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Sample records for explaining neural-activity-induced shrinkage

  1. Astrocytic mechanisms explaining neural-activity-induced shrinkage of extraneuronal space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby, Ivar; Øyehaug, Leiv; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal stimulation causes approximately 30% shrinkage of the extracellular space (ECS) between neurons and surrounding astrocytes in grey and white matter under experimental conditions. Despite its possible implications for a proper understanding of basic aspects of potassium clearance and astr......Neuronal stimulation causes approximately 30% shrinkage of the extracellular space (ECS) between neurons and surrounding astrocytes in grey and white matter under experimental conditions. Despite its possible implications for a proper understanding of basic aspects of potassium clearance...

  2. Astrocytic mechanisms explaining neural-activity-induced shrinkage of extraneuronal space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar Østby

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal stimulation causes approximately 30% shrinkage of the extracellular space (ECS between neurons and surrounding astrocytes in grey and white matter under experimental conditions. Despite its possible implications for a proper understanding of basic aspects of potassium clearance and astrocyte function, the phenomenon remains unexplained. Here we present a dynamic model that accounts for current experimental data related to the shrinkage phenomenon in wild-type as well as in gene knockout individuals. We find that neuronal release of potassium and uptake of sodium during stimulation, astrocyte uptake of potassium, sodium, and chloride in passive channels, action of the Na/K/ATPase pump, and osmotically driven transport of water through the astrocyte membrane together seem sufficient for generating ECS shrinkage as such. However, when taking into account ECS and astrocyte ion concentrations observed in connection with neuronal stimulation, the actions of the Na(+/K(+/Cl(- (NKCC1 and the Na(+/HCO(3 (- (NBC cotransporters appear to be critical determinants for achieving observed quantitative levels of ECS shrinkage. Considering the current state of knowledge, the model framework appears sufficiently detailed and constrained to guide future key experiments and pave the way for more comprehensive astroglia-neuron interaction models for normal as well as pathophysiological situations.

  3. Shrinkage Properties of Cement Stabilized Gravel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Cement stabilized gravel is an attractive material in road construction because its strength prop-erties are accommodating the increasingly higher requirements to the bearing capacity of a base course. However, reflection cracking of cement stabilized gravel is a major concern. In this pa......-per the shrinkage properties of cement stabilized gravel have been documented under various temperature and relative humidity conditions. Two cement contents corresponding to a 28-days compressive strength of 6.2 MPa and 12.3 MPa have been tested and compared. It is found that the coefficient of linear expansion...... for the two cement contents is 9.9 × 10-6 ⁰C-1 and 11.3 × 10-6 ⁰C-1, respectively. Furthermore, it is found that reflecting cracking can mainly be explained by temperature dependent shrinkage rather than moisture dependent shrinkage....

  4. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  5. Total shrinkage versus partial shrinkage in multiple linear regression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses the merits of partial shrinkage of the ordinary least square estimator of the coefficients of the multiple regression model of full rank. Theoretical comparisons of scalar and matrix-valued risks of the partially shrunken and totally shrunken estimators are given. The strategy of partial shrinkage is applied to ...

  6. Development of concrete shrinkage performance specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    During its service life, concrete undergoes volume changes. One of the types of deformation is shrinkage. The four main types of shrinkage associated with concrete are plastic, autogenous, carbonation, and drying shrinkage. The volume changes in conc...

  7. Preliminary test-shrinkage estimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Lemmer

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of using the very simple shrinkage estimator TL proposed by Lemmer rather than that proposed by Mehta and Srivivasan in the case of preliminary test estimators for parameters of the normal, binomial and Poisson distributions are examined.

  8. Smooth Adaptation by Sigmoid Shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atto AbdourrahmaneM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the properties of a subclass of sigmoid-based shrinkage functions: the non zeroforcing smooth sigmoid-based shrinkage functions or SigShrink functions. It provides a SURE optimization for the parameters of the SigShrink functions. The optimization is performed on an unbiased estimation risk obtained by using the functions of this subclass. The SURE SigShrink performance measurements are compared to those of the SURELET (SURE linear expansion of thresholds parameterization. It is shown that the SURE SigShrink performs well in comparison to the SURELET parameterization. The relevance of SigShrink is the physical meaning and the flexibility of its parameters. The SigShrink functions performweak attenuation of data with large amplitudes and stronger attenuation of data with small amplitudes, the shrinkage process introducing little variability among data with close amplitudes. In the wavelet domain, SigShrink is particularly suitable for reducing noise without impacting significantly the signal to recover. A remarkable property for this class of sigmoid-based functions is the invertibility of its elements. This propertymakes it possible to smoothly tune contrast (enhancement, reduction.

  9. The influence of shrinkage reducing admixtures on plastic shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora, J.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs are viable alternatives for reducing plastic shrinkage cracking in concrete. The objective of the present paper is to study early age plastic shrinkage in restrained concrete elements, where three different SRAs have been used. The influence of the admixture is analyzed through the following measurements: capillary pressure, evaporation, temperature evolution, crack evolution and settlement. The tests for studying the cracking and deformation were made on two different configurations (i.e., restrained prisms with reduced cross-section and restrained panel, in a wind tunnel, with controlled wind temperature and velocity. The conclusions obtained indicate the viability of the use of this type of admixture and the usefulness of the test methods.

    Los aditivos reductores de retracción (SRAs se plantean, hoy en día, como una alternativa viable para reducir la fisuración por retracción plástica. El objetivo del presente artículo es conocer mejor y predecir el comportamiento a primeras edades de la retracción plástica en elementos estructurales coaccionados, a los que se les ha añadido diversos aditivos reductores de retracción (tres tipos diferentes. Esta influencia se analiza a través de las siguientes propiedades: presión capilar, evaporación, evolución de temperaturas, evolución de fisuración, y deformaciones verticales de asentamiento. Los ensayos para estudiar la fisuración y las deformaciones se han realizado sobre diferentes configuraciones (prisma restringido con estrangulamiento y panel restringido, en un túnel de viento, con temperaturas y velocidades de viento controladas. Las conclusiones obtenidas señalan la viabilidad del empleo de este tipo de aditivos y la bondad de los métodos experimentales utilizados.

  10. Modelling desiccation shrinkage of large structures

    OpenAIRE

    Torrenti J.-M.; Benboudjema F.

    2013-01-01

    Drying of cement-based materials induces drying shrinkage, which may cause prestress loss or/and cracking if strains are (self or externally) restrained. Drying shrinkage is difficult to predict, since it depends on the material mix, mechanical and hygral boundary conditions, geometry ... This paper focuses on the study of size effect on final drying shrinkage, which is not well documented in the literature. In the Eurocode 2 (European code model), a reduction factor is applied for large stru...

  11. Accounting for PDMS shrinkage when replicating structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal; Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Hansen, Poul-Erik

    2014-01-01

    are seldom applied to counteract the shrinkage of PDMS. Also, to perform metrological measurements using replica techniques one has to take the shrinkage into account. Thus we report a study of the shrinkage of PDMS with several different mixing ratios and curing temperatures. The shrinkage factor, with its...... associated uncertainty, for PDMS in the range 40 to 120 °C is provided. By applying this correction factor, it is possible to replicate structures with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.2% in lateral dimensions using typical curing temperatures and PDMS mixing ratios in the range 1:6 to 1:20 (agent:base)....

  12. Polymerization shrinkage strain of interocclusal recording materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Jung-hyun; Pae, Ahran; Kim, Sung-hun

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the polymerization shrinkage behavior and to measure the polymerization shrinkage-strain of interocclusal recording materials. The materials investigated in this study were five polyvinylsiloxane (Imprint Bite, Silagum Automix Bite, O-Bite, Blu-Mousse Classic and Exabite II), one polyether (Ramitec) and one dimethacrylatebased (Luxabite) materials. The polymerization shrinkage values of ten specimens for each material were measured by the Bonded-disk method at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 min after mixing at 37 degrees C. The amount of shrinkage-strain (%) was derived and all data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the multiple comparison Scheffé test (alpha=0.05). The representative shrinkage-strain kinetic graphs showed that all specimens shrank immediately, except Luxabite which expanded for the initial few seconds. After that, the shrinkage-strain values increased in the magnitude up to 10 min, but its rate decreased gradually with time. The shrinkage-strain values (0.18+/-0.03-0.16+/-0.03%) of O-Bite at 5, 7 and 10 min were significantly lower than the other materials, but Luxabite exhibited the highest values (3.10+/-0.17-3.30+/-0.16%). The interocclusal recording materials investigated presented significantly different polymerization shrinkage-strain kinetics and showed dimensional changes even after the setting time indicated by respective manufacturers.

  13. Modelling desiccation shrinkage of large structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrenti J.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Drying of cement-based materials induces drying shrinkage, which may cause prestress loss or/and cracking if strains are (self or externally restrained. Drying shrinkage is difficult to predict, since it depends on the material mix, mechanical and hygral boundary conditions, geometry ... This paper focuses on the study of size effect on final drying shrinkage, which is not well documented in the literature. In the Eurocode 2 (European code model, a reduction factor is applied for large structure, which is in agreement with experimental data of one campaign (found in the literature. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that a large panel of models, including phenomenological models as physical ones (which takes into account of (aging creep under capillary pressure (assumed to be the physical mechanism for drying shrinkage, do not predict size effect on final value of drying shrinkage.

  14. Mitigation strategies for autogenous shrinkage cracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2004-01-01

    As the use of high-performance concrete has increased, problems with early-age cracking have become prominent. The reduction in water-to-cement ratio, the incorporation of silica fume, and the increase in binder content of high-performance concretes all contribute to this problem. In this paper......, the fundamental parameters contributing to the autogenous shrinkage and resultant early-age cracking of concrete are presented. Basic characteristics of the cement paste that contribute to or control the autogenous shrinkage response include the surface tension of the pore solution, the geometry of the pore...... of early-age cracking due to autogenous shrinkage. Mitigation strategies discussed in this paper include: the addition of shrinkage-reducing admixtures more commonly used to control drying shrinkage, control of the cement particle size distribution, modification of the mineralogical composition...

  15. Potato shrinkage during hot air drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías, A; Clemente, G; Mulet, A

    2010-08-01

    Shrinkage is one of the most important physical changes that occur during the dehydration of foods. In this work, the effect of the temperature (35, 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C) and air velocity (7, 8, 9 and 10 m/s) on bulk volumetric shrinkage was investigated. Volume changes were evaluated by image analysis. It was found that neither temperature nor air velocity had any significant effects on bulk shrinkage in this system. The bulk shrinkage of the potato cubes was well correlated with the moisture content of the sample during drying (R(2) = 97.28). Volume varied linearly with the moisture content changes under the studied conditions. The volume of lost water and the decrease in volume of the samples during dehydration were similar.

  16. Breast specimen shrinkage following formalin fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn CL

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Christopher L Horn, Christopher Naugler Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, and Calgary Laboratory Services, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: Accurate measurement of primary breast tumors and subsequent surgical margin assessment is critical for pathology reporting and resulting patient therapy. Anecdotal observations from pathology laboratory staff indicate possible shrinkage of breast cancer specimens due to the formalin fixation process. As a result, we conducted a prospective study to investigate the possible shrinkage effects of formalin fixation on breast cancer specimens. The results revealed no significant changes in tumor size, but there were significant changes in the distance to all surgical resection margins from the unfixed to fixed state. This shrinkage effect could interfere with the accuracy of determining distance to margin assessment and tumor-free margin assessment. Thus, changes in these measurements due to the formalin fixation process have the potential to alter treatment options for the patient. Keywords: breast margins, formalin, shrinkage, cancer

  17. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  18. Digital image analysis of radial shrinkage of fresh spruce (Picea abies L.) wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Christian; Konnerth, Johannes; Rosner, Sabine

    2011-03-21

    Contact-free digital image analysis was performed of the radial shrinkage of fresh, fully saturated small spruce wood beams. An experimental test set-up was developed to ensure constant distance from the charge-coupled device camera to the sample surface as well as constant climate and light conditions during the whole experiment. Dimensional changes were observed immediately after the drying process began. An unexpected distinct effect could be observed which could not be explained by drying surface layers only. After a fast initial radial shrinkage a slowing down of the dimensional changes occurred at high mean moisture contents. A complete interruption of any dimensional changes followed. Finally, a recovery from shrinkage was even observed. It is assumed that strong negative pressure occurred in the fully saturated capillaries owing to dehydration which led to additional dimensional changes. As a consequence, the break of the water column and aeration in these capillaries finally resulted in a recovery period in the shrinkage rate due to the pressure release. After this effect, the dehydration was characterized by a phase of fast and almost linear shrinkage due to drying surface layers. Finally, the shrinkage slowed down to zero when reaching equilibrium moisture content.

  19. Effect on effective diffusion coefficients and investigation of shrinkage during osmotic dehydration of apricot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togrul, Inci Turk; Ispir, Ayse [Firat University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Chemical Engineering, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2007-10-15

    This article represents the results of the variation in density and shrinkage of apricots during its osmotic dehydration. Shrinkage was investigated by means of dimensionless volume, diameter and length. Various osmotic agents such as sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltodextrin and sorbitol were used. It was found that the shrinkage of apricots could be well correlated with the moisture content of the sample during osmotic dehydration. The relationship between dimensionless parameters and moisture content was investigated by using eight non-linear models for each osmotic agent. It was find that the following proposed model can be confidently use for explaining the effect of shrinkage during osmotic dehydration of apricots.V/V{sub 0},D/D{sub 0},L/L{sub 0},{rho}/{rho}{sub 0}=a+b. exp (cX)+d. exp (e.X{sup f})In addition, the osmotic dehydration kinetics of apricots with and without shrinkage was studied. The effective diffusivities calculated from the diffusional model with and without shrinkage varied from 10.342 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s to 5.139 x 10{sup -9} and from 1.755 x 10{sup -10} and 0.767 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. (author)

  20. Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified EVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, S.K.; Chaki, T.K.; Bhowmick, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Rubber Technology Center; Tikku, V.K.; Pradhan, N.K. [NICCO Corporation Ltd., (Cable Div.), Calcutta (India)

    1997-10-01

    Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) has been investigated over a range of times, temperatures, stretching, irradiation doses and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) levels. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) and stretched (100% elongation) sample shrinks to a maximum level when kept at 453K temperature for 60 s. The heat shrinkage of samples irradiated with radiation doses of 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy increases sharply with increasing stretching in the initial stage. Amnesia rating decreases with increasing radiation dose and TMPTMA level as well as gel content. The high radiation dose and TMPTMA level lower the heat shrinkage due to the chain scission. The effect of temperature at which extension is carried out on heat shrinkage is marginal. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) EVA tubes of different dimensions expanded in a laboratory grade tube expander show similar behaviour at 453K and 60 s. The X-ray and DSC studies reveal that the crystallinity increases on stretching due to orientation of chains and it decreases to a considerable extent on heat shrinking. The theoretical and experimental values of heat shrinkage for tubes and rectangular strips are in good accord, when the radiation dose is 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%. (author).

  1. Dry shrinkage characteristics of buffer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H. [ITC, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujita, A.

    1999-03-01

    Generation of cracks due to drying of compressed bentonite was observed by changing the initial water content to obtain shrinkage constants such as shrinkage limit and shrinking rate. As a result, generation of practically no cracks was observed when the initial water content of samples was below 13%. The volume change due to drying increased with the water content in the sample, and the shrinkage constants were found to depend on the initial water content. Further, the one-dimensional compression strength after drying was compared with that before drying in order to clarify the effect of cracks generated by drying on the mechanical strength. As a result, the dry sample with cracks proved to have large one-dimensional compression strength or E{sub 50} compared to wet samples, so that the mechanical strength was kept even after drying. (H. Baba)

  2. Quantitative analyses of shrinkage characteristics of neem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative analyses of shrinkage characteristics of neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) wood were carried out. Forty five wood specimens were prepared from the three ecological zones of north eastern Nigeria, viz: sahel savanna, sudan savanna and guinea savanna for the research. The results indicated that the wood ...

  3. Drying shrinkage problems in high PI subgrade soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the longitudinal cracking in pavements due to drying : shrinkage of high PI subgrade soils. The study involved laboartory soil testing and modeling. The : shrinkage cracks usually occur within the v...

  4. SHRINKAGE OF SOUND AND DEMINERALIZED HUMAN CORONAL DENTIN SLABS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RUBEN, J; ARENDS, J

    1993-01-01

    In this article a method is presented for dentine shrinkage measurements. The relative shrinkage of sound dentine slabs is assessed using a Perthometer with respect to a steel reference. The relative shrinkage of lesions in dentine slabs can be estimated using combined Perthometer/microradiography

  5. Identification of microcracks caused by autogenous shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Guang, Ye

    2005-01-01

    Detection and quantification of microcracks caused by restrained autogenous shrinkage in high-performance concrete is difficult. Available techniques either lack the required resolution or may cause further cracks indistinguishable from the original ones. The new technique presented in this paper...... allows detection of microcracks while avoiding artifacts induced by unwanted restraint, drying or temperature variations. The technique consists of casting small circular cylindrical samples of cement pastes in silicone moulds. Steel rods of different diameters are cast into the cement paste to restrain...... the autogenous shrinkage and cause crack formation during hardening. Subsequently, liquid gallium is intruded into the cracks under pressure. After solidification of the gallium, the crack pattern is frozen and can be analyzed after plane polishing of the samples. The microcracks are identified by optical...

  6. Compensating For Shrinkage In A Cryogenic Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Arnold E.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed design for seals in liquid-hydrogen plumbing eliminates leaks caused by contraction of seals at low operating temperature. Each seal consists of rubber, polytetrafluorethylene, or lead O-ring including hollow core filled with water. At temperature of liquid hydrogen, anomalous expansion of water keeps seal gland filled and leaktight despite shrinkage of surrounding O-ring material. Design also used in systems using cryogenic fluids other than liquid hydrogen.

  7. Shrinkage measurement for holographic recording materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, R.; Gallego, S.; Márquez, A.; Francés, J.; Navarro Fuster, V.; Neipp, C.; Ortuño, M.; Beléndez, A.; Pascual, I.

    2017-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for new holographic recording materials. One of them are photopolymers, which are becoming a classic media in this field. Their versatility is well known and new possibilities are being created by including new components, such as nanoparticles or dispersed liquid crystal molecules in classical formulations, making them interesting for additional applications in which the thin film preparation and the structural modification have a fundamental importance. Prior to obtaining a wide commercialization of displays based on photopolymers, one of the key aspects is to achieve a complete characterization of them. In this sense, one of the main parameters to estimate and control is the shrinkage of these materials. The volume variations change the angular response of the hologram in two aspects, the angular selectivity and the maximum diffraction efficiency. One criteria for the recording material to be used in a holographic data storage application is the shrinkage, maximum of 0.5%. Along this work, we compare two different methods to measure the holographic recording material shrinkage. The first one is measuring the angle of propagation for both diffracted orders +/-1 when slanted gratings are recorded, so that an accurate value of the grating vector can be calculated. The second one is based on interference measurements at zero spatial frequency limit. We calculate the shrinkage for three different photopolymers: a polyvinyl alcohol acrylamide (PVA/AA) based photopolymer, one of the greenest photopolymers whose patent belongs to the Alicante University called Biophotopol and on the last place a holographic-dispersed liquid crystal photopolymer (H-PDLC).

  8. Nearest shrunken centroids via alternative genewise shrinkages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong Yeob Choi

    Full Text Available Nearest shrunken centroids (NSC is a popular classification method for microarray data. NSC calculates centroids for each class and "shrinks" the centroids toward 0 using soft thresholding. Future observations are then assigned to the class with the minimum distance between the observation and the (shrunken centroid. Under certain conditions the soft shrinkage used by NSC is equivalent to a LASSO penalty. However, this penalty can produce biased estimates when the true coefficients are large. In addition, NSC ignores the fact that multiple measures of the same gene are likely to be related to one another. We consider several alternative genewise shrinkage methods to address the aforementioned shortcomings of NSC. Three alternative penalties were considered: the smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD, the adaptive LASSO (ADA, and the minimax concave penalty (MCP. We also showed that NSC can be performed in a genewise manner. Classification methods were derived for each alternative shrinkage method or alternative genewise penalty, and the performance of each new classification method was compared with that of conventional NSC on several simulated and real microarray data sets. Moreover, we applied the geometric mean approach for the alternative penalty functions. In general the alternative (genewise penalties required fewer genes than NSC. The geometric mean of the class-specific prediction accuracies was improved, as well as the overall predictive accuracy in some cases. These results indicate that these alternative penalties should be considered when using NSC.

  9. Precise measurement of photoresist cross-sectional shape change caused by SEM-induced shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    The mechanism of photoresist shrinkage induced by electron-beam (EB) irradiation was studied. A precise cross-sectional profile of a photoresist pattern was obtained by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) after atomic layer deposition of HfO2 on the sample patterns. Photoresist lines and spaces fabricated with positive-tone development and negative-tone development were exposed to an EB with much higher dose than a practical dose (to accelerate shrinkage intentionally). The obtained STEM images of the patterns before and after EB irradiation show that the shrinkage of the negative-tone-developed patterns is smaller than that of the positive-tone-developed patterns. This observation is explained by the fact that negative-tone-developed photoresist molecules do not contain protection groups, whose volatilization caused by EB irradiation is one of the origins of shrinkage. Another finding is that the EB irradiation causes top-rounding and necking of the pattern profile as well as linewidth slimming. The rounding of the pattern top profile suggests that the pattern's shape was elastically deformed. In addition, EB irradiation only onto the spaces caused sidewall shrinkage and a necking profile, although no electrons were irradiated directly onto the pattern. These phenomena are considered to be due to the electrons scattered from the spaces to the pattern sidewall. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation of electron scattering showed that the distribution of the deposited EB energy on the pattern surface corresponds to the above-described change in pattern shape. Consequently, these observations and simulation results clarify the importance of the effect of elastic shape change and the impact of the electrons scattered from the underlying layer onto the sidewall in the mechanism of photoresist shrinkage.

  10. Polymerization shrinkage assessment of dental resin composites: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisarly, Dalia; Gezawi, Moataz El

    2016-09-01

    Composite restorations are widely used worldwide, but the polymerization shrinkage is their main disadvantage that may lead to clinical failures and adverse consequences. This review reports, currently available in vitro techniques and methods used for assessing the polymerization shrinkage. The focus lies on recent methods employing three-dimensional micro-CT data for the evaluation of polymerization shrinkage: volumetric measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation through tracing particles before and after polymerization. Original research articles reporting in vitro shrinkage measurements and shrinkage stresses were included in electronic and hand-search. Earlier methods are easier, faster and less expensive. The procedures of scanning the samples in the micro-CT and performing the shrinkage vector evaluation are time consuming and complicated. Moreover, the respective software is not commercially available and the various methods for shrinkage vector evaluation are based on different mathematical principles. Nevertheless, these methods provide clinically relevant information and give insight into the internal shrinkage behavior of composite applied in cavities and how boundary conditions affect the shrinkage vectors. The traditional methods give comparative information on polymerization shrinkage of resin composites, whereas using three-dimensional micro-CT data for volumetric shrinkage measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation is a highly accurate method. The methods employing micro-CT data give the researchers knowledge related to the application method and the boundary conditions of restorations for visualizing the shrinkage effects that could not be seen otherwise. Consequently, this knowledge can be transferred to the clinical situation to optimize the material manipulation and application techniques for improved outcomes.

  11. Comparative Study of Shrinkage and Non-Shrinkage Model of Food Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahari, N.; Jamil, N.; Rasmani, KA.

    2016-08-01

    A single phase heat and mass model has always been used to represent the moisture and temperature distribution during the drying of food. Several effects of the drying process, such as physical and structural changes, have been considered in order to increase understanding of the movement of water and temperature. However, the comparison between the heat and mass equation with and without structural change (in terms of shrinkage), which can affect the accuracy of the prediction model, has been little investigated. In this paper, two mathematical models to describe the heat and mass transfer in food, with and without the assumption of structural change, were analysed. The equations were solved using the finite difference method. The converted coordinate system was introduced within the numerical computations for the shrinkage model. The result shows that the temperature with shrinkage predicts a higher temperature at a specific time compared to that of the non-shrinkage model. Furthermore, the predicted moisture content decreased faster at a specific time when the shrinkage effect was included in the model.

  12. Distinct spontaneous shrinkage of a sporadic vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2013-01-01

    We present a case with outspoken spontaneous vestibular schwannoma shrinkage and review the related literature. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left-sided, intrameatal vestibular schwannoma, which subsequently grew into the cerebello-pontine angle (CPA), followed by total shrinkage...... of the CPA component without any intervention over a 12-year observation period. The literature on spontaneous tumor shrinkage was retrieved by searching the subject terms "vestibular schwannoma, conservative management" in PubMed/MEDLINE database, without a time limit. Of the published data, the articles...... on "shrinkage" or "negative growth" or "regression" or "involution" of the tumor were selected, and the contents on the rate, extent and mechanism of spontaneous tumor shrinkage were extracted and reviewed. The reported rate of spontaneous shrinkage of vestibular schwannoma is 5-10% of patients managed...

  13. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  14. Influence of Shrinkage-Reducing Admixtures on the Development of Plastic Shrinkage Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Pease, Bradley Justin; Mazzotta, Guy

    2007-01-01

    -reducing admixture (SRA). Mortars containing SRA show fewer and narrower plastic shrinkage cracks than plain mortars when exposed to the same environmental conditions. It is proposed that the lower surface tension of the pore fluid in the mortars containing SRA results in less evaporation, reduced settlement...

  15. Static and dynamic photoresist shrinkage effects in EUV photoresists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Montgomery, Cecilia; Montgomery, Warren; Cordes, Aaron

    2012-03-01

    Photoresist shrinkage (a.k.a. line slimming) is an important systematic uncertainty source in critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) metrology of lithographic features [1][2][3][4][5]. In terms of metrology gauge metrics, it influences both the precision and the accuracy of CD-SEM measurements, while locally damaging the sample. Minimization or elimination of shrinkage is desirable, yet elusive. This error source will furthermore be a factor in CDSEM metrology on such polymer materials into the era of EUV lithography, such that learning to work around this issue will continue to be necessary. Recent work has demonstrated improved understanding of the trends in the shrinkage response depending on electron beam and target parameters in the static measurement case [2][3][4][5][6]. Another recent work has highlighted a second mode of shrinkage that is apparent over time and progresses as a function of time between consecutive measurements, a form of "dynamic shrinkage" that appears to be activated by electron beam, in which the activated feature perpetually and logarithmically shrinks [7][8]. In this work, we will explore both the static and dynamic shrinkage behaviors of various EUV photoresists. The static shrinkage behaviors will be tested for compliance with the SEMATECH shrinkage model [5][6], and further studies will confirm whether or not the dynamic effects are observable. Knowledge of secondary trends in dynamic shrinkage will also be further explored, including how these vary with electron beam energy, activation dose, feature size, and other parameters.

  16. Drying Shrinkage Microcracking in Cement-based Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, J.; Van Mier, J.G.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the nature of drying shrinkage microcracking in a variety of model cementbased materials, as well as in more practical types of concrete is described. The model mixtures were studied to elucidate the mechanisms of drying shrinkage microcracking and the factors that influence these

  17. Finite element analysis of moisture migration, creep, shrinkage and cracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Borst, R. de; Rots, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    A finite element formulation is presented for the analysis of moisture migra-tion, creep, shrinkage and cracking in cementitious materials. A one-way coupled approach is followed, where the pore humidity, the driving force for shrinkage, is solved for from a diffusion equation. The evolution of the

  18. Coping with shrinkage in Europe's cities and towns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, Gerrit J.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of cities and towns in Europe are facing population decline. In this article we focus on the challenges of this urban shrinkage process from a policy perspective. After a short review of the main causes and consequences of urban shrinkage in Europe, two common public policy

  19. Plastic shrinkage of mortars with shrinkage reducing admixture and lightweight aggregates studied by neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrzykowski, Mateusz, E-mail: mateusz.wyrzykowski@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lodz University of Technology, Department of Building Physics and Building Materials, Lodz (Poland); Trtik, Pavel [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Villigen (Switzerland); Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Münch, Beat [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Weiss, Jason [Purdue University, School of Civil Engineering, West Lafayette (United States); Vontobel, Peter [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Villigen (Switzerland); Lura, Pietro [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Institute for Building Materials (IfB), Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Water transport in fresh, highly permeable concrete and rapid water evaporation from the concrete surface during the first few hours after placement are the key parameters influencing plastic shrinkage cracking. In this work, neutron tomography was used to determine both the water loss from the concrete surface due to evaporation and the redistribution of fluid that occurs in fresh mortars exposed to external drying. In addition to the reference mortar with a water to cement ratio (w/c) of 0.30, a mortar with the addition of pre-wetted lightweight aggregates (LWA) and a mortar with a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) were tested. The addition of SRA reduced the evaporation rate from the mortar at the initial stages of drying and reduced the total water loss. The pre-wetted LWA released a large part of the absorbed water as a consequence of capillary pressure developing in the fresh mortar due to evaporation.

  20. Reduction of the Early Autogenous Shrinkage of High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Saje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a laboratory investigation on the early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concrete, and the possibilities of its reduction, are presented. Such concrete demonstrates significant autogenous shrinkage, which should, however, be limited in the early stages of its development in order to prevent the occurrence of cracks and/or drop in the load-carrying capacity of concrete structures. The following possibilities for reducing autogenous shrinkage were investigated: the use of low-heat cement, a shrinkage-reducing admixture, steel fibres, premoistened polypropylene fibres, and presoaked lightweight aggregate. In the case of the use of presoaked natural lightweight aggregate, with a fraction from 2 to 4 mm, the early autogenous shrinkage of one-day-old high strength concrete decreased by about 90%, with no change to the concrete's compressive strength in comparison with that of the reference concrete.

  1. SPSS explained

    CERN Document Server

    Hinton, Perry R; Brownlow, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    SPSS Explained provides the student with all that they need to undertake statistical analysis using SPSS. It combines a step-by-step approach to each procedure with easy to follow screenshots at each stage of the process. A number of other helpful features are provided: regular advice boxes with tips specific to each test explanations divided into 'essential' and 'advanced' sections to suit readers at different levels frequently asked questions at the end of each chapter. The first edition of this popular book has been fully updated for IBM SPSS version 21 and also includes: chapters that expl

  2. Effective Expansion: Balance between Shrinkage and Hygroscopic Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, E A; Watson, L E; Tantbirojn, D; Lou, J S B; Versluis, A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hygroscopic expansion and polymerization shrinkage for compensation of polymerization shrinkage stresses in a restored tooth. One resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), 2 compomers (Dyract, Dentsply; Compoglass, Ivoclar), and a universal resin-based composite (Esthet•X HD, Dentsply) were tested. Volumetric change after polymerization ("total shrinkage") and during 4 wk of water storage at 37°C was measured using an optical method (n= 10). Post-gel shrinkage was measured during polymerization using a strain gauge method (n= 10). Extracted human molars with large mesio-occluso-distal slot preparations were restored with the tested restorative materials. Tooth surfaces at baseline (preparation), after restoration, and during 4 wk of 37°C water storage were scanned with an optical scanner to determine cuspal flexure (n= 8). Occlusal interface integrity was measured using dye penetration. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and post hoc tests (significance level 0.05). All tested materials shrunk after polymerization. RMGI had the highest total shrinkage (4.65%) but lowest post-gel shrinkage (0.35%). Shrinkage values dropped significantly during storage in water but had not completely compensated polymerization shrinkage after 4 wk. All restored teeth initially exhibited inward (negative) cuspal flexure due to polymerization shrinkage. Cuspal flexure with the RMGI restoration was significantly less (-6.4 µm) than with the other materials (-12.1 to -14.1 µm). After 1 d, cuspal flexure reversed to +5.0 µm cuspal expansion with the RMGI and increased to +9.3 µm at 4 wk. After 4 wk, hygroscopic expansion compensated cuspal flexure in a compomer (Compoglass) and reduced flexure with Dyract and resin-based composite. Marginal integrity (93.7% intact restoration wall) was best for the Compoglass restorations and lowest (73.1%) for the RMGI restorations. Hygroscopic

  3. Shrinkage singularities of amplitudes and weak interaction cross- section asymptotic

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, A D; Okun, Lev Borisovich

    1972-01-01

    The so called shrinkage singularities of amplitudes caused by shrinkage of diffraction peak at asymptotically high energies are discussed given the condition that the amplitude singularities are not stronger than t/sup 2/ ln t (as is case for neutrino pair exchange diagrams) then total cross-section sigma /sub tot/ cannot increase faster at s to infinity than s/sup 1/3/. If shrinkage singularities are absent then sigma /sub tot/ cannot increase as any power of s. All the conclusions are valid, if the dispersion relations with finite number of subtractions exist at t

  4. Hysteresis from Multiscale Porosity: Modeling Water Sorption and Shrinkage in Cement Paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinson, Matthew B.; Masoero, Enrico; Bonnaud, Patrick A.; Manzano, Hegoi; Ji, Qing; Yip, Sidney; Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Bazant, Martin Z.; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Jennings, Hamlin M.

    2015-06-01

    Cement paste has a complex distribution of pores and molecular-scale spaces. This distribution controls the hysteresis of water sorption isotherms and associated bulk dimensional changes (shrinkage). We focus on two locations of evaporable water within the fine structure of pastes, each having unique properties, and we present applied physics models that capture the hysteresis by dividing drying and rewetting into two related regimes based on relative humidity (RH). We show that a continuum model, incorporating a pore-blocking mechanism for desorption and equilibrium thermodynamics for adsorption, explains well the sorption hysteresis for a paste that remains above approximately 20% RH. In addition, we show with molecular models and experiments that water in spaces of ≲1 nm width evaporates below approximately 20% RH but reenters throughout the entire RH range. This water is responsible for a drying shrinkage hysteresis similar to that of clays but opposite in direction to typical mesoporous glass. Combining the models of these two regimes allows the entire drying and rewetting hysteresis to be reproduced accurately and provides parameters to predict the corresponding dimensional changes. The resulting model can improve the engineering predictions of long-term drying shrinkage accounting also for the history dependence of strain induced by hysteresis. Alternative strategies for quantitative analyses of the microstructure of cement paste based on this mesoscale physical model of water content within porous spaces are discussed.

  5. Non-uniform shrinkage of multiple-walled carbon nanotubes under in situ electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lunxiong [South China Normal University, Brain Science Institute, Guangzhou (China); Xiamen University, China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Functional Nanomaterials and Physics Department, Xiamen (China); Su, Jiangbin [Xiamen University, China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Functional Nanomaterials and Physics Department, Xiamen (China); Chang Zhou University, School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou (China); Zhu, Xianfang [Xiamen University, China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Functional Nanomaterials and Physics Department, Xiamen (China)

    2016-10-15

    Instability of multiple-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated by in situ transmission electron microscopy at room temperature. Specially, the non-uniform shrinkage of tubes was found: The pristine MWCNT shrank preferentially in its axial direction from the most curved free cap end of the tube, but the shrinkage of the tube diameter was offset by the axial shrinkage: For the complex MWCNT, the two inner MWCNTs also preferentially axially shrank from their most curved cap ends and separated from each other. However, for the effect of the radial pressure from the out walls which enveloped the two inner tubes and the tube amorphization, the two inner tubes were extruded to come close to each other and finally touched again. The new ''evaporation'' and ''diffusion'' mechanisms of carbon atoms as driven by the nano-curvature of CNT and the electron beam-induced athermal activation were suggested to explain the above phenomena. (orig.)

  6. Mesoscopic analysis of drying shrinkage damage in a cementitious material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moonen, P.; Pedersen, R.R.; Simone, A.

    2008-01-01

    Concrete and cement-based materials exhibit shrinkage when exposed to drying. Structural effects and inhomogeneity of material properties adverse free shrinkage, hereby inducing stress concentrations and possibly damage. In this contribution, the magnitude of shrinkage- induced damage during...... a typical sample preparation procedure is assessed. To this extent, a coupled hygro-thermo-mechanical model, incorporating rate-effects, is developed. The constitutive model is applied at a mesoscopic level where the aggregates and the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) are explicitly modelled. Two drying...... temperatures are considered: 35 °C and 50 °C. Significantly more micro-damage and higher internal stresses are found for the latter, revealing the importance of drying shrinkage damage, even at laboratory scale....

  7. Development of spraying agent for reducing drying shrinkage of mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiromi; Maruoka, Masanori; Liu, Lingling

    2017-02-01

    Mortar used to repair is sometimes exposed to drying state in early ages after construction and a few days later water is sprayed frequently on the surface of the mortar in order to prevent cracks. This research studied on shrinkage characteristic of mortar subjected to drying conditions like this. The result showed that the water spraying on the mortar after initial drying did not have any effect to prevent shrinkage, but increased. And it also showed when various chemical agents are mixed and used in watersprayingit had the prevention effect on shrinkage. This report was to understand this kind of phenomenon and clarify the mechanism. In addition, based on the results, the new spraying agent was developed to reduce drying shrinkage.

  8. Creep and Shrinkage of High Strength Concretes: an Experimental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice Martins Toralles carbonari

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The creep and shrinkage behaviour of high strength silica fume concretes is significantly different from that of conventional concretes. In order to represent the proper time-dependent response of the material in structural analysis and design, these aspects should be adequately quantified. This paper discusses an experimental setup that is able to determine the creep and shrinkage of concrete from the time of placing. It also compares different gages that can be used for measuring the strains. The method is applied to five different concretes in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. The phenomena that are quantified can be classified as basic shrinkage, drying shrinkage, basic creep and drying creep. The relative importance of these mechanisms in high strength concrete will also be presented.

  9. Physical properties of safflower grains. Part II: Volumetric shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton A. S. Martins

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Agricultural products usually have their size reduced during the drying process. The quantification of the reduction in the dimensions is important for the development and optimization of equipment for the post-harvest of the product. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the variation in the moisture content during drying on the volumetric shrinkage of safflower grains and their respective axes. Safflower grains were harvested with an initial moisture content of approximately 0.445 decimal d.b. (dry basis and subjected to drying in an oven with forced air circulation at 40 °C, until the grains reached a final moisture content of 0.073 ± 0.008 decimal d.b. During drying, the contraction of the axes, unit volumetric shrinkage and volumetric shrinkage of the mass of safflower grains were determined at different moisture contents. Based on these results, it can be concluded that reducing the moisture content causes a reduction in the axes of safflower grains and, consequently, reductions in the unit volumetric shrinkage and volumetric shrinkage of the mass of approximately 16 and 13%, respectively, and both variables can be represented by the linear shrinkage model.

  10. Method of Preventing Shrinkage of Aluminum Foam Using Carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakamura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams are commonly produced using titanium hydride as a foaming agent. Carbonates produce aluminum foam with a fine and homogenous cell structure. However, foams produced using carbonates show marked shrinkage, which is clearly different from those produced using titanium hydride. It is essential for practical applications to clarify foam shrinkage and establish a method of preventing it. In this research, cell structures were observed to study the shrinkage of aluminum foam produced using carbonates. The cells of foam produced using dolomite as a foaming agent connected to each other with maximum expansion. It was estimated that foaming gas was released through connected cells to the outside. It was assumed that cell formation at different sites is effective in preventing shrinkage induced by cell connection. The multiple additions of dolomite and magnesium carbonate, which have different decomposition temperatures, were applied. The foam in the case with multiple additions maintained a density of 0.66 up to 973 K, at which the foam produced using dolomite shrank. It was verified that the multiple additions of carbonates are effective in preventing shrinkage.

  11. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Influence of shrinkage-reducing admixture on drying shrinkage and mechanical properties of high-performance concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Quangphu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: High-performance concrete (HPC has specific performance advantages over conventional concrete in strength and durability. HPC mixtures are usually produced with water/binder mass ratios (mW/mB in the range of 0.2-0.4, so volume changes of concrete as a result of drying, chemical reactions, and temperature change cannot be avoided. For these reasons, shrinkage and cracking are frequent phenomena. It is necessary to add some types of admixture for reduction of shrinkage and cracking of HPC. This study used a shrinkage-reducing admixture (SRA for that purpose. Concrete was prepared with two different mW/mB (0.22 and 0.40 and four different mass fractions of SRA to binder (w(SRA = 0%, 1%, 2%, and 4%. The mineral admixtures used for concrete mixes were: 25% fly ash (FA and 25% slag by mass of binder for the mixture with mW/mB = 0.40, and 15% silica fume (SF and 25% FA for the mixture with mW/mB = 0.22. Tests were conducted on 24 prismatic specimens, and shrinkage strains were measured through 120 days of drying. Compressive strength, splitting strength, and static modulus of elasticity were also determined. The results show that the SRA effectively reduces some mechanical properties of HPC. The reductions in compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and elastic modulus of the concrete were 7%-24%, 9%-19%, and 5%-12%, respectively, after 90 days, compared to concrete mixtures without SRA. SRA can also help reduce drying shrinkage of concrete. The shrinkage strains of HPC with SRA were only as high as 41% of the average free shrinkage of concrete without SRA after 120 days of drying.

  13. Linear Shrinkage Behaviour of Compacted Loam Masonry Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAWAB ALI LAKHO

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Walls of wet loam, used in earthen houses, generally experience more shrinkage which results in cracks and less compressive strength. This paper presents a technique of producing loam masonry blocks that are compacted in drained state during casting process in order to minimize shrinkage. For this purpose, loam masonry blocks were cast and compacted at a pressure of 6 MPa and then dried in shade by covering them in plastic sheet. The results show that linear shrinkage of 2% occurred which is smaller when compared to un-compacted wet loam walls. This implies that the loam masonry blocks compacted in drained state is expected to perform better than un-compacted wet loam walls.

  14. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...... seven days, dilatometers were manually recorded during at least 56 days. The dispersion model was applied to fit chemical shrinkage results and to estimate the maximum (or ultimate) value for calculation of degree of hydration. Except for a pure Portland cement best fits were obtained by the general...... form of the dispersion model. The development of hydration varied between the investigated cements; based on the measured data the degree of hydration after 24 h hydration at 20 C varied between 40 and 50%. This should be taken into account when comparing properties of concrete made from the different...

  15. Improving the Incoherence of a Learned Dictionary via Rank Shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaru, Shashanka; Seghouane, Abd-Krim; Saad, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    This letter considers the problem of dictionary learning for sparse signal representation whose atoms have low mutual coherence. To learn such dictionaries, at each step, we first update the dictionary using the method of optimal directions (MOD) and then apply a dictionary rank shrinkage step to decrease its mutual coherence. In the rank shrinkage step, we first compute a rank 1 decomposition of the column-normalized least squares estimate of the dictionary obtained from the MOD step. We then shrink the rank of this learned dictionary by transforming the problem of reducing the rank to a nonnegative garrotte estimation problem and solving it using a path-wise coordinate descent approach. We establish theoretical results that show that the rank shrinkage step included will reduce the coherence of the dictionary, which is further validated by experimental results. Numerical experiments illustrating the performance of the proposed algorithm in comparison to various other well-known dictionary learning algorithms are also presented.

  16. Limitation of Shrinkage Porosity in Aluminum Rotor Die Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Chan; Choi, Se-Weon; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Jae-Ik; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kang, Chang-Seog

    Aluminum rotor prone to have many casting defects especially large amount of air and shrinkage porosity, which caused eccentricity, loss and noise during motor operation. Many attempts have been made to develop methods of shrinkage porosity control, but still there are some problems to solve. In this research, the process of vacuum squeeze die casting is proposed for limitation of defects. The 6 pin point gated dies which were in capable of local squeeze at the end ring were used. Influences of filling patterns on HPDC were evaluated and the important process control parameters were high injection speed, squeeze length, venting and process conditions. By using local squeeze and vacuum during filling and solidification, air and shrinkage porosity were significantly reduced and the feeding efficiency at the upper end ring was improved 10%. As a result of controlling the defects, the dynamometer test showed improved motor efficiency by more than 4%.

  17. Shrinkage-stress kinetics of photopolymerised resin-composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Julian D.

    The use of directly-placed substances as restorative materials in teeth remains the technique of choice for preserving function and form in teeth that have cavities. The current aesthetic restorative materials of choice are resin-composite materials, although these undergo molecular densification during polymerisation, which has deleterious effects. Although shrinkage-strain is the cause, it is the shrinkage-stress effects that may be seen as being responsible for the problems with adhesive resin-based restorations that are encountered clinically, the bond may fail with separation of the material from the cavity wall, leading to marginal discolouration, pulpal irritation and subsequent necrosis, post operative sensitivity, recurrent caries and eventual failure of restorations. Other outcomes include cohesive fracture of enamel or cusps, cuspal movement (strain) and persistent pain. The aims of this research were to characterise the effects of variations in resin-composite formulation on shrinkage-strain and shrinkage-stress kinetics. In particular, the influence of the size and morphology of the dispersed phase was investigated through the study of experimental formulations. Polymerisation shrinkage-strain kinetics were assessed with the bonded-disk method. It was found that resin-composites with spherical filler particles had significantly lower shrinkage-strain compared to those with irregular filler particles. Additionally, shrinkage-strain was found to be dependent on the size of filler particle, and this trend was related, in part, to differences in the degree of conversion. The data were also used to calculate the activation energy for each material, and a relationship between this and filler particle size for the irregular fillers was demonstrated. A fixed-compliance cantilever beam instrument (Bioman) was used for characterisation of shrinkage-stress kinetics. Significant differences were identified between materials in relation to filler particle size and

  18. Self-compacting fine-grained concretes with compensated shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimov Lev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper substantiates the efficiency of application of fine-grained concrete for erection of cast-in-place concrete and reinforced concrete structures of different purpose. On the basis of analysis of experimental research results it was established that the introduction of microfillers with expansion effect to composite binder allows not only improving the rheological properties of fine-grained concrete, but also decreasing of value of shrinkage strain and improving of concrete crack resistance and durability. The analysis of the results of industrial use of fine-grained concretes with compensated shrinkage is given.

  19. Influence of shrinkage-reducing admixture on drying shrinkage and mechanical properties of high-performance concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Quangphu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High-performance concrete (HPC has specific performance advantages over conventional concrete in strength and durability. HPC mixtures are usually produced with water/binder mass ratios (mW/mB in the range of 0.2–0.4, so volume changes of concrete as a result of drying, chemical reactions, and temperature change cannot be avoided. For these reasons, shrinkage and cracking are frequent phenomena. It is necessary to add some types of admixture for reduction of shrinkage and cracking of HPC. This study used

  20. Drying and radial shrinkage characteristics and changes in color ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drying and radial shrinkage characteristics and changes in color and shape of carrots tissues during air drying were studied. Slices dimensions were obtained by computer vision and the color was quantified by chroma, hue, whitening index and total carotenoids contents. The drying time became shorter of 1 h when ...

  1. Preliminary Investigation of Drying Shrinkage Cement Paste Specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankovic, D.; Van Mier, J.G.M.

    2002-01-01

    In order to perform drying shrinkage observations in ESEM (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope), a preparation procedure for cement paste samples is developed. Instead of casting standard prisms (40 x 40 x 160 mm3), cement paste samples were cast in specially designed moulds of 30 x 30 x 2

  2. Magnetic nanoparticles-induced anisotropic shrinkage of polymer emulsion droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, B; de Folter, J.W.J.; Möhwald, H.

    2011-01-01

    We here report magnetic nanoparticles (NPs)-induced buckling instability and anisotropic shrinkage behavior of polymer emulsion droplets. The oil-in-water emulsion is stabilized by the surfactant, and NPs are dispersed into the oil phase. The surface ligands (oleic acid and oleylamine) number of the

  3. Fast generation of computer-generated holograms using wavelet shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2017-01-09

    Computer-generated holograms (CGHs) are generated by superimposing complex amplitudes emitted from a number of object points. However, this superposition process remains very time-consuming even when using the latest computers. We propose a fast calculation algorithm for CGHs that uses a wavelet shrinkage method, eliminating small wavelet coefficient values to express approximated complex amplitudes using only a few representative wavelet coefficients.

  4. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes. Part I: final-product assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    An experimental technique is presented to determine independently shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes based on photographic imaging of their top surface. An inverse correlation between cake shrinkage and cracking during freeze-drying is seen. Shrinkage relaxes the drying tension and gives little cracking, whereas if shrinkage is restrained then more cracking occurs. A lower shrinkage and greater cracking with higher disaccharide concentration correlates with change in cake hardness and brittleness. Adhesion of the cake to the inside vial wall could not be identified as a determining factor for shrinkage. Shrinkage is non-uniform across the cake's surface and is manifested largely in the peripheral region. A correlation between shrinkage and w(g)' for different disaccharides suggests that drying tension develops as non-frozen water is lost from the porous solid after sublimation of the ice phase has exposed the solid/gas interface. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  5. The Shrinkage Cracking Behavior in Reinforced Reactive Powder Concrete Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir A. Al-Mashhadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the reduced scale wall models were used (they are believed to resemble as much as possible the field conditions to study the shrinkage behavior of reactive powder concrete (RPC base restrained walls. Six base restrained RPC walls were casted in different length/height ratios of two ratios of steel fiber by volume in Summer. These walls were restrained by reinforced concrete bases to provide the continuous base restraint to the walls. The mechanical properties of reactive powder concrete investigated were; compressive strength between (75.3 – 140.1 MPa, splitting tensile strength between (5.7 – 13.9 MPa, flexural tensile strength (7.7 – 24.5 MPa, and static modulus of elasticity (32.7 – 47.1GPa. Based on the observations of this work, it was found that the cracks did not develop in the reduced scale of the reactive powder concrete (RPC walls restrained from movement at their bases for different L/H ratios (2, 5, and 10 and for two ratio of steel fiber (1% & 2% during 90 days period of drying conditions. Moreover, the shrinkage values increase toward the edges. Based on the results of this work, the increase in the maximum shrinkage values of walls with 1% steel fiber were (29%, 28%, 28% of the maximum shrinkage values of walls with 2% steel fiber of length/height ratios of (2, 5, and 10 respectively. The experimental observation in beam specimens showed that the free shrinkage, tensile strain capacity and elastic tensile strain capacity (at date of cracking of beams with 1% steel fiber were higher than the beams with 2% steel fiber by about (24%, (45% and (42% respectively

  6. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  7. Study of ‘real’ shrinkage by ESEM observations and digital image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankovic, D.

    2007-01-01

    Defining the 'real' shrinkage values of concrete is still a subject of much debate. In shrinkage experiments size effects are inherently present. Through an attempt to determine the real shrinkage of cement-based materials, these size effects have to be eliminated or at least reduced as much a

  8. Topology optimization of reinforced concrete structures considering control of shrinkage and strength failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yangjun; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhou, Mingdong

    2015-01-01

    To take into account the shrinkage effect in the early stage of Reinforced Concrete (RC) design, an effective continuum topology optimization method is presented in this paper. Based on the power-law interpolation, shrinkage of concrete is numerically simulated by introducing an additional design...... to ensure the structural safety under the combined action of external loads and shrinkage....

  9. Effects of Type of Work and Age on Spinal Shrinkage | Ismaila ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spine. The present study was aimed at studying the effects of different types of work on spinal shrinkage. Moreover, the relationship between age and spinal shrinkage was also studied. The heights just before the start and after the close of work were measured in order to determine the spinal shrinkage. The study confirmed ...

  10. New System of Shrinkage Measurement through Cement Mortars Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón, Carlos; Saiz, Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; García-Fuentevilla, Luisa

    2017-03-06

    Cement mortar is used as a conglomerate in the majority of construction work. There are multiple variants of cement according to the type of aggregate used in its fabrication. One of the major problems that occurs while working with this type of material is the excessive loss of moisture during cement hydration (setting and hardening), known as shrinkage, which provokes a great number of construction pathologies that are difficult to repair. In this way, the design of a new sensor able to measure the moisture loss of mortars at different age levels is useful to establish long-term predictions concerning mortar mass volume loss. The purpose of this research is the design and fabrication of a new capacitive sensor able to measure the moisture of mortars and to relate it with the shrinkage.

  11. Exploiting tumor shrinkage through temporal optimization of radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Unkelbach, Jan; Hong, Theodore; Papp, David; Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Salari, Ehsan; Wolfgang, John; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In multi-stage radiotherapy, a patient is treated in several stages separated by weeks or months. This regimen has been motivated mostly by radiobiological considerations, but also provides an approach to reduce normal tissue dose by exploiting tumor shrinkage. The paper considers the optimal design of multi-stage treatments, motivated by the clinical management of large liver tumors for which normal liver dose constraints prohibit the administration of an ablative radiation dose in a single treatment. We introduce a dynamic tumor model that incorporates three factors: radiation induced cell kill, tumor shrinkage, and tumor cell repopulation. The design of multi-stage radiotherapy is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem in which the total dose to the liver is minimized, subject to delivering the prescribed dose to the tumor. Based on the model, we gain insight into the optimal administration of radiation over time, i.e. the optimal treatment gaps and dose levels. We analyze treatments consisting ...

  12. Analysis of Shrinkage on Thick Plate Part using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najihah S.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection moulding is the most widely used processes in manufacturing plastic products. Since the quality of injection improves plastic parts are mostly influenced by process conditions, the method to determine the optimum process conditions becomes the key to improving the part quality. This paper presents a systematic methodology to analyse the shrinkage of the thick plate part during the injection moulding process. Genetic Algorithm (GA method was proposed to optimise the process parameters that would result in optimal solutions of optimisation goals. Using the GA, the shrinkage of the thick plate part was improved by 39.1% in parallel direction and 17.21% in the normal direction of melt flow.

  13. The Process of Shrinkage as a Challenge to Urban Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stryjakiewicz Tadeusz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For many decades most researchers, planners and local authorities have been focusing almost exclusively on urban growth and its socio-economic and spatial consequences. However, in the current debate concerning the future of cities and regions in Europe the process of their shrinkage starts to attract more attention. In the conditions of a declining population, urban governance is an important challenge for local authorities, being usually much more difficult than during the periods of population growth.

  14. Spinal shrinkage in unloaded and loaded drop-jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, N E; Lees, A; Reilly, T

    1994-01-01

    Plyometric activities, engaging the muscle in a stretch-shortening cycle, are widely used in athletic training. One such plyometric exercise is drop-jumping, where the athlete drops from a raised platform and immediately on landing performs a maximal vertical jump. These actions are also performed with the athlete externally loaded by the addition of weights to provide greater resistance. Exercises which involve repeated impacts have been shown to give rise to a loss of stature (shrinkage) which can be measured by means of a sensitive stadiometer. This study examined the shrinkage induced by unloaded and loaded drop-jumping from a height of 26 cm. Eight male subjects, aged 20-24 years, performed the test protocol three times, at the same time of day on each occasion. Fifty drop-jumps from a height of 26 cm were performed with no additional load and with a load of 8.5 kg carried in a weighted vest. The third condition was a standing trial where the subject stood for 10 min (the time taken to perform the jumps) wearing the weighted vest. Stature was measured before exercise, immediately after exercise and after a 20 min standing recovery. On a separate occasion the regimen was performed and the vertical reaction force was measured using a Kistler force platform. The mean change in stature for the two jump conditions showed shrinkages of 0.62 (+/- 0.43) mm for unloaded and 2.14 (+/- 1.56) mm for the loaded (p < 0.05). The variance in shrinkage was greater in the loaded case compared to the unloaded condition (p < 0.05) indicating a wider range of jumping strategies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. PREDIKSI SHRINKAGE UNTUK MENGHINDARI CACAT PRODUK PADA PLASTIC INJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Dwi Anggono

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Plastic injection merupakan proses manufactur untuk membuat produk dengan bahan dasar plastic atau dalam kesempatan ini polypropylene. Pada proses tersebut seringkali terjadi cacat produk seperti pengerutan, retak, dimensi tidak sesuai dan kerusakan saat produk keluar dari mould, sehingga banyak material yang terbuang percuma. Meskipun cacat produk tersebut dipengaruhi banyak factor, tetapi yang paling utama adalah masalah shrinkage, atau penyusutan material setelah terjadi pendinginan. Sangat penting untuk melakukan prediksi lebih awal terjadinya penyusutan setelah pendinginan untuk menghindari cacat produk. Dalam penelitian ini akan dilakukan prediksi shrinkage yang akan digunakan untuk material polypropylene dengan cara perhitungan standar. Pembuatan modeling dalam bentuk 3D (tiga dimensi injection molding baik cavity maupun corenya dengan menggunakan CATIA, kemudian dilakukan analisis dengan software MoldFlow untuk pembuatan mesh dan memberikan batasan panas pada komponen sehingga dapat diketahui mode penyusutannya. Analisis ini akan memberikan gambaran tentang distribusi panas pada mould dan memberikan tentang gambaran aliran fluida. Pada analisis tersebut dapat dilihat gejala terjadinya cacat produk, jika hal itu terjadi maka perlu dilakukan perubahan shrinkage, sampai diperoleh hasil analisis yang baik.

  16. Experimental Analysis on Shrinkage and Swelling in Ordinary Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kucharczyková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the experimental determination of shrinkage development during concrete ageing. Three concrete mixtures were made. They differed in the amount of cement in the fresh mixture, 300, 350, and 400 kg/m3. In order to determine the influence of plasticiser on the progress of volume changes, another three concrete mixtures were prepared with plasticiser in the amount of 0.25% by cement mass. Measurements were performed with the goal of observing the influence of cement and plasticiser content on the overall development of volume changes in the concrete. Changes in length and mass losses of the concrete during ageing were measured simultaneously. The continuous measurement of concrete mass losses caused by drying of the specimen’s surface proved useful during the interpretation of results obtained from the concrete shrinkage measurement. During the first 24 hours of ageing, all the concrete mixtures exhibited swelling. Its magnitude and progress were influenced by cement, water, and plasticiser content. However, a loss of mass caused by water evaporation from the surface of the specimens was also recorded in this stage. The measured progress of shrinkage corresponded well to the progress of mass loss.

  17. Prediction of Prestressing Losses by Concrete Creep and Shrinkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, S.K. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-07-01

    In this study, the personal-computer program was developed to predict prestressing losses of containment structures induced by concrete creep and shrinkage in nuclear power plants. Thie program is composed of three major parts in which are the pre-processor, calculation module and post-processor. Input data for this program are: material properties of concrete, rebar, liner and duct, test results of concrete creep and shrinkage, relative humidity, dimension of containment structures, and the number of prestressing tendon related in containment structures. To obtain better results, this program was designed to reflect the prestressing losses due to influence that occurred after prestressing of each tendon, thus it can predict prestressing losses and allowable prestressing forces of each tendon. As a case study, this program was applied to containment structures of Youngkwang 3 and 4 NPP's and analytical results were compared with test results in Inservice Inspection of containment structures. From this comparison, it was proved that this program could well predict prestressing losses by concrete creep and shrinkage. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Controlled Shrinkage of Expanded Glass Particles in Metal Syntactic Foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sahlani, Kadhim; Taherishargh, Mehdi; Kisi, Erich; Fiedler, Thomas

    2017-09-13

    Metal matrix syntactic foams have been fabricated via counter-gravity infiltration of a packed bed of recycled expanded glass particles (EG) with A356 aluminum alloy. Particle shrinkage was studied and has been utilized to increase the particles' strength and tailor the mechanical properties of the expanded glass/metal syntactic foam (EG-MSF). The crushing strength of particles could be doubled by shrinking them for 20 min at 700 °C. Owing to the low density of EG (0.20-0.26 g/cm³), the resulting foam exhibits a low density (1.03-1.19 g/cm³) that increases slightly due to particle shrinkage. Chemical and physical analyses of EG particles and the resulting foams were conducted. Furthermore, metal syntactic foam samples were tested in uni-axial compression tests. The stress-strain curves obtained exhibit three distinct regions: elastic deformation followed by a stress plateau and densification commencing at 70-80% macroscopic strain. Particle shrinkage increased the mechanical strength of the foam samples and their average plateau stress increased from 15.5 MPa to 26.7 MPa.

  19. Shrinkage of vitreous body caused by hydroxyl radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Myoung Joo; Shimada, Takashi; Matuo, Yoichirou; Akiyama, Yoko; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Nishijima, Shigehiro [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    In the study, we examined the effect of hydroxyl radical generated by {gamma}-ray and UV irradiation on shrinkage of vitreous body. Change in gel ratio of vitreous body and change in the properties of its components (collagen, sodium hyaluronate) were analyzed. By comparing these results, the amount of hydroxyl radical, which induces the considerable shrinkage of vitreous body, was evaluated from theoretical calculation based on experimental condition and some reported kinetic parameters. It was concluded that the integrated amount of hydroxyl radical required to liquefy half of the vitreous body (vitreous body gel ratio = 50%) was estimated as 140 {mu}molg{sup -1} from {gamma}-ray irradiation experiment. Also, from UV irradiation experiment result, it was confirmed that the effect of hydroxyl radical is larger than that of other reactive species. The causes of shrinkage of vitreous body are supposed as follows, 1) decrease in viscosity by cleavage of glycoside bond in sodium hyaluronate, 2) leaching of collagen from vitreous body and 3) leaching of crosslinked products and scission products of collagen.

  20. Influence of length-to-diameter ratio on shrinkage of basalt fiber concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijie, MA; Yang, Jiansen; Liu, Yuan; Zheng, Xiaojun

    2017-09-01

    In order to study the shrinkage performance of basalt concrete, using the shrinkage rate as index, the work not only studied the influence of different length-to-diameter ratio (LDR) on plastic shrinkage and drying shrinkage of basalt fiber concrete, but also analyzed the action mechanism. The results show that when the fiber content is 0.1%, the LDR of 800 and 1200 take better effects on reducing plastic shrinkage, however the fiber content is 0.3%, that of LDR 600 is better. To improve drying shrinkage, the fiber of LDR 800 takes best effect. In the concrete structure, the adding basalt fibers form a uniform and chaotic supporting system, optimize the pore and the void structure of concrete, make the material further compacted, reduce the water loss, so as to decrease the shrinkage of concrete effectively.

  1. Evaluation of shrinkage and cracking in concrete of ring test by acoustic emission method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chikanori

    2015-03-01

    Drying shrinkage of concrete is one of the typical problems related to reduce durability and defilation of concrete structures. Lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are used to reduce drying shrinkage in Japan. Drying shrinkage is commonly evaluated by methods of measurement for length change of mortar and concrete. In these methods, there is detected strain due to drying shrinkage of free body, although visible cracking does not occur. In this study, the ring test was employed to detect strain and age cracking of concrete. The acoustic emission (AE) method was adopted to detect micro cracking due to shrinkage. It was recognized that in concrete using lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are effective to decrease drying shrinkage and visible cracking. Micro cracking due to shrinkage of this concrete was detected and evaluated by the AE method.

  2. The influence of superabsorbent polymers on the autogenous shrinkage properties of cement pastes with supplementary cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoeck, D.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; De Belie, N.

    2015-01-01

    shrinkage was determined by manual and automated shrinkage measurements. Autogenous shrinkage was reduced in cement pastes with the supplementary cementitious materials versus Portland cement pastes. At later ages, the rate of autogenous shrinkage is higher due to the pozzolanic activity. Internal curing...

  3. Experimental Study on Autogenous and Drying Shrinkage of Steel Fiber Reinforced Lightweight-Aggregate Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunbo Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel fiber reinforced lightweight-aggregate concrete (SFRLAC has many advantages applied in structural engineering. In this paper, the autogenous shrinkage and drying shrinkage of SFRLAC for up to 270 days were measured, considering the effects of types of coarse and fine aggregates with the changes of water-to-binder ratio and volume fraction of steel fiber, respectively. The properties of mix workability, apparent density, and compressive strength of SFRLAC were also reported and discussed in relation to above factors. Test results show that the development of autogenous and drying shrinkage of SFRLAC was fast within 28 days and tended to be steady after 90 days. The development of autogenous shrinkage of SFRLAC reduced with the increasing water-to-binder ratio and by using the expanded shale with higher soundness and good water absorption, especially at early age within 28 days; the later drying shrinkage was reduced and the development of drying shrinkage was slowed down with the increasing volume fraction of steel fiber obviously; manufactured sand led to less autogenous shrinkage but greater drying shrinkage than fine lightweight aggregate in SFRLAC. The regularities of autogenous shrinkage and drying shrinkage of SFRLAC expressed as the series of hyperbola are analyzed.

  4. Polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin-based restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavridakis, Minos M; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    This study measured the linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces induced by polymerization shrinkage of a series of flowable resin-based restorative materials. The materials tested were 22 flowable resin-based restorative materials (Admira Flow, Aelite Flow, Aeliteflow LV, Aria, Crystal Essence, Definite Flow, Dyract Flow, Filtek Flow, FloRestore, Flow-it, Flow-Line, Freedom, Glacier, OmegaFlo, PermaFlo, Photo SC, Revolution 2, Star Flow, Synergy Flow, Tetric Flow, Ultraseal XT and Wave). Measurements for linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces were performed using custom made measuring devices. Polymerization of the test materials was carried out for 60 seconds by means of a light curing unit, and each property was measured for 180 seconds from the start of curing in eight specimens for each material. Statistical evaluation of the data was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) test (p=0.05) and simple linear regression. A wide range of values was recorded for linear polymerization displacement (26.61 to 80.74 microns) and polymerization forces (3.23 to 7.48 kilograms). Statistically significant differences among materials were found for both properties studied. Very few materials (Freedom, Glacier, and Photo SC) presented low values of linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces (similar to hybrid resin composites), while the majority of materials presented very high values in both properties studied. Study of the shrinkage kinetics revealed the exponential growth process of both properties. The polymerization forces development exhibited a few seconds delay over linear polymerization displacement. Simple linear regression showed that the two polymerization shrinkage properties that were studied were not highly correlated (r2=0.59).

  5. Postoperative sensitivity associated with low shrinkage versus conventional composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Postoperative sensitivity in restorative dentistry can be related to preparation trauma, dentin adhesives’ ability to seal open dentinal tubules, deformation of restorations under occlusal stresses and microleakage. Objective. The study assessed possible reduction in postoperative sensitivity with low shrinkage compared to conventional composites using different bonding agents and the influence of the operator skill on the incidence of postoperative sensitivity. Methods. Nine hundred and sixty permanent premolars and molars with primary carious lesions from patients 21 to 40 years old were used. Cavities 2 to 3 mm deep and with margins in enamel were prepared by four operators. Two operators had five years (A and B and two had over 20 years (C and D of clinical experience. Teeth were divided into eight groups each contained 120 restorations: (1 Els®+James-2 (original formula, (2 Els®+James-2 (new formula, (3 Els®+Excite, (4 InTenSe®+James-2 (original formula, (5 InTenSe®+James-2 (new formula, (6 InTenSe®+Excite, (7 Tetric Ceram®+Excite, and (8 Point 4®+OptiBond Solo Plus. At 14 days postoperatively, two independent operators, who did not take part in the clinical procedure, assessed postoperative teeth sensitivity using special questionnaires. Data were analyzed using non-parametric chi-square, Mann-Whitney and ANOVA tests. Results. Group 8 showed significantly higher score than the other groups. Less postoperative sensitivity was reported with two low-shrinkage composites (groups 2, 3, and 5 but with no significant difference. There was no statistical difference between groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. Operator A had the highest postoperative sensitivity score compared to the other three. Conclusion. Conventional composite material Point 4® with its bonding agent caused significantly more postoperative sensitivity than low shrinkage composites combined with different adhesives. Operator skill influenced the incidence of

  6. Sparse electromagnetic imaging using nonlinear iterative shrinkage thresholding

    KAUST Repository

    Desmal, Abdulla

    2015-04-13

    A sparse nonlinear electromagnetic imaging scheme is proposed for reconstructing dielectric contrast of investigation domains from measured fields. The proposed approach constructs the optimization problem by introducing the sparsity constraint to the data misfit between the scattered fields expressed as a nonlinear function of the contrast and the measured fields and solves it using the nonlinear iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm. The thresholding is applied to the result of every nonlinear Landweber iteration to enforce the sparsity constraint. Numerical results demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method in reconstructing sparse dielectric profiles.

  7. Experimental Study on Forecasting Mathematical Model of Drying Shrinkage of Recycled Aggregate Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanchen Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of basic law in AASHTO2007 model, the forecasting mathematical model of drying shrinkage of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC is established by regression analysis and experimental study. The research results show that (1 with the replacement rate of RCA increases, the drying shrinkage value of RAC increases; this trend is even more obvious in the early drying time. (2 The addition of fly ash can inhibit the drying shrinkage of RAC, but the effect is not very obvious. Specifically, the addition of fly ash will increase the shrinkage to some extent when the mixing amount is 20%. (3 The addition of expansive agent can obviously inhibit the shrinkage of RAC; the inhibition affection is better than that of fly ash. (4 The forecasting mathematical models of drying shrinkage of RAC established in this paper have high accuracy and rationality according to experiment validation and error analysis.

  8. Can superabsorbent polymers mitigate shrinkage in cementitious materials blended with supplementary cementitious materials?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoeck, Didier; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; De Belie, Nele

    2016-01-01

    A promising way to mitigate autogenous shrinkage in cementitious materials with a low water-to-binder ratio is internal curing by the use of superabsorbent polymers. Superabsorbent polymers are able to absorb multiple times their weight in water and can be applied as an internal water reservoir...... shrinkage in materials blended with fly ash or blast-furnace slag remain scarce, especially after one week of age. This paper focuses on the autogenous shrinkage by performing manual and automated shrinkage measurements up to one month of age. Without superabsorbent polymers, autogenous shrinkage...... was reduced in cement pastes with the supplementary cementitious materials versus Portland cement pastes. At later ages, the rate of autogenous shrinkage is higher due to the pozzolanic activity of the supplementary cementitious materials. Internal curing by means of superabsorbent polymers is successful...

  9. Development of shrinkage resistant microfibre-reinforced cement-based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedanimojarrad, P.; Adam, G.; Ray, A.; Thomas, P.; Vessalas, K.

    2012-06-01

    Different shrinkage types may cause serious durability dilemma on restrained concrete parts due to crack formation and propagation. Several classes of fibres are used by concrete industry in order to reduce crack size and crack number. In previous studies, most of these fibre types were found to be effective in reducing the number and sizes of the cracks, but not in shrinkage strain reduction. This study deals with the influence of a newly introduced type of polyethylene fibre on drying shrinkage reduction. The novel fibre is a polyethylene microfibre in a new geometry, which is proved to reduce the amount of total shrinkage in mortars. This special hydrophobic polyethylene microfibre also reduces moisture loss of mortar samples. The experimental results on short and long-term drying shrinkage as well as on several other properties are reported. The hydrophobic polyethylene microfibre showed promising improvement in shrinkage reduction even at very low concentrations (0.1% of cement weight).

  10. Experimental Study on Forecasting Mathematical Model of Drying Shrinkage of Recycled Aggregate Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanchen Guo; Xue Wang

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of basic law in AASHTO2007 model, the forecasting mathematical model of drying shrinkage of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) is established by regression analysis and experimental study. The research results show that (1) with the replacement rate of RCA increases, the drying shrinkage value of RAC increases; this trend is even more obvious in the early drying time. (2) The addition of fly ash can inhibit the drying shrinkage of RAC, but the effect is not very obvious. Specifica...

  11. Effect of steel fibers on plastic shrinkage cracking of normal and high strength concretes

    OpenAIRE

    Özgür Eren; Khaled Marar

    2011-01-01

    Naturally concrete shrinks when it is subjected to a drying environment. If this shrinkage is restrained, tensile stresses develop and concrete may crack. Plastic shrinkage cracks are especially harmful on slabs. One of the methods to reduce the adverse effects of shrinkage cracking of concrete is by reinforcing concrete with short randomly distributed fibers. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fiber volume and aspect ratio of hooked steel fibers on plastic shri...

  12. The influence of granulation on lightweight aggregate on early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Maleš, Dijana

    2013-01-01

    Early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concretes is relatively large. It can be reduced by using internal water reservoirs. Lightweight aggregate was used for internal water reservoir. 12% of aggregate was replaced with pre-soaked lightweight aggregate in the concrete mixture. On the basis of experiments in the graduation thesis we studied the influence of granulation of lightweight aggregate on early autogenous shrinkage. The shrinkage was measured electronically during the first day. I...

  13. Longitudinal shrinkage of compression wood in dependence on water content and cell wall structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Włoch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compression wood from branches of Pinus silvestris L. was examined. Wide differences were noted in longitudinal shrinkage of the wood when dried from water saturated state. A relation was found between shrinkage and cell wall thickness, particularly of layer S2, and the degree of callose accumulation in the wall. No dependence could be revealed between the shrinkage and the fibril angle in S2.

  14. Time-Dependent Behavior of Shrinkage Strain for Early Age Concrete Affected by Temperature Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage has been proven to be an important property of early age concrete. The shrinkage strain leads to inherent engineering problems, such as cracking and loss of prestress. Atmospheric temperature is an important factor in shrinkage strain. However, current research does not provide much attention to the effect of atmospheric temperature on shrinkage of early age concrete. In this paper, a laboratory study was undertaken to present the time-dependent shrinkage of early age concrete under temperature variation. A newly developed Material Deformation Tester (MDT, which can simulate consecutive variation of atmospheric temperature, was used to collect the shrinkage strain of specimens and temperature data. A numerical model was established to describe the thermoelastic strain of a specimen. The results show that (1 there are several sharp shrinkages up to 600 μ for early age concrete in the first 3 days; (2 the absolute value of shrinkage strain is larger than thermal strain; and (3 the difference of shrinkage strain under temperature variation or constant temperature is up to 500 μ.

  15. Effect of resin-composite filler particle size and shape on shrinkage-stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Julian D; Maisuria, Amit; Vogel, Karin; Watts, David C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of variations in filler particle size and shape on the polymerization shrinkage-stress kinetics of resin-composites. A model series of 12 VLC resin-composites were studied. The particulate dispersed phase volume fraction was 56.7%: these filler particles were systematically graded in size, and further were either spherical or irregular. A Bioman instrument (cantilever beam method) was employed to determine the shrinkage-stress kinetics following 40s irradiation (600 mW/cm(2)) at 23°C (n=3). All data were captured for 60 min and the final shrinkage-stress calculated. Shrinkage-stress varied between 3.86 MPa (SD 0.14) for S3 (spherical filler particles of 500 nm) and 8.44 MPa (SD 0.41) for I1 (irregular filler particles of 450 nm). The shrinkage-stress values were generally lower for those composites with spherical filler particles than those with irregular filler particles. The differences in shrinkage-stress with filler particle size and shape were statistically significant (pparticles exhibit lower shrinkage-stress values compared to those with irregular filler particles. Shrinkage-stress and shrinkage-stress rate vary in a complex manner with variations in the size of the dispersed phase particles: a hypothesized explanation for the effect of filler particle size and shape is presented. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeongsoo Nam; Gyuyong Kim; Jaechul Yoo; Gyeongcheol Choe; Hongseop Kim; Hyeonggil Choi; Youngduck Kim

    2016-01-01

      This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC...

  17. Design changes of device to investigation of alloys linear contraction and shrinkage stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mutwil

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Some design changes in device elaborated by author to examination of linear contraction and shrinkage stresses progress of metals and alloys during– and after solidification have been described. The introduced changes have been focused on design of closing of shrinkage test rod mould. The introduced changes have been allowed to simplify a mounting procedure of thermocouples measuring a temperature of the shrinkage rod casting (in 6 points. Exemplary investigation results of linear contraction and shrinkage stresses development in Al-Si13.5% alloy have been presented.

  18. Investigation of Shrinkage Defect in Castings by Quantitative Ishikawa Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokkalingam B.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal casting process involves processes such as pattern making, moulding and melting etc. Casting defects occur due to combination of various processes even though efforts are taken to control them. The first step in the defect analysis is to identify the major casting defect among the many casting defects. Then the analysis is to be made to find the root cause of the particular defect. Moreover, it is especially difficult to identify the root causes of the defect. Therefore, a systematic method is required to identify the root cause of the defect among possible causes, consequently specific remedial measures have to be implemented to control them. This paper presents a systematic procedure to identify the root cause of shrinkage defect in an automobile body casting (SG 500/7 and control it by the application of Pareto chart and Ishikawa diagram. with quantitative Weightage. It was found that the root causes were larger volume section in the cope, insufficient feeding of riser and insufficient poured metal in the riser. The necessary remedial measures were taken and castings were reproduced. The shrinkage defect in the castings was completely eliminated.

  19. Impaired decision-making and brain shrinkage in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Berre, A-P; Rauchs, G; La Joie, R; Mézenge, F; Boudehent, C; Vabret, F; Segobin, S; Viader, F; Allain, P; Eustache, F; Pitel, A-L; Beaunieux, H

    2014-03-01

    Alcohol-dependent individuals usually favor instant gratification of alcohol use and ignore its long-term negative consequences, reflecting impaired decision-making. According to the somatic marker hypothesis, decision-making abilities are subtended by an extended brain network. As chronic alcohol consumption is known to be associated with brain shrinkage in this network, the present study investigated relationships between brain shrinkage and decision-making impairments in alcohol-dependent individuals early in abstinence using voxel-based morphometry. Thirty patients performed the Iowa Gambling Task and underwent a magnetic resonance imaging investigation (1.5T). Decision-making performances and brain data were compared with those of age-matched healthy controls. In the alcoholic group, a multiple regression analysis was conducted with two predictors (gray matter [GM] volume and decision-making measure) and two covariates (number of withdrawals and duration of alcoholism). Compared with controls, alcoholics had impaired decision-making and widespread reduced gray matter volume, especially in regions involved in decision-making. The regression analysis revealed links between high GM volume in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and right hippocampal formation, and high decision-making scores (Palcoholism may result from impairment of both emotional and cognitive networks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Early prediction of radiotherapy-induced parotid shrinkage and toxicity based on CT radiomics and fuzzy classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pota, Marco; Scalco, Elisa; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Farneti, Alessia; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Rizzo, Giovanna; Esposito, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    allows to consider the features separately, in order to identify predictors and models to use when only some data source is available, and obtaining more accurate results when more information can be combined. Regarding parotid shrinkage, a number of good predictors is detected, some already known and confirmed here, and some others found here, in particular among radiomics-based features. A number of models are also designed, some using single features and others involving models composition to improve classification accuracy. In particular, the best model to be used at the initial treatment stage, and another one applicable at the half treatment stage are identified. Regarding 12-months toxicity, some possible predictors are detected, in particular among radiomics-based features. Moreover, the relation between final parotid shrinkage rate and 12-months xerostomia is evaluated. The method is compared to the naïve Bayes classifier, which reveals similar results in terms of classification accuracy and best predictors. The interpretable fuzzy rule-based models are explicitly presented, and the dependence between predictors and outcome is explained, thus furnishing in some cases helpful insights about the considered problems. Thanks to the performance and interpretability of the fuzzy classification method employed, predictors of both parotid shrinkage and xerostomia are detected, and their influence on each outcome is revealed. Moreover, models for predicting parotid shrinkage at initial and half radiotherapy stages are found. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of fibers on the loss of water by evaporation and shrinkage of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. P. Pillar

    Full Text Available Shrinkage is one of the least desirable attributes in concrete. Large areas of exposed concrete surfaces , such as in shotcrete tunnel linings, where it is practically impossible to make a moist cure, are highly susceptible to plastic shrinkage at early ages. The autogenous and drying shrinkage can lead to states of greater than threshold strength, causing fracture, mechanical damage and lack of durability of concrete structures. The addition of fibers can greatly reduce plastic shrinkage, but has limited effect in mitigating autogenous and drying shrinkage. To evaluate the performance of polypropylene and steel fibers to understand their effect on shrinkage of concrete, a study was carried out to relate the loss of water from the paste and the shrinkage during the first 28 days of age, and compare it with a control mix without fiber. The loss of water was obtained by the weight loss of the specimens at different ages, since the only component that could contribute for the loss of weight was the water lost by the paste of the concrete. And the paste itself is the only source of shrinkage. Uniaxial compressive tests from very early ages enabled the determination of time when plastic shrinkage ended. It was observed that the control concrete mix lost three times more water and developed plastic and drying shrinkage 60 % higher than the fiber reinforced concrete mixes. It was possible to demonstrate that the reduced loss of water caused by the incorporation of fibers is related to the mitigation of plastic shrinkage. It was observed that the fibers are effective to restrain the movement of water through the cement paste in the plastic state, however such effect is limited after concrete starts the hardening state.

  2. Magnitude, modeling and significance of swelling and shrinkage processes in clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic process of swelling and shrinkage in clay soils has significant practical consequences, such as the rapid transport of water and solutes via shrinkage cracks to the subsoil, and the destruction of buildings and roads on clay soils. In order to develop measuring methods and

  3. Study of Drying Shrinkage Cracking by Lattice Gas Automaton and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mier, J.G.M.; Jankovic, D.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical modeling of moisture flow, drying shrinkage and crack phenomena in cement microstructure, by coupling a Lattice Gas Automaton and a Lattice Fracture Model, highlighted the importance of a shrinkage coefficient (?sh) as the most significant parameter for achieving realistic numerical

  4. Development and Performance Assessment of the High-Performance Shrinkage Reducing Agent for Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Sub Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop a high-performance shrinkage reducing agent, this study investigated several shrinkage reducing materials and supplements for those materials. Fluidity and air content were satisfactory for the various shrinkage reducing materials. The decrease in viscosity was the lowest for glycol-based materials. The decrease in drying shrinkage was most prominent for mixtures containing glycol-based materials. In particular, mixtures containing G2 achieved a 40% decrease in the amount of drying shrinkage. Most shrinkage reducing materials had weaker level of compressive strength than that of the plain mixture. When 3% triethanolamine was used for early strength improvement, the strength was enhanced by 158% compared to that of the plain mixture on day 1; enhancement values were 135% on day 7 and 113% on day 28. To assess the performance of the developed high-performance shrinkage reducing agent and to determine the optimal amount, 2.0% shrinkage reducing agent was set as 40% of the value of the plain mixture. While the effect was more prominent at higher amounts, to prevent deterioration of the compressive strength and the other physical properties, the recommended amount is less than 2.0%.

  5. Hardness, density, and shrinkage characteristics of silk-oak from Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. L. Youngs

    1964-01-01

    Shrinkage, specific gravity, and hardness of two shipments of silk-oak (Grevillea robusta) from Hawaii were evaluated to provide basic information pertinent to the use of the wood for cabinet and furniture purposes. The wood resembles Hawaii-grown shamel ash (Fraxinus uhdei ) in the properties evaluated. Shrinkage compares well with that of black cherry, silver maple,...

  6. Modeling dental composite shrinkage by digital image correlation and finite element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang; Huang, Pin-Sheng; Chuang, Shu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Dental composites are light-curable resin-based materials with an inherent defect of polymerization shrinkage which may cause tooth deflection and debonding of restorations. This study aimed to combine digital image correlation (DIC) and finite element analysis (FEA) to model the shrinkage behaviors under different light curing regimens. Extracted human molars were prepared with proximal cavities for composite restorations, and then divided into three groups to receive different light curing protocols: regular intensity, low intensity, and step-curing consisting of low and high intensities. For each tooth, the composite fillings were consecutively placed under both unbonded and bonded conditions. At first, the shrinkage of the unbonded restorations was analyzed by DIC and adopted as the setting of FEA. The simulated shrinkage behaviors obtained from FEA were further validated by the measurements in the bonded cases. The results showed that different light curing regimens affected the shrinkage in unbonded restorations, with regular intensity showing the greatest shrinkage strain on the top surface. The shrinkage centers in the bonded cases were located closer to the cavity floor than those in the unbonded cases, and were less affected by curing regimens. The FEA results showed that the stress was modulated by the accumulated light energy density, while step-curing may alleviate the tensile stress along the cavity walls. In this study, DIC provides a complete description of the polymerization shrinkage behaviors of dental composites, which may facilitate the stress analysis in the numerical investigation.

  7. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tauböck, T.T.; Feilzer, A.J.; Buchalla, W.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Krejci, I.; Attin, T.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material

  8. Shrinkage reduction of dental composites by addition of expandable zirconia filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, M.; Almdal, Kristoffer; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2011-01-01

    A problem with dental resin composites is the polymerization shrinkage, which makes the filling loosen from the tooth or induces crack formation. We have developed an expandable metastable tetragonal zirconia filler, which upon reaction with water, is able to counter the polymer shrinkage...

  9. Spontaneous tumour shrinkage in 1261 observed patients with sporadic vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoshan; Caye-Thomasen, P; Stangerup, S-E

    2013-01-01

    To determine the rate of spontaneous tumour shrinkage in a group of patients with sporadic vestibular schwannoma managed with a 'wait and scan' approach.......To determine the rate of spontaneous tumour shrinkage in a group of patients with sporadic vestibular schwannoma managed with a 'wait and scan' approach....

  10. Analysis of gene set using shrinkage covariance matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-09-01

    Microarray methodology has been exploited for different applications such as gene discovery and disease diagnosis. This technology is also used for quantitative and highly parallel measurements of gene expression. Recently, microarrays have been one of main interests of statisticians because they provide a perfect example of the paradigms of modern statistics. In this study, the alternative approach to estimate the covariance matrix has been proposed to solve the high dimensionality problem in microarrays. The extension of traditional Hotelling's T2 statistic is constructed for determining the significant gene sets across experimental conditions using shrinkage approach. Real data sets were used as illustrations to compare the performance of the proposed methods with other methods. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  11. Polymerization and polymerization shrinkage stress: fast cure versus conventional cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strydom, C

    2005-07-01

    Dentists nowadays have a choice of conventional halogen lights, halogen lights with more sophisticated curing cycles (step-cure, rapid-cure, ramp-cure & pulse-cure), fast halogen lights, laser lights, plasma arc lights (PAC) and, lately, LED lights. While the manufacturers of some of the curing units try to improve on the operational reliability of their lights with a slower initial rate of cure, other manufacturers simply wish to offer as fast a curing time as possible. The conventional approach to cure accepts that sufficient light intensity of at least 400 mW/cm2 at a wavelength of 400-500 nm, and an exposure time of at least 40 seconds is needed to cure a 2-mm layer of composite. When a halogen light with higher or very high intensity is used, alternative curing strategies provide for an initial slower cure to allow flow, and after that a higher-intensity cure to improve the degree of cure. In contrast, in the fast-cure or rapid-cure approach it is suggested that a layer of composite can be cured for only 5- 10 seconds at >2000 mW/cm2. Some go so far as to say that an exposure time of 3 seconds per layer may be enough. This contradictory approach is compounded by the fact that this support for fast cure does not seem to consider the negative consequences. Therefore, to address these concerns, this review discusses the possible effects of a fast cure approach compared to a more conventional approach in polymerization and polymerization shrinkage, and the consequences there-off. Other factors that play an influencing role in polymerization shrinkage stress are also included in the discussion.

  12. Creep and shrinkage effects on integral abutment bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuswamy, Sivakumar

    Integral abutment bridges provide bridge engineers an economical design alternative to traditional bridges with expansion joints owing to the benefits, arising from elimination of expensive joints installation and reduced maintenance cost. The superstructure for integral abutment bridges is cast integrally with abutments. Time-dependent effects of creep, shrinkage of concrete, relaxation of prestressing steel, temperature gradient, restraints provided by abutment foundation and backfill and statical indeterminacy of the structure introduce time-dependent variations in the redundant forces. An analytical model and numerical procedure to predict instantaneous linear behavior and non-linear time dependent long-term behavior of continuous composite superstructure are developed in which the redundant forces in the integral abutment bridges are derived considering the time-dependent effects. The redistributions of moments due to time-dependent effects have been considered in the analysis. The analysis includes nonlinearity due to cracking of the concrete, as well as the time-dependent deformations. American Concrete Institute (ACI) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) models for creep and shrinkage are considered in modeling the time dependent material behavior. The variations in the material property of the cross-section corresponding to the constituent materials are incorporated and age-adjusted effective modulus method with relaxation procedure is followed to include the creep behavior of concrete. The partial restraint provided by the abutment-pile-soil system is modeled using discrete spring stiffness as translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Numerical simulation of the behavior is carried out on continuous composite integral abutment bridges and the deformations and stresses due to time-dependent effects due to typical sustained loads are computed. The results from the analytical model are compared with the

  13. Parametric study and shrinkage modelling of natural rubber sheet drying using COMSOL multiphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajani, C.; Kumar, A.; Curcio, S.; Tekasakul, P.

    2017-09-01

    Natural rubber is one of the major exporting cash crops in Thailand. Shrinkage in natural rubber sheet during drying creates uneven stresses in the rubber, hampers the quality and the water activity predisposes it to microbial activation. Hence, the effect of drying parameters on shrinkage has been considered in this work. The finite element concept coupled with the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method was used to solve the two-dimensional coupled physics in the rubber sheet drying chamber and account for the shrinkage effect. The spatial domain (drying chamber), material domain (rubber sheet) was analysed. An isotropic linear elastic model was assumed for the rubber sheet for analysis. Three Case studies of different velocity, temperature, relative humidity and shrinkage coefficient were considered in the numerical study using COMSOL Multiphysics. It is concluded that increase in the operating parameters increases the shrinkage of the rubber. Therefore, rubber should dry at relatively lower operating parameters to improve its quality.

  14. Analysis of the effect of shrinkage on macrosegregation in alloy solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Matthew John M.; Incropera, Frank P.

    1995-09-01

    Numerical calculations based on a continuum model are used to examine the effects of solidification shrinkage on the redistribution of solute in a Pb-19.2 pct Sn mixture which is convectively cooled at a sidewall. For each of three different cooling rates, separate calculations are performed for shrinkage and buoyancy-induced flows, as well as for the combined influence of shrinkage and buoyancy effects. The calculations reveal that flow and macrosegregation patterns are more strongly influenced by buoyancy effects over a wide range of solidification rates. Although extremely large solidification rates yield small regions near the chilled wall in which shrinkage-induced flows control the redis-tribution of solute, the overall effect on macrosegregation is small relative to that associated with buoyancy. Scaling analysis of the governing equations produces reference shrinkage and buoyancy velocities which can be used to extend the current numerical results to other binary systems.

  15. Effects of prepolymerized particle size and polymerization kinetics on volumetric shrinkage of dental modeling resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tae-Yub; Ha, Jung-Yun; Chun, Ju-Na; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA) resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control). The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction particle size analysis, respectively. Linear polymerization shrinkage strains of the resins were monitored for 20 minutes using a custom-made linometer, and the final values (at 20 minutes) were converted into volumetric shrinkages. The final volumetric shrinkage values for the modeling resins were statistically similar (P > 0.05) or significantly larger (P resin and were related to the polymerization kinetics (P resin structures rather than the use of dental modeling resins.

  16. Photoresist shrinkage effects in 16 nm node extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoresist targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Montgomery, Cecilia; Montgomery, Warren; Cepler, Aron

    2013-04-01

    Photoresist shrinkage (i.e., line slimming) is an important systematic uncertainty source in critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) metrology of lithographic features [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]. It influences both the precision and the accuracy of CD-SEM measurements, while locally damaging the sample. Minimization or elimination of shrinkage is desirable, yet elusive. This error source will be a factor in CD-SEM metrology on polymer materials in EUV lithography. Recent work has demonstrated improved understanding of the trends in the shrinkage response depending on electron beam and target parameters in static measurements [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]. Some research has highlighted a second mode of shrinkage that is apparent over time and progresses as a function of time between consecutive measurements, a form of "dynamic shrinkage" that appears to be activated by electron beam, in which the activated feature perpetually and logarithmically shrinks [7] [8]. Another work has demonstrated that as pitches continue to get smaller with resulting reductions in spaces between lines, charging may emerge as an additional, competing, unpredictable error source for CD-SEM metrology on dense photoresist features, an issue that is predicted to become more common as these spaces become more confined [9]. In this work, we explore the static shrinkage behaviors of various EUV photoresists into the 16 nm half-pitch node, with samples generated using the advanced EUV lithography capable of generating such tight pitches [10]. Dynamic shrinkage behavior was explored on these materials last year [15]. The static shrinkage behaviors will be validated to show compliance with the SEMATECH shrinkage model [5] [6] on small EUV resist features. Using the results of the model fits, a simulation study will predict the shrinkage trends at future nodes. Further studies will confirm whether or not charging phenomena are observable, and the beginning of a charging simulation study will be

  17. Aerosol particle shrinkage event phenomenology in a South European suburban area during 2009-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Blanco, E.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Núñez, L.; Pujadas, M.; Cusack, M.; Artíñano, B.

    2017-07-01

    A high number of aerosol particle shrinkage cases (70) have been identified and analyzed from an extensive and representative database of aerosol size distributions obtained between 2009 and 2015 at an urban background site in Madrid (Spain). A descriptive classification based on the process from which the shrinkage began is proposed according which shrinkage events were divided into three groups: (1) NPF + shrinkage (NPF + S) events, (2) aerosol particle growth process + shrinkage (G + S) events, and (3) pure shrinkage (S) events. The largest number of shrinkages corresponded to the S-type followed by NPF + S, while the G + S events were the least frequent group recorded. Duration of shrinkages varied widely from 0.75 to 8.5 h and SR from -1.0 to -11.1 nm h-1. These processes typically occurred in the afternoon, around 18:00 UTC, caused by two situations: i) a wind speed increase usually associated with a change in the wind direction (over 60% of the observations) and ii) the reduction of photochemical activity at the end of the day. All shrinkages were detected during the warm period, mainly between May and August, when local meteorological conditions (high solar irradiance and temperature and low relative humidity), atmospheric processes (high photochemical activity) and availability of aerosol-forming precursors were favorable for their development. As a consequence of these processes, the particles concentration corresponding to the Aitken mode decreased into the nucleation mode. The accumulation mode did not undergo significant changes during these processes. In some cases, a dilution of the particulate content in the ambient air was observed. This work, goes further than others works dealing with aerosol particles shrinkages, as it incorporates as a main novelty a classification methodology for studying these processes. Moreover, compared to other studies, it is supported by a high and representative number of observations. Thus, this study contributes to

  18. Effect of temperature and humidity on post-gel shrinkage, cusp deformation, bond strength and shrinkage stress - Construction of a chamber to simulate the oral environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicalho, Aline Aredes; de Souza, Silas Júnior Boaventura; de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis; Soares, Carlos José

    2015-12-01

    Evaluate the effect of environment on post-gel shrinkage (Shr), cuspal strains (CS), microtensile bond strength (μTBS), elastic modulus (E) and shrinkage stress in molars with large class II restorations. Sixty human molars received standardized Class II mesio-oclusal-distal cavity preparations. Restorations were made with two composites (CHA, Charisma Diamond, Heraus Kulzer and IPS Empress Direct, Ivoclar-Vivadent) using three environment conditions (22°C/50% humidity, 37°C/50% humidity and 37°C/90% humidity) simulated in custom developed chamber. Shr was measured using the strain gauge technique (n=10). CS was measured using strain gauges. Half of the teeth (n=5) were used to assess the elastic modulus (E) and Knoop hardness (KHN) at different depths using microhardness indentation. The other half (n=5) was used to measure the μTBS. The composites and environment conditions were simulated in a two-dimensional finite element analysis of a tooth restoration. Polymerization shrinkage was modeled using Shr data. The Shr, CS, μTBS, KHN and E data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (significance level: 0.05). Both composites had similar Shr, CS, μTBS and shrinkage stress. CHA had higher elastic modulus than IPS. Increasing temperature and humidity significantly increased Shr, CS and shrinkage stress. μTBS were similar for groups with lower humidity, irrespective of temperature, and higher with higher humidity. E and KHN were constant through the depth for CHA. E and KHN values were affected by environment only for IPS, mainly deeper in the cavity. Shrinkage stress at dentin/composite interface had high inverse correlation with μTBS. Shrinkage stress in enamel had high correlation with CS. Increasing temperature and humidity caused higher post-gel shrinkage and cusp deformation with higher shrinkage stresses in the tooth structure and tooth/restoration interface for both composites tested. The chamber developed for simulating the

  19. Plagiarism explainer for students

    OpenAIRE

    Barba, Lorena A.

    2016-01-01

    A slide deck to serve as an explainer of plagiarism in academic settings, with a personal viewpoint. For my students.Also on SpeakerDeck:https://speakerdeck.com/labarba/plagiarism-explainer-for-students(The slide viewer on SpeakerDeck is much nicer.)

  20. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage, polymerization shrinkage stress, wear resistance, and compressive strength of a silorane-based composite: A finite element analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Mitthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the mechanical properties is important in predicting the clinical behavior of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA evaluates properties of materials replicating clinical scenario. Aim: This study evaluated polymerization shrinkage and stress, wear resistance (WR, and compressive strength (CS of silorane in comparison with two methacrylate resins. Settings and Design: This study design was a numerical study using FEA. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional (3D models of maxillary premolar with Class I cavities (2 mm depth, 4 mm length, and 2.5 mm width created and restored with silorane, nanohybrid, and microhybrid; Groups I, II, and III, respectively. Loads of 200–600 N were applied. Polymerization shrinkage was first determined by displacement produced in the X, Y, and Z planes. Maximum stress distribution due to shrinkage was calculated using AN SYS software. 3D cube models of composite resins were simulated with varying filler particle size. Similar loads were applied. WR and compressive stress were calculated: K W L/H and load/cross-sectional area, respectively. Statistical analysis done using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, and Tukey's honestly significant difference test (P < 0.05. Results: Polymerization shrinkage (0.99% and shrinkage stress (233.21 Mpa of silorane were less compared to microhybrid (2.14% and 472.43 Mpa and nanohybrid (2.32% and 464.88 Mpa. Silorane (7.92×/1011 μm/mm3 and nanohybrid (7.79×/1011 showed superior WR than microhybrid (1.113×/1017. There was no significant difference in compressive stress among the groups. Conclusion: Silorane exhibited less polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress compared to methacrylates. Silorane and nanohybrid showed greater WR compared to microhybrid. CS of all groups was similar.

  1. Mesocosmic study on autogenous shrinkage of concrete with consideration of effects of temperature and humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan HAI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A study on the autogenous shrinkage (AS of concrete from a mesocosmic perspective was carried out using numerical simulation technology. The temperature history and the autogenous relative humidity (ARH, two factors that have been shown to have occasional influence on this process in previous studies, were introduced into this study. According to these concepts, a program for simulation of the temperature field, humidity field, and stress field based on the equivalent age method and a fully automatic aggregate modeling tool were used. With the help of these programs, the study of a small concrete specimen provided some useful conclusions: the aggregate and the matrix show distinct distribution properties in the temperature field, humidity field, and stress field; the aggregate-matrix interface has a high possibility of becoming the location of the initial cracking caused by AS of concrete; the distribution of random aggregates is extremely important for mesoscopical analysis; and the temperature history is the main factor affecting the AS of concrete. On the whole, inherent mechanisms and cracking mechanisms of AS of concrete can be explained more reasonably and realistically only by considering the different characteristics of material phases and the effects of temperature and humidity.

  2. Influence of fly ash fineness on water requirement and shrinkage of blended cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissorn Vimonsatit

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the influence of fly ash fineness on water requirement and shrinkage of blended cement mortar was studied. The results indicate that the water requirement and shrinkage characteristic of the blended cement mortar are dependent on fly ash fineness and replacement level. The use of coarse fly ash slightly reduces the water requirement but greatly reduced the drying and the autogenous shrinkage of the blended cement mortars and the reduction is more with an increase in the fly ash replacement level. The finer fly ashes further reduce the water requirement, but increase the drying and the autogenous shrinkages as compared with coarser fly ash. The incorporation of superplasticizer drastically reduces the water requirement, but the effect on the drying and autogenous shrinkages of the normal Portland cement mortar is small. However, for the fly ash mortar, the use of superplasticizer results in a decrease in drying shrinkage and in a substantial increase in the autogenous shrinkage particularly for the fine fly ash at a high replacement level.

  3. Influence of shade of adhesive resin cement on its polymerization shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender Akan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resin cements have the ability to bond to the tooth structure and to several indirect restorative materials and they are available in different transparency and shades. However, polymerization shrinkage remains to be a problem that leads to gap formation at the margins of restoration, and accordingly microleakage may occur. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the shade of adhesive resin cement on its polymerization shrinkage. Five shades (Group 1: universal; Group 2: brown; Group 3: clear; Group 4: opaque white; Group 5: opaque yellow of a dual-cure composite cement system (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan were studied with 10 specimens of each shade. Volumetric shrinkages of the composite cements of these five shades were evaluated using a video-imaging device (Acu-Vol; Bisco, Inc. by measuring the volumes before and after polymerization. Different shades displayed different volumetric shrinkages. Group 5 (2.62% and Group 2 (3.96% displayed the lowest and highest shrinkage percentages, respectively, with their respective shrinkage values being significantly different from those of the other groups (p < 0.05. The obtained results indicate that the shade of resin cement does affect its degree of polymerization shrinkage.

  4. Investigations of linear contraction and shrinkage stresses development in hypereutectic al-si binary alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mutwil

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage phenomena during solidification and cooling of hypereutectic aluminium-silicon alloys (AlSi18, AlSi21 have been examined. A vertical shrinkage rod casting with circular cross-section (constant or fixed: tapered has been used as a test sample. Two type of experiments have been conducted: 1 on development of the test sample linear dimension changes (linear expansion/contraction, 2 on development of shrinkage stresses in the test sample. By the linear contraction experiments the linear dimension changes of the test sample and the metal test mould as well a temperature in six points of the test sample have been registered. By shrinkage stresses examination a shrinkage tension force and linear dimension changes of the test sample as well a temperature in three points of the test sample have been registered. Registered time dependences of the test bar and the test mould linear dimension changes have shown, that so-called pre-shrinkage extension has been mainly by mould thermal extension caused. The investigation results have shown that both: the linear contraction as well as the shrinkage stresses development are evident dependent on metal temperature in a warmest region the sample (thermal centre.

  5. Influence of shrinkage porosity on fatigue performance of iron castings and life estimation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage porosity exists more or less in heavy castings, and it plays an important role in the fatigue behavior of cast materials. In this study, fatigue tests were carried out on the QT400-18 cast iron specimens containing random degrees of shrinkage porosity defect. Experimental results showed that the order of magnitude of life scattered from 103 to 106 cycles when the shrinkage percentage ranged from 0.67% to 5.91%. SEM analyses were carried out on the shrinkage porosity region. The inter-granular discontinuous, micro cracks and inclusions interfered with the fatigue sliding or hindering process. The slip in shrinkage porosity region was not as orderly as the ordinary continuous medium. The shrinkage porosity area on fracture surface (SPAFS and alternating stress intensity factor (ASIF were applied to evaluate the tendency of residual life distribution; their relationship was fitted by negative exponent functions. Based on the intermediate variable of ASIF, a fatigue life prediction model of nodular cast iron containing shrinkage porosity defects was established. The modeling prediction was in agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Creep and shrinkage of high performance lightweight concrete: A multi-scale investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mauricio

    This multi-scale investigation aimed to provide new knowledge and understanding of creep and shrinkage of high performance lightweight concrete (HPLC) by assessing prestress losses in HPLC prestressed members in a large-scale study; by quantifying the effect of the constituent materials and external conditions on creep and shrinkage in a medium-scale study; and by improving the fundamental understanding of creep and shrinkage in a small-scale study. Creep plus shrinkage prestress losses were between two and eight times lower than those estimated for the design standards and approximately 50% of those measured in similar strength normal weight high performance concrete girders. The lower creep and shrinkage exhibited by HPLC was found to be caused by a synergy between the pre-soaked lightweight aggregate and the low water-to-cementitious material ratio matrix. That is, the water contained in the lightweight aggregate contributes to enhance hydration by providing an internal moist curing. The water in the aggregate also contributes to maintain a high internal relative humidity which reduces or eliminates autogenous shrinkage. This higher internal relative humidity also reduces creep by preventing load-induced water migration. Finally, lightweight aggregate exhibits a better elastic compatibility with the paste than normal weight aggregate. This improved elastic matching and the enhanced hydration are believed to reduce peak deformations at the ITZ which further decreases creep and shrinkage.

  7. Polymerisation shrinkage versus layer thickness of a dentine bonding resin: Method development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarzadeh T

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Dentine bonding systems are usually unfilled, and so their shrinkage may be significant. High"nshrinkage may cause internal stress at the interface between resin-composite restoration and the dentine"nsubstrate. Failure of the adhesive interface may be observed due to the interna! stress. The aims of this"nstudy were:"nA To obtain a suitable method for measuring the kinetics of polymerisation shrinkage in unfilled resm at different thicknesses, particularly for thin films."nB Consideraing the effect of thickness on shrinkage."nScotchbond Multipurpose (3M adhesive bond resin was used. To overcome the particular challenges presented by thin films, a filled-ring measurement procedure was used. Also, a non-contact laser analogue displacement sensor system was developed and applied to measure polymerisation shrinkage. Regression analysis was performed on a complete data set. Non-linear regression analysis established a logarithmic relationship between polymerisation shrinkage and layer thickness. The method applied in this study was found to be sensitive and accurate procedure for determining photo-polymerisation shrinkage of thin films. Polymerisation shrinkage increased with logarithmic of the adhesive thickness.

  8. Compositional Changes for Reduction of Polymerisation-Induced Shrinkage in Holographic Photopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cody

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymerisation-induced shrinkage is one of the main reasons why many photopolymer materials are not used for certain applications including holographic optical elements and holographic data storage. Here, two compositional changes for the reduction of shrinkage in an acrylamide-based photopolymer are reported. A holographic interferometric technique was used to study changes in the dynamics of the shrinkage processes occurring in the modified photopolymer during holographic recording in real time. Firstly, the effect of the replacement of the acrylamide monomer in the photopolymer composition with a larger monomer molecule, diacetone acrylamide, on polymerisation-induced shrinkage has been studied. A reduction in relative shrinkage of 10–15% is obtained using this compositional change. The second method tested for shrinkage reduction involved the incorporation of BEA-type zeolite nanoparticles in the acrylamide-based photopolymer. A reduction in relative shrinkage of 13% was observed for acrylamide photopolymer layers doped with 2.5% wt. BEA zeolites in comparison to the undoped photopolymer.

  9. Measurement of Shrinkage and Cracking in Lyophilized Amorphous Cakes. Part II: Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of the kinetic development of shrinkage and cracking of an amorphous trehalose cake as they take place during lyophilization. A novel technique has been developed which monitors a vial in situ during the freeze-drying cycle. The 2-dimensional degrees of shrinkage and cracking in its top surface are determined quantitatively using a digital camera and evaluated using AxioVision. Shrinkage and cracking develop largely already during programmed primary drying and are coupled. For trehalose, sucrose and maltose no clear correlation between shrinkage and wg' is found. There is no dependence of cake rim detachment from the vial inner surface on the trehalose concentration. Cake adhesion is therefore likely not the only determining factor for detachment and shrinkage. If shrinkage can occur during primary drying, then this relaxes the drying tension produced by desorption of non-frozen water out of the amorphous structure left behind as the sublimation front passes through a volume element, and causes little or no cracking. If shrinkage is restrained, then the drying tension is relaxed by cracking of the brittle cake.

  10. Reporting explained variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Ron; Fletcher, Harold J.

    The importance of reporting explained variance (sometimes referred to as magnitude of effects) in ANOVA designs is discussed in this paper. Explained variance is an estimate of the strength of the relationship between treatment (or other factors such as sex, grade level, etc.) and dependent variables of interest to the researcher(s). Three methods that can be used to obtain estimates of explained variance in ANOVA designs are described and applied to 16 studies that were reported in recent volumes of this journal. The results show that, while in most studies the treatment accounts for a relatively small proportion of the variance in dependent variable scores., in., some studies the magnitude of the treatment effect is respectable. The authors recommend that researchers in science education report explained variance in addition to the commonly reported tests of significance, since the latter are inadequate as the sole basis for making decisions about the practical importance of factors of interest to science education researchers.

  11. Control of drying shrinkage in magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, T; Liang, X; Li, C; Lorin, M; Li, Y; Vandeperre, LJM; Cheeseman, CR

    2016-01-01

    ? 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.Magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel can be formed by the reaction of MgO with amorphous silica in the presence of sodium hexametaphosphate (Na-HMP). Typical pastes contain 40% MgO and 60% SF and have a w/c ratio of 0.5, but these exhibit shrinkage cracking on drying. The shrinkage characteristics of M-S-H mortar samples containing different additions of sand have been studied using dilatometry. The drying shrinkage was found to decrease with increas...

  12. Shrinkage insensitivity of NKCC1 in myosin II-depleted cytoplasts from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2007-01-01

    -actin organization was disrupted, and myosin II, which in shrunken EATC translocates to the cortical region, was absent. Moreover, NKCC1 activity was essentially insensitive to the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, a potent blocker of shrinkage-induced NKCC1 activity in intact EATC. Cytoplast NKCC1...... to the substantial activation in shrunken intact cells, p38 MAPK could not be further activated by shrinkage of the cytoplasts. Together these findings indicate that shrinkage activation of NKCC1 in EATC is dependent on the cortical F-actin network, myosin II, and MLCK....

  13. Shrinkage/swelling of compacted clayey loose and dense soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowamooz, Hossein; Masrouri, Farimah

    2009-11-01

    This Note presents an experimental study performed on expansive compacted loose and dense samples using osmotic oedometers. Several successive wetting and drying cycles were applied in a suction range between 0 and 8 MPa under different values of constant net vertical stress (15, 30, and 60 kPa). During the suction cycles, the dense samples showed cumulative swelling strains, while the loose samples showed volumetric shrinkage accumulation. At the end of the suction cycles, the volumetric strains converged to an equilibrium stage that indicated elastic behavior of the swelling soil for any further hydraulic variations. At this stage, the compression curves for the studied soil at the different imposed suctions (0, 2, and 8 MPa) converged towards the saturated state curve for the high applied vertical stresses. We defined this pressure as the saturation stress(P). The compression curves provided sufficient data to examine the soil mechanical behavior at the equilibrium stage. To cite this article: H. Nowamooz, F. Masrouri, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  14. Shrinkage, abrasion, erosion and sorption of clay plasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minke, G.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available At the Buildung Research Institute (FEB, Faculty of Architecture, University of Kassel, Germany, in the last years several hundred tests were made to study the characteristics of different loam mortars in respect of their linear shrinkage, absorption of humidity and their resistance against abrasion and erosion. In order to get data about abrasion and erosion new test methods and special apparatusses were developed. The mortars tested, chosen from the market, showed extremely varying test results.

    En el Laboratorio de Construcciones Experimentales (FEB de la Facultad de Arquitectura, Universidad de Kassel, Alemania, fueron testeados cientos de diferentes pruebas de revoque de barro para estudiar su contracción durante el secado, su absorción de humedad y su resistencia contra abrasión, erosión y absorción. Para recibir datos sobre abrasión y erosión, nuevas aparatos y metodos fueron desarrollados. Los resultados de los revoques comprados en el mercado muestran gran diferencias en los valores.

  15. Polymerization Shrinkage and Flexural Modulus of Flowable Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Cavalcanti Xavier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Linear polymerization shrinkage (LPS, flexural strength (FS and modulus of elasticity (ME of low-viscosity resin composites (Admira Flow™, Grandio Flow™/VOCO; Filtek Z350 Flow™/3M ESPE; Tetric Flow™/Ivoclar-Vivadent was evaluated using a well-established conventional micro-hybrid composite as a standard (Filtek Z250™/3M ESPE. For the measurement of LPS, composites were applied to a cylindrical metallic mould and polymerized (n = 8. The gap formed at the resin/mould interface was observed using SEM (1500×. For FS and ME, specimens were prepared according to the ISO 4049 specifications (n = 10. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test. The conventional resin presented significantly lower LPS associated with high FS and ME, but only the ME values of the conventional resin differed significantly from the low-viscosity composites. The relationship between ME and LPS of low-viscosity resin composites when used as restorative material is a critical factor in contraction stress relief and marginal leakage.

  16. Sudden shrinkage of free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap 15 years after maxilla reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Mochizuki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old male displayed sudden shrinkage of a left free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap, which had been grafted to his left maxilla 15 years previously. No post-reconstructive irradiation had been performed, and no late occlusion of the vascular anastomosis, local infection, recurrence of the maxillary cancer, or body weight loss was observed. However, the shrinkage amounted to approximately 50%. This is considerably more than previously reported cases of shrinkage of various free flaps, which ranged between 10% and 25%. The resultant depression was successfully augmented with a right free deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. The residual fat volume of the previously grafted shrunken flap was revealed to be compatible with that of the newly harvested contralateral perforator flap. Thus, the volume of the previously grafted flap may reflect the status of the intact contralateral donor site, although the mechanism of sudden flap shrinkage is unclear.

  17. Report D : self-consolidating concrete (SCC) for infrastructure elements - creep, shrinkage and abrasion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Concrete specimens were fabricated for shrinkage, creep, and abrasion resistance : testing. Variations of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) and conventional concrete were : all tested. The results were compared to previous similar testing programs an...

  18. Strength and Drying Shrinkage of Alkali-Activated Slag Paste and Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-chieh Chi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the strengths and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag paste and mortar. Compressive strength, tensile strength, and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag paste and mortar were measured with various liquid/slag ratios, sand/slag ratios, curing ages, and curing temperatures. Experimental results show that the higher compressive strength and tensile strength have been observed in the higher curing temperature. At the age of 56 days, AAS mortars show higher compressive strength than Portland cement mortars and AAS mortars with liquid/slag ratio of 0.54 have the highest tensile strength in all AAS mortars. In addition, AAS pastes of the drying shrinkage are higher than AAS mortars. Meanwhile, higher drying shrinkage was observed in AAS mortars than that observed comparable Portland cement mortars.

  19. Drying shrinkage problems in high-plastic clay soils in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Longitudinal cracking in pavements due to drying shrinkage of high-plastic subgrade soils has been a major : problem in Oklahoma. Annual maintenance to seal and repair these distress problems costs significant amount of : money to the state. The long...

  20. Validation Tests of Prediction Modules of Shrinkage Defects in Cast Iron Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajkowski J.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental-simulation tests of expansion-shrinkage phenomena occurring in cast iron castings. The tests were based on the standard test for inspecting the tendency of steel-carbon alloys to create compacted discontinuities of the pipe shrinkage type. The cast alloy was a high-silicone ductile iron of GJS - 600 - 10 grade. The validation regarding correctness of prognoses of the shrinkage defects was applied mostly to the simulation code (system NovaFlow & Solid CV (NFS CV. The obtained results were referred to the results obtained using the Procast system (macro- and micromodel. The analysis of sensitivity of the modules responsible for predicting the shrinkage discontinuities on selected pre-processing parameters was performed, focusing mostly on critical fractions concerning the feeding flows (mass and capillary and variation of initial temperature of the alloy in the mould and heat transfer coefficient (HTC on the casting - chill interface.

  1. Development of high shrinkage polyethylene terephthalate (PET) shape memory polymer tendons for concrete crack closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teall, Oliver; Pilegis, Martins; Sweeney, John; Gough, Tim; Thompson, Glen; Jefferson, Anthony; Lark, Robert; Gardner, Diane

    2017-04-01

    The shrinkage force exerted by restrained shape memory polymers (SMPs) can potentially be used to close cracks in structural concrete. This paper describes the physical processing and experimental work undertaken to develop high shrinkage die-drawn polyethylene terephthalate (PET) SMP tendons for use within a crack closure system. The extrusion and die-drawing procedure used to manufacture a series of PET tendon samples is described. The results from a set of restrained shrinkage tests, undertaken at differing activation temperatures, are also presented along with the mechanical properties of the most promising samples. The stress developed within the tendons is found to be related to the activation temperature, the cross-sectional area and to the draw rate used during manufacture. Comparisons with commercially-available PET strip samples used in previous research are made, demonstrating an increase in restrained shrinkage stress by a factor of two for manufactured PET filament samples.

  2. Concrete pavement mixture design and analysis (MDA) : factors influencing drying shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This literature review focuses on factors influencing drying shrinkage of concrete. Although the factors are normally interrelated, they : can be categorized into three groups: paste quantity, paste quality, and other factors.

  3. Numerical Simulation on Open Wellbore Shrinkage and Casing Equivalent Stress in Bedded Salt Rock Stratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength.

  4. Numerical simulation on open wellbore shrinkage and casing equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Linzhi; Zhao, Jinzhou

    2013-01-01

    Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength.

  5. Computer jargon explained

    CERN Document Server

    Enticknap, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Computer Jargon Explained is a feature in Computer Weekly publications that discusses 68 of the most commonly used technical computing terms. The book explains what the terms mean and why the terms are important to computer professionals. The text also discusses how the terms relate to the trends and developments that are driving the information technology industry. Computer jargon irritates non-computer people and in turn causes problems for computer people. The technology and the industry are changing so rapidly; it is very hard even for professionals to keep updated. Computer people do not

  6. Pore Structure and Influence of Recycled Aggregate Concrete on Drying Shrinkage

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yuanchen; Qian, Jueshi; Wang, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Pore structure plays an important role in the drying shrinkage of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC). High-precision mercury intrusion and water evaporation were utilized to study the pore structure of RAC, which has a different replacement rate of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA), and to analyze its influence on drying shrinkage. Finally, a fractal-dimension calculation model was established based on the principles of mercury intrusion and fractal-geometry theory. Calculations were performed...

  7. Experimental drying shrinkage of hardened cement pastes as a function of relative humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Baroghel, V.B.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an experimental study concerning drying shrinkage measured as a function of relative humidity on thin specimens of mature hardened cement pastes are presented. The results obtained at two laboratories are compared.......The results of an experimental study concerning drying shrinkage measured as a function of relative humidity on thin specimens of mature hardened cement pastes are presented. The results obtained at two laboratories are compared....

  8. Influence of Aggregate Wettability with Different Lithology Aggregates on Concrete Drying Shrinkage

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanchen Guo; Jueshi Qian; Xue Wang; Zhengyi Yan; Huadong Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The correlation of the wettability of different lithology aggregates and the drying shrinkage of concrete materials is studied, and some influential factors such as wettability and wetting angle are analyzed. A mercury porosimeter is used to measure the porosities of different lithology aggregates accurately, and the pore size ranges that significantly affect the drying shrinkage of different lithology aggregate concretes are confirmed. The pore distribution curve of the different coarse aggr...

  9. Effects of Prepolymerized Particle Size and Polymerization Kinetics on Volumetric Shrinkage of Dental Modeling Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Tae-Yub; Ha, Jung-Yun; Chun, Ju-Na; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA) resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control). The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electro...

  10. Urban shrinkage, local housing markets and the role of voluntary community organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    Since the beginning of the crisis in 2007-08 urban shrinkage has hit a large number of Danish municipalities, towns and villages outside the two major metropolitan areas in the country .Abandoned homes, plunging property prices and out-migration are among the major symptoms. As a consequence...... and voluntary organizations to strengthen civil society and counteract urban shrinkage. The concluding section includes some policy recommendation....

  11. Effect of shrinkage porosity on mechanical properties of ferritic ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zehua

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Casting defects could largely affect the mechanical properties of casting products. A number of test pieces made of ductile iron (EN-GJS-400-18-LT with different levels of shrinkage porosity were prepared and then tensile and fatigue tests were performed to investigate the impact of shrinkage porosity on their mechanical properties. The results showed that the tensile strength decreases linearly with increasing of the shrinkage porosity. The tensile elongation decreases sharply with the increase of the shrinkage porosity mainly due to the non-uniform plastic deformation. The fatigue life also dramatically declines with increasing of the porosity and follows a power law relationship with the area percentage of porosity. The existence of the shrinkage porosity made the fatigue fracture complex. The shrinkage pores, especially those close to the surface usually became the crack initiation sites. For test pieces with less porosity, the fatigue fracture was clearly composed of crack initiation, propagation, and overloading. While for samples with high level of porosity, multiple crack initiation sites were observed.

  12. The effect of mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants during healing abutment replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, J; Zenziper, E; Rosner, O; Kolerman, R; Chaushu, L; Chaushu, G

    2015-10-01

    Soft tissue shrinkage during the course of restoring dental implants may result in biological and prosthodontic difficulties. This study was conducted to measure the continuous shrinkage of the mucosal cuff around dental implants following the removal of the healing abutment up to 60 s. Individuals treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures were included. Implant data--location, type, length, diameter and healing abutments' dimensions--were recorded. Mucosal cuff shrinkage, following removal of the healing abutments, was measured in bucco-lingual direction at four time points--immediately after 20, 40 and 60 s. anova was used to for statistical analysis. Eighty-seven patients (49 women and 38 men) with a total of 311 implants were evaluated (120 maxilla; 191 mandible; 291 posterior segments; 20 anterior segments). Two-hundred and five (66%) implants displayed thick and 106 (34%) thin gingival biotype. Time was the sole statistically significant parameter affecting mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants (P < 0.001). From time 0 to 20, 40 and 60 s, the mean diameter changed from 4.1 to 4.07, 3.4 and 2.81 mm, respectively. The shrinkage was 1%, 17% and 31%, respectively. The gingival biotype had no statistically significant influence on mucosal cuff shrinkage (P = 0.672). Time required replacing a healing abutment with a prosthetic element should be minimised (up to 20/40 s), to avoid pain, discomfort and misfit. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Explaining the Oxbridge Figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Bronwyn; Harre, Rom

    1989-01-01

    Rejects sociobiological theories on female academic achievement and bases findings on social structure to explain why undergraduate women at Oxford University (England) achieve fewer first places and more second places in class honors. Bases theory on bipolarity of gender as an organizing principle of society. Claims that the double bind of social…

  14. The wireless internet explained

    CERN Document Server

    Rhoton, John

    2001-01-01

    The Wireless Internet Explained covers the full spectrum of wireless technologies from a wide range of vendors, including initiatives by Microsoft and Compaq. The Wireless Internet Explained takes a practical look at wireless technology. Rhoton explains the concepts behind the physics, and provides an overview that clarifies the convoluted set of standards heaped together under the umbrella of wireless. It then expands on these technical foundations to give a panorama of the increasingly crowded landscape of wireless product offerings. When it comes to actual implementation the book gives abundant down-to-earth advice on topics ranging from the selection and deployment of mobile devices to the extremely sensitive subject of security.Written by an expert on Internet messaging, the author of Digital Press''s successful Programmer''s Guide to Internet Mail and X.400 and SMTP: Battle of the E-mail Protocols, The Wireless Internet Explained describes and evaluates the current state of the fast-growing and crucial...

  15. Correlation between polymerization shrinkage stress and C-factor depends upon cavity compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengzhi; Chiang, Martin Y M

    2016-03-01

    The literature reports inconsistent results regarding using configuration factor (C-factor) as an indicator to reflect the generation of polymerization shrinkage stress (PS) from dental restorative composites due to the constraint of cavity configuration. The current study aimed at unraveling the complex effects of C-factor on PS based on analytical and experimental approaches together, such that the reported inconsistency can be explained and a significance of C-factor in clinic can be comprehensively provided. Analytical models based on linear elasticity were established to predict PS measured in instruments (testing systems) with different compliances, and complex effects of C-factor on PS were derived. The analyses were validated by experiments using a cantilever beam-based instrument and systematic variation of instrumental compliance. For a general trend, PS decreased with increasing C-factor when measured by instruments with high compliance. However, this trend gradually diminished and eventually reversed (PS became increased with increasing C-factor) by decreasing the system compliance. Our study indicates that the correlation between PS and C-factor are highly dependent on the compliance of testing instrument for PS measurement. This suggests that the current concept on the role of C-factor in the stress development and transmission to tooth structures, higher C-factor produces higher PS due to reduced flow capacity of more confined materials, can be misleading. Thus, the compliance of the prepared tooth (cavity) structure should also be considered in the effect of C-factor on PS. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Hydro-climatic Investigation of Lake Urmia Shrinkage using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, B.; Khatami, S.; Rashidi, L.; Madani, K.

    2016-12-01

    Lake Urmia (LU) is a shallow endemic lake located in Northwest Iran. Once one of the largest saline lakes in the world, its water level has dramatically dropped by about 7 m since 1997. There has been a contested debate around the major cause(s) of the lake shrinkage and whether this has been due to climatic changes or anthropogenic interventions in the lake's basin. Using MODIS data, we estimate the changes in normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) during the 2000-2015 period. NDVI represents the average quality of vegetation and vegetation coverage and used in this study as an indicator of agricultural drought. Comparison of NDVI with observed precipitation (P), temperature (T), and Lake water level (WL) shows that P and NDVI are significantly and positively correlated with similar trends of near-to-horizontal. Since a significant portion of green coverage represented by NDVI are agricultural lands, the negative correlation between NDVI and WL reflects the trade-off between the declining WL and agricultural development in the basin resulting in less water inflows. A very poor and negative correlation between T and WL could reflect the low contribution of evaporation to the lake's water level decline. However, the normal trend of T weakens the current argument by the local decision makers that the lake has been affected by extreme climatic change. Trend analysis suggests that P, T, and NDVI are in harmony with each other, indicating no extreme climatic regime in the basin. In light of the above, an ever-decreasing trend of WL during the past two decades cannot be simply explained by the hydro-climatology of the lake. Our findings highlight the need to putting more emphasis on understanding the anthropogenic effects of regional development, rather than blaming climatic changes, in the process of developing lake management and restoration plans.

  17. Shrinkage of the scleral canal during cupping reversal in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Hideki; Lesley, Ashley G; Brandt, James D

    2011-10-01

    The mechanism of cupping reversal seen after lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) in pediatric glaucoma is unknown. Theories include forward movement of the lamina cribrosa or shrinkage of a stretched scleral canal. Our study aimed to quantify changes in optic disc size occurring in children who had undergone glaucoma surgery. Retrospective, single-center, observational case series. Children undergoing incisional surgery for pediatric glaucoma at the University of California, Davis. The electronic charts of all patients with pediatric glaucoma were reviewed for the presence of RetCam digital optic nerve photographs (Clarity Medical Systems, Pleasanton, CA). Cases in which the photographs (baseline and follow-up after surgical intervention) were of sufficient quality were analyzed. The optic disc margin was outlined manually using ImageJ software. Inter-session changes in magnification were accounted for by drawing a control polygon joining 4 or 5 fixed landmarks (e.g., vessel crossings) to include a second larger area containing the optic nerve. The optic disc area (in pixels adjusted with the control polygon) was compared between baseline and follow-up images. Change in disc area between baseline and follow-up after surgery. We identified 29 eyes for which baseline and follow-up images were available for analysis. Fifteen eyes of 9 children showed clinically obvious cupping reversal. Fourteen eyes of 12 children showed no cupping reversal. Disc area decreased by 6.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.0 to -3.3) in the obvious reversal group and increased by 4.3% (95% CI, +1.0 to +7.6) in the no reversal group after surgery (P cupping reversal is clinically apparent after successful IOP-lowering surgery for congenital glaucoma, the scleral canal shrinks in area. In contrast, when cupping reversal is not observed, the scleral ring continues to enlarge, indicating ongoing stress on the optic nerve. Clinically obvious cupping reversal is less frequently observed in

  18. Formation of shrinkage porosity during solidification of steel: Numerical simulation and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedler, M.; Michelic, S.; Bernhard, C.

    2016-07-01

    The phase transformations in solidification of steel are accompanied by shrinkage and sudden changes in the solubility of alloying elements, resulting in negative side effects as micro- and macrosegregation and the formation of gas and shrinkage porosities. This paper deals with the numerical and experimental simulation of the formation of shrinkage porosity during the solidification of steel. First the physical basics for the mechanism of shrinkage pore formation will be discussed. The main reason for this type of porosity is the restraint of fluid flow in the mushy zone which leads to a pressure drop. The pressure decreases from the dendrite tip to the root. When the pressure falls below a critical value, a pore can form. The second part of the paper deals with different approaches for the prediction of the formation of shrinkage porosity. The most common one according to these models is the usage of a simple criterion function, like the Niyama criterion. For the computation of the porosity criterion the thermal gradient, cooling rate and solidification rate must be known, easily to determine from numerical simulation. More complex simulation tools like ProCAST include higher sophisticated models, which allow further calculations of the shrinkage cavity. Finally, the different approaches will be applied to a benchmark laboratory experiment. The presented results deal with an ingot casting experiment under variation of taper. The dominant influence of mould taper on the formation of shrinkage porosities can both be demonstrated by the lab experiment as well as numerical simulations. These results serve for the optimization of all ingot layouts for lab castings at the Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy.

  19. Water storage change estimation from in situ shrinkage measurements of clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. te Brake

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the applicability of clay soil elevation change measurements to estimate soil water storage changes, using a simplified approach. We measured moisture contents in aggregates by EC-5 sensors, and in multiple aggregate and inter-aggregate spaces (bulk soil by CS616 sensors. In a long dry period, the assumption of constant isotropic shrinkage proved invalid and a soil moisture dependant geometry factor was applied. The relative overestimation made by assuming constant isotropic shrinkage in the linear (basic shrinkage phase was 26.4% (17.5 mm for the actively shrinking layer between 0 and 60 cm. Aggregate-scale water storage and volume change revealed a linear relation for layers ≥ 30 cm depth. The range of basic shrinkage in the bulk soil was limited by delayed drying of deep soil layers, and maximum water loss in the structural shrinkage phase was 40% of total water loss in the 0–60 cm layer, and over 60% in deeper layers. In the dry period, fitted slopes of the ΔV–ΔW relationship ranged from 0.41 to 0.56 (EC-5 and 0.42 to 0.55 (CS616. Under a dynamic drying and wetting regime, slopes ranged from 0.21 to 0.38 (EC-5 and 0.22 to 0.36 (CS616. Alternating shrinkage and incomplete swelling resulted in limited volume change relative to water storage change. The slope of the ΔV–ΔW relationship depended on the drying regime, measurement scale and combined effect of different soil layers. Therefore, solely relying on surface level elevation changes to infer soil water storage changes will lead to large underestimations. Recent and future developments might provide a basis for application of shrinkage relations to field situations, but in situ observations will be required to do so.

  20. Leaf shrinkage with dehydration: coordination with hydraulic vulnerability and drought tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffoni, Christine; Vuong, Christine; Diep, Steven; Cochard, Hervé; Sack, Lawren

    2014-04-01

    Leaf shrinkage with dehydration has attracted attention for over 100 years, especially as it becomes visibly extreme during drought. However, little has been known of its correlation with physiology. Computer simulations of the leaf hydraulic system showed that a reduction of hydraulic conductance of the mesophyll pathways outside the xylem would cause a strong decline of leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)). For 14 diverse species, we tested the hypothesis that shrinkage during dehydration (i.e. in whole leaf, cell and airspace thickness, and leaf area) is associated with reduction in K(leaf) at declining leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)). We tested hypotheses for the linkage of leaf shrinkage with structural and physiological water relations parameters, including modulus of elasticity, osmotic pressure at full turgor, turgor loss point (TLP), and cuticular conductance. Species originating from moist habitats showed substantial shrinkage during dehydration before reaching TLP, in contrast with species originating from dry habitats. Across species, the decline of K(leaf) with mild dehydration (i.e. the initial slope of the K(leaf) versus Ψ(leaf) curve) correlated with the decline of leaf thickness (the slope of the leaf thickness versus Ψ(leaf) curve), as expected based on predictions from computer simulations. Leaf thickness shrinkage before TLP correlated across species with lower modulus of elasticity and with less negative osmotic pressure at full turgor, as did leaf area shrinkage between full turgor and oven desiccation. These findings point to a role for leaf shrinkage in hydraulic decline during mild dehydration, with potential impacts on drought adaptation for cells and leaves, influencing plant ecological distributions.

  1. Linear Algebra Thoroughly Explained

    CERN Document Server

    Vujičić, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Linear Algebra Thoroughly Explained provides a comprehensive introduction to the subject suitable for adoption as a self-contained text for courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The clear and comprehensive presentation of the basic theory is illustrated throughout with an abundance of worked examples. The book is written for teachers and students of linear algebra at all levels and across mathematics and the applied sciences, particularly physics and engineering. It will also be an invaluable addition to research libraries as a comprehensive resource book for the subject.

  2. Explaining embodied cognition results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, George

    2012-10-01

    From the late 1950s until 1975, cognition was understood mainly as disembodied symbol manipulation in cognitive psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and the nascent field of Cognitive Science. The idea of embodied cognition entered the field of Cognitive Linguistics at its beginning in 1975. Since then, cognitive linguists, working with neuroscientists, computer scientists, and experimental psychologists, have been developing a neural theory of thought and language (NTTL). Central to NTTL are the following ideas: (a) we think with our brains, that is, thought is physical and is carried out by functional neural circuitry; (b) what makes thought meaningful are the ways those neural circuits are connected to the body and characterize embodied experience; (c) so-called abstract ideas are embodied in this way as well, as is language. Experimental results in embodied cognition are seen not only as confirming NTTL but also explained via NTTL, mostly via the neural theory of conceptual metaphor. Left behind more than three decades ago is the old idea that cognition uses the abstract manipulation of disembodied symbols that are meaningless in themselves but that somehow constitute internal "representations of external reality" without serious mediation by the body and brain. This article uniquely explains the connections between embodied cognition results since that time and results from cognitive linguistics, experimental psychology, computational modeling, and neuroscience. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  3. Drying Shrinkage Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Concrete Incorporating Polyvinyl Alcohol Fibres and Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Noushini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study assesses the drying shrinkage behaviour of polyvinyl alcohol fibre reinforced concrete (PVA-FRC containing short-length (6 mm and long-length (12 mm uncoated monofilament PVA fibres at 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.375%, and 0.5% volumetric fractions. Fly ash is also used as a partial replacement of Portland cement in all mixes. PVA-FRC mixes have been compared to length change of control concrete (devoid of fibres at 3 storage intervals: early-age (0–7 days, short-term (0–28 days, and long-term (28–112 days intervals. The shrinkage results of FRC and control concrete up to 112 days indicated that all PVA-FRC mixes exhibited higher drying shrinkage than control. The shrinkage exhibited by PVA-FRC mixes ranged from 449 to 480 microstrain, where this value was only 427 microstrain in the case of control. In addition, the longer fibres exhibited higher mass loss, thus potentially contributing to higher shrinkage.

  4. Effect of limestone and granite coarse aggregate on drying shrinkage of a concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woyciechowski Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effect of limestone and granite aggregate on drying shrinkage of a concrete is investigated. Mixes containing limestone and granite with different Dmax and cement paste volume were tested. A two level, full factorial experiment with three independent factors was conducted which allowed not only to determine the influence of every single factor itself but also potential interactions between them. Measurements of shrinkage were performed up to 98 days after demolding on the beams (10×10×50 cm, in accordance with the procedure from polish standard PN-84/B-06714/23 (Amsler’s method. The multivariate analysis of variances (MANOVA was used for the statistical analysis of the results. The obtained results confirm that the cement paste volume has a decisive influence on a drying shrinkage of a concrete. However statistical analysis showed that with the assumed variability, either the Dmax or type of coarse aggregate has no significant influence on drying shrinkage, still those parameters may potentially be crucial in some cases. A statistically significant interaction between Dmax and type of aggregate has been found. Furthermore the results of drying shrinkage measurements were compared with estimation results from Bażant-Baweja B3 Model and Eurocode 2. The comparison shows that B3 Model provided more accurate results than Eurocode 2.

  5. Modified creep and shrinkage prediction model B3 for serviceability limit state analysis of composite slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhoseini, Alireza

    2016-03-01

    Relatively little research has been reported on the time-dependent in-service behavior of composite concrete slabs with profiled steel decking as permanent formwork and little guidance is available for calculating long-term deflections. The drying shrinkage profile through the thickness of a composite slab is greatly affected by the impermeable steel deck at the slab soffit, and this has only recently been quantified. This paper presents the results of long-term laboratory tests on composite slabs subjected to both drying shrinkage and sustained loads. Based on laboratory measurements, a design model for the shrinkage strain profile through the thickness of a slab is proposed. The design model is based on some modifications to an existing creep and shrinkage prediction model B3. In addition, an analytical model is developed to calculate the time-dependent deflection of composite slabs taking into account the time-dependent effects of creep and shrinkage. The calculated deflections are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  6. Pore Structure and Influence of Recycled Aggregate Concrete on Drying Shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanchen Guo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pore structure plays an important role in the drying shrinkage of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC. High-precision mercury intrusion and water evaporation were utilized to study the pore structure of RAC, which has a different replacement rate of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA, and to analyze its influence on drying shrinkage. Finally, a fractal-dimension calculation model was established based on the principles of mercury intrusion and fractal-geometry theory. Calculations were performed to study the pore-structure fractal dimension of RAC. Results show the following. (1 With the increase in RCA content, the drying shrinkage values increase gradually. (2 Pores with the greatest impact on concrete shrinkage are those whose sizes ranging from 2.5 nm to 50 nm and from 50 nm to 100 nm. In the above two ranges, the proportions of RAC are greater than those of RC0 (natural aggregate concrete, NAC, which is the main reason the shrinkage values of RAC are greater than those of NAC. (3 The pore structure of RAC has good fractal feature, and the addition of RCA increases the complexity of the pore surface of concrete.

  7. Shrinkage modeling of concrete reinforced by palm fibres in hot dry environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchiche, Hamida; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2017-02-01

    The cement materials, such as concrete and conventional mortar present very little resistance to traction and cracking, these hydraulic materials which induces large withdrawals on materials and cracks in structures. The hot dry environments such as: the Saharan regions of Algeria, Indeed, concrete structures in these regions are very fragile, and present high shrinkage. Strengthening of these materials by fibers can provide technical solutions for improving the mechanical performance. The aim of this study is firstly, to reduce the shrinkage of conventional concrete with its reinforcement with date palm fibers. In fact, Algeria has an extraordinary resources in natural fibers (from Palm, Abaca, Hemp) but without valorization in practical areas, especially in building materials. Secondly, to model the shrinkage behavior of concrete was reinforced by date palm fibers. In the literature, several models for still fiber concrete were founded but few are offers for natural fiber concretes. To do so, a still fiber concretes model of YOUNG - CHERN was used. According to the results, a reduction of shrinkage with reinforcement by date palm fibers was showed. A good ability of molding of shrinkage of date palm reinforced concrete with YOUNG - CHERN Modified model was obtained. In fact, a good correlation between experimental data and the model data was recorded.

  8. Some Issues of Shrinkage-Reducing Admixtures Application in Alkali-Activated Slag Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílek, Vlastimil; Kalina, Lukáš; Novotný, Radoslav; Tkacz, Jakub; Pařízek, Ladislav

    2016-06-10

    Significant drying shrinkage is one of the main limitations for the wider utilization of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Few previous works revealed that it is possible to reduce AAS drying shrinkage by the use of shrinkage-reducing admixtures (SRAs). However, these studies were mainly focused on SRA based on polypropylene glycol, while as it is shown in this paper, the behavior of SRA based on 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol can be significantly different. While 0.25% and 0.50% had only a minor effect on the AAS properties, 1.0% of this SRA reduced the drying shrinkage of waterglass-activated slag mortar by more than 80%, but it greatly reduced early strengths simultaneously. This feature was further studied by isothermal calorimetry, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Calorimetric experiments showed that 1% of SRA modified the second peak of the pre-induction period and delayed the maximum of the main hydration peak by several days, which corresponds well with observed strength development as well as with the MIP and SEM results. These observations proved the certain incompatibility of SRA with the studied AAS system, because the drying shrinkage reduction was induced by the strong retardation of hydration, resulting in a coarsening of the pore structure rather than the proper function of the SRA.

  9. Radial shrinkage and ultrasound acoustic emissions of fresh versus pre-dried Norway spruce sapwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Sabine; Konnerth, Johannes; Plank, Bernhard; Salaberger, Dietmar; Hansmann, Christian

    2010-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and radial shrinkage were compared between fully saturated fresh and pre-dried Norway spruce sapwood during dehydration at ambient temperature. Hydraulic conductivity measurements, anatomical investigations on bordered pits and X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans were done to search for possible AE sources other than the breakage of the water columns inside the tracheids. Both fresh and pre-dried specimens showed radial shrinkage due to drying surface layers right from the beginning of dehydration, which induced almost no AE. Whereas no dimensional changes occurred in pre-dried wood thereafter, fresh wood showed a rapid shrinkage increase starting at 25% relative water loss. This dimensional change ceased when further moisture got lost and was even partially reversed. AE of fresh wood showed much higher activity and energy, which is a waveform feature that describes the strength of the acoustic signal. Extremely high single AE energy events were detected at this critical stage of dehydration. After partial recovery from shrinkage, neither dimensional changes nor AE activity showed differences between fresh and pre-dried wood after more than 80% relative moisture loss. Our results suggested that fresh sapwood is more prone to dehydration stresses than pre-dried sapwood. Differences in AE and shrinkage behavior might be due to the weakening or distortion of the pit membranes (cavitation fatigue), pit aspiration, structural changes of the cell walls and micro-checks, which occurred during the first dehydration cycle.

  10. Effect of steel fibers on plastic shrinkage cracking of normal and high strength concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Eren

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Naturally concrete shrinks when it is subjected to a drying environment. If this shrinkage is restrained, tensile stresses develop and concrete may crack. Plastic shrinkage cracks are especially harmful on slabs. One of the methods to reduce the adverse effects of shrinkage cracking of concrete is by reinforcing concrete with short randomly distributed fibers. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fiber volume and aspect ratio of hooked steel fibers on plastic shrinkage cracking behavior together with some other properties of concrete. In this research two different compressive strength levels namely 56 and 73 MPa were studied. Concretes were produced by adding steel fibers of 3 different volumes of 3 different aspect ratios. From this research study, it is observed that steel fibers can significantly reduce plastic shrinkage cracking behavior of concretes. On the other hand, it was observed that these steel fibers can adversely affect some other properties of concrete during fresh and hardened states.

  11. A shrinkage method for testing the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yong; Yuan, Ying

    2013-11-01

    Testing for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is often used as an initial step for checking the quality of genotyping. When testing the HWE for case-control data, the impact of a potential genetic association between the marker and the disease must be controlled for otherwise the results may be biased. Li and Li [2008] proposed a likelihood ratio test (LRT) that accounts for this potential genetic association and it is more powerful than the commonly used control-only χ² test. However, the LRT is not efficient when the marker is independent of the disease, and also requires numerical optimization to calculate the test statistic. In this article, we propose a novel shrinkage test for assessing the HWE. The proposed shrinkage test yields higher statistical power than the LRT when the marker is independent of or weakly associated with the disease, and converges to the LRT when the marker is strongly associated with the disease. In addition, the proposed shrinkage test has a closed form and can be easily used to test the HWE for large datasets that result from genome-wide association studies. We compare the performance of the shrinkage test with existing methods using simulation studies, and apply the shrinkage test to a genome-wide association dataset for Alzheimer's disease. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  12. A generalized DEMATEL theory with a shrinkage coefficient for an indirect relation matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hsiang-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL theory with a shrinkage coefficient of indirect relation matrix is proposed, and a useful validity index, called Liu’s validity index, is also proposed for evaluating the performance of any DEMATEL model. If the shrinkage coefficient of an indirect relation matrix is equal to 1, then this new theory is identical to the traditional theory; in other words, it is a generalization of the traditional theory. Furthermore, the indirect relation is always considerably greater than the direct one in traditional DEMATEL theory, which is unreasonable and unfair because it overemphasizes the influence of the indirect relation. We prove in this paper that if the shrinkage coefficient is equal to 0.5, then the indirect relation is less than its direct relation. Because the shrinkage coefficient belongs to [0.5, 1], according to Liu’s validity index, we can find a more appropriate shrinkage coefficient to obtain a more efficient DEMATEL method. Some crucial properties of this new theory are discussed, and a simple example is provided to illustrate the advantages of the proposed theory.

  13. Effects of Prepolymerized Particle Size and Polymerization Kinetics on Volumetric Shrinkage of Dental Modeling Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Yub Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control. The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction particle size analysis, respectively. Linear polymerization shrinkage strains of the resins were monitored for 20 minutes using a custom-made linometer, and the final values (at 20 minutes were converted into volumetric shrinkages. The final volumetric shrinkage values for the modeling resins were statistically similar (P>0.05 or significantly larger (P<0.05 than that of the control resin and were related to the polymerization kinetics (P<0.05 rather than the PMMA bead size (P=0.335. Therefore, the optimal control of the polymerization kinetics seems to be more important for producing high-precision resin structures rather than the use of dental modeling resins.

  14. Measurement of linear polymerization shrinkage in light cure Ideal Makoo composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M.

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available "nAbstract: Polymerization shrinkage of light cure composite resins causes many complications in conservative and esthetic restorations. The objective of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion and the amount of filler in IDM and tetric ceram composites. Ten disk shaped, uncured specimens (8mm×1.547mm of each composite were placed on glass slide in the center of the metal attached to it. Then specimens were light cured for 60s from underneath. After 30 minutes, the thickness of specimens, using a micrometer and the percent of the polymerization shrinkage of each sample were measured. Statistical analysis was carried out by t-test (P<0.05. Also the degree of conversion of specimens was evaluated with FTIR and the mineral filler content was measured by burning in electric oven. Polymerization shrinkage in IDM and tetric ceram was not significantly different. Degree of conversion and mineral filler content in tetric ceram was greater than that of IDM. "nIt is assumed that the low degree of conversion in IDM is due to its chemical composition and filler content. Also, the similarity in linear polymerization shrinkage between IDM and tetric ceram may be caused by the low degree of conversion in IDM.

  15. Precise Cross-Sectional Measurement of Photoresist Shrinkage Caused by Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2013-06-01

    A mechanism of the photoresist shrinkage induced by electron-beam (EB) irradiation was studied in detail. A precise cross-sectional profile of a photoresist pattern is obtained by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) after HfO2 atomic layer deposition on a sample. Photoresist lines and spaces formed on either of bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) layer or spin-on-glass (SOG) layer were exposed to EB at a much higher dose than a practical dose (to accelerate shrinkage intentionally). The obtained STEM images of the patterns before and after EB irradiation showed that EB irradiation causes necking of the pattern profile as well as linewidth slimming. In addition, it was suggested that the BARC layer shrinkage results in the elastic deformation of the pattern profile, whereas the SOG layer does not shrink. Furthermore, EB irradiation only to the lines or spaces was performed. The EB irradiation to spaces caused sidewall shrinkage and necking of the pattern profile, although no electron was irradiated directly into the pattern. This result is considered to be due to the electrons scattered from the spaces to the pattern sidewall. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation showed that the distribution of the deposited energy on the pattern surface corresponds to the change of the pattern shape. Consequently, our study clarifies the importance of the effect of elastic shape change and the impact of the electrons scattered from the underlying layer to the sidewall on photoresist shrinkage.

  16. Shrinkage Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Recycled Tyre Polymer Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of fibres are often used in concrete to prevent microcracking due to shrinkage, and polypropylene fibres are among the most often used ones. If not prevented, microcracks can lead to the development of larger cracks as drying shrinkage occurs, enabling penetration of aggressive substances from the environment and reducing durability of concrete structures. The hypothesis of the present research is that polypropylene fibres, used in concrete for controlling formation of microcracks due to shrinkage, can be replaced with recycled polymer fibres obtained from end-of-life tyres. To test the hypothesis, concrete mixtures containing polypropylene fibres and recycled tyre polymer fibres were prepared and tested. Experimental programme focused on autogenous, free, and restrained shrinkage. It was shown that PP fibres can be substituted with higher amount of recycled tyre polymer fibres obtaining concrete with similar shrinkage behaviour. The results indicate promising possibilities of using recycled tyre polymer fibres in concrete products. At the same time, such applications would contribute to solving the problem of waste tyre disposal.

  17. Shrinkage Characteristics of Experimental Polymer Containing Composites under Controlled Light Curing Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Pefferkorn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of polymethylmethacrylate polymer of different molecular weight at the aerosil/ethyleneglycol- or 1,3 butanediol-dimethacrylate interfaces was determined to provide microstructured networks. Their structural characteristics were determined to be controlled by the amount of polymer initially supplied to the system. The sediment (the settled phase characteristics, determined as a function of the polymer concentration and the rate of the polymerization shrinkage determined for composite resins, obtained by extrusion of the sediment after centrifugation, were found to be correlated. The specific role of the adsorbed polymer was found to be differently perturbed with the supplementary supply of dimethacrylate based monomer additives. Particularly, the bisphenol A dimethacrylate that generated crystals within the sediment was found to impede the shrinkage along the crystal lateral faces and strongly limit the shrinkage along its basal faces. Addition of ethyleneglycol- or polyethylene-glycoldimethacrylate monomers was determined to modify the sedimentation characteristics of the aerosil suspension and the shrinkage properties of the composites. Finally, the effects of stepwise light curing methods with prolonged lighting-off periods were investigated and found to modify the development and the final values of the composite shrinkage.

  18. Some Issues of Shrinkage-Reducing Admixtures Application in Alkali-Activated Slag Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílek, Vlastimil; Kalina, Lukáš; Novotný, Radoslav; Tkacz, Jakub; Pařízek, Ladislav

    2016-01-01

    Significant drying shrinkage is one of the main limitations for the wider utilization of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Few previous works revealed that it is possible to reduce AAS drying shrinkage by the use of shrinkage-reducing admixtures (SRAs). However, these studies were mainly focused on SRA based on polypropylene glycol, while as it is shown in this paper, the behavior of SRA based on 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol can be significantly different. While 0.25% and 0.50% had only a minor effect on the AAS properties, 1.0% of this SRA reduced the drying shrinkage of waterglass-activated slag mortar by more than 80%, but it greatly reduced early strengths simultaneously. This feature was further studied by isothermal calorimetry, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Calorimetric experiments showed that 1% of SRA modified the second peak of the pre-induction period and delayed the maximum of the main hydration peak by several days, which corresponds well with observed strength development as well as with the MIP and SEM results. These observations proved the certain incompatibility of SRA with the studied AAS system, because the drying shrinkage reduction was induced by the strong retardation of hydration, resulting in a coarsening of the pore structure rather than the proper function of the SRA. PMID:28773584

  19. In situ investigation of the shrinkage of photopolymerized micro/nanostructures: the effect of the drying process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Quan; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2012-02-15

    We report on experimental study of the shrinkage of photopolymerized micro/nanostructures fabricated by femtosecond direct laser writing in organic-inorganic resists. Blueshift of the stop-band positions of fabricated photonic crystals during the drying process, which follows the development and rinsing stages, indicates that the drying process plays an important role in the formation of the shrinkage. It is further confirmed that the shrinkage almost completely occurs during the drying process by in situ optical monitoring the structures. These findings will help to better understand, control, and even positively utilize the shrinkage in the applications of the photopolymerization-based direct laser writing technique.

  20. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate reduces polymerization shrinkage and increases the hardness of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih-Dean Jan

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate represents an effective means of reducing polymerization shrinkage and increasing the surface hardness of dental composite resins.

  1. An Experimental Study on Shrinkage Strains of Normal-and High-Strength Concrete-Filled Frp Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Thomas; Ozbakkaloglu, Togay

    2017-09-01

    It is now well established that concrete-filled fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) tubes (CFFTs) are an attractive construction technique for new columns, however studies examining concrete shrinkage in CFFTs remain limited. Concrete shrinkage may pose a concern for CFFTs, as in these members the curing of concrete takes place inside the FRP tube. This paper reports the findings from an experimental study on concrete shrinkage strain measurements for CFFTs manufactured with normal- and high-strength concrete (NSC and HSC). A total of 6 aramid FRP (AFRP)-confined concrete specimens with circular cross-sections were manufactured, with 3 specimens each manufactured using NSC and HSC. The specimens were instrumented with surface and embedded strain gauges to monitor shrinkage development of exposed concrete and concrete sealed inside the CFFTs, respectively. All specimens were cylinders with a 152 mm diameter and 305 mm height, and their unconfined concrete strengths were 44.8 or 83.2 MPa. Analysis of the shrinkage measurements from concrete sealed inside the CFFTs revealed that embedment depth and concrete compressive strength only had minor influences on recorded shrinkage strains. However, an analysis of shrinkage measurements from the exposed concrete surface revealed that higher amounts of shrinkage can occur in HSC. Finally, it was observed that shrinkage strains are significantly higher for concrete exposed at the surface compared to concrete sealed inside the CFFTs.

  2. Matlab for engineers explained

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafsson, Fredrik

    2003-01-01

    This book is written for students at bachelor and master programs and has four different purposes, which split the book into four parts: 1. To teach first or early year undergraduate engineering students basic knowledge in technical computations and programming using MATLAB. The first part starts from first principles and is therefore well suited both for readers with prior exposure to MATLAB but lacking a solid foundational knowledge of the capabilities of the system and readers not having any previous experience with MATLAB. The foundational knowledge gained from these interactive guided tours of the system will hopefully be sufficient for an effective utilization of MATLAB in the engineering profession, in education and in research. 2. To explain the foundations of more advanced use of MATLAB using the facilities added the last couple of years, such as extended data structures, object orientation and advanced graphics. 3. To give an introduction to the use of MATLAB in typical undergraduate courses in elec...

  3. Explaining wartime rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschall, Jonathan

    2004-05-01

    In the years since the first reports of mass rapes in the Yugoslavian wars of secession and the genocidal massacres in Rwanda, feminist activists and scholars, human rights organizations, journalists, and social scientists have dedicated unprecedented efforts to document, explain, and seek solutions for the phenomenon of wartime rape. While contributors to this literature agree on much, there is no consensus on causal factors. This paper provides a brief overview of the literature on wartime rape in historical and ethnographical societies and a critical analysis of the four leading explanations for its root causes: the feminist theory, the cultural pathology theory, the strategic rape theory, and the biosocial theory. The paper concludes that the biosocial theory is the only one capable of bringing all the phenomena associated with wartime rape into a single explanatory context.

  4. Does Viewing Explain Doing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Gert Martin; Kuyper, Lisette; Adam, Philippe C G

    2013-01-01

    that, when controlling for important other factors, SEM consumption influences sexual behaviors. The small to moderate associations that emerged between SEM consumption and sexual behavior after controlling for other variables suggest that SEM is just one factor among many that may influence youth...... hierarchical multiple regression analyses to control for other factors, the association between SEM consumption and a variety of sexual behaviors was found to be significant, accounting for between 0.3% and 4% of the total explained variance in investigated sexual behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests......INTRODUCTION: Concerns have been voiced that the use of sexually explicit materials (SEMs) may adversely affect sexual behaviors, particularly in young people. Previous studies have generally found significant associations between SEM consumption and the sexual behaviors investigated. However, most...

  5. Prediction and improvement of shrinkage porosity in TiAl based alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Yong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present research has developed a novel investment casting process for ingot production of TiAl alloys through forming a small vertical temperature gradient on the mold. The advantage of this process is to guarantee that the castings solidify sequentially from bottom to top. The analysis of numerical simulation and experimental results showed that the shrinkage porosity of Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy was significantly improved by forming a vertical temperature gradient of 3 ℃/mm on the mold, while the increase of pouring temperature and pressure on the molten alloys had no apparent effect on the reduction of shrinkage porosity. The critical value of the Niyama criterion that can reliably predict the shrinkage porosity in Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy was identified by the comparison of experimental and simulated results.

  6. Significance of Shrinkage Induced Clamping Pressure in Fiber-Matrix Bonding in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    inhomogeneity embedded in a matrix consisting of acementitious material undergoing shrinkage during hydration(autogenous shrinkage). Furthermore, the paperpresents the analysis necessary to perform an interpretation of the experimental results and which allows for thedetermination of the clamping pressure......The present paper accesses the significance of shrinkage inducedclamping pressure in fiber/matrix bonding mechanisms incementitious composite materials. The paper contains a description of an experimental setup whichallows mbox{measurement} of the clamping pressure which develops on anelastic...... acting on any elastic inhomogeneityembedded in the same cementitious matrix material. Fiber-shaped inhomogeneities are of special interest in cementitious composite material systems andresults are presented for the development of clamping pressure on three typical fiber types in two typical cementpastes...

  7. Shrinkage of freeze-dried cryosections of cells: Investigations by EFTEM and cryo-CLEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, G; Nolin, F; Wortham, L; Ploton, D; Banchet, V; Michel, J

    2016-09-01

    Freeze-drying of cryosections of cells or tissues is considered to be the most efficient preparation for microanalysis purpose related to transmission electron microscopy. It allows the measurements of ions and water contents at the ultrastructural level. However an important drawback is associated to freeze-drying: the shrinkage of the cryosections. The aim of this paper is the investigation of this phenomenon by means of three different methods applied to both hydrated and dehydrated cryosections: direct distance measurements on fiducial points, thickness measurements by energy filtered transmission microscopy (EFTEM) and cryo-correlative light electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM). Measurements in our experimental conditions reveal a lateral shrinkage around 10% but the most important result concerns the lack of differential shrinkage between most of the cellular compartments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Numerical simulation of early-age shrinkage effects on RC member deflections and cracking development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bernardi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage effects on short-term behavior of reinforced concrete elements are often neglected both in design code provisions and in numerical simulations. However, it is known that their influence on serviceability performance can be significant, especially in case of lightly-reinforced beams. As a matter of fact, the restraint provided by the reinforcement on concrete determines a reduction of the cracking load of the structural element, as well as an increase of its deflection. This paper deals with the modeling of early-age shrinkage effects in the field of smeared crack approaches. To this aim, an existing non-linear constitutive relation for cracked reinforced concrete elements is extended herein to include early-age concrete shrinkage. Careful verifications of the model are carried out by comparing numerical results with significant experimental data reported in technical literature, providing a good agreement both in terms of global and local behavior.

  9. Shrinkage Analysis on Thick Plate Part using Response Surface Methodology (RSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isafiq M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The work reported herein is about an analysis on the quality (shrinkage on a thick plate part using Response Surface Methodology (RSM. Previous researches showed that the most influential factor affecting the shrinkage on moulded parts are mould and melt temperature. Autodesk Moldflow Insight software was used for the analysis, while specifications of Nessei NEX 1000 injection moulding machine and P20 mould material were incorporated in this study on top of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS as a moulded thermoplastic material. Mould temperature, melt temperature, packing pressure and packing time were selected as variable parameters. The results show that the shrinkage have improved 42.48% and 14.41% in parallel and normal directions respectively after the optimisation process.

  10. Diversity shrinkage: Cross-validating pareto-optimal weights to enhance diversity via hiring practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Q Chelsea; Wee, Serena; Newman, Daniel A

    2017-12-01

    To reduce adverse impact potential and improve diversity outcomes from personnel selection, one promising technique is De Corte, Lievens, and Sackett's (2007) Pareto-optimal weighting strategy. De Corte et al.'s strategy has been demonstrated on (a) a composite of cognitive and noncognitive (e.g., personality) tests (De Corte, Lievens, & Sackett, 2008) and (b) a composite of specific cognitive ability subtests (Wee, Newman, & Joseph, 2014). Both studies illustrated how Pareto-weighting (in contrast to unit weighting) could lead to substantial improvement in diversity outcomes (i.e., diversity improvement), sometimes more than doubling the number of job offers for minority applicants. The current work addresses a key limitation of the technique-the possibility of shrinkage, especially diversity shrinkage, in the Pareto-optimal solutions. Using Monte Carlo simulations, sample size and predictor combinations were varied and cross-validated Pareto-optimal solutions were obtained. Although diversity shrinkage was sizable for a composite of cognitive and noncognitive predictors when sample size was at or below 500, diversity shrinkage was typically negligible for a composite of specific cognitive subtest predictors when sample size was at least 100. Diversity shrinkage was larger when the Pareto-optimal solution suggested substantial diversity improvement. When sample size was at least 100, cross-validated Pareto-optimal weights typically outperformed unit weights-suggesting that diversity improvement is often possible, despite diversity shrinkage. Implications for Pareto-optimal weighting, adverse impact, sample size of validation studies, and optimizing the diversity-job performance tradeoff are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Influence of resin cement polymerization shrinkage on stresses in porcelain crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Liliana G; Kelly, J Robert

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of polymerization shrinkage of the cement layer on stresses within feldspathic ceramic crowns, using experimentally validated FEA models for (1) increasing occlusal cement thickness; and, (2) bonded versus non-bonded ceramic-cement interfaces. 2-D axial symmetric models simulated stylized feldspathic crowns (1.5mm occlusal thickness) cemented with resin-cement layers of 50-500μm on dentin preparations, being loaded (500N) or not. Ceramic-cement interface was either bonded or not. Cement was bonded to the dentin in all models. Maximum axial shrinkage of 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 4.65% were simulated. The first principal stresses developing in the cementation surface at the center and at the occluso-axial line-angle of the crown were registered. Polymerization shrinkage of the cement increased tensile stresses in the ceramic, especially in loaded non-bonded crowns for thicker cement layers. Stresses in loaded non-bonded crowns increased as much as 87% when cement shrinkage increased from 0% to 4.65% (100-187MPa), for a 500μm-thick cement. Increasing polymerization shrinkage strain raised the tensile stresses, especially at the internal occlusal-axial line-angle, for bonded crowns. Changes in the polymerization shrinkage strain (from 0% to 4.65%) have little effect on the tensile stresses generated at the cementation surface of the ceramic crowns, when the occlusal cement thickness is thin (approx. 50μm for bonded crowns). However, as the cement becomes thicker stresses within the ceramic become significant. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymerization Behavior and Mechanical Properties of High-Viscosity Bulk Fill and Low Shrinkage Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, S; Takamizawa, T; Nojiri, K; Imai, A; Tsujimoto, A; Endo, H; Suzuki, S; Suda, S; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    The present study determined the mechanical properties and volumetric polymerization shrinkage of different categories of resin composite. Three high viscosity bulk fill resin composites were tested: Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TB, Ivoclar Vivadent), Filtek Bulk Fill posterior restorative (FB, 3M ESPE), and Sonic Fill (SF, Kerr Corp). Two low-shrinkage resin composites, Kalore (KL, GC Corp) and Filtek LS Posterior (LS, 3M ESPE), were used. Three conventional resin composites, Herculite Ultra (HU, Kerr Corp), Estelite ∑ Quick (EQ, Tokuyama Dental), and Filtek Supreme Ultra (SU, 3M ESPE), were used as comparison materials. Following ISO Specification 4049, six specimens for each resin composite were used to determine flexural strength, elastic modulus, and resilience. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage was determined using a water-filled dilatometer. Data were evaluated using analysis of variance followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference test (α=0.05). The flexural strength of the resin composites ranged from 115.4 to 148.1 MPa, the elastic modulus ranged from 5.6 to 13.4 GPa, and the resilience ranged from 0.70 to 1.0 MJ/m 3 . There were significant differences in flexural properties between the materials but no clear outliers. Volumetric changes as a function of time over a duration of 180 seconds depended on the type of resin composite. However, for all the resin composites, apart from LS, volumetric shrinkage began soon after the start of light irradiation, and a rapid decrease in volume during light irradiation followed by a slower decrease was observed. The low shrinkage resin composites KL and LS showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested materials at the measuring point of 180 seconds. In contrast, the three bulk fill resin composites showed higher volumetric change than the other resin composites. The findings from this study provide clinicians with valuable information regarding the mechanical properties and

  13. Conventional and high-intensity halogen light effects on polymerization shrinkage of orthodontic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Yagmur; Uysal, Tancan; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Demir, Abdullah; Botsali, Murat Selim

    2006-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the polymerization shrinkage of three orthodontic adhesives. In addition we wanted to determine the effectiveness of the high-intensity quartz tungsten halogen (HQTH) in curing orthodontic adhesives on polymerization shrinkage with that of the quartz tungsten halogen (QTH). A total of 120 glass ring molds were prepared using a low-speed saw. The internal surface of the glass rings were roughened and etched. Adhesive pastes were placed into the glass molds, which were sandwiched between two glass slides. Samples were divided into six groups according to the combination of three orthodontic adhesives (Kurasper F, Light Bond, and Transbond XT) and two light intensities. One half of each 40 samples of three adhesive pastes was polymerized for 20 seconds by a QTH (Hilux 350), and the other half was polymerized for 10 seconds by a HQTH (Optilux 501). The volumetric polymerization shrinkage for each system was measured through the specific density method modified by Puckett and Smith. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way analysis of variance for intergroup comparisons. The HQTH-curing unit resulted in a more polymerization shrinkage than did the QTH for all investigated adhesives. However, no statistically significant differences were found. The highest shrinkage was observed for Light Bond cured with HQTH (1.59 +/- 0.82%), and the lowest value was observed for Transbond XT cured with QTH (1.23 +/- 0.60%). There are no significant differences in polymerization shrinkage of the three investigated orthodontic adhesives when polymerized with a QTH or a HQTH.

  14. Regional brain shrinkage over two years: individual differences and effects of pro-inflammatory genetic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, N; Ghisletta, P; Dahle, C L; Bender, A R; Yang, Y; Yuan, P; Daugherty, A M; Raz, N

    2014-12-01

    We examined regional changes in brain volume in healthy adults (N=167, age 19-79years at baseline; N=90 at follow-up) over approximately two years. With latent change score models, we evaluated mean change and individual differences in rates of change in 10 anatomically-defined and manually-traced regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), orbital frontal cortex (OF), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (Hc), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), caudate nucleus (Cd), putamen (Pt), insula (In), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC). Significant mean shrinkage was observed in the Hc, CbH, In, OF, and PhG, and individual differences in change were noted in all regions, except the OF. Pro-inflammatory genetic variants modified shrinkage in PhG and CbH. Carriers of two T alleles of interleukin-1β (IL-1β C-511T, rs16944) and a T allele of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T, rs1801133) polymorphisms showed increased PhG shrinkage. No effects of a pro-inflammatory polymorphism for C-reactive protein (CRP-286C>A>T, rs3091244) or apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele were noted. These results replicate the pattern of brain shrinkage observed in previous studies, with a notable exception of the LPFC, thus casting doubt on the unique importance of prefrontal cortex in aging. Larger baseline volumes of CbH and In were associated with increased shrinkage, in conflict with the brain reserve hypothesis. Contrary to previous reports, we observed no significant linear effects of age and hypertension on regional brain shrinkage. Our findings warrant further investigation of the effects of neuroinflammation on structural brain change throughout the lifespan. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cake shrinkage during freeze drying: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhatla, S; Obert, J P; Luthra, S; Bhugra, C; Pikal, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate, by experimental studies and theoretical analysis, the phenomenon of cake shrinkage during the lyophilization process and to investigate the effect of shelf temperature during primary drying and secondary drying on the degree of cake shrinkage. Freeze-drying experiments were performed using 5% w/v sucrose where the drying protocols were altered in order to produce differing product temperature profiles. Resistance data during freeze drying were evaluated by the Manometric Temperature Measurement (MTM) method. Theoretical simulation of the freeze-drying process was performed using the Passage Freeze-Drying software. The difference between the glass transition temperature and the product temperature (Tg-T) obtained from the theoretical analysis was calculated and used for correlation with experimental shrinkage data. The Brunauer, Emmeth, Teller (BET) Specific Surface Area (SSA) Analysis was used as a method to quantify the degree of shrinkage. Samples were also analyzed for pore volume by mercury porosimetry. The SSA analysis on the freeze-dried samples showed an increase in SSA when samples were freeze dried at a lower shelf temperature during primary drying and at a slower ramp rate during secondary drying. The trend in surface area values was consistent with that obtained for pore size values. However, differences obtained among the various samples are small and cake diameter measurements showed that there was approximately 17% shrinkage even in the sample freeze dried at temperatures well below the Tg' and Tg. Variations in process and product temperature only accounted for an additional 2%-3% shrinkage. Resistance data obtained at various primary drying shelf temperatures showed a good correlation with surface area. The Tg-T behavior of the freeze-dried samples showed that a slow ramp rate of 0.1 degrees C/min during secondary drying maintains a product well below the Tg at all times and a higher ramp rate gives negative

  16. The effect of mold surface topography on plastic parat in-process shrinkage in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mold surface roughness on in-process in-flow linear part shrinkage in injection molding has been carried out. The investigation is based on an experimental two-cavity tool, where the cavities have different surface topographies, but are otherwise identical....... The study has been carried out for typical commercial polystyrene and polypropylene grades. The relationship between mold surface topography and linear shrinkage has been investigated with an experimental two-cavity mold producing simple rectangular parts with the nominal dimensions 1 x 25 x 50 mm (see...

  17. Sparse contrast-source inversion using linear-shrinkage-enhanced inexact Newton method

    KAUST Repository

    Desmal, Abdulla

    2014-07-01

    A contrast-source inversion scheme is proposed for microwave imaging of domains with sparse content. The scheme uses inexact Newton and linear shrinkage methods to account for the nonlinearity and ill-posedness of the electromagnetic inverse scattering problem, respectively. Thresholded shrinkage iterations are accelerated using a preconditioning technique. Additionally, during Newton iterations, the weight of the penalty term is reduced consistently with the quadratic convergence of the Newton method to increase accuracy and efficiency. Numerical results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method.

  18. Cell shrinkage as a signal to apoptosis in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Martin B; Friborg, Christel R; Schneider, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Cell shrinkage is a hallmark of the apoptotic mode of programmed cell death, but it is as yet unclear whether a reduction in cell volume is a primary activation signal of apoptosis. Here we studied the effect of an acute elevation of osmolarity (NaCl or sucrose additions, final osmolarity 687...... mosmol l(-1)) on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts to identify components involved in the signal transduction from shrinkage to apoptosis. After 1.5 h the activity of caspase-3 started to increase followed after 3 h by the appearance of many apoptotic-like bodies. The caspase-3 activity increase was greatly enhanced...

  19. Explaining climate danger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreskes, N.

    2016-12-01

    The idea of `managing planet Earth' is traceable back at least to the 1970s. Recently, it has been reformulated in the idea of a "good Anthropocene": the idea that humans should and can try to manage our planet now that we have become a planetary force. Yet available evidence and experience suggests that our prior attempts to do so have been plagued by under-estimation of the scale of the problems and over-estimation of our capacities to address them. In any case, Earth is not at risk—our planet will survive despite what we do or fail to do. Global climate change, for example, is not a problem for the planet, it is a problem for us. As the UNFCCC articulated in the 1990s, climate change matters because it is dangerous. Yet many Americans still do not understand why this is the case. I suggest that scientists can profitably focus attention on explaining this danger—why climate represents a threat to our health, well-being, and lives—and on what kinds of steps can be taken to reduce the danger.

  20. Surprising shrinkage of expanding gels under an external load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon Jeong; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Prosser, Shona; Whitten, Philip G; Wallace, Gordon G; Kim, Sun I

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogels are fascinating and useful in that they can show large volume changes in response to various stimuli, such as temperature or chemical environment. Here we report the peculiar observation that chemically crosslinked hydrogels that normally expand owing to a change in electrolyte pH can be made to shrink in certain circumstances. Specifically, these hydrogels contract when tested at a constant compressive force and subjected to a pH change that causes expansion in the absence of the applied load. When tested under tension, the gels always expand. Although the effects of external stress on the swelling of gels is known, the concomitant change in gel mechanical properties during pH switching was found to be a more dominant effect in our studies. However, existing mechanical models used to predict dimensional changes in actuator materials could not explain both the tensile and compression results. In addition, we show that the friction between metal plates of the apparatus and the gel is a key factor in explaining the contractile actuation under compressive loads. The observations reported in this paper are important for the successful design and use of hydrogel actuators in devices such as valves for microfluidics.

  1. Study of SEM preparation artefacts with correlative microscopy: Cell shrinkage of adherent cells by HMDS-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Puetz, Norbert; Gepp, Michael M; Neubauer, Julia C; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2016-11-01

    One of the often reported artefacts during cell preparation to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is the shrinkage of cellular objects, that mostly occurs at a certain time-dependent stage of cell drying. Various methods of drying for SEM, such as critical point drying, freeze-drying, as well as hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS)-drying, were usually used. The latter becomes popular since it is a low cost and fast method. However, the correlation of drying duration and real shrinkage of objects was not investigated yet. In this paper, cell shrinkage at each stage of preparation for SEM was studied. We introduce a shrinkage coefficient using correlative light microscopy (LM) and SEM of the same human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The influence of HMDS-drying duration on the cell shrinkage is shown: the longer drying duration, the more shrinkage is observed. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that cell shrinkage is inversely proportional to cultivation time: the longer cultivation time, the more cell spreading area and the less cell shrinkage. Our results can be applicable for an exact SEM quantification of cell size and determination of cell spreading area in engineering of artificial cellular environments using biomaterials. SCANNING 38:625-633, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Use of rice husk ash for mitigating the autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes at low water cement ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, H.; Ye, G.; Fehling, Ekkehard; Middendorf, Bernhard; Thiemicke, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that the high risk of early age micro-crack of HPC/UHPC is attributed to the large magnitude of early age autogenous shrinkage caused by self-desiccation in binder hydration. Over the years, several methods have been proposed to mitigate autogenous shrinkage based on internal

  3. Experimental evaluation and simulation of volumetric shrinkage and warpage on polymeric composite reinforced with short natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jonnathan D.; Fajardo, Jorge I.; Cuji, Alvaro R.; García, Jaime A.; Garzón, Luis E.; López, Luis M.

    2015-09-01

    A polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composite is developed by extrusion and injection molding process. The shrinkage and warpage of high-density polyethylene reinforced with short natural fibers of Guadua angustifolia Kunth are analyzed by experimental measurements and computer simulations. Autodesk Moldflow® and Solid Works® are employed to simulate both volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts at different configurations: 0 wt.%, 20 wt.%, 30 wt.% and 40 wt.% reinforcing on shrinkage and warpage behavior of polymer composite. Become evident the restrictive effect of reinforcing on the volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts. The results indicate that volumetric shrinkage of natural composite is reduced up to 58% with fiber increasing, whereas the warpage shows a reduction form 79% to 86% with major fiber content. These results suggest that it is a highly beneficial use of natural fibers to improve the assembly properties of polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composites.

  4. Taguchi design and flower pollination algorithm application to optimize the shrinkage of triaxial porcelain containing palm oil fuel ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainudin, A.; Sia, C. K.; Ong, P.; Narong, O. L. C.; Nor, N. H. M.

    2017-01-01

    In the preparation of triaxial porcelain from Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA), a new parameter variable must be determined. The parameters involved are the particle size of POFA, percentage of POFA in triaxial porcelain composition, moulding pressure, sintering temperature and soaking time. Meanwhile, the shrinkage is the dependent variable. The optimization process was investigated using a hybrid Taguchi design and flower pollination algorithm (FPA). The interaction model of shrinkage was derived from regression analysis and found that the shrinkage is highly dependent on the sintering temperature followed by POFA composition, moulding pressure, POFA particle size and soaking time. The interaction between sintering temperature and soaking time highly affects the shrinkage. From the FPA process, targeted shrinkage approaching zero values were predicted for 142 μm particle sizes of POFA, 22.5 wt% of POFA, 3.4 tonne moulding pressure, 948.5 °C sintering temperature and 264 minutes soaking time.

  5. Linear shrinkage test: justification for its reintroduction as a standard South African test method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sampson, LR

    2009-06-04

    Full Text Available Several problems with the linear shrinkage test specified in Method A4 of the THM 1 1979 were addressed as part of this investigation in an effort to improve the alleged poor reproducibility of the test and justify its reintroduction into THM 1. A...

  6. Fabrication and characterization of self-folding thermoplastic sheets using unbalanced thermal shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Christian; Mehrnezhad, Ali; YekrangSafakar, Ashkan; Park, Kidong

    2017-06-14

    Self-folding or micro-origami technologies are actively investigated as a novel manufacturing process to fabricate three-dimensional macro/micro-structures. In this paper, we present a simple process to produce a self-folding structure with a biaxially oriented polystyrene sheet (BOPS) or Shrinky Dinks. A BOPS sheet is known to shrink to one-third of its original size in plane, when it is heated above 160 °C. A grid pattern is engraved on one side of the BOPS film with a laser engraver to decrease the thermal shrinkage of the engraved side. The thermal shrinkage of the non-engraved side remains the same and this unbalanced thermal shrinkage causes folding of the structure as the structure shrinks at high temperature. We investigated the self-folding mechanism and characterized how the grid geometry, the grid size, and the power of the laser engraver affect the bending curvature. The developed fabrication process to locally modulate thermomechanical properties of the material by engraving the grid pattern and the demonstrated design methodology to harness the unbalanced thermal shrinkage can be applied to develop complicated self-folding macro/micro structures.

  7. Analysis of the shrinkage at the thick plate part using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, N. M.; Azlan, M. Z.; Shayfull, Z.; Roselina, S.; Nasir, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Injection moulding is well known for its manufacturing process especially in producing plastic products. To measure the final product quality, there are lots of precautions to be taken into such as parameters setting at the initial stage of the process. Sometimes, if these parameters were set up wrongly, defects may be occurred and one of the well-known defects in the injection moulding process is a shrinkage. To overcome this problem, a maximisation at the precaution stage by making an optimal adjustment on the parameter setting need to be done and this paper focuses on analysing the shrinkage by optimising the parameter at thick plate part with the help of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and ANOVA analysis. From the previous study, the outstanding parameter gained from the optimisation method in minimising the shrinkage at the moulded part was packing pressure. Therefore, with the reference from the previous literature, packing pressure was selected as the parameter setting for this study with other three parameters which are melt temperature, cooling time and mould temperature. The analysis of the process was obtained from the simulation by Autodesk Moldflow Insight (AMI) software and the material used for moulded part was Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS). The analysis and result were obtained and it found that the shrinkage can be minimised and the significant parameters were found as packing pressure, mould temperature and melt temperature.

  8. A quantitative analysis of mineral loss and shrinkage of in vitro demineralized human root surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, J M; Nyvad, B; Van de Plassche-Simons, Y M; Fejerskov, O

    1991-10-01

    Demineralization of dentin specimens proceeds at a faster rate than that of enamel. Although this is generally accepted, a quantification of the rate of formation of root lesions is hampered by the shrinkage of the lesions when these are dried prior to microradiographic analysis. This leads to a significant underestimation of the lesion depth and total mineral loss. The aim of this paper was to quantitate the rate of mineral loss during root lesion formation in vitro and to determine the shrinkage of root specimens as a result of drying. Unerupted roots of human teeth were subjected to a demineralizing system of 0.1 mol/L lactate buffer (pH = 4.8) with 0.2 mmol/L methanehydroxydiphosphonate during four, 11, 22, and 44 days. The root lesions were assessed by quantitative microradiography. The demineralizing solutions were analyzed to determine the amounts of root tissue dissolved. A comparison of these two sets of data showed that, with the demineralizing system used, root lesions may shrink up to 62%. Fixation of the specimens in fixative did not affect this shrinkage. Chemical analysis showed that mineral loss proceeded linearly with time. From the data-sets of this study, a model was developed to compensate for the shrinkage in the dentin specimens. In this way, it was possible to calculate the lesion depth at four demineralization times as being 130, 220, 320, and 530 microns, respectively. These values were in agreement with a microscopic determination of the lesion depth.

  9. A modelling study of drying shrinkage damage in concrete repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Ye, G.; van Breugel, K.

    2014-01-01

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems (Martinola, Sadouki et al. 2001, Beushausen and Alexander 2007). Magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the amount of restraint,

  10. Combined Use of Shrinkage Reducing Admixture and CaO in Cement Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Giosuè, Chiara; Monosi, Saveria

    2017-10-01

    The combined addition of a Shrinkage-Reducing Admixture (SRA) with a CaO-based expansive agent (CaO) has been found to have a synergistic effect to improve the dimensional stability of cement based materials. In this work, aimed to further investigate the effect, mortar and self-compacting concrete specimens were prepared either without admixtures, as reference, or with SRA alone and/or CaO. Their performance was compared in terms of compressive strength and free shrinkage measurements. Results showed that the synergistic effect in reducing shrinkage is confirmed in the specimens manufactured with SRA and CaO. In order to clarify this phenomenon, the effect of SRA on the hydration of CaO as well as cement was evaluated through different techniques. The obtained results show that SRA induces a finer microstructure of the CaO hydration products and a retarding effect on the microstructure development of cement based materials. A more deformable mortar or concrete, due to the delay in microstructure development by SRA, coupled with a finer microstructure of CaO hydration products could allow higher early expansion, which might contribute in contrasting better the successive drying shrinkage.

  11. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeongsoo; Kim, Gyuyong; Yoo, Jaechul; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Kim, Hongseop; Choi, Hyeonggil; Kim, Youngduck

    2016-02-26

    This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC) with two types of fiber-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and nylon. A small fiber volume fraction, such as 0.05% or 0.1%, in RFAC with polyvinyl alcohol or nylon fibers was used for optimum efficiency in minimum quantity. Additionally, to make a comparative evaluation of the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking, we examined natural fine aggregate concrete as well. The test results revealed that the addition of fibers and fine aggregates plays an important role in improving the mechanical performance of the investigated concrete specimens as well as controlling their cracking behavior. The mechanical properties such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and flexural strength of fiber-reinforced RFAC were slightly better than those of non-fiber-reinforced RFAC. The shrinkage cracking behavior was examined using plat-ring-type and slab-type tests. The fiber-reinforced RFAC showed a greater reduction in the surface cracks than non-fiber-reinforced concrete. The addition of fibers at a small volume fraction in RFAC is more effective for drying shrinkage cracks than for improving mechanical performance.

  12. Specimen size effect in the volumetric shrinkage of cancellous bone measured at two levels of dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievers, W Brent; Lee, Victoria; Arsenault, Simon M; Waldman, Stephen D; Pilkey, A Keith

    2007-01-01

    Water is commonly removed from bone to study its effect on mechanical behaviour; however, dehydration also alters the bone structure. To make matters worse, measuring structural changes in cancellous bone is complicated by a number of factors. Therefore, the goals of this study were to address these issues by (1) comparing Archimedes' method and a helium pycnometer as methods for measuring cancellous bone volume; (2) measuring the apparent dimensional and volumetric tissue shrinkage of cancellous bone at two levels of dehydration; and, (3) identifying whether a size effect exists in cancellous bone shrinkage. Cylindrical specimens (3, 5 and 8.3 mm diameters) of cancellous bone were taken from the distal bovine femur. The apparent dimensions of each cylindrical specimen were measured in a fully hydrated state (HYD), after drying at room temperature (AIR), and after oven drying at 105 degrees C (OVEN). Tissue volume measurements for those three hydration states were obtained using both a helium pycnometer and Archimedes' method. Aluminium foams, which mimic the cancellous structure, were used as controls. The results suggest that the helium pycnometer and Archimedes' method yield identical results in the HYD and AIR states, but that Archimedes' method under-predicts the nominal OVEN volume by incorporating the collagen-apatite porosity. A distinct size effect on volumetric shrinkage is observed (pshrinkage (2% and 7%) at the two dehydration levels is much smaller than the measured volumetric tissue shrinkage (16% and 29%), which results in a reduced dehydrated bone volume fraction.

  13. Short-term effects of radiofrequency shrinkage treatment for anterior cruciate ligament relaxation on proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Min; Liu, Yujie; Li, Zhongli; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-10-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) shrinkage is used in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The present study investigated the therapeutic effects of RF on ACL relaxation and the probable influencing factors. Patients with ACL relaxation were included. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: a treatment group, in which patients were treated with RF shrinkage (RF group); a control group, in which patients received conventional surgical treatment. Thermal shrinkage was performed on ACL using an ArthroCare® CAPSure® wand. Lysholm scores, proprioceptive testing and Tegner activity scores were evaluated before and after treatment (at 6 and 12 months). A total of 38 patients were included. The mean ± SD Lysholm score of those in the RF group at 12 months' post-treatment was significantly higher than in controls. The angle of deviation of the knee joint in RF group was significantly larger than in the control group at 6 months' post-treatment. RF shrinkage treatment for ACL laxity could improve knee scores, and may affect proprioception and recovery of activity after surgery.

  14. Shrinkage-reducing admixtures and early-age desiccation in cement pastes and mortars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, D. P.; Geiker, Mette Rica; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    Fundamental studies of the early-age desiccation of cement-based materials with and without a shrinkage-reducing admixture (SRA) have been performed. Studies have been conducted under both sealed and drying conditions. Physical measurements include mass loss, surface tension, X-ray absorption...

  15. Minimal volume regulation after shrinkage of red blood cells from five species of reptiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Karina; Berenbrink, Michael; Koldkjær, Pia

    2008-01-01

    cell function. The present study demonstrates that oxygenated RBCs in all major groups of reptiles exhibit no or a very reduced RVI upon ~ 25% calculated hyperosmotic shrinkage. Thus, RBCs from the snakes Crotalus durissus and Python regius, the turtle Trachemys scripta and the alligator Alligator...

  16. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Ye, G.; van Breugel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions,

  17. Prediction of Shrinkage Porosity Defect in Sand Casting Process of LM25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Hardik; Dhulia, Jay K.; Maniar, Nirav P.

    2017-08-01

    In the present worldwide and aggressive environment, foundry commercial enterprises need to perform productively with least number of rejections and create casting parts in shortest lead time. It has become extremely difficult for foundry industries to meet demands of defects free casting and meet strict delivery schedules. The process of casting solidification is complex in nature. Prediction of shrinkage defect in metal casting is one of the critical concern in foundries and is one of the potential research areas in casting. Due to increasing pressure to improve quality and to reduce cost, it is very essential to upgrade the level of current methodology used in foundries. In the present research work, prediction methodology of shrinkage porosity defect in sand casting process of LM25 using experimentation and ANSYS is proposed. The objectives successfully achieved are prediction of shrinkage porosity distribution in Al-Si casting and determining effectiveness of investigated function for predicting shrinkage porosity by correlating results of simulating studies to those obtained experimentally. The real-time application of the research reflects from the fact that experimentation is performed on 9 different Y junctions at foundry industry and practical data obtained from experimentation are used for simulation.

  18. Setting shrinkage strains of chemical-cured glass ionomer-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shrinkage strains are exhibited by the current formulations of chemical-cured dental restorative systems. In resin-modified glass ionomer systems, these have been linked to filler contents, types and quantity of monomer. Post-gelation rigid contraction that follows onset of cure leading to marginal defects is a clinically ...

  19. Direct voxel-based comparisons between grey matter shrinkage and glucose hypometabolism in chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Ludivine; Segobin, Shailendra; Lannuzel, Coralie; Boudehent, Céline; Vabret, François; Eustache, Francis; Beaunieux, Hélène; Pitel, Anne L

    2016-09-01

    Alcoholism is associated with widespread brain structural abnormalities affecting mainly the frontocerebellar and the Papez's circuits. Brain glucose metabolism has received limited attention, and few studies used regions of interest approach and showed reduced global brain metabolism predominantly in the frontal and parietal lobes. Even though these studies have examined the relationship between grey matter shrinkage and hypometabolism, none has performed a direct voxel-by-voxel comparison between the degrees of structural and metabolic abnormalities. Seventeen alcoholic patients and 16 control subjects underwent both structural magnetic resonance imaging and (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography examinations. Structural abnormalities and hypometabolism were examined in alcoholic patients compared with control subjects using two-sample t-tests. Then, these two patterns of brain damage were directly compared with a paired t-test. Compared to controls, alcoholic patients had grey matter shrinkage and hypometabolism in the fronto-cerebellar circuit and several nodes of Papez's circuit. The direct comparison revealed greater shrinkage than hypometabolism in the cerebellum, cingulate cortex, thalamus and hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus. Conversely, hypometabolism was more severe than shrinkage in the dorsolateral, premotor and parietal cortices. The distinct profiles of abnormalities found within the Papez's circuit, the fronto-cerebellar circuit and the parietal gyrus in chronic alcoholism suggest the involvement of different pathological mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeongsoo; Kim, Gyuyong; Yoo, Jaechul; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Kim, Hongseop; Choi, Hyeonggil; Kim, Youngduck

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC) with two types of fiber—polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and nylon. A small fiber volume fraction, such as 0.05% or 0.1%, in RFAC with polyvinyl alcohol or nylon fibers was used for optimum efficiency in minimum quantity. Additionally, to make a comparative evaluation of the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking, we examined natural fine aggregate concrete as well. The test results revealed that the addition of fibers and fine aggregates plays an important role in improving the mechanical performance of the investigated concrete specimens as well as controlling their cracking behavior. The mechanical properties such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and flexural strength of fiber-reinforced RFAC were slightly better than those of non-fiber-reinforced RFAC. The shrinkage cracking behavior was examined using plat-ring-type and slab-type tests. The fiber-reinforced RFAC showed a greater reduction in the surface cracks than non-fiber-reinforced concrete. The addition of fibers at a small volume fraction in RFAC is more effective for drying shrinkage cracks than for improving mechanical performance. PMID:28773256

  1. Ultra high performance concrete made with rice husk ash for reduced autogenous shrinkage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Breugel, K.; Van Tuan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Ultra High Strength Concrete (UHPC) is generally made with low w/c mixtures and by adding silica fume. Low w/c mixtures, however, exhibit high autogenous shrinkage, while a high amount of silica fume increases the price of these mixtures. For designing ultra high strength mixtures with low

  2. Quantification of shrinkage microcracking in young mortar with fluorescence light microscopy and ESEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, J.; Van Mier, J.C.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a method is described to quantify shrinkage microcracking in young mortar by means of crack mapping. Visualisation of the microcracks is realised with two techniques: Fluorescence Light Microscopy (FLM) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). The preliminary results

  3. SEM-induced shrinkage and site-selective modification of single-crystal silicon nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Liu, Zewen

    2017-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores with feature sizes around 5 nm play a critical role in bio-sensing fields, especially in single molecule detection and sequencing of DNA, RNA and proteins. In this paper we present a systematic study on shrinkage and site-selective modification of single-crystal silicon nanopores with a conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM). Square nanopores with measurable sizes as small as 8 nm × 8 nm and rectangle nanopores with feature sizes (the smaller one between length and width) down to 5 nm have been obtained, using the SEM-induced shrinkage technique. The analysis of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and the recovery of the pore size and morphology reveal that the grown material along with the edge of the nanopore is the result of deposition of hydrocarbon compounds, without structural damage during the shrinking process. A simplified model for pore shrinkage has been developed based on observation of the cross-sectional morphology of the shrunk nanopore. The main factors impacting on the task of controllably shrinking the nanopores, such as the accelerating voltage, spot size, scanned area of e-beam, and the initial pore size have been discussed. It is found that single-crystal silicon nanopores shrink linearly with time under localized irradiation by SEM e-beam in all cases, and the pore shrinkage rate is inversely proportional to the initial equivalent diameter of the pore under the same e-beam conditions.

  4. The evolution of shrinkage strain of pet-mortar composite eco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concretes and mortars are subjected to several kinds of shrinkage strains which represent the volumic variations resulting from the cement hydration and are governed by various physical and chemical aspects. The use of polyethylene terephthalate PET plastic wastes which are available in quantity and within low cost in ...

  5. Reducing of on Polymerization Shrinkage by Application of UV Curable Dental Restorative Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świderska Jolanta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes dental compositions contain in-organic fillers, multifunctional methacrylates and photoinitiators. The main problem by application and UV curing process is the shrinkage of photoreactive dental materials during and after UV curing process. Total shrinkage of UV curable dental composites is a phenomenon of polymerization shrinkage, typical behavior for multifunctional methacrylates during polymerization process. The important factors by curing of dental composites are: kind and concentration of used methacrylates, their functionality, double bond concentration, kind and concentration of added photoinitiator and UV dose. They are investigated UV-curable dental compositions based on 2,2-bis-[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryxloyloxypropylphenyl]propane (Bis-GMA and containing such multifunctional monomers as 1,3-butanediol dimethacrylate (1,3-BDDMA, diethylene glycol dimethacrylate (DEGDMA, tetraethylene glycol dimethacrylate (T3EGDMA, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA, polyethylene glycol 200 dimethacrylate (PEG200DA. Reduction of polymerization shrinkage of dental compositions is at the moment a major problem by dental technology.

  6. Influence of rare earths on shrinkage porosity in thin walled ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2009-01-01

    Ductile cast iron has been cast in test bars with thickness from 2 to 10 mm. The rare earth elements La and Ce have been added to some of the castings to evaluate their influence on microstructure and shrinkage tendency. Both La and Ce increased the graphite nodule count, especially for thickness...

  7. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes. Part IV: Effects of freezing protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-11-10

    The shrinkage and cracking of pure trehalose cakes during lyophilization has been determined quantitatively using different protocols for the freezing step. The influences of shelf cooling rate and of a two-step freezing protocol with holding and annealing phases were investigated. A small change in the shelf cooling rate from 0.4°C to 0.2°C per minute produced surprisingly large increases in shrinkage and reductions in cracking over all trehalose concentrations up to 30% w/v. The two-step freezing protocol also increased shrinkage and reduced cracking in the final-product cakes, especially at trehalose concentrations ≥ 15% and with large vial fill height. A combination of two-step freezing with use of TopLyo vials produced less than 1.5% cracking even at high trehalose concentrations and large fill height. The results give further confirmation of the causal linkage of shrinkage and cracking during lyophilization, and also illustrate how cracking can be greatly reduced by manipulating the freezing protocol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitigation strategies for early-age shrinkage cracking in bridge decks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Early-age shrinkage cracking has been observed in many concrete bridge decks in Washington State and elsewhere around the U.S. The cracking increases the effects of freeze-thaw damage, spalling, and corrosion of steel reinforcement, thus resulting in...

  9. Autogenous shrinkage of Ducorit S5R ASTM C 1698-09 test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars

    The report deals with experimental measurement of autogenous shrinkage of Ducorit S5R according to the test method ASTM C 1698-09. This test method measures the bulk strain of a sealed cementitious specimen, at constant temperature and not subjected to external forces, from the time of final...

  10. Porous stainless steel hollow fibers with shrinkage-controlled small radial dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten-Olieman, Maria W.J.; Raaijmakers, Michiel; Raaijmakers, Michiel J.T.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Wessling, Matthias; Nijmeijer, Arian; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2011-01-01

    A method is presented for the preparation of thin (∼250 μm) porous stainless steel hollow fiber membranes based on dry–wet spinning of a particle-loaded polymer solution followed by heat treatment. Extraordinarily small radial dimensions were achieved by controlled shrinkage during thermal

  11. The Influence of Water Sorption of Dental Light-Cured Composites on Shrinkage Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Bociong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The contraction stress generated during the photopolymerization of resin dental composites is the major disadvantage. The water sorption in the oral environment should counteract the contraction stress. The purpose was to evaluate the influence of the water sorption of composite materials on polymerization shrinkage stress generated at the restoration-tooth interface. The following materials were tested: Filtek Ultimate, Gradia Direct LoFlo, Heliomolar Flow, Tetric EvoCeram, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Tetric EvoFlow, Tetric EvoFlow Bulk Fill, X-tra Base, Venus BulkFil, and Ceram.X One. The shrinkage stress was measured immediately after curing and after: 0.5 h, 24 h, 72 h, 96 h, 168 h, 240 h, 336 h, 504 h, 672 h, and 1344 h by means of photoelastic study. Moreover, water sorption and solubility were evaluated. Material samples were weighted on scale in time intervals to measure the water absorbency and the dynamic of this process. The tested materials during polymerization generated shrinkage stresses ranging from 6.3 MPa to 12.5 MPa. Upon water conditioning (56 days, the decrease in shrinkage strain (not less than 48% was observed. The decrease in value stress in time is material-dependent.

  12. Measurement with corrugated tubes of early-age autogenous shrinkage of cement-based material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Qian; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    The use of a special corrugated mould enables transformation of volume strain into horizontal, linear strain measurement in the fluid stage. This allows continuous measurement of the autogenous shrinkage of cement-based materials since casting, and also effectively eliminates unwanted influence...

  13. Characterizetion of Flexural Strength, Warpage and Shrinkage of Polypropylene-Nanoclay-Nanocomposites Blend with Gigantochloa Scortechinii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, S. Z.; Othman, M. H.; Hasan, S.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the characterization of Flexural Strength, Warpage and Shrinkage of reinforcement gigantochloa scortechinii fibre. The content of fiber were fixed at 0 wt.%, 3 wt.% and 6 wt.% in uniform increased. The selected injection moulding processing conditions were packing pressure, melt temperature, screw speed and filling time. The quality factors that need to be improved upon the characterization were flexural strength, warpage and shrinkage. This research started by drying the Gigantochloa Scortechinii fibres at 120°C. After that, 3 wt.% of the fibres were mixed with 81 wt.% of polypropylene, 15 wt.% of polypropylene grafted maleic anhydride (compatibilizer) and 1 wt. % of nanoclay. Samples with 6 wt.% of fibers were also prepared for comparison purpose. The mixing process was performed by using Brabender Lab-Compounder KETSE 20/40 and the pallets were produced using used Brabender® pelletizer with diameters of 1 to 4 mm. The optimisation process was accomplished by adopting the Taguchi L9 orthogonal array method. According to the results, for 0 wt.% GS, the flexural strength is 30.0082 MPa, the warpage is 0.0030000 mm and the shrinkage is 0.0003830 mm at packing pressure 40%, melt temperature 165°C, filled time 2 seconds and screw speed 35%. For the result 3 wt.% GS, the flexural strength is 32.2477 MPa, the warpage is 0.006670 mm and the shrinkage is 0.0003830 mm at packing pressure is 35%, melt temperature 165°C, filled times is 1 seconds and screw speed is 30%. While for the 6 wt.% GS, the results of the flexural strength is 36.9084 MPa, the warpage is 0.0066700 mm and the shrinkage is 0.0003830 mm at packing pressure is 35%, melt temperature 165°C, filled time is 2 seconds and screw speed is 30%. The existence of Gigantochloa Scortechinii fibre was also proven to effect significantly towards flexural strength with 6% increasing value ordering from 0 wt.% GS to 6 wt.% GS. while, the warpage value increasing from 0.003000 mm to 0.00667 mm and

  14. Predicting shrinkage and warpage in injection molding: Towards automatized mold design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicke, Florian; Behr, Marek; Elgeti, Stefanie

    2017-10-01

    It is an inevitable part of any plastics molding process that the material undergoes some shrinkage during solidification. Mainly due to unavoidable inhomogeneities in the cooling process, the overall shrinkage cannot be assumed as homogeneous in all volumetric directions. The direct consequence is warpage. The accurate prediction of such shrinkage and warpage effects has been the subject of a considerable amount of research, but it is important to note that this behavior depends greatly on the type of material that is used as well as the process details. Without limiting ourselves to any specific properties of certain materials or process designs, we aim to develop a method for the automatized design of a mold cavity that will produce correctly shaped moldings after solidification. Essentially, this can be stated as a shape optimization problem, where the cavity shape is optimized to fulfill some objective function that measures defects in the molding shape. In order to be able to develop and evaluate such a method, we first require simulation methods for the diffierent steps involved in the injection molding process that can represent the phenomena responsible for shrinkage and warpage ina sufficiently accurate manner. As a starting point, we consider the solidification of purely amorphous materials. In this case, the material slowly transitions from fluid-like to solid-like behavior as it cools down. This behavior is modeled using adjusted viscoelastic material models. Once the material has passed a certain temperature threshold during cooling, any viscous effects are neglected and the behavior is assumed to be fully elastic. Non-linear elastic laws are used to predict shrinkage and warpage that occur after this point. We will present the current state of these simulation methods and show some first approaches towards optimizing the mold cavity shape based on these methods.

  15. Control of polymerization shrinkage and stress in nanogel-modified monomer and composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Rafael R; Garcia, Jeffrey W; Barros, Matthew D; Lewis, Steven H; Pfeifer, Carmem S; Liu, JianCheng; Stansbury, Jeffrey W

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates the effects of nano-scale prepolymer particles as additives to model dental monomer and composite formulations. Discrete nanogel particles were prepared by solution photopolymerization of isobornyl methacrylate and urethane dimethacrylate in the presence of a chain transfer agent, which also provided a means to attach reactive groups to the prepolymer. Nanogel was added to triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) in increments between 5 and 40 wt% with resin viscosity, reaction kinetics, shrinkage, mechanical properties, stress and optical properties evaluated. Maximum loading of barium glass filler was determined as a function of nanogel content and composites with varied nanogel content but uniform filler loading were compared in terms of consistency, conversion, shrinkage and mechanical properties. High conversion, high molecular weight internally crosslinked and cyclized nanogel prepolymer was efficiently prepared and redispersed into TEGDMA with an exponential rise in viscosity accompanying nanogel content. Nanogel addition at any level produced no deleterious effects on reaction kinetics, conversion or mechanical properties, as long as reactive nanogels were used. A reduction in polymerization shrinkage and stress was achieved in proportion to nanogel content. Even at high nanogel concentrations, the maximum loading of glass filler was only marginally reduced relative to the control and high strength composite materials with low shrinkage were obtained. The use of reactive nanogels offers a versatile platform from which resin and composite handling properties can be adjusted while the polymerization shrinkage and stress development that challenge the adhesive bonding of dental restoratives are controllably reduced. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurement, growth types and shrinkage of newly formed aerosol particles at an urban research platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Imre; Németh, Zoltán; Weidinger, Tamás; Kovács, Boldizsár; Kristóf, Gergely

    2016-06-01

    Budapest platform for Aerosol Research and Training (BpART) was created for advancing long-term on-line atmospheric measurements and intensive aerosol sample collection campaigns in Budapest. A joint study including atmospheric chemistry or physics, meteorology, and fluid dynamics on several-year-long data sets obtained at the platform confirmed that the location represents a well-mixed, average atmospheric environment for the city centre. The air streamlines indicated that the host and neighbouring buildings together with the natural orography play an important role in the near-field dispersion processes. Details and features of the airflow structure were derived, and they can be readily utilised for further interpretations. An experimental method to determine particle diffusion losses in the differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) system of the BpART facility was proposed. It is based on CPC-CPC (condensation particle counter) and DMPS-CPC comparisons. Growth types of nucleated particles observed in 4 years of measurements were presented and discussed specifically for cities. Arch-shaped size distribution surface plots consisting of a growth phase followed by a shrinkage phase were characterised separately since they supply information on nucleated particles. They were observed in 4.5 % of quantifiable nucleation events. The shrinkage phase took 1 h 34 min in general, and the mean shrinkage rate with standard deviation was -3.8 ± 1.0 nm h-1. The shrinkage of particles was mostly linked to changes in local atmospheric conditions, especially in global radiation and the gas-phase H2SO4 concentration through its proxy, or to atmospheric mixing in few cases. Some indirect results indicate that variations in the formation and growth rates of nucleated particles during their atmospheric transport could be a driving force of shrinkage for particles of very small sizes and on specific occasions.

  17. Porcine intestinal mast cells. Evaluation of different fixatives for histochemical staining techniques considering tissue shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rieger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Staining of mast cells (MCs, including porcine ones, is critically dependent upon the fixation and staining technique. In the pig, mucosal and submucosal MCs do not stain or stain only faintly after formalin fixation. Some fixation methods are particularly recommended for MC staining, for example the fixation with Carnoy or lead salts. Zinc salt fixation (ZSF has been reported to work excellently for the preservation of fixation-sensitive antigens. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable histological method for counting of MCs in the porcine intestinum. For this purpose, different tissue fixation and staining methods that also allow potential subsequent immunohistochemical investigations were evaluated in the porcine mucosa, as well as submucosa of small and large intestine. Tissues were fixed in Carnoy, lead acetate, lead nitrate, Zamboni and ZSF and stained subsequently with either polychromatic methylene blue, alcian blue or toluidine blue. For the first time our study reveals that ZSF, a heavy metal fixative, preserves metachromatic staining of porcine MCs. Zamboni fixation was not suitable for histochemical visualization of MCs in the pig intestine. All other tested fixatives were suitable. Alcian blue and toluidine blue co-stained intestinal goblet cells which made a prima facie identification of MCs difficult. The polychromatic methylene blue proved to be the optimal staining. In order to compare MC counting results of the different fixation methods, tissue shrinkage was taken into account. As even the same fixation caused shrinkage-differences between tissue from small and large intestine, different factors for each single fixation and intestinal localization had to be calculated. Tissue shrinkage varied between 19% and 57%, the highest tissue shrinkage was found after fixation with ZSF in the large intestine, the lowest one in the small intestine after lead acetate fixation. Our study emphasizes that MC counting results from

  18. Volume shrinkage and rheological studies of epoxidised and unepoxidised poly(styrene-block-butadiene-block-styrene) triblock copolymer modified epoxy resin-diamino diphenyl methane nanostructured blend systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sajeev Martin; Puglia, Debora; Kenny, Josè M; Parameswaranpillai, Jyotishkumar; Vijayan P, Poornima; Pionteck, Jűrgen; Thomas, Sabu

    2015-05-21

    Styrene-block-butadiene-block-styrene (SBS) copolymers epoxidised at different epoxidation degrees were used as modifiers for diglycidyl ether of the bisphenol A-diamino diphenyl methane (DGEBA-DDM) system. Epoxy systems containing modified epoxidised styrene-block-butadiene-block-styrene (eSBS) triblock copolymer with compositions ranging from 0 to 30 wt% were prepared and the curing reaction was monitored in situ using rheometry and pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) analysis. By controlling the mole percent of epoxidation, we could generate vesicles, worm-like micelles and core-shell nanodomains. At the highest mole percent of epoxidation, the fraction of the epoxy miscible component in the triblock copolymer (epoxidised polybutadiene (PB)) was maximum. This gave rise to core-shell nanodomains having a size of 10-15 nm, in which the incompatible polystyrene (PS) becomes the core, the unepoxidised PB becomes the shell and the epoxidised PB interpenetrates with the epoxy phase. On the other hand, the low level of epoxidation gave rise to bigger domains having a size of ∼1 μm and the intermediate epoxidation level resulted in a worm-like structure. This investigation specifically focused on the importance of cure rheology on nanostructure formation, using rheometry. The reaction induced phase separation of the PS phase in the epoxy matrix was carefully explored through rheological measurements. PVT measurements during curing were carried out to understand the volume shrinkage of the blend, confirming that shrinkage behaviour is related to the block copolymer phase separation process during curing. The volume shrinkage was found to be maximum in the case of blends with unmodified SBS, where a heterogeneous morphology was observed, while a decrease in the shrinkage was evidenced in the case of SBS epoxidation. It could be explained by two effects: (1) solubility of the epoxidised block copolymer in the DGEBA leads to the formation of nanoscopic domains upon

  19. Convective drying of hawthorn fruit (Crataegus spp.): Effect of experimental parameters on drying kinetics, color, shrinkage, and rehydration capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aral, Serdar; Beşe, Ayşe Vildan

    2016-11-01

    Thin layer drying characteristics and physicochemical properties of hawthorn fruit (Crataegus spp.) were investigated using a convective dryer at air temperatures 50, 60 and 70°C and air velocities of 0.5, 0.9 and 1.3m/s. The drying process of hawthorn took place in the falling rate period, and the drying time decreased with increasing air temperature and velocity. The experimental data obtained during the drying process were fitted to eleven different mathematical models. The Midilli et al.'s model was found to be the best appropriate model for explaining the drying behavior of hawthorn fruit. Effective moisture diffusion coefficients (Deff) were calculated by Fick's diffusion model and their values varied from 2.34×10(-10)m(2)/s to 2.09×10(-9)m(2)/s. An Arrhenius-type equation was applied to determine the activation energies. While the shrinkage decreased, the rehydration ratio increased with increasing air temperature and air velocity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evolution of hut access facing glacier shrinkage in the Mer de Glace basin (Mont Blanc massif, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourey, Jacques; Ravanel, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    Given the evolution of high mountain environment due to global warming, mountaineering routes and huts accesses are more and more strongly affected by glacial shrinkage and concomitant gravity processes, but almost no studies have been conducted on this relationship. The aim of this research is to describe and explain the evolution over the last century of the access to the five alpine huts around the Mer de Glace glacier (Mont Blanc massif), the larger French glacier (length = 11.5 km, area = 30 km²), a major place for Alpine tourism since 1741 and the birthplace of mountaineering, by using several methods (comparing photographs, surveying, collecting historical documents). While most of the 20th century shows no marked changes, loss of ice thickness and associated erosion of lateral moraines generate numerous and significant changes since the 1990s. Boulder falls, rockfalls and landslides are the main geomorphological processes that affect the access, while the glacier surface lowering makes access much longer and more unstable. The danger is then greatly increased and the access must be relocated and/or equipped more and more frequently (e.g. a total of 520 m of ladders has been added). This questions the future accessibility to the huts, jeopardizing an important part of mountaineering and its linked economy in the Mer de Glace area.

  1. Effects of molecular structure of the resins on the volumetric shrinkage and the mechanical strength of dental restorative composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, L U; Kim, J W; Kim, C K

    2006-09-01

    To prepare a dental composite that has a low amount of curing shrinkage and excellent mechanical strength, various 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy propoxy) phenyl] propane (Bis-GMA) derivatives were synthesized via molecular structure design, and afterward, properties of their mixtures were explored. Bis-GMA derivatives, which were obtained by substituting methyl groups for hydrogen on the phenyl ring in the Bis-GMA, exhibited lower curing shrinkage than Bis-GMA, whereas their viscosities were higher than that of Bis-GMA. Other Bis-GMA derivatives, which contained a glycidyl methacrylate as a molecular end group exhibited reduced curing shrinkage and viscosity. Methoxy substitution for hydroxyl groups on the Bis-GMA derivatives was performed for the further reduction of the viscosity and curing shrinkage. Various resin mixtures, which had the same viscosity as the commercial one, were prepared, and their curing shrinkage was examined. A resin mixture containing 2,2-bis[3,5-dimethyl, 4-(2-methoxy-3-methacryloyloxy propoxy) phenyl] propane] (TMBis-M-GMA) as a base resin and 4-tert-butylphenoxy-2-methyoxypropyl methacrylate (t-BP-M-GMA) as a diluent exhibited the lowest curing shrinkage among them. The composite prepared from this resin mixture also exhibited the lowest curing shrinkage along with enhanced mechanical properties.

  2. Early age volume changes in concrete due to chemical shrinkage of cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebensperger, L.

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Unrestrained early age volume changes due to chemical shrinkage in cement pastes, mortars and concretes have been determined. The measurements were performed on sealed and unsealed samples which were stored under water. The chemical shrinkage of unsealed specimens represents the amount of absorbed water due to the chemical reaction of the cement It depends only on the cement content of the sample and does not lead to changes of the external dimensions. However the chemical shrinkage of sealed specimens is connected with a real volume change due to self-desiccation and the effect of internal pressures. The shrinkage depends in this case on the restraining effect of coarse aggregates as well as the cement content. The chemical shrinkage measured on sealed concretes was much higher than the one expected to ocurr on concretes, because normally an equalization of pressure takes place to some extent in the interior of the concrete. The use of expansive additives showed that they may compensate the chemical shrinkage, but its dosage is very sensitive and should be defined exactly for each case particularly.

    Se han determinado los cambios volumétricos que ocurren en pastas de cemento, morteros y hormigones a edad temprana debido al efecto de la retracción química. Las mediciones se realizaron en probetas selladas y no selladas sumergidas bajo agua. La retracción química en probetas no selladas representa la cantidad de agua absorbida debido a la reacción química del cemento. Depende solamente del contenido de cemento de la probeta y no produce ningún cambio en las dimensiones de la probeta. Por el contrario, la retracción química en probetas selladas está relacionada con un cambio volumétrico real debido al efecto de la autodesecación y presiones internas. La retracción en este caso depende tanto de la restricción que imponen los áridos, como del contenido de cemento. La retracción química medida en hormigones sellados

  3. Evaluation of shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana Paula G. O.; Karam, Leandro Z.; Galvão, José R.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was evaluate the shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique. Two implants were placed in an artificial bone, with the two transfer copings joined with dental floss and acrylic resins; two dental resins are used. Measurements of deformation and temperature were performed with Fiber Braggs grating sensor for 17 minutes. The results revealed that one type of resin shows greater values of polymerization shrinkage than the other. Pattern resins did not present lower values of shrinkage, as usually reported by the manufacturer.

  4. Learned Shrinkage Approach for Low-Dose Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Shtok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a direct nonlinear reconstruction algorithm for Computed Tomography (CT, designed to handle low-dose measurements. It involves the filtered back-projection and adaptive nonlinear filtering in both the projection and the image domains. The filter is an extension of the learned shrinkage method by Hel-Or and Shaked to the case of indirect observations. The shrinkage functions are learned using a training set of reference CT images. The optimization is performed with respect to an error functional in the image domain that combines the mean square error with a gradient-based penalty, promoting image sharpness. Our numerical simulations indicate that the proposed algorithm can manage well with noisy measurements, allowing a dose reduction by a factor of 4, while reducing noise and streak artifacts in the FBP reconstruction, comparable to the performance of a statistically based iterative algorithm.

  5. Durability of a low shrinkage TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this randomized controlled prospective trial was to evaluate the durability of a low shrinkage and TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in posterior restorations in a 6-year follow up. Material and methods: 139 Class II restorations were placed in 67 patients...... with a mean age of 53 years (range 29-82). Each participant received at random two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations. In the first cavity of each pair the TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system was placed with its 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (cmf-els). In the second cavity a 1-step HEMA...... for failure were fracture followed by recurrent caries. Most fractures and all caries lesions were found in high risk participants. Significance: The tested Class II resin composite restorations performed with the new TEGDMA/HEMA-free low shrinkage resin composite system showed good durability over six years....

  6. Effectiveness of shrinkage-reducing admixtures on Portland pozzolan cement concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Videla, C.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying shrinkage causes tensile stress in restrained concrete members. Since all structural elements are subject to some degree of restraint, drying shrinkage is regarded to be one of the main causes of concrete cracking. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SRA in reducing drying shrinkage strain in Portland pozzolan cement concrete. The major variables examined included slump, admixture type and dose, and specimen size. The measured results indicate that any of the admixtures used in the study significantly reduced shrinkage. Concrete manufactured with shrinkage reducing admixtures shrank an average of 43% less than concrete without admixtures. As a rule, the higher the dose of admixture, the higher was its shrinkage reduction performance. The experimental results were compared to the shrinkage strain estimated with the ACI 209, CEB MC 90, B3, GL 2000, Sakata 1993 and Sakata 2001 models. Although none of these models was observed to accurately describe the behaviour of Portland pozzolan cement concrete with shrinkage reducing admixtures, the Sakata 2001 model, with a weighted coefficient of variation of under 30%, may be regarded to be roughly adequate.

    La retracción por secado es un fenómeno intrínseco del hormigón que produce tensiones de tracción en elementos restringidos de hormigón. Puesto que todos los elementos presentan algún grado de retracción, se considera a la retracción por secado como una de las principales causas de agrietamiento en proyectos de construcción en hormigón. Por lo tanto, el objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar la efectividad de los aditivos reductores de retracción (SRA en hormigones fabricados con cemento Portland puzolánico. Las variables principales estudiadas incluyen el asentamiento de cono de Abrams, marca y dosis de aditivo reductor de retracción, y tamaño de espécimen de hormigón. Los resultados obtenidos permiten concluir que el uso de

  7. Shrinkage Simulation of Holographic Grating Using Diffusion Model in PQ-PMMA Photopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zepeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended model based on nonlocal polymerization-driven diffusion model is derived by introducing shrinkage process for describing photopolymerized dynamics in PQ-PMMA photopolymer. The kinetic parameters, polymerization rate and diffusion rate are experimentally determined to provide quantitative simulation. The numerical results show that the fringes at edge of grating are firstly shifted and consequently, it leads to a contrast reduction of holograms. Finally, theoretical results are experimentally checked by temporal evolution of diffraction efficiency, and the shrinkage coefficient 0.5% is approximately achieved under incident intensity 25.3mw/cm2. This work can enhance the applicability of diffusion model and contribute to the reasonable description of the grating formation in the photopolymer.

  8. A moment projection method for population balance dynamics with a shrinkage term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shaohua [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Block EA, Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore); Yapp, Edward K.Y.; Akroyd, Jethro; Mosbach, Sebastian [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Xu, Rong [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore); Yang, Wenming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Block EA, Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore); Kraft, Markus, E-mail: mk306@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore)

    2017-02-01

    A new method of moments for solving the population balance equation is developed and presented. The moment projection method (MPM) is numerically simple and easy to implement and attempts to address the challenge of particle shrinkage due to processes such as oxidation, evaporation or dissolution. It directly solves the moment transport equation for the moments and tracks the number of the smallest particles using the algorithm by Blumstein and Wheeler (1973) . The performance of the new method is measured against the method of moments (MOM) and the hybrid method of moments (HMOM). The results suggest that MPM performs much better than MOM and HMOM where shrinkage is dominant. The new method predicts mean quantities which are almost as accurate as a high-precision stochastic method calculated using the established direct simulation algorithm (DSA).

  9. Hybrid processing and anisotropic sintering shrinkage in textured ZnO ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinbora, Kahraman; Suzuki, Tohru S.; Ozgur Ozer, I.; Sakka, Yoshio; Suvaci, Ender

    2010-12-01

    We have studied the combined effects of the templated grain growth and magnetic alignment processes on sintering, anisotropic sintering shrinkage, microstructure development and texture in ZnO ceramics. Suspensions of 0-10 vol % ZnO template particles were slip cast in a 12 T rotating magnetic field. Sintering and texture characteristics were investigated via thermomechanical analysis and electron backscatter diffraction, respectively. Sintering as well as texture characteristics depend on template concentration. For the studied ZnO system, there is a critical template concentration (2 vol % in this study) above which densification is limited by the templates owing to constrained sintering. Below this limit, the densification is enhanced and the anisotropic shrinkage is reduced, which is attributed to densifying characteristics of the templates.

  10. Can hygroscopic expansion compensate polymerization shrinkage? Part I. Deformation of restored teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Antheunis; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Lee, Michael S; Tu, Lam S; DeLong, Ralph

    2011-02-01

    Restorative materials exhibit contraction and expansion due to polymerization and water absorption. Each process deforms and stresses a restored tooth structure in opposite direction. This study evaluated the tooth deformations during these competing processes. Large MOD cavities were prepared in 10 extracted molars. Five were restored with a hydrophobic resin composite (Filtek Supreme, 3M ESPE) and the others with a hydrophilic resin-modified glass-ionomer (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE). The restored molars and two unrestored controls were stored in water for 24 weeks. The molars were digitized with an optical scanner at baseline, after preparation, restoration, and at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks water immersion. The digitized buccal, lingual, and restoration surfaces were analyzed to determine their deformation patterns. The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc tests (p=0.05). The buccal and lingual tooth surfaces moved 13-14 μm inward after restoration. After water immersion, cuspal deformation in the resin composite group gradually decreased, reversing the shrinkage deformation within four weeks. The immersed resin-modified glass ionomer group reversed shrinkage deformation within one week, and continued to expand further to 28 μm after 24 weeks. Cuspal deformations after water immersion were significantly different with the two restoratives. Restoration surfaces also expanded after water immersion, while the control teeth showed no significant deformation. Polymerization shrinkage deformation was compensated by hygroscopic expansion within 4 weeks in teeth restored with a hydrophobic resin composite, while a hydrophilic restorative over-compensated polymerization shrinkage within 1 week causing tooth expansion. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Light polymerization during cavity filling: influence of total energy density on shrinkage and marginal adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Prando, Federico; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation and shrinkage stress development of a micro hybrid restorative composite as a function of energy density. Linear displacement and shrinkage forces were measured with custom-made devices for energies of 4,000, 8,000, 16,000 and 32,000 mJ/cm(2) at a constant power density of 800 mW/cm(2). Marginal adaptation of composite restorations cured with the same energy density was evaluated before and after mechanical loading with 300,000 cycles at 70 N. The group "4,000 mJ/cm(2)" showed the lowest shrinkage force [2.9(0.2) kg] and linear displacement [23.5(0.7) μm] but led to the worst marginal adaptation after loading [46.4(23.5) %CM] probably due to under-curing. When the maximum energy of 32,000 mJ/cm(2) was applied, a slight increase in shrinkage forces [3.6(0.2) kg and 29.2(0.8) μm], and a slight decrease in marginal adaptation after loading [75.4(11.5) %CM] were observed, but these changes were not significantly different in comparison to groups cured with energies of 8,000 and 16,000 mJ/cm(2). For the resin composite tested in this study, no differences in marginal adaptation could be detected above the energy threshold of 8,000 mJ/cm(2).

  12. Minimum Reinforcement in Concrete Structures under Restrained Shrinkage and Thermal Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Bo; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present paper deals with minimum reinforcement to ensure limitation of crack widths in concrete structures subjected to small imposed strains, such as those from restrained shrinkage or thermal actions. A theory is presented, which models the behaviour of a tensile member from zero load...... to first yielding of reinforcement. The theory takes into account the formation of each crack. However, concluding the paper, a simple design formula is given, which provides the amount of reinforcement, necessary to ensure a given crack width....

  13. Polymerization shrinkage evaluation of three packable composite resins using a gas pycnometer

    OpenAIRE

    Amore, Ricardo; Pagani, Clóvis; Youssef, Michel Nicolau; Anauate Netto, Camillo; Lewgoy, Hugo Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Modern restorative dentistry has been playing an outstanding role lately since composite resins, allied to adhesive systems, have been widely applied on anterior and posterior teeth restorations. The evolution of composite resins has mostly been verified due to the improvement of their aesthetic behavior and the increase in their compressive and abrasive strengths. In spite of these developments, the polymerization shrinkage inherent to the material has been a major deficiency that, so far, h...

  14. Polymerization shrinkage evaluation of three packable composite resins using a gas pycnometer.

    OpenAIRE

    Amore, Ricardo; Pagani, Clóvis; Youssef, Michel Nicolau; Anauate Netto, Camillo; Lewgoy, Hugo Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Modern restorative dentistry has been playing an outstanding role lately since composite resins, allied to adhesive systems, have been widely applied on anterior and posterior teeth restorations. The evolution of composite resins has mostly been verified due to the improvement of their aesthetic behavior and the increase in their compressive and abrasive strengths. In spite of these developments, the polymerization shrinkage inherent to the material has been a major deficiency that, so far, h...

  15. Seeing without the Occipito-Parietal Cortex: Simultagnosia as a Shrinkage of the Attentional Visual Field

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Fran?ois; Henaff, Marie-Anne

    2004-01-01

    Following bi-parietal lesions patient AT showed a severe inability to relocate her attention within a visual field which perimetry proved to be near-normal. An experimental approach with tasks testing visuo-spatial attention demonstrated a shrinkage of A.T.’s attentional visual field. With her visual attention narrowed to a kind of functional tunnel vision, the patient exhibited simultanagnosia (Wolpert, 1924), a symptom previously described in 1909 by Balint under the label of Psychic paraly...

  16. Moisture Diffusivity and Shrinkage of Fruit and Cladode of Opuntia ficus-indica during Infrared Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Touil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drying behaviour of prickly pear cladodes and fruits was studied with an Infrared dryer. The volume shrinkage for Opuntia ficus-indica products is calculated and a linear relation was established to describe the experimental variation of shrinkage of the product versus its moisture content. Effective diffusion coefficient of moisture transfer was determined using the Fick law at three drying temperatures (40, 50, and 60°C. Shrinkage was also included into the diffusion model for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient. The obtained results of the effective moisture diffusivity, for the cladode and the fruit, were evaluated in the range of 1.77 × 10−10–5.07 × 10−10 m2/s and 2.53 × 10−10–7.6 × 10−10 m2/s, respectively. The values of the activation energies for cladode and fruit were estimated to be 45.39 and 47.79 kJ/mol, respectively. However, these values of moisture diffusivity were estimated independently of the evolution of moisture content during drying process. Therefore, a correlation (full quadratic equation for moisture diffusivity as a function of moisture content and temperature was developed. The parameters are obtained by a multilinear regression method. This equation was found satisfactory to describe the diffusivity evolution function of moisture content and temperature with correlation coefficients of 91.5 and 95%.

  17. Modelling the shrinkage in pigmented coatings during drying: a stick-slip mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudone, G M; Matthews, G P; Gane, P A C

    2006-12-01

    Pigmented coatings, used to improve optical and printing properties, are applied to fibrous paper substrates as slurry, which then dries. We have elucidated the mechanism of the shrinkage which occurs during drying. The void space of the dry coating layers and their effective solid skeletal elements were modelled using the porous network simulation software Pore-Cor. The water-filled porous structures at the beginning of the shrinking process were modelled by creating simulated structures with the same effective skeletal element size distribution as the dry ones, but with higher given porosity to account for the water present. The capillary forces acting on the surface of the drying coating were calculated for the model structures and found to be orders of magnitude larger than the experimentally measured shrinkage forces. The shrinkage process was therefore postulated as resulting from the effect of capillary forces resisted by a discrete stick-slip process. The differences in the visco-elastic properties of the slurries also supported this postulate, as did further experimental evidence.

  18. Shrinkage Porosity Criterion and Its Application to A 5.5 Ton Steel Ingot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang C.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the distribution of shrinkage porosity in steel ingot efficiently and accurately, a criterion R√L and a method to obtain its threshold value were proposed. The criterion R√L was derived based on the solidification characteristics of steel ingot and pressure gradient in the mushy zone, in which the physical properties, the thermal parameters, the structure of the mushy zone and the secondary dendrite arm spacing were all taken into consideration. The threshold value of the criterion R√L was obtained with combination of numerical simulation of ingot solidification and total solidification shrinkage rate. Prediction of the shrinkage porosity in a 5.5 ton ingot of 2Cr13 steel with criterion R√L>0.21 m · °C1/2 · s−3/2 agreed well with the results of experimental sectioning. Based on this criterion, optimization of the ingot was carried out by decreasing the height-to-diameter ratio and increasing the taper, which successfully eliminated the centreline porosity and further proved the applicability of this criterion.

  19. Graphene oxide as an anti-shrinkage additive for resorcinol-formaldehyde composite aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kang; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Du, Xian; Zhong, Liang

    2014-06-21

    In order to strengthen the nanostructure and suppress the collapse of nanopores of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels during the drying process, graphene oxide (GO) was incorporated into the RF matrix to prepare GO-RF composite aerogels by sol-gel polymerization. The influences of GO content on the sol-gel process, structure, and physical properties of RF aerogels were investigated. The morphologies of composite aerogels were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and it was found that GO was well dispersed in the RF matrix. In addition, GO can obviously accelerate the gelation of the RF solution and reduce both the drying shrinkage and aerogel density. As the content of GO increased from 0 to 2 wt%, both the linear shrinkage and density of composite aerogels decreased progressively from 28.3% to 2.0% and 506 to 195 kg m(-3), respectively, implying that GO is an effective additive for inhibiting the volume shrinkage of aerogels during the drying process.

  20. Influence Of Volcanic Scoria On Mechanical Strength, Chemical Resistance And Drying Shrinkage Of Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Swaidani A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the study, three types of cement have been prepared; one CEM I type (the control sample and two blended cements: CEM II/A-P and CEM II/B-P (EN 197-1, each of them with three replacement levels of volcanic scoria: (10 %, 15 %, 20 % wt. and (25 %, 30 %, 35 % wt., respectively. Strength development of mortars has been investigated at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days curing. Evaluation of chemical resistance of mortars containing scoria-based cements has been investigated through exposure to 5 % sulphate and 5 % sulphuric acid solutions in accordance with ASTM C1012 & ASTM 267, respectively. Drying shrinkage has been evaluated in accordance with ASTM C596. Test results showed that at early ages, the mortars containing CEM II/B-P binders had strengths much lower than that of the control mortar. However, at 90 days curing, the strengths were comparable to the control mortar. In addition, the increase of scoria significantly improved the sulphate resistance of mortars. Further, an increase in scoria addition improved the sulphuric acid resistance of mortar, especially at the early days of exposure. The results of drying shrinkage revealed that the CEM II/B-P mortar bars exhibited a greater contraction when compared to the control mortar, especially at early ages. However, drying shrinkage of mortars was not influenced much at longer times.

  1. Development of shrinkage and fracture parameters in selected fine-grained cement-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucharczyková Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes results of a pilot study aimed at the evaluation of an experimental investigation focused on determination of the material characteristics development of selected fine-grained cement-based composites during their ageing. The composition of composites being investigated differed only in a water to cement (w/c ratio and in amount of superplasticizer. Quite extensive experiments were performed with the aim to determine shrinkage, dynamic a static modulus of elasticity and fracture properties on test specimens exposed to free drying during the whole time of its ageing (including the early stage of setting and hardening. The article presents especially results (including their statistical evaluation of shrinkage and fracture parameters development within 90 days of composites’ ageing. Experimental results show the dependence of the investigated characteristics on the value of w/c ratio. The most visible effect was observed in the case of shrinkage development. The curing conditions were reflected especially in high variability of the test results.

  2. Influence of Aggregate Wettability with Different Lithology Aggregates on Concrete Drying Shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanchen Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The correlation of the wettability of different lithology aggregates and the drying shrinkage of concrete materials is studied, and some influential factors such as wettability and wetting angle are analyzed. A mercury porosimeter is used to measure the porosities of different lithology aggregates accurately, and the pore size ranges that significantly affect the drying shrinkage of different lithology aggregate concretes are confirmed. The pore distribution curve of the different coarse aggregates is also measured through a statistical method, and the contact angle of different coarse aggregates and concrete is calculated according to the linear fitting relationship. Research shows that concrete strength is determined by aggregate strength. Aggregate wettability is not directly correlated with concrete strength, but wettability significantly affects concrete drying shrinkage. In all types’ pores, the greatest impacts on wettability are capillary pores and gel pores, especially for the pores of the size locating 2.5–50 nm and 50–100 nm two ranges.

  3. Multiple-Shrinkage Multinomial Probit Models with Applications to Simulating Geographies in Public Use Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgette, Lane F; Reiter, Jerome P

    2013-06-01

    Multinomial outcomes with many levels can be challenging to model. Information typically accrues slowly with increasing sample size, yet the parameter space expands rapidly with additional covariates. Shrinking all regression parameters towards zero, as often done in models of continuous or binary response variables, is unsatisfactory, since setting parameters equal to zero in multinomial models does not necessarily imply "no effect." We propose an approach to modeling multinomial outcomes with many levels based on a Bayesian multinomial probit (MNP) model and a multiple shrinkage prior distribution for the regression parameters. The prior distribution encourages the MNP regression parameters to shrink toward a number of learned locations, thereby substantially reducing the dimension of the parameter space. Using simulated data, we compare the predictive performance of this model against two other recently-proposed methods for big multinomial models. The results suggest that the fully Bayesian, multiple shrinkage approach can outperform these other methods. We apply the multiple shrinkage MNP to simulating replacement values for areal identifiers, e.g., census tract indicators, in order to protect data confidentiality in public use datasets.

  4. Glutaraldehyde crosslinking of collagen: effects of time, temperature, concentration and presoaking as measured by shrinkage temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijgrok, J M; de Wijn, J R; Boon, M E

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to study the effect on the degree of crosslinking of: (a) short term (1 or 5 min) high (50 degrees C) temperature glutaraldehyde (GA) fixation of native collagen membrane, (b) a combination of GA presoaking at low temperature [0 degree C or room temperature (rt)] followed by short time (collagen fleece in a multilayer diffusion model. As a measure for the degree of crosslinking the shrinkage temperature (Ts) was determined. Short time (1 or 5 min) high temperature (50 degrees C) fixation using 0.1% GA solution caused the shrinkage temperature to increase to 80% and 93% respectively, of the maximum attainable Ts employing GA crosslinking (ca 91 degrees C). Fixation with 0.01% GA for 5 min at 50 degrees C appeared equally as effective as 1 min with 0.1% GA. Although an elevated fixation temperature (from rt to 45 degrees C) was found to produce a substantial increase in Ts of the collagen sheets, a homogeneous distribution of cross links was not obtained by this method. Presoaking the samples at rt (1 h) or at 0 degree C (3 h) with subsequent short time heating to 45 degrees C caused an almost equal rise in shrinkage temperature in Ts throughout the collagen samples.

  5. A Study of Shrinkage Stress Reduction and Mechanical Properties of Nanogel-Modified Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiancheng; Howard, Gregory D; Lewis, Steven H; Barros, Matthew D; Stansbury, Jeffrey W

    2012-11-01

    A series of nanogel compositions were prepared from urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and isobornyl methacrylate (IBMA) in the presence of a thiol chain transfer agent. The linear oligomer of IBMA was synthesized by a similar solution polymerization technique. The nanogels were prepared with different crosslinker concentrations to achieve varied branching densities and molecular weights. The prepolymers were dispersed in triethylene glycol dimethacrylate at loading levels ranging from 10 wt% to 50 wt%. Photopolymerization reaction kinetics of all prepolymer modified systems were enhanced relative to the nanogel-free control during early stage polymerization while limiting conversion was similar for most samples. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage was reduced proportionally with the prepolymer content while the corresponding decrease in polymerization stress was potentially greater than an additive linear behavior. Flexural strength for inert linear polymer-modified systems decreased significantly with the increase in the prepolymer content; however, with an increase in the crosslinker concentration within the nanogel additives, and an increase in the concentration of residual pendant reactive sites, flexural strength was maintained or improved regardless of the nanogel loading level. This demonstrates that covalent attachment rather than just physical entanglement with the polymer matrix is important for effective polymer mechanical reinforcement by nanogel additives. Reactive nanogel additives can be considered as a practical, generic means to achieve substantial reductions in polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress in common polymers.

  6. Shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s tests for high-dimensional small sample size data

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Kai

    2015-09-16

    DNA sequencing techniques bring novel tools and also statistical challenges to genetic research. In addition to detecting differentially expressed genes, testing the significance of gene sets or pathway analysis has been recognized as an equally important problem. Owing to the “large pp small nn” paradigm, the traditional Hotelling’s T2T2 test suffers from the singularity problem and therefore is not valid in this setting. In this paper, we propose a shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s test for both one-sample and two-sample cases. We also suggest several different ways to derive the approximate null distribution under different scenarios of pp and nn for our proposed shrinkage-based test. Simulation studies show that the proposed method performs comparably to existing competitors when nn is moderate or large, but it is better when nn is small. In addition, we analyze four gene expression data sets and they demonstrate the advantage of our proposed shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s test.

  7. Application of Artificial Neural Network to Predict Colour Change, Shrinkage and Texture of Osmotically Dehydrated Pumpkin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S. Y.; Lee, J. S.; Loh, S. P.; Tham, H. J.

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to use Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to predict colour change, shrinkage and texture of osmotically dehydrated pumpkin slices. The effects of process variables such as concentration of osmotic solution, immersion temperature and immersion time on the above mentioned physical properties were studied. The colour of the samples was measured using a colorimeter and the net colour difference changes, ΔE were determined. The texture was measured in terms of hardness by using a Texture Analyzer. As for the shrinkage, displacement of volume method was applied and percentage of shrinkage was obtained in terms of volume changes. A feed-forward backpropagation network with sigmoidal function was developed and best network configuration was chosen based on the highest correlation coefficients between the experimental values versus predicted values. As a comparison, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) statistical analysis was also employed. The performances of both RSM and ANN modelling were evaluated based on absolute average deviation (AAD), correlation of determination (R2) and root mean square error (RMSE). The results showed that ANN has higher prediction capability as compared to RSM. The relative importance of the variables on the physical properties were also determined by using connection weight approach in ANN. It was found that solution concentration showed the highest influence on all three physical properties.

  8. Shrinkage of the Toona ciliata wood from three counties in the south of Minas Gerais state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra de Oliveira Ribeiro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the shrinkage, in the bottom-up and pith-bark direction, of the australian cedar wood from three Counties in the south of Minas Gerais state, and also to check the variation in chemical composition of wood due the location of planting. The australian cedar wood was obtained with four years of age and in three cities in the south of Minas Gerais state (Campo Belo, Cana Verde and Santo Antonio do Amparo. The chemical constituents of wood, shrinkage values (tangential, radial, longitudinal and volumetric and the anisotropy coefficient. According to the results, there was no significant variation in the levels of holocellulose were determined, lignin, extractives and ashes between the three plantation sites evaluated. For the shrinkage of the wood in the bottom-up direction, there was no significant variation of the radial and longitudinal contractions for the three locations evaluated. However, significant variation was observed for the tangential and volumetric contractions for cities of Campo Belo and Cana Verde, and significant variation of Tangential contraction for the plantation of Santo Antonio do Amparo. In the pith-bark direction, significant variation was observed only on the radial contraction and the coefficient of anisotropy for location of Cana Verde.

  9. DH and ESPI laser interferometry applied to the restoration shrinkage assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, L. M. P.; Parra, D. F.; Vasconcelos, M. R.; Vaz, M.; Monteiro, J.

    2014-01-01

    In dental restoration postoperative marginal leakage is commonly associated to polymerization shrinkage effects. In consequence the longevity and quality of restorative treatment depends on the shrinkage mechanisms of the composite filling during the polymerization. In this work the development of new techniques for evaluation of those effects under light-induced polymerization of dental nano composite fillings is reported. The composite resins activated by visible light, initiate the polymerization process by absorbing light in wavelengths at about 470 nm. The techniques employed in the contraction assessment were digital holography (DH) and Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) based on laser interferometry. A satisfactory resolution was achieved in the non-contact displacement field measurements on small objects concerning the experimental dental samples. According to a specific clinical protocol, natural teeth were used (human mandibular premolars). A class I cavity was drilled and restored with nano composite material, according to Black principles. The polymerization was monitored by DH and ESPI in real time during the cure reaction of the restoration. The total displacement reported for the material in relation of the tooth wall was 3.7 μm (natural tooth). The technique showed the entire tooth surface (wall) deforming during polymerization shrinkage.

  10. Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Shrinkage and Growth Involve Downregulation of Cofilin via Distinct Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Barbara; Saffin, Jean-Michel; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    A current model posits that cofilin-dependent actin severing negatively impacts dendritic spine volume. Studies suggested that increased cofilin activity underlies activity-dependent spine shrinkage, and that reduced cofilin activity induces activity-dependent spine growth. We suggest instead that both types of structural plasticity correlate with decreased cofilin activity. However, the mechanism of inhibition determines the outcome for spine morphology. RNAi in rat hippocampal cultures demonstrates that cofilin is essential for normal spine maintenance. Cofilin-F-actin binding and filament barbed-end production decrease during the early phase of activity-dependent spine shrinkage; cofilin concentration also decreases. Inhibition of the cathepsin B/L family of proteases prevents both cofilin loss and spine shrinkage. Conversely, during activity-dependent spine growth, LIM kinase stimulates cofilin phosphorylation, which activates phospholipase D-1 to promote actin polymerization. These results implicate novel molecular mechanisms and prompt a revision of the current model for how cofilin functions in activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:24740405

  11. Hygroscopic swelling and shrinkage of latewood cell wall micropillars reveal ultrastructural anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Stiefel, Michael; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Mokso, Rajmund; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan

    2014-06-06

    We document the hygroscopic swelling and shrinkage of the central and the thickest secondary cell wall layer of wood (named S2) in response to changes in environmental humidity using synchrotron radiation-based phase contrast X-ray tomographic nanoscopy. The S2 layer is a natural fibre-reinforced nano-composite polymer and is strongly reactive to water. Using focused ion beam, micropillars with a cross section of few micrometres are fabricated from the S2 layer of the latewood cell walls of Norway spruce softwood. The thin neighbouring cell wall layers are removed to prevent hindering or restraining of moisture-induced deformation during swelling or shrinkage. The proposed experiment intended to get further insights into the microscopic origin of the anisotropic hygro-expansion of wood. It is found that the swelling/shrinkage strains are highly anisotropic in the transverse plane of the cell wall, larger in the normal than in the direction parallel to the cell wall's thickness. This ultrastructural anisotropy may be due to the concentric lamellation of the cellulose microfibrils as the role of the cellulose microfibril angle in the transverse swelling anisotropy is negligible. The volumetric swelling of the cell wall material is found to be substantially larger than the one of wood tissues within the growth ring and wood samples made of several growth rings. The hierarchical configuration in wood optimally increases its dimensional stability in response to a humid environment with higher scales of complexity.

  12. Multiple-Shrinkage Multinomial Probit Models with Applications to Simulating Geographies in Public Use Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgette, Lane F.; Reiter, Jerome P.

    2013-01-01

    Multinomial outcomes with many levels can be challenging to model. Information typically accrues slowly with increasing sample size, yet the parameter space expands rapidly with additional covariates. Shrinking all regression parameters towards zero, as often done in models of continuous or binary response variables, is unsatisfactory, since setting parameters equal to zero in multinomial models does not necessarily imply “no effect.” We propose an approach to modeling multinomial outcomes with many levels based on a Bayesian multinomial probit (MNP) model and a multiple shrinkage prior distribution for the regression parameters. The prior distribution encourages the MNP regression parameters to shrink toward a number of learned locations, thereby substantially reducing the dimension of the parameter space. Using simulated data, we compare the predictive performance of this model against two other recently-proposed methods for big multinomial models. The results suggest that the fully Bayesian, multiple shrinkage approach can outperform these other methods. We apply the multiple shrinkage MNP to simulating replacement values for areal identifiers, e.g., census tract indicators, in order to protect data confidentiality in public use datasets. PMID:24358073

  13. The Comfort Properties of Two Differential-Shrinkage Polyester Warp Knitted Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-layered warp knitted fabrics were produced by the 60D/36F (containing 36 filaments polyester yarn with differential shrinkage (DS property in this study. Due to the differential shrinkage property, the fabric becomes curly and bulkier, simulating cotton fabric in terms of its appearance and fabric handle. The performance and appearance of these DS polyester warp knitted fabrics were evaluated objectively and subjectively. The testing results demonstrated that the DS polyester warp knitted fabric had better abrasion property, worse pilling resistance due to the mechanical property of polyester yarn when compared with 100% cotton warp knitted fabric. Meanwhile, lower water vapour permeability and air resistance were found for DS polyester warp knitted fabric resulting from the dense structure of yarn shrinkage after heat-moisture treatment. Besides, the fabric handle was evaluated by Kawabata evaluation system and subject to trial under dry and wet fabric condition. DS polyester warp knitted fabrics provide better recovery under low stress mechanical pressure. The subjective evaluation result shows that the warp knitted fabrics made of DS polyester had similar handle against cotton warp knitted fabric in terms of prickle, smooth, comfort and dry feeling in both dry and wet testing conditions.

  14. Computed tomographic studies of the basis pedunculi in chronic hemiplegic patients: Topographic correlation between cerebral lesion and midbrain shrinkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warabi, T.; Miyasaka, K.; Inoue, K.; Nakamura, N.

    1987-09-01

    A computed tomographic method for analyzing the shrinkage of the basis pedunculi (BP) due to the secondary degeneration of the descending fibers was applied in correlation to the site of cerebral lesions in 89 chronic hemiplegic patients. Cerebral lesions in the anterior corona radiata or the anterior limb of the capsula interna caused shrinkage of the medial BP. Lesions in the central corona radiata or the genu and posterior limb of the capsula interna caused shrinkage of the central BP, while lesions of the posterior corona radiata or the posterior limb of the capsula interna caused shrinkage of the lateral BP. These results suggested that CT images are able to reveal the principle sites of atrophy of the descending fiber tracts in chronic hemiplegia.

  15. Characteristics of low polymerization shrinkage flowable resin composites in newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    NITTA, Keiko; NOMOTO, Rie; TSUBOTA, Yuji; TSUCHIKAWA, Masuji; HAYAKAWA, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage and other physical properties of newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique, with the brand name BULK BASE (BBS...

  16. Effect of cyclic loading on microleakage of silorane based composite compared with low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Silorane did not provide better marginal seal than the low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites (except Aelite. In addition, cyclic loading did not affect the marginal microleakage of evaluated composite restorations .

  17. Depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-03-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites. Depth of cure and flexural properties were determined according to ISO 4049, and volumetric shrinkage was measured using a dilatometer. The depths of cure of giomers were significantly lower than those of resin composites, regardless of photo polymerization times. No difference in flexural strength and modulus was found among either high or low viscosity bulk fill materials. Volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill resin composites was significantly less than low and high viscosity giomers. Depth of cure of both low and high viscosity bulk-fill materials is time dependent. Flexural strength and modulus of high viscosity or low viscosity bulk-fill giomer or resin composite materials are not different for their respective category. Resin composites exhibited less polymerization shrinkage than giomers.

  18. Model to predict shrinkage and ejection forces of injection moulded tubular parts of short glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, M. C. R.; Netto, A. C. S.; Pontes, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a model to predict shrinkage and ejection forces for glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics of tubular geometry. This mathematical model was based in Jansen’s Model to predict shrinkage and residual stresses in fiber reinforced injection molded products and Pontes’s Model to predict ejection forces for tubular parts of pure PP. The model used the modified classical laminate theory applied to injection moulding and it uses the fiber orientation state, temperatu...

  19. Partial shrinkage of venous tissues near valves using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Curiel, Laura; Milleret, René; Pichot, Olivier; Lacoste, François; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2005-03-01

    The cross-section of a vein can be reduced by exposing the collagen of the vein wall to high temperature (85° C) for a few seconds. Partial shrinkage of the vein is appropriate for correcting deformations of valvular tissues that can cause the abnormal blood reflux which is the main cause of varicose veins and Superficial Venous Insufficiency. Due to its suitability for inducing localized heating, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is a good method for correcting valvular tissue. In the present study, the feasibility of using HIFU for inducing partial shrinkage of the saphenous vein wall is demonstrated. The position and size of valvular deformations are well suited to being heated and, consequently, reduced with HIFU. The resulting shrinkage of deformations should restore normal function of the valve. An experimental protocol was used in which several in vitro segments of human saphenous vein were exposed with a monochromatic signal produced by a real-time imaging HIFU probe. The probe has a focal length of 45 mm, a diameter of 52.5 mm and operates at 3 MHz. Ultrasonic imaging, obtained with an 8-MHz 128-element linear array placed at the centre of the HIFU probe, was used to target the vein. The segment was inserted in a porcine muscle sample, and both were placed into a PVC cylinder. Individual sonications of the vein wall were performed for acoustic power values ranging between 8.75 and 35 W at a constant sonication duration of 5 s. Different durations ranging between 3 and 7 s at constant power were also tested. Finally, a long duration of 18 s was tested while the focal point was displaced along the vein wall at a speed of 0.5 mm/s. Results showed that shrinkage of the vein wall was observed using echographic and macroscopic analysis. In particular, the vein diameter was reduced by 15% for a sonication-duration of 18 s with continuous displacement of the focal point. Results showed that HIFU is suitable for partial shrinkage of the saphenous vein and

  20. Investigation on Failures of Composite Beam and Substrate Concrete due to Drying Shrinkage Property of Repair Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnaik, Rashmi Ranjan

    2017-06-01

    A Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and an experimental study was conducted on composite beam of repair material and substrate concrete to investigate the failures of the composite beam due to drying shrinkage property of the repair materials. In FEA, the stress distribution in the composite beam due to two concentrate load and shrinkage of repair materials were investigated in addition to the deflected shape of the composite beam. The stress distributions and load deflection shapes of the finite element model were investigated to aid in analysis of the experimental findings. In the experimental findings, the mechanical properties such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength, and load-deflection curves were studied in addition to slant shear bond strength, drying shrinkage and failure patterns of the composite beam specimens. Flexure test was conducted to simulate tensile stress at the interface between the repair material and substrate concrete. The results of FEA were used to analyze the experimental results. It was observed that the repair materials with low drying shrinkage are showing compatible failure in the flexure test of the composite beam and deform adequately in the load deflection curves. Also, the flexural strength of the composite beam with low drying shrinkage repair materials showed higher flexural strength as compared to the composite beams with higher drying shrinkage value of the repair materials even though the strength of those materials were more.

  1. The correlation between aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 level and tumor shrinkage after preoperative chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhandyka Rafli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to determine the correlation between aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1 level and tumor shrinkage after chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. This is a retrospective study of 14 locally advanced rectal cancer patients with long course neoadjuvant chemoradiation. ALDH1A1 level was measured using ELISA from paraffin embedded tissue. Tumor shrinkage was measured from computed tomography (CT scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor v1.1 (RECIST v1.1. The mean of ALDH1A1 level was 9.014 ± 3.3 pg/mL and the mean of tumor shrinkage was 7.89 ± 35.7%. Partial response proportion was 28.6%, stable disease proportion was 50% and progressive disease proportion was 21.4%. There was a significant strong negative correlation (r = –0.890, plt; 0.001 between ALDH1A1 and tumor shrinkage. In conclusion, tumor shrinkage in locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiation was influenced by ALDH1A1 level. Higher level of ALDH1A1 suggests decreased tumor shrinkage after preoperative chemoradiation.

  2. 1-D diffusion based solidification model with volumetric expansion and shrinkage effect: A semi-analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monde, Aniket D.; Chakraborty, Prodyut R.

    2017-10-01

    Volumetric expansion and shrinkage due to different densities of solid and liquid phases are common phenomena during solidification process. Simple analytical models addressing effect of volumetric expansion/shrinkage during solidification are rarely found. The few existing 1-D solidification models are valid only for semi-infinite domain with limitations of their application for finite domain size. The focus of the present work is to develop a 1-D semi-analytical solidification model addressing effects of volumetric expansion/shrinkage in a finite domain. The proposed semi-analytical scheme involves finding simultaneous solution of transient 1-D heat diffusion equations at solid and liquid domain coupled at the interface by Stefan condition. The change of the total domain length during solidification due to volumetric expansion/shrinkage is addressed by using mass conservation. For validation of the proposed model, solidification of water in a finite domain is studied without considering volumetric expansion/shrinkage effect and results are compared with those obtained from existing enthalpy updating based numerical model. After validation, case studies pertaining to volumetric expansion and shrinkage are performed considering solidification of water and paraffin respectively and physically consistent results are obtained. The study is relevant for understanding unidirectional crystal growth under the effect of controlled boundary condition.

  3. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hi, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji ...

  5. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! ... colonography or, as it is more commonly known, virtual colonoscopy. Virtual colonoscopy is a diagnostic imaging test ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  7. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript ... by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’ ...

  10. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual ... to allow for inflation with air while CT images are being taken. If you’re scheduled for ...

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript ... by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’ ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) ... asked to wear a gown. After the CT scan you can return to your normal diet and ...

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  14. TH-E-BRF-01: Exploiting Tumor Shrinkage in Split-Course Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, J; Craft, D; Hong, T; Papp, D; Wolfgang, J; Bortfeld, T [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ramakrishnan, J [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Salari, E [Wichita State University, Wichita, KS (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In split-course radiotherapy, a patient is treated in several stages separated by weeks or months. This regimen has been motivated by radiobiological considerations. However, using modern image-guidance, it also provides an approach to reduce normal tissue dose by exploiting tumor shrinkage. In this work, we consider the optimal design of split-course treatments, motivated by the clinical management of large liver tumors for which normal liver dose constraints prohibit the administration of an ablative radiation dose in a single treatment. Methods: We introduce a dynamic tumor model that incorporates three factors: radiation induced cell kill, tumor shrinkage, and tumor cell repopulation. The design of splitcourse radiotherapy is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem in which the total dose to the liver is minimized, subject to delivering the prescribed dose to the tumor. Based on the model, we gain insight into the optimal administration of radiation over time, i.e. the optimal treatment gaps and dose levels. Results: We analyze treatments consisting of two stages in detail. The analysis confirms the intuition that the second stage should be delivered just before the tumor size reaches a minimum and repopulation overcompensates shrinking. Furthermore, it was found that, for a large range of model parameters, approximately one third of the dose should be delivered in the first stage. The projected benefit of split-course treatments in terms of liver sparing depends on model assumptions. However, the model predicts large liver dose reductions by more than a factor of two for plausible model parameters. Conclusion: The analysis of the tumor model suggests that substantial reduction in normal tissue dose can be achieved by exploiting tumor shrinkage via an optimal design of multi-stage treatments. This suggests taking a fresh look at split-course radiotherapy for selected disease sites where substantial tumor regression translates into reduced

  15. WASICA: An effective wavelet-shrinkage based ICA model for brain fMRI data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nizhuan; Zeng, Weiming; Shi, Yingchao; Ren, Tianlong; Jing, Yanshan; Yin, Jun; Yang, Jiajun

    2015-05-15

    Researches declared that the super-Gaussian property contributed to the success of some spatial independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms in brain fMRI source separation (e.g., Infomax and FastICA), which implied that sparse approximation transforming the sources (super-Gaussian or Gaussian-like) with stronger super-Gaussian feature would possibly improve the separation performance of these algorithms. This paper presented a novel wavelet-shrinkage based ICA (WASICA) model, an extension of our previous SACICA, for single-subject analysis. In contrast, two main aspects had been effectively enhanced: (1) sparse approximation coefficients set formation, made up of two sub-procedures: the wavelet-shrinkage of wavelet packet (WP) tree nodes, and the automatic nodes selection and integration based on the relative WP energy; (2) ICA-based decomposition and reconstruction, composed of temporal dynamics extraction using ICA, WP reconstruction based on the sparse approximation coefficients set and least-square-based functional networks reconstruction. The wavelet-shrinkage and the automatic nodes selection and integration simultaneously transformed both the mixtures and underlying sources into effective sparse approximation coefficients sets, exhibiting stronger super-Gaussian distribution; WP projected-back approximation with nuisance-exclusion contributed to networks reconstruction. Simulation 1 revealed WASICA successfully recovered super-Gaussian and some Gaussian-like sources. Simulation 2 and hybrid data experiments showed that WASICA with good temporal performance had stronger source recovery ability and signal detection sensitivity spatially than FastICA, Infomax and SACICA did; the higher intra-consistency in task-related experiments denoted WASICA occupied stronger spatial robustness against smooth kernels. WASICA was a promising brain signal separation model with charming spatial-temporal performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Shrinkage of Dynamesh IPOM mesh in 6-week follow-up – an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Jamry

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The process of shrinkage of a mesh in the peritoneal cavity is not fully understood, but it may cause reduction of the implant area down to 30-50%. Therefore, knowledge on the magnitude of the phenomenon for the used prosthesis enables proper sizing. This reduces the relapse rate on the one hand and the use of excess material, being a “foreign body”, on the other hand. Aim: 1. To assess shrinkage of Dynamesh IPOM (intraperitoneal onlay mesh implanted into the peritoneal cavity in 6-week follow-up. 2. To assess whether the type of slow-absorbable suture used to attach the prosthesis affects the process.Material and methods: The study was conducted in an animal model (swine. In each one of 12 animals two mesh fragments were implanted. In each case, one fragment was sutured with PDS II and the other one with Maxon. After 6 weeks, mesh area was measured and compared with respective baseline values, calculating linear shortening and area loss. The second part of the analysis was addressed to determine the effect of the used suture on the phenomenon. To do this, mesh linear and area loss was calculated for both groups (PDS and Maxon, and the results were compared with Mann-Whitney U test.Results and conclusion: 1. Dynamesh IPOM demonstrates linear shortening by 12.53% and area loss of 23.85% after 6 weeks. These values are significant and should be accounted for during implant sizing. 2. There was no statistically significant difference in shrinkage parameters in the groups with meshes attached with PDS II and Maxon.

  17. Early daily trunk shrinkage is highly sensitive to water stress in nectarine trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pastor, Alejandro; De la Rosa, Jose M.; Dodd, Ian C.; Conesa, María R.; Domingo, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    The sensitivity to water stress of different plant water status indicators was evaluated during two consecutive years in early nectarine trees grown in a semi-arid region. Measurements were made post-harvest and two irrigation treatments were applied: a control treatment (CTL), irrigated at 120% of crop evapotranspiration demand to achieve non-limiting water conditions, and a deficit irrigation treatment (DI), that applied around 37% less water than CTL during late postharvest. The plant water status indicators evaluated were midday stem water potential (Ψstem) and parameters derived from trunk diameter fluctuations (TDF): maximum daily shrinkage (MDS), trunk daily growth rate (TGR), early daily shrinkage measured between 0900 and 1200 h solar time (EDS), and late daily shrinkage (LDS) that occurred between 1200 h solar time and the moment that minimum trunk diameter was reached (typically 1600 h solar time). The most sensitive (highest ratio of signal intensity (SI) to noise) indicators to water stress were Ψstem together with EDS. The SI of EDS was greater than that of Ψstem, although with greater variability. EDS was a better indicator than MDS, with higher SI and similar variability. Although MDS was linearly related to Ψstem down to -1.5 MPa, thereafter MDS decreased with increasing water stress. In contrast, EDS was linearly related to Ψstem, although the slope of the regression decreased as the season progressed, as in the case of MDS. Further studies are needed to determine whether EDS is a sensitive indicator of water stress in a range of species.

  18. Shrinkage stress compensation in composite-restored teeth: relaxation or hygroscopic expansion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriwether, Laurel A; Blen, Bernard J; Benson, Jarred H; Hatch, Robert H; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2013-05-01

    Polymerization of composite restorations causes shrinkage, which deforms and thus stresses restored teeth. This shrinkage deformation, however, has been shown to decrease over time. The objective was to investigate whether this reduction was caused by hygroscopic expansion or stress relaxation of the composite/tooth complex. Extracted molars were mounted in rigid stainless steel rings with four spherical reference areas. Twelve molars were prepared with large mesioocclusodistal slots, etched, bonded, and restored with a composite material (Filtek Supreme, 3M ESPE) in two horizontal layers. Ten intact molars were the controls. The teeth were stored either in deionized water or silicone oil. They were scanned after preparation (baseline), restoration (0-week), and after 1, 2, and 4 weeks storage. Scanned tooth surfaces were aligned with the baseline using the unchanged reference areas. Cuspal flexure was calculated from lingual and buccal surface deformation. To verify that the restorations had remained bonded, dye penetration at the interfaces was assessed using basic fuchsin dye. Statistical assessment was done by ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test (p=0.05). Substantial cuspal contraction was found for restored teeth after the composite was cured (13-14 μm cuspal flexure). After 4 weeks cuspal contraction decreased significantly for restored teeth stored in water (7.3 ± 3.2) but not for those stored in silicone oil (11.4 ± 5.0). Dye penetration of the occlusal interface was minimal in both groups (106 ± 87 and 21 ± 28 μm in water and silicone oil, respectively). The results suggest that hygroscopic expansion was the main mechanism for shrinkage stress compensation. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A geometric atlas to predict lung tumor shrinkage for radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Rimner, Andreas; Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Kuo, Licheng; Apte, Aditya; Lockney, Natalie; Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2017-02-01

    To develop a geometric atlas that can predict tumor shrinkage and guide treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer. To evaluate the impact of the shrinkage atlas on the ability of tumor dose escalation. The creation of a geometric atlas included twelve patients with lung cancer who underwent both planning CT and weekly CBCT for radiotherapy planning and delivery. The shrinkage pattern from the original pretreatment to the residual posttreatment tumor was modeled using a principal component analysis, and used for predicting the spatial distribution of the residual tumor. A predictive map was generated by unifying predictions from each individual patient in the atlas, followed by correction for the tumor’s surrounding tissue distribution. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the predictive model for classifying voxels inside the original gross tumor volume were evaluated. In addition, a retrospective study of predictive treatment planning (PTP) escalated dose to the predicted residual tumor while maintaining the same level of predicted complication rates for a clinical plan delivering uniform dose to the entire tumor. The effect of uncertainty on the predictive model’s ability to escalate dose was also evaluated. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the predictive model were 0.73, 0.76, and 0.74, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for voxel classification was 0.87. The Dice coefficient and mean surface distance between the predicted and actual residual tumor averaged 0.75, and 1.6 mm, respectively. The PTP approach allowed elevation of PTV D95 and mean dose to the actual residual tumor by 6.5 Gy and 10.4 Gy, respectively, relative to the clinical uniform dose approach. A geometric atlas can provide useful information on the distribution of resistant tumors and effectively guide dose escalation to the tumor without compromising the organs at risk complications. The atlas can be further refined by using

  20. Birefringence, anisotropic shrinkage and luminance in injection molded light-guide plate: Modeling and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsui-Hsun

    Liquid crystal displays (LCDs) with edge-lit backlight system have been widely used in industry due to several advantages over traditional cathode-ray tubes (CRTs). The main component of the backlight system is the light-guide plate (LGP) which is designed to provide the highest possible degree of light concentration and luminance efficiency. However, the relationship between processing conditions in manufacturing and their optical performance have not been established. In addressing this issue, LGP moldings were made of optical grade polycarbonates (PCs) of low and high viscosity and a polystyrene (PS). The theoretical and experimental studies on the effect of the processing conditions on the anisotropic shrinkage, residual stresses and birefringence, and resulting luminance in the injection molded V-groove LGPs were carried out. The stress-optical coefficient and relaxation modulus functions of polymers were obtained by specially designed rheo-optical instrument. These functions were incorporated to the linear viscoelastic and photoviscoelastic constitutive equations to predict the thermal birefringence in constrained, freely quenched plates and LGP moldings. The flow-induced birefringence and anisotropic shrinkage of LGPs were simulated by using a combination of a CV/FEM/FDM technique, a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive equation, and orientation functions. The residual normal and transverse birefringence in LGPs along with shrinkages were measured. The predicted total birefringence was obtained by a summation of the predicted flow- and thermally-induced birefringence. Numerical results were compared with measurements at various processing conditions indicating a good agreement in the anisotropic shrinkage and a fair agreement in the residual birefringence. The luminance as a function of a viewing angle on the injection molded LGPs at various molding conditions was measured by means of the device that was built for this purpose. Strong effects from the

  1. Stein-Rule Estimation and Generalized Shrinkage Methods for Forecasting Using Many Predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillebrand, Eric Tobias; Lee, Tae-Hwy

    We examine the Stein-rule shrinkage estimator for possible improvements in estimation and forecasting when there are many predictors in a linear time series model. We consider the Stein-rule estimator of Hill and Judge (1987) that shrinks the unrestricted unbiased OLS estimator towards a restricted...... biased principal component (PC) estimator. Since the Stein-rule estimator combines the OLS and PC estimators, it is a model-averaging estimator and produces a combined forecast. The conditions under which the improvement can be achieved depend on several unknown parameters that determine the degree...

  2. Influence of Blasted Uranium Ore Heap on Radon Concentration in Confined Workspaces of Shrinkage Mining Stope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y. J.; Liang, T.; Ding, D. X.; Lei, B.; Su, H.; Zhang, Y. F.

    2017-07-01

    A calculation model for radon concentration in shrinkage mining stopes under various ventilation conditions was established in this study. The model accounts for the influence of permeability and area of the blasted ore heap, ventilation air quantity, and airflow direction on radon concentration in a confined workspace; these factors work together to allow the engineer to optimize the ventilation design. The feasibility and effectiveness of the model was verified by applying it to mines with elevated radon radiation exposure. The model was found to accurately changes in radon concentration according to the array of influence factors in underground uranium mines.

  3. Hinge-free topology optimization with embedded translation-invariant differentiable wavelet shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, G. H.; Kim, Y. Y.; Bendsøe, Martin P.

    2004-01-01

    In topology optimization applications for the design of compliant mechanisms, the formation of hinges is typically encountered. Often such hinges are unphysical artifacts that appear due to the choice of discretization spaces for design and analysis. The objective of this work is to present a new...... method to find hinge-free designs using multiscale wavelet-based topology optimization formulation. The specific method developed in this work does not require refinement of the analysis model and it consists of a translation-invariant wavelet shrinkage method where a hinge-free condition is imposed...

  4. [Determination of linear sintering shrinkage rate of slip-casting infiltrated ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Y; Cao, Y; Liao, Y

    1998-05-01

    This study tested the linear sintering shrinkage (SS) rate of ceramic infiltrated with different glasses (Vita In-ceram, G I-I La, G I-II La, G I-II Ce), the results showed that the linear SS rate was 0.08%-0.32%, which occurred mainly in the firing stage of alumina (P 0.05). It suggests that the effects of glass infiltration on the dimensional stability of GI glasses were comparable with that of Vita In-ceram.

  5. Evaluation of shrinkage temperature of bovine pericardium tissue for bioprosthetic heart valve application by differential scanning calorimetry and freeze-drying microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgilio Tattini Jr

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Bovine pericardium bioprosthesis has become a commonly accepted device for heart valve replacement. Present practice relies on the measurement of shrinkage temperature, observed as a dramatic shortening of tissue length. Several reports in the last decade have utilized differential scanning calorimetry (DSC as an alternative method to determine the shrinkage temperature, which is accompanied by the absorption of heat, giving rise to an endothermic peak over the shrinkage temperature range of biological tissues. Usually, freeze-drying microscope is used to determine collapse temperature during the lyophilization of solutions. On this experiment we used this technique to study the shrinkage event. The aim of this work was to compare the results of shrinkage temperature obtained by DSC with the results obtained by freeze-drying microscopy. The results showed that both techniques provided excellent sensitivity and reproducibility, and gave information on the thermal shrinkage transition via the thermodynamical parameters inherent of each method.

  6. Formation mechanism of shrinkage and large inclusions of a 70 t 12Cr2Mo1 heavy steel ingot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage cavities and large inclusions are serious internal defects of heavy steel ingot and influence the quality of subsequent forgings. In order to remove these two types of defects, a 70 t 12Cr2Mo1 heavy ingot fabricated by vacuum carbon de-oxidation process was sectioned and investigated by means of structure observation and EDS analysis. To further study the forming mechanism of shrinkage and inclusion defects and find possible solutions, simulation on pouring and solidification processes was also carried out using Fluent and ProCAST software, respectively. Results show that the shrinkage defects do not appear in the middle-upper part of the ingot. The critical value of shrinkage cavity criterion is ascertained as 0.013 on the basis of sectioning investigation and simulation results, which can be used in computer simulation to predict and avoid shrinkage defects in production of 12Cr2Mo1 ingots with different weights. However, large inclusions are found at the bottom of the ingot body. The bad thermal conditions of the ingot surface and large amount of entrained slag are the main origin of the large inclusions. The simulation result of the pouring process shows that large inclusions may be eliminated by combined measures of improving the top thermal condition and controlling the height of rudimental molten steel in the ladle to above 300 mm.

  7. A Study of the Shrinkage Changes and Mathematical Modeling of Garlic (Allium sativumL. During Convective Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rasouli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativumL. is one of the most important Allium spice. From an economic point of view, the dried garlic slices are valuable products. In this research, garlic slices as a thin layer were dried in a laboratory scale hot-air dryer, under air flow of 1.5 m/s, air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70˚C and slice thicknesses of 2, 3 and 4 mm. The mean values of shrinkage of garlic slices obtained 69.8%. In addition, the effects of the drying variables on the shrinkage of dried garlic were evaluated. The ANOVA results indicated that the air temperature and slice thickness had no significant effect on final shrinkage of dried garlic slices. In order to derive and select the appropriate shrinkage model, four mathematical models were fitted to the experimental data. According to the statistical criteria (R2, SSE & RMSE the best model was found to describe the shrinkage behavior of garlic slice.

  8. Durability and Shrinkage Characteristics of Self-Compacting Concretes Containing Recycled Coarse and/or Fine Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Gesoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses durability and shrinkage performance of the self-compacting concretes (SCCs in which natural coarse aggregate (NCA and/or natural fine aggregate (NFA were replaced by recycled coarse aggregate (RCA and/or recycled fine aggregate (RFA, respectively. A total of 16 SCCs were produced and classified into four series, each of which included four mixes designed with two water to binder (w/b ratios of 0.3 and 0.43 and two silica fume replacement levels of 0 and 10%. Durability properties of SCCs were tested for rapid chloride penetration, water sorptivity, gas permeability, and water permeability at 56 days. Also, drying shrinkage accompanied by the water loss and restrained shrinkage of SCCs were monitored over 56 days of drying period. Test results revealed that incorporating recycled coarse and/or fine aggregates aggravated the durability properties of SCCs tested in this study. The drying shrinkage and restrained shrinkage cracking of recycled aggregate (RA concretes had significantly poorer performance than natural aggregate (NA concretes. The time of cracking greatly prolonged as the RAs were used along with the increase in water/binder ratio.

  9. Does work stress make you shorter? An ambulatory field study of daily work stressors, job control, and spinal shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igic, Ivana; Ryser, Samuel; Elfering, Achim

    2013-10-01

    Body height decreases throughout the day due to fluid loss from the intervertebral disk. This study investigated whether spinal shrinkage was greater during workdays compared with nonwork days, whether daily work stressors were positively related to spinal shrinkage, and whether job control was negatively related to spinal shrinkage. In a consecutive 2-week ambulatory field study, including 39 office employees and 512 days of observation, spinal shrinkage was measured by a stadiometer, and calculated as body height in the morning minus body height in the evening. Physical activity was monitored throughout the 14 days by accelerometry. Daily work stressors, daily job control, biomechanical workload, and recreational activities after work were measured with daily surveys. Multilevel regression analyses showed that spinal disks shrank more during workdays than during nonwork days. After adjustment for sex, age, body weight, smoking status, biomechanical work strain, and time spent on physical and low-effort activities during the day, lower levels of daily job control significantly predicted increased spinal shrinkage. Findings add to knowledge on how work redesign that increases job control may possibly contribute to preserving intervertebral disk function and preventing occupational back pain.

  10. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate reduces polymerization shrinkage and increases the hardness of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Yih-Dean; Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Lin, Chun-Pin; Tseng, Wan-Yu

    2014-04-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is one of the main causes of dental restoration failure. This study tried to conjugate two diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate resins in order to reduce polymerization shrinkage and increase the hardness of composite resins. Diisocyanate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and bisphenol A dimethacrylate were reacted in different ratios to form urethane-modified new resin matrices, and then mixed with 50 wt.% silica fillers. The viscosities of matrices, polymerization shrinkage, surface hardness, and degrees of conversion of experimental composite resins were then evaluated and compared with a non-modified control group. The viscosities of resin matrices increased with increasing diisocyanate side chain density. Polymerization shrinkage and degree of conversion, however, decreased with increasing diisocyanate side chain density. The surface hardness of all diisocyanate-modified groups was equal to or significantly higher than that of the control group. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate represents an effective means of reducing polymerization shrinkage and increasing the surface hardness of dental composite resins. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Thermally induced strains and total shrinkage of the polymethyl-methacrylate cement in simplified models of total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griza, Sandro; Ueki, Marcelo M; Souza, Dárcio H G; Cervieri, André; Strohaecker, Telmo R

    2013-02-01

    An evaluation of transient and stabilized strains in the cement mantle during polymerization was carried out in simplified cemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) model. A mathematical approach combined with a simple finite element simulation was used to compare measured and calculated stabilized strain values and to provide the Von Mises stresses at the stem/cement interface due to shrinkage related to temperature decrease after exothermal reaction. A second similar model was carried out to measure stem/cement/mold interfacial shear strength and dimensional changes of the cement mantle to obtain total shrinkage due to temperature decrease plus cement polymerization. The results indicated that positive strain peaks found during the exothermic stage of polymerization have the potential to produce pre-loading cracking. After the initial expansion, it was observed a progressive strain decrease pattern down to stabilized values that takes place near 2h after the cementation. Even though there is a great deal of dispersion in the measured stabilized strain values, in average those values match quite well with the numerical simulations, indicating 4,7 MPa von Mises interfacial stress due to thermal shrinkage. The total cement shrinkage leads to a negative radial stress of 11 MPa and 14 MPa von Mises interfacial stress. Finally, total shrinkage has the potential to enhance gaps in the cement/mold interface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Mesoscopic Simulation for the Early-Age Shrinkage Cracking Process of High Performance Concrete in Bridge Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On a mesoscopic level, high performance concrete (HPC was assumed to be a heterogeneous composite material consisting of aggregates, mortar, and pores. The concrete mesoscopic structure model had been established based on CT image reconstruction. By combining this model with continuum mechanics, damage mechanics, and fracture mechanics, a relatively complete system for concrete mesoscopic mechanics analysis was established to simulate the process of early-age shrinkage cracking in HPC. This process was based on the dispersion crack model. The results indicated that the interface between the aggregate and mortar was the crack point caused by shrinkage cracks in HPC. The locations of early-age shrinkage cracks in HPC were associated with the spacing and the size of the aggregate particle. However, the shrinkage deformation size of the mortar was related to the scope of concrete cracking and was independent of the crack position. Whereas lower water to cement ratios can improve the early strength of concrete, this ratio cannot control early-age shrinkage cracks in HPC.

  13. Explaining Errors in Children's Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Caroline F.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to explain the occurrence of errors in children's speech is an essential component of successful theories of language acquisition. The present study tested some generativist and constructivist predictions about error on the questions produced by ten English-learning children between 2 and 5 years of age. The analyses demonstrated that,…

  14. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions ... Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji Rajendran, ...

  15. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual ... to allow for inflation with air while CT images are being taken. If you’re scheduled for ...

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound November 8 is ...

  17. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound November 8 is ...

  18. Prediction of shrinkage of individual parameters using the bayesian information matrix in non-linear mixed effect models with evaluation in pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, François Pierre; Retout, Sylvie; Frey, Nicolas; Mentré, France

    2013-09-01

    When information is sparse, individual parameters derived from a non-linear mixed effects model analysis can shrink to the mean. The objective of this work was to predict individual parameter shrinkage from the Bayesian information matrix (M BF ). We 1) Propose and evaluate an approximation of M BF by First-Order linearization (FO), 2) Explore by simulations the relationship between shrinkage and precision of estimates and 3) Evaluate prediction of shrinkage and individual parameter precision. We approximated M BF using FO. From the shrinkage formula in linear mixed effects models, we derived the predicted shrinkage from M BF . Shrinkage values were generated for parameters of two pharmacokinetic models by varying the structure and the magnitude of the random effect and residual error models as well as the design. We then evaluated the approximation of M BF FO and compared it to Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations. We finally compared expected and observed shrinkage as well as the predicted and estimated Standard Errors (SE) of individual parameters. M BF FO was similar to M BF MC. Predicted and observed shrinkages were close . Predicted and estimated SE were similar. M BF FO enables prediction of shrinkage and SE of individual parameters. It can be used for design optimization.

  19. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladena Luković

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions, type of repair material, etc. Numerical simulations combined with experimental observations can be of great use when determining the influence of these parameters on the performance of repair systems. In this work, a lattice type model was used to simulate first the moisture transport inside a repair system and then the resulting damage as a function of time. 3D simulations were performed, and damage patterns were qualitatively verified with experimental results and cracking tendencies in different brittle and ductile materials. The influence of substrate surface preparation, bond strength between the two materials, and thickness of the repair material were investigated. Benefits of using a specially tailored fibre reinforced material, namely strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC, for controlling the damage development due to drying shrinkage in concrete repairs was also examined.

  20. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luković, Mladena; Šavija, Branko; Schlangen, Erik; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2016-07-14

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions, type of repair material, etc. Numerical simulations combined with experimental observations can be of great use when determining the influence of these parameters on the performance of repair systems. In this work, a lattice type model was used to simulate first the moisture transport inside a repair system and then the resulting damage as a function of time. 3D simulations were performed, and damage patterns were qualitatively verified with experimental results and cracking tendencies in different brittle and ductile materials. The influence of substrate surface preparation, bond strength between the two materials, and thickness of the repair material were investigated. Benefits of using a specially tailored fibre reinforced material, namely strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC), for controlling the damage development due to drying shrinkage in concrete repairs was also examined.

  1. Deindustrialization and Urban Shrinkage in Romania. What Lessons for the Spatial Policy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia POPESCU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available After remodeling the economies of the Western world all along the 1980s, deindustrialization abruptly hit the former socialist countries in the early 1990s. Deindustrialization with destructuring meant the disintegration of the economic structure and industrial cities, and regions entered a downsizing spiral of population loss after the breakdown of traditional industries, outmigration and suburbanization. Post-socialist Europe forms a new ‘pole of shrinkage’. Set within the regional context, deindustrialization and urban shrinkage show a solid cause-effect relationship in the Romanian case. The industrial change of cities creates a pattern of uneven growth which stays at the core of understanding the emerging urban shrinkage. The paper finds out that 122 out of 260 towns had an above average Location Quotient (LQ of industrial employment in 1992 and about 5 million urban dwellers were under the threat of forthcoming deindustrialization. Towns of all demographic sizes were above average industrialized but mostly were medium-small and medium-big towns. They lost more than one quarter of the 1992 population number, significantly higher than in towns with below average LQ of industrial employment. At a large extent, the mix of urban, regional and industrial policies failed to reduce the social costs of deindustrialization. The policy response of spatial strategies, while avoiding the ‘one size fits all’ perspective, should be focused on placebased approach and should be built on economic diversification, complementarity and cooperation within the specific territorial context of small and medium-sized towns.

  2. Recycling of rubble from building demolition for low-shrinkage concretes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, Valeria; Moriconi, Giacomo

    2010-04-01

    In this project concrete mixtures were prepared that were characterized by low ductility due to desiccation by using debris from building demolition, which after a suitable treatment was used as aggregate for partial replacement of natural aggregates. The recycled aggregate used came from a recycling plant, in which rubble from building demolition was selected, crushed, cleaned, sieved, and graded. Such aggregates are known to be more porous as indicated by the Saturated Surface Dry (SSD) moisture content. The recycled concrete used as aggregates were added to the concrete mixture in order to study their influence on the fresh and hardened concrete properties. They were added either after water pre-soaking or in dry condition, in order to evaluate the influence of moisture in aggregates on the performance of concrete containing recycled aggregate. In particular, the effect of internal curing, due to the use of such aggregates, was studied. Concrete behavior due to desiccation under dehydration was studied by means of both drying shrinkage test and German angle test, through which shrinkage under the restrained condition of early age concrete can be evaluated. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Shrinkage Estimators for Robust and Efficient Inference in Haplotype-Based Case-Control Studies

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yi-Hau

    2009-03-01

    Case-control association studies often aim to investigate the role of genes and gene-environment interactions in terms of the underlying haplotypes (i.e., the combinations of alleles at multiple genetic loci along chromosomal regions). The goal of this article is to develop robust but efficient approaches to the estimation of disease odds-ratio parameters associated with haplotypes and haplotype-environment interactions. We consider "shrinkage" estimation techniques that can adaptively relax the model assumptions of Hardy-Weinberg-Equilibrium and gene-environment independence required by recently proposed efficient "retrospective" methods. Our proposal involves first development of a novel retrospective approach to the analysis of case-control data, one that is robust to the nature of the gene-environment distribution in the underlying population. Next, it involves shrinkage of the robust retrospective estimator toward a more precise, but model-dependent, retrospective estimator using novel empirical Bayes and penalized regression techniques. Methods for variance estimation are proposed based on asymptotic theories. Simulations and two data examples illustrate both the robustness and efficiency of the proposed methods.

  4. A bootstrapping soft shrinkage approach for variable selection in chemical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bai-Chuan; Yun, Yong-Huan; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Yin, Yu-Long; Wang, Wei-Ting; Lu, Hong-Mei; Luo, Qian-Yi; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2016-02-18

    In this study, a new variable selection method called bootstrapping soft shrinkage (BOSS) method is developed. It is derived from the idea of weighted bootstrap sampling (WBS) and model population analysis (MPA). The weights of variables are determined based on the absolute values of regression coefficients. WBS is applied according to the weights to generate sub-models and MPA is used to analyze the sub-models to update weights for variables. The optimization procedure follows the rule of soft shrinkage, in which less important variables are not eliminated directly but are assigned smaller weights. The algorithm runs iteratively and terminates until the number of variables reaches one. The optimal variable set with the lowest root mean squared error of cross-validation (RMSECV) is selected. The method was tested on three groups of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic datasets, i.e. corn datasets, diesel fuels datasets and soy datasets. Three high performing variable selection methods, i.e. Monte Carlo uninformative variable elimination (MCUVE), competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) and genetic algorithm partial least squares (GA-PLS) are used for comparison. The results show that BOSS is promising with improved prediction performance. The Matlab codes for implementing BOSS are freely available on the website: http://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/52770-boss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of vertical holes on creep and shrinkage of railway prestressed concrete sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-09-01

    Railway prestressed concrete sleepers (or railroad ties) must successfully perform two critical duties: first, to carry wheel loads from the rails to the ground; and second, to secure rail gauge for dynamic safe movements of trains. The second duty is often fouled by inappropriate design of the time-dependent behaviors due to their creep, shrinkage and elastic shortening responses of the materials. In addition, the concrete sleepers are often modified on construction sites to fit in other systems such as cables, signalling gears, drainage pipes, etc. Accordingly, this study is the world first to investigate creep and shrinkage effects on the railway prestressed concrete sleepers with vertical holes. This paper will highlight constitutive models of concrete materials within the railway sleepers under different environmental conditions over time. It will present a comparative investigation using a variety of methods to evaluate shortening effects in railway prestressed concrete sleepers. The outcome of this study will improve material design, which is very critical to the durability of railway track components.

  6. Finite Element Stress Analysis of Composite Polymerisation Shrinkage in Endodontically Treated Maxillary Central Incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Khosravi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Resin composites are common materials used to restore anterior teeth following root canal therapy, but are accompanied with shrinkage during polymerization. The aim of this in vitrostudy was to investigate the effect of the insertion method and polymerization shrinkage of resin composite on residual tooth structure.Materials and Methods: Stereomicroscopy and computerized Finite Element Modelling (FEM were used to compare residual stresses in endodontically treated, extracted maxillary central incisor teeth,in which the access cavities were restored with resin composite. Theoretical stresses derived from the FEM were analyzed during preparation and after teeth were restored using either a “bulk” or a“wedge incremental” method. These data were subsequently compared with stresses measured directly using strain gauges.Results: Results showed that intensive stresses, which had the potential to cause fracture in dental structures and composite de-bonding, were applied to teeth during polymerization.Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the “bulk” build up led to less stress induction during restoration of teeth following root canal therapy.

  7. THE URBAN SHRINKAGE OF THE SMALL TOWNS LOCATED IN SOUTHERN PART OF BIHOR COUNTY, ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana PRAȘCA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The urban shrinkage1 is a common phenomenon among East-European small towns. Effects of this phenomenon are much stronger in case of the former mono-industrial small towns emerged during the communist period in Romania, where after the 90's have been manifested a series of major political and socio-economic changes. The aim of this paper is to detail the specific situation of the former mono-industrial small towns located in the southern part of Bihor County, where the effects of de-industrialization and the incoherent post-communist development policies have hallmarked the structure, the spatial organization and the urban functions of these towns at local and regional level (sum of aspects that actually led to urban shrinking. Thus, the towns of Ștei, Nucet and Vașcău, emerged in the 50's as a result of forced industrialization, currently are three of the smallest towns of Romania, confronted with a strong demographical, social and economic decline. If in the future these cities maintain the same rate of population decrease, it raises a question mark over the real chances to provide a smart urban shrinkage.

  8. Effects of dynamic office chairs on trunk kinematics, trunk extensor EMG and spinal shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dieën, J H; de Looze, M P; Hermans, V

    2001-06-10

    Seated work has been shown to constitute a risk factor for low-back pain. This is attributed to the prolonged and monotonous low-level mechanical load imposed by a seated posture. To evaluate the potential health effects with respect to the low back of office chairs with a movable seat and back rest, trunk kinematics, erector spinae EMG, spinal shrinkage and local discomfort were assessed in 10 subjects performing simulated office work. On three separate occasions subjects performed a 3 h task consisting of word processing, computer-aided design and reading. Three chairs were used, one with a fixed seat and back rest and two dynamic chairs, one with a seat and back rest movable in a fixed ratio with respect to each other, and one with a freely movable seat and back rest. Spinal shrinkage measurements showed a larger stature gain when working on the two dynamic chairs as compared with working on the chair with fixed seat and back rest. Trunk kinematics and erector spinae EMG were strongly affected by the task performed but not by the chair type. The results imply that dynamic office chairs offer a potential advantage over fixed chairs, but the effects of the task on the indicators of trunk load investigated were more pronounced than the effects of the chair.

  9. Fabrication of Polydimethylsiloxane Microlenses Utilizing Hydrogel Shrinkage and a Single Molding Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader Aldalali

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS microlenses and microlens arrays on flat and curved substrates fabricated via a relatively simple process combining liquid-phase photopolymerization and a single molding step. The mold for the formation of the PDMS lenses is fabricated by photopolymerizing a polyacrylamide (PAAm pre-hydrogel. The shrinkage of PAAm after its polymerization forms concave lenses. The lenses are then transferred to PDMS by a single step molding to form PDMS microlens array on a flat substrate. The PAAm concave lenses are also transferred to PDMS and another flexible polymer, Solaris, to realize artificial compound eyes. The resultant microlenses and microlens arrays possess good uniformity and optical properties. The focal length of the lenses is inversely proportional to the shrinkage time. The microlens mold can also be rehydrated to change the focal length of the ultimate PDMS microlenses. The spherical aberration is 2.85 μm and the surface roughness is on the order of 204 nm. The microlenses can resolve 10.10 line pairs per mm (lp/mm and have an f-number range between f/2.9 and f/56.5. For the compound eye, the field of view is 113°.

  10. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements through in vitro and in situ experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Pulido, C. A.; Gomes, O. M. M.; Kalinowski, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of two types of resin cements , conventional dual and dual self adhesive, through in vitro and in situ experiments. For the in vitro assay were selected two resin cements that were handled and dispensed over a mylar strip supported by a glass plate. The Bragg grating sensors were positioned and another portion of cement. was placed, covered by another mylar strip. For the in situ experiment 16 single-rooted teeth were selected who were divided into 2 groups: group 1 - conventional dual resin cement Relyx ARC and group 2 - dual self adhesive resin cement Relyx U200 ( 3M/ESPE ). The teeth were treated and prepared to receive the intracanal posts. Two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and introduced into the root canal at different apical and coronal positions. The results showed that the in vitro experiment presented similar values of polymerization shrinkage that the in situ experiment made in cervical position; whereas Relyx ARC resulted lower values compared to Relyx U200; and cervical position showed higher shrinkage than the apical.

  11. Influence of calcined mud on the mechanical properties and shrinkage of self-compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Taieb

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of SCC has a particular interest in terms of sustainable development. Indeed, their specific formulation leads to a greater volume of dough than for common concretes, thus, a larger quantity of cement. However, for economical, ecological and technical reasons, it is sought to limit their cement content [1]. It is therefore necessary to almost always use mineral additions as a partial replacement for cement because the technology of self-compacting concretes can consume large quantities of fines, in this case calcinated mud issued from dams dredging sediments that can give and/or ameliorate characteristics and performances of this type of concretes. Four SCCs had been formulated from the same composition where the only percentage of calcinated mud of Chorfa (west of Algeria dam changed (0%, 10%, 20% and 30%. The effect of calcinated mud on characteristics at fresh state of SCC according to AFGC was quantified. Mechanical strengths and shrinkage deformation (total, autogenous, drying were evaluated. The results show the possibility to make SCCs with different dosages of calcinated mud having strengths that can defy those of the control SCC. The analysis of free deformations indicates the beneficial impact of the mud by contributing to decrease the amplitudes of the shrinkage compared to those of the control SCC.

  12. clınıcal EVALUATION OF FREE GINGIVAL GRAFT SHRINKAGE IN HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL DIMENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine ÇİFCİBAŞI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the shrinkage of Free Gingival Graft (FGG in horizontal and vertical dimensions and calculate the changes in the surface area of the transplanted tissue in a 3 months period. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 FGG were placed aiming to increase attached gingiva around recession sites. Vertical recessions, horizontal recessions, surface area, plaque index, gingival index, periodontal probing depth and clinical attachment level were assesed at baseline, 1 and 3 months postoperatively. Results: Graft shrinkage between baseline and 1 month was more evident than 1 to 3 months in either dimensions. Both horizontal and vertical dimensions were significantly decreased (p0.05. . Conclusion: The shrinkage of vertical and horizontal dimensions of the grafts were almost equal unlike the literature. In addition, the different dimensional changes observed in individual level deserve further research.

  13. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes, part 3: hydrophobic vials and the question of adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-06-01

    The importance of cake adhesion to the inside vial wall during lyophilization of amorphous trehalose cakes was determined by using hydrophobized vials. The degrees of cake shrinkage and cracking were determined independently by photographic imaging of the cake top surface in a dark cell. Additionally, measurements with microcomputed tomography were performed. Adhesion is found to be a determining factor in both cake shrinkage and cracking. The correlation between cake detachment from the vial inner wall and trehalose concentration indicates that adhesion of the frozen solute phase is a determining factor in shrinkage. The hydrophobized vials give reduced cracking at trehalose concentrations of up to 15%. The reduced wetting of the hydrophobized inside vial wall gives a planar cake topography with a uniform distribution of cracks within the cake. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Influence of void density on dislocation mechanisms of void shrinkage in nickel single crystal based on molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanqiu; Jiang, Shuyong; Zhu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yanan

    2017-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate influence of void density on dislocation mechanism of void shrinkage in nickel single crystal. The simulation results show that the higher void density can accelerate the yield of nickel single crystal. During the compression, all the dislocations are emitted toward the other side of the voids, which causes the atoms on the void surface to move into the voids and finally leads to the shrinkage of the voids. There exist six types of dislocations during void shrinkage of nickel single crystal, and the densities of all the six types of dislocations increase with the increase in the void density. The increase of Shockley partial dislocations enhances the slip ability of nickel single crystal, so the void size decreases with the increase in the void density at a constant stain.

  15. First time observation of local current shrinkage during the MARFE behavior on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peng; Zhuang, G.; Gentle, K.; Hu, Qiming; Chen, Jie; Li, Qiang; Liu, Yang; Gao, Li; Zhang, Xiaolong; Liu, Hai; Chen, Zhipeng; Zhu, Lizhi; Li, Fuming; Zhou, Yinan; Zeng, Zhong; Liu, Linzi; He, Jiyang

    2017-11-01

    Multifaceted asymmetric radiation as well as strong poloidal asymmetry of the electron density from the edge, dubbed as ‘MARFE’, has been observed in high electron density Ohmically heated plasmas on J-TEXT tokamak. Equilibrium reconstruction based on the measured data from the 17-channel FIR polarimeter-interferometer indicates that an asymmetric plasma current density distribution forms at the edge region and the plasma current shrinkage locates at the MARFE affected region. Furthermore, associated with the localized plasma current shrinkage, a locked mode MHD activity is excited, which then terminate the discharge with a major disruption. Localized plasma current shrinkage at the MARFE region is considered to be the direct cause for the density limit disruptions, and the proposed interpretation is consistent with the experimental observations.

  16. Muscle activity patterns and spinal shrinkage in office workers using a sit-stand workstation versus a sit workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Cronin, Neil J; Pesola, Arto J; Finni, Taija

    2016-10-01

    Reducing sitting time by means of sit-stand workstations is an emerging trend, but further evidence is needed regarding their health benefits. This cross-sectional study compared work time muscle activity patterns and spinal shrinkage between office workers (aged 24-62, 58.3% female) who used either a sit-stand workstation (Sit-Stand group, n = 10) or a traditional sit workstation (Sit group, n = 14) for at least the past three months. During one typical workday, muscle inactivity and activity from quadriceps and hamstrings were monitored using electromyography shorts, and spinal shrinkage was measured using stadiometry before and after the workday. Compared with the Sit group, the Sit-Stand group had less muscle inactivity time (66.2 ± 17.1% vs. 80.9 ± 6.4%, p = 0.014) and more light muscle activity time (26.1 ± 12.3% vs. 14.9 ± 6.3%, p = 0.019) with no significant difference in spinal shrinkage (5.62 ± 2.75 mm vs. 6.11 ± 2.44 mm). This study provides evidence that working with sit-stand workstations can promote more light muscle activity time and less inactivity without negative effects on spinal shrinkage. Practitioner Summary: This cross-sectional study compared the effects of using a sit-stand workstation to a sit workstation on muscle activity patterns and spinal shrinkage in office workers. It provides evidence that working with a sit-stand workstation can promote more light muscle activity time and less inactivity without negative effects on spinal shrinkage.

  17. Explaining mirror-touch synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jamie; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mirror-touch synesthesia (MTS) is the conscious experience of tactile sensations induced by seeing someone else touched. This paper considers two different, although not mutually exclusive, theoretical explanations and, in the final section, considers the relation between MTS and other forms of synesthesia and also other kinds of vicarious perception (e.g., contagious yawning). The Threshold Theory explains MTS in terms of hyper-activity within a mirror system for touch and/or pain. This offers a good account for some of the evidence (e.g., from fMRI) but fails to explain the whole pattern (e.g., structural brain differences outside of this system; performance on some tests of social cognition). The Self-Other Theory explains MTS in terms of disturbances in the ability to distinguish the self from others. This can be construed in terms of over-extension of the bodily self in to others, or as difficulties in the control of body-based self-other representations. In this account, MTS is a symptom of a broader cognitive profile. We suggest this meets the criteria for synesthesia, despite the proximal causal mechanisms remaining largely unknown, and that the tendency to localize vicarious sensory experiences distinguishes it from other kinds of seemingly related phenomena (e.g., non-localized affective responses to observing pain).

  18. Explaining the gender wealth gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruel, Erin; Hauser, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    To assess and explain the United States' gender wealth gap, we use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine wealth accumulated by a single cohort over 50 years by gender, by marital status, and limited to the respondents who are their family's best financial reporters. We find large gender wealth gaps between currently married men and women, and between never-married men and women. The never-married accumulate less wealth than the currently married, and there is a marital disruption cost to wealth accumulation. The status-attainment model shows the most power in explaining gender wealth gaps between these groups explaining about one-third to one-half of the gap, followed by the human-capital explanation. In other words, a lifetime of lower earnings for women translates into greatly reduced wealth accumulation. After controlling for the full model, we find that a gender wealth gap remains between married men and women that we speculate may be related to gender differences in investment strategies and selection effects.

  19. Pre-heating of high-viscosity bulk-fill resin composites: effects on shrinkage force and monomer conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Tarle, Zrinka; Marovic, Danijela; Attin, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the influence of pre-heating of high-viscosity bulk-fill composite materials on their degree of conversion and shrinkage force formation. Four bulk-fill composite materials (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill-TECBF, x-tra fil-XF, QuixFil-QF, SonicFill-SF) and one conventional nano-hybrid resin composite (Tetric EvoCeram-TEC) were used. The test materials were either kept at room temperature or pre-heated to 68°C by means of a commercial heating device, before being photoactivated with a LED curing unit for 20s at 1170mW/cm(2). Shrinkage forces (n=5) of 1.5-mm-thick specimens were recorded in real-time for 15min inside a temperature-controlled chamber at 25°C (simulating intraoral temperature after rubber dam application) with a custom-made stress analyzer. Degree of conversion (n=5) was determined at the bottom of equally thick (1.5mm) specimens using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test, ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post-hoc test (α=0.05). Composite pre-heating significantly increased the degree of conversion of TECBF, but had no effect on monomer conversion of the other materials investigated. For each of the test materials, pre-heated composite generated significantly lower shrinkage forces than room-temperature composite. At both temperature levels, TECBF created the significantly highest shrinkage forces, and QF caused significantly higher shrinkage forces than both XF and TEC. Both the composite material and the pre-cure temperature affect shrinkage force formation. Pre-heating of bulk-fill and conventional restorative composites prior to photoactivation decreases polymerization-induced shrinkage forces without compromising the degree of conversion. Composite pre-heating significantly reduces shrinkage force formation of high-viscosity bulk-fill and conventional resin composites, while maintaining or increasing the degree of monomer conversion, dependent upon the specific composite material used. Copyright

  20. Explaining the Evolution of Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Azhar; Jones, Edward Samuel

    2012-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive approach for analyzing the evolution of poverty using Mozambique as a case study. Bringing together data from disparate sources, we develop a novel “back-casting” framework that links a dynamic computable general equilibrium model to a micro-simulation poverty module....... This framework provides a new approach to explaining and decomposing the evolution of poverty, as well as to examining rigorously the coherence between poverty, economic growth, and inequality outcomes. Finally, various simple but useful and rarely-applied approaches to considering regional changes in poverty...

  1. Explaining (Missing) Regulator Paradigm Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigger, Angela; Buch-Hansen, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    of competition regulation is heaving into sight. It sets out to explain this from the vantage point of a critical political economy perspective, which identifies the circumstances under which a crisis can result in a regulatory paradigm shift. Contrasting the current situation with the shift in EC/EU competition...... capitalism; the social power configuration underpinning the neoliberal order remains unaltered; no clear counter-project has surfaced; the European Commission has been (and remains) in a position to oppose radical changes; and finally, there are no signs of a wider paradigm shift in the EU's regulatory...

  2. Explaining the Gender Wealth Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Ruel, Erin; Hauser, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    To assess and explain the United States’ gender wealth gap, we use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine wealth accumulated by a single cohort over 50 years by gender, by marital status, and limited to the respondents who are their family’s best financial reporters. We find large gender wealth gaps between currently married men and women, and never-married men and women. The never-married accumulate less wealth than the currently married, and there is a marital disruption cost to wealth...

  3. Creep and drying shrinkage of high performance concrete for the skyway structures of the new San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge and cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of admixtures on long term drying shrinkage and creep of high : strength concrete (HSC). Creep and shrinkage of the mix utilized in segments of the Skyway Structure of the San : Francisco-Oak...

  4. Reasons and Premises for the Shrinkage in Timişoara. Research Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Dincă

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Timisoara is nowadays the second city of Romania, an important economical, social and cultural urban centre. Until 1990, the city had a relatively continuous growing, natural at the beginning of the 19th century, but artificially accelerated during the communist period. After the political change, the city has started a natural process of reconfiguration, similar with the national and euro-regional trends. In this context, the relation centre-periphery into the urban space involves a renegotiation for its new equilibrium. This article is based on the partial result of the project FP7 no.225193 ShrinkSmart – The Governance of the Shrinkage into the European Context, financed by European Commission. West University of Timisoara is partner into the consortium of this project (http://www.shrinksmart.ufz.de/.

  5. Slow and steady cell shrinkage reduces osmotic stress in bovine and murine oocyte and zygote vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, D; Ding, J; Smith, G W; Smith, G D; Takayama, S

    2015-01-01

    Does the use of a new cryoprotectant agent (CPA) exchange protocol designed to minimize osmotic stress improve oocyte or zygote vitrification by reducing sublethal cryodamage? The use of a new CPA exchange protocol made possible by automated microfluidics improved oocyte and zygote vitrification with superior morphology as indicated by a smoother cell surface, higher sphericity, higher cytoplasmic lipid retention, less cytoplasmic leakage and higher developmental competence compared with conventional methods. The use of more 'steps' of CPA exposure during the vitrification protocol increases cryosurvival and development in the bovine model. However, such an attempt to eliminate osmotic stress is limited by the practicality of performing numerous precise pipetting steps in a short amount of time. Murine meiotically competent germinal vesicle intact oocytes and zygotes were harvested from the antral follicles in ovaries and ampulla, respectively. Bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir at random stages of the estrous cycle. A total of 110 murine oocytes, 802 murine zygotes and 52 bovine oocytes were used in this study. Microfluidic devices were fabricated using conventional photo- and soft-lithography. CPAs used were 7.5% ethylene glycol (EG) and 7.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for equilibration solution and 15% EG, 15% DMSO and 0.5 M sucrose for vitrification solution. End-point analyses include mathematical modeling using Kedem-Katchalsky equations, morphometrics assessed by conventional and confocal microscopy, cytoplasmic lipid quantification by nile red staining, cytoplasmic leakage quantification by fluorescent dextran intercalation and developmental competence analysis by 96 h embryo culture and blastomere quantification. The automated microfluidics protocol decreased the shrinkage rate of the oocyte and zygote by 13.8 times over its manual pipetting alternative. Oocytes and zygotes with a lower shrinkage rate during CPA exposure experienced less

  6. The Shrinkage Behavior and Surface Topographical Investigation for Micro Metal Injection Molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Giannekas, Nikolaos; Marhöfer, David Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) is a near net shape manufacturing technology that can produce highly complex and dimensionally stable parts for high end engineering applications. Despite the recent growth and industrial interest, micro metal molding is yet to be the field of extensive research...... especially when it is compared with micro molding of thermoplastics. The current paper presents a thorough investigation on the process of metal injection molding where it systematically characterizes the effects of important process conditions on the shrinkage and surface quality of molded parts with micro...... by 2½D surface structures containing thin ribs of different aspect ratios and thicknesses in the sub-mm dimensional range. The test parts were molded from Catamold 316L with a conventional injection molding machine. Afterwards, the parts were de-binded and sintered to produce the final test samples...

  7. Shrinkage-thresholding enhanced born iterative method for solving 2D inverse electromagnetic scattering problem

    KAUST Repository

    Desmal, Abdulla

    2014-07-01

    A numerical framework that incorporates recently developed iterative shrinkage thresholding (IST) algorithms within the Born iterative method (BIM) is proposed for solving the two-dimensional inverse electromagnetic scattering problem. IST algorithms minimize a cost function weighted between measurement-data misfit and a zeroth/first-norm penalty term and therefore promote "sharpness" in the solution. Consequently, when applied to domains with sharp variations, discontinuities, or sparse content, the proposed framework is more efficient and accurate than the "classical" BIM that minimizes a cost function with a second-norm penalty term. Indeed, numerical results demonstrate the superiority of the IST-BIM over the classical BIM when they are applied to sparse domains: Permittivity and conductivity profiles recovered using the IST-BIM are sharper and more accurate and converge faster. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  8. Acoustical source reconstruction from non-synchronous sequential measurements by Fast Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Antoni, Jerome; Leclere, Quentin; Jiang, Weikang

    2017-11-01

    Acoustical source reconstruction is a typical inverse problem, whose minimum frequency of reconstruction hinges on the size of the array and maximum frequency depends on the spacing distance between the microphones. For the sake of enlarging the frequency of reconstruction and reducing the cost of an acquisition system, Cyclic Projection (CP), a method of sequential measurements without reference, was recently investigated (JSV,2016,372:31-49). In this paper, the Propagation based Fast Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm (Propagation-FISTA) is introduced, which improves CP in two aspects: (1) the number of acoustic sources is no longer needed and the only making assumption is that of a ;weakly sparse; eigenvalue spectrum; (2) the construction of the spatial basis is much easier and adaptive to practical scenarios of acoustical measurements benefiting from the introduction of propagation based spatial basis. The proposed Propagation-FISTA is first investigated with different simulations and experimental setups and is next illustrated with an industrial case.

  9. Influence of Surface Abrasion on Creep and Shrinkage of Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-10-01

    Ballasted railway track is very suitable for heavy-rail networks because of its many superior advantages in design, construction, short- and long-term maintenance, sustainability, and life-cycle cost. The sleeper, which supports rail and distributes loads from rail to ballast, is a very important component of rail track system. Prestressed concrete is very popular used in manufacturing sleepers. Therefore, improved knowledge about design techniques for prestressed concrete (PC) sleepers has been developed. However, the ballast angularity causes differential abrasions on the soffit or bottom surface of sleepers. Furthermore, in sharp curves and rapid gradient change, longitudinal and lateral dynamics of rails increase the likelihood of abrasions in concrete sleepers. This paper presents a comparative investigation using a variety of methods to evaluate creep and shrinkage effects in railway prestressed concrete sleepers. The outcome of this study will improve the material design, which is very critical to the durability of railway track components.

  10. In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Fan, C.; Ding, J.; Xue, S.; Chen, Y.; Li, Q.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    High energy particle radiations induce severe microstructural damage in metallic materials. Nanoporous materials with a giant surface-to-volume ratio may alleviate radiation damage in irradiated metallic materials as free surface are defect sinks. Here we show, by using in situ Kr ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature, that nanoporous Au indeed has significantly improved radiation tolerance comparing with coarse-grained, fully dense Au. In situ studies show that nanopores can absorb and eliminate a large number of radiation-induced defect clusters. Meanwhile, nanopores shrink (self-heal) during radiation, and their shrinkage rate is pore size dependent. Furthermore, the in situ studies show dose-rate-dependent diffusivity of defect clusters. This study sheds light on the design of radiation-tolerant nanoporous metallic materials for advanced nuclear reactor applications.

  11. Evaluation of the shrinkage and creep of medium strength self compacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, C. J.; Ramos, G.; Hurtado, W. A.

    2017-02-01

    The difference between self compacting concrete (SCC) and conventional concrete (CC) is in fresh state, is the high fluidity at first and the need for vibration at second, but in hardened state, both concretes must comply with the resistance specified, in addition to securing the safety and functionality for which it was designed. This article describes the tests and results for shrinkage and creep at some medium strength Self Compacting Concrete with added sand (SCC-MSs) and two types of cement. The research was conducted at the Laboratorio de Tecnología de Estructuras (LTE) of the Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC), in dosages of 200 liters; with the idea of evaluating the effectiveness of implementation of these new concretes at elements designed with conventional concrete (CCs).

  12. Drying shrinkage of mortars with limestone filler and blast-furnace slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasco, M. F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available During the 1990's the use of cements made with port land clinker and two mineral admixtures, called ternary or blended cements, has grown considerably. Nowadays, cements containing several combinations of fly ash and silica fume, blast-furnace slag and silica fume or blast-furnace slag and limestone filler are commonly used. There are numerous works on the influence of blended cements on the fresh state and mechanical properties of mortar and concrete, but the their deformations due to drying shrinkage are not so well described. Analysis of drying shrinkage is relevant because this property influences the possibility of cracking occurrence and, hence, the deterioration of mechanical and durable properties of concrete structures. This paper evaluates the influence on the drying shrinkage of mortars of variable contents of limestone filler and/or blast-furnace slag in Portland cement. Additionally, flexion strength and non evaporable water content were evaluated. Test results show that the inclusion of these mineral admixtures, Joint or separately, increments drying shrinkage of mortars at early ages. Despite this fact, mortars made with limestone filler cement are less susceptible to cracking than mortars made with cements incorporating blast-furnace slag or both admixtures.

    Durante los años 90 el uso de cementos fabricados con clínker Portland y dos adiciones suplementarias (cementos ternarios o compuestos se ha incrementado en forma considerable. En la práctica, es cada vez más común el empleo de estos cementos conteniendo combinaciones de ceniza volante y humo de sílice, escoria y humo de sílice o escoria y filler calcáreo. En la actualidad existen numerosos estudios sobre la influencia de los cementos compuestos en las características en estado fresco y las propiedades mecánicas de morteros y hormigones, pero las deformaciones que estos materiales sufren debido a la retracción por secado no son tan conocidas. El análisis de

  13. Cicatricial ectropion due to essential skin shrinkage: treatment with rotational upper-lid pedicle flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, J J; Lichter, M; Rodgers, J

    1983-10-01

    Ectropion is sometimes due to a shortage of skin of the lower lid (cicatricial) and may result from previous surgery, trauma, burns, skin diseases etc. Excessive exposure to the sun has also been incriminated. Vertical traction lines in the skin of the lower lid, accentuated by gazing up or by opening the mouth, suggest this condition. This paper describes the use of pedicle skin flaps rotated from the upper lid to treat cicatricial ectropion occurring in the absence of any predisposing factor and not responding to conservative treatment--that is, due to essential skin shrinkage. All 10 patients had an improved appearance, and epiphora persisted in only 1 patient, who subsequently underwent a punctum-enlarging procedure. In an 11th patient there was insufficient redundant upper-lid skin, so a free skin graft was used instead.

  14. Separation of EEG and ECG components based on wavelet shrinkage and variable cosine window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, M; Okuyama, Y; Wei, D

    2012-02-01

    During ambulatory monitoring, it is sometimes required to record an electroencephalogram (EEG) and an electrocardiogram (ECG) simultaneously. It would be ideal if both EEG and ECG could be obtained with one measurement. Here, we introduce an algorithm that combines the wavelet shrinkage and variable cosine window operation to separate the EEG and ECG components from an EEG signal recorded with a noncephalic reference (NCR). Evaluation using simulated data and actual measured data showed that accurate frequency analysis of EEG and an R-R detection-based heart rate analysis were feasible with our proposed algorithm, which improved the signal-averaging based algorithm so that ECG components containing ectopic beats can be applied.

  15. International Symposium on Fundamental Research on Creep and Shrinkage of Concrete

    CERN Document Server

    1982-01-01

    Today research on creep and shrinkage of concrete is diversified to such a degree that specialists working in different areas sometimes find it difficult to understand one-another. Materials scientists are mainly interested in processes on a microstructural level but they do not necessarily understand the relevance of time dependent deformation in structural design. On the other hand engineers who apply simplified model laws in non-elastic structural analysis are not always in the position to judge the limitations implied in their approach. It is generally realized that further development can be stimulated by a more effective exchange of results and ideas among the different groups involved. In an attempt to bridge this obvious gap in September 1980 there was a Conference organized at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne. The papers presented at this meeting covered the wide range starting with microstructural aspects and mechanisms and including constitutive modelling and structural creep analy...

  16. Characterization of field compaction using shrinkage analysis and visual soil examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Alice; Keller, Thomas; Weisskopf, Peter; Schulin, Rainer; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Visual field examination of soil structure can be very useful in extension work, because it is easy to perform, does not require equipment or lab analyses and the result is immediately available. The main limitations of visual methods are subjectivity and variation with field conditions. To provide reliable reference information, methods for objective and quantitative assessment of soil structure quality are still necessary. Soil shrinkage analysis (ShA) (Braudeau et al., 2004) provides relevant parameters for soil functions that allow precise and accurate assessment of soil compaction. To test it, we applied ShA to samples taken from a soil structure observatory (SSO) set up in 2014 on a loamy soil in Zurich, Switzerland to quantify the structural recovery of compacted agricultural soil. The objective in this presentation is to compare the ability of a visual examination method and ShA to assess soil compaction and structural recovery on the SSO field plots. Eighteen undisturbed soil samples were taken in the topsoil (5-10 cm) and 9 samples in the subsoil (30-35 cm) of compacted plots and control. Each sample went through ShA, followed by a visual examination of the sample and analysis of soil organic carbon and texture. ShA combines simultaneous shrinkage with water retention measurements and, in addition to soil properties such as bulk density, coarse and fine porosity, also provides information on hydrostructural stability and plasma and structural porosity. For visual examination the VESS method of Ball et al. (2007) was adapted to core samples previously equilibrated at -100 hPa matric potential. The samples were randomly and anonymously scored to avoid subjectivity and were equilibrated to insure comparable conditions. Compaction decreased the total specific volume, as well as air and water content at all matric potentials. Structural porosity was reduced, while plasma porosity remained unchanged. Compaction also changed the shape of the shrinkage curve: (i

  17. Seeing without the Occipito-Parietal Cortex: Simultagnosia as a Shrinkage of the Attentional Visual Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Michel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Following bi-parietal lesions patient AT showed a severe inability to relocate her attention within a visual field which perimetry proved to be near-normal. An experimental approach with tasks testing visuo-spatial attention demonstrated a shrinkage of A.T.’s attentional visual field. With her visual attention narrowed to a kind of functional tunnel vision, the patient exhibited simultanagnosia (Wolpert, 1924, a symptom previously described in 1909 by Balint under the label of Psychic paralysis of “Gaze”. In striking contrast AT showed an efficient and effortless perception of complex natural scenes, which, according to recent work in normal subjects, necessitate few if any attentional resources.

  18. Seeing without the Occipito-Parietal Cortex: Simultagnosia as a Shrinkage of the Attentional Visual Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, François; Henaff, Marie-Anne

    2004-01-01

    Following bi-parietal lesions patient AT showed a severe inability to relocate her attention within a visual field which perimetry proved to be near-normal. An experimental approach with tasks testing visuo-spatial attention demonstrated a shrinkage of A.T.’s attentional visual field. With her visual attention narrowed to a kind of functional tunnel vision, the patient exhibited simultanagnosia (Wolpert, 1924), a symptom previously described in 1909 by Balint under the label of Psychic paralysis of “Gaze”. In striking contrast AT showed an efficient and effortless perception of complex natural scenes, which, according to recent work in normal subjects, necessitate few if any attentional resources. PMID:15201489

  19. Seeing without the occipito-parietal cortex: Simultagnosia as a shrinkage of the attentional visual field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, François; Henaff, Marie-Anne

    2004-01-01

    Following bi-parietal lesions patient AT showed a severe inability to relocate her attention within a visual field which perimetry proved to be near-normal. An experimental approach with tasks testing visuo-spatial attention demonstrated a shrinkage of A.T.'s attentional visual field. With her visual attention narrowed to a kind of functional tunnel vision, the patient exhibited simultanagnosia (Wolpert, 1924), a symptom previously described in 1909 by Balint under the label of Psychic paralysis of "Gaze". In striking contrast AT showed an efficient and effortless perception of complex natural scenes, which, according to recent work in normal subjects, necessitate few if any attentional resources. Copyright 2004 IOS Press

  20. ISTA-Net: Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm Inspired Deep Network for Image Compressive Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jian

    2017-06-24

    Traditional methods for image compressive sensing (CS) reconstruction solve a well-defined inverse problem that is based on a predefined CS model, which defines the underlying structure of the problem and is generally solved by employing convergent iterative solvers. These optimization-based CS methods face the challenge of choosing optimal transforms and tuning parameters in their solvers, while also suffering from high computational complexity in most cases. Recently, some deep network based CS algorithms have been proposed to improve CS reconstruction performance, while dramatically reducing time complexity as compared to optimization-based methods. Despite their impressive results, the proposed networks (either with fully-connected or repetitive convolutional layers) lack any structural diversity and they are trained as a black box, void of any insights from the CS domain. In this paper, we combine the merits of both types of CS methods: the structure insights of optimization-based method and the performance/speed of network-based ones. We propose a novel structured deep network, dubbed ISTA-Net, which is inspired by the Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm (ISTA) for optimizing a general $l_1$ norm CS reconstruction model. ISTA-Net essentially implements a truncated form of ISTA, where all ISTA-Net parameters are learned end-to-end to minimize a reconstruction error in training. Borrowing more insights from the optimization realm, we propose an accelerated version of ISTA-Net, dubbed FISTA-Net, which is inspired by the fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm (FISTA). Interestingly, this acceleration naturally leads to skip connections in the underlying network design. Extensive CS experiments demonstrate that the proposed ISTA-Net and FISTA-Net outperform existing optimization-based and network-based CS methods by large margins, while maintaining a fast runtime.

  1. Treatment effect heterogeneity for univariate subgroups in clinical trials: Shrinkage, standardization, or else.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Treatment effect heterogeneity is a well-recognized phenomenon in randomized controlled clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss subgroup analyses with prespecified subgroups of clinical or biological importance. We explore various alternatives to the naive (the traditional univariate) subgroup analyses to address the issues of multiplicity and confounding. Specifically, we consider a model-based Bayesian shrinkage (Bayes-DS) and a nonparametric, empirical Bayes shrinkage approach (Emp-Bayes) to temper the optimism of traditional univariate subgroup analyses; a standardization approach (standardization) that accounts for correlation between baseline covariates; and a model-based maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach. The Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes methods model the variation in subgroup-specific treatment effect rather than testing the null hypothesis of no difference between subgroups. The standardization approach addresses the issue of confounding in subgroup analyses. The MLE approach is considered only for comparison in simulation studies as the "truth" since the data were generated from the same model. Using the characteristics of a hypothetical large outcome trial, we perform simulation studies and articulate the utilities and potential limitations of these estimators. Simulation results indicate that Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes can protect against optimism present in the naïve approach. Due to its simplicity, the naïve approach should be the reference for reporting univariate subgroup-specific treatment effect estimates from exploratory subgroup analyses. Standardization, although it tends to have a larger variance, is suggested when it is important to address the confounding of univariate subgroup effects due to correlation between baseline covariates. The Bayes-DS approach is available as an R package (DSBayes). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Tissue shrinkage in microwave ablation of liver: an ex vivo predictive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Claudio; Farina, Laura; Lopresto, Vanni; Pinto, Rosanna; Cassarino, Simone; Tosoratti, Nevio; Goldberg, S Nahum; Cavagnaro, Marta

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model of the shrinkage of liver tissues in microwave ablation. Thirty-seven cuboid specimens of ex vivo bovine liver of size ranging from 2 cm to 8 cm were heated exploiting different techniques: 1) using a microwave oven (2.45 GHz) operated at 420 W, 500 W and 700 W for 8 to 20 min, achieving complete carbonisation of the specimens, 2) using a radiofrequency ablation apparatus (450 kHz) operated at 70 W for a time ranging from 6 to 7.5 min obtaining white coagulation of the specimens, and 3) using a microwave (2.45 GHz) ablation apparatus operated at 60 W for 10 min. Measurements of specimen dimensions, carbonised and coagulated regions were performed using a ruler with an accuracy of 1 mm. Based on the results of the first two experiments a predictive model for the contraction of liver tissue from microwave ablation was constructed and compared to the result of the third experiment. For carbonised tissue, a linear contraction of 31 ± 6% was obtained independently of the heating source, power and operation time. Radiofrequency experiments determined that the average percentage linear contraction of white coagulated tissue was 12 ± 5%. The average accuracy of our model was determined to be 3 mm (5%). The proposed model allows the prediction of the shrinkage of liver tissues upon microwave ablation given the extension of the carbonised and coagulated zones. This may be useful in helping to predict whether sufficient tissue volume is ablated in clinical practice.

  3. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  4. Treatment effect heterogeneity for univariate subgroups in clinical trials: Shrinkage, standardization, or else

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Treatment effect heterogeneity is a well-recognized phenomenon in randomized controlled clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss subgroup analyses with prespecified subgroups of clinical or biological importance. We explore various alternatives to the naive (the traditional univariate) subgroup analyses to address the issues of multiplicity and confounding. Specifically, we consider a model-based Bayesian shrinkage (Bayes-DS) and a nonparametric, empirical Bayes shrinkage approach (Emp-Bayes) to temper the optimism of traditional univariate subgroup analyses; a standardization approach (standardization) that accounts for correlation between baseline covariates; and a model-based maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach. The Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes methods model the variation in subgroup-specific treatment effect rather than testing the null hypothesis of no difference between subgroups. The standardization approach addresses the issue of confounding in subgroup analyses. The MLE approach is considered only for comparison in simulation studies as the “truth” since the data were generated from the same model. Using the characteristics of a hypothetical large outcome trial, we perform simulation studies and articulate the utilities and potential limitations of these estimators. Simulation results indicate that Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes can protect against optimism present in the naïve approach. Due to its simplicity, the naïve approach should be the reference for reporting univariate subgroup-specific treatment effect estimates from exploratory subgroup analyses. Standardization, although it tends to have a larger variance, is suggested when it is important to address the confounding of univariate subgroup effects due to correlation between baseline covariates. The Bayes-DS approach is available as an R package (DSBayes). PMID:26485117

  5. Shrinkage and porosity evolution during air-drying of non-cellular food systems: Experimental data versus mathematical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Khuong; Khalloufi, Seddik; Mondor, Martin; Ratti, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, the impact of glass transition on shrinkage of non-cellular food systems (NCFS) during air-drying will be assessed from experimental data and the interpretation of a 'shrinkage' function involved in a mathematical model. Two NCFS made from a mixture of water/maltodextrin/agar (w/w/w: 1/0.15/0.015) were created out of maltodextrins with dextrose equivalent 19 (MD19) or 36 (MD36). The NCFS made with MD19 had 30°C higher Tg than those with MD36. This information indicated that, during drying, the NCFS with MD19 would pass from rubbery to glassy state sooner than NCFS MD36, for which glass transition only happens close to the end of drying. For the two NCFS, porosity and volume reduction as a function of moisture content were captured with high accuracy when represented by the mathematical models previously developed. No significant differences in porosity and in maximum shrinkage between both samples during drying were observed. As well, no change in the slope of the shrinkage curve as a function of moisture content was perceived. These results indicate that glass transition alone is not a determinant factor in changes of porosity or volume during air-drying. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Addition of A Marble Dust on Drying Shrinkage Cracks of Cement Mortar Reinforced with Various Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim Thabit Al-Khafaji

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is conducted to study the effect of addition of marble powder (marble dust and different fibers on drying shrinkage cracks and some properties of fibers reinforcment cement mortar. Steel molds having a trapezoidal section, and the end restrained at square shape with( 2.7 meter at length are used to study restrained drying shrinkage of cement mortar. Specimens of ( compressive .flextural. splitting strength were cast. The admixture (marble dust was used to replacie weight of cement with three levels of (4%, 8% and 16% and the fiber hemp and sisal fiber were added for all mixes with proportion by volum of cement . All specimens were cured for (14 days. Average of three results was taken for any test of compressive, tensil and flextural strength. The experimental results showed that the adding of this admixture(marble dust cause adelay in a formation of cracks predicted from a drying shrinkage ,decreases of its width , and hence increases of (compressive, splitting tensil and flextural strength at levels of (4%, and 8%. Thus there is a the positive effect when fiberes added for all mixes of cement mortar with addition of (marble dust. All The admixtures (marble dust and fibers have the obvious visible effect in the delay of the information of shrinkage cracks and the decrease of its width as Compared to the cement mortar mixes when marble dust added a alone.

  7. Effect of Expansive Admixtures on the Shrinkage and Mechanical Properties of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites (HPFRCCs are characterized by strain-hardening and multiple cracking during the inelastic deformation process, but they also develop high shrinkage strain. This study investigates the effects of replacing Portland cement with calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive admixtures (CSA EXAs to compensate for the shrinkage and associated mechanical behavior of HPFRCCs. Two types of CSA EXA (CSA-K and CSA-J, each with a different chemical composition, are used in this study. Various replacement ratios (0%, 8%, 10%, 12%, and 14% by weight of cement of CSA EXA are considered for the design of HPFRCC mixtures reinforced with 1.5% polyethylene (PE fibers by volume. Mechanical properties, such as shrinkage compensation, compressive strength, flexural strength, and direct tensile strength, of the HPFRCC mixtures are examined. Also, crack width and development are investigated to determine the effects of the EXAs on the performance of the HPFRCC mixtures, and a performance index is used to quantify the performance of mixture. The results indicate that replacements of 10% CSA-K (Type 1 and 8% CSA-J (Type 2 considerably enhance the mechanical properties and reduce shrinkage of HPFRCCs.

  8. Self-healing of drying shrinkage cracks in cement-based materials incorporating reactive MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, T. S.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Excessive drying shrinkage is one of the major issues of concern for longevity and reduced strength performance of concrete structures. It can cause the formation of cracks in the concrete. This research aims to improve the autogenous self-healing capacity of traditional Portland cement (PC) systems, adding expansive minerals such as reactive magnesium oxide (MgO) in terms of drying shrinkage crack healing. Two different reactive grades (high ‘N50’and moderately high ‘92-200’) of MgO were added with PC. Cracks were induced in the samples with restraining end prisms through natural drying shrinkage over 28 days after casting. Samples were then cured under water for 28 and 56 days, and self-healing capacity was investigated in terms of mechanical strength recovery, crack sealing efficiency and improvement in durability. Finally, microstructures of the healing materials were investigated using FT-IR, XRD, and SEM-EDX. Overall N50 mixes show higher expansion and drying shrinkage compared to 92-200 mixes. Autogenous self-healing performance of the MgO containing samples were much higher compared to control (only PC) mixes. Cracks up to 500 μm were sealed in most MgO containing samples after 28 days. In the microstructural investigations, highly expansive Mg-rich hydro-carbonate bridges were found along with traditional calcium-based, self-healing compounds (calcite, portlandite, calcium silicate hydrates and ettringite).

  9. Five-year evaluation of a low-shrinkage Silorane resin composite material: A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Malene; Dige, Irene; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical performance of a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite material (Filtek™ Silorane, 3 M-Espe) by comparing it with a methacrylate-based composite material (Ceram•X™, Dentsply DeTrey). Material and methods A number of 72patien...

  10. Satellite based radar interferometry to estimate large-scale soil water depletion from clay shrinkage: possibilities and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, te B.; Hanssen, R.F.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Rooij, de G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based radar interferometry is a technique capable of measuring small surface elevation changes at large scales and with a high resolution. In vadose zone hydrology, it has been recognized for a long time that surface elevation changes due to swell and shrinkage of clayey soils can serve as

  11. Polymerization shrinkage and hygroscopic expansion of contemporary posterior resin-based filling materials--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Krüger, Sören; Raab, Wolfgang H-M; Janda, Ralf

    2007-10-01

    To investigate the polymerization shrinkage and hygroscopic expansion of contemporary posterior resin-based filling materials. The densities of SureFil (SU), CeramXMono (CM), Clearfil AP-X (CF), Solitaire 2 (SO), TetricEvoCeram (TE), and Filtek P60 (FT) were measured using the Archimedes' principle prior to and 15min after curing for 20, 40 and 60s and after 1h, 24h, 7 d, and 30 d storage at 37 degrees C in water. Volumetric changes (DeltaV) in percent after polymerization and after each storage period in water were calculated from the changes of densities. Water sorption and solubility were determined after 30 d for all specimens and their curing times. Two-way ANOVA was calculated for shrinkage and repeated measures ANOVA was calculated for hygroscopic expansion (pHygroscopic expansion depended on water sorption and solubility. Except for SU, all materials showed DeltaV approximately +1% after water storage. Polymerization shrinkage depended on the type of resin-based filling material but not on curing time. Shrinkage was not compensated by hygroscopic expansion.

  12. Prediction of transverse shrinkages of young-growth Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) with ultrasonic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker Dundar; Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of acoustic measurement as a rapid and nondestructive method to predict the dimensional stability of young-growth Sitka spruce and western hemlock. Ultrasonic velocity, peak energy, specific gravity, and radial and tangential shrinkages were measured on twenty-four 25- x

  13. High-throughput deterministic single-cell encapsulation and droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage in a single microfluidic device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoeman, R.M.; Kemna, Evelien; Wolbers, F.; van den Berg, Albert

    In this article, we present a microfluidic device capable of successive high-yield single-cell encapsulation in droplets, with additional droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage. Deterministic single-cell encapsulation is realized using Dean-coupled inertial ordering of cells in a Yin-Yang-shaped

  14. Further Evaluation of Covariate Analysis using Empirical Bayes Estimates in Population Pharmacokinetics: the Perception of Shrinkage and Likelihood Ratio Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu Steven; Yuan, Min; Yang, Haitao; Feng, Yan; Xu, Jinfeng; Pinheiro, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Covariate analysis based on population pharmacokinetics (PPK) is used to identify clinically relevant factors. The likelihood ratio test (LRT) based on nonlinear mixed effect model fits is currently recommended for covariate identification, whereas individual empirical Bayesian estimates (EBEs) are considered unreliable due to the presence of shrinkage. The objectives of this research were to investigate the type I error for LRT and EBE approaches, to confirm the similarity of power between the LRT and EBE approaches from a previous report and to explore the influence of shrinkage on LRT and EBE inferences. Using an oral one-compartment PK model with a single covariate impacting on clearance, we conducted a wide range of simulations according to a two-way factorial design. The results revealed that the EBE-based regression not only provided almost identical power for detecting a covariate effect, but also controlled the false positive rate better than the LRT approach. Shrinkage of EBEs is likely not the root cause for decrease in power or inflated false positive rate although the size of the covariate effect tends to be underestimated at high shrinkage. In summary, contrary to the current recommendations, EBEs may be a better choice for statistical tests in PPK covariate analysis compared to LRT. We proposed a three-step covariate modeling approach for population PK analysis to utilize the advantages of EBEs while overcoming their shortcomings, which allows not only markedly reducing the run time for population PK analysis, but also providing more accurate covariate tests.

  15. What explains consciousness? Or…What consciousness explains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulany, Donelson E

    2014-01-01

    In this invited commentary I focus on the topic addressed in three papers: De Sousa's (2013[1617]) Toward an Integrative Theory of Consciousness, a monograph with Parts 1 & 2, as well as commentaries by Pereira (2013a[59]) and Hirstein (2013[42]). All three are impressively scholarly and can stand-and shout-on their own. But theory of consciousness? My aim is to slice that topic into the two fundamentally different kinds of theories of consciousness, say what appears to be an ideology, out of behaviourism into cognitivism, now also influencing the quest for an "explanation of consciousness" in cognitive neuroscience. I will then say what can be expected given what we know of the complexity of brain structure, the richness of a conscious "vocabulary", and current technological limits of brain imaging. This will then turn to the strategy for examining "what consciousness explains"-metatheory, theories, mappings, and a methodology of competitive support, a methodology especially important where there are competing commitments. There are also increasingly common identifications of methodological bias in, along with failures to replicate, studies reporting unconscious controls in decision, social priming-as there have been in perception, learning, problem solving, etc. The literature critique has provided evidence taken as reducing, and in some cases eliminating, a role for conscious controls-a position consistent with that ideology out of behaviourism into cognitivism. It is an ideological position that fails to recognize the fundamental distinction between theoretical and metaphysical assertions.

  16. Reference values for soil structural degradation evaluation: an approach using shrinkage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Alice; Weisskopf, Peter; Schulin, Rainer; Boivin, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Diagnosis of soil compaction and other soil structural degradation require reference threshold values defining non-degraded soil structure versus degraded soil structure. Large-scale application, e.g. for soil protection regulation, require accurate, cost-efficient and robust methods providing meaningful information with respect to soil quality. The shrinkage curve analysis (ShC)(Braudeau et al., 2004) does not only provide relevant parameters for soil functions such as water and air content of structural porosity but also holds promises to fulfil these requirements. Our objective was to test the potential of ShC analysis to define reference values for soil structural degradation at Swiss scale. Material and Methods Agricultural soils of the most common soil order on the Swiss plateau, namely cambi-luvisol, were sampled. Undisturbed samples were collected from topsoil at 200 locations from spring 2012 to fall 2014 on a large area (240 km) across Switzerland. Three types of soil managements were represented, namely permanent pasture (PP), conventional tillage and no-till. Only soils showing no evidence of structural degradation, as assessed visually and according to a VESS score smaller than 3 (Ball et al., 2007), were sampled. Compaction, erosion, waterlogging and poor degradation of organic matter were criteria to discard sampling locations. The undisturbed soil samples were analysed for SOC, texture, CEC and ShC, from which a set of parameters defining the soil porosities and hydrostructural stability was obtained. Results and Discussion The texture properties were similar between the different soil management, with clay content ranging from 10 to 35%. SOC content ranged from 0.5 to 4.5% and was significantly larger in average for PP, though the ranges were largely overlapping amongst the 3 soil managements. ShC parameters were found to be highly determined by SOC, with the R2 of the regressions usually over 70%, regardless of soil management, large

  17. Impact of roots, mycorrhizas and earthworms on soil physical properties as assessed by shrinkage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milleret, R.; Le Bayon, R.-C.; Lamy, F.; Gobat, J.-M.; Boivin, P.

    2009-07-01

    SummarySoil biota such as earthworms, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant roots are known to play a major role in engineering the belowground part of the terrestrial ecosystems, thus strongly influencing the water budget and quality on earth. However, the effect of soil organisms and their interactions on the numerous soil physical properties to be considered are still poorly understood. Shrinkage analysis allows quantifying a large spectrum of soil properties in a single experiment, with small standard errors. The objectives of the present study were, therefore, to assess the ability of the method to quantify changes in soil properties as induced by single or combined effects of leek roots ( Allium porrum), AMF ( Glomus intraradices) and earthworms ( Allolobophora chlorotica). The study was performed on homogenised soil microcosms and the experiments lasted 35 weeks. The volume of the root network and the external fungal hyphae was measured at the end, and undisturbed soil cores were collected. Shrinkage analysis allowed calculating the changes in soil hydro-structural stability, soil plasma and structural pore volumes, soil bulk density and plant available water, and structural pore size distributions. Data analysis revealed different impacts of the experimented soil biota on the soil physical properties. At any water content, the presence of A. chlorotica resulted in a decrease of the specific bulk volume and the hydro-structural stability around 25%, and in a significant increase in the bulk soil density. These changes went with a decrease of the structural pore volumes at any pore size, a disappearing of the thinnest structural pores, a decrease in plant available water, and a hardening of the plasma. On the contrary, leek roots decreased the bulk soil density up to 1.23 g cm -3 despite an initial bulk density of 1.15 g cm -3. This increase in volume was accompanied with a enhanced hydro-structural stability, a larger structural pore volume at any

  18. Leaf shrinkage: a predictive indicator of the potential variation of the surface area-to-volume ratio according to the leaf moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaghi, Salaheddine; Hachmi, M'hamed; Yessef, Mohammed; Dehhaoui, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Leaf shrinkage provides insights into the potential variation of foliar SVR, within the same species, when leaf moisture content is changing in response to water deficit. Since SVR is among the most significant plant flammability features, leaf shrinkage would be a relevant component of fuel hazard assessment through its influence on SVR, enhancing-if it is taken into account-thereby the wildfire prediction accuracy. The purpose of this work is, first, to consider the leaf shrinkage by characterizing the plant species towards the shrinkability of their leaves, taking account the possible site effect, to characterize the behavior of shrinkage as a function of moisture content and finally to perform a classification for some dominant Mediterranean species based on the shrinkage levels. The assessment of the hierarchical relationships between the dimensional shrinkages is also aimed. Leaves and needles of thirteen tree and shrub species were harvested from six different sites in western Rif Mountains. Leaves dimensions and moisture content were measured regularly during a gradual drying at the laboratory. Dimensional shrinkages were calculated at each moisture content level. Dimensional shrinkages behaved similarly whether in leaf or timber and kept the same reporting relationships between each other. Among the species sampled in different sites, site effect is significant only in Pinus canariensis and Pistacia lentiscus. A classification of the plant species was carried out in three separate classes. Generally, shrinkage class of the plant species studied gave an idea on its flammability ranking reported in the literature, implying thus a cause-and-effect relationship between both parameters.

  19. Conducting EQ-5D Valuation Studies in Resource-Constrained Countries: The Potential Use of Shrinkage Estimators to Reduce Sample Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kelvin K W; Xie, Feng; Willan, Andrew R; Pullenayegum, Eleanor M

    2018-01-01

    Resource-constrained countries have difficulty conducting large EQ-5D valuation studies, which limits their ability to conduct cost-utility analyses using a value set specific to their own population. When estimates of similar but related parameters are available, shrinkage estimators reduce uncertainty and yield estimators with smaller mean square error (MSE). We hypothesized that health utilities based on shrinkage estimators can reduce MSE and mean absolute error (MAE) when compared to country-specific health utilities. We conducted a simulation study (1,000 iterations) based on the observed means and standard deviations (or standard errors) of the EQ-5D-3L valuation studies from 14 counties. In each iteration, the simulated data were fitted with the model based on the country-specific functional form of the scoring algorithm to create country-specific health utilities ("naïve" estimators). Shrinkage estimators were calculated based on the empirical Bayes estimation methods. The performance of shrinkage estimators was compared with those of the naïve estimators over a range of different sample sizes based on MSE, MAE, mean bias, standard errors and the width of confidence intervals. The MSE of the shrinkage estimators was smaller than the MSE of the naïve estimators on average, as theoretically predicted. Importantly, the MAE of the shrinkage estimators was also smaller than the MAE of the naïve estimators on average. In addition, the reduction in MSE with the use of shrinkage estimators did not substantially increase bias. The degree of reduction in uncertainty by shrinkage estimators is most apparent in valuation studies with small sample size. Health utilities derived from shrinkage estimation allow valuation studies with small sample size to "borrow strength" from other valuation studies to reduce uncertainty.

  20. CT image denoising using locally adaptive shrinkage rule in tetrolet domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In Computed Tomography (CT, image degradation such as noise and detail blurring is one of the universal problems due to hardware restrictions. The problem of noise in CT images can be solved by image denoising. The main aim of image denoising is to reduce the noise as well as preserve the important features such as edges, corners, textures and sharp structures. Due to the large capability of noise suppression in noisy signals according to neighborhood pixels or coefficients, this paper presents a new technique to denoise CT images with edge preservation in tetrolet domain (Haar-type wavelet transform where a locally adaptive shrinkage rule is performed on high frequency tetrolet coefficients in such a way that noise can be reduced more effectively. The experimental results of the proposed scheme are excellent in terms of noise suppression and structure preservation. The proposed scheme is compared with some standard existing methods where it is observed that performance of the proposed scheme is superior to the existing methods in terms of visual quality, MSE, PSNR and Image Quality Index (IQI.

  1. Long lasting protein synthesis- and activity-dependent spine shrinkage and elimination after synaptic depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmín Ramiro-Cortés

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuits modify their response to synaptic inputs in an experience-dependent fashion. Increases in synaptic weights are accompanied by structural modifications, and activity dependent, long lasting growth of dendritic spines requires new protein synthesis. When multiple spines are potentiated within a dendritic domain, they show dynamic structural plasticity changes, indicating that spines can undergo bidirectional physical modifications. However, it is unclear whether protein synthesis dependent synaptic depression leads to long lasting structural changes. Here, we investigate the structural correlates of protein synthesis dependent long-term depression (LTD mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs through two-photon imaging of dendritic spines on hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We find that induction of mGluR-LTD leads to robust and long lasting spine shrinkage and elimination that lasts for up to 24 hours. These effects depend on signaling through group I mGluRs, require protein synthesis, and activity. These data reveal a mechanism for long lasting remodeling of synaptic inputs, and offer potential insights into mental retardation.

  2. PERBANDINGAN ANALISIS LEAST ABSOLUTE SHRINKAGE AND SELECTION OPERATOR DAN PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES (Studi Kasus: Data Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KADEK DWI FARMANI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Linear regression analysis is one of the parametric statistical methods which utilize the relationship between two or more quantitative variables. In linear regression analysis, there are several assumptions that must be met that is normal distribution of errors, there is no correlation between the error and error variance is constant and homogent. There are some constraints that caused the assumption can not be met, for example, the correlation between independent variables (multicollinearity, constraints on the number of data and independent variables are obtained. When the number of samples obtained less than the number of independent variables, then the data is called the microarray data. Least Absolute shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO and Partial Least Squares (PLS is a statistical method that can be used to overcome the microarray, overfitting, and multicollinearity. From the above description, it is necessary to study with the intention of comparing LASSO and PLS method. This study uses coronary heart and stroke patients data which is a microarray data and contain multicollinearity. With these two characteristics of the data that most have a weak correlation between independent variables, LASSO method produces a better model than PLS seen from the large RMSEP.

  3. Improved deadzone modeling for bivariate wavelet shrinkage-based image denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelMarco, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Modern image processing performed on-board low Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) platforms, must provide high- performance while simultaneously reducing memory footprint, power consumption, and computational complexity. Image preprocessing, along with downstream image exploitation algorithms such as object detection and recognition, and georegistration, place a heavy burden on power and processing resources. Image preprocessing often includes image denoising to improve data quality for downstream exploitation algorithms. High-performance image denoising is typically performed in the wavelet domain, where noise generally spreads and the wavelet transform compactly captures high information-bearing image characteristics. In this paper, we improve modeling fidelity of a previously-developed, computationally-efficient wavelet-based denoising algorithm. The modeling improvements enhance denoising performance without significantly increasing computational cost, thus making the approach suitable for low-SWAP platforms. Specifically, this paper presents modeling improvements to the Sendur-Selesnick model (SSM) which implements a bivariate wavelet shrinkage denoising algorithm that exploits interscale dependency between wavelet coefficients. We formulate optimization problems for parameters controlling deadzone size which leads to improved denoising performance. Two formulations are provided; one with a simple, closed form solution which we use for numerical result generation, and the second as an integral equation formulation involving elliptic integrals. We generate image denoising performance results over different image sets drawn from public domain imagery, and investigate the effect of wavelet filter tap length on denoising performance. We demonstrate denoising performance improvement when using the enhanced modeling over performance obtained with the baseline SSM model.

  4. Analysing breast cancer microarrays from African Americans using shrinkage-based discriminant analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Herbert

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breast cancer tumours among African Americans are usually more aggressive than those found in Caucasian populations. African-American patients with breast cancer also have higher mortality rates than Caucasian women. A better understanding of the disease aetiology of these breast cancers can help to improve and develop new methods for cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The main goal of this project was to identify genes that help differentiate between oestrogen receptor-positive and -negative samples among a small group of African-American patients with breast cancer. Breast cancer microarrays from one of the largest genomic consortiums were analysed using 13 African-American and 201 Caucasian samples with oestrogen receptor status. We used a shrinkage-based classification method to identify genes that were informative in discriminating between oestrogen receptor-positive and -negative samples. Subset analysis and permutation were performed to obtain a set of genes unique to the African-American population. We identified a set of 156 probe sets, which gave a misclassification rate of 0.16 in distinguishing between oestrogen receptor-positive and -negative patients. The biological relevance of our findings was explored through literature-mining techniques and pathway mapping. An independent dataset was used to validate our findings and we found that the top ten genes mapped onto this dataset gave a misclassification rate of 0.15. The described method allows us best to utilise the information available from small sample size microarray data in the context of ethnic minorities.

  5. A General Iterative Shrinkage and Thresholding Algorithm for Non-convex Regularized Optimization Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Pinghua; Zhang, Changshui; Lu, Zhaosong; Huang, Jianhua Z; Ye, Jieping

    2013-01-01

    Non-convex sparsity-inducing penalties have recently received considerable attentions in sparse learning. Recent theoretical investigations have demonstrated their superiority over the convex counterparts in several sparse learning settings. However, solving the non-convex optimization problems associated with non-convex penalties remains a big challenge. A commonly used approach is the Multi-Stage (MS) convex relaxation (or DC programming), which relaxes the original non-convex problem to a sequence of convex problems. This approach is usually not very practical for large-scale problems because its computational cost is a multiple of solving a single convex problem. In this paper, we propose a General Iterative Shrinkage and Thresholding (GIST) algorithm to solve the nonconvex optimization problem for a large class of non-convex penalties. The GIST algorithm iteratively solves a proximal operator problem, which in turn has a closed-form solution for many commonly used penalties. At each outer iteration of the algorithm, we use a line search initialized by the Barzilai-Borwein (BB) rule that allows finding an appropriate step size quickly. The paper also presents a detailed convergence analysis of the GIST algorithm. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by extensive experiments on large-scale data sets.

  6. Differential shrinkage induced formation of yolk-shell carbon microspheres toward enhanced microwave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chunhua; Du, Yunchen; Xu, Haiyan; Xue, Jianlei; Chu, Wenlei; Qiang, Rong; Han, Xijiang; Xu, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Rational design of the microstructure paves new ways for microwave absorbing materials because it can create more facilities for the attenuation of incident electromagnetic waves. In this study, a simple method is proposed to prepare yolk-shell carbon microspheres through differential shrinkage in the internal cores and external shells of polypyrrole microspheres with the assistance of outermost SiO2 coating. This method simplifies the preparation procedures and avoids strictly controlled conditions. The electromagnetic parameters, such as relative complex permittivity and permeability, of the as-prepared yolk-shell carbon microspheres, are investigated in the frequency range of 2.0-18.0 GHz. Compared with solid carbon microspheres, yolk-shell carbon microspheres exhibit significantly enhanced microwave absorption properties in terms of both the reflection loss intensity and absorption bandwidth. The minimum reflection loss value can reach up to -27.5 dB at 8.32 GHz with an absorber thickness of 2.96 mm. The absorption bandwidth over -10.0 dB is in the range of 11.3-16.2 GHz at the typical thickness of 2.0 mm. The enhanced microwave absorption properties may be attributed to the good attenuation ability and well matched characteristic impedance. This work not only provides a promising candidate for microwave absorption, but also provides an attractive strategy to prepare various yolk-shell composites.

  7. Improved subjective symptoms of conjunctivochalasis using bipolar diathermy method for conjunctival shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Miura, Fumihide; Kishi, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the improvement in subjective symptoms of conjunctivochalasis after bipolar coagulation. Methods Forty-three eyes of 26 patients (average age, 75.7 ± 8.4 years) were included in this study. The inferior conjunctivas were cauterized between April 2009 and June 2010. Surgery involved pinching the excess conjunctiva and performing bipolar cauterization after subconjunctival injection of a local anesthetic agent. Patients were asked to describe the postoperative foreign-body sensation and change in subjective symptoms 1 month postoperatively, with the preoperative symptom score defined as 10. Results Twenty-two patients (84.6%) reported symptom relief immediately after the procedure, though all patients had a mild gritty sensation for 1–2 weeks postoperatively. The mean postoperative symptom score obtained from the questionnaire was 3.27 ± 3.31, which was significantly lower than the preoperative score (P < 0.0001). No patients had experienced recurrent symptoms at the end of the follow-up period. Conclusion Thermal cauterization can achieve conjunctival shrinkage and adherence to the subconjunctival tissues. Operation time is only a few minutes, postoperative pain is not severe, and the procedure can be performed in an outpatient clinic, all of which represent benefits to the patients. PMID:22034558

  8. Improved subjective symptoms of conjunctivochalasis using bipolar diathermy method for conjunctival shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashima T

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Tomoyuki Kashima1,2, Hideo Akiyama1, Fumihide Miura2, Shoji Kishi11Department of Ophthalmology, Gunma University School of Medicine, Gunma, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Saku Central Hospital, Nagano, JapanPurpose: To evaluate the improvement in subjective symptoms of conjunctivochalasis after bipolar coagulation.Methods: Forty-three eyes of 26 patients (average age, 75.7 ± 8.4 years were included in this study. The inferior conjunctivas were cauterized between April 2009 and June 2010. Surgery involved pinching the excess conjunctiva and performing bipolar cauterization after subconjunctival injection of a local anesthetic agent. Patients were asked to describe the postoperative foreign-body sensation and change in subjective symptoms 1 month postoperatively, with the preoperative symptom score defined as 10.Results: Twenty-two patients (84.6% reported symptom relief immediately after the procedure, though all patients had a mild gritty sensation for 1–2 weeks postoperatively. The mean postoperative symptom score obtained from the questionnaire was 3.27 ± 3.31, which was significantly lower than the preoperative score (P < 0.0001. No patients had experienced recurrent symptoms at the end of the follow-up period.Conclusion: Thermal cauterization can achieve conjunctival shrinkage and adherence to the subconjunctival tissues. Operation time is only a few minutes, postoperative pain is not severe, and the procedure can be performed in an outpatient clinic, all of which represent benefits to the patients.Keywords: coagulation, cauterization, conjunctival injection 

  9. Concerted action of neuroepithelial basal shrinkage and active epithelial migration ensures efficient optic cup morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Norden, Caren

    2017-01-01

    Organ formation is a multi-scale event that involves changes at the intracellular, cellular and tissue level. Organogenesis often starts with the formation of characteristically shaped organ precursors. However, the cellular mechanisms driving organ precursor formation are often not clear. Here, using zebrafish, we investigate the epithelial rearrangements responsible for the development of the hemispherical retinal neuroepithelium (RNE), a part of the optic cup. We show that in addition to basal shrinkage of RNE cells, active migration of connected epithelial cells into the RNE is a crucial player in its formation. This cellular movement is driven by progressive cell-matrix contacts and actively translocates prospective RNE cells to their correct location before they adopt neuroepithelial fate. Failure of this migration during neuroepithelium formation leads to ectopic determination of RNE cells and consequently impairs optic cup formation. Overall, this study illustrates how spatiotemporal coordination between morphogenic movements and fate determination critically influences organogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22689.001 PMID:28372636

  10. Europa's Alfvén wing: shrinkage and displacement influenced by an induced magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Volwerk

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The Galileo magnetometer data are used to investigate the structure of the Alfvén wing during three flybys of Europa. The presence of an induced magnetic field is shown to shrink the cross section of the Alfvén wing and offset it along the direction radial to Jupiter. Both the shrinkage and the offset depend on the strength of the induced field. The entry and exit points of the spacecraft into and out of the Alfvén wings are modeled to determine the angle between the wings and the background magnetic field. Tracing of the Alfvén characteristics in a model magnetic field consisting of Jupiter's background field and an induced field in Europa produces an offset and shrinking of the Alfvén wing consistent with the geometric modeling. Thus we believe that the Alfvén wing properties have been determined correctly. The Alfvén wing angle is directly proportional to the local Alfvén velocity, and is thus a probe for the local plasma density. We show that the inferred plasma density can be understood in terms of the electron density measured by the plasma wave experiment. When Europa is located in the Jovian plasma sheet the derived mass-per-charge exceeds the previous estimates, which is a result of increased pickup of sputtered ions near the moon. The estimated rate of O2+ pickup agrees well with the results from numerical models.

  11. Harnessing Photochemical Shrinkage in Direct Laser Writing for Shape Morphing of Polymer Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauhofer, Anton A; Krödel, Sebastian; Rys, Jan; Bilal, Osama R; Constantinescu, Andrei; Daraio, Chiara

    2017-11-01

    Structures that change their shape in response to external stimuli unfold possibilities for more efficient and versatile production of 3D objects. Direct laser writing (DLW) is a technique based on two-photon polymerization that allows the fabrication of microstructures with complex 3D geometries. Here, it is shown that polymerization shrinkage in DLW can be utilized to create structures with locally controllable residual stresses that enable programmable, self-bending behavior. To demonstrate this concept, planar and 3D-structured sheets are preprogrammed to evolve into bio-inspired shapes (lotus flowers and shark skins). The fundamental mechanisms that control the self-bending behavior are identified and tested with microscale experiments. Based on the findings, an analytical model is introduced to quantitatively predict bending curvatures of the fabricated sheets. The proposed method enables simple fabrication of objects with complex geometries and precisely controllable shape morphing potential, while drastically reducing the required fabrication times for producing 3D, hierarchical microstructures over large areas in the order of square centimeters. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Effect of thermal shrinkage during thermoforming on the thickness of fabricated mouthguards: Part 2 pressure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Satoh, Yoshihide; Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of thermal shrinkage, which occurs during thermoforming of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) sheets on the thickness of mouthguards fabricated by pressure formation. Mouthguards were fabricated from 4.0-mm-thick EVA sheets by utilizing a pressure-forming machine. Two molding conditions were compared: The sheets were placed in the thermoforming machine with the sheet extrusion direction either vertical or parallel to the model's center line. The working model was trimmed to the height of 20 mm at the cutting edge of the maxillary central incisor and 15 mm at the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar. The sheet was pressed against the working model for 2 min where the center of the softened sheet sagged 15 mm lower than the clamp. After fabrication, the thickness of mouthguard sheets was determined for the incisal (incisal edge and labial surface) and molar (cusp and buccal surface) portions, and dimensional measurements were made. Differences in molded mouthguard thickness with the sheet orientation of extruded sheets were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U-test. In comparison with the parallel axis orientation, the sheets in vertical orientation with the model's centerline yielded significantly higher thickness measurements at the incisal edge, labial surface, and the cusp (P effectively reduce loss of thickness in mouthguards after pressure formation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND SHRINKAGE OF Sclerolobium paniculatum Vogel WOOD IN A HOMOGENEOUS PLANTING UNDER DIFFERENT LEVELS OF FERTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselito Bonifácio Oliveira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The purposa of this work was to study the influence of fertilization on wood quality of Sclerolobium paniculatum Vogel. A homogeneous planting trial, under different levels of liming and phosphorus, was established by Embrapa-Cerrados 18 years ago in Planaltina, Distrito Federal, Brazil, tropical wood savanna region. Mechanical tests conducted were static bending, parallel compression to grain, shear strength and shrinkage. No significant differences were observed for mechanical properties or for shrinkage, which presented: ¦b = 650kg/cm2, E = 59.877kg/cm2, ¦c = 296kg/cm2 e ¦n = 131kg/cm2. Control treatment showed highest values for shear strength and compression parallel to grain. Too many branches in all trees and also too many knots in lumber were observed. Pruning is recommended for homogeneous planting of Sclerolobium paniculatum to avoid knots in order to be produced wood of superior quality.

  14. An Understanding of the Band Gap Shrinkage in Sn-Doped ZnO for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Abdullah; Ozturk, Elif; Atilgan, Abdullah; Sbeta, Mohamed; Atli, Aycan; Serin, Tulay

    2017-12-01

    Sn-doped ZnO (TZO) films were deposited onto glass substrates by a spray pyrolysis technique. The temperature-dependent conductivity measurements and room-temperature Hall effect measurements were carried out, which indicated that the films exhibited a degenerate semiconductor behavior. Band gap energy of the films was studied by transmission measurements. With increasing Sn content, band gap shrinkage was observed. It was determined that this shrinkage was associated with the competition between many body interactions and the Burstein-Moss effect. We concluded that there is a good agreement between experimental results and theoretical calculations in terms of the shift in band gap. Furthermore, the effective mass value based on parabolic band considerations needed to be replaced by one based on nonparabolic band structure of ZnO for higher content of Sn (>3% at.) to correlate the calculations with the results.

  15. The properties of the cement screeds with the addition of polypropylene fibres and the shrinkage-reducing admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Rada M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper points out the problems of damage that can occur during the preparation and exploitation of a cement screed. There were described the types and properties and presented test results obtained on the samples of cement composites prepared with the addition of fibre reinforcement and shrinkage-reducing admixture. Testing procedure included the following properties: density, compressive strength, ultrasound, coefficient of construction advantages and shrinking, and above all the impact of compaction procedure on the quality of cement screed. The testing results of experimental research show that the use of polypropylene fibres and shrinkage-reducing admixture contributes to the improvement of mechanical and deformation properties of cement screeds and that installation which includes some method of vibration is crucial for screed quality. The above statements are also recommendations in the execution of cement screed in practice.

  16. Statistical processing the results of interlaboratory testing the consistency of soil - the Atterberg limits (liquid, plasticity and shrinkage limit)

    OpenAIRE

    Đurđevac-Ignjatović, Lidija; Ignjatović, Dragan; Jovanović, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of interlaboratory testing the soil consistency - the Atterberg limits (liquid, plasticity and shrinkage limit). The tests were performed on representative samples of soil. The results were analyzed in two ways: numerical method - the Cochran test of precision and graphical interpretation - calculation of z value in accordance with the Standard ISO 5725-2 [1]. The followings were calculated: variance of repeatability Sr2, interlaboratory variance SL 2 and repro...

  17. Daily cone-beam computed tomography used to determine tumour shrinkage and localisation in lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquard Knap, Marianne; Nordsmark, Marianne (Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus (Denmark)), E-mail: mariknap@rm.dk; Hoffmann, Lone; Vestergaard, Anne (Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    Purpose/Objective. Daily Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in room imaging is used to determine tumour shrinkage during a full radiotherapy (RT) course. In addition, relative interfractional tumour and lymph node motion is determined for each RT fraction. Material and methods. From November 2009 to March 2010, 20 consecutive lung cancer patients (14 NSCLC, 6 SCLC) were followed with daily CBCT during RT. The gross tumour volume for lung tumour (GTV-t) was visible in all daily CBCT scans and was delineated at the beginning, at the tenth and the 20th fraction, and at the end of treatment. Whenever visible, the gross tumour volume for lymph nodes (GTV-n) was also delineated. The GTV-t and GTV-n volumes were determined. All patients were setup according to an online bony anatomy match. Retrospectively, matching based on the internal target volume (ITV), the GTV-t or the GTV-n was performed. Results. In eight patients, we observed a significant GTV-t shrinkage (15-40%) from the planning CT until the last CBCT. Only five patients presented a significant shrinkage (21-37%) in the GTV-n. Using the daily CBCT imaging, it was found that the mean value of the difference between a setup using the skin tattoo and an online matching using the ITV was 7.3+-2.9 mm (3D vector in the direction of ITV). The mean difference between the ITV and bony anatomy matching was 3.0+-1.3 mm. Finally, the mean distance between the GTV-t and the GTV-N was 2.9+-1.6 mm. Conclusion. One third of all patients with lung cancer undergoing chemo-RT achieved significant tumour shrinkage from planning CT until the end of the radiotherapy. Differences in GTV-t and GTV-n motion was observed and matching using the ITV including both GTV-t and GTV-n is therefore preferable.

  18. The Shrinkage in the Fast-Moving Consumer Goods Sector Caused by Shoplifters as a Tool of Financial Results Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Janusz Liber

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to characterize the problem of the shrinkage in the fast-moving consumer goods sector caused by shoplifters. The purpose of this study is to determine if offenders factor characteristics of retail layout into their decision. This information will allow retailers to focus on things that influence shoplifter perceptions and behavior in order to optimize their retail operational strategy. This article shows the way of fighting against stock losses without money engagem...

  19. Shrinkage Behavior of Polystyrene-based Foam Molded Parts Depending on Volatile Matter Content and Other Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafafian, Carineh

    Polymer foam materials play a large role in the modern world. Expanded polystyrene (EPS) bead foam is a lightweight, low density, and good thermal and acoustic insulating material whose properties make it attractive for a number of applications, especially as building insulation. However, EPS also experiences post-molding shrinkage; it shrinks dimensionally from its molded size after processing. This means parts must be stored in warehouses until they are considered stable by the industry standard, DIN EN 1603. This often takes 11--18 weeks and is thus very timely and expensive. This study aims to decrease the post-molding shrinkage time of EPS foam by understanding the mechanisms of shrinkage behavior. Samples were split into two groups based on their amount of initial volatile matter content and storage conditions, then compared to a control group. Based on thermogravimetric analysis and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, the volatile matter content and composition was found to not be the sole contributor to EPS foam dimensional stability. Residual stress testing was done with the hole drilling method and Raman spectroscopy. As this type of testing has not been done with polymer foams before, the aim was to see if either method could reliably produce residual stress values. Both methods measured residual stress values with unknown accuracy. All samples stored at a higher temperature (60°C) reached dimensional stability by the end of this study. Thus, air diffusion into EPS foam, encouraged by the high temperature storage, was found to play a significant role in post-molding shrinkage.

  20. The Shrinkage in the Fast-Moving Consumer Goods Sector Caused by Shoplifters as a Tool of Financial Results Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Liber

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to characterize the problem of the shrinkage in the fast-moving consumer goods sector caused by shoplifters. The purpose of this study is to determine if offenders factor characteristics of retail layout into their decision. This information will allow retailers to focus on things that influence shoplifter perceptions and behavior in order to optimize their retail operational strategy. This article shows the way of fighting against stock losses without money engagement.

  1. Asymptotic Properties of Bayes Risk of a General Class of Shrinkage Priors in Multiple Hypothesis Testing Under Sparsity

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Prasenjit; Tang, Xueying; Ghosh, Malay; Chakrabarti, Arijit

    2013-01-01

    Consider the problem of simultaneous testing for the means of independent normal observations. In this paper, we study some asymptotic optimality properties of certain multiple testing rules induced by a general class of one-group shrinkage priors in a Bayesian decision theoretic framework, where the overall loss is taken as the number of misclassified hypotheses. We assume a two-groups normal mixture model for the data and consider the asymptotic framework adopted in Bogdan et al. (2011) who...

  2. Minimization of variation in volumetric shrinkage and deflection on injection molding of Bi-aspheric lens using numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensingh, R. Joseph [Central Institute of Plastics Engineering and Technology, Chennai (India); Boopathy, S. Rajendra [College of Engineering, Anna University, Chennai (India); Jebaraj, C. [Vellore Institutes of Technology, Chennai (India)

    2016-11-15

    The profile of a bi-aspheric lens is such a way that the thickness narrows down from center to periphery (convex). Injection molding of these profiles has high shrinkage in localized areas, which results in internal voids or sink marks when the part gets cool down to room temperature. This paper deals with the influence of injection molding process parameters such as mold surface temperature, melt temperature, injection time, V/P Switch over by percentage volume filled, packing pressure, and packing duration on the volumetric shrinkage and deflection. The optimal molding parameters for minimum variation in volumetric shrinkage and deflection of bi-aspheric lens have been determined with the application of computer numerical simulation integrated with optimization. The real experimental work carried out with optimal molding parameters and found to have a shallow and steep surface profile accuracy of 0.14 and 1.57 mm, 21.38-45.66 and 12.28-26.90 μm, 41.56-157.33 and 41.56-157.33 nm towards Radii of curvatures (RoC), surface roughness (Ra) and waviness of the surface profiles (profile error Pt), respectively.

  3. Mechanisms of activation of NHE by cell shrinkage and by calyculin A in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Varming, Camilla; Hoffmann, E K

    2002-01-01

    The Na+/H+ exchanger isoforms NHE1, NHE2, and NHE3 were all found to be expressed in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, as evaluated by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. Under unstimulated conditions, NHE1 was found predominantly in the plasma membrane, NHE3 intracellularly, and NHE2 in both...... compartments. Osmotic cell shrinkage elicited a rapid intracellular alkalinization, the sensitivity of which to EIPA (IC50 0.19 microM) and HOE 642 (IC50 0.85 microM) indicated that it predominantly reflected activation of NHE1. NHE activation by osmotic shrinkage was inhibited by the protein kinase C...... inhibitors chelerythrine (IC50 12.5 microM), Gö 6850 (5 microM), and Gö 6976 (1 microM), and by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 203580 (10 microM). Furthermore, hypertonic cell shrinkage elicited a biphasic increase in p38 MAPK phosphorylation, with the first significant increase detectable 2 minutes after...

  4. Predicting the drying shrinkage behavior of high strength portland cement mortar under the combined influence of fine aggregate and steel micro fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqi Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The workability, 28-day compressive strength and free drying shrinkage of a very high strength (121-142 MPa steel micro fiber reinforced portland cement mortar were studied under a combined influence of fine aggregate content and fiber content. The test results showed that an increase in the fine aggregate content resulted in decreases in the workability, 28-day compressive strength and drying shrinkage of mortar at a fixed fiber content. An increase in the fiber content resulted in decreases in the workability and drying shrinkage of mortar, but an increase in the 28-day compressive strength of mortar at a fixed fine aggregate content. The modified Gardner model most accurately predicted the drying shrinkage development of the high strength mortars, followed by the Ross model and the ACI 209R-92 model. The Gardner model gave the least accurate prediction for it was developed based on a database of normal strength concrete.

  5. Development and construction of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks: Free shrinkage tests, restrained ring tests, construction experience, and crack survey results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiqiu

    2011-12-01

    The development, construction, and evaluation of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks are described based on laboratory test results and experiences gained during the construction of 13 LC-HPC bridge decks in Kansas, along with another deck bid under the LC-HPC specifications but for which the owner did not enforce the specification. This study is divided into four parts covering (1) an evaluation of the free shrinkage properties of LC-HPC candidate mixtures, (2) an investigation of the relationship between the evaporable water content in the cement paste and the free shrinkage of concrete, (3) a study of the restrained shrinkage performance of concrete using restrained ring tests, and (4) a description of the construction and preliminary evaluation of LC-HPC and control bridge decks constructed in Kansas. The first portion of the study involves evaluating the effects of the duration of curing, fly ash, and a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) on the free-shrinkage characteristics of concrete mixtures. The results indicate that an increase of curing period reduces free shrinkage. With 7 days of curing, concretes containing fly ash as a partial replacement for cement exhibit higher free shrinkage than concretes with 100% portland cement. When the curing period is increased to 14, 28, and 56 days, the adverse effect of adding fly ash on free shrinkage is minimized and finally reversed. The addition of an SRA significantly reduces free shrinkage for both the 100% portland cement mixture and the mixture containing fly ash. The second portion of the study investigates the relationship between the evaporable water content in the cement paste and the free shrinkage of concrete. A linear relationship between free shrinkage and evaporable water content in the cement paste is observed. For a given mixture, specimens cured for a longer period contain less evaporable water and exhibit lower free shrinkage and less weight loss in the free shrinkage

  6. Materials Related Forensic Analysis and Special Testing : Drying Shrinkage Evaluation of Bridge Decks with Class AAA and Class W/WD Type K Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    This work pertains to preparation of concrete drying shrinkage data for proposed concrete mixtures during normal concrete : trial batch verification. Selected concrete mixtures will include PennDOT Classes AAA and AA and will also include the use of ...

  7. TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF CAP CONCRETE STRESS AND STRAIN DUE TO SHRINKAGE, CREEP, AND EXPANSION FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, H.; Restivo, M.

    2011-08-01

    In-situ decommissioning of Reactors P- and R- at the Savannah River Site will require filling the reactor vessels with a special concrete based on materials such as magnesium phosphate, calcium aluminate or silica fume. Then the reactor vessels will be overlain with an 8 ft. thick layer of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) steel reinforced concrete, called the 'Cap Concrete'. The integrity of this protective layer must be assured to last for a sufficiently long period of time to avoid ingress of water into the reactor vessel and possible movement of radioactive contamination into the environment. During drying of this Cap Concrete however, shrinkage strains are set up in the concrete as a result of diffusion and evaporation of water from the top surface. This shrinkage varies with depth in the poured slab due to a non-uniform moisture distribution. This differential shrinkage results in restraint of the upper layers with larger shrinkage by lower layers with lesser displacements. Tensile stresses can develop at the surface from the strain gradients in the bulk slab, which can lead to surface cracking. Further, a mechanism called creep occurs during the curing period or early age produces strains under the action of restraining forces. To investigate the potential for surface cracking, an experimental and analytical program was started under TTQAP SRNL-RP-2009-01184. Slab sections made of Cap Concrete mixture were instrumented with embedded strain gages and relative humidity sensors and tested under controlled environmental conditions of 23 C and relative humidities (RH) of 40% and 80% over a period of 50 days. Calculation methods were also developed for predictions of stress development in the full-scale concrete placement over the reactor vessels. These methods were evaluated by simulating conditions for the test specimens and the calculation results compared to the experimental data. A closely similar test with strain gages was performed by Kim and Lee for

  8. Evaluating the Impact of Glacier Shrinkage on Water Supply at Volcán Chimborazo, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Frenierre, J.; Mark, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    Glaciers play a critical hydrologic role in mountain watersheds worldwide, and the potential effect of persistent glacier shrinkage on water supply is justly regarded as one of the key climate change impacts that the scientific and development communities must endeavor to understand. The relationship between glaciers and water supply is particularly acute in the tropical Andes, where irrigation is often essential for the sustainability of agricultural livelihoods. In Ecuador, the glaciers of Volcán Chimborazo (6267 m.a.s.l.) are a highly-visible component of the local hydrologic system and irrigators in the communities that surround the mountain are concerned about their potential vulnerability in the face of noticeable recent glacier retreat on the mountain. Here, I present results from an integrated study that quantifies the rate of glacier retreat at Chimborazo since the mid-1980s, estimates the present-day contribution of glacier melt to total discharge in the mountain's most glacierized watershed, and assays the implications of changing hydrologic conditions on water users in the region. Methods employed include direct hydrologic and glaciologic measurements, analysis of hydrologic tracers, remote sensing techniques, and social research activities such as household surveys and focus groups. Over the past quarter-century, increased water stress has been a key driver of shifting livelihood patterns in the agrarian communities below the mountain, with persistent glacier retreat one of multiple biophysical and socio-economic forcing mechanisms. Since 1986, Chimborazo has lost 20.5% of its glacier surface area (0.8%/yr). While station records indicate patterns of climate change consistent with those reported elsewhere in the tropical Andes (temperature increase of 1.1°C/decade; no statistically-significant changes in precipitation since 1985), there is a very strong local perception that surface water sources are diminishing and that rainfall patterns are

  9. Permeability Enhancement in Fine-Grained Sediments by Chemically Induced Clay Fabric Shrinkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, A M; Kansa, E J; Viani, B E; Blake, R G; Roberts, J J; Huber, R D

    2004-02-26

    The National Research Council [1] identified the entrapment of contaminants in fine-grained clay-bearing soils as a major impediment to the timely and cost-effective remediation of groundwater to regulatory standards. Contaminants trapped in low-permeability, low-diffusivity, high-sorptivity clays are not accessible to advective flushing by treatment fluids from permeable zones, and slowly diffuse out to recontaminate previously cleaned permeable strata. We propose to overcome this barrier to effective remediation by exploiting the ability of certain nontoxic EPA-approved chemicals (e.g., ethanol) to shrink and alter the fabric of clays, and thereby create macro-porosity and crack networks in fine-grained sediments. This would significantly reduce the distance and time scales of diffusive mass transport to advectively flushed boundaries, to yield orders of magnitude reduction in the time required to complete remediation. Given that effective solutions to this central problem of subsurface remediation do not yet exist, the cost and time benefits of successful deployment of this novel concept, both as a stand-alone technology and as an enabling pre-treatment for other remedial technologies that rely on advective delivery, is likely to be very large. This project, funded as a 1-year feasibility study by LLNL's LDRD Program, is a multi-directorate, multi-disciplinary effort that leverages expertise from the Energy & Environment Directorate, the Environmental Restoration Division, and the Manufacturing & Materials Evaluation Division of Mechanical Engineering. In this feasibility study, a ''proof-of-principle'' experiment was performed to answer the central question: ''Can clay shrinkage induced by ethanol in clay-bearing sediments overcome realistic confining stresses, crack clay, and increase its effective permeability by orders of magnitude within a time that is much smaller than the time required for diffusive mass transport of

  10. Genome-scale cluster analysis of replicated microarrays using shrinkage correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianchao; Chang, Chunqi; Salmi, Mari L; Hung, Yeung Sam; Loraine, Ann; Roux, Stanley J

    2008-06-18

    Currently, clustering with some form of correlation coefficient as the gene similarity metric has become a popular method for profiling genomic data. The Pearson correlation coefficient and the standard deviation (SD)-weighted correlation coefficient are the two most widely-used correlations as the similarity metrics in clustering microarray data. However, these two correlations are not optimal for analyzing replicated microarray data generated by most laboratories. An effective correlation coefficient is needed to provide statistically sufficient analysis of replicated microarray data. In this study, we describe a novel correlation coefficient, shrinkage correlation coefficient (SCC), that fully exploits the similarity between the replicated microarray experimental samples. The methodology considers both the number of replicates and the variance within each experimental group in clustering expression data, and provides a robust statistical estimation of the error of replicated microarray data. The value of SCC is revealed by its comparison with two other correlation coefficients that are currently the most widely-used (Pearson correlation coefficient and SD-weighted correlation coefficient) using statistical measures on both synthetic expression data as well as real gene expression data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two leading clustering methods, hierarchical and k-means clustering were applied for the comparison. The comparison indicated that using SCC achieves better clustering performance. Applying SCC-based hierarchical clustering to the replicated microarray data obtained from germinating spores of the fern Ceratopteris richardii, we discovered two clusters of genes with shared expression patterns during spore germination. Functional analysis suggested that some of the genetic mechanisms that control germination in such diverse plant lineages as mosses and angiosperms are also conserved among ferns. This study shows that SCC is an alternative to the Pearson

  11. SORPTION AND SOLUBILITY OF LOW-SHRINKAGE RESIN-BASED DENTAL COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Yantcheva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-based composites are well-established restorative materials. However, these materials may absorb significant amounts of water when exposed to aqueous environments. Sorption and solubility are affecting composite restorations by two different mechanisms; the first is the up taking of water producing an increased weight and the second is the dissolution of materials in water, leading to a weight reduction of the final conditioned samples. Objective: To measure the water sorption and solubility of different low-shrinkage resin-based composites. Six materials were selected: Filtek P60, Filtek Ultimate, SonicFill, Filtek Silorane, Kalore and Venus Diamond. Materials and methods: Five disc specimens were prepared of each material and polymerized with diode light-curing unit. Water sorption and solubility of the different materials were were calculated by means of weighting the samples before and after water immersion and desiccation. Data were statistically analyzed using Shapiro-Wilk One Way Analysis of Variance followed by the Holm-Sidak comparison test . Results: There were significant differences (p<=0.001 between materials regarding sorption and solubility. Regarding sorption F. Silorane showed lowest values, followed by SonicFill, without significant difference between them. Statistical significant differences exist between F. Silorane and F.P60, F. Ultimate, Kalore. Significant differences exist between SonicFill and F. Ultimate. F.Silorane (-0.018 and Kalore (-0.010 showed lowest values of solubility but there were marginal difference among all composites investigated. Conclusions: 1.The material with lowest values of sorption and solubility was F.Silorane. 2. The attained sorption and solubility values for composites are influenced by the differences in resin matrix composition and filler contend. 3. Modifications of dimethacrylate matrix did not minimize significantly sorption and solubility of composites. 4. Besides water

  12. Effect of adhesive hydrophobicity on microtensile bond strength of low-shrinkage silorane resin to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Yeun Cho

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate µTBS (microtensile bond strength of current dentin bonding adhesives which have different hydrophobicity with low-shrinkage silorane resin. Materials and Methods Thirty-six human third molars were used. Middle dentin was exposed. The teeth were randomly assigned to nine experimental groups: Silorane self-etch adhesives (SS, SS + phosphoric acid etching (SS + pa, Adper easy bond (AE, AE + Silorane system bonding (AE + SSb, Clearfil SE bond (CSE, CSE + SSb, All-Bond 2 (AB2, AB2 + SSb, All-Bond 3 (AB3. After adhesive's were applied, the clinical crowns were restored with Filtek LS (3M ESPE. The 0.8 mm × 0.8 mm sticks were submitted to a tensile load using a Micro Tensile Tester (Bisco Inc.. Water sorption was measured to estimate hydrophobicity adhesives. Results µTBS of silorane resin to 5 adhesives: SS, 23.2 MPa; CSE, 19.4 MPa; AB3, 30.3 MPa; AB2 and AE, no bond. Additional layering of SSb: CSE + SSb, 26.2 MPa; AB2 + SSb, 33.9 MPa; AE + SSb, no bond. High value of µTBS was related to cohesive failure. SS showed the lowest water sorption. AE showed the highest solubility. Conclusions The hydrophobicity of adhesive increased, and silorane resin bond-strength was also increased. Additional hydrophobic adhesive layer did not increase the bond-strength to silorane resin except AB2 + SSb. All-Bond 3 showed similar µTBS & water sorption with SS. By these facts, we could reach a conclusion that All-Bond 3 is a competitive adhesive which can replace the Silorane adhesive system

  13. Lenvatinib induces early tumor shrinkage in patients with advanced thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Chie; Sugino, Kiminori; Saito, Naoko; Saito, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Ogimi, Yuna; Maeda, Tetsuyo; Osaku, Tadatoshi; Akaishi, Junko; Hames, Kiyomi Y; Tomoda, Chisato; Suzuki, Akifumi; Matsuzu, Kenichi; Uruno, Takashi; Ohkuwa, Keiko; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nagahama, Mitsuji; Takami, Hiroshi; Ito, Koichi

    2017-08-30

    Although advanced thyroid carcinoma patients who cannot be cured by conventional therapy have lacked effective treatment, multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors have recently become available. Phase 3 trials of lenvatinib showed a median time to objective response of 2 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.9-3.5) months, demonstrating that shrinks tumors rapidly. The phenomenon of immediate tumor shrink is known as early tumor shrinkage (ETS) which is related to clinical outcome in other malignancies. However, precisely when within 8 weeks lenvatinib starts to affect tumors remains unclear. In tumors near the carotid arteries, trachea, or esophagus, a rapid therapeutic effect can induce fistula formation or arterial bleeding. To prevent such treatment-emergent serious adverse events (SAE), early imaging evaluation seems to be very important. In this study, the point in time when lenvatinib started to shrink tumors was retrospectively investigated. The subjects were 16 patients who started lenvatinib administration between May and August 2015. Tumor size was evaluated by computed tomography (CT) scans frequently within the first 8 weeks according to the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) guideline. Initial tumor response was defined as ≥ 10% tumor reduction. Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level was monitored in 8 differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) without TgAb patients. At the first evaluation, 13 patients (83.3 %) showed tumor reduction and that decreased with time. Thirteen patients (83.3 %) showed >10 % tumor reduction within 8 weeks. In all DTC patients, serum Tg level was markedly decreased. In conclusion, lenvatinib immediately shrinks tumors, the so-called ETS phenomenon. Therefore, careful attention should be paid to fistula formation from the early phase.

  14. Marginal leakage and microhardness evaluation of low-shrinkage resin-based restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Tabari, Negin; Keshvad, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to compare the marginal leakage and microhardness of low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative materials containing ormocer- and silorane-based composites to that of conventional methacrylate-based systems. A total of 50 noncarious extracted human teeth were collected after debridement and standard Class V cavities were prepared. Teeth were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 10) and restored with 5 types of resin-based restorative material composites: hybrid, microhybrid, nanohybrid, ormocer-based, and silorane-based. After thermocycling, all teeth were placed in a silver nitrate solution, sectioned longitudinally in a buccolingual direction, and observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the degree of dye penetration. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test (P microhardness test, five specimens were made for each restorative material, using Teflon molds with disk-shaped specimen wells. Specimens were photocured and placed in distilled water (at 37°C) for 24 hours. Vickers Hardness Number (VHN) measurements were performed using a microhardness tester. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests. In terms of microhardness, there was no statistically significant difference among the resin-based restorative materials (P > 0.05). The degree of microleakage at the gingival margins was lowest for the silorane composite, followed by microhybrid and nanohybrid. The silorane composite was significantly lower than that of the ormocer and hybrid composites (P material could provide a marginal seal comparable to that provided by microhybrid or nanohybrid resin composites.

  15. Accelerated fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithms for sparsity-regularized cone-beam CT image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Sawatzky, Alex; Anastasio, Mark A., E-mail: anastasio@wustl.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Yang, Deshan [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Tan, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: The development of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) remains an active and important research area. Even with hardware acceleration, the overwhelming majority of the available 3D iterative algorithms that implement nonsmooth regularizers remain computationally burdensome and have not been translated for routine use in time-sensitive applications such as image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this work, two variants of the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm (FISTA) are proposed and investigated for accelerated iterative image reconstruction in CBCT. Methods: Algorithm acceleration was achieved by replacing the original gradient-descent step in the FISTAs by a subproblem that is solved by use of the ordered subset simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OS-SART). Due to the preconditioning matrix adopted in the OS-SART method, two new weighted proximal problems were introduced and corresponding fast gradient projection-type algorithms were developed for solving them. We also provided efficient numerical implementations of the proposed algorithms that exploit the massive data parallelism of multiple graphics processing units. Results: The improved rates of convergence of the proposed algorithms were quantified in computer-simulation studies and by use of clinical projection data corresponding to an IGRT study. The accelerated FISTAs were shown to possess dramatically improved convergence properties as compared to the standard FISTAs. For example, the number of iterations to achieve a specified reconstruction error could be reduced by an order of magnitude. Volumetric images reconstructed from clinical data were produced in under 4 min. Conclusions: The FISTA achieves a quadratic convergence rate and can therefore potentially reduce the number of iterations required to produce an image of a specified image quality as compared to first-order methods. We have proposed and investigated

  16. Biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of two novel low-shrinkage dental resin matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Yih-Dean; Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Lin, Chun-Pin; Tseng, Wan-Yu

    2014-06-01

    To reduce the polymerization shrinkage of dental composite resin, we used two different ratios of toluene 2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) or 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) as functional side chains of bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate (bis-GMA) to synthesize two series of new dental resin matrices. This study evaluated the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these two series of new resin matrices. Two series of new dental resin matrices with the ratios of TDI or HDI functional side chain to bis-GMA (defined as B group) being 1:4, 1:2, 1:1 and 3:2 (defined as T1/4, T1/2, T1, T3/2, and H1/4, H1/2, H1, H3/2 groups, respectively) were synthesized. Each resin sample was light cured and immersed in the culture medium for 24 hours to make the extract solution. Then, human gingival fibroblasts were cultured in different extract solutions for 72 hours. The cytotoxicities of different resins were evaluated by microtitertetrazolium (MTT) assay, the levels of cell-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by different extract solutions was measured. Resins of the T1/4 and B groups revealed significantly higher cytotoxicity than resins of other groups. However, resins of the T1 and T3/2 groups exhibited less cytotoxicity. In general, resins of the TDI-modified groups showed equal or less cytotoxicity and induced equal or lower levels of ROS than the corresponding resins of the HDI-modified and B groups. Our results showed that the TDI-modified resin matrices containing more functional side chains were less cytotoxic than the corresponding HDI-modified resin matrices. When the ratio of functional side chain to bis-GMA is increased, the stereo hindrance of resin structure is increased, more toxic resin monomers are trapped in the complicated resin structure, and thus the resin matrix reveals less cytotoxicity. The TDI-modified resin matrices exhibit higher stereo hindrance of resin structure and thus show less cytotoxicity than the corresponding HDI-modified resin matrices

  17. The potential of computer vision, optical backscattering parameters and artificial neural network modelling in monitoring the shrinkage of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) during drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwude, Daniel I; Hashim, Norhashila; Abdan, Khalina; Janius, Rimfiel; Chen, Guangnan

    2018-03-01

    Drying is a method used to preserve agricultural crops. During the drying of products with high moisture content, structural changes in shape, volume, area, density and porosity occur. These changes could affect the final quality of dried product and also the effective design of drying equipment. Therefore, this study investigated a novel approach in monitoring and predicting the shrinkage of sweet potato during drying. Drying experiments were conducted at temperatures of 50-70 °C and samples thicknesses of 2-6 mm. The volume and surface area obtained from camera vision, and the perimeter and illuminated area from backscattered optical images were analysed and used to evaluate the shrinkage of sweet potato during drying. The relationship between dimensionless moisture content and shrinkage of sweet potato in terms of volume, surface area, perimeter and illuminated area was found to be linearly correlated. The results also demonstrated that the shrinkage of sweet potato based on computer vision and backscattered optical parameters is affected by the product thickness, drying temperature and drying time. A multilayer perceptron (MLP) artificial neural network with input layer containing three cells, two hidden layers (18 neurons), and five cells for output layer, was used to develop a model that can monitor, control and predict the shrinkage parameters and moisture content of sweet potato slices under different drying conditions. The developed ANN model satisfactorily predicted the shrinkage and dimensionless moisture content of sweet potato with correlation coefficient greater than 0.95. Combined computer vision, laser light backscattering imaging and artificial neural network can be used as a non-destructive, rapid and easily adaptable technique for in-line monitoring, predicting and controlling the shrinkage and moisture changes of food and agricultural crops during drying. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Influence of initial water content of aggregates on the compressive strength and the shrinkage of High Performance Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makani Abdelkadir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-dependent deformations of concretes, particularly in the case of high performance concrete (HPC must be taken into account precisely when measurement of civil engineering works. theses deformations is essential for predicting the deflections, the stress distribution in statically indeterminate structures and the loss of pre-stressing force in elements of pre-stressed concrete. However, the experience shows a certain dispersion of values of instantaneous and delayed deformations measured and some significant differences with the values calculated using the building codes. The objective of the present paper focuses on the parameter which is not taken into account in building codes, which could causes the inaccuracies of their predictions: the initial water content of aggregates. The experimental program includes a comparative study of the mechanical behaviours (instantaneous deformations and shrinkage of HPC with the same basic formulation (water cement ratio, volume of paste, differing principally in the initial water content of aggregates. The experimental results show that HPC made with wet aggregates has a higher resistance than others (dry aggregates. The pre-saturated aggregates would be a water reservoir in which the dough could slow the self-drying due to hydration in the capillary pores at the level of the Interfacial Transition Zone (ITZ. This would increase the amount of hydrates and improve the mechanical behaviour of this interface through better adhesion and less porosity. If the evolution of shrinkage of HPC with wet or dry aggregates can be distinct during the first months, the effect of this formulation parameter is not clear since it differs according to the type of aggregate. Moreover, in the long term, convergent shrinkage shows that this influence becomes insignificant. The comparisons with estimations of Eurocode 2 model were also performed and showed significant differences with the experimental values.

  19. Illness Severity and Poor Social Functioning Relate to Hippocampal Shrinkage in Schizophrenia: A Three-Dimensional Mapping Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Paolo; Perlini, Cinzia; Rajagopalan, Priya; Saharan, Priyanka; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Bellani, Marcella; Dusi, Nicola; Cerini, Roberto; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi; Tansella, Michele; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Context Hippocampal shrinkage is commonly reported in schizophrenia, but its role in the illness is still poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how clinical and psychosocial variables relate to hippocampal volumes. Objectives To address this, new methods for three-dimensional (3-D) computational image analysis may offer more detailed investigation of neuroanatomic differences than standard volumetric measures. Design We used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and surface-based modeling to map the 3D profile of hippocampal differences. 3D parametric mesh models of the hippocampus were created from manual tracings. Regression models were used to relate diagnostic measures to maps of radial distance. Color-coded maps were generated to show the profile of associations. Participants 67 adults with schizophrenia (mean age= 39.40±12.08 years; 44 males/23 females) and 72 healthy controls (mean age= 39.28±11.03 years; 38 males/34 females). Results There were no detectable differences in hippocampal radial distance between schizophrenia patients and controls. In patients, however, bilateral shrinkage was associated with greater illness severity (i.e. length of illness, positive and negative symptoms), and with poorer social functioning (i.e. educational level, quality of life and health status), which survived Bonferroni correction. Conclusions Illness severity and poor social functioning may be associated with hippocampal shrinkage in schizophrenia. As a structural sign of poor outcome, imaging measures may help to identify a subgroup of patients who may need specific treatment to resist hippocampal decreased volumes, such as cognitive rehabilitation, or physical exercise. PMID:23284150

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Marginal Adaptation of Direct Class II Composite Restorations Made of Different "Low-Shrinkage" Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, C; Krejci, I; Dietschi, D

    The present study evaluated the influence of various low-shrinkage restorative systems in class II direct composite restorations following simulated occlusal loading. Forty MOD class II cavities were prepared on freshly extracted human lower third molars with proximal margins located mesially 1.0 mm coronal to and distally 1 mm apical to the cementoenamel junction. The samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups corresponding to the following restorative systems: a conventional resin composite (Tetric) as active control group, a low-shrinkage composite (Extra Low Shrinkage [ELS]) alone or combined with its corresponding flowable version (ELSflow) used as a 1- to 1.5-mm liner, a bulk-filling flowable composite (Surefil SDR) covered by a 1-mm layer of restorative composite (Ceram-X), and a restorative bulk-filling composite (SonicFill). All specimens were submitted to 1,000,000 cycles with a 100N eccentric load into saline. Tooth restoration margins were analyzed semiquantitatively by scanning electron microscopy before and after loading. The percentage of perfect adaptation to enamel varied from 94.15% (SonicFill) to 100% (ELS) before loading and from 69.22% (SonicFill) to 93.61% (ELS and ELSflow) after loading. Continuous adaptation to cervical dentin varied from 22.9% (Tetric) to 79.48% (SDR/Ceram-X) before loading and from 18.66% (Tetric) to 56.84% (SDR/Ceram-X) after loading. SDR/CeramX and SonicFill showed the best cervical dentin adaptation.

  1. Calcium fluxes cause nuclear shrinkage and the translocation of phospholipase C-delta1 into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masashi; Taguchi, Katsutoshi; Maekawa, Shohei; Fukami, Kiyoko; Yagisawa, Hitoshi

    2010-03-26

    Phospholipase C-delta1 (PLCdelta1) is the most fundamental form of the eukaryotic PLC and thought to play important roles in the regulation of cells. We previously reported that PLCdelta1 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus, and an influx of Ca2+ triggers the nuclear import of PLCdelta1 via Ca2+-dependent interaction with importin beta1, although the physiological meaning of this is unclear. Here we have examined the distribution of PLCdelta1 using primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons. Treatment of 7DIV neurons with ionomycin or thapsigargin caused the nuclear localization of PLCdelta1 as has been observed in other cell lines. Similar results were obtained with neurons treated with glutamate, suggesting that the nuclear localization of PLCdelta1 plays some roles in excitotoxicity associated with ischemic stress. Generally, cells undergoing ischemic or hypoxic cell death show nuclear shrinkage. We confirmed that a massive influx of Ca2+ caused similar results. Furthermore, overexpression of GFP-PLCdelta1 facilitated ionomycin-induced nuclear shrinkage in embryonic fibroblasts derived from PLCdelta1 gene-knockout mice (PLCdelta1KO-MEF). By contrast, an E341A mutant that cannot bind with importin beta1 and be imported into the nucleus by ionomycin and also lacks enzymatic activity did not cause nuclear shrinkage in PLCdelta1KO-MEF. Nuclear translocation and the PLC activity of PLCdelta1, therefore, may regulate the nuclear shape by controlling the nuclear scaffold during stress-induced cell death caused by high levels of Ca2+. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tumor shrinkage assessed by volumetric MRI in the long-term follow-up after stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astner, Sabrina T.; Theodorou, Marilena; Dobrei-Ciuchendea, Mihaela; Kopp, Christine; Molls, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Auer, Florian [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor volume reduction in the follow-up of meningiomas after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) or linac radiosurgery (RS) by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients and Methods: In 59 patients with skull base meningiomas, gross tumor volume (GTV) was outlined on contrast-en-hanced MRI before and median 50 months (range 11-92 months) after stereotactic radiotherapy. MRI was performed as an axial three-dimensional gradient-echo T1-weighted sequence at 1.6 mm slice thickness without gap (3D-MRI). Results were compared to the reports of diagnostic findings. Results: Mean tumor size of all 59 meningiomas was 13.9 ml (0.8-62.9 ml) before treatment. There was shrinkage of the treated meningiomas in all but one patient. Within a median volumetric follow-up of 50 months (11-95 months), an absolute mean volume reduction of 4 ml (0-18 ml) was seen. The mean relative size reduction compared to the volume before radiotherapy was 27% (0-73%). Shrinkage measured by 3D-MRI was greater at longer time intervals after radiotherapy. The mean size reduction was 17%, 23%, and 30% (at < 24 months, 24-48 months, and 48-72 months). Conclusion: By using 3D-MRI in almost all patients undergoing radiotherapy of a meningioma, tumor shrinkage is detected. The data presented here demonstrate that volumetric assessment from 3D-MRI provides additional information to routinely used radiologic response measurements. After FSRT or RS, a mean size reduction of 25-45% can be expected within 4 years. (orig.)

  3. Pre-heating of high-viscosity bulk-fill resin composites: Effects on shrinkage force and monomer conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Tobias T. Tauböck; Tarle, Zrinka; Marovic, Danijela; Attin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To investigate the influence of pre-heating of high-viscosity bulk-fill composite materials on their degree of conversion and shrinkage force formation. METHODS Four bulk-fill composite materials (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill-TECBF, x-tra fil-XF, QuixFil-QF, SonicFill-SF) and one conventional nano-hybrid resin composite (Tetric EvoCeram-TEC) were used. The test materials were either kept at room temperature or pre-heated to 68°C by means of a commercial heating device, before being...

  4. Pattern of Tumor Shrinkage during Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Is Associated with Prognosis in Low-Grade Luminal Early Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Ippei; Araki, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kokoro; Shibayama, Tomoko; Takahashi, Shunji; Gomi, Naoya; Kokubu, Yumi; Oikado, Katsunori; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji; Ohno, Shinji; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Sata, Naohiro; Ito, Yoshinori

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between tumor shrinkage patterns shown with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and prognosis in patients with low-grade luminal breast cancer. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained from all subjects. The low-grade luminal breast cancer was defined as hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative with nuclear grades 1 or 2. The patterns of tumor shrinkage as revealed at MR imaging were categorized into two types: concentric shrinkage (CS) and non-CS. Among 854 patients who had received NAC in a single institution from January 2000 to December 2009, 183 patients with low-grade luminal breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated for the development set. Another data set from 292 patients who had received NAC in the same institution between January 2010 and December 2012 was used for the validation set. Among these 292 patients, 121 patients with low-grade luminal breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated. Results In the development set, the median observation period was 67.9 months. Recurrence was observed in 31 patients, and 16 deaths were related to breast cancer. There were statistically significant differences in both the disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates between patterns of tumor shrinkage (P breast cancer. DFS rate was significantly longer in patients with the CS pattern (72.8 months; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 69.9, 75.6 months) than in those with the non-CS pattern (56.0 months; 95% CI: 49.1, 62.9 months; P ≤ .001). The CS pattern was associated with an excellent prognosis (median OS, 80.6 months; 95% CI: 79.3, 81.8 months vs 65.0 months; 95% CI: 60.1, 69.8 months; P = .004). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the CS pattern had the only significant independent association with DFS (P = .007) and OS (P = .037) rates. Conclusion

  5. A simple beam model to analyse the durability of adhesively bonded tile floorings in presence of shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. de Miranda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple beam model for the evaluation of tile debonding due to substrate shrinkage is presented. The tile-adhesive-substrate package is modeled as an Euler-Bernoulli beam laying on a two-layer elastic foundation. An effective discrete model for inter-tile grouting is introduced with the aim of modelling workmanship defects due to partial filled groutings. The model is validated using the results of a 2D FE model. Different defect configurations and adhesive typologies are analysed, focusing the attention on the prediction of normal stresses in the adhesive layer under the assumption of Mode I failure of the adhesive.

  6. Volumetric shrinkage and film thickness of cementation materials for veneers: An in vitro 3D microcomputed tomography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Camila S; Barbosa, João Malta; Cáceres, Eduardo; Rigo, Lindiane C; Coelho, Paulo G; Bonfante, Estevam A; Hirata, Ronaldo

    2017-06-01

    Few studies have investigated the volumetric polymerization shrinkage and film thickness of the different cementation techniques used to cement veneers. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the volumetric polymerization shrinkage (VS) and film thickness (FT) of various cementation techniques through 3-dimensional (3D) microcomputed tomography (μCT). Forty-eight artificial plastic maxillary central incisors with standard preparations for veneers were provided by a mannequin manufacturer (P-Oclusal) and used as testing models with the manufacturer's plastic veneers. They were divided into 8 groups (n=6): RelyX Veneer + Scotchbond Universal (RV+SBU); Variolink Esthetic LC+Adhese Universal (VE+ADU); Filtek Supreme Ultra Flowable + Scotchbond Universal (FF+SBU); IPS Empress Direct Flow + Adhese Universal (IEF+ADU); Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal + Scotchbond Universal (FS+SBU); IPS Empress Direct + Adhese Universal (IED+ADU); Preheated Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal + Scotchbond Universal (PHF+SBU); and Preheated IPS Empress Direct + Adhese Universal (PHI+ADU). Specimens were scanned before and after polymerization using a μCT apparatus (mCT 40; Scanco Medical AG), and the resulting files were imported and analyzed with 3D rendering software to calculate the VS and FT. Collected data from both the VS and FT were submitted to 1-way ANOVA (α=.05). VE+ADU had the lowest volumetric shrinkage (1.03%), which was not significantly different from RV+SBU, FF+SBU or IEF+ADU (P>.05). The highest volumetric shrinkage was observed for FS+SBU (2.44%), which was not significantly different from RV+SBU, IED+ADU, PHF+SBU, or PHI+ADU (P>.05). Group RV+SBU did not differ statistically from the remaining groups (P>.05). Film thickness evaluation revealed the lowest values for RV+SBU, VE+ADU, FF+SBU, and IEF+ADU, with an average between groups of 0.17 mm; these groups were significantly different from FS+SBU, IED+ADU, PHF+SBU, and PHI+ADU (P>.05), with an average

  7. Explaining the Allocation of Regional Structural Funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charron, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    What regional factors can explain the heterogeneity in Structural Funds distribution to European Union regions? Past studies have shown that aside from the level of economic development and rates of unemployment, other political, and economic factors systematically explain why certain European...

  8. Explaining Biological Functionality: Is Control Theory Enough ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is generally agreed that organisms are Complex Adaptive Systems. Since the rise of Cybernetics in the middle of the last century ideas from information theory and control theory have been applied to the adaptations of biological organisms in order to explain how they work. This does not, however, explain functionality, ...

  9. Self-Shrinkage Behaviors of Waste Paper Fiber Reinforced Cement Paste considering Its Self-Curing Effect at Early-Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwu Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to study how the early-age self-shrinkage behavior of cement paste is affected by the addition of the waste paper fibers under sealed conditions. Although the primary focus was to determine whether the waste paper fibers are suitable to mitigate self-shrinkage as an internal curing agent under different adding ways, evaluating their strength, pore structure, and hydration properties provided further insight into the self-cured behavior of cement paste. Under the wet mixing condition, the waste paper fibers could mitigate the self-shrinkage of cement paste and, at additions of 0.2% by mass of cement, the waste paper fibers were found to show significant self-shrinkage cracking control while providing some internal curing. In addition, the self-curing efficiency results were analyzed based on the strength and the self-shrinkage behaviors of cement paste. Results indicated that, under a low water cement ratio, an optimal dosage and adding ways of the waste paper fibers could enhance the self-curing efficiency of cement paste.

  10. Role of the beam profile and sample geometry in the bonded-disk method on the shrinkage kinetics of two dental resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostylev, I; Winters, T; Labrie, D; Price, R B T

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the time evolution of the two dimensional axial shrinkage field for two dental resins in the bonded disk geometry and further test the bonded-disk method. An interferometric technique employing a camera was used to image the 2D axial shrinkage field when polymerizing dental resins in real time both during and after light exposure. Four different beam profiles from two light curing units and three sample geometries were utilized to investigate their roles on the 2D axial shrinkage field. The 2D axial shrinkage field correlates qualitatively with the beam profile shortly after the start of light exposure but takes on distinct shapes caused by the rigidity of the coverslip, beam profile, and the resin viscoelasticity. Using the conventional bonded disk geometry and uniform beam profile from a light curing unit, the axial 2D shrinkage field was uniform to within 4% in the central part of bonded disk samples. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Desiccation-Induced Volumetric Shrinkage of Compacted Metakaolin-Treated Black Cotton Soil for a Hydraulic Barriers System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses George

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Black cotton soil treated with up to 24% metakaolin (MCL content was prepared by molding water contents of −2, 0, 2, 4 and 6% of optimum moisture content (OMC and compacted with British Standard Light (BSL and West African Standard (WAS or ‘Intermediate’ energies. The specimens were extruded from the compaction molds and allowed to air dry in a laboratory in order to assess the effect of desiccation-induced shrinkage on the compacted mix for use as a hydraulic barrier in a waste containment application. The results recorded show that the volumetric shrinkage strain (VSS values were large within the first 10 days of drying; the VSS values increased with a higher molding of the water content, relative to the OMC. The VSS generally increased with a higher initial degree of saturation for the two compactive efforts, irrespective of the level of MCL treatment. Generally, the VSS decreased with an increasing MCL content. Only specimens treated with a minimum 20% MCL content and compacted with the WAS energy satisfied the regulatory maximum VSS of 4% for use as a hydraulic barrier.

  12. Shrinkage of spray-freeze-dried microparticles of pure protein for ballistic injection by manipulation of freeze-drying cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straller, Georg; Lee, Geoffrey

    2017-10-30

    Spray-freeze-drying was used to produce shrivelled, partially-collapsed microparticles of pure proteins that may be suitable for use in a ballistic injector. Various modifications of the freeze drying cycle were examined for their effects on collapse of the pure protein microparticles. The use of annealing at a shelf temperature of up to +10°C resulted in no visible particle shrinkage. This was because of the high T g ' of the pure protein. Inclusion of trehalose or sucrose led to particle shrinkage because of the plasticizing effects of the disaccharides on the protein. Only by extending the duration of primary drying from 240 to 2745min at shelf temperatures in the range -12 to -8°C were shrivelled, wrinkled particles of bSA and bCA of reduced porosity obtained. Manipulation of the freeze-drying cycle used for SFD can therefore be used to modify particle morphology and increase particle density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of recycled expanded polystyrene (EPS) on concrete properties: Influence on flexural strength, water absorption and shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsalah, Jamaleddin; Al-Sahli, Yosra; Akish, Ahmed; Saad, Omar; Hakemi, Abdurrahman

    2013-12-01

    Expanded polystyrene waste in a granular form was used as a lightweight aggregate in order to produce lightweight concretë Lightweight EPS concrete composites were produced by replacing the coarse aggregate, either partially or fully with equal volume of EPS aggregates. The coarse aggregate replacements levels used were 25, 50, 75, and 100%, which corresponded to (9.20, 18.40, 27.60, and 36.8%) from total volume. The investigation is directed towards the development and performance evaluation of the concrete composites containing EPS aggregates, without addition of either bonding additives, or super-plasticizers on some concrete properties such as flexure strength, water absorption and change in length (or shrinkage). Experimental results showed that a density reduction of 12% caused flexure strength to decrease by 25.3% at a replacement level of 25% EPS. However, the reduction percentage strongly depends upon the replacement level of EPS granules. Moreover, the lower strength concretes showed a higher water absorption values compared to higher strength concrete, i.e., increasing the volume percentage of EPS increases the water absorption as well as the negative strain (shrinkage). The negative strain was higher at concretes of lower density (containing a high amount of EPS aggregate). The water to cement ratio of EPS aggregate concrete is found to be slightly lower than that of conventional concrete.

  14. Effects of hot isostatic pressing temperature on casting shrinkage densification and microstructure of Ti6Al4V alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Ti6Al4V alloy castings were produced by the investment casting process, and the hot isostatic pressing (HIP was used to remove shrinkage from castings. The processing pressure and holding time for HIP were 150 MPa and 20 min, respectively. Four different HIP temperatures were tested, including 750 ºC, 850 ºC, 920 ºC and 950 ºC. To evaluate the effects of temperature on densification and microstructure of Ti6Al4V alloy treated by HIP, non-destructive testing and metallographic observation was performed. The experimental results show that the shrinkage was completely closed at 920 ºC and 950 ºC. The densification of Ti6Al4V alloy increased as the HIP temperature increased below 920 ºC. The lamellae were more uniform, the thickness of lamellae was obviously broadened and the structure was coarsen. Besides, the Norton creep equation was used to simulate the effect of different temperatures on the densification of Ti6Al4V alloy during HIP. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results. It was also found that 920 ºC is a suitable temperature for HIP for Ti6Al4V alloy.

  15. Possible future lakes resulting from continued glacier shrinkage in the Aosta Valley Region (Western Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Cristina; Machguth, Horst; Huggel, Christian; Godio, Alberto; Perotti, Luigi; Giardino, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Aosta Valley (NW-Alps, Italy) is the region with the largest glaciarized area of Italy (133.73 km2). Like the other alpine regions it has shown a significant glacier retreat starting from the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA, ca. 1850 AD), by losing about 60% of its glaciarized area. As a direct consequence of glacier shrinkage, within glacially-sculpted landscapes, glacier-bed overdeepenings become exposed, offering suitable conditions for glacier lakes formation. In the Aosta Valley region, about 200 glacier lakes have been recognized in different time periods within LIA maximum extent boundaries, mainly dammed by bedrock landforms. With respect to human activities, glacier lakes represent both opportunities (e.g. Miage lake for tourism) and risks (e.g. outburst flood of the Gran Croux lake above Cogne in August 2016) in such a densely populated and developed region. The objective of this contribution is to assess locations of possible future glacier lakes in the Aosta Valley by using the GlabTop2 model (Glacier Bed Topography model version 2). Understanding where future lakes will appear is of fundamental importance for the identification of potential hazards and the interpretation of conditioning factors and dynamics. We first assessed ice thickness and consequently glacier bed topography over large glaciated areas of the region, by using both glaciers outlines related to 1999 (provided by the GlaRiskAlp project) and the regional DEM of 1990 (provided by the Aosta Valley Region) as input data. We performed several runs by varying different input parameters (e,g.: pixel size and basal shear stress). Then we compared modelled results on selected test glaciers (Rutor and Grand Etrèt) with available GPR data. As a validation, we also carried out a GPR survey during summer 2016 on the central area of Indren Glacier (Monte Rosa massif) where GlabTop2 shows the presence of a possible subglacial overdeepening morphology. We found that ice thickness and consequently the

  16. A cell shrinkage-induced non-selective cation conductance with a novel pharmacology in Ehrlich-Lettre-ascites tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawonn, Peter; Hoffmann, Else K; Hougaard, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    In whole-cell recordings on Ehrlich-Lettre-ascites tumour (ELA) cells, the shrinkage-induced activation of a cation conductance with a selectivity ratio P(Na):P(Li):P(K):P(choline):P(NMDG) of 1.00:0.97:0.88:0.03:0.01 was observed. In order of potency, this conductance was blocked by Gd(3+)=benzamil......>amiloride>ethyl-isopropyl-amiloride (EIPA). In patch-clamp studies using the cell-attached configuration, a 14 pS channel became detectable that was reversibly activated upon hypertonic cell shrinkage. It is concluded that ELA cells express a shrinkage-induced cation channel that may reflect a molecular link between amiloride...

  17. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Lung Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ...

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  20. Topology Explains Why Automobile Sunshades Fold Oddly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Curtis; Naimi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Automobile sunshades always fold into an "odd" number of loops. The explanation why involves elementary topology (braid theory and linking number, both explained in detail here with definitions and examples), and an elementary fact from algebra about symmetric group.

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  2. Explorers Presentation: Explaining the Tides to Children

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2015-01-01

    Explaining the tides to children Presentation includes information about: Orbits of the Earth, Moon and Sun; Moon phases and the lunar cycle; Gravity; Gravity and the tide; Types of tides; The tides and me!; Tide tables; Extra insight

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ...

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  6. Comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neurinomas according to 3-D tumor volume shrinkage and quality of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzel, Martin; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany); Hamm, Klaus; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele [Dept. of Stereotactic Neurosurgery and Radiosurgery, HELIOS Klinikum, Erfurt (Germany); Sitter, Helmut [Dept. of Theoretical Surgery, Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany); Gross, Markus W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany); Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. Hospital of Basel (Switzerland)

    2009-09-15

    Background and purpose: stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and also fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) offer high local control (LC) rates (> 90%). This study aimed to evaluate three-dimensional (3-D) tumor volume (TV) shrinkage and to assess quality of life (QoL) after SRS/SRT. Patients and methods: from 1999 to 2005, 35/74 patients were treated with SRS, and 39/74 with SRT. Median age was 60 years. Treatment was delivered by a linear accelerator. Median single dose was 13 Gy (SRS) or 54 Gy (SRT). Patients were followed up {>=} 12 months after SRS/SRT. LC and toxicity were evaluated by clinical examinations and magnetic resonance imaging. 3-D TV shrinkage was evaluated with the planning system. QoL was assessed using the questionnaire Short Form-36. Results: Median follow-up was 50/36 months (SRS/SRT). Actuarial 5-year freedom from progression/overall survival was 88.1%/100% (SRS), and 87.5%/87.2% (SRT). TV shrinkage was 15.1%/40.7% (SRS/SRT; p = 0.01). Single dose (< 13 Gy) was the only determinant factor for TV shrinkage after SRS (p = 0.001). Age, gender, initial TV, and previous operations did not affect TV shrinkage. Acute or late toxicity ({>=} grade 3) was never seen. Concerning QoL, no significant differences were observed after SRS/SRT. Previous operations and gender did not affect QoL (p > 0.05). Compared with the German normal population, patients had worse values for all domains except for mental health. Conclusion: TV shrinkage was significantly higher after SRT than after SRS. Main symptoms were not affected by SRS/SRT. Retrospectively, QoL was neither affected by SRS nor by SRT. (orig.)

  7. Calculation of percent shrinkage in human fetal diaphyseal lengths from fresh bone to carbonized and calcined bone using Petersohn and Köhler's data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, A K; Kósa, F

    1999-05-01

    Calculation of age from fetal and newborn remains may be problematic, and when these remains are altered by maceration, decomposition or burning, age may be more difficult to discern. When soft tissue indicators are transformed, then two techniques exist for accurate age determination; dental development, which may prove difficult given the degree of tissue alteration; and appearance, size and fusion of ossification centers, including diaphyseal length, which may yield inaccurate ages if shrinkage is not accounted for. This study is undertaken to facilitate age calculation by systematically re-evaluating diaphyseal shrinkage and determine shrinkage rates from wet to carbonized states and wet to calcined states using Petersohn and Köhler's data, originally published in German and then published in Fazekas and Kósa (1978:362-369). Average shrinkage, standard deviation, minimum and maximum values are calculated for each diaphysis and then for all diaphyses between 4-10 lunar months (LM) and for newborns. Associated values for carbonized diaphyses are: 4 LM--32.50% +/- 12.12%; 5 LM--14.04% +/- 4.44%; 6 LM--6.78% +/- 1.06%; 7 LM--4.18% +/- 0.31%; 8 LM--3.47% +/- 0.42%; 9 LM--3.05% +/- 0.18%; 10 LM--2.46% +/- 0.67%; and in newborns 2.16% +/- 0.29%. Similar values for calcined diaphyses are: 4 LM--40.11% +/- 17.51%; 5 LM--18.29% +/- 4.42%; 6 LM--9.84% +/- 1.27%; 7 LM--9.82% +/- 0.51%; 8 LM--9.42% +/- 0.72%; 9 LM--9.45% +/- 0.33%; 10 LM--8.94% +/- 0.37%; and in newborns 8.96% +/- 0.49%. These findings suggest that percent shrinkage due to carbonization and calcination is greatest in the earliest age groups, decreasing substantially with advancing age. The rates of shrinkage, however, vary by the burning process utilized and age group studied. These general findings are similar to those of Petersohn and Köhler, yet specific values for percent shrinkage vary greatly from values cited in this analysis. These data provide a means to assess the degree of shrinkage that

  8. Characterization of Early Age Curing and Shrinkage of Metakaolin-Based Inorganic Binders with Different Rheological Behavior by Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Giovanna; Iadicicco, Agostino; Messina, Francesco; Ferone, Claudio; Campopiano, Stefania; Cioffi, Raffaele; Colangelo, Francesco

    2017-12-22

    This paper reports results related to early age temperature and shrinkage measurements by means fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), which were embedded in geopolymer matrices. The sensors were properly packaged in order to discriminate between different shrinkage behavior and temperature development. Geopolymer systems based on metakaolin were investigated, which dealt with different commercial aluminosilicate precursors and siliceous filler contents. The proposed measuring system will allow us to control, in a very accurate way, the early age phases of the binding systems made by metakaolin geopolymer. A series of experiments were conducted on different compositions; moreover, rheological issues related to the proposed experimental method were also assessed.

  9. Explaining religiosity: towards a unified theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Jörg

    2009-06-01

    The article presents a unified theoretical model, explaining differences in Christian and 'alternative' religiosity at individual and collective levels. The model reconstructs and integrates the most important theories explaining religiosity (deprivation, regulation, socialization, cultural production, and ethnicity) as complementary causal mechanisms in a rational-action based framework. It is maintained that the mechanisms of the various theories are not exclusive, but complementary, and that integration into the general model is both theoretically and empirically beneficial. The model is tested on representative data from Switzerland. Substantively, I find for the Swiss case that Christian religiosity can be best explained by a religious socialization mechanism. The most important mechanisms accounting for alternative religiosity involve deprivation, gender, and age.

  10. A Novel Process to Prepare Chitosan Macrospheres without Shrinkage and its Application to Immobilize β-Galactosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Fang Sun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new process for the preparation of chitosan macrospheres, which was simple and practicable, was suggested in this paper and various chitosans with different molecular weight were used as materials to immobilize β-galactosidase and the chitosan macrospheres with the lowest molecular weight (500 000 was selected as enzyme immobilization carrier based on the highest enzyme activity. In order to overcome the shrinkage of chitosan during drying, the wet macrospheres obtained was treated by 30% glycerol solution for 1 h before drying and the results showed that the dried chitosan macrospheres obtained could keep almost the same structure as its wet form, which was very important for chitosan as enzyme carrier in industry. Finally, β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae was immobilized on above dry chitosan macrospheres and a satisfactory result of the immobilized enzyme was obtained in enzyme activity yield, pH stability, thermal stability, operational stability, Michaelis constants Km and the maximum velocity (Vm

  11. Study on Stretching Methods of Biaxially Stretched Co-polyester Film with Has Uniaxially Heat Shrinkage Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Masayuki; Mukouyama, Yukinobu; Tabota, Norimi; Ito, Katsuya; Nonomura, Chisato

    Heat shrinkable film made of stretched film is widely used for decorative labels by attaching on PET bottles with heat shrinkage by steam or dry heating. Trouble cancellation in the installation process of the PET bottle is necessary. The purpose of this study is development of uniaxially heat shrinkable co-polyester film that has strength both in the machine direction (MD) and transverse direction (TD). The film production was performed using sequential biaxial stretched process that combined roll stretching with TD stretching. Cast film was processed in the order of TD stretching-Anneal 1-MD stretching-Anneal 2. As a result, the heat shrinkable film that shrunk only in MD got high tensile strength both in MD and TD. The anneal 1 temperature over Tg (Glass transition temperature) of material resin was needed to obtain the heat shrinkable film shrunk in MD after TD stretching.

  12. High-throughput deterministic single-cell encapsulation and droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage in a single microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Rogier M; Kemna, Evelien W M; Wolbers, Floor; van den Berg, Albert

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic device capable of successive high-yield single-cell encapsulation in droplets, with additional droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage. Deterministic single-cell encapsulation is realized using Dean-coupled inertial ordering of cells in a Yin-Yang-shaped curved microchannel using a double T-junction, with a frequency over 2000 Hz, followed by controlled droplet pairing with a 100% success rate. Subsequently, droplet fusion is realized using electrical actuation resulting in electro-coalescence of two droplets, each containing a single HL60 cell, with 95% efficiency. Finally, volume reduction of the fused droplet up to 75% is achieved by a triple pitchfork structure. This droplet volume reduction is necessary to obtain close cell-cell membrane contact necessary for final cell electrofusion, leading to hybridoma formation, which is the ultimate aim of this research. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Reducing the effect of polymerization shrinkage of temporary fixed dental prostheses by using different materials and fabrication techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libecki, Wojtek; Elsayed, Adham; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Kern, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this laboratory study was to evaluate the horizontal and vertical effects of the polymerization shrinkage of three-unit temporary fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) on the position of the prepared teeth. In addition, the reduction of these effects by using different fabrication techniques was evaluated. A total of 192 temporary FDPs were fabricated using one methacrylate (MA) and two dimethacrylate (DMA) materials. Each material group (n=64) was divided into two groups according to the fabrication methods (M1: curing on the prepared teeth, M2: curing in a silicone mold). Each fabrication group was divided into four subgroups (n=8) according to the relining method used (B: no relining, S: spacer foil 300μm, DG: grinding-out with 500μm cutting depth, and FG: free grinding). The experimental apparatus consisted of two abutment teeth lowered at right angles into a silicone mold. One prepared tooth was embedded in silicone to simulate the periodontium and permit slight horizontal tooth movement. The dimensional changes were recorded with an optical microscope. The test images were superimposed and measured using image analysis software. The statistical analysis showed that there were significantly higher horizontal changes for the MA than the DMA resins in M1, while there was none in M2. Regarding the vertical changes, there were significant differences between the baseline group and all relining and fabrication groups in all materials. Relining of directly fabricated temporary FDPs significantly reduces the effect of polymerization shrinkage and thus secures the position of the prepared teeth. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of volumetric shrinkage and curing light intensity on proximal contact tightness of class II resin composite restorations: in vitro study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Shamy, H.; Saber, M.H.; Dorfer, C.E.; El-Badrawy, W.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Proximal contact tightness of class II resin composite restorations is influenced by a myriad of factors. Previous studies investigated the role of matrix band type and thickness, consistency of resin composite, and technique of placement. However, the effect of volumetric shrinkage of

  15. Experimental study on the shrinkage properties and cracking potential of high strength concrete containing industrial by-products for nuclear power plant concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Baek Joong; Yi, Chong Ku [School of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In Korea, attempts have been made to develop high strength concrete for the safety and design life improvement of nuclear power plants. In this study, the cracking potentials of nuclear power plant-high strength concretes (NPP-HSCs) containing industrial by-products with W/B 0.34 and W/B 0.28, which are being reviewed for their application in the construction of containment structures, were evaluated through autogenous shrinkage, unrestrained drying shrinkage, and restrained drying shrinkage experiments. The cracking potentials of the NPP-HSCs with W/B 0.34 and W/B 0.28 were in the order of 0.34FA25 > 0.34FA25BFS25 > 0.34BFS50 > 0.34BFS65SF5 and 0.28FA25SF5 >> 0.28BFS65SF5 > 0.28BFS45SF5 > 0.28 FA20BFS25SF5, respectively. The cracking potentials of the seven mix proportions excluding 0.28FA25SF5 were lower than that of the existing nuclear power plant concrete; thus, the durability of a nuclear power plant against shrinkage cracking could be improved by applying the seven mix proportions with low cracking potentials.

  16. Heat shock protein 70 inhibits shrinkage-induced programmed cell death via mechanisms independent of effects on cell volume-regulatory membrane transport proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylandsted, J; Jäättelä, M; Hoffmann, E K

    2004-01-01

    Cell shrinkage is a ubiquitous feature of programmed cell death (PCD), but whether it is an obligatory signalling event in PCD is unclear. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) potently counteracts PCD in many cells, by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. In the present investigation, we found...

  17. Explaining dysfunctional effects of lexicographical communication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Explaining Dysfunctional Effects of Lexicographical Communication. 61 part of the aim.El propositions relate directly to the observability and measur- ability of aim.El. They can be taken from education theory, for instance Bloom's revised taxonomy of educational objectives (cf. Anderson and Krathwohl. 2001).21. It is now ...

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. ...

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ...

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is ...

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is ...

  2. Explaining Violence in Sierra Leone's Civil War

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Explaining the violence of civil war is never a simple task for the scholar. In the case of the Sierra Leone, paradoxically, the task has in some ways been rendered more difficult by the sheer variety of compelling scholarship on the question. This paper seeks to identify the most useful of the explanations offered thus far, and ...

  3. Explaining the Sex Difference in Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Anne B.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Peterson, Robin L.; Willcutt, Erik G.; DeFries, John C.; Olson, Richard K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Males are diagnosed with dyslexia more frequently than females, even in epidemiological samples. This may be explained by greater variance in males' reading performance. Methods: We expand on previous research by rigorously testing the variance difference theory, and testing for mediation of the sex difference by cognitive correlates.…

  4. Explaining the VET Applied Research Developmental Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Linda; Beddie, Francesca M.

    2017-01-01

    This document explains the VET Applied Research Developmental Framework, created as part of a project that explored how the vocational education and training (VET) sector could broaden its engagement in Australia's research and development (R&D) and innovation systems. Achieving this engagement will rely significantly on building the…

  5. How Employees Remain Happy: Explaining a Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Dorothy M.; Atkinson, Barbara; Judd, Priya; Darling, Julie; Tran, Linh; Cummins, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper draws on subjective quality of life theory to explain findings from three studies of quality of work life. The studies were conducted with 346 regional process workers, metropolitan employment officers and nurses. The results support the adoption of the theory of homeostasis as an explanation for findings on subjective wellbeing at work…

  6. Explaining convergence of oecd welfare states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, C.; Starke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    of conditional convergence helps to both better describe and explain the phenomenon. By applying error correction models, we examine conditional convergence of various types of social expenditure in 21 OECD countries between 1980 and 2005. Our empirical findings go beyond the existing literature in two respects...

  7. Measuring and explaining house price developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study discusses ways of measuring and explaining the development of house prices. The goal of the research underpinning this dissertation was to develop a methodological framework for studying these developments. This framework relates, first, to correcting for changes in the composition of

  8. Explaining quality of life with crisis theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, M.A.G.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.; de Haes, H.C.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Based on the premises of crisis theory. we expected cancer patients in-crisis to report a poorer quality of life (QL) and cancer patients post-crisis to report a similar level of overall QL in comparison to healthy individuals. To explain these hypothesized findings, we expected the coping resources

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound November 8 is ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging tumor regression shrinkage patterns after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer: Correlation with tumor biological subtypes and pathological response after therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesio, Laura; Gigli, Silvia; Di Pastena, Francesca; Giraldi, Guglielmo; Manganaro, Lucia; Anastasi, Emanuela; Catalano, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze magnetic resonance imaging shrinkage pattern of tumor regression after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and to evaluate its relationship with biological subtypes and pathological response. We reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging studies of 51 patients with single mass-enhancing lesions (performed at time 0 and at the II and last cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy). Tumors were classified as Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2+, and Triple Negative based on biological and immunohistochemical analysis after core needle biopsy. We classified shrinkage pattern, based on tumor regression morphology on magnetic resonance imaging at the II cycle, as concentric, nodular, and mixed. We assigned a numeric score (0: none; 1: low; 2: medium; 3: high) to the enhancement intensity decrease. Pathological response on the surgical specimen was classified as complete (grade 5), partial (grades 4-3), and non-response (grades 1-2) according to Miller and Payne system. Fisher test was used to relate shrinkage pattern with biological subtypes and final pathological response. Seventeen patients achieved complete response, 25 partial response, and 9 non-response. A total of 13 lesions showed nodular pattern, 20 concentric, and 18 mixed. We found an association between concentric pattern and HER2+ (p < 0.001) and mixed pattern and Luminal A lesions (p < 0.001). We observed a statistical significant correlation between concentric pattern and complete response (p < 0.001) and between mixed pattern and non-response (p = 0.005). Enhancement intensity decrease 3 was associated with complete response (p < 0.001). Shrinkage pattern and enhancement intensity decrease may serve as early response indicators after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Shrinkage pattern correlates with tumor biological subtypes.

  11. Children's Theories and the Drive to Explain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitzgebel, Eric

    Debate has been growing in developmental psychology over how much the cognitive development of children is like theory change in science. Useful debate on this topic requires a clear understanding of what it would be for a child to have a theory. I argue that existing accounts of theories within philosophy of science and developmental psychology either are less precise than is ideal for the task or cannot capture everyday theorizing of the sort that children, if they theorize, must do. I then propose an account of theories that ties theories and explanation very closely together, treating theories primarily as products of a drive to explain. I clarify some of the positions people have taken regarding the theory theory of development, and I conclude by proposing that psychologists interested in the ''theory theory'' look for patterns of affect and arousal in development that would accompany the existence of a drive to explain.

  12. Explaining money creation by commercial banks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Educators and economists concerned with monetary reform face the extraordinary challenge of explaining to the public and its elected representatives not only what a reformed system would look like, but also how the current system works. Centrally, the point that in a modern economy money is largely...... created by commercial banks, as explained by the Bank of England recently (McLeay, Radia & Thomas, 2014b), is often met with incredulity: “What do you mean, created?” This paper introduces five easy-to-grasp analogies that educators and reformers may use to convey key money-creation concepts to a lay...... audience. The analogies offered include (1) money as patches in an expandable patchwork quilt that covers a nation’s real assets, (2) the money supply as water in a bathtub with a faucet and a drain, (3) money understood as debt in a model economy run by schoolchildren, (4) the misleading concept of a bank...

  13. Drug detoxification dynamics explain the postantibiotic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, Jaydeep K; Huang, Shuqiang; Lopatkin, Allison J; You, Lingchong

    2017-10-23

    The postantibiotic effect (PAE) refers to the temporary suppression of bacterial growth following transient antibiotic treatment. This effect has been observed for decades for a wide variety of antibiotics and microbial species. However, despite empirical observations, a mechanistic understanding of this phenomenon is lacking. Using a combination of modeling and quantitative experiments, we show that the PAE can be explained by the temporal dynamics of drug detoxification in individual cells after an antibiotic is removed from the extracellular environment. These dynamics are dictated by both the export of the antibiotic and the intracellular titration of the antibiotic by its target. This mechanism is generally applicable for antibiotics with different modes of action. We further show that efflux inhibition is effective against certain antibiotic motifs, which may help explain mixed cotreatment success. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  14. John Watson's paradoxical struggle to explain Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, M

    2000-03-01

    John Watson was fascinated by the discoveries of psychoanalysis, but he rejected Freud's central concept of the unconscious as incompatible with behaviorism. After failing to explain psychoanalysis in terms of William James's concept of habit, Watson borrowed concepts from classical conditioning to explain Freud's discoveries. Watson's famous experiment with Little Albert is interpreted not only in the context of Pavlovian conditioning but also as a psychoanalytically inspired attempt to capture simplified analogues of adult phobic behavior, including the "transference" of emotion in an infant. Watson used his behavioristic concept of conditioned emotional responses to compete with Freud's concepts of displacement and the unconscious transference of emotion. Behind a mask of anti-Freudian bias, Watson surprisingly emerges as a psychologist who popularized Freud and pioneered the scientific appraisal of his ideas in the laboratory.

  15. Explaining Underrepresentation: A Theory of Precluded Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheryan, Sapna; Plaut, Victoria C

    2010-10-01

    What processes best explain women's underrepresentation in science, math, and engineering fields in the U.S.? Do they also explain men's underrepresentation in the humanities? Two survey studies across two U.S. West Coast universities (N = 62; N = 614) addressed these questions in the context of two fields: one male-dominated (computer science) and the other female-dominated (English). Among a set of social predictors-including perceived similarity to the people in the field, social identity threats, and expectations of success-the best mediator of women's lower interest in computer science and men's lower interest in English was perceived similarity. Thus, changing students' social perceptions of how they relate to those in the field may help to diversify academic fields.

  16. IEE wiring regulations explained and illustrated

    CERN Document Server

    Scaddan, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The IEE Wiring Regulations Explained and Illustrated, Second Edition discusses the recommendations of the IEE Regulations for the Electrical Equipment of Buildings for the safe selection or erection of wiring installations. The book emphasizes earthing, bonding, protection, and circuit design of electrical wirings. The text reviews the fundamental requirements for safety, earthing systems, the earth fault loop impedance, and supplementary bonding. The book also describes the different types of protection, such as protection against mechanical damage, overcurrent, under voltage (which prevents

  17. Explaining the Slowdown in Global Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Jarkko Jaaskela; Thomas Mathews

    2015-01-01

    Following the global financial crisis, global trade contracted sharply and, after an initial recovery, grew at an unusually slow pace relative to global GDP. This article reviews cyclical and structural explanations for this phenomenon, and finds econometric evidence that cyclical factors – namely shifts in the composition of aggregate demand toward less import-intensive components and heightened economic uncertainty – can explain most of the slowdown in trade in a panel of advanced economies...

  18. "Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in Georgia"

    OpenAIRE

    Khitarishvili, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates gender wage differentials in Georgia between 2000 and 2004. Using ordinary least squares, we find that the gender wage gap in Georgia is substantially higher than in other transition countries. Correcting for sample selection bias using the Heckman approach further increases the gender wage gap. The Blinder Oaxaca decomposition results suggest that most of the wage gap remains unexplained. The explained portion of the gap is almost entirely attributed to industrial variab...

  19. Explaining the variety of human sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, W A

    2000-11-01

    In this paper, the author formulates a theory to explain why human sexual orientation seems to run amok. The 'psychic instrument', as he terms it, is the baby's dreaming mind which interprets or misinterprets input from its sociocultural sexual environment. The baby, already born an omnisexual being, then develops a fantasy life with socially sanctioned or unsanctioned fetishes which are likely to be expressed when certain triggering situations arise.

  20. Effect of blue and violet light on polymerization shrinkage vectors of a CQ/TPO-containing composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Camila S; Atria, Pablo J; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Giannini, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G; Hirata, Ronaldo; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of light-curing wavelengths on composite filler particle displacement, and thus to visualize localized polymerization shrinkage in a resin-based composite (RBC) containing camphorquinone (CQ) and Lucirin TPO (TPO). Three light-curing units (LCUs) were used to light-cure a RBC containing CQ and TPO: a violet-only, a blue-only, and a dual-wavelength, conventional (Polywave ® , emitting violet and blue wavelengths simultaneously). Zirconia fillers were added to the RBC to act as filler particle displacement tracers. LCUs were characterized for total emitted power (mW) and spectral irradiant output (mW/cm 2 /nm). 2-mm high, 7-mm diameter silanized glass cylindrical specimens were filled in a single increment with the RBC, and micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) scans were obtained before and after light-curing, according to each LCU (n=6). Filler particle movement identified polymerization shrinkage vectors, traced using software, at five depths (from 0 up to 2mm): top, top-middle, middle, middle-bottom and bottom. Considering different RBC depths within the same LCU, use of violet-only and conventional LCUs showed filler particle movement decreased with increased depth. Blue-only LCU showed homogeneous filler particle movement along the depths. Considering the effect of different LCUs within the same depth, filler particle movement within LCUs was not statistically different until the middle of the samples (P>.05). However, at the middle-bottom and bottom depths (1.5 and 2mm, respectively), blue-only LCU compared to violet-only LCU showed higher magnitude of displacement vector values (P.05). With respect to the direction of particle movement vectors, use of violet-only LCU showed a greater displacement when close to the incident violet LED; blue-only LCU showed equally distributed particle displacement values within entire depth among the samples; and the conventional LCU showed greater filler displacement closer to the blue LED locations

  1. A comparison of stresses in molar teeth restored with inlays and direct restorations, including polymerization shrinkage of composite resin and tooth loading during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejak, Beata; Młotkowski, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of composites is one of the main causes of leakage around dental restorations. Despite the large numbers of studies there is no consensus, what kind of teeth reconstruction--direct or indirect composite restorations are the most beneficial and the most durable. The aim was to compare equivalent stresses and contact adhesive stresses in molar teeth with class II MOD cavities, which were restored with inlays and direct restorations (taking into account polymerization shrinkage of composite resin) during simulated mastication. The study was conducted using the finite elements method with the application of contact elements. Three 3D models of first molars were created: model A was an intact tooth; model B--a tooth with a composite inlay, and model C--a tooth with a direct composite restoration. Polymerization linear shrinkage 0.7% of a direct composite restoration and resin luting cement was simulated (load 1). A computer simulation of mastication was performed (load 2). In these 2 situations, equivalent stresses according to the modified von Mises criterion (mvM) in the materials of mandibular first molar models with different restorations were calculated and compared. Contact stresses in the luting cement-tooth tissue adhesive interface around the restorations were also assessed and analyzed. Equivalent stresses in a tooth with a direct composite restoration (the entire volume of which was affected by polymerization shrinkage) were many times higher than in the tooth restored with a composite inlay (where shrinkage was present only in a thin layer of the luting cement). In dentin and enamel the stress values were 8-14 times higher, and were 13 times higher in the direct restoration than in the inlay. Likewise, contact stresses in the adhesive bond around the direct restoration were 6.5-7.7 times higher compared to an extraorally cured restoration. In the masticatory simulation, shear contact stresses in the adhesive bond around the direct

  2. Dissipative dark matter explains rotation curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, R.

    2015-06-01

    Dissipative dark matter, where dark matter particles interact with a massless (or very light) boson, is studied. Such dark matter can arise in simple hidden sector gauge models, including those featuring an unbroken U (1 )' gauge symmetry, leading to a dark photon. Previous work has shown that such models can not only explain the large scale structure and cosmic microwave background, but potentially also dark matter phenomena on small scales, such as the inferred cored structure of dark matter halos. In this picture, dark matter halos of disk galaxies not only cool via dissipative interactions but are also heated via ordinary supernovae (facilitated by an assumed photon-dark photon kinetic mixing interaction). This interaction between the dark matter halo and ordinary baryons, a very special feature of these types of models, plays a critical role in governing the physical properties of the dark matter halo. Here, we further study the implications of this type of dissipative dark matter for disk galaxies. Building on earlier work, we develop a simple formalism which aims to describe the effects of dissipative dark matter in a fairly model independent way. This formalism is then applied to generic disk galaxies. We also consider specific examples, including NGC 1560 and a sample of dwarf galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS survey. We find that dissipative dark matter, as developed here, does a fairly good job accounting for the rotation curves of the galaxies considered. Not only does dissipative dark matter explain the linear rise of the rotational velocity of dwarf galaxies at small radii, but it can also explain the observed wiggles in rotation curves which are known to be correlated with corresponding features in the disk gas distribution.

  3. word2vec Parameter Learning Explained

    OpenAIRE

    Rong, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The word2vec model and application by Mikolov et al. have attracted a great amount of attention in recent two years. The vector representations of words learned by word2vec models have been shown to carry semantic meanings and are useful in various NLP tasks. As an increasing number of researchers would like to experiment with word2vec or similar techniques, I notice that there lacks a material that comprehensively explains the parameter learning process of word embedding models in details, t...

  4. Chromosome congression explained by nanoscale electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, L John; Shain, Daniel H

    2014-02-24

    Nanoscale electrostatic microtubule disassembly forces between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charges on plus ends of microtubules have been implicated in poleward chromosome motions and may also contribute to antipoleward chromosome movements. We propose that chromosome congression can be understood in terms of antipoleward nanoscale electrostatic microtubule assembly forces between negatively charged microtubule plus ends and like-charged chromosome arms, acting in conjunction with poleward microtubule disassembly forces. Several other aspects of post-attachment prometaphase chromosome motions, as well as metaphase oscillations, are consistently explained within this framework.

  5. Explaining perceptions of the unemployed in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Vlandas, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the determinants of the perceptions of the unemployed in 29 European countries along three dimensions: whether people see the unemployed as the ‘government’s responsibility’; whether they believe the unemployed do not ‘try hard to find a job’; and whether they think that the standard of living of the unemployed is ‘bad’. I derive a number of expectations from the political economy literature on policy preferences and test whether these expectations explain variation in t...

  6. SOME THEORETICAL MODELS EXPLAINING ADVERTISING EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilica Magdalena SOMEŞFĂLEAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Persuade clients is still the main focus of the companies, using a set of methods and techniques designed to influence their behavior, in order to obtain better results (profits over a longer period of time. Since the late nineteenth - early twentieth century, the american E.St.Elmo Lewis, considered a pioneer in advertising and sales, developed the first theory, AIDA model, later used by marketers and advertisers to develop a marketing communications strategy. Later studies have developed other models that are the main subject of this research, which explains how and why persuasive communication works, to understand why some approaches are effective and others are not.

  7. Developmental systems theory: what does it explain, and how does it explain it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Paul E; Tabery, James

    2013-01-01

    We examine developmental systems theory (DST) with two questions in mind: What does DST explain? How does DST explain it? To answer these questions, we start by reviewing major contributions to the origins of DST: the introduction of the idea of a "developmental system", the idea of probabilistic epigenesis, the attention to the role of information in the developmental system, and finally the explicit identification of a DST. We then consider what DST is not, contrasting it with two approaches that have been foils for DST: behavioral genetics and nativist cognitive psychology. Third, we distill out two core concepts that have defined DSTthroughout its history: epigenesis and developmental dynamics. Finally, we turn to how DST explains, arguing that it explains by elucidating mechanisms.

  8. Large pore size and controlled mesh elongation are relevant predictors for mesh integration quality and low shrinkage--Systematic analysis of key parameters of meshes in a novel minipig hernia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyhe, Dirk; Cobb, William; Lecuivre, Julie; Alves, Antoine; Ladet, Sebastien; Lomanto, Davide; Bayon, Yves

    2015-10-01

    Prosthetic mesh implants in hernia repair are frequently used based on the fact that lower recurrence rates are detected. However, an undesirable side effect is persistent foreign body reaction that drives adhesions and shrinkage among other things in the course of time. Thereby a variety of meshes have been created in an attempt to alleviate these side effects, and particular relating to shrinkage, the ideal mesh has not been developed. Large pore size is one of the properties to get better ingrowth of the implants but could also be a risk factor to shrinkage behavior. The aim of this preclinical study was to determine optimal pore size based on mesh integration and shrinkage in a hernia minipig model. Twenty female minipigs were each implanted at four abdominal retromuscular sites with meshes (designed and knitted specifically for this study) that had various weights and pore sizes, but similar weave. At 3 and 21 weeks post-operation, ten pigs each were euthanized. Mesh integration and shrinkage were evaluated through macroscopic observation, biomechanical testing and histopathological analysis. The large pore meshes (6.1-6.6 mm(2)) showed significantly better integration than small pore (0.9-1.1 mm(2)) counterparts, by biomechanical testing and histological assessment. This was independent of mesh weight. The lightweight small pore mesh exhibited significantly more shrinkage than any of the other meshes, while the three-dimensional heavyweight large pore mesh exhibited the least shrinkage. Mesh shrinkage and elongation at 50 Newton (N) as one parameter of the implant structural stability appeared to be strongly interrelated. Tissue ingrowth of meshes depends on increasing pore size. Macroporous mesh design >1.5 mm diameter appears to be optimal in terms of mesh integration. Lightweight meshes with a large pore size on one hand and a lack of structural stability on the other hand drives mesh shrinkage. High stretchability (Elongation >50 N) induces higher

  9. Boosted Regression Tree Models to Explain Watershed ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boosted regression tree (BRT) models were developed to quantify the nonlinear relationships between landscape variables and nutrient concentrations in a mesoscale mixed land cover watershed during base-flow conditions. Factors that affect instream biological components, based on the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI), were also analyzed. Seasonal BRT models at two spatial scales (watershed and riparian buffered area [RBA]) for nitrite-nitrate (NO2-NO3), total Kjeldahl nitrogen, and total phosphorus (TP) and annual models for the IBI score were developed. Two primary factors — location within the watershed (i.e., geographic position, stream order, and distance to a downstream confluence) and percentage of urban land cover (both scales) — emerged as important predictor variables. Latitude and longitude interacted with other factors to explain the variability in summer NO2-NO3 concentrations and IBI scores. BRT results also suggested that location might be associated with indicators of sources (e.g., land cover), runoff potential (e.g., soil and topographic factors), and processes not easily represented by spatial data indicators. Runoff indicators (e.g., Hydrological Soil Group D and Topographic Wetness Indices) explained a substantial portion of the variability in nutrient concentrations as did point sources for TP in the summer months. The results from our BRT approach can help prioritize areas for nutrient management in mixed-use and heavily impacted watershed

  10. EXPLAINING THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN INCARCERATION AND DIVORCE*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siennick, Sonja E.; Stewart, Eric A.; Staff, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that incarceration dramatically increases the odds of divorce, but we know little about the mechanisms that explain the association. This study uses prospective longitudinal data from a subset of married young adults in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 1,919) to examine whether incarceration is associated with divorce indirectly via low marital love, economic strain, relationship violence, and extramarital sex. The findings confirmed that incarcerations occurring during, but not before, a marriage were associated with an increased hazard of divorce. Incarcerations occurring during marriage also were associated with less marital love, more relationship violence, more economic strain, and greater odds of extramarital sex. Above-average levels of economic strain were visible among respondents observed preincarceration, but only respondents observed postincarceration showed less marital love, more relationship violence, and higher odds of extramarital sex than did respondents who were not incarcerated during marriage. These relationship problems explained approximately 40 percent of the association between incarceration and marital dissolution. These findings are consistent with theoretical predictions that a spouse’s incarceration alters the rewards and costs of the marriage and the relative attractiveness of alternative partners. PMID:25598544

  11. A prospective randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of artificial shrinkage (collapse) on the implantation potential of vitrified blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landuyt, L; Polyzos, N P; De Munck, N; Blockeel, C; Van de Velde, H; Verheyen, G

    2015-11-01

    What is the effect of artificial shrinkage by laser-induced collapse before vitrification on the implantation potential after transfer of vitrified-warmed blastocysts? The artificial shrinkage by laser-induced collapse did not significantly increase the implantation rate per transferred collapsed blastocyst (37.6%) compared with non-collapsed blastocysts (28.9%) [odds ratio (OR): 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.78-2.83]. Retrospective studies have demonstrated that artificial shrinkage of the blastocyst prior to vitrification can have a positive effect on blastocyst survival after warming. A recent study found a similar survival rate but higher implantation rate for collapsed blastocysts. So far, no randomized controlled trial has been conducted to investigate the implantation potential of collapsed blastocysts. Prospective randomized trial. Patients were recruited from December 2011 until April 2014 and warming cycles were included until July 2014. Patients were randomized in the fresh cycle if blastocysts were available for vitrification and were allocated to the study or control arm according to a computer-generated list. In the study group, blastocysts underwent laser-induced collapse before vitrification. In the control group, blastocysts were vitrified without collapsing. In total, 443 patients signed informed consent and 270 patients had blastocysts vitrified. One-hundred and thirty-five patients were allocated to the study group and 135 to the control group. Sixty-nine patients from the study group and 69 from the control group returned for at least one warming cycle in which 85 and 93 blastocysts were warmed in the first cycle, respectively. Primary outcome was implantation rate per embryo transferred in the first warming cycle. Secondary outcomes were survival and transfer rates, blastocyst quality after warming, clinical pregnancy rate and implantation rate per warmed blastocyst. Blastocysts were vitrified-warmed one by one using closed

  12. Alternative two-step matrix application method for imaging mass spectrometry to avoid tissue shrinkage and improve ionization efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimma, Shuichi; Takashima, Yuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Yonemori, Kan; Tamura, Kenji; Hamada, Akinobu

    2013-12-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) was used to measure the concentrations of drug and biological compounds in plasma and tissues. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging MS (IMS) has recently been applied to the analysis of localized drugs on biological tissue surfaces. In MALDI-IMS, matrix application process is crucial for successful results. However, it is difficult to obtain homogeneous matrix crystals on the tissue surface due to endogenous salts and tissue surface heterogeneity. Consequently, the non-uniform crystals degrade the quality of the spectrum and likely cause surface imaging artifacts. Furthermore, the direct application of matrix solution can cause tissue shrinkage due to the organic solvents. Here, we report an alternative two-step matrix application protocol which combines the vacuum deposition of matrix crystals and the spraying of matrix solution to produce a homogeneous matrix layer on the tissue surface. Our proposed technique can also prevent cracking or shrinking of the tissue samples and improve the ionization efficiency of the distributed exogenous material. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Understanding the shrinkage of optical absorption edges of nanostructured Cd-Zn sulphide films for photothermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Md. Sohrab [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh); Kabir, Humayun [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh); School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Rahman, M. Mahbubur, E-mail: M.Rahman@Murdoch.edu.au [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh); Surface Analysis and Materials Engineering Research Group, School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia 6150 (Australia); Hasan, Kamrul [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, University of Sharjah, P.O. Box 27272, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Bashar, Muhammad Shahriar; Rahman, Mashudur [Institute of Fuel and Research Development, Bangladesh Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Dhanmondi, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Gafur, Md. Abdul [Pilot Plant and Process Development Center, Bangladesh Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Dhanmondi, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Islam, Shariful [Department of Physics, Comilla University, Comilla (Bangladesh); Amri, Amun [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitas Riau, Pekanbaru (Indonesia); Jiang, Zhong-Tao [Surface Analysis and Materials Engineering Research Group, School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia 6150 (Australia); Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z. [School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Cd-Zn sulphide films synthesized via chemical bath deposition technique. • Nanocrystalline phase of Cd-Zn sulphide films were seen in XRD studies. • Nanocrystalline structures of the films were also confirmed by the SEM. • The band gap of these films is a combination of composition and size. • E{sub U} and σ studies ascribed the shrinkage of absorption edges around the optical band-gaps. - Abstract: In this article Cd-Zn sulphide thin films deposited onto soda lime glass substrates via chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique were investigated for photovoltaic applications. The synthesized films were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ultraviolet visible (UV–vis) spectroscopic methodologies. A higher degree of crystallinity of the films was attained with the increase of film thicknesses. SEM micrographs exhibited a partial crystalline structure with a particulate appearance surrounded by the amorphous grain boundaries. The optical absorbance and absorption coefficient of the films were also enhanced significantly with the increase in film thicknesses. Optical band-gap analysis indicated a monotonic decrease in direct and indirect band-gaps with the increase of thicknesses of the films. The presence of direct and indirect transitional energies due to the exponential falling edges of the absorption curves may either be due to the lack of long-range order or to the existence of defects in the films. The declination of the optical absorption edges was also confirmed via Urbach energy and steepness parameters studies.

  14. Measurement error correction in the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator model when validation data are available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Monica M; Hu, Chengcheng; Roe, Denise J; Halonen, Marilyn; Guerra, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of serum biomarkers by multiplex assays may be more variable as compared to single biomarker assays. Measurement error in these data may bias parameter estimates in regression analysis, which could mask true associations of serum biomarkers with an outcome. The Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) can be used for variable selection in these high-dimensional data. Furthermore, when the distribution of measurement error is assumed to be known or estimated with replication data, a simple measurement error correction method can be applied to the LASSO method. However, in practice the distribution of the measurement error is unknown and is expensive to estimate through replication both in monetary cost and need for greater amount of sample which is often limited in quantity. We adapt an existing bias correction approach by estimating the measurement error using validation data in which a subset of serum biomarkers are re-measured on a random subset of the study sample. We evaluate this method using simulated data and data from the Tucson Epidemiological Study of Airway Obstructive Disease (TESAOD). We show that the bias in parameter estimation is reduced and variable selection is improved.

  15. Forecasts for the Canadian Lynx time series using method that bombine neural networks, wavelet shrinkage and decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi Lopes Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Time series forecasting is widely used in various areas of human knowledge, especially in the planning and strategic direction of companies. The success of this task depends on the forecasting techniques applied. In this paper, a hybrid approach to project time series is suggested. To validate the methodology, a time series already modeled by other authors was chosen, allowing the comparison of results. The proposed methodology includes the following techniques: wavelet shrinkage, wavelet decomposition at level r, and artificial neural networks (ANN. Firstly, a time series to be forecasted is submitted to the proposed wavelet filtering method, which decomposes it to components of trend and linear residue. Then, both are decomposed via level r wavelet decomposition, generating r + 1 Wavelet Components (WCs for each one; and then each WC is individually modeled by an ANN. Finally, the predictions for all WCs are linearly combined, producing forecasts to the underlying time series. For evaluating purposes, the time series of Canadian Lynx has been used, and all results achieved by the proposed method were better than others in existing literature.

  16. One Year Clinical Evaluation of a Low Shrinkage Composite Compared with a Packable Composite Resin: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Hoseinifar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of a packable and a low shrinkage methacrylate-based composite after one year.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 50 class I or II restorations were placed in 25 patients. Each patient received two restorations. The tested materials were: (I Filtek P60 + Single Bond 2 and (II Kalore GC + Single Bond 2. The restorations were evaluated by two independent examiners after one week (baseline, six months and one year according to the modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS criteria. The evaluated parameters included color match, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, retention, surface texture, postoperative sensitivity, marginal staining and secondary caries. Data were then analyzed using Friedman and conditional (matched logistic regression tests at P<0.05 level of significance. Results: P60 and Kalore performed similarly at six months and one year (P>0.05. When each composite resin was evaluated independently at baseline and after one year, no statistically significant differences were found except for marginal adaptation (P60 where four restorations were rated Bravo (clinically acceptable. In 8% of restorations, patients expressed postoperative sensitivity.Conclusions: Kalore GC and Filtek P60 showed acceptance clinical performance after one year of service.Keywords: Composite Resins; Dental Marginal Adaptation; Patients

  17. Maximizing Sustainability of Concrete through the Control of Moisture Rise and Drying Shrinkage Using Calcined Clay Pozzolan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Solomon Ankrah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ghanaian concrete industry is really a booming industry due to many infrastructural developments and the surge in residential development. However, many developmental projects that utilize concrete do suffer from the negative impact of moisture rise including paint peeling-off, bacterial and fungi growth, and microcracks as well as unpleasant looks on buildings. Such negative outlook resulting from the effects of moisture rise affects the longevity of concrete and hence makes concrete less sustainable. This study seeks to develop materials that could minimize the rise of moisture or ions through concrete medium. The experimental works performed in this study included pozzolanic strength activity index, water sorptivity, and shrinkage test. Calcined clay produced from clay was used as pozzolan to replace Portland cement at 20%. The strength activity test showed that the cement containing the calcined material attained higher strength activity indices than the control. The thermal gravimetric analysis showed that the pozzolan behaved partly as a filler material and partly as a pozzolanic material. The sorptivity results also showed that the blended mix resulted in lower sorptivity values than the control mortar. The study recommends that calcined clay and Portland cement mixtures could be used to produce durable concrete to maximize sustainability.

  18. Distributed fiber optic sensor-enhanced detection and prediction of shrinkage-induced delamination of ultra-high-performance concrete overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yi; Valipour, Mahdi; Meng, Weina; Khayat, Kamal H.; Chen, Genda

    2017-08-01

    This study develops a delamination detection system for smart ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) overlays using a fully distributed fiber optic sensor. Three 450 mm (length) × 200 mm (width) × 25 mm (thickness) UHPC overlays were cast over an existing 200 mm thick concrete substrate. The initiation and propagation of delamination due to early-age shrinkage of the UHPC overlay were detected as sudden increases and their extension in spatial distribution of shrinkage-induced strains measured from the sensor based on pulse pre-pump Brillouin optical time domain analysis. The distributed sensor is demonstrated effective in detecting delamination openings from microns to hundreds of microns. A three-dimensional finite element model with experimental material properties is proposed to understand the complete delamination process measured from the distributed sensor. The model is validated using the distributed sensor data. The finite element model with cohesive elements for the overlay-substrate interface can predict the complete delamination process.

  19. Polypropylene/ethylene-propylene rubber (PP/EPR blends for the automotive industry: Basic correlations between EPR-design and shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Potter

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the phase morphology on the shrinkage of injection molded plates from reactor based PP/EPR blends was investigated using a model series. The morphology of the dispersed phase – in terms of size and shape of the rubber particles as determined from scanning electron microscopy (SEM – was found to correlate fairly well with the shrinkage determined in the flow and transverse direction of injection molded plates. In this respect it turned out to be elementary to consider the anisotropy of the particles rather than their average size alone. Additionally, the effect of the EPR design on the coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE was evaluated and brought into a relationship with the blend morphology.

  20. Tumor Shrinkage Assessed by Volumetric MRI in Long-Term Follow-Up After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Christine, E-mail: Christine.Kopp@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Theodorou, Marilena; Poullos, Nektarios; Jacob, Vesna; Astner, Sabrina T.; Molls, Michael [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Universitaet Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in the management of residual or recurrent nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Methods and Materials: We assessed exact tumor volume shrinkage in 16 patients with NFPA after FSRT. All patients had previously undergone surgery. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was outlined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and median 63 months (range, 28-100 months) after FSRT. MRI was performed as an axial three-dimensional gradient echo T1-weighted sequence at 1.6-mm slice thickness without gap (3D MRI). Results: Mean tumor size of all 16 pituitary adenomas before treatment was 7.4 mL (3.3-18.9 mL). We found shrinkage of the treated pituitary adenoma in all patients. Within a median follow-up of 63 months (28-100 months) an absolute mean volume reduction of 3.8 mL (0.9-12.4 mL) was seen. The mean relative size reduction compared with the volume before radiotherapy was 51% (22%-95%). Shrinkage measured by 3D MRI was greater at longer time intervals after radiotherapy. A strong negative correlation between the initial tumor volume and the absolute volume reduction after FSRT was found. There was no correlation between tumor size reduction and patient age, sex, or number of previous surgeries. Conclusions: By using 3D MRI in all patients undergoing FSRT of an NFPA, tumor shrinkage is detected. Our data demonstrate that volumetric assessment based on 3D MRI adds additional information to routinely used radiological response measurements. After FSRT a mean relative size reduction of 51% can be expected within 5 years.