sensitivity of Greenland's Jakobshavn ice stream to a range of friction law parameterizations, with model-data comparisons for the surface flow field. This work has implications for ice sheet model development and understanding of ice sheet slippage events. This work was performed at JPL under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Modeling, Analysis and Prediction (MAP) Program.

  3. Invariant manifolds and the parameterization method in coupled energy harvesting piezoelectric oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Albert

    2017-08-01

    Energy harvesting systems based on oscillators aim to capture energy from mechanical oscillations and convert it into electrical energy. Widely extended are those based on piezoelectric materials, whose dynamics are Hamiltonian submitted to different sources of dissipation: damping and coupling. These dissipations bring the system to low energy regimes, which is not desired in long term as it diminishes the absorbed energy. To avoid or to minimize such situations, we propose that the coupling of two oscillators could benefit from theory of Arnold diffusion. Such phenomenon studies O(1) energy variations in Hamiltonian systems and hence could be very useful in energy harvesting applications. This article is a first step towards this goal. We consider two piezoelectric beams submitted to a small forcing and coupled through an electric circuit. By considering the coupling, damping and forcing as perturbations, we prove that the unperturbed system possesses a 4-dimensional Normally Hyperbolic Invariant Manifold with 5 and 4-dimensional stable and unstable manifolds, respectively. These are locally unique after the perturbation. By means of the parameterization method, we numerically compute parameterizations of the perturbed manifold, its stable and unstable manifolds and study its inner dynamics. We show evidence of homoclinic connections when the perturbation is switched on.

  4. Development of QSARs for parameterizing Physiology Based ToxicoKinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarigiannis, Dimosthenis Α; Papadaki, Krystalia; Kontoroupis, Periklis; Karakitsios, Spyros P

    2017-08-01

    A Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) model was developed in order to predict physicochemical and biochemical properties of industrial chemicals of various groups. This model was based on the solvation equation, originally proposed by Abraham. In this work Abraham's solvation model got parameterized using artificial intelligence techniques such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the prediction of partitioning into kidney, heart, adipose, liver, muscle, brain and lung for the estimation of the bodyweight-normalized maximal metabolic velocity (Vmax) and the Michaelis - Menten constant (Km). Model parameterization using ANNs was compared to the use of non-linear regression (NLR) for organic chemicals. The coupling of ANNs with Abraham's solvation equation resulted in a model with strong predictive power (R2 up to 0.95) for both partitioning and biokinetic parameters. The proposed model outperformed other QSAR models found in the literature, especially with regard to the estimation and prediction of key biokinetic parameters such as Km. The results show that the physicochemical descriptors used in the model successfully describe the complex interactions of the micro-processes governing chemical distribution and metabolism in human tissues. Moreover, ANNs provide a flexible mathematical framework to capture the non-linear biochemical and biological interactions compared to less flexible regression techniques. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Parameterization of Time-Averaged Suspended Sediment Concentration in the Nearshore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Doug Yoon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To quantify the effect of wave breaking turbulence on sediment transport in the nearshore, the vertical distribution of time-averaged suspended sediment concentration (SSC in the surf zone was parameterized in terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE at different cross-shore locations, including the bar crest, bar trough, and inner surf zone. Using data from a large-scale laboratory experiment, a simple relationship was developed between the time-averaged SSC and the time-averaged TKE. The vertical variation of the time-averaged SSC was fitted to an equation analogous to the turbulent dissipation rate term. At the bar crest, the proposed equation was slightly modified to incorporate the effect of near-bed sediment processes and yielded reasonable agreement. This parameterization yielded the best agreement at the bar trough, with a coefficient of determination R2 ≥ 0.72 above the bottom boundary layer. The time-averaged SSC in the inner surf zone showed good agreement near the bed but poor agreement near the water surface, suggesting that there is a different sedimentation mechanism that controls the SSC in the inner surf zone.

  6. Structural and isospin effects on balance energy and transition energy via different nuclear charge radii parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeeta; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2017-10-01

    The structural and isospin effects have been studied through isospin dependent and independent nuclear charge radii parameterizations on the collective flow within the framework of Isospin-dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD) model. The calculations have been carried out by using two approaches: (i) for the reaction series having fixed N / Z ratio and (ii) for the isobaric reaction series with different N / Z ratio. Our results indicate that there is a considerable effect of radii parameterizations on the excitation function of reduced flow (∂v1/∂Yred) and elliptical flow (v2). Both balance energy (Ebal) and transition energy (Etrans) are enhanced with increase in radii of reacting nuclei and found to follow a power law with nuclear charge radii. The exponent τ values show that the elliptical flow is more sensitive towards different nuclear charge radii as compared to reduced flow. Moreover, we observe that our theoretical calculation of Ebal and Etrans are in agreement with the experimental data provided by GSI, INDRA and FOPI collaborations.

  7. Model-driven harmonic parameterization of the cortical surface: HIP-HOP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzias, G; Lefèvre, J; Le Troter, A; Fischer, C; Perrot, M; Régis, J; Coulon, O

    2013-05-01

    In the context of inter subject brain surface matching, we present a parameterization of the cortical surface constrained by a model of cortical organization. The parameterization is defined via an harmonic mapping of each hemisphere surface to a rectangular planar domain that integrates a representation of the model. As opposed to previous landmark-based registration methods we do not match folds between individuals but instead optimize the fit between cortical sulci and specific iso-coordinate axis in the model. This strategy overcomes some limitation to sulcus-based registration techniques such as topological variability in sulcal landmarks across subjects. Experiments on 62 subjects with manually traced sulci are presented and compared with the result of the Freesurfer software. The evaluation involves a measure of dispersion of sulci with both angular and area distortions. We show that the model-based strategy can lead to a natural, efficient and very fast (less than 5 min per hemisphere) method for defining inter subjects correspondences. We discuss how this approach also reduces the problems inherent to anatomically defined landmarks and open the way to the investigation of cortical organization through the notion of orientation and alignment of structures across the cortex.

  8. Microphysical Parameterizations for NWP: It's All About the Sizes and Production Pathways of Hydrometeors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Sara A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Grell, Evelyn D.

    2017-04-01

    Bulk microphysical parameterization schemes are popularly used in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models to simulate clouds and precpitation. These schemes are based on assumed number distribution functions for individual hydrometeor species, which are integratable over size distributions of diameters from zero to infinity. Typically, hydrometeor mass and number mixing ratios are predicted in these schemes. Some schemes also predict a third parameter of hydrometeor distribution characteristics. In this study, four commonly-used microphysics schemes of various complexity that are available in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) are investigated and compared using numerical model simulations of an idealized 2-D squall line and microphysics budget analysis. Diagnoses of the parameterized pathways for hydrometeor production reveal that the differences related to the assumptions of hydrometeor size distributions between the schemes lead to the differences in the simulations due to the net effect of various microphysical processes on the interaction between latent heating/evaporative cooling and flow dynamics as the squall line develops. Results from this study also highlight the possibility that the advantage of double-moment formulations can be overshadowed by the uncertainties in the spectral definition of individual hydrometeor categories and spectrum-dependent microphysical processes. It is concluded that the major differences between the schemes investigated here are in the assumed hydrometeor size distributions and pathways for their production.

  9. Fast engineering optimization: A novel highly effective control parameterization approach for industrial dynamic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Li, Guodong; Liu, Xinggao

    2015-09-01

    Control vector parameterization (CVP) is an important approach of the engineering optimization for the industrial dynamic processes. However, its major defect, the low optimization efficiency caused by calculating the relevant differential equations in the generated nonlinear programming (NLP) problem repeatedly, limits its wide application in the engineering optimization for the industrial dynamic processes. A novel highly effective control parameterization approach, fast-CVP, is first proposed to improve the optimization efficiency for industrial dynamic processes, where the costate gradient formulae is employed and a fast approximate scheme is presented to solve the differential equations in dynamic process simulation. Three well-known engineering optimization benchmark problems of the industrial dynamic processes are demonstrated as illustration. The research results show that the proposed fast approach achieves a fine performance that at least 90% of the computation time can be saved in contrast to the traditional CVP method, which reveals the effectiveness of the proposed fast engineering optimization approach for the industrial dynamic processes. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Trends in parameterization, economics and host behaviour in influenza pandemic modelling: a review and reporting protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Luis R; Jit, Mark; Chen, Mark I; Lee, Vernon J; Milne, George J; Cook, Alex R

    2013-05-07

    The volume of influenza pandemic modelling studies has increased dramatically in the last decade. Many models incorporate now sophisticated parameterization and validation techniques, economic analyses and the behaviour of individuals. We reviewed trends in these aspects in models for influenza pandemic preparedness that aimed to generate policy insights for epidemic management and were published from 2000 to September 2011, i.e. before and after the 2009 pandemic. We find that many influenza pandemics models rely on parameters from previous modelling studies, models are rarely validated using observed data and are seldom applied to low-income countries. Mechanisms for international data sharing would be necessary to facilitate a wider adoption of model validation. The variety of modelling decisions makes it difficult to compare and evaluate models systematically. We propose a model Characteristics, Construction, Parameterization and Validation aspects protocol (CCPV protocol) to contribute to the systematisation of the reporting of models with an emphasis on the incorporation of economic aspects and host behaviour. Model reporting, as already exists in many other fields of modelling, would increase confidence in model results, and transparency in their assessment and comparison.

  11. Effects of model resolution and parameterizations on the simulations of clouds, precipitation, and their interactions with aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoung Soo; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Yuwei; Yoo, Hyelim; Kim, Seungbum; Kim, Byung-Gon; Choi, Yong-Sang; Mok, Jungbin; Um, Junshik; Ock Choi, Kyoung; Dong, Danhong

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the roles played by model resolution and microphysics parameterizations in the well-known uncertainties or errors in simulations of clouds, precipitation, and their interactions with aerosols by the numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. For this investigation, we used cloud-system-resolving model (CSRM) simulations as benchmark simulations that adopt high-resolution and full-fledged microphysical processes. These simulations were evaluated against observations, and this evaluation demonstrated that the CSRM simulations can function as benchmark simulations. Comparisons between the CSRM simulations and the simulations at the coarse resolutions that are generally adopted by current NWP models indicate that the use of coarse resolutions as in the NWP models can lower not only updrafts and other cloud variables (e.g., cloud mass, condensation, deposition, and evaporation) but also their sensitivity to increasing aerosol concentration. The parameterization of the saturation process plays an important role in the sensitivity of cloud variables to aerosol concentrations. while the parameterization of the sedimentation process has a substantial impact on how cloud variables are distributed vertically. The variation in cloud variables with resolution is much greater than what happens with varying microphysics parameterizations, which suggests that the uncertainties in the NWP simulations are associated with resolution much more than microphysics parameterizations.

  12. A Note Comparing Component-Slope, Scheffé, and Cox Parameterizations of the Linear Mixture Experiment Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.

    2006-05-01

    A mixture experiment involves combining two or more components in various proportions and collecting data on one or more responses. A linear mixture model may adequately represent the relationship between a response and mixture component proportions and be useful in screening the mixture components. The Scheffé and Cox parameterizations of the linear mixture model are commonly used for analyzing mixture experiment data. With the Scheffé parameterization, the fitted coefficient for a component is the predicted response at that pure component (i.e., single-component mixture). With the Cox parameterization, the fitted coefficient for a mixture component is the predicted difference in response at that pure component and at a pre-specified reference composition. This paper presents a new component-slope parameterization, in which the fitted coefficient for a mixture component is the predicted slope of the linear response surface along the direction determined by that pure component and at a pre-specified reference composition. The component-slope, Scheffé, and Cox parameterizations of the linear mixture model are compared and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  13. A parameterization study for elastic VTI Full Waveform Inversion of hydrophone components: synthetic and North Sea field data examples

    KAUST Repository

    Guitton, Antoine

    2017-08-15

    Choosing the right parameterization to describe a transversely isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) allows us to match the scattering potential of these parameters to the available data in a way that avoids potential tradeoff and focus on the parameters to which the data are sensitive. For 2-D elastic full waveform inversion in VTI media of pressure components and for data with a reasonable range of offsets (as with those found in conventional streamer data acquisition systems), assuming that we have a kinematically accurate NMO velocity (vnmo) and anellipticity parameter η (or horizontal velocity, vh) obtained from tomographic methods, a parameterization in terms of horizontal velocity vh, η and ε is preferred to the more conventional parameterization in terms of vh, δ and ε. In the vh, η, ε parameterization and for reasonable scattering angles (<60o), ε acts as a “garbage collector” and absorbs most of the amplitude discrepancies; between modeled and observed data, more so when density ρ and shear-wave velocity vs are not inverted for (a standard practice with streamer data). On the contrary, in the vv, δ, ε parameterization, ε is mostly sensitive to large scattering angles, leaving vv exposed to strong leakages from ρ mainly. There assertions will be demonstrated on the synthetic Marmousi II as well as a North Sea OBC dataset, where inverting for the horizontal velocity rather than the vertical velocity yields more accurate models and migrated images.

  14. Impacts of Light Use Efficiency and fPAR Parameterization on Gross Primary Production Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yen-Ben; Zhang, Qingyuan; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Wang, Yujie; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of parameterization of two variables, light use efficiency (LUE) and the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR or fAPAR), on gross primary production(GPP) modeling. Carbon sequestration by terrestrial plants is a key factor to a comprehensive under-standing of the carbon budget at global scale. In this context, accurate measurements and estimates of GPP will allow us to achieve improved carbon monitoring and to quantitatively assess impacts from cli-mate changes and human activities. Spaceborne remote sensing observations can provide a variety of land surface parameterizations for modeling photosynthetic activities at various spatial and temporal scales. This study utilizes a simple GPP model based on LUE concept and different land surface parameterizations to evaluate the model and monitor GPP. Two maize-soybean rotation fields in Nebraska, USA and the Bartlett Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA were selected for study. Tower-based eddy-covariance carbon exchange and PAR measurements were collected from the FLUXNET Synthesis Dataset. For the model parameterization, we utilized different values of LUE and the fPAR derived from various algorithms. We adapted the approach and parameters from the MODIS MOD17 Biome Properties Look-Up Table (BPLUT) to derive LUE. We also used a site-specific analytic approach with tower-based Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) and PAR to estimate maximum potential LUE (LUEmax) to derive LUE. For the fPAR parameter, the MODIS MOD15A2 fPAR product was used. We also utilized fAPAR chl, a parameter accounting for the fAPAR linked to the chlorophyll-containing canopy fraction. fAPAR chl was obtained by inversion of a radiative transfer model, which used the MODIS-based reflectances in bands 1-7 produced by Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. fAPAR chl exhibited seasonal dynamics more similar with the flux tower based GPP than MOD15A2 fPAR, especially

  15. Farside explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mimoun, David; Wieczorek, Mark A.; Alkalai, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Farside Explorer is a proposed Cosmic Vision medium-size mission to the farside of the Moon consisting of two landers and an instrumented relay satellite. The farside of the Moon is a unique scientific platform in that it is shielded from terrestrial radio-frequency interference, it recorded...... the primary differentiation and evolution of the Moon, it can be continuously monitored from the Earth-Moon L2 Lagrange point, and there is a complete lack of reflected solar illumination from the Earth. Farside Explorer will exploit these properties and make the first radio-astronomy measurements from...... the most radio-quiet region of near-Earth space, determine the internal structure and thermal evolution of the Moon, from crust to core, and quantify impact hazards in near-Earth space by the measurement of flashes generated by impact events. The Farside Explorer flight system includes two identical solar...

  16. Observation-based parameterization of air-sea fluxes in terms of wind speed and atmospheric stability under low-to-moderate wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhongshui; Zhao, Dongliang; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Jun A.; Huang, Jian

    2017-05-01

    This study explores the behavior of the exchange coefficients for wind stress (CD), sensible heat flux (CH), and water vapor flux (CE) as functions of surface wind speed (U10) and atmospheric stability using direct turbulent flux measurements obtained from a platform equipped with fast-response turbulence sensors in a low-to-moderate wind region. Turbulent fluxes are calculated using the eddy-correlation method with extensive observations. The total numbers of quality-controlled 30 min flux runs are 12,240, 5813, and 5637 for estimation of CD, CH, and CE, respectively. When adjusted to neutral stability using the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST), we found that CDN, CHN, and CEN decrease with neutral-adjusted wind speed when wind speed is less than 5 m/s. CDN is constant over the range 5 m/s 12 m/s. In contrast, CHN and CEN exhibit no clear dependence on wind speed and are generally constant, with mean values of 0.96 × 10-3 and 1.2 × 10-3, respectively. This behavior of neutral exchange coefficients is consistent with the findings of previous studies. We also found that CDN under offshore winds is generally greater than that under onshore wind conditions, which is ascribed to the younger wind waves present due to the shorter fetch in the former case. However, this behavior is not exhibited by CHN or CEN. The original CD, CH, and CE values without MOST adjustment are also investigated to develop a new parameterization based on wind speed and stability. Three stability parameters are tested, including the bulk Richardson number, stability as defined in COARE 3.0, and a simplified Richardson number using the Charnock parameter. This new parameterization is free of MOST and the associated self-correlation. Compared with previous studies and COARE 3.0 results, the new parameterization using the simplified Richardson number performs well, with an increased correlation coefficient and reduction of root-mean-square error and bias.

  17. Dimensionless parameterization of lidar for laser remote sensing of the atmosphere and its application to systems with SiPM and PMT detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Agishev, Ravil R.; Comerón Tejero, Adolfo; Rodríguez Gómez, Alejandro Antonio; Sicard, Michaël

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we show a renewed approach to the generalized methodology for atmospheric lidar assessment, which uses the dimensionless parameterization as a core component. It is based on a series of our previous works where the problem of universal parameterization over many lidar technologies were described and analyzed from different points of view. The modernized dimensionless parameterization concept applied to relatively new silicon photomultiplier detectors (SiPMs) and traditional pho...

  18. Shape space exploration of constrained meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yongliang

    2011-12-12

    We present a general computational framework to locally characterize any shape space of meshes implicitly prescribed by a collection of non-linear constraints. We computationally access such manifolds, typically of high dimension and co-dimension, through first and second order approximants, namely tangent spaces and quadratically parameterized osculant surfaces. Exploration and navigation of desirable subspaces of the shape space with regard to application specific quality measures are enabled using approximants that are intrinsic to the underlying manifold and directly computable in the parameter space of the osculant surface. We demonstrate our framework on shape spaces of planar quad (PQ) meshes, where each mesh face is constrained to be (nearly) planar, and circular meshes, where each face has a circumcircle. We evaluate our framework for navigation and design exploration on a variety of inputs, while keeping context specific properties such as fairness, proximity to a reference surface, etc. © 2011 ACM.

  19. Shape space exploration of constrained meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yongliang

    2011-01-01

    We present a general computational framework to locally characterize any shape space of meshes implicitly prescribed by a collection of non-linear constraints. We computationally access such manifolds, typically of high dimension and co-dimension, through first and second order approximants, namely tangent spaces and quadratically parameterized osculant surfaces. Exploration and navigation of desirable subspaces of the shape space with regard to application specific quality measures are enabled using approximants that are intrinsic to the underlying manifold and directly computable in the parameter space of the osculant surface. We demonstrate our framework on shape spaces of planar quad (PQ) meshes, where each mesh face is constrained to be (nearly) planar, and circular meshes, where each face has a circumcircle. We evaluate our framework for navigation and design exploration on a variety of inputs, while keeping context specific properties such as fairness, proximity to a reference surface, etc.

  20. Basic Concepts for Convection Parameterization in Weather Forecast and Climate Models: COST Action ES0905 Final Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun–Ichi Yano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The research network “Basic Concepts for Convection Parameterization in Weather Forecast and Climate Models” was organized with European funding (COST Action ES0905 for the period of 2010–2014. Its extensive brainstorming suggests how the subgrid-scale parameterization problem in atmospheric modeling, especially for convection, can be examined and developed from the point of view of a robust theoretical basis. Our main cautions are current emphasis on massive observational data analyses and process studies. The closure and the entrainment–detrainment problems are identified as the two highest priorities for convection parameterization under the mass–flux formulation. The need for a drastic change of the current European research culture as concerns policies and funding in order not to further deplete the visions of the European researchers focusing on those basic issues is emphasized.

  1. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative medicine refers to treatments that are used instead of conventional (standard) ones. If you use an alternative ... considered complementary therapy. There are many forms of ... Acupuncture involves stimulating certain acupoints on the body ...

  2. Alternative and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for e-updates Please leave this field empty Alternative & Integrative Medicine SHARE Home > Treatment and Care > Treatments Listen Alternative medicine is a term used to define therapies other ...

  3. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Parents - or Other Adults Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Teens > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... replacement. continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  4. Evaluation of PBL Parameterizations in WRF at Sub-Kilometer Resolution: Turbulence Statistics in the Convective Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey Shin, Hyeyum; Dudhia, Jimy

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization up to the present time has focused on profiles of mean and parameterized vertical flux, since the parameterization has been developed for horizontal resolution that cannot resolve any turbulence in the PBL. Meanwhile, recent increase in computing power has been allowing numerical weather prediction at horizontal resolution finer than 1 km, at which kilometer-scale large eddies in the PBL are partly resolvable. In this study, the performance of five PBL parameterizations in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is evaluated at sub-kilometer resolution. The evaluation focuses on resolved high-order turbulence statistics, given that modeling at the high resolution is aimed at improving the simulation of resolved fields. The five parameterizations include four nonlocal PBL schemes - the Yonsei University (YSU), Asymmetric Convective Model 2 (ACM2), Eddy Diffusivity Mass Flux (EDMF), and Total Energy Mass Flux (TEMF) schemes, and one local scheme - Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) level 2.5 model. Key findings are as follows. 1) None of the PBL schemes are scale-aware. Instead, each PBL scheme has its own best performing resolution in parameterizing subgrid-scale (SGS) vertical transport and resolving eddies, and the resolution appears to be different between heat and momentum. 2) All the selected PBL schemes reproduce total vertical heat transport well, as resolved transport compensates defects of SGS transport. This interaction between the resolved and SGS transports is not found in momentum transport. 3) The local PBL scheme maintains a weakly stable temperature profile in the upper PBL, which was not accomplished by coarser-resolution simulations. 4) The best schemes in simulating mean, energy spectrum, and vertical-velocity histogram, i.e., the first-, second- and third-order statistics, do not coincide.

  5. Modeling the clouds on Venus: model development and improvement of a nucleation parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttänen, Anni; Bekki, Slimane; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Julin, Jan; Montmessin, Franck; Ortega, Ismael K.; Lebonnois, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    As both the clouds of Venus and aerosols in the Earth's stratosphere are composed of sulfuric acid droplets, we use the 1-D version of a model [1,4] developed for stratospheric aerosols and clouds to study the clouds on Venus. We have removed processes and compounds related to the stratospheric clouds so that the only species remaining are water and sulfuric acid, corresponding to the stratospheric sulfate aerosols, and we have added some key processes. The model describes microphysical processes including condensation/evaporation, and sedimentation. Coagulation, turbulent diffusion, and a parameterization for two-component nucleation [8] of water and sulfuric acid have been added in the model. Since the model describes explicitly the size distribution with a large number of size bins (50-500), it can handle multiple particle modes. The validity ranges of the existing nucleation parameterization [7] have been improved to cover a larger temperature range, and the very low relative humidity (RH) and high sulfuric acid concentrations found in the atmosphere of Venus. We have made several modifications to improve the 2002 nucleation parameterization [7], most notably ensuring that the two-component nucleation model behaves as predicted by the analytical studies at the one-component limit reached at extremely low RH. We have also chosen to use a self-consistent cluster distribution [9], constrained by scaling it to recent quantum chemistry calculations [3]. First tests of the cloud model have been carried out with temperature profiles from VIRA [2] and from the LMD Venus GCM [5], and with a compilation of water vapor and sulfuric acid profiles, as in [6]. The temperature and pressure profiles do not evolve with time, but the vapour profiles naturally change with the cloud. However, no chemistry is included for the moment, so the vapor concentrations are only dependent on the microphysical processes. The model has been run for several hundreds of Earth days to reach a

  6. Improving Mixed-phase Cloud Parameterization in Climate Model with the ACRF Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhien [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2016-12-13

    Mixed-phase cloud microphysical and dynamical processes are still poorly understood, and their representation in GCMs is a major source of uncertainties in overall cloud feedback in GCMs. Thus improving mixed-phase cloud parameterizations in climate models is critical to reducing the climate forecast uncertainties. This study aims at providing improved knowledge of mixed-phase cloud properties from the long-term ACRF observations and improving mixed-phase clouds simulations in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). The key accomplishments are: 1) An improved retrieval algorithm was developed to provide liquid droplet concentration for drizzling or mixed-phase stratiform clouds. 2) A new ice concentration retrieval algorithm for stratiform mixed-phase clouds was developed. 3) A strong seasonal aerosol impact on ice generation in Arctic mixed-phase clouds was identified, which is mainly attributed to the high dust occurrence during the spring season. 4) A suite of multi-senor algorithms was applied to long-term ARM observations at the Barrow site to provide a complete dataset (LWC and effective radius profile for liquid phase, and IWC, Dge profiles and ice concentration for ice phase) to characterize Arctic stratiform mixed-phase clouds. This multi-year stratiform mixed-phase cloud dataset provides necessary information to study related processes, evaluate model stratiform mixed-phase cloud simulations, and improve model stratiform mixed-phase cloud parameterization. 5). A new in situ data analysis method was developed to quantify liquid mass partition in convective mixed-phase clouds. For the first time, we reliably compared liquid mass partitions in stratiform and convective mixed-phase clouds. Due to the different dynamics in stratiform and convective mixed-phase clouds, the temperature dependencies of liquid mass partitions are significantly different due to much higher ice concentrations in convective mixed phase clouds. 6) Systematic evaluations

  7. A comparison of sea salt emission parameterizations in northwestern Europe using a chemistry transport model setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Neumann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric sea salt particles affect chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere. These particles provide surface area for condensation and reaction of nitrogen, sulfur, and organic species and are a vehicle for the transport of these species. Additionally, HCl is released from sea salt. Hence, sea salt has a relevant impact on air quality, particularly in coastal regions with high anthropogenic emissions, such as the North Sea region. Therefore, the integration of sea salt emissions in modeling studies in these regions is necessary. However, it was found that sea salt concentrations are not represented with the necessary accuracy in some situations.In this study, three sea salt emission parameterizations depending on different combinations of wind speed, salinity, sea surface temperature, and wave data were implemented and compared: GO03 (Gong, 2003, SP13 (Spada et al., 2013, and OV14 (Ovadnevaite et al., 2014. The aim was to identify the parameterization that most accurately predicts the sea salt mass concentrations at different distances to the source regions. For this purpose, modeled particle sodium concentrations, sodium wet deposition, and aerosol optical depth were evaluated against measurements of these parameters. Each 2-month period in winter and summer 2008 were considered for this purpose. The shortness of these periods limits generalizability of the conclusions on other years.While the GO03 emissions yielded overestimations in the PM10 concentrations at coastal stations and underestimations of those at inland stations, OV14 emissions conversely led to underestimations at coastal stations and overestimations at inland stations. Because of the differently shaped particle size distributions of the GO03 and OV14 emission cases, the deposition velocity of the coarse particles differed between both cases which yielded this distinct behavior at inland and coastal stations. The PM10 concentrations produced by the SP13 emissions

  8. Atmospheric parameterization schemes for satellite cloud property retrieval during FIRE IFO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titlow, James; Baum, Bryan A.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite cloud retrieval algorithms generally require atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles to determine such cloud properties as pressure and height. For instance, the CO2 slicing technique called the ratio method requires the calculation of theoretical upwelling radiances both at the surface and a prescribed number (40) of atmospheric levels. This technique has been applied to data from, for example, the High Resolution Infrared Radiometer Sounder (HIRS/2, henceforth HIRS) flown aboard the NOAA series of polar orbiting satellites and the High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS). In this particular study, four NOAA-11 HIRS channels in the 15-micron region are used. The ratio method may be applied to various channel combinations to estimate cloud top heights using channels in the 15-mu m region. Presently, the multispectral, multiresolution (MSMR) scheme uses 4 HIRS channel combination estimates for mid- to high-level cloud pressure retrieval and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data for low-level (is greater than 700 mb) cloud level retrieval. In order to determine theoretical upwelling radiances, atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles must be provided as well as profiles of other radiatively important gas absorber constituents such as CO2, O3, and CH4. The assumed temperature and humidity profiles have a large effect on transmittance and radiance profiles, which in turn are used with HIRS data to calculate cloud pressure, and thus cloud height and temperature. For large spatial scale satellite data analysis, atmospheric parameterization schemes for cloud retrieval algorithms are usually based on a gridded product such as that provided by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) or the National Meteorological Center (NMC). These global, gridded products prescribe temperature and humidity profiles for a limited number of pressure levels (up to 14) in a vertical atmospheric column. The FIRE IFO 2

  9. Comparison of the Snow Simulations in Community Land Model Using Two Snow Cover Fraction Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhipeng; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    Snow cover is an important component of local- and regional-scale energy and water budgets, especially in mountainous areas. This paper evaluates the snow simulations by using two snow cover fraction schemes in CLM4.5 (NY07 is the original snow-covered area parameterization used in CLM4, and SL12 is the default scheme in CLM4.5). Off-line simulations are carried out forced by the China Meteorological forcing dataset from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2010 over the Tibetan Plateau. Simulated snow cover fraction (SCF), snow depth, and snow water equivalent (SWE) were compared against a set of observations including the Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System (IMS) snow cover product, the daily snow depth dataset of China, and China Meteorological Administration (CMA) in-situ snow depth and SWE observations. The comparison results indicate significant differences existing between those two SCF parameterizations simulations. Overall, the SL12 formulation shows a certain improvement compared to the NY07 scheme used in CLM4, with the percentage of correctly modeled snow/no snow being 75.8% and 81.8% when compared with the IMS snow product, respectively. Yet, this improvement varies both temporally and spatially. Both these two snow cover schemes overestimated the snow depth, in comparison with the daily snow depth dataset of China, the average biases of simulated snow depth are 7.38cm (8.77cm), 6.97cm (8.2cm) and 5.49cm (5.76cm) NY07 (and SL12) in the snow accumulation period (September through next February), snowmelt period (March through May) and snow-free period (June through August), respectively. When compared with the CMA in-situ snow depth observations, averaged biases are 3.18cm (4.38cm), 2.85cm (4.34cm) and 0.34cm (0.34cm) for NY07 (SL12), respectively. Though SL12 does worse snow depth simulation than NY07, the simulated SWE by SL12 is better than that by NY07, with average biases being 2.64mm, 6.22mm, 1.33mm for NY07, and 1.47mm, 2.63mm, 0.31mm

  10. Application of Multiscale Parameterization Framework for the Large Scale Hydrologic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Samaniego, L. E.; Livneh, B.; Attinger, S.

    2012-12-01

    In recent decades there has been increasing interest in the development and application of large scale hydrologic models to support the management of regional water resources as well as for flood forecasting and drought monitoring. However, the reliable prediction of distributed hydrologic states (i.e. soil moisture, runoff, evapotranspiration) for large river basins (i.e. ≥ 100 000 km2) requires a robust parameterization technique that avoids scale dependent issues, reduces the over-parameterization problem, and allows the transferability of model parameters across locations (e.g. to unaguged basins). In this study, we show the ability of the recently developed Multiscale Parameter Regionalization (MPR) technique (Samaniego, et. al. 2010), integrated within a grid based hydrologic model (mHM), to address the above problems. The MPR technique explicitly accounts for sub-grid variability of basin physical characteristics by linking them to model parameters at much finer spatial resolution (e.g. 100 - 500 m) than the model pixels (> 1 km). The application of the multiscale parameterization framework was tested in four large scale river basins; two in Central Europe (the Rhine and the Elbe river basins), and two in North America (the Ohio and the Red river basins). Model runs were performed at 3h time scale on four spatial resolutions, ranging from a grid size of approximately 7 km to 50 km, for the period from 1960 to 2000. Results of the study indicated that it is possible to transfer a priori set of global parameters, estimated in a relatively small German river basin (Neckar river, 10 000 km2), to all four large river basins including the remote North American basins. The values of Nash Sutcliffe efficiency for the daily and monthly streamflow simulations were, on average, above 0.80. Similar results were obtained from simulations at four spatial resolutions (0.0625°, 0.125°, 0.25°, and 0.5°), which indicated the possibility for the cross

  11. Dissipative particle dynamics parameterization and simulations to predict negative volume excess and structure of PEG and water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacar, Gokhan

    2017-12-01

    We report the results of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) parameterization and simulations of a mixture of hydrophilic polymer, PEG 400, and water which are known to exhibit negative volume excess property upon mixing. The addition of a Morse potential to the conventional DPD potential mimics the hydrogen bond attraction, where the parameterization takes the internal chemistry of the beads into account. The results indicate that the mixing of PEG and water are maintained by the influence of hydrogen bonds, and the mesoscopic structure is characterized by the trade-off of enthalpic and entropic effects.

  12. Exploring quadrangulations

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chihan

    2014-01-01

    Here we presented a framework to explore quad mesh topologies. The core of our work is a systematic enumeration algorithm that can generate all possible quadrangular meshes inside a defined boundary with an upper limit of v3-v5 pairs. The algorithm is orders of magnitude more efficient than previous work. The combination of topological enumeration and shape-space exploration demonstrates that mesh topology has a powerful influence on geometry. The Fig. 18. A gallery of different quadrilateral meshes for a Shuriken. The quadrilaterals of the model were colored in a postprocess. Topological variations have distinctive, interesting patterns of mesh lines. © 2014 ACM 0730-0301/2014/01-ART3 15.00.

  13. A Formal Approach to Verify Parameterized Protocols in Mobile Cyber-Physical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile cyber-physical systems (CPSs are very hard to verify, because of asynchronous communication and the arbitrary number of components. Verification via model checking typically becomes impracticable due to the state space explosion caused by the system parameters and concurrency. In this paper, we propose a formal approach to verify the safety properties of parameterized protocols in mobile CPS. By using counter abstraction, the protocol is modeled as a Petri net. Then, a novel algorithm, which uses IC3 (the state-of-the-art model checking algorithm as the back-end engine, is presented to verify the Petri net model. The experimental results show that our new approach can greatly scale the verification capabilities compared favorably against several recently published approaches. In addition to solving the instances fast, our method is significant for its lower memory consumption.

  14. A Novel Structure and Design Optimization of Compact Spline-Parameterized UWB Slot Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koziel Slawomir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel structure of a compact UWB slot antenna and its design optimization procedure has been presented. In order to achieve a sufficient number of degrees of freedom necessary to obtain a considerable size reduction rate, the slot is parameterized using spline curves. All antenna dimensions are simultaneously adjusted using numerical optimization procedures. The fundamental bottleneck here is a high cost of the electromagnetic (EM simulation model of the structure that includes (for reliability an SMA connector. Another problem is a large number of geometry parameters (nineteen. For the sake of computational efficiency, the optimization process is therefore performed using variable-fidelity EM simulations and surrogate-assisted algorithms. The optimization process is oriented towards explicit reduction of the antenna size and leads to a compact footprint of 199 mm2 as well as acceptable matching within the entire UWB band. The simulation results are validated using physical measurements of the fabricated antenna prototype.

  15. Optimal Layout Design using the Element Connectivity Parameterization Method: Application to Three Dimensional Geometrical Nonlinear Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Gil Ho; Joung, Young Soo; Kim, Yoon Young

    2005-01-01

    of freedom of the element-connectivity parameterizing links are eliminated in element level before the total system matrix is assembled. In terms of implementation, however, the E-ECP is easier to use because the sensitivity analysis in E-ECP does not require the explicit expression of the (tangent......The topology design optimization of “three-dimensional geometrically-nonlinear” continuum structures is still a difficult problem not only because of its problem size but also the occurrence of unstable continuum finite elements during the design optimization. To overcome this difficulty......) stiffness matrix of continuum finite elements. Therefore, any finite element code, including commercial codes, can be readily used for the ECP implementation. The key ideas and characteristics of these methods will be presented in this paper....

  16. Towards product design automation based on parameterized standard model with diversiform knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-04-01

    Product standardization based on CAD software is an effective way to improve design efficiency. In the past, research and development on standardization mainly focused on the level of component, and the standardization of the entire product as a whole is rarely taken into consideration. In this paper, the size and structure of 3D product models are both driven by the Excel datasheets, based on which a parameterized model library is therefore established. Diversiform knowledge including associated parameters and default properties are embedded into the templates in advance to simplify their reuse. Through the simple operation, we can obtain the correct product with the finished 3D models including single parts or complex assemblies. Two examples are illustrated later to invalid the idea, which will greatly improve the design efficiency.

  17. The role of aerosols in cloud drop parameterizations and its applications in global climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The characteristics of the cloud drop size distribution near cloud base are initially determined by aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei and the updraft velocity. We have developed parameterizations relating cloud drop number concentration to aerosol number and sulfate mass concentrations and used them in a coupled global aerosol/general circulation model (GCM) to estimate the indirect aerosol forcing. The global aerosol model made use of our detailed emissions inventories for the amount of particulate matter from biomass burning sources and from fossil fuel sources as well as emissions inventories of the gas-phase anthropogenic SO{sub 2}. This work is aimed at validating the coupled model with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program measurements and assessing the possible magnitude of the aerosol-induced cloud effects on climate.

  18. Knowledge Representation and Reasoning in Norm-Parameterized Fuzzy Description Logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jidi; Boley, Harold

    The Semantic Web is an evolving extension of the World Wide Web in which the semantics of the available information are formally described, making it more machine-interpretable. The current W3C standard for SemanticWeb ontology languages, OWL, is based on the knowledge representation formalism of Description Logics (DLs). Although standard DLs provide considerable expressive power, they cannot express various kinds of imprecise or vague knowledge and thus cannot deal with uncertainty, an intrinsic feature of the real world and our knowledge. To overcome this deficiency, this chapter extends a standard Description Logic to a family of norm-parameterized Fuzzy Description Logics. The syntax to represent uncertain knowledge and the semantics to interpret fuzzy concept descriptions and knowledge bases are addressed in detail. The chapter then focuses on a procedure for reasoning with knowledge bases in the proposed Fuzzy Description Logics. Finally, we prove the soundness, completeness, and termination of the reasoning procedure

  19. Analytical method for parameterizing the random profile components of nanosurfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Mirsaidov, Utkur; Polyakov, Yuriy S; Misurkin, Pavel I; Musaev, Ibrahim; Polyakov, Sergey V

    2010-01-01

    The functional properties of many technological surfaces in biotechnology, electronics, and mechanical engineering depend to a large degree on the individual features of their nanoscale surface texture, which in turn are a function of the surface manufacturing process. Among these features, the surface irregularities and self-similarity structures at different spatial scales, especially in the range of 1 to 100 nm, are of high importance because they greatly affect the surface interaction forces acting at a nanoscale distance. An analytical method for parameterizing the surface irregularities and their correlations in nanosurfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is proposed. In this method, flicker noise spectroscopy - a statistical physics approach - is used to develop six nanometrological parameters characterizing the high-frequency contributions of jump- and spike-like irregularities into the surface texture. These contributions reflect the stochastic processes of anomalous diffusion and inertial e...

  20. Landscape design or parameterization? Recent tendencies in geo-technologies for representing and planning urban territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clara Mourão Moura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The text discusses the state-of-the-art of GIS Technologies in planning and management processes of urban and architectural spaces. It presents latest’s evolution in GIS methodology and applications, discussing how these resources have changed our way of representing and projecting territory. It discusses contemporaneous values, in interventions into urban spaces. The paper also presents legislation’s role in data registers and infrastructure, favoring wide employment of geoprocessing. It announces the arrival of new territorial representation logics, among which is azimuth visualization, considering mental maps, the employment of BIM (Building Information Modeling and the process of parameterization. It points out tendencies and values, such as being inter- operational, creating interpretative portraits for reality, producing simulated scenarios, investing in visualizing and involvement with communities, and fully employing geo-technologies, as aids for decision making. It defends that we are living a new paradigm on territorial planning: the Parametric Modeling of Territorial Occupation.

  1. Empirical parameterization of the $K^{+-} \\to \\pi^{+-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ decay Dalitz plot

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J R

    2010-01-01

    As first observed by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS, the $\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ invariant mass ($M_{00}$) distribution from $K^{\\+-} -> \\pi^{+-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ decay shows a cusp-like anomaly at $M_{00}=2m_{+}$, where $m_+$ is the charged pion mass. An analysis to extract the $\\pi\\pi$ scattering lengths in the isospin $I=0$ and $I=2$ states, $a_0$ and $a_2$, respectively, has been recently reported. In the present work the Dalitz plot of this decay is fitted to a new empirical parameterization suitable for practical purposes, such as Monte Carlo simulations of $K^{+-}->\\pi^{+-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ decays.

  2. Verification for Different Contrail Parameterizations Based on Integrated Satellite Observation and ECMWF Reanalysis Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglin Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aviation induced cloud termed contrail plays a more and more important role in the climate change, which makes a significant contribution to anthropogenic climate forcing through impacting the coverage of cirrus in the intersection of troposphere and stratosphere. In this paper, we propose one novel automatic contrail detecting method based on Himawari-8 stationary satellite imagery and two kinds of potential contrail coverage (PCC1 and PCC2 from contrail parameterization in ECHAM4 and HadGEM2. In addition, we propose one new climatological index called contrail occurrence and persistence (COP. According to the algorithm identification (AI and artificial visual inspection (AVI, COP measured from Himawari-8 stationary satellite imagery is related to upper tropospheric relative humidity over ice (RHI computed with the ECMWF reanalysis data by simple linear regression. Similarly, we compared the linear correlation between COP and PCCs fractions and found that PCC1 has better correspondence with COP than PCC2.

  3. Parameterization for subgrid-scale motion of ice-shelf calving fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A parameterization for the motion of ice-shelf fronts on a Cartesian grid in finite-difference land-ice models is presented. The scheme prevents artificial thinning of the ice shelf at its edge, which occurs due to the finite resolution of the model. The intuitive numerical implementation diminishes numerical dispersion at the ice front and enables the application of physical boundary conditions to improve the calculation of stress and velocity fields throughout the ice-sheet-shelf system. Numerical properties of this subgrid modification are assessed in the Potsdam Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM-PIK for different geometries in one and two horizontal dimensions and are verified against an analytical solution in a flow-line setup.

  4. Importance of including ammonium sulfate ((NH42SO4 aerosols for ice cloud parameterization in GCMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Yang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A common deficiency of many cloud-physics parameterizations including the NASA's microphysics of clouds with aerosol-cloud interactions (hereafter called McRAS-AC is that they simulate lesser (larger than the observed ice cloud particle number (size. A single column model (SCM of McRAS-AC physics of the GEOS4 Global Circulation Model (GCM together with an adiabatic parcel model (APM for ice-cloud nucleation (IN of aerosols were used to systematically examine the influence of introducing ammonium sulfate (NH42SO4 aerosols in McRAS-AC and its influence on the optical properties of both liquid and ice clouds. First an (NH42SO4 parameterization was included in the APM to assess its effect on clouds vis-à-vis that of the other aerosols. Subsequently, several evaluation tests were conducted over the ARM Southern Great Plain (SGP and thirteen other locations (sorted into pristine and polluted conditions distributed over marine and continental sites with the SCM. The statistics of the simulated cloud climatology were evaluated against the available ground and satellite data. The results showed that inclusion of (NH42SO4 into McRAS-AC of the SCM made a remarkable improvement in the simulated effective radius of ice cloud particulates. However, the corresponding ice-cloud optical thickness increased even more than the observed. This can be caused by lack of horizontal cloud advection not performed in the SCM. Adjusting the other tunable parameters such as precipitation efficiency can mitigate this deficiency. Inclusion of ice cloud particle splintering invoked empirically further reduced simulation biases. Overall, these changes make a substantial improvement in simulated cloud optical properties and cloud distribution particularly over the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ in the GCM.

  5. Evaluating the importance of characterizing soil structure and horizons in parameterizing a hydrologic process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the influence of soil structure and horizons into parameterizations of distributed surface water/groundwater models remains a challenge. Often, only a single soil unit is employed, and soil-hydraulic properties are assigned based on textural classification, without evaluating the potential impact of these simplifications. This study uses a distributed physics-based model to assess the influence of soil horizons and structure on effective parameterization. This paper tests the viability of two established and widely used hydrogeologic methods for simulating runoff and variably saturated flow through layered soils: (1) accounting for vertical heterogeneity by combining hydrostratigraphic units with contrasting hydraulic properties into homogeneous, anisotropic units and (2) use of established pedotransfer functions based on soil texture alone to estimate water retention and conductivity, without accounting for the influence of pedon structures and hysteresis. The viability of this latter method for capturing the seasonal transition from runoff-dominated to evapotranspiration-dominated regimes is also tested here. For cases tested here, event-based simulations using simplified vertical heterogeneity did not capture the state-dependent anisotropy and complex combinations of runoff generation mechanisms resulting from permeability contrasts in layered hillslopes with complex topography. Continuous simulations using pedotransfer functions that do not account for the influence of soil structure and hysteresis generally over-predicted runoff, leading to propagation of substantial water balance errors. Analysis suggests that identifying a dominant hydropedological unit provides the most acceptable simplification of subsurface layering and that modified pedotransfer functions with steeper soil-water retention curves might adequately capture the influence of soil structure and hysteresis on hydrologic response in headwater catchments.

  6. The influence of canopy snow parameterizations on snow albedo feedback in boreal forest regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Chad W.; Fletcher, Christopher G.; Derksen, Chris

    2014-08-01

    Variation in snow albedo feedback (SAF) among Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 climate models has been shown to explain much of the variation in projected 21st century warming over Northern Hemisphere land. Prior studies using observations and models have demonstrated both considerable spread in the albedo and a negative bias in the simulated strength of SAF, over snow-covered boreal forests. Boreal evergreen needleleaf forests are capable of intercepting snowfall throughout the winter and consequently exert a significant impact on seasonal surface albedo. Two satellite data products and tower-based observations of albedo are compared with simulations from multiple versions of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) to investigate the causes of weak simulated SAF over the boreal forest. The largest bias occurs in April and May, when simulated SAF is one half the strength of SAF in observations. This is traced to two features of the canopy snow parameterizations used in the land model. First, there is no mechanism for the dynamic removal of snow from the canopy when temperatures are below freezing, which results in albedo values in midwinter that are biased high. Second, when temperatures do rise above freezing, all snow on the canopy is melted instantaneously, which results in an unrealistically early transition from a snow-covered to a snow-free canopy. These processes combine to produce large differences between simulated and observed monthly albedo and are the source of the weak bias in SAF. This analysis highlights the importance of canopy snow parameterizations for simulating the hemispheric scale climate response to surface albedo perturbations.

  7. Sensitivity of Drought Processes to Runoff Parameterizations in East Asia with the Community Land Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. B.; Um, M. J.; Kim, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Drought is one of the most powerful and extensive disasters and has the highest annual average damage among all the disasters. Focusing on East Asia, where over one fifth of all the people in the world live, drought has impacted as well as been projected to impact the region significantly. .Therefore it is critical to reasonably simulate the drought phenomenon in the region and thus this study would focus on the reproducibility of drought with the NCAR CLM. In this study, we examine the propagation of drought processes with different runoff parameterization of CLM in East Asia. Two different schemes are used; TOPMODEL-based and VIC-based schemes, which differentiate the result of runoff through the surface and subsurface runoff parameterization. CLM with different runoff scheme are driven with two atmospheric forcings from CRU/NCEP and NCEP reanalysis data. Specifically, propagation of drought from meteorological, agricultural to hydrologic drought is investigated with different drought indices, estimated with not only model simulated results but also observational data. The indices include the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI), standardized runoff index (SRI) and standardized soil moisture index (SSMI). Based on these indices, the drought characteristics such as intensity, frequency and spatial extent are investigated. At last, such drought assessments would reveal the possible model deficiencies in East Asia. AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (2015R1C1A2A01054800) and the Korea Meteorological Administration R&D Program under Grant KMIPA 2015-6180.

  8. A review of selected physical parameterization sensitivity settings within Polar-WRF model over Svalbard area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilguj, Natalia; Kryza, Maciej; Czernecki, Bartosz; Migała, Krzysztof; Kolendowicz, Leszek

    2017-04-01

    In this work we present the results of the sensitivity study using the mesoscale meteorological Polar Weather Research and Forecasting model (Polar-WRF) for high-resolution dynamical downscaling done over the Svalbard area. In total, 36 unique simulations were performed for January 2009 and June 2008. For each model run, we have used different configuration of physical parameters, including the tests of long and shortwave radiation schemes, planetary boundary layer, microphysics and cumulus parameterizations. Additionally, two model runs were tested using the same configuration for physical parameterizations, but with two different digital elevation models: the default one as provided in the WRF Preprocessing System, and a high-resolution layer available for the Svalbard area. The sensitivity of the model in terms of spatial resolution is also analyzed, as the Polar-WRF model was configured using three-way nested domains with 27km, 9km and 3km grid cell resolutions. The results were compared against meteorological observations gathered at 9 weather stations. These preliminary results show high sensitivity of the obtained dynamical downscaling geophysical fields to the selected model configuration. For example, mean values of Pearson correlation coefficients for near-surface air temperature may vary from 0.3 up to 0.73 in June and from 0.79 up to 0.97 depending on analyzed locations. Significant differences of stations mean error (ME) distributions occur for longwave radiation schemes (particularly for CAM and New Goddard). This study is an attempt to address the most optimal model configuration for the area of Svalbard in order to downscale a future climate scenarios as accurate as possible.

  9. Comparison of Four Mixed Layer Mesoscale Parameterizations and the Equation for an Arbitrary Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two issues, the inter-comparison of four mixed layer mesoscale parameterizations and the search for the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer. It must be stressed that our analysis is limited to mixed layer mesoscales since we do not treat sub-mesoscales and small turbulent mixing. As for the first item, since three of the four parameterizations are expressed in terms of a stream function and a residual flux of the RMT formalism (residual mean theory), while the fourth is expressed in terms of vertical and horizontal fluxes, we needed a formalism to connect the two formulations. The standard RMT representation developed for the deep ocean cannot be extended to the mixed layer since its stream function does not vanish at the ocean's surface. We develop a new RMT representation that satisfies the surface boundary condition. As for the general form of the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer, thus far, it has been assumed that there is only the one that originates from the curl of the stream function. This is because it was assumed that the tracer residual flux is purely diffusive. On the other hand, we show that in the case of an arbitrary tracer, the residual flux has also a skew component that gives rise to an additional bolus velocity. Therefore, instead of only one bolus velocity, there are now two, one coming from the curl of the stream function and other from the skew part of the residual flux. In the buoyancy case, only one bolus velocity contributes to the mean buoyancy equation since the residual flux is indeed only diffusive.

  10. Parameterized runtime analyses of evolutionary algorithms for the planar euclidean traveling salesperson problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Andrew M; Neumann, Frank; Nallaperuma, Samadhi

    2014-01-01

    Parameterized runtime analysis seeks to understand the influence of problem structure on algorithmic runtime. In this paper, we contribute to the theoretical understanding of evolutionary algorithms and carry out a parameterized analysis of evolutionary algorithms for the Euclidean traveling salesperson problem (Euclidean TSP). We investigate the structural properties in TSP instances that influence the optimization process of evolutionary algorithms and use this information to bound their runtime. We analyze the runtime in dependence of the number of inner points k. In the first part of the paper, we study a [Formula: see text] EA in a strictly black box setting and show that it can solve the Euclidean TSP in expected time [Formula: see text] where A is a function of the minimum angle [Formula: see text] between any three points. Based on insights provided by the analysis, we improve this upper bound by introducing a mixed mutation strategy that incorporates both 2-opt moves and permutation jumps. This strategy improves the upper bound to [Formula: see text]. In the second part of the paper, we use the information gained in the analysis to incorporate domain knowledge to design two fixed-parameter tractable (FPT) evolutionary algorithms for the planar Euclidean TSP. We first develop a [Formula: see text] EA based on an analysis by M. Theile, 2009, "Exact solutions to the traveling salesperson problem by a population-based evolutionary algorithm," Lecture notes in computer science, Vol. 5482 (pp. 145-155), that solves the TSP with k inner points in [Formula: see text] generations with probability [Formula: see text]. We then design a [Formula: see text] EA that incorporates a dynamic programming step into the fitness evaluation. We prove that a variant of this evolutionary algorithm using 2-opt mutation solves the problem after [Formula: see text] steps in expectation with a cost of [Formula: see text] for each fitness evaluation.

  11. Parameterizing amylose chain-length distributions for biosynthesis-structure-property relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Sharif S; Zou, Wei; Li, Changfeng; Gilbert, Robert G

    2017-11-01

    Amylose, one of the components of starch, is a glucose polymer consisting largely of long, linear chains with a few long-chain branch points. The chain-length (molecular weight) distribution (CLD) of the component chains of amylose can provide information on amylose biosynthesis-structure-property relations, as has been done previously by fitting amylopectin CLDs to a model with physically meaningful parameters. Due to the presence of long chains, the CLD of amylose can currently best be obtained by size-exclusion chromatography, a technique that suffers from band-broadening effects which alter the observed distribution. The features of the multiple regions present in amylose chain-length distributions are also difficult to resolve, an issue that combines with band broadening to compound the difficulty of analysis and subsequent parameterization of the structural characteristics of amylose. A new method is presented to fit these distributions with biologically meaningful parameters in a way that accounts for band broadening. This is achieved by assuming that band broadening takes the form of a simple Gaussian over a relatively small region and that chain stoppage is a random process independent of the length of the substrate chain over the same region; these assumptions are relatively weak and expected to be frequently applicable. The method provides inbuilt consistency tests for its applicability to a given data set and, in cases where it is applicable, allows for the first nonempirical parameterization of amylose biosynthesis-structure-property relations from CLDs by using parameters directly linked to the activities of the enzymes responsible for chain growth and chain stoppage. Graphical abstract Model calculation illustrating the method described and showing the division between the three characteristic regions of a typical amylose chain-length distribution.

  12. Device-Free Localization via an Extreme Learning Machine with Parameterized Geometrical Feature Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Device-free localization (DFL is becoming one of the new technologies in wireless localization field, due to its advantage that the target to be localized does not need to be attached to any electronic device. In the radio-frequency (RF DFL system, radio transmitters (RTs and radio receivers (RXs are used to sense the target collaboratively, and the location of the target can be estimated by fusing the changes of the received signal strength (RSS measurements associated with the wireless links. In this paper, we will propose an extreme learning machine (ELM approach for DFL, to improve the efficiency and the accuracy of the localization algorithm. Different from the conventional machine learning approaches for wireless localization, in which the above differential RSS measurements are trivially used as the only input features, we introduce the parameterized geometrical representation for an affected link, which consists of its geometrical intercepts and differential RSS measurement. Parameterized geometrical feature extraction (PGFE is performed for the affected links and the features are used as the inputs of ELM. The proposed PGFE-ELM for DFL is trained in the offline phase and performed for real-time localization in the online phase, where the estimated location of the target is obtained through the created ELM. PGFE-ELM has the advantages that the affected links used by ELM in the online phase can be different from those used for training in the offline phase, and can be more robust to deal with the uncertain combination of the detectable wireless links. Experimental results show that the proposed PGFE-ELM can improve the localization accuracy and learning speed significantly compared with a number of the existing machine learning and DFL approaches, including the weighted K-nearest neighbor (WKNN, support vector machine (SVM, back propagation neural network (BPNN, as well as the well-known radio tomographic imaging (RTI DFL approach.

  13. Device-Free Localization via an Extreme Learning Machine with Parameterized Geometrical Feature Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Xiao, Wendong; Zhang, Sen; Huang, Shoudong

    2017-04-17

    Device-free localization (DFL) is becoming one of the new technologies in wireless localization field, due to its advantage that the target to be localized does not need to be attached to any electronic device. In the radio-frequency (RF) DFL system, radio transmitters (RTs) and radio receivers (RXs) are used to sense the target collaboratively, and the location of the target can be estimated by fusing the changes of the received signal strength (RSS) measurements associated with the wireless links. In this paper, we will propose an extreme learning machine (ELM) approach for DFL, to improve the efficiency and the accuracy of the localization algorithm. Different from the conventional machine learning approaches for wireless localization, in which the above differential RSS measurements are trivially used as the only input features, we introduce the parameterized geometrical representation for an affected link, which consists of its geometrical intercepts and differential RSS measurement. Parameterized geometrical feature extraction (PGFE) is performed for the affected links and the features are used as the inputs of ELM. The proposed PGFE-ELM for DFL is trained in the offline phase and performed for real-time localization in the online phase, where the estimated location of the target is obtained through the created ELM. PGFE-ELM has the advantages that the affected links used by ELM in the online phase can be different from those used for training in the offline phase, and can be more robust to deal with the uncertain combination of the detectable wireless links. Experimental results show that the proposed PGFE-ELM can improve the localization accuracy and learning speed significantly compared with a number of the existing machine learning and DFL approaches, including the weighted K-nearest neighbor (WKNN), support vector machine (SVM), back propagation neural network (BPNN), as well as the well-known radio tomographic imaging (RTI) DFL approach.

  14. Alternative splicing in ascomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempken, Frank

    2013-05-01

    Alternative splicing is a complex and regulated process, which results in mRNA with different coding capacities from a single gene. Extend and types of alternative splicing vary greatly among eukaryotes. In this review, I focus on alternative splicing in ascomycetes, which in general have significant lower extend of alternative splicing than mammals. Yeast-like species have low numbers of introns and consequently alternative splicing is lower compared to filamentous fungi. Several examples from single studies as well as from genomic scale analysis are presented, including a survey of alternative splicing in Neurospora crassa. Another focus is regulation by riboswitch RNA and alternative splicing in a heterologous system, along with putative protein factors involved in regulation.

  15. Space exploration

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Space Exploration, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  16. Exploring Youth Development in Ethiopia: An Alternative Strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, however, youth are conceived as resources to be cultivated and upgraded, and the focus is on promoting competencies. This study examined Ethiopian youth from a strength- based perspective with triple objectives: 1) portrayal of young people in scientific literature, 2) youth participation over historical periods, ...

  17. Long Day's Drive: An Alternative Paradigm for Martian Robotic Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, M. H.; McKay, C. P.

    2003-01-01

    Long Day's Drive (LLD) will investigate the north polar layered deposits (PLD). The overarching science rationale for LDD is the belief that the PLD preserve within their stratigraphy an interpretable record of recent climate and geologic history for Mars. Our primary goal is to obtain data that can provide a basis for interpreting that record. In addition, we will test the hypothesis that the ice of the PLD contains organics at higher concentrations than the aeolian dust sampled at the two Viking sites. Finally, we seek to contribute to the understanding of Mars' total volatile inventory by detailed determination of the ice content of the PLD over the traverse.

  18. Alternative search strategies to explore ATLAS diboson excess

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-10-05

    Oct 5, 2017 ... We consider the s-channel resonance to fit the 2 TeV ATLAS diboson excess.We address the production mechanism of the resonance, its decay and coupling measurement. In order to explain only the hadronic channel excess, we consider the scenario where resonance decays to two new beyond ...

  19. Militias: Exploring Alternative Force Structures for National Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    development in the art of warfare and 15 Mario A. Fumerton, “Rondas Campesinas in the Peruvian Civil War: Peasant Self-defense Organizations in...Ridge, 90. 63 Holley, General Parker, 333. 25 E. CONCLUSION Surprisingly, the literature on the...Fumerton, Mario A. “Rondas Campesinas in the Peruvian Civil War: Peasant Self- defense Organizations in Ayacucho.” Session 182 DEM, Armed Actors: Security

  20. Landscape is the key. Exploring mass tourism alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Huete

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We offer a reflection on the possibility of developing innovative sustainable tourism projects around the concept of landscape in environments linked to mass tourism and real estate development. In the framework of the province of Alicante, an illustrative example of a region specializing in residential tourism, the project Vivood Landscape Hotel is identified as a paradigmatic case, whose immediate environment is the municipality of Benimantell and Guadalest Valley, a few kilometres from Benidorm. This reflection is based on qualitative research based primarily on the application of in-depth interviews with key stakeholders regarding this multi-awarded entrepreneurship. Here, criteria of architectural and environmental sustainability are combined with a development that is inclusive and respectful with the socio-economic interests of the local population.

  1. Cell of Origin: Exploring an Alternative Contributor to Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    KRAS, or PIK3CA were successfully constructed. 9. The viral constructs were initially validated in a human endometrial cancer cell line and mouse...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Our studies to date have determined that human oogonial stem cells, while far less stable...tumorigenicity of these cells with the ultimate goal of comparing the DNA signature of the oogonial stem cell-derived tumors to that of primary human ovarian

  2. The difference between alternative averages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Vaupel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Demographers have long been interested in how compositional change, e.g., change in age structure, affects population averages. OBJECTIVE We want to deepen understanding of how compositional change affects population averages. RESULTS The difference between two averages of a variable, calculated using alternative weighting functions, equals the covariance between the variable and the ratio of the weighting functions, divided by the average of the ratio. We compare weighted and unweighted averages and also provide examples of use of the relationship in analyses of fertility and mortality. COMMENTS Other uses of covariances in formal demography are worth exploring.

  3. Changes in sub-daily precipitation extremes in a global climate model with super-parameterization under CO2 warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairoutdinov, Marat; Zhou, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Virtually all of the projections for future change of extreme precipitation statistics under CO2 warming have been made using global climate models (GCMs) in which clouds and, in particular, convective cloud systems are not explicitly resolved, but rather parameterized. In our study, a different kind of a GCM, a super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SP-CAM), is employed. In SP-CAM, all the conventional cloud parameterizations are replaced with a small-domain cloud resolving model (CRM), called super-parameterization (SP). The SP is embedded in each grid column of the host GCM. The resolution of each embedded CRM is 4 km, which is generally sufficient to explicitly represent deep convection, which is mostly responsible for extreme precipitation events. In this study, we use the SP-CAM to contrast to the present and to conventional climate model, CAM, the sub-daily extreme precipitation statistics in response to the sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) and CO2 levels as projected for the end of 21st century in response to the IPCC AR5 RCP8.5 emission scenario. Different mechanisms for extreme precipitation changes are discussed.

  4. Constructing IGA-suitable planar parameterization from complex CAD boundary by domain partition and global/local optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Li, Ming; Mourrain, Bernard; Rabczuk, Timon; Xu, Jinlan; Bordas, Stéphane P. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a general framework for constructing IGA-suitable planar B-spline parameterizations from given complex CAD boundaries consisting of a set of B-spline curves. Instead of forming the computational domain by a simple boundary, planar domains with high genus and more complex boundary curves are considered. Firstly, some pre-processing operations including B\\'ezier extraction and subdivision are performed on each boundary curve in order to generate a high-quality planar parameterization; then a robust planar domain partition framework is proposed to construct high-quality patch-meshing results with few singularities from the discrete boundary formed by connecting the end points of the resulting boundary segments. After the topology information generation of quadrilateral decomposition, the optimal placement of interior B\\'ezier curves corresponding to the interior edges of the quadrangulation is constructed by a global optimization method to achieve a patch-partition with high quality. Finally, after the imposition of C1=G1-continuity constraints on the interface of neighboring B\\'ezier patches with respect to each quad in the quadrangulation, the high-quality B\\'ezier patch parameterization is obtained by a C1-constrained local optimization method to achieve uniform and orthogonal iso-parametric structures while keeping the continuity conditions between patches. The efficiency and robustness of the proposed method are demonstrated by several examples which are compared to results obtained by the skeleton-based parameterization approach.

  5. An architectural model of spring wheat : Evaluation of the effects of population density and shading on model parameterization and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, J.B.; Vos, J.; Fournier, C.; Andrieu, B.; Chelle, M.; Struik, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    ADELwheat is an architectural model that describes development of wheat in 3D. This paper analyzes the robustness of the parameterization of ADELwheat for spring wheat cultivars in relation to plant population density and shading. The model was evaluated using data from two spring wheat experiments

  6. Analysis of different atmospheric physical parameterizations in COAWST modeling system for the Tropical Storm Nock-ten application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Danqin; Du, Jianting; Hua, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport modeling system was applied to study the atmosphere and ocean dynamics during Tropical Storm Nock-ten. Different atmospheric physical parameterizations in WRF model were investigated through ten groups of numerical experiments. Results of atmosph...

  7. The use of the k - {epsilon} turbulence model within the Rossby Centre regional ocean climate model: parameterization development and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markus Meier, H.E. [Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Inst., Norrkoeping (Sweden). Rossby Centre

    2000-09-01

    As mixing plays a dominant role for the physics of an estuary like the Baltic Sea (seasonal heat storage, mixing in channels, deep water mixing), different mixing parameterizations for use in 3D Baltic Sea models are discussed and compared. For this purpose two different OGCMs of the Baltic Sea are utilized. Within the Swedish regional climate modeling program, SWECLIM, a 3D coupled ice-ocean model for the Baltic Sea has been coupled with an improved version of the two-equation k - {epsilon} turbulence model with corrected dissipation term, flux boundary conditions to include the effect of a turbulence enhanced layer due to breaking surface gravity waves and a parameterization for breaking internal waves. Results of multi-year simulations are compared with observations. The seasonal thermocline is simulated satisfactory and erosion of the halocline is avoided. Unsolved problems are discussed. To replace the controversial equation for dissipation the performance of a hierarchy of k-models has been tested and compared with the k - {epsilon} model. In addition, it is shown that the results of the mixing parameterization depend very much on the choice of the ocean model. Finally, the impact of two mixing parameterizations on Baltic Sea climate is investigated. In this case the sensitivity of mean SST, vertical temperature and salinity profiles, ice season and seasonal cycle of heat fluxes is quite large.

  8. Monte Carlo-based subgrid parameterization of vertical velocity and stratiform cloud microphysics in ECHAM5.5-HAM2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tonttila

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A new method for parameterizing the subgrid variations of vertical velocity and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC is presented for general circulation models (GCMs. These parameterizations build on top of existing parameterizations that create stochastic subgrid cloud columns inside the GCM grid cells, which can be employed by the Monte Carlo independent column approximation approach for radiative transfer. The new model version adds a description for vertical velocity in individual subgrid columns, which can be used to compute cloud activation and the subgrid distribution of the number of cloud droplets explicitly. Autoconversion is also treated explicitly in the subcolumn space. This provides a consistent way of simulating the cloud radiative effects with two-moment cloud microphysical properties defined at subgrid scale. The primary impact of the new parameterizations is to decrease the CDNC over polluted continents, while over the oceans the impact is smaller. Moreover, the lower CDNC induces a stronger autoconversion of cloud water to rain. The strongest reduction in CDNC and cloud water content over the continental areas promotes weaker shortwave cloud radiative effects (SW CREs even after retuning the model. However, compared to the reference simulation, a slightly stronger SW CRE is seen e.g. over mid-latitude oceans, where CDNC remains similar to the reference simulation, and the in-cloud liquid water content is slightly increased after retuning the model.

  9. The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation Based on Double Gaussian Distributional Parameterization of Inertial Gravity Waves in WACCM Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C.; Xue, X.; Dou, X.; Wu, J.

    2015-12-01

    The adjustment of gravity wave parameterization associated with model convection has made possible the spontaneous generation of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM 4.0), although there are some mismatching when compared with the observation. The parameterization is based on Lindzen's linear saturation theory which can better describe inertia-gravity waves (IGW) by taking the Coriolis effects into consideration. In this work we improve the parameterization by importing a more realistic double Gaussian distribution IGW spectrum, which is calculated from tropical radiosonde observations. A series of WACCM simulations are performed to determine the relationship between the period and amplitude of equatorial zonal wind oscillations and the feature of parameterized IGW. All of these simulations are capable of generating equatorial wind oscillations in the stratosphere using the standard spatial resolution settings. The period of the oscillation is associate inversely with the strength of the IGW forcing, but the central values of double Gaussian distribution IGW have influence both on the magnitude and period of the oscillation. In fact, the eastward and westward IGWs affect the amplitude of the QBO wind, respectively, and the strength of IGWs forcing determines the accelerating rate of the QBO wind. Furthermore, stronger forcing of IGWs can lead to a deeper propagate of the QBO phase, which can extend the lowest altitude of the constant zonal wind amplitudes to about 100 hPa.

  10. Theoretical Tools for Relativistic Gravimetry, Gradiometry and Chronometric Geodesy and Application to a Parameterized Post-Newtonian Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacôme Delva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An extensive review of past work on relativistic gravimetry, gradiometry and chronometric geodesy is given. Then, general theoretical tools are presented and applied for the case of a stationary parameterized post-Newtonian metric. The special case of a stationary clock on the surface of the Earth is studied.

  11. A global wave parameter database for geophysical applications. Part 2: Model validation with improved source term parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascle, Nicolas; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2013-10-01

    A multi-scale global hindcast of ocean waves is presented that covers the years 1994-2012, based on recently published parameterizations for wind sea and swell dissipation [Ardhuin, F., Rogers, E., Babanin, A., Filipot, J.-F., Magne, R., Roland, A., van der Westhuysen, A., Queffeulou, P., Lefevre, J.-M., Aouf, L., Collard, F., 2010. Semi-empirical dissipation source functions for wind-wave models: Part I. Definition, calibration and validation. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 40 (9), 1917-1941]. Results from this hindcast include traditional wave parameters, like the significant wave height and mean periods, and we particularly consider the accuracy of the results for phenomenal sea states, with significant heights above 14 m. Using unbiased winds, there is no evidence of a bias in wave heights even for this very high range. Various spectral moments were also validated, including the surface Stokes drift and mean square slopes that are relevant for wave-current interactions modelling and remote sensing, and also spectra of seismic noise sources. The estimation of these parameters is made more accurate by the new wave growth and dissipation parameterizations. Associated air-sea fluxes of momentum and energy are significantly different from what is obtained with the WAM-Cycle 4 parameterization, with a roughness that is practically a function of wind speed only. That particular output of the model does not appear very realistic and will require future adjustments of the generation and dissipation parameterizations.

  12. Parameterization of the chlorophyll a-specific in vivo light absorption coefficient covering estuarine, coastal and oceanic waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, P. A.; Markager, S.

    2004-01-01

    .015 m2 mg-1 Chl a) at 440 nm, the peak absorption of Chl a in the blue part of the spectrum. The variations in the modelled a*ph spectra were within realistic predictions of a*ph (¿) and the model satisfactorily reproduced the spectral flattening with increasing [Chl a]. The parameterization of a...

  13. Using Ensemble of Neural Networks to Learn Stochastic Convection Parameterizations for Climate and Numerical Weather Prediction Models from Data Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Krasnopolsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach based on the neural network (NN ensemble technique is formulated and used for development of a NN stochastic convection parameterization for climate and numerical weather prediction (NWP models. This fast parameterization is built based on learning from data simulated by a cloud-resolving model (CRM initialized with and forced by the observed meteorological data available for 4-month boreal winter from November 1992 to February 1993. CRM-simulated data were averaged and processed to implicitly define a stochastic convection parameterization. This parameterization is learned from the data using an ensemble of NNs. The NN ensemble members are trained and tested. The inherent uncertainty of the stochastic convection parameterization derived following this approach is estimated. The newly developed NN convection parameterization has been tested in National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM. It produced reasonable and promising decadal climate simulations for a large tropical Pacific region. The extent of the adaptive ability of the developed NN parameterization to the changes in the model environment is briefly discussed. This paper is devoted to a proof of concept and discusses methodology, initial results, and the major challenges of using the NN technique for developing convection parameterizations for climate and NWP models.

  14. Alternatives to estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Lorraine A

    2003-09-01

    For many years, women have sought alternative therapies for menopausal symptoms and for general health overall. The highly publicized findings from the Women's Health Initiative have led to an increased pressure on the medical community to find safe and alternative medications for female health. This article reviews the challenges and problems with the use of alternative medicines, and the clinical trials that prove their efficacy, and discusses the safety issues that may occur with these types of products.

  15. Geoelectrical exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Said Barseem

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sinai development is a goal of successive governments in Egypt. The present study is a geoelectrical exploration to find appropriate solutions of the problems affecting the land of a Research Station in Southeast Al Qantara. This research station is one of the Desert Research Center stations to facilitate the development of desert land for agriculture by introducing applied research. It suffers from some problems which can be summarized in the shortage of irrigation water and water logging. The appropriate solutions of these problems have been delineated by the results of 1D and 2D geoelectrical measurements. Electrical resistivity (ER revealed the subsurface sedimentary sequences and extension of subsurface layers in the horizontal and vertical directions, especially, the water bearing layer. Additionally it helped to choose the most suitable places to drill productive wells with a good condition.

  16. Exploring ESASky

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Guido; ESASky Team

    2017-06-01

    ESASky is a science-driven discovery portal for all ESA space astronomy missions. It also includes missions from international partners such as Suzaku and Chandra. The first public release of ESASky features interfaces for sky exploration and for single and multiple target searches. Using the application requires no prior-knowledge of any of the missions involved and gives users world-wide simplified access to high-level science-ready data products from space-based Astronomy missions, plus a number of ESA-produced source catalogues, including the Gaia Data Release 1 catalogue. We highlight here the latest features to be developed, including one that allows the user to project onto the sky the footprints of the JWST instruments, at any chosen position and orientation. This tool has been developed to aid JWST astronomers when they are defining observing proposals. We aim to include other missions and instruments in the near future.

  17. Alternative medicine studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2011-01-01

    A peer-reviewed, open-access journal about alternative medicine systems including acupuncture, anthroposophic medicine, ayurveda, chiropractic, herbalism and natural products, homeopathy, naturopathy...

  18. Alternative Auditing Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, Alicen J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-15

    This presentation for the 2017 Energy Exchange in Tampa, Florida, offers information about advanced auditing technologies and techniques including alternative auditing approaches and considerations and caveats.

  19. RACORO Continental Boundary Layer Cloud Investigations: 3. Separation of Parameterization Biases in Single-Column Model CAM5 Simulations of Shallow Cumulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) Project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only a relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.

  20. Parameterization of a process-based soil erosion model by means of experimental field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzen, Verena; Seeger, Manuel; Scherer, Ulrike; Casper, Markus; Ries, Johannes B.

    2010-05-01

    The physically-based hydrological and soil erosion model CATFLOW-SED has been developed with data from a loess area in Germany (Maurer, 1997; Scherer, 2008) and covers the principal processes detachment, transport and deposition. The catchment is divided into slopes on the basis of topography as well as soil and land-use maps. The slopes are further divided into slope segments and the flow-routing is abstractly modeled as slope cross sections connected by a drainage network. In many process-based soil erosion models, soil erosion is calculated by an interaction of the forces of flowing water and rainfall. In CATFLOW-SED the detachment process is divided into the pulse current of precipitation and the sheer stress of flowing water. The most important parameter concerning detachment is the erosion resistance parameter fcrit. The described model is parameterized for a small catchment in the Central Spanish Pyrenees with experimental field data from this study area. The mean annual precipitation amount of 1120 mm is rather high but as it is typical of a Mediterranean climate the summer months show a deficit in water balance. Accordingly, a seasonal variation in dominating overland flow generation and soil erosion processes, can be observed particularly for wetland areas that regularly dry out in summer. The spatial and temporal pattern of overland-flow generation and erosion processes and their intensity in the study area is assessed by means of small plot-scale rainfall experiments in the field. The gained data are the amounts of overland flow and eroded material for intervals of five minutes duration. The gained results are used for the parameterization of the soil specific parameter fcrit in CATFLOW-SED. In order to cover the seasonal variation in dominating runoff processes, rainfall simulations that were carried out under dry soil moisture conditions in September as well as measurements that were done under moist conditions in March are used for parameterization

  1. Reducing Errors in Satellite Simulated Views of Clouds with an Improved Parameterization of Unresolved Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, B. R.; Marchand, R.; Ackerman, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Satellite instrument simulators have emerged as a means to reduce errors in model evaluation by producing simulated or psuedo-retrievals from model fields, which account for limitations in the satellite retrieval process. Because of the mismatch in resolved scales between satellite retrievals and large-scale models, model cloud fields must first be downscaled to scales consistent with satellite retrievals. This downscaling is analogous to that required for model radiative transfer calculations. The assumption is often made in both model radiative transfer codes and satellite simulators that the unresolved clouds follow maximum-random overlap with horizontally homogeneous cloud condensate amounts. We examine errors in simulated MISR and CloudSat retrievals that arise due to these assumptions by applying the MISR and CloudSat simulators to cloud resolving model (CRM) output generated by the Super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SP-CAM). Errors are quantified by comparing simulated retrievals performed directly on the CRM fields with those simulated by first averaging the CRM fields to approximately 2-degree resolution, applying a "subcolumn generator" to regenerate psuedo-resolved cloud and precipitation condensate fields, and then applying the MISR and CloudSat simulators on the regenerated condensate fields. We show that errors due to both assumptions of maximum-random overlap and homogeneous condensate are significant (relative to uncertainties in the observations and other simulator limitations). The treatment of precipitation is particularly problematic for CloudSat-simulated radar reflectivity. We introduce an improved subcolumn generator for use with the simulators, and show that these errors can be greatly reduced by replacing the maximum-random overlap assumption with the more realistic generalized overlap and incorporating a simple parameterization of subgrid-scale cloud and precipitation condensate heterogeneity. Sandia National Laboratories is a

  2. Wind turbine parameterizations implemented in WRF mesoscale-LES nested simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, N.; Mirocha, J. D.; Chow, F. K.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric simulations can be used to predict wind energy production at increasingly higher resolutions, which can better capture boundary layer processes and topography. Wind turbine performance depends on several different factors including local topography, weather conditions, and turbine spacing. In this work, we implement and examine the performance of a generalized actuator disk model (GAD) and a generalized actuator line model (GAL) in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a mesoscale atmospheric model. The wind turbine parameterizations are designed for turbulence-resolving simulations, and are used within downscaled large-eddy simulations (LES) forced with mesoscale simulations and WRF's grid nesting capability. The GAD represents the effects of thrust and torque created by a wind turbine on the atmosphere within a disk representing the rotor swept area. The forces applied by the turbine blades on the atmosphere are parameterized using blade-element theory and the aerodynamic properties of the blades. The GAL tracks the location of the individual turbine blades and applies thrust and tangential forces at the temporal location of each blade instead of distributing the total force of all the blades over the actuator disk like the GAD does. This should in theory increase fidelity but carries higher computational cost (~10 m for GAD vs. ~1 m resolution for GAL). Both GAD and GAL models include real-time yaw and pitch control to respond realistically to changing flow conditions. Comparisons are also made to help determine the importance of turbine blade tilt away from the tower and the inclusion of the tower and turbine hub drag effects. Our implementations are designed to permit simulation of turbine wake effects and turbine/airflow interactions within a realistic atmospheric boundary layer flow field, including resolved turbulence, time-evolving mesoscale forcing, and real topography. This work was performed under the auspices of the U

  3. Nonsmooth optimization approaches to VDA of models with on/off parameterizations: Theoretical issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Kamachi, M.; Zhou, G. Q.

    2002-05-01

    Some variational data assimilation problems of time- and space-discrete models with on/off parameterizations; can be regarded as nonsmooth optimization problems. Some theoretical issues related to those problems is systematically addressed, One of the basic concept in nonsmooth optimization is subgradient, a generalized notation of a gradient of the cost function. First it is shown that the concept of subgradient leads to a clear definition of the adjoint variables in the conventional adjoint model at singular points caused by on/off switches, Using an illustrated example of a multi-layer diffusion model with the convective adjustment, it is proved that the solution of the conventional adjoint model can not be interpreted as Gateaux derivatives or directional derivatives, at singular points, but can be interpreted as a subgradient of the cost function. Two existing smooth optimization approaches are then reviewed which are used in current data assimilation practice, The first approach is the conventional adjoint model plus smooth optimization algorithms. Some conditions under which the approach can converge to the minimal are discussed, Another approach is smoothing and regularization approach, which removes some thresholds in physical parameterizations. Two nonsmooth optimization approaches are also reviewed, One is the subgradient method, which uses the conventional adjoint model. The method is convergent, but very slow. Another approach, the bundle methods are more efficient. The main idea of the bundle method is to use the minimal norm vector of subdifferential, which is the convex hull of all subgradients, as the descent director. However finding all subgradients is very difficult in general, Therefore bundle methods are modified to use only one subgradient that can be calculated by the conventional adjoint model. In order to develop an efficient bundle method, a set-valued adjoint model, as a generalization of the conventional adjoint model, is proposed, It

  4. Identification of GCM Uncertainty of Dynamical Cores and Physical Parameterizations by Object-Based Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorgun, M. S.; Rood, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    The behavior of atmospheric models is sensitive to the algorithms that are used to represent the equations of motion. Typically, comprehensive models are conceived in terms of the resolved fluid dynamics (i.e. the dynamical core) and subgrid, unresolved physics represented by parameterizations. There are model uncertainties inherent to both components. In this study, we investigate the role of the dynamical core as the source of uncertainty in simulation of orographic precipitation by different models. As a concrete example, we focus on analyzing how the choice of dynamical core impacts the representation of precipitation in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, Western Canada, and Alaska; this brings attention to the interaction of the resolved and the parameterized components of the model. Two dynamical cores are considered within the Community Atmosphere Model. These are the Spectral (Eulerian), which relies on global basis functions and the Finite Volume (FV), which uses only local information. We aim to identify and quantify the relationship between the model uncertainty and the numerical scheme as well as other model parameters such as the treatment of topography, SST etc. We also focus on the evolution of the uncertainty as a function of model resolution. In order to evaluate model uncertainty through validation against observations we introduce the concept of "meteorological realism" that is, do local representations of large-scale phenomena, for example, fronts and orographic precipitation, look like the observations? Our approach to quantify meteorological realism employs objective pattern recognition methods using semantic lists for isolated features to define their characteristics. We seek to develop model evaluation strategies that identify like "objects" - coherent systems with an associated set of measurable parameters. This makes it possible to evaluate processes and assess the sources of uncertainty in models without needing to reproduce the

  5. Quantifying the Relationship between Dynamical Cores and Physical Parameterizations by Object-Based Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorgun, M. S.; Rood, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    The behavior of atmospheric models is sensitive to the algorithms that are used to represent the equations of motion. Typically, comprehensive models are conceived in terms of the resolved fluid dynamics (i.e. the dynamical core) and subgrid, unresolved physics represented by parameterizations. Deterministic weather predictions are often validated with feature-by-feature comparison. Probabilistic weather forecasts and climate projects are evaluated with statistical methods. We seek to develop model evaluation strategies that identify like "objects" - coherent systems with an associated set of measurable parameters. This makes it possible to evaluate processes in models without needing to reproduce the time and location of, for example, a particular observed cloud system. Process- and object-based evaluation preserves information in the observations by avoiding the need for extensive spatial and temporal averaging. As a concrete example, we focus on analyzing how the choice of dynamical core impacts the representation of precipitation in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, Western Canada, and Alaska; this brings attention to the interaction of the resolved and the parameterized components of the model. Two dynamical cores are considered within the Community Atmosphere Model. These are the Spectral (Eulerian), which relies on global basis functions and the Finite Volume (FV), which uses only local information. We introduce the concept of "meteorological realism" that is, do local representations of large-scale phenomena, for example, fronts and orographic precipitation, look like the observations? A follow on question is, does the representation of these phenomena improve with resolution? Our approach to quantify meteorological realism starts with identification and isolation of key features of orographic precipitation that are represented differently by Spectral and FV models, using objective pattern recognition methods. Then we aim to quantitatively compare

  6. Parameterization of a bucket model for soil-vegetation-atmosphere modeling under seasonal climatic regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Romano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential impact of accounting for seasonal variations in the climatic forcing and using different methods to parameterize the soil water content at field capacity on the water balance components computed by a bucket model (BM. The single-layer BM of Guswa et al. (2002 is employed, whereas the Richards equation (RE based Soil Water Atmosphere Plant (SWAP model is used as a benchmark model. The results are analyzed for two differently-textured soils and for some synthetic runs under real-like seasonal weather conditions, using stochastically-generated daily rainfall data for a period of 100 years. Since transient soil-moisture dynamics and climatic seasonality play a key role in certain zones of the World, such as in Mediterranean land areas, a specific feature of this study is to test the prediction capability of the bucket model under a condition where seasonal variations in rainfall are not in phase with the variations in plant transpiration. Reference is made to a hydrologic year in which we have a rainy period (starting 1 November and lasting 151 days where vegetation is basically assumed in a dormant stage, followed by a drier and rainless period with a vegetation regrowth phase. Better agreement between BM and RE-SWAP intercomparison results are obtained when BM is parameterized by a field capacity value determined through the drainage method proposed by Romano and Santini (2002. Depending on the vegetation regrowth or dormant seasons, rainfall variability within a season results in transpiration regimes and soil moisture fluctuations with distinctive features. During the vegetation regrowth season, transpiration exerts a key control on soil water budget with respect to rainfall. During the dormant season of vegetation, the precipitation regime becomes an important climate forcing. Simulations also highlight the occurrence of bimodality in the probability distribution of soil moisture during the season when plants are

  7. A new parameterization for integrated population models to document amphibian reintroductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Adam; Pearl, Christopher; Adams, Michael J.; Peterson, James T.

    2017-01-01

    Managers are increasingly implementing reintroduction programs as part of a global effort to alleviate amphibian declines. Given uncertainty in factors affecting populations and a need to make recurring decisions to achieve objectives, adaptive management is a useful component of these efforts. A major impediment to the estimation of demographic rates often used to parameterize and refine decision-support models is that life-stage-specific monitoring data are frequently sparse for amphibians. We developed a new parameterization for integrated population models to match the ecology of amphibians and capitalize on relatively inexpensive monitoring data to document amphibian reintroductions. We evaluate the capability of this model by fitting it to Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) monitoring data collected from 2007 to 2014 following their reintroduction within the Klamath Basin, Oregon, USA. The number of egg masses encountered and the estimated adult and metamorph abundances generally increased following reintroduction. We found that survival probability from egg to metamorph ranged from 0.01 in 2008 to 0.09 in 2009 and was not related to minimum spring temperatures, metamorph survival probability ranged from 0.13 in 2010–2011 to 0.86 in 2012–2013 and was positively related to mean monthly temperatures (logit-scale slope = 2.37), adult survival probability was lower for founders (0.40) than individuals recruited after reintroduction (0.56), and the mean number of egg masses per adult female was 0.74. Our study is the first to test hypotheses concerning Oregon spotted frog egg-to-metamorph and metamorph-to-adult transition probabilities in the wild and document their response at multiple life stages following reintroduction. Furthermore, we provide an example to illustrate how the structure of our integrated population model serves as a useful foundation for amphibian decision-support models within adaptive management programs. The integration of multiple

  8. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PARAMETERIZED SCATTER REMOVAL ALGORITHM FOR NUCLEAR MATERIALS IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM IMAGING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grogan, Brandon R [ORNL

    2010-05-01

    This report presents a novel method for removing scattering effects from Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) imaging. The NMIS uses fast neutron radiography to generate images of the internal structure of objects nonintrusively. If the correct attenuation through the object is measured, the positions and macroscopic cross sections of features inside the object can be determined. The cross sections can then be used to identify the materials, and a 3D map of the interior of the object can be reconstructed. Unfortunately, the measured attenuation values are always too low because scattered neutrons contribute to the unattenuated neutron signal. Previous efforts to remove the scatter from NMIS imaging have focused on minimizing the fraction of scattered neutrons that are misidentified as directly transmitted by electronically collimating and time tagging the source neutrons. The parameterized scatter removal algorithm (PSRA) approaches the problem from an entirely new direction by using Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the point scatter functions (PScFs) produced by neutrons scattering in the object. PScFs have been used to remove scattering successfully in other applications, but only with simple 2D detector models. This work represents the first time PScFs have ever been applied to an imaging detector geometry as complicated as the NMIS. By fitting the PScFs using a Gaussian function, they can be parameterized, and the proper scatter for a given problem can be removed without the need for rerunning the simulations each time. In order to model the PScFs, an entirely new method for simulating NMIS measurements was developed for this work. The development of the new models and the codes required to simulate them are presented in detail. The PSRA was used on several simulated and experimental measurements, and chi-squared goodness of fit tests were used to compare the corrected values to the ideal values that would be expected with no scattering. Using the

  9. The Development of a Parameterized Scatter Removal Algorithm for Nuclear Materials Identification System Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grogan, Brandon Robert [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2010-03-01

    This dissertation presents a novel method for removing scattering effects from Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) imaging. The NMIS uses fast neutron radiography to generate images of the internal structure of objects non-intrusively. If the correct attenuation through the object is measured, the positions and macroscopic cross-sections of features inside the object can be determined. The cross sections can then be used to identify the materials and a 3D map of the interior of the object can be reconstructed. Unfortunately, the measured attenuation values are always too low because scattered neutrons contribute to the unattenuated neutron signal. Previous efforts to remove the scatter from NMIS imaging have focused on minimizing the fraction of scattered neutrons which are misidentified as directly transmitted by electronically collimating and time tagging the source neutrons. The parameterized scatter removal algorithm (PSRA) approaches the problem from an entirely new direction by using Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the point scatter functions (PScFs) produced by neutrons scattering in the object. PScFs have been used to remove scattering successfully in other applications, but only with simple 2D detector models. This work represents the first time PScFs have ever been applied to an imaging detector geometry as complicated as the NMIS. By fitting the PScFs using a Gaussian function, they can be parameterized and the proper scatter for a given problem can be removed without the need for rerunning the simulations each time. In order to model the PScFs, an entirely new method for simulating NMIS measurements was developed for this work. The development of the new models and the codes required to simulate them are presented in detail. The PSRA was used on several simulated and experimental measurements and chi-squared goodness of fit tests were used to compare the corrected values to the ideal values that would be expected with no scattering. Using

  10. Alternative health insurance schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Hansen, Bodil O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple model of health insurance with asymmetric information, where we compare two alternative ways of organizing the insurance market. Either as a competitive insurance market, where some risks remain uninsured, or as a compulsory scheme, where however, the level...... competitive insurance; this situation turns out to be at least as good as either of the alternatives...

  11. Alternative fuel for automobiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editor [Korea Energy Management Corporation, Songnam (Korea)

    1999-05-01

    Recently the developed countries are showing great interest on use of an alternative energy as a fuel for a transport. Korea decided to import 5,000 CNG bus by 2002 and operate in six megalopolis including Seoul. The possibility and problems of using a clean alternative fuel for automobile are discussed.

  12. Symbolic Query Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veanes, Margus; Grigorenko, Pavel; de Halleux, Peli; Tillmann, Nikolai

    We study the problem of generating a database and parameters for a given parameterized SQL query satisfying a given test condition. We introduce a formal background theory that includes arithmetic, tuples, and sets, and translate the generation problem into a satisfiability or model generation problem modulo the background theory. We use the satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) solver Z3 in the concrete implementation. We describe an application of model generation in the context of the database unit testing framework of Visual Studio.

  13. Convective organization in the super-parameterized community atmosphere model with constant surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Organization in a moist convecting atmosphere is investigated using the super-parameterized community atmosphere model (SPCAM) in aquaplanet setting with constant surface temperature, with and without planetary rotation. Without radiative and surface feedbacks, convective organization is dominated by convectively coupled gravity waves without planetary rotation and convectively coupled equatorial waves when there is planetary rotation. This behavior is well captured when the cloud resolving model (CRM) in SPCAM is replaced by its linear response function, computed following Kuang (2010), for the state of radiative convective equilibrium (RCE). With radiative feedback, however, convection self-aggregates, and with planetary rotation, the tropical zonal wavenumber-frequency spectrum features a red noise background. These behaviors in the presence of the radiative feedback are not captured when the CRM is replaced by its linear response function around the RCE state with radiative feedback included in the construction. Implications to organization in a moist convecting atmosphere will be discussed. Kuang, Z., Linear response functions of a cumulus ensemble to temperature and moisture perturbations and implication to the dynamics of convectively coupled waves, J. Atmos. Sci., 67, 941-962, (2010)

  14. Super-parameterization in GRAPES: The construction of SP-GRAPES and associated preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Xu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Xiaohui; Wang, Yuhong

    2015-04-01

    Super-parameterization (SP) aims to explicitly represent deep convection within a coarse resolution global model by embedding a cloud resolving model (CRM) in each column of the mother model. For the first time, we implemented the SP in a mesoscale regional weather model, the Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES). The constructed SP-GRAPES uses a two-dimensional (2D) CRM in each grid column. A control and two SP simulations are conducted for the Beijing "7.21" heavy rainfall event to evaluate improvements in GRAPES using SP. The SP-run-I is a basic SP run delivering microphysics feedback only, whereas the SP-run-II delivers both microphysical and cloud fraction feedbacks. A comparison of the runs indicates that the SP-run-I has a slightly positive impact on the precipitation forecast than the control run. However, the inclusion of cloud fraction feedback leads to an evident overall improvement, particularly in terms of cloud fraction and 24-h cumulative precipitation. Although this is only a preliminary study using SP-GRAPES, we believe that it will provide considerable guidance for follow-up studies using SP in China.

  15. Parameterized Linear Temporal Logics Meet Costs: Still not Costlier than LTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Zimmermann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We continue the investigation of parameterized extensions of Linear Temporal Logic (LTL that retain the attractive algorithmic properties of LTL: a polynomial space model checking algorithm and a doubly-exponential time algorithm for solving games. Alur et al. and Kupferman et al. showed that this is the case for Parametric LTL (PLTL and PROMPT-LTL respectively, which have temporal operators equipped with variables that bound their scope in time. Later, this was also shown to be true for Parametric LDL (PLDL, which extends PLTL to be able to express all omega-regular properties. Here, we generalize PLTL to systems with costs, i.e., we do not bound the scope of operators in time, but bound the scope in terms of the cost accumulated during time. Again, we show that model checking and solving games for specifications in PLTL with costs is not harder than the corresponding problems for LTL. Finally, we discuss PLDL with costs and extensions to multiple cost functions.

  16. Sensitivities to parameterization in the size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert C.; Boschitsch, Alexander H.; Fenley, Marcia O.

    2014-02-01

    Experimental results have demonstrated that the numbers of counterions surrounding nucleic acids differ from those predicted by the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, NLPBE. Some studies have fit these data against the ion size in the size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation, SMPBE, but the present study demonstrates that other parameters, such as the Stern layer thickness and the molecular surface definition, can change the number of bound ions by amounts comparable to varying the ion size. These parameters will therefore have to be fit simultaneously against experimental data. In addition, the data presented here demonstrate that the derivative, SK, of the electrostatic binding free energy, ΔGel, with respect to the logarithm of the salt concentration is sensitive to these parameters, and experimental measurements of SK could be used to parameterize the model. However, although better values for the Stern layer thickness and ion size and better molecular surface definitions could improve the model's predictions of the numbers of ions around biomolecules and SK, ΔGel itself is more sensitive to parameters, such as the interior dielectric constant, which in turn do not significantly affect the distributions of ions around biomolecules. Therefore, improved estimates of the ion size and Stern layer thickness to use in the SMPBE will not necessarily improve the model's predictions of ΔGel.

  17. Parameterized Finite Element Modeling and Buckling Analysis of Six Typical Composite Grid Cylindrical Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Changliang; Wang, Junbiao; Liu, Chuang

    2014-10-01

    Six typical composite grid cylindrical shells are constructed by superimposing three basic types of ribs. Then buckling behavior and structural efficiency of these shells are analyzed under axial compression, pure bending, torsion and transverse bending by finite element (FE) models. The FE models are created by a parametrical FE modeling approach that defines FE models with original natural twisted geometry and orients cross-sections of beam elements exactly. And the approach is parameterized and coded by Patran Command Language (PCL). The demonstrations of FE modeling indicate the program enables efficient generation of FE models and facilitates parametric studies and design of grid shells. Using the program, the effects of helical angles on the buckling behavior of six typical grid cylindrical shells are determined. The results of these studies indicate that the triangle grid and rotated triangle grid cylindrical shell are more efficient than others under axial compression and pure bending, whereas under torsion and transverse bending, the hexagon grid cylindrical shell is most efficient. Additionally, buckling mode shapes are compared and provide an understanding of composite grid cylindrical shells that is useful in preliminary design of such structures.

  18. An improved parameterization of the mean monthly precipitation in the Northern Hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, V. M; Oda, B; Adem, J [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-01-01

    A mean monthly precipitation parameterization is given. It is developed by a multiple linear regression equation in terms of the temperature and the horizontal wind. Using a period of eleven years, from January 1982 to December 1992, for the anomalies of the mean monthly precipitation, temperature, zonal and meridional wind, and vorticity of the wind as variable data, we have obtained a skill above 80% in the estimation of the mean monthly precipitation anomalies with the Adems Thermodynamic Model, or with any others energy balance or general circulation models, as well as to compute monthly precipitation anomalies from observed anomalies of temperature and horizontal wind data. [Spanish] Se presenta una parametrizacion de la precipitacion media mensual desarrollada en una ecuacion de regresion linear multiple en funcion de la temperatura y del viento horizontal. En el calculo de los coeficientes de la ecuacion se usaron los datos de un periodos de once anos, de enero de 1982 a diciembre de 1992, de las anomalias medias mensuales de la precipitacion con el modelo termodinamico de Adem, u otros modelos de balance de energia o de circulacion general de la atmosfera, asi como para calcular anomalias mensuales de precipitacion a partir de datos de anomalias de temperatura y viento observados.

  19. Scale dependence in the effects of leaf ecophysiological traits on photosynthesis: Bayesian parameterization of photosynthesis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaohui; Dietze, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Relationships between leaf traits and carbon assimilation rates are commonly used to predict primary productivity at scales from the leaf to the globe. We addressed how the shape and magnitude of these relationships vary across temporal, spatial and taxonomic scales to improve estimates of carbon dynamics. Photosynthetic CO2 and light response curves, leaf nitrogen (N), chlorophyll (Chl) concentration and specific leaf area (SLA) of 25 grassland species were measured. In addition, C3 and C4 photosynthesis models were parameterized using a novel hierarchical Bayesian approach to quantify the effects of leaf traits on photosynthetic capacity and parameters at different scales. The effects of plant physiological traits on photosynthetic capacity and parameters varied among species, plant functional types and taxonomic scales. Relationships in the grassland biome were significantly different from the global average. Within-species variability in photosynthetic parameters through the growing season could be attributed to the seasonal changes of leaf traits, especially leaf N and Chl, but these responses followed qualitatively different relationships from the across-species relationship. The results suggest that one broad-scale relationship is not sufficient to characterize ecosystem condition and change at multiple scales. Applying trait relationships without articulating the scales may cause substantial carbon flux estimation errors. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Visualization and evaluation of flow during water filtration: Parameterization and sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bílek Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with visualization and evaluation of flow during filtration of water seeded by artificial microscopic particles. Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF is a wide spread method for visualization and non-invasive characterization of flow. However the method uses fluorescent dyes or fluorescent particles in special cases. In this article the flow is seeded by non-fluorescent monodisperse polystyrene particles with the diameter smaller than one micrometer. The monodisperse sub-micron particles are very suitable for testing of textile filtration materials. Nevertheless non-fluorescent particles are not useful for PLIF method. A water filtration setup with an optical access to the place, were a tested filter is mounted, was built and used for the experiments. Concentration of particles in front of and behind the tested filter in a laser light sheet measured is and the local filtration efficiency expressed is. The article describes further progress in the measurement. It was carried out sensitivity analysis, parameterization and performance of the method during several simulations and experiments.

  1. Comprehensive Parameterization of the p-Meson Spectral Function in Hot and Dense Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Thomas; Rapp, Ralf

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this research is to study how hadronic matter transitions into quark-gluon plasma. This transition is believed to have occurred in the early universe about 10 microseconds after the big bang. In particular, this transition created more than 95% of the visible mass in the universe, and confined quarks and gluons into hadrons. Hot nuclear matter can be recreated in the laboratory by colliding heavy atomic nuclei at very high energies. This transition into the quark-gluon plasma can be probed by analyzing the invariant mass distributions of ρ-mesons. The ρ-meson was chosen because it decays into dilepton pairs, e.g. or . Dilepton pairs are a preferred observable because they do not interact through the strong nuclear force inside the strongly interacting fireball, therefore ρ-mesons decay into dileptons in the medium and can be measured during heavy ion collisions. In this project, we developed a parameterization of this process which will help to describe quark-gluon plasma which filled the early universe.

  2. A truncated Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for the calibration of highly parameterized nonlinear models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finsterle, S.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2010-10-15

    We propose a modification to the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm for a more robust and more efficient calibration of highly parameterized, strongly nonlinear models of multiphase flow through porous media. The new method combines the advantages of truncated singular value decomposition with those of the classical Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, thus enabling a more robust solution of underdetermined inverse problems with complex relations between the parameters to be estimated and the observable state variables used for calibration. The truncation limit separating the solution space from the calibration null space is re-evaluated during the iterative calibration process. In between these re-evaluations, fewer forward simulations are required, compared to the standard approach, to calculate the approximate sensitivity matrix. Truncated singular values are used to calculate the Levenberg-Marquardt parameter updates, ensuring that safe small steps along the steepest-descent direction are taken for highly correlated parameters of low sensitivity, whereas efficient quasi-Gauss-Newton steps are taken for independent parameters with high impact. The performance of the proposed scheme is demonstrated for a synthetic data set representing infiltration into a partially saturated, heterogeneous soil, where hydrogeological, petrophysical, and geostatistical parameters are estimated based on the joint inversion of hydrological and geophysical data.

  3. A Parameterized Method for Air-Quality Diagnosis and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Z. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A parameterized method is developed to diagnose the air quality in Beijing and other cities with an index termed (parameters linking air-quality to meteorological elements PLAM derived from a correlation between PM10 and relevant weather elements based on the data between 2000 and 2007. Key weather factors for diagnosing the air pollution intensity are identified and included in PLAM that include atmospheric condensation of water vapour, wet potential equivalent temperature, and wind velocity. It is found that the poor air quality days with elevated PM10 are usually associated with higher PLAM values, featuring higher temperature, humidity, lower wind velocity, and higher stability compared to the averaged values in the same period. Both 24 h and 72 h forecasts provided useful services for the day of the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympic Games and subsequent sport events. A correlation coefficient of 0.82 was achieved between the forecasts and (air pollution index API and 0.59 between the forecasts and observed PM10, all reaching the significant level of 0.001, for the summer period. A correction factor was also introduced to enable the PLAM to diagnose the observed PM10 concentrations all year round.

  4. Parameterization of High Resolution Vegetation Characteristics using Remote Sensing Products for the Nakdong River Watershed, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Il Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale regional climate models (RCMs, the primary tool for climate predictions, have recently increased in sophistication and are being run at increasingly higher resolutions to be also used in climate impact studies on ecosystems, particularly in agricultural crops. As satellite remote sensing observations of the earth terrestrial surface become available for assimilation in RCMs, it is possible to incorporate complex land surface processes, such as dynamics of state variables for hydrologic, agricultural and ecologic systems at the smaller scales. This study focuses on parameterization of vegetation characteristics specifically designed for high resolution RCM applications using various remote sensing products, such as Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR, Système Pour l’Observation de la Terre-VEGETATION (SPOT-VGT and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. The primary vegetative parameters, such as land surface characteristics (LCC, fractional vegetation cover (FVC, leaf area index (LAI and surface albedo localization factors (SALF, are currently presented over the Nakdong River Watershed domain, Korea, based on 1-km remote sensing satellite data by using the Geographic Information System (GIS software application tools. For future high resolution RCM modeling efforts on climate-crop interactions, this study has constructed the deriving parameters, such as FVC and SALF, following the existing methods and proposed the new interpolation methods to fill missing data with combining the regression equation and the time series trend function for time-variant parameters, such as LAI and NDVI data at 1-km scale.

  5. Examination of convective parameterization closures and their scale awareness using cloud-resolving model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettammal, S.; Zhang, G. J.; Chen, R.

    2014-12-01

    Closure is the main component of a mass flux-based convective parameterization scheme and it determines the amount of convection under a given large-scale condition. In this study, we use cloud-resolving model output from simulations of both tropical and midlatitude convection to evaluate commonly used closures for a range of global climate model (GCM) horizontal resolutions, taking convective precipitation and mass flux at 600 hPa as measures for deep convection. To mimic different GCM horizontal resolutions, we use high resolution CRM data to create domain averages representing GCM horizontal resolutions of 128 km, 64 km, 32 km, 16 km, 8 km and 4 km. Lead-lag correlation analysis shows that except moisture convergence and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), none of the other closure variables evaluated in this study show any relationship with convection for the six subdomain sizes. It is found that the correlation between moisture convergence and convective precipitation is largest when moisture convergence leads convection. This correlation weakens as the subdomain size decreases to 8 km or smaller. Although convective precipitation and mass flux increase with moisture convergence, as the subdomain size increases the rate at which they increase becomes smaller. This suggests that moisture convergence-based closure should scale down the predicted mass flux for given moisture convergence as GCM resolution increases. Lead-lag correlation and composite analysis show that TKE is largely a result of convection and therefore its use in a closure variable is not supported.

  6. Testing stable boundary layer parameterizations against the BASE:ALFA measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafè, G.; Tampieri, F.; di Giuseppe, F.; Caporaso, L.

    2010-09-01

    The Po valley in the Northern Italy is a large plain in a semi-closed basin surrounded by complex orography; the Alps to the North and Apennines to the South-East, and closed to the east by the Adriatic sea. As a flatland basin shielded by mountains, calm wind is very frequent and strong temperature inversions are often observed near the ground, during the night and in the winter period the occurrence of a extremely stable boundary layer is common. A complete set of surface and atmospheric measurements have been collected during a four month observational program carried out at San Pietro Capofiume meteo station, in the middle of the Po Valley. The long term dataset has been collected in the contest of the project BASE:ALFA with the main aim of creating a data pool of micro-meteorological /soil data to test and validate numerical weather prediction PBL schemes. The measurement periods span summer, winter and spring and allows to analyse a wide range of PBL stability conditions. Different parameterizations of first and second order moments of velocity and temperature are tested against the collected data. A particular focus is given to stable boundary layer and the values of its height obtained from Nieuwstadt 1984 and Zilitinkievich et al 2005 formulas will be provided and compared against radiosounding profile estimates.

  7. Sensitivities to parameterization in the size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert C; Boschitsch, Alexander H; Fenley, Marcia O

    2014-02-21

    Experimental results have demonstrated that the numbers of counterions surrounding nucleic acids differ from those predicted by the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, NLPBE. Some studies have fit these data against the ion size in the size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation, SMPBE, but the present study demonstrates that other parameters, such as the Stern layer thickness and the molecular surface definition, can change the number of bound ions by amounts comparable to varying the ion size. These parameters will therefore have to be fit simultaneously against experimental data. In addition, the data presented here demonstrate that the derivative, SK, of the electrostatic binding free energy, ΔGel, with respect to the logarithm of the salt concentration is sensitive to these parameters, and experimental measurements of SK could be used to parameterize the model. However, although better values for the Stern layer thickness and ion size and better molecular surface definitions could improve the model's predictions of the numbers of ions around biomolecules and SK, ΔGel itself is more sensitive to parameters, such as the interior dielectric constant, which in turn do not significantly affect the distributions of ions around biomolecules. Therefore, improved estimates of the ion size and Stern layer thickness to use in the SMPBE will not necessarily improve the model's predictions of ΔGel.

  8. Importance of subgrid-scale parameterization in numerical simulations of lake circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqi

    Two subgrid-scale modeling techniques--Smagorinsky's postulation for the horizontal eddy viscosity and the Mellor-Yamada level-2 model for the vertical eddy viscosity--are applied as turbulence closure conditions to numerical simulations of resolved-scale baroclinic lake circulations. The use of the total variation diminishing (TVD) technique in the numerical treatment of the advection terms in the governing equations depresses numerical diffusion to an acceptably low level and makes stable numerical performances possible with small eddy viscosities resulting from the turbulence closure parameterizations. The results show that, with regard to the effect of an external wind stress, the vertical turbulent mixing is mainly restricted to the topmost epilimnion with the order of magnitude for the vertical eddy viscosity of 10 -3 m 2 s -1, whilst the horizontal turbulent mixing may reach a somewhat deeper zone with an order of magnitude for the horizontal eddy viscosity of 0.1-1 m 2 s -1. Their spatial and temporal variations and influences on numerical results are significant. A comparison with prescribed constant eddy viscosities clearly shows the importance of subgrid-scale closures on resolved-scale flows in the lake circulation simulation. A predetermination of the eddy viscosities is inappropriate and should be abandoned. Their values must be determined by suitable subgrid-scale closure techniques.

  9. Analytical method for parameterizing the random profile components of nanosurfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaidov, Utkur; Timashev, Serge F; Polyakov, Yuriy S; Misurkin, Pavel I; Musaev, Ibrahim; Polyakov, Sergey V

    2011-02-07

    The functional properties of many technological surfaces in biotechnology, electronics, and mechanical engineering depend to a large degree on the individual features of their nanoscale surface texture, which in turn is a function of the surface manufacturing process. Among these features, the surface irregularities and self-similarity structures at different spatial scales, especially in the range of 1 to 100 nm, are of high importance because they greatly affect the surface interaction forces acting at a nanoscale distance. An analytical method for parameterizing the surface irregularities and their correlations in nanosurfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is proposed. In this method, flicker noise spectroscopy--a statistical physics approach--is used to develop six nanometrological parameters characterizing the high-frequency contributions of jump- and spike-like irregularities into the surface texture. These contributions reflect the stochastic processes of anomalous diffusion and inertial effects, respectively, in the process of surface manufacturing. The AFM images of the texture of corrosion-resistant magnetite coatings formed on low-carbon steel in hot nitrate solutions with coating growth promoters at different temperatures are analyzed. It is shown that the parameters characterizing surface spikiness are able to quantify the effect of process temperature on the corrosion resistance of the coatings. It is suggested that these parameters can be used for predicting and characterizing the corrosion-resistant properties of magnetite coatings.

  10. Online Adaboost-Based Parameterized Methods for Dynamic Distributed Network Intrusion Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiming; Gao, Jun; Wang, Yanguo; Wu, Ou; Maybank, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Current network intrusion detection systems lack adaptability to the frequently changing network environments. Furthermore, intrusion detection in the new distributed architectures is now a major requirement. In this paper, we propose two online Adaboost-based intrusion detection algorithms. In the first algorithm, a traditional online Adaboost process is used where decision stumps are used as weak classifiers. In the second algorithm, an improved online Adaboost process is proposed, and online Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) are used as weak classifiers. We further propose a distributed intrusion detection framework, in which a local parameterized detection model is constructed in each node using the online Adaboost algorithm. A global detection model is constructed in each node by combining the local parametric models using a small number of samples in the node. This combination is achieved using an algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) and support vector machines. The global model in each node is used to detect intrusions. Experimental results show that the improved online Adaboost process with GMMs obtains a higher detection rate and a lower false alarm rate than the traditional online Adaboost process that uses decision stumps. Both the algorithms outperform existing intrusion detection algorithms. It is also shown that our PSO, and SVM-based algorithm effectively combines the local detection models into the global model in each node; the global model in a node can handle the intrusion types that are found in other nodes, without sharing the samples of these intrusion types.

  11. Parameterization of rain induced surface roughness and its validation study using a third generation wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh Kumar, R.; Prasad Kumar, B.; Bala Subrahamanyam, D.

    2009-09-01

    The effect of raindrops striking water surface and their role in modifying the prevailing sea-surface roughness is investigated. The work presents a new theoretical formulation developed to study rain-induced stress on sea-surface based on dimensional analysis. Rain parameters include drop size, rain intensity and rain duration. The influences of these rain parameters on young and mature waves were studied separately under varying wind speeds, rain intensity and rain duration. Contrary to popular belief that rain only attenuates surface waves, this study also points out rain duration under certain condition can contribute to wave growth at high wind speeds. Strong winds in conjunction with high rain intensity enhance the horizontal stress component on the sea-surface, leading to wave growth. Previous studies based on laboratory experiments and dimensional analysis do not account for rain duration when attempting to parameterize sea-surface roughness. This study signifies the importance of rain duration as an important parameter modifying sea-surface roughness. Qualitative as well quantitative support for the developed formulation is established through critical validation with reports of several researchers and satellite measurements for an extreme cyclonic event in the Indian Ocean. Based on skill assessment, it is suggested that the present formulation is superior to prior studies. Numerical experiments and validation performed by incorporating in state-of-art WAM wave model show the importance of treating rain-induced surface roughness as an essential pre-requisite for ocean wave modeling studies.

  12. Visualization and evaluation of flow during water filtration: Parameterization and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílek, Petr

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with visualization and evaluation of flow during filtration of water seeded by artificial microscopic particles. Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) is a wide spread method for visualization and non-invasive characterization of flow. However the method uses fluorescent dyes or fluorescent particles in special cases. In this article the flow is seeded by non-fluorescent monodisperse polystyrene particles with the diameter smaller than one micrometer. The monodisperse sub-micron particles are very suitable for testing of textile filtration materials. Nevertheless non-fluorescent particles are not useful for PLIF method. A water filtration setup with an optical access to the place, were a tested filter is mounted, was built and used for the experiments. Concentration of particles in front of and behind the tested filter in a laser light sheet measured is and the local filtration efficiency expressed is. The article describes further progress in the measurement. It was carried out sensitivity analysis, parameterization and performance of the method during several simulations and experiments.

  13. Physically-based parameterization of spatially variable soil and vegetation using satellite multispectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1989-01-01

    A stochastic-geometric landsurface reflectance model is formulated and tested for the parameterization of spatially variable vegetation and soil at subpixel scales using satellite multispectral images without ground truth. Landscapes are conceptualized as 3-D Lambertian reflecting surfaces consisting of plant canopies, represented by solid geometric figures, superposed on a flat soil background. A computer simulation program is developed to investigate image characteristics at various spatial aggregations representative of satellite observational scales, or pixels. The evolution of the shape and structure of the red-infrared space, or scattergram, of typical semivegetated scenes is investigated by sequentially introducing model variables into the simulation. The analytical moments of the total pixel reflectance, including the mean, variance, spatial covariance, and cross-spectral covariance, are derived in terms of the moments of the individual fractional cover and reflectance components. The moments are applied to the solution of the inverse problem: The estimation of subpixel landscape properties on a pixel-by-pixel basis, given only one multispectral image and limited assumptions on the structure of the landscape. The landsurface reflectance model and inversion technique are tested using actual aerial radiometric data collected over regularly spaced pecan trees, and using both aerial and LANDSAT Thematic Mapper data obtained over discontinuous, randomly spaced conifer canopies in a natural forested watershed. Different amounts of solar backscattered diffuse radiation are assumed and the sensitivity of the estimated landsurface parameters to those amounts is examined.

  14. Parameterization and quantification of recharge in crystalline fractured bedrocks in Galicia-Costa (NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Raposo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying groundwater recharge in crystalline rocks presents great difficulties due to the high heterogeneity of the underground medium (mainly, due to heterogeneity in fracture network, which determines hydraulic parameters of the bedrock like hydraulic conductivity or effective porosity. Traditionally these rocks have been considered to have very low permeability, and their groundwater resources have usually been neglected; however, they can be of local importance when the bedrock presents a net of well-developed fractures. The current European Water Framework Directive requires an efficient management of all groundwater resources; this begins with a proper knowledge of the aquifer and accurate recharge estimation. In this study, an assessment of groundwater resources in the Spanish hydrologic district of Galicia-Costa, dominated by granitic and metasedimentary rocks, was carried out. A water-balance modeling approach was used for estimating recharge rates in nine pilot catchments representatives of both geologic materials. These results were cross-validated with an independent technique, i.e. the chloride mass balance (CMB. A relation among groundwater recharge and annual precipitation according to two different logistic curves was found for both granites and metasedimentary rocks, thus allowing the parameterization of recharge by means of only a few hydrogeological parameters. Total groundwater resources in Galicia-Costa were estimated to be 4427 hm3 yr−1. An analysis of spatial and temporal variability of recharge was also carried out.

  15. Surrogate POD models for building forming limit diagrams of parameterized sheet metal forming applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdaoui, M.; Le Quilliec, Guénhaël; Breitkopf, Piotr; Villon, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to present a surrogate POD (Proper Orthogonal Decomposition) approach for building forming limit diagrams at minimum cost for parameterized sheet metal formed work-pieces. First, a Latin Hypercube Sampling is performed on the design parameter space. Then, at each design site, displacement fields are computed using the popular open-source finite element software Code_Aster. Then, the method of snapshots is used for POD mode determination. POD coefficients are interpolated using kriging. Furthermore, an error analysis of the surrogate POD model is performed on a validation set. It is shown that on the considered use case the accuracy of the surrogate POD model is excellent for the representation of finite element displacement fields. The validated surrogate POD model is then used to build forming limit diagrams (FLD) for any design parameter to assess the quality of stamped metal sheets. Using the surrogate POD model, the Green-Lagrange strain tensor is derived, then major and minor principal deformations are determined at Gauss points for each mesh element. Furthermore, a signed distance between the forming limit curve in rupture and the obtained cloud of points in the plane (ɛ2, ɛ1) is computed to assess the quality of the formed workpiece. The minimization of this signed distance allows determining the safest design for the chosen use case.

  16. Parameterization of the Age-Dependent Whole Brain Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Klose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The distribution of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values in the brain can be used to characterize age effects and pathological changes of the brain tissue. The aim of this study was the parameterization of the whole brain ADC histogram by an advanced model with influence of age considered. Methods. Whole brain ADC histograms were calculated for all data and for seven age groups between 10 and 80 years. Modeling of the histograms was performed for two parts of the histogram separately: the brain tissue part was modeled by two Gaussian curves, while the remaining part was fitted by the sum of a Gaussian curve, a biexponential decay, and a straight line. Results. A consistent fitting of the histograms of all age groups was possible with the proposed model. Conclusions. This study confirms the strong dependence of the whole brain ADC histograms on the age of the examined subjects. The proposed model can be used to characterize changes of the whole brain ADC histogram in certain diseases under consideration of age effects.

  17. Operational evapotranspiration mapping using remote sensing and weather datasets: a new parameterization for the SSEB approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Gabriel B.; Bohms, Stefanie; Singh, Ramesh K.; Gowda, Prasanna H.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Alemu, Henok; Verdin, James P.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of multi-scale remotely sensed data and global weather datasets is allowing the estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) at multiple scales. We present a simple but robust method that uses remotely sensed thermal data and model-assimilated weather fields to produce ET for the contiguous United States (CONUS) at monthly and seasonal time scales. The method is based on the Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model, which is now parameterized for operational applications, renamed as SSEBop. The innovative aspect of the SSEBop is that it uses predefined boundary conditions that are unique to each pixel for the "hot" and "cold" reference conditions. The SSEBop model was used for computing ET for 12 years (2000-2011) using the MODIS and Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) data streams. SSEBop ET results compared reasonably well with monthly eddy covariance ET data explaining 64% of the observed variability across diverse ecosystems in the CONUS during 2005. Twelve annual ET anomalies (2000-2011) depicted the spatial extent and severity of the commonly known drought years in the CONUS. More research is required to improve the representation of the predefined boundary conditions in complex terrain at small spatial scales. SSEBop model was found to be a promising approach to conduct water use studies in the CONUS, with a similar opportunity in other parts of the world. The approach can also be applied with other thermal sensors such as Landsat.

  18. Performance evaluation of dispersion parameterization schemes in the plume simulation of FFT-07 diffusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gavendra; Sharan, Maithili

    2018-01-01

    Application of atmospheric dispersion models in air quality analysis requires a proper representation of the vertical and horizontal growth of the plume. For this purpose, various schemes for the parameterization of dispersion parameters σ‧s are described in both stable and unstable conditions. These schemes differ on the use of (i) extent of availability of on-site measurements (ii) formulations developed for other sites and (iii) empirical relations. The performance of these schemes is evaluated in an earlier developed IIT (Indian Institute of Technology) dispersion model with the data set in single and multiple releases conducted at Fusion Field Trials, Dugway Proving Ground, Utah 2007. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the relative performance of all the schemes is carried out in both stable and unstable conditions in the light of (i) peak/maximum concentrations, and (ii) overall concentration distribution. The blocked bootstrap resampling technique is adopted to investigate the statistical significance of the differences in performances of each of the schemes by computing 95% confidence limits on the parameters FB and NMSE. The various analysis based on some selected statistical measures indicated consistency in the qualitative and quantitative performances of σ schemes. The scheme which is based on standard deviation of wind velocity fluctuations and Lagrangian time scales exhibits a relatively better performance in predicting the peak as well as the lateral spread.

  19. Application of LES (Large Eddy Simulation) to Understanding and Parameterizing the Arctic Cloudy Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Judith

    2002-01-01

    The GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) Cloud Systems Studies Working Group 5 Polar Clouds was formed largely to exploit the enormous potential of the FIRE.ACE (FIRE Arctic Cloud Experiment) and SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) data sets to improve parameterizations of clouds, radiation, and atmospheric boundary layer processes in the polar regions. The web page for this project is a clearinghouse of information for polar clouds in general and specifically for FIRE.ACE and SHEBA modelling activities. Note that the GCSS Working Group and Polar Clouds leverages heavily the FIRE.ACE investment, since it involves a large group of international scientists and has adopted the modelling goals and other issues related to cloud and radiation processes that are articulated by the FIRE.ACE Science Plan. The supplemental funds in this proposal are targeted at providing the continued coordination for the GCSS Working Group on Polar Clouds, which will insure that final FIRE.ACE project objectives regarding modelling and cloud and radiative processes are achieved.

  20. Approaches in highly parameterized inversion - PEST++, a Parameter ESTimation code optimized for large environmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, David E.; Doherty, John E.; Hunt, Randall J.; Muffels, Christopher T.; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Schreuder, Willem A.

    2012-01-01

    An object-oriented parameter estimation code was developed to incorporate benefits of object-oriented programming techniques for solving large parameter estimation modeling problems. The code is written in C++ and is a formulation and expansion of the algorithms included in PEST, a widely used parameter estimation code written in Fortran. The new code is called PEST++ and is designed to lower the barriers of entry for users and developers while providing efficient algorithms that can accommodate large, highly parameterized problems. This effort has focused on (1) implementing the most popular features of PEST in a fashion that is easy for novice or experienced modelers to use and (2) creating a software design that is easy to extend; that is, this effort provides a documented object-oriented framework designed from the ground up to be modular and extensible. In addition, all PEST++ source code and its associated libraries, as well as the general run manager source code, have been integrated in the Microsoft Visual Studio® 2010 integrated development environment. The PEST++ code is designed to provide a foundation for an open-source development environment capable of producing robust and efficient parameter estimation tools for the environmental modeling community into the future.