WorldWideScience

Sample records for experts conclude iaea

  1. International Expert Team Concludes IAEA Peer Review of Poland's Regulatory Framework for Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: International safety experts last week concluded a two-week International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in Poland. In its preliminary report, the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission team found that Poland's nuclear regulator, Panstwowa Agencja Atomistyki (PAA), has a clear commitment to safety, a high level of transparency, competent staff and leadership, and a good recognition of challenges ahead related to Poland's efforts to develop nuclear power. ''Poland's regulatory framework and the work of PAA give high confidence of strong radiation protection for the Polish people. Further, there has been significant progress in the development of Poland's regulatory framework in preparation for the challenge of regulating nuclear power,'' said team leader Robert Lewis, a senior executive in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The mission was conducted at the request of the Government of Poland from 15-25 April. The team was made up of 11 regulatory experts from Belgium, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, the Republic of Korea, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States, as well as five IAEA staff members. The IRRS review team was very thorough in its review, and we welcome its advice on how to continue to improve our programmes to protect people and the environment , said Janusz Wlodarski, President of PAA. The team interviewed members of PAA and officials from various ministries, as well as key players in the Polish safety framework. Such IRRS missions are peer reviews based on IAEA Safety Standards, not inspections or audits. Among its main observations the IRRS review team identified the following good practices: Applying the considerable experience of PAA's senior management to regulatory issues; The introduction of changes to Poland's laws and regulations following broad public consultation at an early stage in

  2. International experts conclude IAEA peer review of Iran's safety regulation of Bushehr NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts today completed an IAEA mission to review the effectiveness of Iran's safety regulation of its first nuclear power plant and to identify possible improvements before the plant begins operation. Upon invitation of the Islamic Republic of Iran, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a team of senior regulators from seven Member States for an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. The scope of the mission was limited to the safety regulation of Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP-1). The IRRS review took place from 20 February to 2 March at the INRA offices in Tehran and included a technical visit to the BNPP-1 site. The mission was an objective peer review based on IAEA safety standards, and was neither an inspection, nor an audit. Ms. Olena Mykolaichuk, IRRS Team Leader and Head of the State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine, commended her INRA counterparts: 'The regulatory work performed on the Bushehr construction and in preparation for commissioning has demonstrated significant progress of INRA as a nuclear regulatory authority,' she said. Philippe Jamet, Director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division, added: 'Through this IRRS mission, both Iran and the international experts contribute to the enhancement of nuclear safety and worldwide experience sharing.' In the course of its review the IRRS team identified the following strengths: - INRA has a dedicated, conscientious staff, demonstrating clear commitments to further improvements. - INRA clearly recognizes the value of peer reviews and international cooperation regarding nuclear safety. - Despite a shortage of staff, INRA demonstrated strong leadership while performing both review and assessment and inspection tasks during the BNPP-1 construction and pre-commissioning. - INRA has developed an excellent computerized documentation control system. Recommendations and suggestions to improve INRA's regulatory

  3. International Nuclear Safety Experts Conclude IAEA Peer Review of Swiss Regulatory Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A team of international nuclear safety experts today completed a two-week International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) review of the regulatory framework for nuclear safety in Switzerland. The Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission noted good practices in the Swiss system and also made recommendations for the nation's nuclear regulatory authority, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI). ''Our team developed a good impression of the independent Swiss regulator - ENSI - and the team considered that ENSI deserves particular credit for its actions to improve Swiss safety capability following this year's nuclear accident in Japan,'' said IRRS Team Leader Jean-Christophe Niel of France. The mission's scope covered the Swiss nuclear regulatory framework for all types of nuclear-related activities regulated by ENSI. The mission was conducted from 20 November to 2 December, mainly at ENSI headquarters in Brugg. The team held extensive discussions with ENSI staff and visited many Swiss nuclear facilities. IRRS missions are peer reviews, not inspections or audits, and are conducted at the request of host nations. For the Swiss review, the IAEA assembled a team of 19 international experts from 14 countries. The experts came from Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, the Republic of Korea, Norway, Russia, Slovakia, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. ''The findings of the IRRS mission will help us to further improve our work. That is part of our safety culture,'' said ENSI Director General Hans Wanner. ''As Switzerland argued at international nuclear safety meetings this year for a strengthening of the international monitoring of nuclear power, we will take action to fulfil the recommendations.'' The IRRS team highlighted several good practices of the Swiss regulatory system, including the following: ENSI requires Swiss nuclear operators to back-fit their facilities by continuously upgrading

  4. International nuclear safety experts conclude IAEA peer review of China's regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior experts on nuclear safety regulation today completed a two-week International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) review of the governmental and regulatory framework for nuclear safety in the People's Republic of China. The team identified good practices within the system and gave advice on areas for future improvements. The IAEA has conveyed the team's main conclusions to the Government of the People's Republic of China. The final report will be submitted to China by Autumn 2010. At the request of Chinese authorities, the IAEA assembled a team of 22 experts to conduct an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. This mission is a peer review based on the IAEA Safety Standards . It is not an inspection, nor an audit. The experts came from 15 different countries: Australia, Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Japan, Pakistan, the Republic of Korea, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Ukraine and the United States. Mike Weightman, the United Kingdom's Head of Nuclear Directorate, HSE and HM Chief Inspector of Nuclear Installations said: ''I was honoured and pleased to lead such a team of senior regulatory experts from around the world, and I was impressed by their commitment, experience and hard work to provide their best advice possible. We had very constructive interactions with the Chinese authority to maximize the beneficial impact of the mission.'' The scope of the mission included the regulation of nuclear and radiation safety of the facilities and activities regulated by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA). The mission was conducted from 18 to 30 July, mainly in Beijing. To observe Chinese regulatory activities, the IRRS team visited several nuclear facilities, including a nuclear power plant, a manufacturer of safety components for nuclear power plants, a research reactor, a fuel cycle facility, a waste management facility

  5. International nuclear safety experts conclude IAEA peer review of Canada's regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts today completed a two-week IAEA review of the regulatory framework and effectiveness of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC). The team identified good practices within the system and gave advice on some areas for improvement. The IAEA has conveyed initial findings to Canadian authorities; the final report will be submitted by autumn. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a team of nuclear, radiation, and waste safety experts at the request of the Government of Canada, to conduct an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. The mission from 31 May to 12 June was a peer review based on IAEA Standards, not an inspection, nor an audit. The scope of the mission included sources, facilities and activities regulated by the CNSC: the operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs), research reactors and fuel cycle facilities; the refurbishment or licensing of new NPPs; uranium mining; radiation protection and environmental protection programmes; and the implementation of IAEA Code of Conduct on Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. The 21-member team from 13 IAEA States and from the IAEA itself reviewed CNSC's work in all relevant areas: legislative and governmental responsibilities; responsibilities and functions; organization; activities of the regulatory body, including the authorization process, review and assessment, inspection and enforcement, the development of regulations, as well as guides and its the management system of CNSC. The basis for the review was a well-prepared self-assessment by the CNSC, including an evolution of its strengths and proposed actions to improve its regulatory effectiveness. Mr. Shojiro Matsuura, IRRS Team Leader and President of the Japanese Nuclear Safety Research Association, said the team 'was impressed by the extensive preparation at all CNSC staff levels.' 'We identified a number of good practices and made recommendations and suggestions

  6. IAEA Remediation Mission to Japan Concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    classifying removed materials that do not warrant special radiation protection measures as ''radioactive waste''; - Japan is advised to consider explaining to the public the importance of focusing on radiation doses that may actually be received by people rather than on data indicating contamination levels; and - Japan is encouraged to continue its remediation efforts. In doing so, Japan is encouraged to take into account the advice provided by the Mission. The IAEA stands ready to support Japan as it considers new and appropriate criteria for such activities. The authorities and local residents in Japan fully assisted the IAEA international team in its endeavor to conclude its mission successfully. ''The team also appreciates the openness with which our discussions were conducted and the high level of cooperation and access we were granted by Japan,'' says Mr. Lentijo. ''This was an invaluable opportunity for us to learn from this important decontamination initiative. We would like to continue our support to Japan in this very challenging task. We look forward to sharing our findings with the international community.'' The final report of the mission will be presented to the Government of Japan in the next month. Background. The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant has led to elevated levels of radiation over large areas. The Government of Japan has been formulating a strategy and plans to implement countermeasures to remediate these areas. The IAEA organized an International Fact Finding Expert Mission of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Following The Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, which took place between 24 May and 2 June 2011. The mission concluded today is a follow-up to the fact-finding mission held earlier in the year and an essential component of the IAEA's Nuclear Safety Action Plan, approved by the IAEA Board of Governors on 13 September and endorsed by all 151 Member States at the recent IAEA General Conference in

  7. International IAEA Emergency Response Workshop in Fukushima Concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA workshop aimed at further strengthening nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response capabilities concluded today in Fukushima, Japan. More than 40 participants from 18 countries took part in the four-day Response and Assistance Network (RANET) workshop, which included a field exercise in areas affected following the March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. During the exercise, participants conducted radiation monitoring and environmental sampling and analysis. They measured the contamination level of the ground surface and conducted gamma spectrum analysis and vehicle-based monitoring - activities that are conducted following any nuclear or radiological incident or emergency. Results were then compared amongst participants. RANET is a network currently comprising 22 countries through which the IAEA can facilitate the provision of expert support and equipment on request under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. Pat Kenny, IAEA RANET Officer, said the workshop provided an opportunity to practice cooperation between international teams that would be deployed through RANET following an emergency. 'By bringing together so many experts from different countries in one place, the workshop helped us learn how international teams can work together to provide assistance in a nuclear or radiological emergency situation,' he said. 'It also enabled us to improve the coordination of such assistance, and it gave participants the opportunity to learn from each other.' The workshop was the first activity conducted from the IAEA RANET Capacity Building Centre, a new training centre based in the city of Fukushima that was designated earlier this week with the support of the Japanese Foreign Ministry and Fukushima Prefecture. The Centre will host RANET and other training courses, workshops and exercises aimed at enhancing nuclear emergency preparedness and response

  8. IAEA Mission Concludes Peer Review of Slovenia's Nuclear Regulatory Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Senior international nuclear safety and radiation protection experts today concluded an eight-day International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety at the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA). The team reviewed measures taken to address the recommendations and suggestions made during an earlier Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission conducted in 2011. The IRRS team said in its preliminary findings that Slovenia had made significant progress since the review in 2011. The team identified a good practice in the country's nuclear regulatory system additional to those identified in 2011 and made new recommendations and suggestions to SNSA and the Government to strengthen the effectiveness of the country's regulatory framework in line with IAEA Safety Standards. ''By hosting a follow-up mission, Slovenia demonstrated its commitment to enhance its regulatory programmes, including by implementing the recommendations of the 2011 mission,'' said Petr Krs, mission leader and Vice Chairman of the Czech Republic's State Office for Nuclear Safety. SNSA's Director, Andrej Stritar, welcomed the progress noted by the team, while also emphasizing that the mission highlighted important future nuclear safety challenges for Slovenia. The five-member review team, comprising experts from Belgium, the Czech Republic, France and Romania, as well as four IAEA staff members, conducted the mission at the request of the Slovenian Government from 9 to 16 September 2014. The main observations of the IRRS Review team included the following: SNSA has made significant progress in addressing the findings of the 2011 IRRS mission and has demonstrated commitment to effective implementation of the IRRS programme; The economic situation in Slovenia might in the short and long term affect SNSA's ability to maintain its capacity and competence; and A radioactive waste disposal project is stalled and the licensing

  9. IAEA Mission Concludes Peer Review of Pakistan's Nuclear Regulatory Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    An international team of senior nuclear safety experts today concluded a nine-day International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) mission to review the regulatory framework for the safety of operating nuclear power plants in the United States of America (USA). The Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission was a follow-up to the IRRS mission to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that was conducted in 2010, with the key additional aim of reviewing whether the response of the US regulatory regime to the implications of the accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Plant had been timely and effective. The mission team concluded that the recommendations and suggestions made by the 2010 IRRS mission have been taken into account systematically under the NRC's subsequent action plan, with significant progress in many areas and many improvements carried out. One of two recommendations and 19 out of 20 suggestions made by the 2010 IRRS mission have been effectively addressed and can therefore be considered closed. The outstanding recommendation relates to the NRC's review of its Management System, which is in the process of being finalised. The IRRS team also found that the NRC acted promptly and effectively after the Fukushima accident in the interests of public health and safety, and that the report of its Near-Term Task Force represents a sound and ample basis for taking into account the lessons learned from the accident

  10. IAEA Mission Concludes Peer Review of Jordan's Nuclear Regulatory Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Senior international nuclear safety and radiation protection experts today concluded an 11-day International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in Jordan. The mission team said in its preliminary findings that Jordan's nuclear regulator, the Energy and Minerals Regulatory Commission (EMRC), faces challenges because it is a relatively new body that handles a high workload while also working to recruit, train and keep competent staff. The team also noted that a recent merger provided the regulator with more of the resources it needs to perform its duty. The team made recommendations and suggestions to the regulatory body and the Government to help them strengthen the effectiveness of Jordan's regulatory framework and functions in line with IAEA Safety Standards. The main observations of the IRRS Review team comprised the following: The regulatory body, founded in 2007 and merged with other regulators in April 2014 to form EMRC, faces large challenges in terms of its regulatory workload, management system building and staff recruitment and training; The new EMRC structure and revision of the radiation and nuclear safety law represents an important opportunity to strengthen Jordan's radiation and nuclear safety infrastructure; The Government has shown commitment to radiation and nuclear safety through measures including becoming party to international conventions. It could further demonstrate its commitment by adopting a formal national policy and strategy for safety that defines the role of the Minister of Energy in relation to EMRC and protects the independence of regulatory decision-making

  11. IAEA Mission Concludes Peer Review of UK's Nuclear Regulatory Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Senior international nuclear safety and radiation protection experts today concluded a ten-day International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in the United Kingdom (UK). The Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission team said in its preliminary findings that the UK had made considerable progress since reviews in 2006 and 2009. It also identified good practices in the country's nuclear regulatory system. In addition to following up previous missions, a key objective was to review the effectiveness of the role of the Office of Nuclear Regulation (ONR), the UK's nuclear regulator, in ensuring the safety of radioactive waste management and decommissioning, occupational radiation protection, and public and environmental exposures, including emergency planning and response. The mission also considered the response of the UK's regulatory regime to the implications of the Fukushima Daichi accident had been timely and effective. Recommendations and suggestions were made to the ONR and the Government aimed at strengthening the effectiveness of the country's regulatory framework and functions in line with IAEA Safety Standards, the control of radioactive discharges and environmental monitoring. 'The staff of ONR is clearly dedicated to their mission to secure the protection of people and society from the hazards of the nuclear industry. I am confident that ONR will use the results of this mission to further enhance their regulatory programs', said Bill Borchardt, mission leader and former Executive Director of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). 'The staff were open and cooperative in their discussions; they provided the fullest practicable assistance, and accepted advice from the Team for continuous improvement in their regulatory work'. ONR's Chief Executive, John Jenkins, said that the full report of the IRRS mission will enhance regulatory effectiveness in the UK

  12. IAEA Concludes Safety Review at Chooz Nuclear Power Plant in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA-led international team of nuclear safety experts noted good practices and made recommendations to reinforce safety measures during a review of operational safety at France's Chooz Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) that concluded today. The Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) was assembled at the French Government's request. The in-depth review, which began 17 June, focused on aspects essential to the safe operation of the NPP. The team comprised experts from Switzerland, Belgium, Germany, China, India, United Kingdom, Czech Republic, Canada, Hungary and the IAEA. The review covered the areas of management, organization and administration; training and qualification of personnel; operations; maintenance; technical support; operating experience; radiation protection; chemistry; emergency planning and preparedness; and severe accident management. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards. The OSART team identified good plant practices that will be shared with the rest of the nuclear industry for consideration. Examples include: The plant has a professional development programme as part of a joint employment effort shared by the plant and its contractors. This enables trainees to develop professional capability, understand practices and gain experience from other nuclear power plants in terms of work planning and coordination; The plant has built a strong relationship between the on-shift response team of the plant and the local fire brigade to improve firefighting and rescue operations; Self-assessment groups discuss and resolve specific issues within operations, empowering operations personnel to take ownership of improvement programmes; and The plant has improved warnings at entrances to all o range zones , areas of elevated dose rates to which only authorized staff have access. The team identified a number of improvements to operational safety at Chooz NPP. Examples include: The plant should review its process for the

  13. IAEA concludes follow-up mission to Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA follow-up fact-finding mission to the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant in Japan has concluded from the examination of the plant's key safety areas that there was no significant damage to safety equipment from a strong earthquake last year. 'The first objective of the team has been to confirm that there appears to be no significant damage to the integrity of the plant,' said Phillipe Jamet, whose team was able to view key internal components in the plant inaccessible during their first visit in August last year. The IAEA team's site visit followed three days of open and constructive discussions with Japanese regulatory officials, the plant's operators, and other experts. The mission concluded that significant data about the earthquake has been gathered and efforts to obtain remaining information are underway. Overall interpretation of all the data will still be necessary to reach a full understanding of the 16 July 2007 earthquake and to assess the possibility of future ones. The team recommended an international cooperative effort which could expand on-going Japanese studies and make a contribution to the evolution of international safety standards. Last year's earthquake significantly exceeded the level of seismic activity for which the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa plant, in the coastal prefecture of Niigata, north-west of Tokyo, was designed. The Director General of the IAEA, Mohamed ElBaradei, said today that an international response to the earthquake is appropriate because of its relevance to other nuclear plants worldwide. He welcomed Japan's continued cooperation with the effort. The earthquake also caused fractures on the surface of the site. Before the reactors at the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) owned plant started up, between 1985 and 1997, it was acknowledged that geological faults ran deep beneath the site but were considered stable, the team said. Geologists are investigating if surface fractures caused by the earthquake

  14. Nuclear Experts Discuss IAEA Operational Safety Reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Senior nuclear experts today offered several recommendations on how the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) can further develop its operational safety review services. The IAEA hosted a technical meeting on the Evaluation of Effectiveness of Operational Safety Review Services and their Future Evolution at the Agency's headquarters in Vienna from 1 to 4 November 2011. Representatives from nuclear regulatory bodies, nuclear utilities, nuclear power plants and technical support organisations from 19 IAEA Member States and the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) took part in the meeting. It provided a platform for the exchange of information, experience and lessons learned from the operational safety review missions performed during 2008-2011. The meeting also included discussion of expectations for the future evolution of these services. ''This week's meeting demonstrated the response of the IAEA's Member States to the lessons learned from the Fukushima accident. Nations must constantly strive to improve their nuclear safety practices, and the IAEA review services provide an excellent tool to assess their progress,'' said Miroslav Lipar, head of the IAEA's Operational Safety Section. The IAEA's operational safety review services assess the operational safety performance of nuclear power plants by conducting peer reviews using the requirements of IAEA Safety Standards. The longest running safety review service, the Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme, was established in 1982 and has provided advice and assistance to Member States in 165 missions to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants during commissioning and operation. Other review services available in the area of operations evaluate operating experience feedback, safe long-term operation and safety culture. The IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety includes actions focused towards strengthening the existing IAEA peer reviews by incorporating lessons learned and improving

  15. IAEA Mission Concludes Peer Review of the US Nuclear Regulatory Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2014-01-01

    An international team of senior nuclear safety experts today concluded a nine-day International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) mission to review the regulatory framework for the safety of operating nuclear power plants in the United States of America (USA). The Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission was a follow-up to the IRRS mission to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that was conducted in 2010, with the key additional aim of reviewing whether the response of the US regulatory regime to the implications of the accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Plant had been timely and effective. The mission team concluded that the recommendations and suggestions made by the 2010 IRRS mission have been taken into account systematically under the NRC's subsequent action plan, with significant progress in many areas and many improvements carried out. One of two recommendations and 19 out of 20 suggestions made by the 2010 IRRS mission have been effectively addressed and can therefore be considered closed. The outstanding recommendation relates to the NRC's review of its Management System, which is in the process of being finalised. The IRRS team also found that the NRC acted promptly and effectively after the Fukushima accident in the interests of public health and safety, and that the report of its Near-Term Task Force represents a sound and ample basis for taking into account the lessons learned from the accident

  16. IAEA Team Concludes Peer Review of Greece's Regulatory Framework for Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior nuclear safety and radiation protection experts yesterday concluded an 11-day mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in Greece. The Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission, which was conducted at the request of the Government of the Hellenic Republic, noted good practices in the country's nuclear regulatory system and also identified issues for improvement for the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) and the Greek competent authorities. These are aimed at strengthening the effectiveness of the country's regulatory framework and functions in line with IAEA Safety Standards. ''The IRRS team enjoyed excellent cooperation from the GAEC throughout its mission,'' said Tom Ryan, mission leader and Director of Regulations and Information Management at the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland. ''The GAEC staff were very open and candid in their discussions and provided the fullest practicable assistance.'' The main observations of the IRRS Review team included: While the Greek Government's commitment to safety is being demonstrated through its actions, the development of a comprehensive national policy and strategy expressed in a consolidated statement would provide a valuable framework and guidance for future actions in terms of safety; and GAEC has effective independence. The Greek government has ensured that GAEC is effectively independent in its safety-related decision-making and that it has functional separation from entities having responsibility or interests that could unduly influence its decision making. Strengths and good practices identified by the IRRS team included: Greece actively participates in the global safety regime including all relevant safety conventions; The nation's radiation monitoring system for the detection of illicit trafficking contributes significantly to identifying potential radiation emergencies due to events within or outside the country

  17. States strengthen nuclear cooperation for new millennium. IAEA General Conference concludes in Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document gives information about the concluding session of the 43rd regular session of the IAEA's General Conference (27 September - 1 October 1999, Austria Center, Vienna), as well as about the most important steps taken during the week of conference

  18. Expert assessment concludes negative emissions scenarios may not deliver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Naomi E.; Gough, Clair

    2016-09-01

    Many integrated assessment models (IAMs) rely on the availability and extensive use of biomass energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) to deliver emissions scenarios consistent with limiting climate change to below 2 °C average temperature rise. BECCS has the potential to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, delivering ‘negative emissions’. The deployment of BECCS at the scale assumed in IAM scenarios is highly uncertain: biomass energy is commonly used but not at such a scale, and CCS technologies have been demonstrated but not commercially established. Here we present the results of an expert elicitation process that explores the explicit and implicit assumptions underpinning the feasibility of BECCS in IAM scenarios. Our results show that the assumptions are considered realistic regarding technical aspects of CCS but unrealistic regarding the extent of bioenergy deployment, and development of adequate societal support and governance structures for BECCS. The results highlight concerns about the assumed magnitude of carbon dioxide removal achieved across a full BECCS supply chain, with the greatest uncertainty in bioenergy production. Unrealistically optimistic assumptions regarding the future availability of BECCS in IAM scenarios could lead to the overshoot of critical warming limits and have significant impacts on near-term mitigation options.

  19. Nuclear Power Remains Important Energy Option for Many Countries, IAEA Ministerial Conference Concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear power remains an important option for many countries to improve energy security, provide energy for development and fight climate change, the International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Power in the 21st Century concluded today. Participants also emphasised the importance of nuclear safety in the future growth of nuclear power, noting that nuclear safety has been strengthened worldwide following the March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The Conference was organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in cooperation with the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and hosted by the Government of the Russian Federation through the State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM. Sergei Kirienko, Director General of the State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM, said: ''The Conference has achieved its main goal: to confirm that nuclear energy is an important part of the world's energy-mix. The innovative character of this type of energy provides us with sustainable development in the future. The closed nuclear fuel cycle and fusion may open for humanity absolutely new horizons. The Conference underlined the leading role of the IAEA in promoting the peaceful use of nuclear power and provision of the non-proliferation regime. Russia as a co-founder of the IAEA will always support its efforts to develop and expand safety and security standards all over the world.'' ''I believe we can look ahead with confidence and optimism to the future of nuclear power in the 21st century,'' said IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano. After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, ''effective steps have been taken to make nuclear power plants safer everywhere,'' he stressed. ''Nuclear power will make a significant and growing contribution to sustainable development in the coming decades. The IAEA is committed to ensuring that the

  20. IAEA Concludes Follow-up Review of Malaysia Rare Earth Plant IAEA Concludes Follow-up Review of Malaysia Rare Earth Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    In its preliminary observations, the follow-up mission found that good progress had been made in implementing the recommendations of the 2011 mission, and noted that the radiological risks of the Lynas plant are low because of the very low level of radioactivity of the materials handled. The team also noted that Malaysia is actively updating its regulations in accordance with the most recent IAEA safety standards. The IAEA team gave some advice for further progress in specific areas. For example: The waste management plan should be based on realistic scenarios including, if considered appropriate, the identification of a final disposal site. Environmental monitoring activities should be optimised to ensure resources are focused on the most important areas, including enhancing monitoring of liquid discharges. The basis of the financial fund to be paid by Lynas for long-term waste management and decommissioning should be communicated more clearly. The AELB and Lynas are encouraged to maintain a proactive approach to relations with the media, public and other stakeholders, on an ongoing basis, to address continuing widespread misconceptions about the plant and radiation issues in general. Rare earths are elements used in many high-technology applications, from mobile phones to wind turbines. Since the ore from which they are refined also usually contains naturally occurring radioactive materials such as thorium or uranium, the process results in very low-level radioactive waste that must be managed safely. The IAEA mission's final report will be submitted to the Malaysian government at the end of October, and will be made public

  1. IAEA Expert Remediation Mission to Japan Issues Preliminary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s international expert mission to review remediation efforts in areas affected by the Fukushima Daiichi accident concluded today with the presentation of a Preliminary Summary Report to Japan's Senior Vice-Minister of the Environment, Shinji Inoue. The Follow-up IAEA International Mission on Remediation of Large Contaminated Areas Off-site the Fukushima Daiichi NPS recognised the huge effort and enormous resources that Japan is devoting to its remediation strategies and activities, with the aim of improving living conditions for people affected by the nuclear accident and enabling evacuees to return home. The Mission Team highlighted important progress since the first IAEA remediation mission in October 2011, noted that Japan had made good use of advice from that earlier Mission, and offered fresh advice in a number of areas where it is still possible to further improve current practices, taking into account both international standards and the experience of remediation programmes in other countries. 'Japan has done an enormous amount to reduce people's radiation exposure in the affected areas, to work towards enabling evacuees to go back to their homes and to support local communities in overcoming economic and social disruption', said team leader Juan Carlos Lentijo, Director of the Division of Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology in the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy. 'The Mission Team has been really impressed by the involvement of a wide range of ministries, agencies and local authorities in driving these crucial remediation efforts'. Among the findings of the Mission, which was requested by the Japanese government and began on 14 October, the team welcomed the extensive provision of individual dosimeters so that residents can monitor their own radiation dose rates, helping to boost public confidence. Good progress has been made in the remediation of affected farmland, and comprehensive implementation of

  2. IAEA Experts to Visit Japan for Fukushima Seawater Sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Two IAEA experts will visit Japan from 8 to 14 September 2014 to collect water samples from the sea near TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, in an exercise to support high-quality gathering and analysis of radioactivity data by the responsible authorities in Japan. The visit by the experts is the first follow-up activity to the advisory points on marine monitoring included in a report by the IAEA International Peer Review Mission on Mid- and Long-Term Roadmap Towards the Decommissioning of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Units 1-4, which in late 2013 reviewed Japan's efforts to plan and implement the decommissioning of the plant. Advice from that mission included conducting interlaboratory comparisons in order to foster greater transparency and confidence in the marine monitoring results produced, as well as presenting these results to the public in a scientifically correct but understandable way. Water samples collected during the forthcoming visit will be shared between the IAEA Environment Laboratories and Japanese laboratories, and analysed independently by each. The results will then be compared to check the quality of the analyses and document the reliability and comparability of data. The IAEA and Japan are also discussing the details of their cooperation regarding marine monitoring. The IAEA runs similar exercises for analytical laboratories worldwide, to help improve analytical capabilities. Photos taken during the collection of water samples will be provided by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority. (IAEA)

  3. IAEA expert review mission completes assessment of fuel cleaning incident at Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA today completed its expert review mission to investigate the 10 April fuel cleaning incident at the Paks nuclear power plant in Hungary. The mission was requested by the Hungarian Government to provide an independent assessment of the causes and actions taken by the plant and Hungarian authorities. The team was composed of nuclear and radiation experts from the IAEA, Austria, Canada, Finland, Slovakia, the United Kingdom and the United States. In a press conference, team leader Miroslav Lipar highlighted the team's findings in five areas: On management, the team concluded that the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority and Paks are committed to improving the safety of the plant. They noted that as a result of steam generator decontamination in previous years, deposits became attached to the fuel assemblies. A decision was made to clean the fuel and contract an outside company to develop and operate a fuel cleaning process. The team found that the design and operation of the fuel cleaning tank and system was not accomplished in the manner prescribed by the IAEA Safety Standards. Neither the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority nor Paks used conservative decision-making in their safety assessments for this unproven fuel cleaning system. The team determined that there was an over-reliance on the contractor that had been selected for the design, management and operation of the fuel cleaning system. Time pressure related to a prescribed fuel outage schedule, combined with confidence generated by previous successful fuel cleaning operations, contributed to a weak assessment of a new design and operation, which involved fuel directly removed from the reactor following a planned shutdown. On regulatory oversight, the IAEA team concluded that the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority underestimated the safety significance of the proposed designs for the fuel cleaning system, which resulted in a less than rigorous review and assessment than should have been necessary

  4. Safety experts complete second IAEA regulatory review of UK nuclear regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear safety experts today concluded a 10-day mission to peer-review the UK Nuclear Regulator: Health and Safety Executive (HSE), Nuclear Directorate (ND). At the request of the UK Government, the International Atomic Energy Agency assembled a team of ten high-level regulatory experts from eight nations to conduct the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. The mission was the second of three planned IRRS missions for the United Kingdom. The first was held in March 2006 to begin a process to assess the nation's readiness to regulate and license new reactor designs, considered as a result of the Energy Policy review initiated by the British Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (DTI) in 2005. The IRRS team leader Mr. William Borchardt, Executive Director of Operations from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, stated, ''The IAEA IRRS serves an important role in both benchmarking against its safety standards and in promoting dialogue between nuclear safety regulators from around the world.'' During the 2nd mission the IRRS the team reviewed HSE/ND progress since the first IRRS mission and recent regulatory developments, the regulation of operating power plants and fuel cycle facilities, the inspection and enforcement programme for nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities, and the emergency preparedness and response programme. The IAEA found that HSE/ND has made significant progress toward improving its effectiveness in regulating existing nuclear power plants and in preparing to license new nuclear reactors designs. Many of the findings identified in the 2006 report had been fully addressed and therefore could be considered closed, the others are being addressed in accordance with a comprehensive action plan. IRRS team members visited the Heysham 1 Nuclear Power Plant near Lancaster, the Sellafield site at Cumbria and the Strategic Control Centre at Hutton, and they met senior managers from HSE and a UK

  5. Experts Complete IAEA Follow-up Review of Australia's Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear and radiation safety experts today concluded an eight-day mission to review the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), the country's nuclear regulator. At the request of the Australian Government, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a peer-review team of five regulatory experts from as many nations and three IAEA staff members to conduct a follow-up assessment of an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission conducted in 2007. This follow-up IRRS mission examined ARPANSA's progress in acting upon the recommendations and suggestions made during the 2007 IRRS mission and reviewed the areas of significant regulatory changes since that review. Both reviews covered safety regulatory aspects of all facilities and activities regulated by ARPANSA. IRRS team leader Kaare Ulbak, Chief Advisor of Denmark's National Institute of Radiation Protection, said: ''ARPANSA should be commended for the significant amount of efforts in addressing all the findings identified in the 2007 mission and for inviting this follow-up review.'' The review team found that ARPANSA has made significant progress toward improving its regulatory activities, as most of the findings identified in the 2007 report have been effectively addressed and therefore can be considered closed. Complementing the ARPANSA strengths identified during the 2007 mission, the 2011 IRRS team noted the following strengths: Response to the Tepco Fukushima Dai-ichi accident; High level of in-house technical expertise in radiation safety; Recognition of the need and willingness to re-organize ARPANSA; Timely development of the national sealed source register in good coordination with other relevant organizations; and Creation of the Australian clinical dosimetry service and the national dose reference levels database. The 2011 IRRS team also made recommendations and suggestions to further strengthen ARPANSA's regulatory system, including: Making full

  6. Experts and equipment: The IAEA programme in 1965

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    Nearly 100 projects are being assisted by Agency experts and equipment in 38 countries under the 1965 programme to be financed from Agency funds, which the Board of Governors approved at its meeting in February, together with four other countries where projects previously approved extend into 1965. In addition, further work is being financed under the UN Expanded Programme of Technical Assistance, including several important regional projects. Under the Agency's long-term programme, it is desirable that all types of technical assistance, whether training, research, or expert advice, should be combined as far as possible. Each country will therefore be asked, in respect of its 1966 programme, to make its requests for experts, equipment, fellowships, scientific visits and research grants as a single submission. The Agency then prepares a country programme of technical assistance, in collaboration with the Government. The number of requests for experts and equipment continues to grow year by year, and it has not been possible to finance them all. This increase is largely because a number of Member States have now set up research reactors and established a nucleus of laboratories under bilateral arrangements; they then turn to the Agency for assistance in developing their programmes. The estimated cost of experts and equipment being provided from Agency resources is $874 000 in 1965, of which $596 800 is for experts, and $277 200 is for equipment and supplies. The Agency also assists some Member States in making arrangements to receive technical assistance directly from other Member States. The work covers a wide range, with isotopes predominating; about 30 projects deal with production of isotopes, their applications in medicine, agriculture and hydrology, in food preservation and industry. A number of projects are concerned with various aspects of reactor construction and use; others deal with health and safety, instrumentation, special branches of chemistry and

  7. Nuclear Experts Complete IAEA Follow-up Review of German Regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear safety experts concluded a seven-day mission to review the German Regulatory System, conducted from 4-10 September in Bonn, Stuttgart and Berlin. At the request of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany, the International Atomic Energy Agency assembled a peer-review team of six high-level regulatory experts from six nations (Finland, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the UK, the US and three IAEA senior staff members) to conduct a follow-up assessment of an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission conducted in 2008. This follow-up IRRS mission examined the progress in acting upon the recommendations and suggestions made during the 2008 IRRS mission and reviewed the areas of significant regulatory changes since that review at both the Federal Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) and the Ministry of Environment of the federal state of Baden-Wurttemberg (UM BW). The first mission reviewed Germany's regulatory framework against IAEA Safety Standards and fostered the exchange of information and experience on safety regulation. This is a peer review based on IAEA Standards. It is not an inspection, nor an audit. The scope of the mission was limited to the safety regulation of nuclear power plants. IRRS team leader, Mr. McCree, of the US Nuclear Safety Commission (USNRC), said, ''This was an important IRRS mission, particularly given the recent Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident and the related insights which underscore the importance of having an independent, credible nuclear safety regulator.'' ''The IRRS team identified several strengths of the German nuclear safety regulators, including the prompt and coordinated incident response activities of BMU and UM BW to the Fukushima accident. Some suggestions were also made to further strengthen nuclear safety regulations concerning the future work of BMU,'' he said. The review team found that important progress has been made toward

  8. IAEA Expert Team Completes Mission to Review Japan's Nuclear Power Plant Safety Assessment Process, 31 January 2012, Tokyo, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A team of international nuclear safety experts today completed a review of Japan's two-stage process for assessing nuclear safety at the nation's nuclear power plants. The team began its work on 23 January and delivered a Preliminary Summary Report to Japanese officials today and plans to finish the final report by the end of February. National safety assessments and their peer review by the IAEA are a key component of the IAEA's Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was approved by the Agency's 152 Member States following last year's nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. At the request of the Government of Japan, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a 10-person team to review the Japanese Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency's (NISA) approach to the Comprehensive Assessments for the Safety of Existing Power Reactor Facilities and how NISA examines the results submitted by nuclear operators. The IAEA safety review mission consisted of five IAEA and three international nuclear safety experts. To help its review, the team held meetings in Tokyo with officials from NISA, the Japanese Nuclear Energy Safety (JNES) Organization, and the Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO), and the team visited the Ohi Nuclear Power Station to see an example of how Japan's Comprehensive Safety Assessment is being implemented by nuclear operators. 'We concluded that NISA's instructions to power plants and its review process for the Comprehensive Safety Assessments are generally consistent with IAEA Safety Standards', said team leader James Lyons, director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division. In its Preliminary Summary Report delivered today, the team highlighted a number of good practices and identified some improvements that would enhance the overall effectiveness of the Comprehensive Safety Assessment process. Good practices identified by the mission team include: Based on NISA instructions and commitments of the

  9. IAEA Completes Expert Mission to Kori 1 Nuclear Power Plant in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has completed a review of safety practices at the Kori 1 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) near Busan in the Republic of Korea. The IAEA assembled the team at the request of Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) following a station blackout event on 9 February 2012. The team - comprised of experts from Belgium, France, Sweden, United Kingdom and the IAEA - conducted its mission from 4 to 11 June 2012 under the leadership of the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety. The expert mission applied the methodology of the IAEA's Operational Safety Review (OSART) missions and covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Operations; Maintenance and Operating Experience. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards, which are developed by the Agency to help nations improve their nuclear safety practices, which are the responsibility of every nation that undertakes nuclear-related activities. Throughout the review, the exchange of information between the experts and plant personnel was very open, professional and productive. Prior to the mission, Korea's Nuclear Safety and Security Commission completed an interim investigation, and it continues to perform additional investigations and technical reviews. The Commission identified corrective actions for the plant concerning reinforcing safety culture, emergency diesel generator reliability, configuration control and risk management during refueling outage, test and maintenance procedures and emergency action level declaration. The expert mission confirmed that some corrective actions have already been completed and others are in progress. The expert mission found the management and staff of Kori 1 NPP to be committed and working hard to complete all improvements. The root cause analysis of the event at Kori 1 NPP is still in progress and is expected to lead to

  10. International nuclear safety experts complete IAEA peer review of German regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: An international expert team has today completed a two-week IAEA review of Germany's nuclear regulatory system. The team identified good practices within the system and gave advice on some areas for further improvement. The IAEA has conveyed the initial findings to German authorities but the final report will be submitted within two months. At the request of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a team of 14 experts to conduct an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. This is a peer review based on IAEA Standards. It is not an inspection, nor an audit. The scope of the mission was limited to the safety regulation of nuclear power plants. Experts from Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Republic of Korea, Spain, Switzerland, the UK, the US and from the IAEA took part in the mission, which was conducted from 7 to 19 September in Bonn, Stuttgart and Berlin. The main basis for the review was a well-prepared self-assessment made by the Federal Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) and the Ministry of Environment of the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg (UM BW). 'The team members were impressed by the extensive preparation and dedication of the staff both at BMU and UM BW to excellence in nuclear safety,' said Mike Weightman, IRRS Team Leader and Chief Inspector of the UK nuclear regulatory body, the Nuclear Directorate of the Health and Safety Executive. 'We hope the IRRS mission will facilitate further improvements in the safety regulation of nuclear power in Germany and throughout the world.' 'Germany's invitation to undergo such a detailed review is a clear demonstration of its openness and commitment to continuously improve nuclear safety regulation,' said Philippe Jamet, Director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division. Among the particular strengths of BMU and UM BW associated with their

  11. High-level panel of experts to recommend future course for IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A high-level panel of experts, charged by IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei with making an assessment of the challenges the IAEA will face up to the year 2020 and beyond, holds its initial meetings in Vienna 25 - 26 February. The Commission of Eminent Persons, under the chairmanship of former Mexican President, Ernesto Zedillo, includes 18 senior international figures, and will make recommendations on ways in which the Agency can prepare to meet its expanding workload. The Commission's findings are intended to stimulate further discussion - among Member States, between the States and the IAEA Secretariat, and by the broader public - about the future of the Agency and how best it can contribute in the coming years to the efforts of the international community to achieve development, peace and security, said IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei. The members of the Commission are: Dr. Ernesto Zedillo (Chairman) - Director of the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization; former President of Mexico; Ambassador Oluyemi Adeniji - former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Nigeria; former Member of the Board of Governors of the IAEA; Lakhdar Brahimi - Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey; former UN Under-Secretary-General, Special Adviser to the Secretary-General, and Chair of the Panel on UN Peace Operations; Lajos Bokros - Professor of Economics and Public Policy, and Chief Operating Officer of the Central European University, Budapest, Hungary; Dr. Rajagopala Chidambaram - Principal Scientific Advisor to the Government of India; DAE Homi Bhabha Professor; former Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission; former Director of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre; Senator Lamberto Dini - President of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the Italian Senate; Gareth Evans - President and Chief Executive Officer, International Crisis Group, Brussels; former Australian Foreign Minister 1988-1998; former Minister for Resources and

  12. Concluding Address

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Giovannelli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Before I offcially conclude this workshop - far be it from me to attempt to compete with some concluding remarks already delivered at the meeting with various levels of passion by Gennady Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Giulio Auriemma and Sergio Colafrancesco - I would like to comment on some of the highlights emerging from our fruitful week of discussions about Multifrequency Behaviour of High Energy Cosmic Sources, without any pretension of completeness.

  13. Concluding remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, H.

    2007-01-01

    This document provides the speech presented by Hideki Nariai on May 2007 at the workshop on transparency of nuclear regulatory activities. It aims to propose concluding remarks concerning nuclear safety and the necessity to be transparent to the general public. (A.L.B.)

  14. Concluding remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    This section contains the concluding remarks of the workshop on rock mechanics issues in repository design and performance assessment. Technical issues such as spatial variability of rock properties, rock mass strength, measurement of loads, evaluation of long-term seal performance, and integration of data into design were discussed. Programmatic issues such as development of a coherent and consistent design methodology and implementation of that methodology were also reiterated

  15. Concluding remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, E.

    1989-05-01

    The workshop has covered in a very interesting and complete way the basic physics issues to be addressed by the complementary facilities, in Canada and Japan, intended to explore the intensity-frontier of strong-interaction physics. Japan has its new KEK facilities and its future Japanese Hadron Project (JHP): Canada has its present TRIUMF laboratory and its future KAON Factory. Both JHP and KAON appear very near to final construction approval. The possibilities are very great for new joint programs between the two countries which can lead the world in the new strong interaction physics. These concluding remarks describe the general science basis and particularly the models for the internationalization of science needed to make these new collaborations thrive

  16. Multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle. Expert group report to the Director General of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    An international expert group has been appointed to consider options for possible multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle. The terms of reference for the Expert Group were to: 1)Identify and provide an analysis of issues and options relevant to multilateral approaches to the front and back ends of the nuclear fuel cycle; 2)Provide an overview of the policy, legal, security, economic and technological incentives and disincentives for cooperation in multilateral arrangements for the front and back ends of the nuclear fuel cycle; and 3)Provide a brief review of the historical and current experience in this area, and of the various analyses relating to multilateral fuel cycle arrangements relevant to the work of the Expert Group. The Group examined the nuclear fuel cycle and multinational approaches at meetings convened over a seven month period. Their report, presented in the paper, was released on 22 February 2005, and circulated for discussion among the IAEA Member States, as well as others, as an IAEA Information Circular (INFCIRC/640)

  17. Use of PET and PET/CT for radiation therapy planning: IAEA expert report 2006-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacManus, Michael; Nestle, Ursula; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Carrio, Ignasi; Messa, Cristina; Belohlavek, Otakar; Danna, Massimo; Inoue, Tomio; Deniaud-Alexandre, Elizabeth; Schipani, Stefano; Watanabe, Naoyuki; Dondi, Maurizio; Jeremic, Branislav

    2009-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a significant advance in cancer imaging with great potential for optimizing radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning and thereby improving outcomes for patients. The use of PET and PET/CT in RT planning was reviewed by an international panel. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized two synchronized and overlapping consultants' meetings with experts from different regions of the world in Vienna in July 2006. Nine experts and three IAEA staff evaluated the available data on the use of PET in RT planning, and considered practical methods for integrating it into routine practice. For RT planning, (18)F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was the most valuable pharmaceutical. Numerous studies supported the routine use of FDG-PET for RT target volume determination in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). There was also evidence for utility of PET in head and neck cancers, lymphoma and in esophageal cancers, with promising preliminary data in many other cancers. The best available approach employs integrated PET/CT images, acquired on a dual scanner in the radiotherapy treatment position after administration of tracer according to a standardized protocol, with careful optimization of images within the RT planning system and carefully considered rules for contouring tumor volumes. PET scans that are not recent or were acquired without proper patient positioning should be repeated for RT planning. PET will play an increasing valuable role in RT planning for a wide range of cancers. When requesting PET scans, physicians should be aware of their potential role in RT planning.

  18. Do Good Without Causing Undue Harm. Experts Tackle Patient Radiation Safety During IAEA's Scientific Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, Sasha

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, about four billion X-ray exams, 35 million nuclear medicine exams and eight million radiation therapy treatment courses are undertaken each year. With millions exposed to ionizing radiation for medical purposes, and developing countries acquiring more machines to treat and diagnose cancer, the safety of patients is an ever-increasing concern. During the IAEA´s Scientific Forum, cancer experts and regulators put their heads together to explore the problems and possible solutions relating to the safe and appropriate use of new radiation medicine technology in developed and developing countries

  19. Synthesis of the report from the IRRS evaluation mission performed at the ASN in April 2009 by 12 international experts under the IAEA coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    At the request of the Government authorities of France, an international team of 24 experts visited the Autorite de Surete Nucleaire (ASN), the French regulatory authority for nuclear and radiation safety, in November 2006 to conduct the first full scope Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. The purpose of the mission was to undertake a peer review of the regulatory body of France against the IAEA Safety Standards and to exchange information and experience on safety regulation. In March 2008 the Government authorities of France requested a follow-up mission to review the measures undertaken following the recommendations and suggestions presented in the report of the November 2006 IRRS mission. The scope of the IRRS follow-up mission covered the regulatory aspects of the facilities and practices regulated by ASN, nuclear power plants, research reactors, fuel cycle facilities, medical practices with further review of radiotherapy, industrial and research activities, waste facilities, decommissioning, remediation, public information and communication and, in addition, it was also extended to cover the application of the Code of Conduct of Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. The review was conducted from March 29 to April 3 2009 by an IRRS team consisting of 12 senior regulatory experts from 11 Member States, two staff members from the IAEA, one IAEA observer and an IAEA administrative assistant. During the review the team recognized that ASN has taken a number of initiatives to improve its effectiveness and efficiency and that ASN faces new challenges. ASN supplied a package of documentation and a well prepared self-assessment, in advance of the mission, including a status report and an action plan to improve its regulatory effectiveness. Both regulatory technical and policy issues were addressed. The policy issues discussed were: regulatory independence, the relationship between ASN and IRSN and medical issues. The IRRS follow-up mission

  20. The IAEA and non-proliferation: is quiescence progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herron, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current status of more important non-proliferation aspects affecting or involving the IAEA. The questions dealt with cover in particular the Non-Proliferation Treaty, the Tlatelolco Treaty, the Committee on Assurances of Supply established by the IAEA in 1980 and the International Plutonium Storage Study prepared by an IAEA expert group. The author concludes that in a number of areas involving this Agency, recent considerable activity at both political and technical levels has produced few tangible results althrough the situation is not static. (NEA) [fr

  1. IAEA RANET Capacity Building Centre in Fukushima Begins Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The designation of the IAEA Response and Assistance Network (RANET) Capacity Building Centre, which will coordinate several training activities related to nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response, was marked with a ceremony today. Ambassador Shin Maruo, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Masao Uchibori, Deputy Governor of Fukushima Prefecture, and Elena Buglova, IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre Head, delivered remarks during the ceremony. The Centre will be home to training courses, workshops and exercises aimed at enhancing nuclear emergency preparedness and response capacity, both in Japan and worldwide, in light of the March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The Centre is supported by the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) and Fukushima Prefecture. The first activity in the Centre, an IAEA RANET Workshop, will start tomorrow and conclude on 31 May 2013. More than 40 experts from 18 countries will participate in the workshop, which will involve a field exercise in Fukushima Prefecture. During this exercise, participants will conduct radiation monitoring and environmental sampling and analysis. They will monitor beta and gamma dose rate, the contamination level of the ground surface and conduct gamma spectrum analysis and vehicle-based monitoring. Through RANET, the IAEA can mobilize the provision of expert support and equipment by request under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. The Centre forms part of the IAEA's work to further strengthen international emergency preparedness and response, as guided by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety which was unanimously endorsed by IAEA Member States in September 2011. ''Working together, the IAEA's Member States have already made significant progress in this area, but we can never stop working to improve it further , Ms. Buglova said at the ceremony. T hrough efforts here at the IAEA RANET Capacity

  2. IAEA Director General to Visit Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano will travel to Tehran on 10 November 2013 to meet senior Iranian leaders on Monday, 11 November 2013, with the aim of strengthening dialogue and cooperation. Separately, as previously announced, IAEA and Iranian experts will meet in Tehran on Monday to discuss technical issues. IAEA)

  3. Lessons learned from IAEA fire safety missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    The IAEA has conducted expert missions to evaluate fire safety at the following nuclear power plants: the Zaporozhe plant in the Ukraine, the Borselle plant in the Netherlands, the Medzamor plant in Armenia, the Karachi plant in Pakistan, the Temelin plant in the Czech Republic, and the Laguna Verde plant in Mexico. The scope of these missions varied in subject and depth. The teams sent from the IAEA consisted of external fire experts and IAEA staff. All the missions were of great use to the host countries. The participating experts also benefited significantly. A summary of the missions and their findings is given. (author)

  4. IAEA safeguards for geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    In September. 1988, the IAEA held its first formal meeting on the safeguards requirements for the final disposal of spent fuel and nuclear material-bearing waste. The consensus recommendation of the 43 participants from 18 countries at this Advisory Group Meeting was that safeguards should not terminate of spent fuel even after emplacement in, and closure of, a geologic repository.' As a result of this recommendation, the IAEA initiated a series of consultants' meetings and the SAGOR Programme (Programme for the Development of Safeguards for the Final Disposal of Spent Fuel in Geologic Repositories) to develop an approach that would permit IAEA safeguards to verify the non-diversion of spent fuel from a geologic repository. At the end of this process, in December 1997, a second Advisory Group Meeting, endorsed the generic safeguards approach developed by the SAGOR Programme. Using the SAGOR Programme results and consultants' meeting recommendations, the IAEA Department of Safeguards issued a safeguards policy paper stating the requirements for IAEA safeguards at geologic repositories. Following approval of the safeguards policy and the generic safeguards approach, the Geologic Repository Safeguards Experts Group was established to make recommendations on implementing the safeguards approach. This experts' group is currently making recommendations to the IAEA regarding the safeguards activities to be conducted with respect to Finland's repository programme. (author)

  5. The IAEA at work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    Fifty years ago, Dwight Eisenhower stood before the United Nations to offer both a warning and a vision. The knowledge to build an atomic bomb was in the hands of rival powers and would soon be shared by many countries, the President said. It was time to create a U.N. body that could ensure that the new technology served no military purpose. It was time, moreover, to 'devise methods whereby this fissionable material would be allocated to serve the peaceful pursuits of mankind' in agriculture, medicine and other peaceful activities. Eisenhower foresaw a world safe from the destructive power of atomic fission but gaining from its technological advances. Half a century later, the world continues to witness his foresight through the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The IAEA aims at four formidable goals: safeguarding nuclear nonproliferation; enhancing the security of nuclear facilities and radioactive materials; ensuring the safety of nuclear technologies; and promoting nuclear science to meet human needs. As the world's 'nuclear watchdog,' the IAEA's impartial inspectorate verifies the peaceful uses of nuclear energy in scores of countries. By joining the Agency's strengthened safeguards system and concluding an Additional Protocol, countries can assure the world-and the IAEA can verify-that their nuclear activities are not used for weapons purposes. True to Eisenhower's vision, the power of the atom is being tapped for many human benefits, especially in the world's less developed nations. Extreme poverty remains a profound problem today: some 1.2 billion people in the developing world survive marginally on less that US$1 per day. Another 2.8 billion struggle on less than US$2 per day. The IAEA is mobilizing nuclear science to help address these pressing needs. From managing water better, to controlling pests and diseases, to protecting the environment, the IAEA is helping poor countries make sizeable advances. At the same time, the IAEA works

  6. Expert assessment concludes negative emissions scenarios may not deliver

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Naomi E; Gough, Clair

    2016-01-01

    Many integrated assessment models (IAMs) rely on the availability and extensive use of biomass energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) to deliver emissions scenarios consistent with limiting climate change to below 2 °C average temperature rise. BECCS has the potential to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, delivering ‘negative emissions’. The deployment ofBECCS at the scale assumed in IAM scenarios is highly uncertain: biomass energy is commonly used but not at such a sca...

  7. IAEA introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Physics Section supports the IAEA Member States regarding utilization of: Accelerators; Research reactors; Cross-cutting material research; Controlled fusion. The activities in the field of material science include studies of present NPP structural materials; investigation of degradation mechanisms and contribution to research programs of new materials, as well as education and training activities. The Section is participating in the coordinated research projects 'Accelerator Simulation and Theoretical Modeling of Radiation Effects' (Jointly NA-NE) and 'Benchmarking of advanced materials pre-selected for innovative nuclear reactors' (Jointly NA and NE)

  8. IAEA Completes Nuclear Security Review Mission in United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: A team of nuclear security experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today completed a mission to review nuclear security practices of civil nuclear facilities licensed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Conducted at the U.S. Government's request, the two-week International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) mission reviewed the United States' nuclear security-related legislative and regulatory framework. As part of this work, the IPPAS team, led by John O'Dacre of Canada and comprising nine experts from eight IAEA Member States, met with NRC officials and reviewed the physical protection systems at the Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The IPPAS team concluded that nuclear security within the U.S. civil nuclear sector is robust and sustainable and has been significantly enhanced in recent years. The team identified a number of good practices in the nation's nuclear security regime and at the NCNR. The IPPAS team also made a recommendation and some suggestions for the continuing improvement of nuclear security overall. The mission in the United States was the 60th IPPAS mission organized by the IAEA. 'Independent international peer reviews such as IAEA IPPAS missions are increasingly being recognized for their value as a key component for exchanges of views and advice on nuclear security measures', said Khammar Mrabit, Director of the IAEA Office of Nuclear Security. 'The good practices identified during this mission will contribute to the continuous improvements of nuclear security in other Member States'. The IPPAS team provided a draft report to the NRC and will submit a final report soon. Because it contains security-related information about a specific nuclear site, IPPAS reports are not made public. 'The IPPAS programme gives us a chance to learn from the experience and perspective of our international partners', said NRC Chairman Allison M

  9. Concluding Remarks | Ewing | Rwanda Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rwanda Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Concluding Remarks. Helen Ewing. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text:.

  10. Directory of IAEA databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The first edition of the Directory of IAEA Databases is intended to describe the computerized information sources available to IAEA staff members. It contains a listing of all databases produced at the IAEA, together with information on their availability

  11. IAEA Leads Operational Safety Mission to Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency today concluded a review of the safety practices at the Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) near Bern in Switzerland. The team noted a series of good practices and made recommendations and suggestions to reinforce them. The IAEA assembled the Operational Safety Review Team at the request of the Swiss government. The team, led by the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, performed an in-depth operational safety review from 8 to 25 October 2012. The team comprised experts from Belgium, the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Slovakia, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States as well as experts from the IAEA. The team conducted an in-depth review of the aspects essential to the safe operation of the Muehleberg NPP. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards and proven good international practices. The review covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Training; Operations; Maintenance; Technical Support; Operating Experience; Radiation Protection; Chemistry, Emergency Planning and Preparedness, Severe Accident Management and Long-Term Operation. The OSART team made 10 recommendations and 11 suggestions related to areas where operations of Muehleberg NPP could be further improved, for example: - Plant management could improve the operating experience program and methods throughout the plant to ensure corrective actions are taken in a timely manner; - In the area of Long-Term Operation, the ageing management review for some systems and components is not complete and the environmental qualification of originally installed safety cables has not yet been revalidated for long-term operation; and - The plant provisions for the protection of persons on the site during an emergency with radioactive release can be improved to minimize health risks to plant personnel. The team also identified 10 good

  12. IAEA Completes Nuclear Security Review Mission in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: A team of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) experts today completed a mission to review nuclear security practices in Hungary. At the request of the Government of Hungary, the IAEA conducted the two-week International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) mission that reviewed the nation's nuclear security-related legislative and regulatory framework, physical protection systems at Hungarian nuclear facilities, and security arrangements applied to the transport of nuclear and radioactive materials. The IAEA team was led by Stephen Ortiz of the United States and included nine experts from six nations and the IAEA. The team met in Budapest with officials from the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority, Hungarian Police Headquarters, National Security Authority and other relevant agencies. They also conducted site visits to the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, the Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility, the Budapest Research Reactor, the Budapest Training Reactor, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility and several other locations where high activity radioactive sources are used for different applications. ''At a time where development of a nuclear power programme is more than ever recognised as necessitating a strong commitment to safety, security and sustainability, the example given today by Hungary strengthens the message about the value of applying the IAEA Security Guidance,'' said IAEA Deputy Director General for Nuclear Safety and Security, Denis Flory, who opened the mission. ''Indeed, IPPAS missions, carried out at the appropriate time in the development of a nuclear power programme, provide valuable insights into how best to reach that goal.'' The IPPAS team concluded that nuclear security within Hungary has been significantly enhanced in recent years. The team also identified a number of good practices at the nation's nuclear facilities, and provided some recommendations and suggestions to assist Hungary in the continuing

  13. 30th IAEA general conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the spring of 1986, the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have been characterized mainly by the major reactor accident of Chernobyl and its consequences. Already at its meeting on May 21, 1986, the IAEA Board of Governors had found a need for intensified international cooperation in the field of reactor safety and begun preparing agreements on an international early warning system and on mutual emergency assistance. The agreements were drafted by government experts at the head office of the Agency between July 21 and August 8, 1986. The post-accident review meeting on the Chernobyl accident was held in Vienna on August 25-29, 1986. It was attended by more than 500 experts from 62 countries and 21 national and international organizations to evaluate the accident on the basis of the Soviet report. The first extraordinary meeting of the IAEA general conference was held on September 24-26, 1986 to deal with problems of international cooperation in the field of reactor safety. The special meeting was followed by the 30th IAEA general conference on September 29 - October 3, 1986. By October 27, 1986, a total of 58 states had signed the Convention on Early Warning, which entered into force on that day. The Convention on Assistance, which was also open for signature during the extraordinary meeting on September 26, 1986, had been signed by 57 states by October 27, 1986. The Federal Republic of Germany is among the signatories to both conventions. (orig.)

  14. Newsbriefs www.iaea.org. January 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In this newsbrief the topics covered include: categories of risk, nuclear materials, nuclear facilities, and radioactive sources; a special session of IAEA experts meeting on the subject; financing the prevention of terrorism; nuclear security discussed by the IAEA Board of Governors; technical cooperation for security; use of electron beam scanning for mail safety; sustainable development; radioactive waste management; health programs in Latin America; landmine cleanup; clean water programmes

  15. IAEA Completes Nuclear Security Review Mission in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Full text: A team of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) experts today completed a mission to review national nuclear security practices in the Republic of Korea. At the request of the Government of the ROK, the IAEA conducted a two-week International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) mission that reviewed the nation's nuclear security-related legislative and regulatory framework for nuclear and other radioactive material and associated facilities, as well as security arrangements applied to the transport of nuclear material and radioactive sources, and to computer systems. In addition, the team reviewed physical protection systems at the Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), operated by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP), and at the High-Flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor (HANARO), operated by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The IPPAS team concluded that Korea is working well to conduct strong and sustainable nuclear security activities. Moreover, the team identified a number of good practices in the national nuclear security regime, and at the visited facilities. The team also made recommendations and suggestions for continuous improvement in nuclear security. The IAEA team was led by Joseph Sandoval, a staff member at the Sandia National Laboratories in the United States, and it included eight experts from six nations and the IAEA. The team met in Daejeon with officials from the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), representatives of the Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Control (KINAC), the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), KAERI, and the Korea Electric Power Corporation Nuclear Fuel (KEPCO NF). They conducted site visits to the Hanbit NPP, the HANARO research reactor, the irradiation facility at KAERI's Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI), and the KHNP Cyber Security Center. ''Successful development of a nuclear power programme necessitates a strong commitment to

  16. IAEA safeguard system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontes, B.C.

    1987-01-01

    The intents of IAEA safeguards, analysing into the IAEA statutes, are presented. The different types of safeguard agreements; the measurements of accounting, containment and caution used by the operator and; the information to be provided and the verification to be developed by IAEA are described. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. IAEA TECDOC 055 Outline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, Doug [Gregg Protection Services, Palm Beach Gardens, FL (United States)

    2015-07-13

    An outline of suggestions for updating a version of IAEA-TECDOC-1276 is provided. This update will become IAEA-TECDOC-055, titled ''IAEA handbook for designing and implementing physical protection systems for nuclear material and nuclear facilities.''

  18. IAEA activities on nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basak, U.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a brief description and the main objectives of IAEA Programme B on Nuclear fuel cycle are given. The following Coordinated Research Projects: 1) FUel performance at high burn-up and in ageing plant by management and optimisation of WAter Chemistry Technologies (FUWAC ); 2) Near Term and Promising Long Term Options for Deployment of Thorium Based Nuclear Energy; 3) Fuel Modelling (FUMEX-III) are shortly described. The data collected by the IAEA Expert Group of Fuel Failures in Water Cooled Reactors including information about fuel failure cause for PWR (1994-2006) and failure mechanisms for BWR fuel (1994-2006) are shown. The just published Fuel Failure Handbook as well as preparation of a Monograph on Zirconium including an overview of Zirconium for nuclear applications are presented. The current projects in Sub-programme B2 - Power Reactor Fuel Engineering are also listed

  19. IAEA supports regional seas conventions and action plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document informs about the 3rd Global Meeting of Regional Seas Conventions and Action Plans held in Monaco in November 2000 at the IAEA's Marine Environmental Laboratory (IAEA-MEL). The meeting assembled a number of marine environmental experts from several UN bodies to reinforce activities to protect the marine environment

  20. Finnish support programme to IAEA safeguards. Annual report 1994; Suomen tukiohjelma IAEA:n safeguards-valvonnalle. Vuoden 1994 toimintakertomus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, M. [ed.

    1995-05-01

    Implementation of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards (FINSP) during the calender year in question is summarized. FINSP is carried out trough separate tasks concentrating on verification of nuclear material, training and expert services to the IAEA. In addition to the Finnish summary, the report includes detailed description of each task in English.

  1. IAEA Clarification on Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Director General Amano has been quoted in a news story as saying today that a site in Syria allegedly destroyed by Israel was a nuclear reactor under construction. The Director General did not say that the IAEA has reached the conclusion that the site was definitely a nuclear reactor. The IAEA continues to seek further information on the nature of the Dair Alzour site. (IAEA)

  2. Now and future of IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Tomihiro; Omoto, Akira; Ichimura, Tomoya

    2005-01-01

    IAEA was established in 1957. Main activities consist of safeguards, cooperation of technologies and safety security. It has six sections such as the cooperation of technologies, nuclear energy, safety standards and security, nuclear science and its application, selfguards and management. Eleven Japanese are working in it and they .reported the present activities, problems and the future. Their subjects contain the problems of IAEA and expectation to Japanese, the utilization of nuclear energy, increasing nuclear safety and security in the world, application of radiation and isotope technologies, change and prospect of cooperation of technologies, and non-proliferation and safeguards. It was concluded as a first country holding many nuclear facilities that Japan had not nuclear materials and development activity in hiding and did not transform nuclear fuels reported to weapons. Accordingly, Japan is expected to make effort leading nuclear use for peace and non-proliferation in the world. (S.Y.)

  3. Clear progress in nuclear safety worldwide: Convention on nuclear safety concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    It has been concluded that a significant progress has been observed in a number of key areas, such as strengthened legislation, regulatory independence, the availability of financial resources, enhanced emergency preparedness and safety improvements at nuclear power plants built to earlier standards. The objective of the Convention is to achieve and maintain a high level of nuclear safety worldwide. During the two week Review Meeting, parties engaged in a 'peer review' process in which the National Reports from individual States were collectively examined and discussed, with written replies provided to all the questions raised. Clear improvement was noted in the quality of the National Reports, the number of questions and the openness and quality of discussion and answers. The Contracting Parties praised the IAEA's various safety review missions and services, which they use widely to help enhance the effectiveness of their national safety arrangements. Forty-six contracting parties participated at the Review Meeting with over 400 delegates attending, including many heads and senior officers from regulatory bodies and experts from industry. To date, the Convention has been signed by sixty-five States and ratified by fifty-four, representing 428 of the 448 nuclear power reactors worldwide

  4. IAEA Remediation Mission Issues Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A team of international experts today completed their assessment of the strategy and plans being considered by the Japanese authorities to remediate the areas off-site TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Their Final Report, delivered to the Japanese authorities, is available here. ''A lot of good work, done at all levels, is on-going in Japan in the area of environmental remediation,'' said Juan Carlos Lentijo, Team Leader and General Director for Radiation Protection at Spain's nuclear regulatory authority. In the report, Japan is encouraged to continue its remediation efforts, taking into account the advice provided by the Mission. ''In the early phases of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, a very cautious approach was adopted by the Japanese authorities in terms of dealing with the handling of residue materials. It is considered right to do so,'' Lentijo said. ''However, at this point in time, we see that there is room to take a more balanced approach, focussing on the real priority areas, classifying residue materials and adopting appropriate remediation measures on the basis of the results of safety assessments for each specific situation.'' The IAEA stands ready to support Japan as it continues its efforts to remediate the environment in the area off-site the Fukushima Daiichi NPP. The IAEA sent the mission to Japan from 7 to 15 October 2011 following a request from the country's government. The mission, comprising 12 international and IAEA experts from several countries, visited numerous locations in the Fukushima Prefecture and conducted meetings in Tokyo and Fukushima with Japanese officials from several ministries and institutions. A Preliminary Summary Report was issued on 14 October. Background The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP has led to elevated levels of radiation over large areas. The Government of Japan has been formulating a strategy and plans to implement countermeasures to remediate these areas. The IAEA

  5. IAEA Monitors Marine Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha; Kaiser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA assists Member States in using scientific tools to precisely identify and track nuclear and nonnuclear contaminants, as well as to investigate their biological effects on the marine ecosystem

  6. IAEA Completes Nuclear Security Review Mission in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    A team of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) experts today completed a two-week mission to review nuclear security practices in Indonesia. At the request of the Indonesian Government, the IAEA conducted an International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) mission that reviewed the current status of the State's Physical Protection Regime of nuclear and other radioactive material, as well as associated facilities and activities in Indonesia. This included the country's nuclear security-related legislative and regulatory framework and the physical protection systems at the nuclear research sites in Serpong, Bandung and Yogyakarta, as well as radioactive facilities at Bekasi and Cibitung. The mission also reviewed how the recommendations of previous IPPAS missions in 2001 and 2007 had been implemented. The IPPAS team concluded that, since the last missions, Indonesia has improved its national security regime, especially its legislation and regulations, and had introduced new physical protection equipment. It also found that areas remained that required attention and efforts were needed to reach an overall comprehensive and effective nuclear security regime. The team made a number of new recommendations and suggestions aimed at further strengthening the overall regime

  7. IAEA Nuclear Security Human Resource Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunegger-Guelich, A.

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA is at the forefront of international efforts to strengthen the world's nuclear security framework. The current Nuclear Security Plan for 2006-2009 was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors in September 2005. This Plan has three main points of focus: needs assessment, prevention, detection and response. Its overall objective is to achieve improved worldwide security of nuclear and other radioactive material in use, storage and transport, and of their associated facilities. This will be achieved, in particular, through the provision of guidelines and recommendations, human resource development, nuclear security advisory services and assistance for the implementation of the framework in States, upon request. The presentation provides an overview of the IAEA nuclear security human resource development program that is divided into two parts: training and education. Whereas the training program focuses on filling gaps between the actual performance of personnel working in the area of nuclear security and the required competencies and skills needed to meet the international requirements and recommendations described in UN and IAEA documents relating to nuclear security, the Educational Program in Nuclear Security aims at developing nuclear security experts and specialists, at fostering a nuclear security culture and at establishing in this way sustainable knowledge in this field within a State. The presentation also elaborates on the nuclear security computer based learning component and provides insights into the use of human resource development as a tool in achieving the IAEA's long term goal of improving sustainable nuclear security in States. (author)

  8. IAEA Yearbook 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The IAEA Yearbook 1995 concentrates on developments in nuclear science and technology and on the work of the IAEA during the previous year, but it also records major events which took place during the early months of the current year. One such event was the holding in New York of the Review and Extension Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. Further details regarding recent changes and future developments in IAEA safeguards are given in Part E of the Yearbook. Article IV of the NPT recalls the right of all countries to have access to the benefits of nuclear science and technology. The Statute of the IAEA defines one of its functions as being ''to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world. Part B of the Yearbook describes just a few of the IAEA activities in this area: the use of nuclear techniques to help maintain a cleaner environment, methods for improving animal production and the use of research reactors for the production of radioisotopes and for education and training purposes. Part C of the Yearbook as usual deals with the status and trends in nuclear power, the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management throughout the world, together with details of the IAEA programmes in these areas. In the area of nuclear safety, the most significant development in 1994 were the opening for signature of the international Convention on Nuclear Safety and the publication of the new International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. Both of these events are described in Part D of the Yearbook. Finally, Part F once again provides reference material on the structure and organization of the IAEA and its relationship with its Member States. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. A strategy study on the effective participation in the IAEA technical cooperation programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Joon Keuk; Choi, P. H.; Kim, K. P.; Hong, Y. D.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, Y. M.; Chung, H. S.; Han, B. O.; Seo, M. W.; Chung, J. M.

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of this research are to seek the most effective means of participation in implementing IAEA technical cooperation programs, to seek and establish a desirable role for Korea in these program, to predict future opportunities among IAEA programs, to enhance the status of Korea within the international society and to keep up with rapidly changing international nuclear developments in effective and positive ways. Participation in IAEA programs are to coincide with our efforts to upgrade and achieve self-reliance in nuclear technology. Seven activities should be considered in Korea's future directions regarding the IAEA. These include strengthening our diplomatic activities, expanding coordinated research programs (CRP's), domestic personnel becoming IAEA staff members, encouraging domestic experts to participate as members of IAEA advisory groups, increasing participation in international meetings, implementing footnote a/ projects, strengthening cooperation with the IAEA-operational research laboratories and actively implementing technology transfer to developing countries and encouraging IAEA fellowships. (author). 57 refs., 74 tabs., 17 figs

  10. Finnish support programme to IAEA safeguards. Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarvainen, M.

    1993-04-01

    Implementation of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards (FINSP) during the calender year in question is summarized. FINSP is carried out through separate tasks related to development of non-destructive measurement methods (NDA methods) for verification of nuclear material, training and expert services to the IAEA. In addition to a Finnish summary, the report includes detailed description of each task in English. (editor)

  11. Finnish support programme to IAEA safeguards. Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarvainen, M.

    1994-03-01

    Implementation of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards (FINSP) during the calender year in question is summarized. FINSP is carried out through separate tasks related to development of non-destructive measurement methods (NDA methods) for verification of nuclear material, training and expert services to the IAEA. In addition to a Finnish summary, the report includes detailed description of each task in English. (editor)

  12. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 13, no. 2(79). Apr-May 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA Board Meetings Set in May and June, Database of the IAEA's International Nuclear Information Systems (INIS) is being made available over the Internet free of charge, Senior Expert Group Starts Review of IAEA Programmes, IAEA Reports to Security Council on Nuclear Inspections in Iraq, Parties Consider Extending Fusion Research through the ITER Project, Status of Joint Safety and Nuclear Liability Conventions, Proposed Global Convention Against Nuclear Terrorism, Upcoming Symposia and Conferences, New IAEA Books, Nuclear Data File, and other short information

  13. Senior IAEA Team to Visit Iran from 29 to 31 January 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano issued the following statement: A senior IAEA team will visit Iran from 29 to 31 January 2012. The overall objective of the IAEA is to resolve all outstanding substantive issues. The team of experts will be led by the Deputy Director General for Safeguards, Herman Nackaerts, and will include the Assistant Director General for Policy, Rafael Grossi. ''The Agency team is going to Iran in a constructive spirit, and we trust that Iran will work with us in that same spirit,'' IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano said. (IAEA)

  14. Finnish support programme to IAEA safeguards. Annual report 1992; Suomen tukiohjelma IAEA:n safeguards-valvonnalle. Vuoden 1992 toimintakertomus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, M. [ed.

    1993-04-01

    Implementation of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards (FINSP) during the calender year in question is summarized. FINSP is carried out through separate tasks related to development of non-destructive measurement methods (NDA methods) for verification of nuclear material, training and expert services to the IAEA. In addition to a Finnish summary, the report includes detailed description of each task in English. (editor).

  15. IAEA Safety Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-09-01

    The IAEA Safety Standards Series comprises publications of a regulatory nature covering nuclear safety, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, the transport of radioactive material, the safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and management systems. These publications are issued under the terms of Article III of the IAEA’s Statute, which authorizes the IAEA to establish “standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property”. Safety standards are categorized into: • Safety Fundamentals, stating the basic objective, concepts and principles of safety; • Safety Requirements, establishing the requirements that must be fulfilled to ensure safety; and • Safety Guides, recommending measures for complying with these requirements for safety. For numbering purposes, the IAEA Safety Standards Series is subdivided into General Safety Requirements and General Safety Guides (GSR and GSG), which are applicable to all types of facilities and activities, and Specific Safety Requirements and Specific Safety Guides (SSR and SSG), which are for application in particular thematic areas. This booklet lists all current IAEA Safety Standards, including those forthcoming

  16. IAEA Sampling Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The objectives for this presentation are to describe the method that the IAEA uses to determine a sampling plan for nuclear material measurements; describe the terms detection probability and significant quantity; list the three nuclear materials measurement types; describe the sampling method applied to an item facility; and describe multiple method sampling.

  17. IAEA film library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    Most of the scientific and technical films shown during the Second Geneva Conference for the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy were donated to IAEA by the producing countries at the end of the Conference. They will form the basic stock for the Agency's loan service intended to provide atomic energy institutions in Member States with film material. A detailed catalogue of the films, classified according to subject and giving conditions of loan or purchase, is now being prepared. In addition to this, information on all films produced in Member Countries dealing with the peaceful uses cf atomic energy is being assembled. The documentary information contained in the films in IAEA's possession relates to the following subjects: national programmes; nuclear physics; accelerators; plasma and fusion; reactors (power, research, material testing and experimental); prospecting and mining; ore dressing; metallurgy; production of fuel elements; treatment of irradiated fuel elements; protection against radiation; detection and counting; uses of radiation in medicine, biochemistry, agriculture and industry; industrial application of nuclear explosions. Most of the commentaries are in the language of the producing country. A few films are available in a choice of two languages. The films donated to the Agency total 82, two of which have been produced in Canada, 13 in France, one in India, one in Romania, one in Spain, 14 in the United Kingdom, one in the Union of South Africa, 47 in the United States of America and two in the USSR: they are mostly illustrations of papers presented at the Second Geneva Conference. In arranging for the circulation of scientific and technical films IAEA wishes to help meet some of the training and information needs of Member States. It is hoped that all organizations producing films on the peaceful uses of atomic energy will entrust copies to the IAEA with a view to their widest possible circulation. In the meantime, the Agency's films have been given

  18. Development of REI meetings (concluding remarks)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, K.

    1988-01-01

    It is an honour and a pleasure to deliver the concluding remarks of this Fourth International Conference on Radiation Effects in Insulators. After commenting upon the present meeting, the genesis of REI conferences, their aims and position relative to related meetings in radiation and ion implantation research will be treated, particularly in order to inform new-comers. The development of the last four REI meetings will be discussed on the base of a statistical analysis. Some recommendations and an outlook of future trends will be given. (orig.)

  19. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 10, no. 1(67). Mar-Apr 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA Board to Consider Proposal on Safeguards, IAEA Director General to Address NPT Conference in mid-April, IAEA Hosts UN System-Wide Meeting, Joint IAEA/EC/WHO Conference on Chernobyl Announced, IAEA Concludes Post-Chernobyl Research Project, Uranium Data in Environmental Monitoring, Director General Address in Chile, South Africa, the Philippines Host Nuclear Information Seminars, Upcoming IAEA Conferences, Symposia and Seminars, Isotopes in Water Resources Management, Environmental Impacts of Radioactive Releases, Joint FAO/IAEA Symposium on Crop Improvement, Other Conferences, Symposia and Seminars in 1995, Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Developments (IAEA Safeguards Agreements, New NPT Members), Handbook on Nuclear Communications, SIT Campaign in Zanzibar, and other short information

  20. Japan Reports New Water Leak at Fukushima Daiichi; IAEA Sees No Danger to Public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Japanese authorities have informed the IAEA that a leak from an overflowing water storage tank at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station was detected in the late evening of 19 February 2014. About 100 cubic metres of radioactive water leaked to the ground adjacent to the tank storage area before the leak was stopped about six hours later. Based on the information provided, IAEA experts consider that the leak poses no danger to the public. IAEA experts also consider actions taken by Japan's Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) following the leak to be appropriate. These include an NRA recommendation that TEPCO remove soil contaminated by the leaked water, which will reduce the risk that contaminated water will be spread further through rain and groundwater. Japan has not asked the IAEA for any assistance in connection with the leak from the tank. The IAEA will continue monitoring developments. (IAEA)

  1. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 13, no. 3(80). Jul-Aug 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA General Conference Opens 21 September in Vienna, IAEA Board Concludes Mid-Year Review: Approves Six More Protocols to Safeguards Agreements, Safeguards Implementation in 1997 Reported, Study of Radiological Situation at Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls, Nuclear Inspections in Iraq Seeking Further Clarification, Pioneering Waste Repository Gets 'Green Light' in the USA, Status of International Conventions, Nuclear Techniques Targeted for Studying Water Pollution, Zimbabwe Farmers Realize Benefits from Nuclear Techniques, Waging a War Against Insect Pests, IAEA and WCO Formally Join Forces Against Illicit Trafficking, Annual Report for 1997, Range of Topics on IAEA Meeting Agenda, New IAEA Books, and other short information

  2. Statement by IAEA and Iran Following Technical Talks in Tehran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Following technical talks between IAEA and Iranian experts in Tehran today, here is the text of a joint statement read by Tero Varjoranta, IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of the Department of Safeguards, and H.E. Ambassador Reza Najafi of the Islamic Republic of Iran: ''Iran and the IAEA held constructive technical discussions to follow up the Joint Statement that was signed earlier today. ''At this meeting, preliminary arrangements to begin implementation of the six measures listed in the Annex to the Joint Statement were discussed. This will include a technical visit in the near future to the Heavy Water Production Plant at Arak. Future meetings at the working level will finalise the details of implementation. ''Further discussion will be held at the next technical meeting, scheduled for 11 December in Vienna.'' (IAEA)

  3. Chemical physics of electroactive materials: concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutland, Mark W

    2017-07-01

    It is an honour to be charged with providing the concluding remarks for a Faraday Discussion. As many have remarked before, it is nonetheless a prodigious task, and what follows is necessarily a personal, and probably perverse, view of a watershed event in the Chemical Physics of Electroactive materials. The spirit of the conference was captured in a single sentence during the meeting itself."It is the nexus between rheology, electrochemistry, colloid science and energy storage". The current scientific climate is increasingly dominated by a limited number of global challenges, and there is thus a tendency for research to resemble a football match played by 6 year olds, where everyone on the field chases the (funding) ball instead of playing to their "discipline". It is thus reassuring to see how the application of rigorous chemical physics is leading to ingenious new solutions for both energy storage and harvesting, via, for example, nanoactuation, electrowetting, ionic materials and nanoplasmonics. In fact, the same language of chemical physics allows seamless transition between applications as diverse as mechano-electric energy generation, active moisture transport and plasmonic shutters - even the origins of life were addressed in the context of electro-autocatalysis!

  4. Directory of IAEA databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This second edition of the Directory of IAEA Databases has been prepared within the Division of Scientific and Technical Information (NESI). Its main objective is to describe the computerized information sources available to staff members. This directory contains all databases produced at the IAEA, including databases stored on the mainframe, LAN's and PC's. All IAEA Division Directors have been requested to register the existence of their databases with NESI. For the second edition database owners were requested to review the existing entries for their databases and answer four additional questions. The four additional questions concerned the type of database (e.g. Bibliographic, Text, Statistical etc.), the category of database (e.g. Administrative, Nuclear Data etc.), the available documentation and the type of media used for distribution. In the individual entries on the following pages the answers to the first two questions (type and category) is always listed, but the answers to the second two questions (documentation and media) is only listed when information has been made available

  5. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives.

  6. Improvements to the IAEA's electric generation expansion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoytchev, D.; Georgiev, S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the implementation of the IAEA's planning approach and software in Bulgaria. The problems encountered in the process are summarized, with emphasis on two of the limitations of the electric generation expansion model (WASP). The solutions found by Bulgarian experts to overcome these problems are also described, together with some comparative results of the tests performed. (author)

  7. Recommended IAEA decommissioning levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, M.

    1977-01-01

    The areas covered by each of the two terms 'decommissioning' and 'dismantling' of a nuclear installation are defined in order to distinguish them with greater accuracy. Decommissioning is first an administrative decision and afterwards all the material operations involved by this decision. Dismantling is only one of the material operations of the decommissioning but it can be the most important. For the IAEA the possible outcomes for a decommissioned installation fall under three main headings (stages) which we call 'decommissioning levels'. - level 1: shut-down with surveillance, - level 2: conditional release for another use, - level 3: unconditional release of the site [fr

  8. IAEA nuclear security program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek, D. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Although nuclear security is a State responsibility, it is nevertheless an international concern, as the consequences of a nuclear security incident would have worldwide impact. These concerns have resulted in the development of numerous international instruments on nuclear security since the terrorist events in the USA on September 11, 2001. The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security has been charged to assist Member States to improvement their nuclear security and to meet the intent of these international obligations in order to ensure a cohesive thread of nuclear security protects the global community. The programs underway and planned by the Office of Nuclear Security will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  9. IAEA nuclear security program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, D.

    2006-01-01

    Although nuclear security is a State responsibility, it is nevertheless an international concern, as the consequences of a nuclear security incident would have worldwide impact. These concerns have resulted in the development of numerous international instruments on nuclear security since the terrorist events in the USA on September 11, 2001. The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security has been charged to assist Member States to improvement their nuclear security and to meet the intent of these international obligations in order to ensure a cohesive thread of nuclear security protects the global community. The programs underway and planned by the Office of Nuclear Security will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  10. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 13, no. 1(78). Jan-Feb 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA Board Meets in March, Director General ElBaradei Initiates Reviews, Nuclear Energy and Climate Change, States Honour Dr. Hans Blix, Radiological Conditions on Bikini Atoll Reassessed, Radiological Study of Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls Nears Completion, Nuclear Inspections in Iraq, New Laboratory Set for Seibersdorf, Vienna Library Receives IAEA Collection, Developing Africa's Agricultural Economies, Marine Scientific Expedition to Northwest Pacific, Experts Target Radioactive Waste Management Needs in Russia, States Move to Accept Safeguards Protocol, In Memoriam, More States Sign Safety Convention, 1998 IAEA Scientific Meetings, New IAEA books, and other short information

  11. IAEA safeguards glossary. 2001 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    IAEA safeguards have evolved since their inception in the late 1960s. In 1980 the IAEA published the first IAEA Safeguards Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l) with the aim of facilitating understanding of the specialized safeguards terminology within the international community. In 1987 the IAEA published a revised edition of the Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l (Rev.l)) which took into account developments in the safeguards area as well as comments received since the first edition appeared. Since 1987, IAEA safeguards have become more effective and efficient, mainly through the series of strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors during 1992-1997, the Board's approval, in 1997, of the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)), and the work, begun in 1999, directed towards the development and implementation of integrated safeguards. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition reflects these developments. Each of the 13 sections of the Glossary addresses a specific subject related to IAEA safeguards. To facilitate understanding. definitions and, where applicable, explanations have been given for each of the terms listed. The terms defined and explained intentionally have not been arranged in alphabetical order, but their sequence within each section corresponds to the internal relationships of the subject treated. The terms are numbered consecutively within each section and an index referring to these numbers has been provided for ease of reference. The terms used have been translated into the official languages of the IAEA, as well as into German and Japanese. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition has no legal status and is not intended to serve as a basis for adjudicating on problems of definition such as might arise during the negotiation or in the interpretation of safeguards agreements or additional protocols. The IAEA

  12. IAEA safeguards glossary. 2001 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    IAEA safeguards have evolved since their inception in the late 1960s. In 1980 the IAEA published the first IAEA Safeguards Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l) with the aim of facilitating understanding of the specialized safeguards terminology within the international community. In 1987 the IAEA published a revised edition of the Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l (Rev.l)) which took into account developments in the safeguards area as well as comments received since the first edition appeared. Since 1987, IAEA safeguards have become more effective and efficient, mainly through the series of strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors during 1992-1997, the Board's approval, in 1997, of the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)), and the work, begun in 1999, directed towards the development and implementation of integrated safeguards. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition reflects these developments. Each of the 13 sections of the Glossary addresses a specific subject related to IAEA safeguards. To facilitate understanding. definitions and, where applicable, explanations have been given for each of the terms listed. The terms defined and explained intentionally have not been arranged in alphabetical order, but their sequence within each section corresponds to the internal relationships of the subject treated. The terms are numbered consecutively within each section and an index referring to these numbers has been provided for ease of reference. The terms used have been translated into the official languages of the IAEA, as well as into German and Japanese. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition has no legal status and is not intended to serve as a basis for adjudicating on problems of definition such as might arise during the negotiation or in the interpretation of safeguards agreements or additional protocols. The IAEA

  13. Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections. Final report: Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    This is the second of two reports prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in open-quotes Observational Skillsclose quotes. The first (Phase 1) report was essentially exploratory. It defined Observational Skills broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. It identified 10 specific Observational Skills components, analyzed their relevance to IAEA safeguards inspections, and reviewed a variety of inspection programs in the public and private sectors that provide training in one or more of these components. The report concluded that while it should be possible to draw upon these other programs in developing Observational Skills training for IAEA inspectors, the approaches utilized in these programs will likely require significant adaption to support the specific job requirements, policies, and practices that define the IAEA inspector's job. The overall objective of this second (Phase 2) report is to provide a basis for the actual design and delivery of Observational Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The more specific purposes of this report are to convey a fuller understanding of the potential application of Observational Skills to the inspector's job, describe inspector perspectives on the relevance and importance of particular Observational Skills, identify the specific Observational Skill components that are most important and relevant to enhancing safeguards inspections, and make recommendations as to Observational Skills training for the IAEA's consideration in further developing its Safeguards training program

  14. New IAEA guidelines on environmental remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency, A2444, Seibersdorf (Austria); Howard, Brenda [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, LA1 4AP, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Kashparov, Valery [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology, 08162, 7, Mashinobudivnykiv str., Chabany, Kyivo-Svyatoshin region, Kyiv (Ukraine); Sanzharova, Natalie [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Russian Federation, 249032, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Vidal, Miquel [Analytical Chemistry Department-Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    dimensions including radiological, economic, social and environmental aspects. The system of criteria used for evaluating management options, including effectiveness and technical feasibility economic cost, waste generation, social and ethical issues, side effects and factors constraining application are discussed. Rather than a comprehensive analysis of remedial options, the new document gives selected information, describe key issues that are relevant to their implementation based on practical experience, and provide some guidance of their usefulness as part of a remediation strategy. Basic mechanisms behind the effectiveness of most of management options are also described. The document provides recommendations on remediation planning, optimising remediation strategies and available tools for decision making on remediation of different environments. The document specifically collates, and summarises, recent activities relevant to remediation conducted under the auspices of the IAEA, but also refers to relevant studies conducted elsewhere. The text thus capitalises on the knowledge and expertise gained by the many experts involved. In common with previous IAEA documents on remediation, much of the document is relevant for many other situations which may need to be remediated. (authors)

  15. IAEA and food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    1995-01-01

    IAEA was founded in 1957. 122 countries take part in it. It is operated with the yearly ordinary budget of about 20 billion yen and the technical cooperation budget of about 6 billion yen and by 2200 personnel. Its two important roles are the promotion of the peaceful utilization of atomic energy and the prevention of nuclear proliferation. The activities of IAEA are shown. The cooperation with developing countries and the international research cooperation program are the important activities. The securing of foods is an urgent subject, and the utilization of radiation and isotopes has been promoted, aiming at sustaining agriculture. The necessity of food irradiation is explained, and at present, commercial food irradiation is carried out in 28 countries including Japan. The irradiation less than 10 kGy does not cause poisonous effect in any food, according to JECFI. The new international agreement is expected to be useful for promoting the international trade of irradiated foods. The international cooperation for the spread of food irradiation and the public acceptance of food irradiation are reported. (K.I.)

  16. News from IAEA Headquarters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Full text: Two more countries have joined the Agency - Panama and Jordan - bringing IAEA membership up to 96. Mr. Ginige Richard Walter de Silva (Ceylon) has been appointed Director of the Division of Conference and General Services of the Agency. Born in 1911 at Nugegeda, Ceylon, Mr. de Silva obtained his B.Sc. in Physics at London University and his M.A. in Physics and Mathematics at Cambridge University. He has had a long career in the Civil Service, mainly in the administrative, commercial and finance branches of government. Mr.de Silva took over from Mr. Arthur E. Barrett, Chief of the Conference and Engineering Services, who had been Acting Director of the Division for a long period of time, and who will be leaving the Agency later this year to take up work elsewhere. From the early days of IAEA in 1957, Mr. Barrett has been closely associated with the establishment of the Agency's temporary headquarters in Vienna. He has been in charge of the planning and design of the technical facilities for the various conference installations and responsible for the servicing of all the General Conference sessions since 1958. In fact, Mr. Barrett has played an essential part in the creation of the Vienna Congress Centre in the former Hofburg Imperial Palace. Educated at Cambridge and London Universities, Mr. Barrett has had some 35 years of public service, first in the BBC in London and subsequently with the United Nations in New York. (author)

  17. IAEA support for the establishment of nuclear security education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunegger-Guelich, Andrea; Rukhlo, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA has developed - together with academics and nuclear security experts from Member States - a technical guidance entitled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model Master of Science (M.Sc.) and a certificate programme in nuclear security. The paper sets out IAEA efforts to support the establishment of nuclear security at educational institutions, underlines particularly the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 and discusses the efforts made by the IAEA to establish a network among educational and research institutions, and other stakeholders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (orig.)

  18. The IAEA safeguards information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmelin, W.R.; Parsick, R.

    1976-01-01

    The IAEA safeguards under the Non-Proliferation Treaty is meant to follow the model agreement developed by the Safeguards Committee in 1970 and formulated in document INFCIRC/153, which contains provisions that Member States, having concluded Safeguards Agreements with the Agency, should provide design information and reports on initial inventories, changes in the inventories and material balances in respect of each nuclear facility and material balance area for all nuclear materials subject to safeguards. The Agency, on the other hand, should establish and maintain an accountancy system which would provide the data on the location and the movements of all nuclear material subject to safeguards on the basis of the reported information and information obtained during inspections in order to support the Agency's verification activities in the field, to enable the preparation of safeguards statements and to adjust the inspection intensity. Following these requirements, a computer-based information system has been developed and is being implemented and used routinely for input manipulations and queries on a limited scale. This information system comprises two main parts: Part 1 for processing the information as provided by the States, and Part 2 (still under development) for processing the inspection data obtained during verification. This paper describes the characteristics of the Agency information system for processing data under the Non-Proliferation Treaty as well as recent operational experience. (author)

  19. Turkish experience with the use of IAEA planning models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fikret, H.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the IAEA planning methodologies for energy and electricity planning have been transferred to Turkey as part of Technical Co-operation projects on the subject matter. The transfer has been supplemented by adequate training to national experts through their participation in the above projects and in the training courses on these models organized by the IAEA. The experience gathered in the use of these models in Turkey is described in this paper, highlighting how the models are imbedded in the country's planning procedure for energy and electricity matters. (author). 7 figs, 6 tabs

  20. The evolution of IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This, second in a new series of booklets dealing with IAEA safeguards is intended for persons professionally interested in the subject as government officials responsible for non-proliferation or management of nuclear facilities, and practitioners of safeguards - the international and national officials charged with implementing IAEA safeguards. It is also aimed at the broader public concerned with the spread of nuclear weapons and interested in nuclear arms control and disarmament. It presents the situation as IAEA safeguards make 'quantum jump' into new phase characterized by the IAEA as the 'Strengthened Safeguards System'. It includes the historical overview of the International safeguards from 1945-1998; the aims and limitations of IAEA Safeguards; a chapter on how safeguards work in practice; as well as new challenges and opportunities

  1. The IAEA and the legacy of cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempus, P.

    1985-01-01

    The author discusses the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in promoting the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. He describes several activities of the IAEA to promote nuclear safety. International cooperation is necessary to enforce the IAEA safeguards

  2. IAEA Nobel Peace fund schools for nutrition. Combating child malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Dhaka, Bangladesh - Malnutrition remains the world's most serious health problem and the single biggest contributor to child deaths in the developing world, according to the World Bank. Now, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is using its Nobel Peace Prize earnings to promote the use of nuclear techniques to combat malnutrition during the earliest years of life. 'One out of every ten children born in developing countries will die before his or her fifth birthday,' explains IAEA nutrition expert Lena Davidsson. 'That's more than 10 million dead children each year. And the vast majority of these child deaths in developing countries are preventable with a combination of good care, adequate nutrition and appropriate medical treatment,' explains Dr. Davidsson. 'This brings us hope that unacceptably high childhood mortality can be substantially reduced with effective and well-targeted nutritional interventions.' Undernutrition is an important factor in more than half of all child deaths worldwide. The high prevalence of infants born with low birth weight and undernutrition among Asian children, especially in South Asia, emphasizes the urgent need to develop effective nutrition interventions within 'the window of opportunity', i.e., to target young women before pregnancy as well as infants and young children during the first 2 years of life. The IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Fund School for Nutrition for Asia will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh, April 22-26, 2007. It will focus on Interventions to combat undernutrition during early life and seeks to disseminate information about the usefulness of stable isotope techniques in intervention programs that reduce malnutrition, in particular in infants and children. The event is hosted by the Government of Bangladesh through the International Centre for Health and Population Research (ICDDR, B) and the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC). The IAEA is assisting some of the world's poorest countries in their

  3. Optimizing the IAEA safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobysz, Sonia; Sitt, Bernard

    2011-09-01

    During the 2010 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, States parties recognized that the Additional Protocol (AP) provides increased confidence about the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities in a State as a whole. They agreed in action 28 of the final document to encourage 'all States parties that have not yet done so to conclude and bring into force an AP as soon as possible and to implement them provisionally pending their entry into force'. Today, 109 out of 189 States parties to the NPT have brought an AP in force. The remaining outliers have not yet done so for three types of reasons: they do not clearly understand what the AP entails; when they do, they refuse to accept new non-proliferation obligations either on the ground of lack of progress in the realm of disarmament, or simply because they are not ready to bear the burden of additional safeguards measures. Strong incentives are thus needed in order to facilitate universalization of the AP. While external incentives would help make the AP a de facto norm and encourage its conclusion by reducing the deplored imbalanced implementation of non-proliferation and disarmament obligations, internal incentives developed by the Agency and its member States can also play an important role. In this respect, NPT States parties recommended in action 32 of the Review Conference final document 'that IAEA safeguards should be assessed and evaluated regularly. Decisions adopted by the IAEA policy bodies aimed at further strengthening the effectiveness and improving the efficiency of IAEA safeguards should be supported and implemented'. The safeguards system should therefore be optimized: the most effective use of safeguards measures as well as safeguards human, financial and technical resources would indeed help enhance the acceptability and even attractiveness of the AP. Optimization can be attractive for States committed to a stronger verification regime independently from other

  4. IAEA monitoring field trials workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, H.H.; Cooley, J.N.; Belew, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    Recent safeguards inspections in Iraq and elsewhere by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have led to the supposition that environmental monitoring can aid in verifying declared and in detecting undeclared nuclear activities or operations. This assumption was most recently examined by the IAEA's Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI), in their reports to the IAEA Board of Governors. In their reports, SAGSI suggested that further assessment and development of environmental monitoring would be needed to fully evaluate its potential application to enhanced IAEA safeguards. Such an inquiry became part of the IAEA ''Programme 93+2'' assessment of measures to enhance IAEA safeguards. In March, 1994, the International Safeguards Group at Oak Ridge hosted an environmental monitoring field trial workshop for IAEA inspectors to train them in the techniques needed for effective environmental sampling. The workshop included both classroom lectures and actual field sampling exercises. The workshop was designed to emphasize the analytical infrastructure needed for an environmental program, practical sampling methods, and suggested procedures for properly planning a sampling campaign. Detailed techniques for swipe, vegetation, soil, biota, and water associated sampling were covered. The overall approach to the workshop, and observed results, are described

  5. Overview of IAEA activities on PSA applications and IAEA references

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Cobo, A.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation describes the IAEA activities in the following areas: requirements and applications of living PSA, PSA applications and tools to improve NPP safety, use of PSA to optimize maintenance, use of PSA for regulatory decision making. 22 refs

  6. Safeguards Implementation Practices Guide on Facilitating IAEA Verification Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA implements safeguards pursuant to agreements concluded with States. It is in the interests of both States and the IAEA to cooperate to facilitate the practical implementation of safeguards. Such cooperation is explicitly required under all types of safeguards agreement. Effective cooperation depends upon States and the IAEA sharing a common understanding of their respective rights and obligations. To address this, in 2012 the IAEA published Services Series 21, Guidance for States Implementing Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols, which aimed at enhancing understanding of the safeguards obligations of both States and the IAEA and at improving their cooperation in safeguards implementation. States may establish different processes and procedures at the national level, and set up different systems as required to meet their safeguards obligations. Indeed, a variety of approaches are to be expected, owing to such differences as the size and complexity of States’ nuclear programmes and their regulatory framework. The purpose of this Safeguards Implementation Practices (SIP) Guide is to share the experiences and good practices as well as the lessons learned by both States and the IAEA, acquired over the many decades of safeguards implementation. The information contained in the SIP Guides is provided for explanatory purposes and use of the Guides is not mandatory. The descriptions in the SIP Guides have no legal status and are not intended to add to, subtract from, amend or derogate from, in any way, the rights and obligations of the IAEA and the States set forth in The Structure and Content of Agreements between the Agency and States Required in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (issued as INFCIRC/153 (Corrected)) and Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)). This SIP

  7. The position of IAEA safeguards relative to nuclear material control accountancy by states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rometsch, R.; Hough, G.

    1977-01-01

    IAEA Safeguards are always implemented on the basis of agreements which are concluded between one or more Governments and the Agency. They lay down the rights and obligations of the parties; the more modern types of agreements, in particular those in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, do that in quite some details. Several articles, for instance, regulate the working relations between the States and the IAEA inspectorate. Those are based on two basic obligations: that of the State to establish and maintain a ''System of Accountancy for and Control of Nuclear Material'' and that of the Agency to ascertain the absence of diversion of nuclear material by verifying the findings of the States' system, inter alia through independent measurements and observations. Other articles dealing also with the working relations States - IAEA rule that the Agency should take due account of the technical effectiveness of the States' system and mention among the criteria for determining the inspection effort, the extent of functional dependence of the State's accountancy from that of the facility operator. However, quantitative relationships in that respect are left to be worked out in practice. With the help of consultants and expert advisory groups a rational has been developed and possible practical arrangements discussed with several States concerned. The rational for coordinating the work of the States' inspectorate with IAEA's inspectorate was to use a factor by which the significant quantity used for calculating verification sampling plans would be adjusted in order to reduce to a certain extent the Agency's independent verification work in case the States would do extensive verifications themselves in a manner transparent to IAEA. However, in practice it proved that there are quite a number of points in the fuel cycle where such adaptations would have little or no effect on the inspection effort necessary to achieve the safeguards objective

  8. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 13, no. 4(81). Oct-Nov 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA General Conference Concludes in Vienna, Newly Elected IAEA Board of Governors, Director General Highlights Major Work Ahead, Statement to UN General Assembly, More States Accept Strengthened Safeguards Measures, Status of Additional Protocols, Signings at IAEA General Conference, USA Backs International Nuclear Fusion Project, September Meeting on Trilateral Initiative, Results From IAEA-Supported Projects, Database of Nuclear Medicine Best Practices, 1999 Seminar on Radiopharmaceuticals in Medical Treatment, International Symposium on Marine Pollution in Monaco, Safeguards Support From France and United Kingdom, Nuclear Inspections in Iraq, States Move to Join International Safety Conventions, Safety of Radiation Sources and Security of Radioactive Materials, Technical Team Trained in IAEA-Supported Project, Scientific Forum on Water Issues, International Scientific and Technical Meetings, New IAEA Books, and other short information

  9. Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections. Final report: Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    This is the second of two reports prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in {open_quotes}Observational Skills{close_quotes}. The first (Phase 1) report was essentially exploratory. It defined Observational Skills broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. It identified 10 specific Observational Skills components, analyzed their relevance to IAEA safeguards inspections, and reviewed a variety of inspection programs in the public and private sectors that provide training in one or more of these components. The report concluded that while it should be possible to draw upon these other programs in developing Observational Skills training for IAEA inspectors, the approaches utilized in these programs will likely require significant adaption to support the specific job requirements, policies, and practices that define the IAEA inspector`s job. The overall objective of this second (Phase 2) report is to provide a basis for the actual design and delivery of Observational Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The more specific purposes of this report are to convey a fuller understanding of the potential application of Observational Skills to the inspector`s job, describe inspector perspectives on the relevance and importance of particular Observational Skills, identify the specific Observational Skill components that are most important and relevant to enhancing safeguards inspections, and make recommendations as to Observational Skills training for the IAEA`s consideration in further developing its Safeguards training program.

  10. New appointment at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document gives short information on the biography of Professor Dr. Werner Burkart from Germany who was appointed (as of July 2000) as Deputy Director General, Head of the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, IAEA

  11. Enhanced cooperation between IAEA and Republic of Korea on safeguards implementation at light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Wan-Sou; Kim, Byung-Koo; Yim, Seuk-Soon

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In Korea, national inspection has been initiated from the second half of 1997. From 1999, national inspection has been carried out for all nuclear facilities in Korea. In 2000, national inspections were performed successfully in 32 nuclear facilities including 12 PWRs, 4 CANDU reactors, 10 research facilities, 4 fuel fabrication plants and others. As the national inspection system settled down, both the IAEA and Korea were looking for possible ways of cooperation for mutual benefit. It was expected that considerable saving on inspection resources as well as more effective safeguards implementation could be achieved, if more enhanced cooperation work was realized. In 1999, the IAEA and Korea agreed to establish a working group for the enhanced cooperation between both sides. A working group, composed of experts from the IAEA and ROK, reviewed several options for enhanced cooperation on LWRs in Korea and suggested a measure for implementing the current safeguards approach for LWRs with remote monitoring. The basic concepts of the Enhanced Cooperation Scheme are: 1. The SSAC shall carry out all scheduled inspections for each facility for each year, while the Agency shall carry out the annual PIV and post-PIV, and a random selection of the remaining inspections; 2, The remote monitoring (RM) data necessary for technical and safeguards review shall be shared between the Agency and SSAC; 3. The IAEA shall bear the costs of purchasing RM equipment and communication operating costs from the central hub station in Korea to Vienna; the ROK will bear the costs of installing all RM equipment and communication operating costs from each LWR to the central hub station in Korea. Typically, around 8-9 inspections are performed for one LWR per annum under current safeguards approach; 1 pre-PIV, 1 PIV, 1 post-PIV, 3-4 interim inspections, fresh fuel receipts and simultaneous inspection. RM design includes 2 digital cameras (equipment hatch and spent fuel pond), VACOSS

  12. Strengthening the infrastructure for RI applications in cooperation with the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyung Bae; Hong, Young Don; Kim, Seung Yun; Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Lee, Jeong Kong

    2000-12-01

    The future direction for nuclear cooperation should be implemented with the aim of enhancing the status of Korea within the international society as well as carrying out the established national nuclear policy goal. Strategies for implementing cooperation with the IAEA were described into four separate parts; 'strategies for strengthening cooperation in general areas', 'strategies for implementing IAEA technical cooperation programs', 'strategies for implementing IAEA CRP programs' and 'Strategies for effective participation in the area of radiation and RI application'. As for strategies for implementing IAEA technical cooperation programs, i) expanding domestic personnel's entering into the IAEA ii) establishment of a liaison office for support of IAEA technical cooperation iii) expanding domestic experts entering into member of consultation group for a director-general of the IAEA and more participation in the international meetings iv) cooperation with IAEA's Seibersdorf Laboratories. For the strengthening of IAEA technical cooperation, strategies for effective implementation of technical cooperation programs such as i) strengthening role of national TC liaison officer ii) strengthening application of Model Project concept iii) Implementing End-user oriented programs iv) Establishment of measure to increase the TC implementation rate v) hosting of fellowship, scientific visitors, support for expert mission, were presented. Strategies for expanding domestic participation in the IAEA technical cooperation programs were also described for producing the benefits from implementing the IAEA technical cooperation programs. As for strategies for implementing the IAEA CRP programs, i) measures for active participation in the IAEA CRP programs and ii) measures for gradual participation in the IAEA CRP programs were separately described. To maximize the utilization of HANARO, a multi-purpose research reactor, the on-going development and development project are actively

  13. Strengthening the infrastructure for RI applications in cooperation with the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Bae; Hong, Young Don; Kim, Seung Yun; Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Lee, Jeong Kong

    2000-12-01

    The future direction for nuclear cooperation should be implemented with the aim of enhancing the status of Korea within the international society as well as carrying out the established national nuclear policy goal. Strategies for implementing cooperation with the IAEA were described into four separate parts; 'strategies for strengthening cooperation in general areas', 'strategies for implementing IAEA technical cooperation programs', 'strategies for implementing IAEA CRP programs' and 'Strategies for effective participation in the area of radiation and RI application'. As for strategies for implementing IAEA technical cooperation programs, i) expanding domestic personnel's entering into the IAEA ii) establishment of a liaison office for support of IAEA technical cooperation iii) expanding domestic experts entering into member of consultation group for a director-general of the IAEA and more participation in the international meetings iv) cooperation with IAEA's Seibersdorf Laboratories. For the strengthening of IAEA technical cooperation, strategies for effective implementation of technical cooperation programs such as i) strengthening role of national TC liaison officer ii) strengthening application of Model Project concept iii) Implementing End-user oriented programs iv) Establishment of measure to increase the TC implementation rate v) hosting of fellowship, scientific visitors, support for expert mission, were presented. Strategies for expanding domestic participation in the IAEA technical cooperation programs were also described for producing the benefits from implementing the IAEA technical cooperation programs. As for strategies for implementing the IAEA CRP programs, i) measures for active participation in the IAEA CRP programs and ii) measures for gradual participation in the IAEA CRP programs were separately described. To maximize the utilization of HANARO, a multi-purpose research reactor, the on

  14. Mass media and nuclear energy - IAEA's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyd, D.R.

    1993-11-01

    The presentation covers the following areas: the wide spectrum of media outlets that the IAEA seeks to serve and their differing needs; the resources available to the IAEA for that purpose; the way in which IAEA endeavours to disseminate authoritative, reliable nuclear-related information to media; the exceptional role the IAEA may be called on to play in emergency situations

  15. Nuclear Fuel Supply Arrangements through the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phuong, Ha-Vinh

    1981-10-01

    By virtue of its statutory functions, the International Atomic Energy Agency may be the depositary and also the supplier of nuclear materials made available to it by Member States, and these may then be stored in facilities it has acquired or which it has established under its control. However, this possibility did not materialize, mainly because the supplying states -few in number- do not want an international organization to become directly involved in bilateral transactions in that field. This paper analyses in particular the provisions of supply agreements concluded with the United Kingdom, the USA and the USSR. The Annex contains a Table of Agreements on supply of nuclear fuel and equipment concluded between supplying and consumer states through the IAEA. (NEA) [fr

  16. IAEA Catalogue of Services for Nuclear Infrastructure Development. Rev. 1, April 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-04-01

    This IAEA Catalogue offers a wide range of services to Member States embarking on a new nuclear power programme or expanding an existing one. A new IAEA Catalogue of Services for Nuclear Infrastructure Development helps Member States to identify and request IAEA assistance for national organizations at different stages of the development or expansion of a nuclear power programme. This IAEA Catalogue of Services is presented in two tables. It is based on the IAEA Milestones Approach for nuclear power infrastructure development, documented in 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' (IAEA Nuclear Energy Series NG-G-3.1). The two tables allow users to identify and select available IAEA services by: i) The three phases of the IAEA Milestones Approach, or ii) Organizations typically involved in the development of a nuclear power programme: the government / Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization (NEPIO), the regulatory body and the owner operator of a nuclear power plant. This Catalogue includes information on the following IAEA services: i) Workshops / Training Courses; ii) Expert Missions / Advisory Services; iii) Review Missions / Peer Reviews; iv) Training tools and networks. The Catalogue lists both existing IAEA services and those being developed for the 19 issues to be addressed in developing a national nuclear infrastructure. Each existing service is linked to a relevant IAEA webpage that either describes a particular service or gives practical examples of the type of assistance that the Agency offers (e.g. workshops or missions). The owners of these webpages can be contacted for more detailed information or to request assistance. This IAEA Catalogue of Services will be updated regularly

  17. IAEA to hold special session on nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Experts from around the world are meeting at the IAEA this week for an international symposium on nuclear safeguards, verification, and security. A special session on 2 November focuses on the issue of combating nuclear terrorism. The Special Session, which will bring together experts on nuclear terrorism from around the world, will deal with the following issues: The Psychology of terrorism; Intelligence, police and border protection; Guarding nuclear reactors and material from terrorists and thieves; The threat of nuclear terrorism: Nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices; The threat of nuclear terrorism: Intentional dispersal of radioactive material - Sabotage of fixed installations or transport systems; The Legal Framework: Treaties and Conventions, Laws; Regulations and Codes of Practice; IAEA Nuclear Security and Safety Programmes

  18. IAEA safeguards in new nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catton, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Durbin, K. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Hamilton, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Martikka, E. [STUK, Helsinki (Finland); Poirier, S.; Sprinkle, J. K.; Stevens, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Whitlock, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The inclusion of international safeguards early in the design of nuclear facilities offers an opportunity to reduce project risk. It also has the potential to minimize the impact of safeguards activities on facility operations. Safeguards by design (SBD) encourages stakeholders to become familiar with the requirements of their safeguards agreements and to decide when and how they will fulfil those requirements. As one example, modular reactors are at a design stage where SBD can have a useful impact. Modular reactors might be turnkey projects where the operator takes ownership after commissioning. This comes with a legal obligation to comply with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards requirements. Some of the newcomer countries entering the reactor market have little experience with IAEA safeguards and the associated non-proliferation obligations. To reduce delays or cost increments, one can embed safeguards considerations in the bid and design phases of the project, along with the safety and security considerations. SBD does not introduce any new requirements - it is a process whereby facility designers facilitate the implementation of the existing safeguards requirements. In short, safeguards experts share their expertise with the designers and vice versa. Once all parties understand the fundamentals of all of the operational constraints, they are better able to decide how best to address them. This presentation will provide an overview of SBD activities. (author)

  19. IAEA To Launch Centre On Ocean Acidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is to launch a new centre this summer to address the growing problem of ocean acidification. Operated by the Agency's Monaco Environmental Laboratories, the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre will serve the scientific community - as well as policymakers, universities, media and the general public - by facilitating, promoting and communicating global actions on ocean acidification. Growing amounts of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere are being absorbed in the planet's oceans which increases their acidity. According to the experts, ocean acidification may render most regions of the ocean inhospitable to coral reefs by 2050 if atmospheric carbon dioxide levels continue to increase. This could lead to substantial changes in commercial fish stocks, threatening food security for millions of people as well as the multi-billion dollar fishing industry. International scientists have been studying the effect and possible responses, and the new centre will help coordinate their efforts. ''During the past five years, numerous multinational and national research projects on ocean acidification have emerged and significant research advances have been made,'' said Daud bin Mohamad, IAEA Deputy Director General for Nuclear Sciences and Applications. ''The time is now ripe to provide international coordination to gain the greatest value from national efforts and research investments.'' The centre will be supported by several IAEA Member States and through the Peaceful Uses Initiative, and it will be overseen by an Advisory Board consisting of leading institutions, including the U.N. Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, the Fondation Prince Albert II de Monaco, the OA-Reference User Group, as well as leading scientists and economists in the field. The new centre will focus on international

  20. IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory - Monaco: Biennial report 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The report contains the results of the scientific tasks carried out in 1989-90 by the IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory in Monaco. The methods development and analytical quality assurance for radionuclide measurements, studies for evaluating environmental impacts of radionuclide releases into the sea, contribution to international marine pollution monitoring and research including special missions are presented. In addition, lists of the visiting consultants/experts, trainees/fellows, publications/meetings, committee/expert group membership, courses and research/technical contracts are given. Figs and tabs

  1. Participation in the 1999 IAEA interlaboratory comparison on chemical analysis of groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Kih Soo; Choi, Kwang Soon; Han, Sun Ho; Suh, Moo Yul; Park, Kyung Kyun; Choi, Ke Chun; Kim, Won Ho

    2000-08-01

    KAERI analytical laboratory participated in the 1999 IAEA interlaboratory comparison on chemical analysis of groundwater organized by IAEA Hydrology Laboratory(RAS/8/084). 13 items such as pH, electroconductivity, HCO{sub 3}, Cl, SO{sub 4}, NO{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, B, Li, Na, K, Ca, Mg were analyzed. The result of this program showed that KAERI laboratory was ranked within 10% range from top level. An analytical expert in KAERI attended the 'Consultants' Meeting' at IAEA headquater and prepared the guideline for chemical analysis of groundwater.

  2. Participation in the 1999 IAEA interlaboratory comparison on chemical analysis of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, Kih Soo; Choi, Kwang Soon; Han, Sun Ho; Suh, Moo Yul; Park, Kyung Kyun; Choi, Ke Chun; Kim, Won Ho

    2000-08-01

    KAERI analytical laboratory participated in the 1999 IAEA interlaboratory comparison on chemical analysis of groundwater organized by IAEA Hydrology Laboratory(RAS/8/084). 13 items such as pH, electroconductivity, HCO 3 , Cl, SO 4 , NO 3 , SiO 2 , B, Li, Na, K, Ca, Mg were analyzed. The result of this program showed that KAERI laboratory was ranked within 10% range from top level. An analytical expert in KAERI attended the 'Consultants' Meeting' at IAEA headquater and prepared the guideline for chemical analysis of groundwater

  3. Expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haldy, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    The definitions of the terms 'artificial intelligence' and 'expert systems', the methodology, areas of employment and limits of expert systems are discussed. The operation of an expert system is described, especially the presentation and organization of knowledge as well as interference and control. Methods and tools for expert system development are presented and their application in nuclear energy are briefly addressed. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  4. IAEA's role in nuclear desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, I.; )

    2010-01-01

    Currently, several Member States have shown interest in the utilization of the nuclear energy for seawater desalination not only because recent studies have demonstrated that nuclear desalination is feasible, but also economical and has been already demonstrated in several countries. Therefore, the article will provide a highlight on sea water desalination using nuclear energy as a potential for a sustainable development around the world and the IAEA role in this regards. Special emphasis is placed on past, present, and future nuclear desalination experience in various IAEA Member States. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) role could be summarized in facilitating cutting-edge developments in the area of seawater desalination using nuclear energy, and establishing a framework for facilitating activities in Member States through information exchange and provision of technical assistance. (author)

  5. Career prospects in the IAEA safeguards inspectorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, C.; Lichliter, W.

    1987-01-01

    The paper first defines the term career and assesses its application in the IAEA safeguards inspectorate. It then identifies prerequisites for employment in the inspectorate and describes the selection process. The second part outlines the requirements for approval by the Board of Governors and designation to specific countries, together with designation difficulties and delays the Department of Safeguards encounters in its attempts to utilize its staff resources as efficiently as possible. The paper examines working conditions of the inspectorate, and considers the political-technical nature of inspection work, headquarters and field responsibilities, productivity standards, promotion possibilities, the rotation system, and career potential. The paper concludes that an opportunity for a career in the inspectorate is necessary to ensure the staff loyalty, independence, and competence required for the IAEA to maintain credibility in the international community. It stresses the need to recognize the political-technical nature of the work, the lack of glamour, and the need for steps to provide career development. (author)

  6. New [IAEA] publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    Collection and dissemination of scientific and technical information is one of the most effective ways in which the Agency can promote the world-wide development of the peaceful applications of nuclear energy. While some of the information transmitted may be completely new, based on the latest scientific research and technical development, a major portion must be in the form of a comprehensive collation of available data representing the widest possible expert thinking and experience. The first volumes of an International Directory of Radioisotopes and a Directory of Nuclear Reactors, which have been well received in interested circles all over the world. The work has been followed up in the second volumes of both directories which have recently been published. The Agency has also started a series of publications reviewing recent developments and the present state of knowledge in some major fields of the peaceful utilization of atomic energy. The first in the series, published recently, deals with the survey and evaluation of radioactive deposits. The Agency is publishing the proceedings of the scientific meetings held by it or organized with its assistance. These meetings are among the most useful means of an exchange and dissemination of information on the findings of current research and experiments, and the publications contain both the papers presented at the meetings and records of the discussions based on those papers

  7. IAEA paper on institutional arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    At its fifth series of meetings, Working Group 3 received a background paper prepared by the IAEA which had a threefold purpose: firstly, to provide an overview on institutional arrangements under consideration by the INFCE Working Groups; secondly, to explore potential relationships between the various institutional arrangements under consideration; and thirdly, to identify areas where further analysis might be desirable

  8. Training of an IAEA fellow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackerle, V.

    1960-01-01

    A scientific worker at the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, was awarded an IAEA fellowship for training at the Saclay Centre for Nuclear Studies, France. At the end of his training he wrote this article describing some aspects of his experience that are likely to be of wider interest

  9. IAEA Safeguards: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruemm, H.

    1983-01-01

    The IAEA has just celebrated its 25th anniversary, and the first safeguards inspections were performed twenty years ago. Counting only since 1978, some 5100 inspections had been performed up to mid-1982, using a staff which now includes about 130 inspectors. Despite these impressive figures, and the fact that the IAEA has never detected any apparent diversion of nuclear materials, there are increasing public allegations that safeguards lack effectiveness. After briefly reviewing the nature of IAEA safeguards agreements, the paper examines the political and technical objectives of safeguards together with some of the criticisms which have been voiced. Allocation of limited safeguards resources is examined in terms of the sometimes conflicting allocation criteria which are contained in various safeguards documents. The paper argues that the credibility and deterrent effect of IAEA safeguards should not be underestimated. It should be of greater concern that a few States are known to be operating or constructing non-safeguarded nuclear facilities capable of producing weapons-grade nuclear materials. Thus the risk of safeguards would appear to be greatest at exactly the point where safeguards end. (author)

  10. The IAEA's Research Contract Programme in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The IAEA's research contract programme for 1993 is outlined, under which the IAEA places contracts and agreements with research institutes in Member States for carrying out research projects related to their scientific programmes. 2 tabs

  11. IAEA Orientation for Diplomats 2013. The IAEA in Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-02-01

    The IAEA's mission is to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and to help all countries - especially in the developing world - benefit from the peaceful, safe and secure use of nuclear science and technology. Since the Agency was founded in 1957, our work has constantly evolved to meet the changing needs of our member states. We work to improve human and animal health. We help farmers to grow more abundant and robust crops. We help to make clean water more available and to combat environmental pollution. We help countries which wish to use nuclear power to do so safely and securely. Through all of these activities, the IAEA helps member states to use nuclear technology to meet the basic needs of their people. Nuclear power is the best-known peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fukushima Daiichi accident in Japan in 2011 caused considerable public anxiety throughout the world and damaged confidence in nuclear power. Nevertheless, use of nuclear power looks set to grow steadily in the next 20 years, although at a slower rate than was expected before the accident. The fukushima Daiichi accident led to a renewed focus on safety. In 2011, IAEA member states agreed an Action Plan on nuclear safety which they, and the Agency, are now implementing. The Agency also serves as the global platform for strengthening nuclear security. Our work focuses on helping to minimize the risk of nuclear and other radioactive material falling into the hands of terrorists, or of nuclear facilities being subjected to malicious acts. The IAEA is the only organization within the UN system with expertise in nuclear technologies. Our unique specialist laboratories help transfer knowledge and expertise to our member states in areas such as human health, food, water and the environment. cancer control in developing countries is a major priority for the Agency and for me personally. Hundreds of thousands of patients in developing countries do not have access to treatment that could save

  12. EXPERT SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiana Marin; Mihai Catalin Andrei

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades IT and computer systems have evolved rapidly in economic informatics field. The goal is to create user friendly information systems that respond promptly and accurately to requests. Informatics systems evolved into decision assisted systems, and such systems are converted, based on gained experience, in expert systems for creative problem solving that an organization is facing. Expert systems are aimed at rebuilding human reasoning on the expertise obtained from experts, sto...

  13. Nuclear information: An overview of IAEA's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesi, I.H.; Konstantinov, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    As stated in this overview of IAEA nuclear information activities the Agency's role in information services is rapidly evolving and multifaceted. The Agency maintains more than 200 computerized files of information. Some 60 of these are part of systems directly related to nuclear activities. Some of these are briefly profiled in this overview such as INIS, the IAEA Nuclear Data Programme, the IAEA Incident Reporting System, the IAEA Energy and Economic Databank, the IAEA Power Reactor Information System, the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System, and the International Uranium Geology Information System. Future directions are pointed out. Different ways to upgrade information systems are listed

  14. Expert System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas Troels; Cattani, Gian Luca

    2016-01-01

    An expert system is a computer system for inferring knowledge from a knowledge base, typically by using a set of inference rules. When the concept of expert systems was introduced at Stanford University in the early 1970s, the knowledge base was an unstructured set of facts. Today the knowledge...... base of expert systems is often given in terms of an ontology, extracted and built from various data sources by employing natural language-processing and statistics. To emphasize such capabilities, the term “expert” is now often replaced by “cognitive,” “knowledge,” “knowledge-based,” or “intelligent......” system. With very few exceptions, general-purpose expert systems have failed to emerge so far. However, expert systems are applied in specialized domains, particularly in healthcare. The increasing availability of large quantities of data to organizations today provides a valuable opportunity...

  15. IAEA puts cyber security in focus for nuclear facilities in 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, John

    2015-01-01

    Later in 2015 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will convene a special conference to discuss computer security, in the wake of cyber attacks on global financial institutions and government agencies that were increasingly in the news. According to the IAEA, the prevalence of IT security incidents in recent years involving the Stuxnet malware 'demonstrated that nuclear facilities can be susceptible to cyber attack'. The IAEA said this and other events have significantly raised global concerns over potential vulnerabilities and the possibility of a cyber attack, or a joint cyber-physical attack, that could impact on nuclear security. The IAEA has correctly identified that the use of computers and other digital electronic equipment in physical protection systems at nuclear facilities, as well as in facility safety systems, instrumentation, information processing and communication, 'continues to grow and presents an ever more likely target for cyber attack'. The agency's Vienna conference, to be held in June, will review emerging trends in computer security and areas that may still need to be addressed. The meeting follows a declaration of ministers of IAEA member states in 2013 that called on the agency to help raise awareness of the growing threat of cyber attacks and their potential impact on nuclear security. The conference is being organised 'to foster international cooperation in computer security as an essential element of nuclear security', the IAEA said. Details of the IAEA's 'International Conference on Computer Security in a Nuclear World: Expert Discussion and Exchange' are on the 'meetings' section of the agency's web site.

  16. IAEA safeguards approaches and goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai

    2001-01-01

    IAEA safeguards provide a technical means of verifying that political obligations undertaken by States party to international agreements relating to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy are being honored. The Agency assures the international community that States party to Safeguards Agreements are complying with their undertaking not to use facilities and divert nuclear materials from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear explosive devices. The task of IAEA safeguards can be summed up as to detect diversion of nuclear materials committed to peaceful uses of nuclear energy, or the misuse of equipment or facilities subject to certain safeguards agreements, and to deter such diversion or misuse through the risk of early detection. This lecture concentrates on the factors the Agency takes into account in designing and implementing safeguards approaches at facilities. (author)

  17. Domestic implications of concluding observations of the committee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though concluding observations cannot sufficiently reach domestic law-making process and the law making organs, propelling role of the observations in the adoption of ... Keywords: concluding observations, constructive dialogue, Convention on the Rights of the Child, recommendations, reporting, rights of the child ...

  18. A Planning Study for the Enhancement of National Nuclear Transparency through the Voluntary Contribution to IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Maeng Ho; Oh, K. B.; Lee, H. M. (and others)

    2006-12-15

    This study investigated the experts' opinions and a case study of typical country in order to enhance international transparency and confidence for national nuclear policy and its activities. And direction and strategies for strengthening cooperation with IAEA through various voluntary contribution into IAEA activities, was also investigated as well as long term strategic road map. It is important to strengthen the nuclear diplomacy in order to increase transparency of Korean nuclear activities through the establishment of nation-wide collaborative systems as well as systematic and long term based implementation of positive measures and actions. At the same time, it is also required to strengthen cooperation with IAEA through voluntary contribution program into relevant IAEA activities as well as establishing national long term strategies and road map.

  19. IAEA Safeguards Information System (ISIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Publication of this technical document should serve for better understanding of the technical and functional features of the IAEA Safeguards Information System (ISIS) within the Agency, as well as in the National Systems of accounting for and control of nuclear material. It will also serve as a foundation for further development and improvement of the design and modifications of the Safeguards Information System and its services as a function of Safeguards implementation

  20. IAEA safeguards - a 1988 perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennekens, J.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of IAEA safeguards as regards its perspectives for 1988 is discussed. The necessity of balancing between safeguards measures required for the timely detection of nuclear material diversion to military purposes and measures to prove the absence of diversion is stated. Accurately working safeguards system aimed at the provision of nondiversion can include, as an accompanying component, any deterrence element required. Such a system will be more expensive than any other altrenatives but it will undoubtly be more suitable and accepatble

  1. IAEA spent fuel storage glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    The aim of this glossary is to provide a basis for improved international understanding of terms used in the important area of spent fuel storage technology. The glossary is the product of an IAEA Consultant Group with valuable input from a substantial list of reviewers. The glossary emphasizes fuel storage relevant to power reactors, but is also widely applicable to research reactors. The intention is to define terms from current technologies. Terms are limited to those directly related to spent fuel storage

  2. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFFHEINS,B.; ANNESE,C.; GOODMAN,M.; OCONNOR,W.; GUSHUE,S.; PEPPER,S.

    2003-07-13

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The

  3. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOFFHEINS, B.; ANNESE, C.; GOODMAN, M.; OCONNOR, W.; GUSHUE, S.; PEPPER, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors' load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The presentation will include a

  4. IAEA Supports World Cancer Day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Cancer can strike anyone at anytime, young or old, rich or poor. It knows no borders. World Cancer Day, on 4 February, was initiated to raise global awareness of cancer issues and stimulate new strategies and thinking to combat the killer disease. Nowhere is the need greater than in the developing world, where millions of people are suffering and dying due to lack of cancer prevention and treatment. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 84 million people will die of cancer in the next 10 years, more than 70% of them in low-income countries, unless action is taken now. The IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) was created to help poorer countries confront the growing cancer crisis by integrating radiotherapy into comprehensive cancer control programmes. As it celebrates its third birthday on World Cancer Day, PACT can claim significant progress in building effective relationships with a broad array of stakeholders, initiating six pilot projects and gaining increasing support from Member States. The IAEA commends all organizations, agencies and individuals engaged in the battle to defeat this dreadful disease. We look forward to continued collaboration with international partners to help bring hope to cancer patients, to relieve their suffering and to save lives. (IAEA)

  5. IAEA safeguards and classified materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, J.F.; Eccleston, G.W.; Fearey, B.L.; Nicholas, N.J.; Tape, J.W.; Kratzer, M.

    1997-01-01

    The international community in the post-Cold War period has suggested that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) utilize its expertise in support of the arms control and disarmament process in unprecedented ways. The pledges of the US and Russian presidents to place excess defense materials, some of which are classified, under some type of international inspections raises the prospect of using IAEA safeguards approaches for monitoring classified materials. A traditional safeguards approach, based on nuclear material accountancy, would seem unavoidably to reveal classified information. However, further analysis of the IAEA's safeguards approaches is warranted in order to understand fully the scope and nature of any problems. The issues are complex and difficult, and it is expected that common technical understandings will be essential for their resolution. Accordingly, this paper examines and compares traditional safeguards item accounting of fuel at a nuclear power station (especially spent fuel) with the challenges presented by inspections of classified materials. This analysis is intended to delineate more clearly the problems as well as reveal possible approaches, techniques, and technologies that could allow the adaptation of safeguards to the unprecedented task of inspecting classified materials. It is also hoped that a discussion of these issues can advance ongoing political-technical debates on international inspections of excess classified materials

  6. Financial aspects of decommissioning. Report by an expert group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    Estimating decommissioning costs and collecting funds for eventual decommissioning of facilities that have used radioactive material is a prerequisite for safe, timely and cost effective decommissioning. A comprehensive overview of decommissioning costs and funding mechanisms was missing in the IAEA literature although the subject had been marginally dealt with in a few IAEA publications. Costing and funding issues were partially addressed by other international organizations, but there is a need to address the subject from the standpoint of the diverse social, economic and cultural environments that constitute IAEA membership. In its role of an international expert committee assisting the IAEA, the Technical Group on Decommissioning (TEGDE) debates and draws conclusions on topics omitted from general guidance. TEGDE members met in Vienna in 2003, 2004 and 2005 to develop the basis for this publication. The views expressed here reflect those of TEGDE and not necessarily those of the IAEA

  7. Development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database. Summary report of an IAEA specialists' meeting, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1994-12-01

    An IAEA Specialists' Meeting proposes procedures describing how an internationally accepted database of high-priority nuclear decay data and thermal neutron cross-sections can be developed through a network of experts coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  8. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Asia and the Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuguid, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    During the period 1970-1974 the IAEA provided country programme assistance (expert services, equipment and supplies, and fellowship training) to 17 countries in the geographic region designated as 'Asia and the Pacific' by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), namely, to Afghanistan; Bangladesh; Burma; Cambodia; China, Republic of; Hong Kong; India; Indonesia; Iran; Korea, Republic of; Malaysia; Pakistan; the Philippines; Republic of South Viet-Nam; Singapore and Thailand. In addition, representatives of Laos and Nepal have attended Agency-organized short-term training projects, such as seminars and training courses. (author)

  9. EURATOM safeguards implementation in France and cooperation with the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddou, J.

    2013-01-01

    International safeguards in France are applied both by: -) the European Commission (EC), through the Chapter 7 of the EURATOM Treaty; -) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as France is a party to the NPT and has concluded a safeguards agreement with IAEA. With the exception of mining, France has a complete nuclear fuel cycle from ore concentrates to waste. Based on the legal framework of the EURATOM Treaty, all civil nuclear facilities and all civil nuclear materials are safeguarded by EURATOM wherever they are in France. Therefore the two conversion plants, the two enrichment plants, the three fuel fabrication plants, the 59 nuclear power plants including the EPR of Flamanville under construction, the 2 reprocessing plants in La Hague, the five facilities for waste treatment and numerous research centers and reactors of CEA are declared and controlled by the European Commission. The activities of the EURATOM inspectors are of various kind depending of the facility and the type of inspection. The most common checks are: identification and counting of the nuclear material, verification of accountancy declaration vs. physical follow-up of the nuclear material, non-destructive analysis and destructive analysis after sampling in large bulk handling facilities. There is a strong cooperation between IAEA and EC: the majority of IAEA inspections in France are joint team inspections with the EC. This pooling of equipment and teams can save money and human resources. Equipment for containment and surveillance are paid whether by the EC or by the IAEA and can be used by both bodies of inspectors. With the principle of 'One Job One Person', verification activities are done only once and it saves time for the inspectors and the operators. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (A.C.)

  10. IAEA safeguards: Challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The history of the IAEA safeguards regime is described. New challenges and opportunities are discussed in connection with the discovery in Iraq of a clandestine nuclear weapons development programme, the difficulties experienced in the implementation of the safeguards agreement with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the conclusion of a comprehensive safeguards agreement with Argentina, Brazil and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials, recent developments in South Africa, the emergence of newly independent States that made up the former USSR. 2 figs

  11. IAEA Radiation Events Database (RADEV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, J.; Ortiz-Lopez, P.

    2001-01-01

    Whilst the use of ionizing radiation continues to bring benefits to many people throughout the world there is increasing concern at the number of reported accidents involving radiation. Such accidents have had an impact on the lives of patients, workers and members of the public, the consequences of which have ranged from trivial health effects to fatalities. In order to reduce the number of accidents and to mitigate their consequences it is, therefore, necessary to raise awareness of the causes of accidents and to note the lessons that can be learned. The IAEA's database on unusual radiation events (RADEV) is intended to provide a world-wide focal point for such information. (author)

  12. Nuclear data services provided by the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Oblozinsky, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the various nuclear data types, libraries and services available free of charge from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The databases are collected, maintained and made available within the framework of an international nuclear data center's network. Particular emphasis is given to online services via the Internet. The URL address of the IAEA Nuclear Services is http://www-nds.iaea.or.at. (author)

  13. IAEA symposium on international safeguards. Extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The most important subjects treated in 188 papers presented by the participants from member state and IAEA Safeguards Inspectors at the Symposium were as follows: implementation of IAEA safeguards; national support programs to the IAEA safeguards; experiences in application of safeguard monitoring devices; improved methods for verification of plutonium; highly enriched uranium; surveillance of spent fuel storage facilities, reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication plants; excess weapon grade plutonium and other fissile materials

  14. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  15. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency's Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America

  16. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency's Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America

  17. China boosts support for IAEA development and security initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Marking 20 years of cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), China announced today that it would donate US$1 million to IAEA's special funds for technical cooperation and enhanced nuclear security. Welcoming the contribution, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei said, 'The IAEA is grateful for China's continuing generosity in supporting our technical cooperation and security programmes in the nuclear field. The IAEA has forged an excellent partnership with China over the past two decades - one of the most far-reaching partnerships we have with any Member State, extending across the spectrum of IAEA work from safety and security, to safeguards and verification, to technical cooperation in food, energy, water and health. China has been both a major recipient and contributor to IAEA special funds since it joined the IAEA in 1984. China has been an active participant in the IAEA Technical Cooperation (TC) programme, receiving more than US$22 million in assistance through 103 TC projects, in particular in the fields of nuclear safety, engineering and technology. China has also been a major contributor to the TC Fund, with some $11 million in cash and $400,000 of in-kind support. The IAEA's TC Programme disburses more than US$75 million worth of expert services, fellowships, equipment and training workshops per year in approximately 110 countries and territories. The Agency works in partnership with project counterparts in the recipient Member States, typically in the government's atomic energy authority as well as with health, food and agriculture, environment and water authorities. In addition, The Agency collaborates with the World Bank and other UN organizations to plan and execute projects in harmony with Member States' needs. In March 2002, the IAEA launched a 'Plan of Activities to Protect Against Nuclear Terrorism,' which enhanced and integrated the Agency's existing nuclear security-related activities. These activities

  18. IAEA Nobel Prize money fights cancer crisis in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    To fight the looming cancer crisis in Africa, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is assembling many of the world's leading cancer experts in Cape Town on 11-16 December. Cancer is a disease that is spreading very fast in the developing world and the IAEA has come to realize that we need to do much more to combat cancer in this part of the world, says IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei in a video address to the conference. I hope this event will be the first of many events that would enable us to work together - national governments, international organisations, civil society - to help combat this dreadful disease and provide quality of life to our fellow human beings. With the support of African Nobel Laureates Nelson Mandela, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and F.W. de Klerk, this unprecedented gathering will bring together senior representatives from major national and international cancer organisations. Together with leading public figures and specialists they will assess the growing cancer burden in Africa and focus on building effective cancer control programmes at the national and regional levels. The IAEA is sponsoring the intensive workshops using funds awarded for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. The IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy, or 'PACT', was established in 2004 to help achieve these goals. Building on the IAEA's 30 years of expertise in promoting radiotherapy, PACT aims to help get more cancer treatment facilities up and running in the world's developing regions, along with the trained personnel to operate them. 'PACT' is building partnerships with the WHO and other international cancer-control organisations so that the battle against cancer can be waged at country level. This includes cancer prevention, early detection, diagnosis and palliation, and more importantly education and training of professionals, says PACT Head Massoud Samiei. Current estimates suggest that several billion US$ are needed in the next 10 to 15 years if the

  19. Incident involving radioactive material at IAEA Safeguards Laboratory - No radioactivity released to environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Pressure build-up in a small sealed sample bottle in a storage safe resulted in plutonium contamination of a storage room at about 02:30 today at the IAEA's Safeguards Analytical Laboratory in Seibersdorf. All indications are that there was no release of radioactivity to the environment. Further monitoring around the laboratory will be undertaken. No one was working in the laboratory at the time. The Laboratory's safety system detected plutonium contamination in the storage room where the safe was located and in two other rooms - subsequently confirmed by a team of IAEA radiation protection experts. The Laboratory is equipped with multiple safety systems, including an air-filtering system to prevent the release of radioactivity to the environment. There will be restricted access to the affected rooms until they are decontaminated. A full investigation of the incident will be conducted. The IAEA has informed the Austrian regulatory authority. The IAEA's Laboratory in Seibersdorf is located within the complex of the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf (ARC), about 35 km southeast of Vienna. The laboratory routinely analyses small samples of nuclear material (uranium or plutonium) as part of the IAEA's safeguards verification work. (IAEA)

  20. Recent developments in the IAEA safety standards: design and operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takehiko

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA has been publishing a wide variety of safety standards for nuclear and radiation related facilities and activities since 1978. In 1996, a more rigorously structured approach for the preparation and review of its safety standards was introduced. Currently, based on the approach, revision of most of the standards is in completion or near completion. The latest versions of the Safety Requirements for ''Design'' and ''Operation'' of nuclear power plants were respectively published in 2000. Currently, along with this revision of the Safety Requirements, many Safety Guides have been revised. In order to clarify the complicated revision procedure, an example of the entire revision process for a Safety Guide is provided. Through actual example of the revision process, enormous amount of work involved in the revision work is clearly indicated. The current status of all of the Safety Standards for Design and that for Operation of nuclear power plants are summarized. Summary of other IAEA safety standards currently revised and available related IAEA publications, together with information on the IAEA Web Site from where these documents can be downloaded, is also provided. The standards are reviewed to determine whether revision (or new issue) is necessary in five years following publication. The IAEA safety standards will continue to be updated through comprehensive and structured approach, collaboration of many experts of the world, and reflecting good practices of the world. The IAEA safety standards will serve to provide high level of safety assurance. (author)

  1. Expert Witness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    demonstrated that, on the balance of probabilities, a correct diagnosis at that time would not have altered the course of the illness. Quantum. Where it appears likely that the claimant may have a strong case on both breach of duty and causation, MPS may seek the opinion of a quantum expert to assist in determining the size.

  2. FORATOM - IAEA Workshop, Mamaia 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, Nicolai

    2006-01-01

    The FORATOM Workshop was organized on May 16-19, 2006 by IAEA and FORATOM in the frame of common actions of experience exchange planned to take place every 18 months. At the same time at Mamaia, Romania, a meeting of the Business Excellence FORATOM group took place in which the Romanian organization ROMATOM is represented by the author of the paper from behalf of the Quality Management Group. Romanian Atomic Forum, ROMATOM as a member of European Atomic Forum, FORATOM, plays an active role in nuclear field in Romania. The Business Excellence Working Group, as the most active group in FORATOM, has the following objectives: - to promote and support the safe and effective performance of nuclear facilities to encourage the common of high level business standards; - to support FORATOM to enable decision makers and the public at large to get informed; - to facilities the exchange of best practices for management systems in order to raise the level of awareness and understanding so that members can better support the improvement within the member organizations, the other nuclear facilities in the BEx -WG member countries, the regular organization in the member countries, and international organizations active in the same fields of interest; - to provide a focus for influencing the development and harmonization of nuclear industry standards and practices to achieve improved business effectiveness and quality and safety management of nuclear facilities; - to advise FORATOM on management system issues. The FORATOM Workshop organized at Mamaia was held under the topics 'Successful Management of Organizational Change'. Three key issues for debate were established as follows: - key issue 1, effective handling of organizational change: drivers for change; managing change: the IAEA perspective; managing change within a utility; managing outsourcing; - key issue 2, organizational culture and safety culture: management systems and safety culture; proactive management; developing

  3. IAEA General Conference begins annual session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The document gives general information about the opening and the programme of the 45th regular session of the IAEA General Conference (17-21 September 2001, Austria Center Vienna). The conference is attended by ministers and high-level governmental representatives from 132 Member States of the IAEA

  4. IAEA Director General to Visit Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Full text: The Director General of the IAEA, Yukiya Amano, will visit Iran for meetings on 17 August 2014 with Iranian leaders and senior officials. The visit is part of the efforts to advance dialogue and cooperation between the Agency and Iran. (IAEA)

  5. Expert Systems and Intelligent Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, H. M.

    1987-01-01

    Explores what an intelligent information retrieval system involves and why expert system techniques might interest system designers. Expert systems research is reviewed with emphasis on components, architecture, and computer interaction, and it is concluded that information retrieval is not an ideal problem domain for expert system application at…

  6. Expert Systems: What Is an Expert System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Beverly K.; Main, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Describes expert systems and discusses their use in libraries. Highlights include parts of an expert system; expert system shells; an example of how to build an expert system; a bibliography of 34 sources of information on expert systems in libraries; and a list of 10 expert system shells used in libraries. (Contains five references.) (LRW)

  7. How to improve nuclear security worldwide: Three young women win IAEA essay contest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Three essays that provided actionable and innovative recommendations to strengthen nuclear security through stronger border controls, closer international cooperation and public education won the IAEA’s first ever nuclear security essay contest. In preparation for the International Conference on Nuclear Security: Commitments and Actions, the IAEA invited students and young professionals to submit essays focusing on challenges and recommendations to strengthen nuclear security. A panel of experts from the IAEA and the International Nuclear Security Education Network selected three winners from among the 353 submissions received. The winners will present their papers at the conference, taking place in Vienna in December 2016.

  8. How to improve nuclear security worldwide: Three young women win IAEA essay contest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Three essays that provided actionable and innovative recommendations to strengthen nuclear security through stronger border controls, closer international cooperation and public education won the IAEA’s first ever nuclear security essay contest. In preparation for the International Conference on Nuclear Security: Commitments and Actions, the IAEA invited students and young professionals to submit essays focusing on challenges and recommendations to strengthen nuclear security. A panel of experts from the IAEA and the International Nuclear Security Education Network selected three winners from among the 353 submissions received. The winners will present their papers at the conference, taking place in Vienna in December 2016

  9. Directory of IAEA databases. 4. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    This fourth edition of the Directory of IAEA Databases has been prepared within the Division of NESI. ITs main objective is to describe the computerized information sources available to the public. This directory contains all publicly available databases which are produced at the IAEA. This includes databases stored on the mainframe, LAN servers and user PCs. All IAEA Division Directors have been requested to register the existence of their databases with NESI. At the data of printing, some of the information in the directory will be already obsolete. For the most up-to-date information please see the IAEA's World Wide Web site at URL: http:/www.iaea.or.at/databases/dbdir/. Refs, figs, tabs

  10. The k0-IAEA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossbach, M.; Blaauw, M.; Bacchi, M.A.; Xilei Lin

    2007-01-01

    New software was developed to assist users of the k 0 -approach in NAA to harmonize their results. The k 0 -IAEA software uses the holistic approach developed at the Delft Interfaculty Reactor Institute and incorporates the latest k 0 data catalogue together with additional information on coincidence and sum peaks, which together are used in the joint evaluation of samples. Multiple irradiations as well as multiple measurements of samples are treated simultaneously. Flux parameter determination as well as efficiency calibrations of detectors are accommodated using a singlemeasurement approach as developed at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft. The standard Windows software will stimulate the application of the k 0 approach through the free distribution and updates of the program. (author)

  11. IAEA Response and Assistance Network. Date Effective: 1 September 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    accepted the new draft as resolving the critical issues that had been hindering participation. To reflect the new concept of the network, it was decided to change the name of the network to Response Assistance Network (RANET), and EPR-RANET 2006 was issued as the third edition of the assistance network publication. The 2010 edition of EPR-RANET contained minor changes in the concept of the network. The functional areas of assistance were restructured to facilitate easier registration, the name of the network was changed to Response and Assistance Network, and the responsibilities and duties of the Assistance Mission Leader were added. EPRRANET 2010 no longer had attachments, as all three of the previous RANET attachments were incorporated into the main body of the text. As was reflected in the editions of EPR-RANET up to and including the 2010 edition, RANET had primarily focused on providing assistance to manage the consequences following a nuclear or radiological incident or emergency and had not focused on the on-site assessment and management of emergencies at nuclear installations. Although assistance under the Assistance Convention was not requested and RANET was not used in response to the accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in March 2011, subsequent evaluation of the event identified areas where RANET could be enhanced. These were captured in the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (GOV/2011/59-GC(55)/14), which was endorsed by the General Conference of the IAEA in September 2011. In January 2012, the IAEA Secretariat convened a consultancy meeting on the extension of RANET capabilities under the IAEA's Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. The purpose of the consultancy was to discuss the enhancement of RANET pursuant to the Action Plan, to agree on the methods to implement these enhancements, and to continue to encourage States to register their National Assistance Capabilities under RANET. The meeting concluded that ''There is a need to fully

  12. Radiation safety - an IAEA perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    1993-01-01

    The activities of the IAEA relating to radiation safety cover: The preparation of International Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources - it is expected that the new Basic Safety Standards will be adopted by the sponsoring organizations in 1994. The radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident: the thyroid cancer controversy - the hypothesis that must be tested is whether the reported increased incidence of thyroid cancer due to exposure to radioactive iodine released in the Chernobyl accident, and there are several questions that must be answered before a firm conclusion can be reached. Emergency Response Services (ERS): In March 1993, at the request of Viet Nam, which invoked the Energency Assistance Convention, a medical team organized by the IAEA went to Hanoi and assisted in arranging for an overexposed person to be transferred from Viet Nam to Paris for specialized medical treatment. In April 1993, the ERS was used to inform Member States of the consequences of an explosion at the Tomsk 7 fuel reprocessing plant in Siberia, Russia, which caused a radiation leak. Reassessing the long range transport of radioactive material through the environment: Data from the Chernobyl accident have been used for model validation in the Atmospheric Transport Model Evaluation Study (ATMES). A follow-up programme, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) with experimental studies of long range atmospheric movements over Europe has been established in order to increase knowledge and prediction capability. As part of the programme, a non-toxic atmospheric tracer will be released under suitable conditions in 1994. The Radiation Protection Advisory Teams Service (RAPAT): In many of the developing countries visited, the lack of an adequate infrastructure for radiation protection is the main obstacle to improved radiation protection. Strengthening radiation and nuclear safety infrastructures in successor states of the USSR: The

  13. The IAEA as a publisher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    One of the largest publishing enterprises in Vienna has developed in then Agency, incidental to its function of disseminating scientific information. The Agency recently completed its sixth year of scientific publication of literature dealing with the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Quite early in the history of IAEA, this work grew to considerable dimensions. In 1959 the programme consisted of two volumes in the Proceedings series, one in the Safety series, and four Technical Directories, making a total in that year of 18 000 books, in addition to those prepared for free distribution. In the following year, as Agency meetings and other activities developed, the list was much longer consisting of six volumes in the Proceedings series, two in the Safety series, two in the Technical Directory series, eight in the Review series, two in the Bibliographical series, three panel reports, one volume in the legal series and the first issue of 'Nuclear Fusion'. The total number of volumes sold was 24 000, in addition to the large number for free distribution. Thereafter, there was some difficulty in keeping up with the expanding demands, and some arrears of contract printing began to accumulate. It was therefore decided to introduce internal printing of Agency publications. The adoption of the 'cold type' method in 1962 led to considerable savings and faster production. During 1963, printing and binding equipment was installed which rendered the Agency independent of contractual services. Current policy is to print and bind internally all IAEA publications except the journal, 'Nuclear Fusion', Average annual production now consists of about twenty volumes of the proceedings of scientific meetings, six technical directories (the Directory of Nuclear Reactors has been published in its fifth edition), several bibliographies and numerous technical reports

  14. Clarifying the role of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    1983-01-01

    The IAEA has many roles in promoting the role of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. The most significant role that the IAEA undertakes is the development and application of safeguards to nuclear material, other material, equipment and facilities; this work consumes about 35% of the IAEA budget. The authority, procedures and limitations for the application of safeguards were described together with the relationship between the IAEA and the States where safeguards are in effect. Claims that the IAEA is not adequately fulfilling its safeguard role are usually based on misunderstandings of its role and authority. The IAEA's relationship to inspected States is not adversarial, regulatory, or guarding. It provides assurance to all States that peaceful nuclear activities are not diverted to a military program and in so doing enhances the reputation of States to whom safeguards are applied. Safeguards would be only one of many factors that would be involved in a States embarking on a military nuclear program. If proliferation of nuclear weapons occurs, this may be due in entirety or in part to these other factors. Many States could now undertake a military program but do not do so, because of their enlightened viewpoint that such activities are not in their own, or the world's best interests. However, any trend to further proliferation of nuclear weapons could be diminished by: -a lessening of political and economic tension between States, -restrictions on the supply of required technology, equipment, and material, and -an effective IAEA safeguard regime. There has been a regrettable trend to politicization in the direction and operation of the IAEA. It is hoped that this trend will be reversed and that IAEA will return to its earlier more technical role. There is a pressing need for the general public and governments to more fully understand the IAEA's role and its limitations

  15. IAEA news: • Newcomer countries face common challenges in nuclear infrastructure development. • Safety and licensing requirements for small modular reactors: IAEA hosts first workshop for regulators. • IAEA reaches milestone in disposal of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollar, Lenka; Dyck, Elisabeth; Dixit, Aabha; Gaspar, Miklos; Gil, Laura

    2016-01-01

    • Newcomer countries face common challenges in nuclear infrastructure development: Countries embarking on a nuclear power programme need to make sure that the development of their legal, regulatory and support infrastructure keeps pace with the construction of the power plant itself. This is the only way to ensure that the programme proceeds in a safe, secure and sustainable way, concluded participants of a workshop on nuclear power infrastructure development hosted at the IAEA last February. • Safety and licensing requirements for small modular reactors: IAEA hosts first workshop for regulators: A new generation of advanced, prefab nuclear power reactors called small modular reactors (SMRs) could be licensed and hit the market as early as 2020, and the IAEA is helping regulators prepare for their debut. In a series of workshops that began earlier this year, the IAEA is working closely with regulators on approaches to safety and licensing ahead of potential SMR deployment worldwide. • IAEA reaches milestone in disposal of radioactive sources: Successful tests of a promising technology for moving and storing low level radioactive sealed sources are paving the way for a new disposal method for dealing with small volumes of radioactive waste around the world. The method, which involves placing and covering sealed sources in a narrow hole a few hundred metres deep, would allow countries to safely and securely take charge of their own disused radioactive sources. The proof of concept for the technology was tested in Croatia late last year — without the use of actual radioactive material.

  16. Development of IAEA description of passive safety and subsequent thoughts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The description of passive components and systems published by the IAEA in its TECDOC-626 was developed in the course of a Technical Committee Meeting held in Sweden and two subsequent Consultants Meetings held in Vienna. This description is reviewed and discussed in terms of the philosophies behind it, alternatives considered, problems encountered, and conclusions drawn. Also discussed is an Appendix to the TECDOC, which illustrates the spectrum of possibilities from passive to active by describing four typical categories of passivity. Subsequent thoughts on passive safety include a discussion of its advantages and disadvantages, concluding with a summary of current views and problems with it. (author). 8 refs

  17. Testing the validity of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safety culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Castro, Borja; Gracia, Francisco J; Peiró, José M; Pietrantoni, Luca; Hernández, Ana

    2013-11-01

    This paper takes the first steps to empirically validate the widely used model of safety culture of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), composed of five dimensions, further specified by 37 attributes. To do so, three independent and complementary studies are presented. First, 290 students serve to collect evidence about the face validity of the model. Second, 48 experts in organizational behavior judge its content validity. And third, 468 workers in a Spanish nuclear power plant help to reveal how closely the theoretical five-dimensional model can be replicated. Our findings suggest that several attributes of the model may not be related to their corresponding dimensions. According to our results, a one-dimensional structure fits the data better than the five dimensions proposed by the IAEA. Moreover, the IAEA model, as it stands, seems to have rather moderate content validity and low face validity. Practical implications for researchers and practitioners are included. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. IAEA Perspectives on Radiological Characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Patrick; Ljubenov, Vladan

    2012-01-01

    Requirements for characterization of radiological and other hazards in nuclear facilities are reflected in the IAEA Safety Standards. WS-R-5, Safety Requirements for Decommissioning of Facilities using Radioactive Material, includes a requirement that 'During the preparation of the final decommissioning plan, the extent and type of radioactive material (irradiated and contaminated structures and components) at the facility shall be determined by means of a detailed characterization survey and on the basis of records collected during the operational period'. The subsidiary Safety Guide WS-G-2.1, Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants and Research Reactors, further elaborates that 'A survey of radiological and non-radiological hazards provides an important input for the safety assessment and for implementing a safe approach during the work'. Although the characterisation requirements addressed in the Safety Standards relate primarily to the detailed survey activities undertaken following the shutdown of the facility, it is evident that radiological characterization is of relevance to all major phases of the lifetime of a nuclear facility, including: - the siting phase - baseline surveys are undertaken to determine background radiation levels; - the construction phase - construction materials are retained to support future calculations of radioactivity distributions; - the operational phase - surveys are done regularly, with additional surveys being required following incidents involving plant contamination; - the transition phase - detailed radiological surveys are required to support the development of the final decommissioning plan; and - the closure phase - a final survey of the site and any remaining structures will be needed to support an application for release of the site from regulatory control. In the case of facilities that are already shut down, the main purpose of radiological characterisation is to provide a reliable database of information on the

  19. IAEA '77: between politics and factual constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, A.

    1976-01-01

    The IAEA's organization of its 20th General Conference at Rio de Janeiro clearly underlined the importance of a comprehensive international transfer of nuclear technology. Despite all efforts to keep the Agency out of general political confrontations, the Conference was tinged politically by the PLO and South Africa problems. Besides the next five year program, which was agreed upon in the light of existing factual constraints, the support and control functions of the IAEA and next year's Salzburg Fuel Cycle Conference were other main topics of discussion. The 1977 IAEA budget was approved at a level of 43.5 million, the General Fund at 6.5 million. (orig.) [de

  20. The IAEA/WHO Network of SSDLs. Short history, activity and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, Hans; Zsdanszky, Kalman

    1990-01-01

    In 1968 at an IAEA meeting in Caracas, Venezuela, the dosimetric requirements of radiotherapy centres were discussed. At that time many radiotherapy departments in developing countries did not have a dosimeter. Even those that had a dosimeter were seldom able to send it to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (PSDL) for proper calibration. The establishment of regional dosimeter calibration laboratories was recommended by the participating experts including representatives of WHO. There was general consent that it was not necessary to establish in every country a PSDL, which would need a very qualified staff and sophisticated equipment. Instead, the establishment of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) was found to be an adequate solution to the problem. The new idea of SSDLs and their role within the international metrology system was thoroughly discussed at a joint IAEA/WHO meeting in Rio de Janeiro (scientific secretaries: H.H. Eisenlohr, IAEA and W. Seelentag, WHO) in December 1974. Considering the fact that an SSDL cannot work in isolation the experts recommended the setting up of an international Network of SSDLs under the auspices of the IAEA and WHO. The statutes of the IAEA/WHO Network of SSDLs were laid down in a Working Arrangement between the IAEA and WHO in April 1976. Later in 1976 the two Directors General of the IAEA and WHO formally announced by circular letters to their respective member states the establishment of the IAEA/WHO Network of SSDL. The Criteria for the Establishment of a Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory were formulated by an Advisory Group and were attached to these letters. At that time there existed already 8 laboratories, which had been designated by WHO during the period 1968-1976 as regional reference centres for dosimetry. Another SSDL had been set up in Rio de Janeiro in collaboration between the Brazilian Government, the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany, and the IAEA. As a consequence of the

  1. Verifying compliance with nuclear non-proliferation undertakings: IAEA safeguards agreements and additional protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    This report provides background information on safeguards and explains procedures for States to conclude Additional Protocols to comprehensive Safeguards Agreements with the IAEA. Since the IAEA was founded in 1957, its safeguards system has been an indispensable component of the nuclear non-proliferation regime and has facilitated peaceful nuclear cooperation. In recognition of this, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) makes it mandatory for all non-nuclear-weapon States (NNWS) party to the Treaty to conclude comprehensive safeguards agreements with the IAEA, and thus allow for the application of safeguards to all their nuclear material. Under Article III of the NPT, all NNWS undertake to accept safeguards, as set forth in agreements to be negotiated and concluded with the IAEA, for the exclusive purpose of verification of the fulfilment of the States' obligations under the NPT. In May 1997, the IAEA Board of Governors approved the Model Additional Protocol to Safeguards Agreements (reproduced in INFCIRC/540(Corr.)) which provided for an additional legal authority. In States that have both a comprehensive safeguards agreement and an additional protocol in force, the IAEA is able to optimize the implementation of all safeguards measures available. In order to simplify certain procedures under comprehensive safeguards agreements for States with little or no nuclear material and no nuclear material in a facility, the IAEA began making available, in 1971, a 'small quantities protocol' (SQP), which held in abeyance the implementation of most of the detailed provisions of comprehensive safeguards agreements for so long as the State concerned satisfied these criteria. The safeguards system aims at detecting and deterring the diversion of nuclear material. Such material includes enriched uranium, plutonium and uranium-233, which could be used directly in nuclear weapons. It also includes natural uranium and depleted uranium, the latter of which is

  2. The Contracting Parties' Ability To Conclude The Employment Contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Constantina NENU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study's main objective is to analyze certain effects produced by the changes of the Labor Code and by the entry into force of the current Romanian Civil Code. These effects refer to one of the fundamental conditions for the valid conclusion of the individual employment contract, that is, to the legal capacity of employers and employees. Thus, a complete analysis of legal regulations and of the correlations between different provisions on the legal capacity of parties to the individual employment contract is required to identify the existing noncompliance and to propose solutions. The research demonstrated that the current regulatory framework governing the legal capacity of the parties to an individual employment contract does not entirely correspond to the social reality. Therefore, only the employer benefits from a relatively comprehensive statutory regulation on the legal capacity to conclude an individual employment contract. The employee, however, does not benefit from the same attention from legislature. Considering the above, the study represents a significant scientific contribution, whose value lies in the proposed changes to modify legislature, so that the legal capacity of job holders would benefit from fair regulation, in accordance with the principle of legal protection of employee rights.

  3. IAEA puts cyber security in focus for nuclear facilities in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear 24, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Later in 2015 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will convene a special conference to discuss computer security, in the wake of cyber attacks on global financial institutions and government agencies that were increasingly in the news. According to the IAEA, the prevalence of IT security incidents in recent years involving the Stuxnet malware 'demonstrated that nuclear facilities can be susceptible to cyber attack'. The IAEA said this and other events have significantly raised global concerns over potential vulnerabilities and the possibility of a cyber attack, or a joint cyber-physical attack, that could impact on nuclear security. The IAEA has correctly identified that the use of computers and other digital electronic equipment in physical protection systems at nuclear facilities, as well as in facility safety systems, instrumentation, information processing and communication, 'continues to grow and presents an ever more likely target for cyber attack'. The agency's Vienna conference, to be held in June, will review emerging trends in computer security and areas that may still need to be addressed. The meeting follows a declaration of ministers of IAEA member states in 2013 that called on the agency to help raise awareness of the growing threat of cyber attacks and their potential impact on nuclear security. The conference is being organised 'to foster international cooperation in computer security as an essential element of nuclear security', the IAEA said. Details of the IAEA's 'International Conference on Computer Security in a Nuclear World: Expert Discussion and Exchange' are on the 'meetings' section of the agency's web site.

  4. IAEA programme on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala, F.; Di Meglio, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the IAEA programme on research reactor safety and includes the safety related areas of conversions to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The program is based on the IAEA statutory responsibilities as they apply to the requirements of over 320 research reactors operating around the world. The programme covers four major areas: (a) the development of safety documents; (b) safety missions to research reactor facilities; (c) support of research programmes on research reactor safety; (d) support of Technical Cooperation projects on research reactor safety issues. The demand for these activities by the IAEA member states has increased substantially in recent years especially in developing countries with increasing emphasis being placed on LEU conversion matters. In response to this demand, the IAEA has undertaken an extensive programme for each of the four areas above. (author)

  5. IAEA technical committee meeting on fusion safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.

    2000-01-01

    The 7th IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Fusion Reactor Safety was held in Cannes, France on 13-16 June 2000. The purpose of the meeting was to learn lessons from current installations and studies for the future

  6. Physical protection in relation to IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnier, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    The general structure of the safeguards system, the SSAC interfaces, and physical protection principles, equipment, and techniques are reviewed. In addition, the interactions between the State, the facility operator, and the IAEA are described

  7. Scientometric study of IAEA activation analysis conferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.S.

    1979-01-01

    Multiple speakers at three IAEA conferences on NAA in Life Sciences are analyzed and compared with other conferences; results indicate that these NAA conferences are about as open for participation as any of the other conferences

  8. JURISDICTION RULES APPLICABLE TO CONTRACTS CONCLUDED BY ELECTRONIC MEANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA GIURANIUC (TUDORACHE

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyse the legislation, doctrinal opinions and relevant case law regarding the rules of jurisdiction applicable to the cases arising from contracts concluded by electronic means (e-contracts.Considering the elements of foreign origin that often affect this type of contracts, and the lack of a global agreement regarding international jurisdiction and recognition and enforcement of judgements, the objectives pursued by the author are:- identification of rules of jurisdiction applicable to the cases arising from e-contracts,- identification of problems that could arise from law’s interpretation,- issuing of the de lege ferenda proposals.At European Union level, according to the provisions of Brussels I Regulation, as a general rule, actions against a person domiciled in a Member State shall be brought to the courts of that State.According to the same Regulation, cases resulting from a contractual relationship may be decided by the courts of the place of performance of the contractual obligation. In lack of specific jurisdictional rules, the above rules apply to B2B e-contracts. In the case of B2C e-contracts, the consumer can bring proceedings either before the courts of the Member State of his domicile or before the courts of the Member State of the defendant’s domicile. The consumer can only be sued in the Member State of his domicile. The rules protecting the consumer apply if the trader ‘directs its activities’ to the Member State in which the consumer is domiciled. If the defendant is not domiciled in a Member State, the international jurisdiction is determined, in each Member State, according to its national rules of international private laws.

  9. Newly elected IAEA Board of Governors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The document gives information about the election of 11 Member States to the IAEA Board of Governors, the 35-member policy-making body, during the 45th regular session of the IAEA's General Conference (17-21 September 2001, Austria Center, Vienna). The newly elected Member States are: Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Chile, Colombia, Islamic Republic of Iran, Kuwait, Morocco, Philippines, Romania, Spain, and Turkey. The other 24 Member States of the Board are also given

  10. Newly elected IAEA Board of Governors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document gives information about the election of 11 Member States to the IAEA Board of Governors, the 35-member policy-making body, during the 44th regular session of the IAEA's General Conference (18 - 22 September 2000, Austria Center, Vienna). The newly elected Member States are: Argentina, Egypt, Ghana, Ireland, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Switzerland, Thailand, Ukraine. The other 24 Member States of the Board are also given

  11. The International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzutti, A.A.C.

    1980-01-01

    The origens, functions and objectives of the IAEA are analysed. The application of safeguards to avoid military uses of nuclear energy is discussed. In the final section the agrement between Brazil and Germany regarding IAEA safeguards, as well as the competence for executing the brazilian program are explained. It is, then, an informative study dealing with nuclear energy and its peaceful path, the creation of International Fuel Cycle Evaluation and nonproliferation [pt

  12. INAA of RM IAEA-155 whey powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Lixin; Tian Weizhi

    1993-01-01

    An IAEA biological RM IAEA-155 whey powder was analysed for phosphorus, as well as other 24 elements by INAA. The Bremsstrahlung photons produced by 32 P is measured by a HpGe spectrometer. The interferences involved in P determination were comprehensively studied and this method was also applied to the determinations of P in several established biological NBS SRMs and proved to be reliable for a wide range of P contents in biological samples

  13. Typical IAEA inspection procedures for model plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, W.

    1984-01-01

    This session briefly refers to the legal basis for IAEA inspections and to their objectives. It describes in detail the planning and performance of IAEA inspections, including the examination of records, the comparison of facility records with State reports, flow and inventory verifications, the design of statistical sampling plans, and Agency's independent verification measurements. In addition, the session addresses the principles of Material Balance and MUF evaluation, as well as the content and format of summary statements and related problems

  14. The public information programme of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Hans-Friedrich

    1989-01-01

    The public information programme of the IAEA is deter-mined by two basic criteria: First by the Statute of the IAEA which defines its objectives as 'to seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world' as well as 'to ensure as far as it is able, that assistance provided by it or at its request or under its supervision or control is not used in such a way as to further any military purpose'; second by the fact that the IAEA is an intergovernmental organization, which means that it has to fulfill request of independent, sovereign governments. In a discussion of the public infomation program of the IAEA, three main fields of activities always have to be kept in mind: Nuclear applications in agriculture, medicine, industry, hydrology, research, etc.; The use of nuclear energy for electricity generation, here mainly the aspects of safety and economics; and safeguards. From this it can be understood that the public information activities of the IAEA must have different perspectives: There are non-controversial fields for public information work, such as ost all aspects of nuclear application employing radiation and Isotopes. -- There are activities of the IAEA where the work in general is not questioned but considered absolutely necessary. -- There are finally controversial fields, where the IAEA is blamed for being too promotional. Examples are the IAEA's activities in nuclear power program planning as well as in food irradiation. In these controversial fields, it is very important to look for long-term, issue-oriented strategies to communicate good factual information in perspective

  15. Evaluation and development of advanced nuclear materials: IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inozemtsev, V.; Basak, U.; Killeen, J.; Dyck, G.; Zeman, A.; )

    2011-01-01

    Economical, environmental and non-proliferation issues associated with sustainable development of nuclear power bring about a need for optimization of fuel cycles and implementation of advanced nuclear systems. While a number of physical and design concepts are available for innovative reactors, the absence of reliable materials able to sustain new challenging irradiation conditions represents the real bottle-neck for practical implementation of these promising ideas. Materials performance and integrity are key issues for the safety and competitiveness of future nuclear installations being developed for sustainable nuclear energy production incorporating fuel recycling and waste transmutation systems. These systems will feature high thermal operational efficiency, improved utilization of resources (both fissile and fertile materials) and reduced production of nuclear waste. They will require development, qualification and deployment of new and advanced fuel and structural materials with improved mechanical and chemical properties combined with high radiation and corrosion resistance. The extensive, diverse, and expensive efforts toward the development of these materials can be more effectively organized within international collaborative programmes with wide participation of research, design and engineering communities. IAEA carries out a number of international projects supporting interested Member States with the use of available IAEA program implementation tools (Coordinated Research Projects, Technical Meetings, Expert Reviews, etc). The presentation summarizes the activities targeting material developments for advanced nuclear systems, with particular emphasis on fast reactors, which are the focal topics of IAEA Coordinated Research Projects 'Accelerator Simulation and Theoretical Modelling of Radiation Effects' (on-going), 'Benchmarking of Structural Materials Pre-Selected for Advanced Nuclear Reactors', 'Examination of advanced fast reactor fuel and core

  16. IAEA/UNESCO Joint International Isotopes in Hydrology Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezgueler, H.

    2002-01-01

    International Hydrology Programme (IHP) of UNESCO was established in 1965 as International Hydrological Decade. This programme was transformed to the IHP having the phases of 6-year duration. Presently, IHP-VI Phase (2002-2007) is based on the fundamental principle that freshwater is as essential to sustainable development as it is to life and that water, beyond its geophysical, chemical, biological function in the hydrological cycle, has social, economic and environmental values that are inter-linked and mutually supportive. The international Programme for Isotopes in the Hydrological Cycle 'proposal was presented by IAEA to the Fifth UNESCO-WMO International Conference on Hydrology' held in Geneva in 1999. The Conference noted the proposal and invited UNESCO and IAEA to develop the proposal further in collaboration with WMO, in order to submit it to the relevant bodies of the organizations concerned. At the end of this study, the IAEA / UNESCO Joint International Isotopes in Hydrology Programme (JIIHP) was formed in 2001. The JIIHP will service a number of international needs including the dissemination of research and application results in isotope methodologies through a global infrastructure network. This is foreseen primarily through an appropriate expansion of the IHP National Committees to include experts in isotope methods in hydrology in order to facilitate a more efficient dialogue and mainstreaming of isotope methods in member states of UNESCO. Main areas for co-operation have already been incorporated within the IHP-VI plans. In this paper, with some brief information on the studies to be realised in the near future under the framework of this programme JIIHP, the isotop related priorities of the Turkish hydrology community are explained herewith

  17. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 12, no. 4(77). Sep-Oct 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA General Conference concludes: States strengthen nuclear cooperation, States approve Dr. ElBaradei as next Director General, honour Dr. Blix, New Board Chairman: Ambassador Ikeda, Dr. ElBaradei outlines challenges ahead, Scientific programme at GC, Productive year, Dr. Blix reports, States sign to accept new safeguards measures, Fortieth anniversary presentations, Meetings calendar, Marine scientists plan expedition to Northwest Pacific, States sign new joint convention, Trilateral initiative: Verifying ex-weapons material, Nuclear liability regime strengthened, New IAEA books, and other short information

  18. Report of the IAEA/RCA-NDT education project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooka, Kiichi; Terada, Kunio; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Noboru.

    1988-01-01

    The Japan Non-Destructive Test (NDT) Association has been carried out an NDT technical education project with support from IAEA. Phase I of the project was successfully completed last year. The present report briefly outlines the second five-year plan (Phase II) to be carried out under the project. The project was first established in 1981 after receiving a request from IAEA to provide NDT education for participants from the RCA countries (13 countries in Asian and Pacific area). Phase I was mainly designed to provide lectures on NDT techniques. Prior to the start of Phase II, the International Education Subcommittee was established in December 1986 to take the leadership in carrying out Phase II of the project. In addition, the NDT Expert Working Group (formally called Advisory Group) has been installed which consists of representative from Japan. Australia India and Singapore. The Group held nine meetings during Phase I. Three lecture meetings at Singapore and another three at Tokyo were held to provide education according to a plan developed by the Group. It has been decided that Japan be support the lecture meetings to be held during Phase II. To conduct such meetings, a group comprising all of the National Coordinators from the RCA countries was set up to replace the Working Group. The National Coordinator Conference was held four times since its establishment. (N.K.)

  19. IAEA programme on nuclear fuel cycle and materials technologies - 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a brief description and the main objectives of IAEA Programme B on Nuclear fuel cycle are given. The following Coordinated Research Projects: 1) Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC); 2) Structural Materials Radiation Effects (SMoRE); 3) Water Chemistry (FUWAC) and 4) Fuel Modelling (FUMEX-III) are shortly described. The data collected by the IAEA Expert Group of Fuel Failures in Water Cooled Reactors including information about fuel assembly damage that did not result in breach of the fuel rod cladding, such as assembly bow or crud deposition an the experience with these unexpected fuel issues shows that they can seriously affect plant operations, and it is clear that concerns about reliability in this area are of similar importance today as fuel rod failures, at least for LWR fuel are discussed. Detection, examination and analysis of fuel failures and description of failures and mitigation measures as well as preparation of a Monograph on Zirconium including an overview of Zirconium for nuclear applications, including extraction, forming, properties and irradiation experience are presented

  20. The IAEA's safeguards systems. Ready for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The publication reviews the IAEA's safeguards system, answering the following questions: What is being done to halt the further spread of nuclear weapons? Why are IAEA Safeguards important? what assurances do safeguards seek to provide? How are safeguards agreements implemented? What specific challenges have there been for IAEA verification? Can the IAEA prevent the diversion of declared Material? How has the safeguards system been strengthened? How much do safeguards cost? What is the future of IAEA verification? (author)

  1. The IAEA's safeguards system. Ready for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The publication reviews the IAEA's safeguards system, answering the following questions: What is being done to halt the further spread of nuclear weapons? Why are IAEA Safeguards important? What assurances do safeguards seek to provide? How are safeguards agreements implemented? What specific challenges have there been for IAEA verification? Can the IAEA prevent the diversion of declared Material? How has the safeguards system been strengthened? How much do safeguards cost? What is the future of IAEA verification?

  2. Improving the Database for Physical and Chemical Sputtering. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B. J.

    2013-02-01

    Seven experts and IAEA staff convened in Vienna to review the existing database for physical and chemical sputtering of fusion wall materials and to make recommendations about priorities for further work. Recommendations were made about database needs for pure and mixed Be, C and W wall material for the processes of physical and chemical sputtering, reflection, penetration and trapping and also for effects of surface and material microstructure. The proceedings and recommendations of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  3. IAEA scientific forum to focus on nuclear technology's role in serving human needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Science and technology's critical role in eradicating famine and disease - among the root causes of global instability - was addressed by some of the world's leading experts at an IAEA forum in Vienna, 18-19 September. The meeting underlined the contribution of nuclear science and technology to sustainable development and the betterment of human welfare and stressed the need for the world's wealthiest nations to give it more support

  4. Transport safety research abstracts. No. 2. Information on research recently concluded and in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Transport Safety Research Abstracts (TSRA) was first published by the IAEA in 1991 as a means of disseminating information on research in radioactive material transport. This second edition utilizes International Nuclear Information System (INIS) protocol for data processing and report preparation for a research-in-progress database established by the IAEA's Division of Scientific and Technical Information. INIS subject categories and descriptors are included in the information about each project

  5. Nuclear non-proliferation states urged to conclude Safeguards Agreement with International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document contains a brief presentation of the annual report of the IAEA, the statement of the Director General of the IAEA at the General Assembly Plenary with emphasis on Agency's actions to strengthen safeguards, and statements made by the representatives of Brazil, Finland, Mexico, United States, Lithuania, Cuba, Czech Republic, Japan, Egypt, Ukraine, South Africa, India, Myanmar, and the Russian Federation at the 46th Meeting, on 4 November 1999

  6. Clinical training of medical physicists. IAEA experience in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, D.

    2013-01-01

    Medical physicists make a major contribution to the safe and effective diagnosis and treatment of patients with cancer and other illnesses. The medical physicist's responsibilities include the major areas of dosimetry, treatment planning, quality assurance, image quality, optimization, equipment management, research, teaching, and radiation safety. With the increasing complexity of technological application to medicine the competence of trained physicists is critical to good patient care, with counter examples, sadly evident in the literature. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in conjunction with international experts, including from Japan, has developed clinical training programmes that have been successfully implemented on a pilot basis in a number of countries in Asia. A new project is to begin in 2014 which will focus increasingly on the use of electronic teaching material and experiences, to assist medical physicists in clinical training increasingly in more remote locations in Asia. (author)

  7. IAEA completes third mission to Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA-led team of international experts has completed its third mission, at the invitation of the Government of Japan. This follow-up mission continued to share the lessons learned from the effects of the July 2007 earthquake of the Kashiwazaki- Kariwa nuclear power plant. The mission received further evidence confirming the findings of previous missions regarding the safe performance of the plant during and after the earthquake. The mission found that there is consensus in the scientific community about the causes of the unexpectedly large ground motions experienced at the plant site during the July 2007 earthquake and, consequently, it has been possible to identify the precautions needed to be taken in relation to possible future events. These precautions were based on extensive studies and assessments conducted by a number of specialized institutions and experts in different fields. The necessary upgrades and actions were consequently defined and are being implemented by the Japanese utility for both safety and non-safety related components at the nuclear power plant. The lessons learned from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa experience has also contributed to the development of IAEA Safety Standards related to seismic safety. These standards are expected to be released shortly. The mission's report will be provided to the Japanese Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and will be made publicly available in January 2009. The IAEA conducted two previous missions to the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP in August 2007 and January/February 2008. The experience from recent strong seismic events and the lessons learned through the missions to Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP have led to the establishment of an International Seismic Safety Centre (ISSC) at the IAEA that is working as a focal point for seismic safety- related information about nuclear installations. Related Resources: (1) January 2008 IAEA Report: Follow-up IAEA Mission in Relation to the Findings and Lessons

  8. Safeguards Implementation Practices Guide on Provision of Information to the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The IAEA implements safeguards pursuant to agreements concluded with States. It is in the interests of both States and the IAEA to cooperate to facilitate the practical implementation of safeguards. Such cooperation is explicitly required under all types of safeguards agreement and is furthered through a common understanding of the respective rights and obligations of States and the IAEA. To address this, in 2012 the IAEA published IAEA Services Series No. 21, Guidance for States Implementing Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols, which aimed at enhancing understanding and improving cooperation in safeguards implementation. To meet their safeguards obligations, States may establish different processes and procedures at the national level, and set up their infrastructure to meet their specific needs. Indeed, a variety of approaches are to be expected, owing to differences in the size and complexity of States’ nuclear programmes, their regulatory framework and other factors. The purpose of this Safeguards Implementation Practices (SIP) Guide is to share the experiences and good practices as well as the lessons learned by both States and the IAEA, acquired over the many decades of safeguards implementation. This SIP Guide addresses the important topic of the provision of information by States to the IAEA. Declarations by States form the basis for IAEA verification activities, and the quality and timeliness of such declarations impact significantly the efficiency of safeguards implementation. The information contained in the SIP Guides is provided for explanatory purposes and their use is voluntary. The descriptions in the SIP Guides have no legal status and are not intended to add to, subtract from, amend or derogate from, in any way, the rights and obligations of the IAEA and the States set forth in The Structure and Content of Agreements between the Agency and States Required in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear

  9. International Nuclear Officials Discuss IAEA Peer Reviews of Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Senior nuclear regulators today concluded a Workshop on the Lessons Learned from the IAEA Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) Missions. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) hosted the workshop, in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, in Washington, DC, from 26 to 28 October 2011. About 60 senior regulators from 22 IAEA Member States took part in this workshop. The IRRS programme is an international peer review service offered by the IAEA to its Member States to provide an objective evaluation of their nuclear safety regulatory framework. The review is based on the internationally recognized IAEA Safety Standards. ''The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission was pleased to host the IAEA's IRRS meeting this week. The discussions over the past three days have provided an important opportunity for regulators from many countries to come together to strengthen the international peer review process,'' said U.S. NRC Chairman Gregory B. Jaczko. ''Especially after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the global community recognizes that IRRS missions fill a vital role in strengthening nuclear safety and security programs around the world, and we are proud to be a part of this important effort.'' The IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety includes actions focused towards strengthening the existing IAEA peer reviews, incorporating lessons learned and improving their effectiveness. The workshop provided a platform for the exchange of information, experience and lessons learned from the IRRS missions, as well as expectations for the IRRS programme for the near future. Further improvements in the planning and implementation of the IRRS missions in the longer term were discussed. A strong commitment of all relevant national authorities to the IRRS programme was identified as a key element of an effective regulatory framework. The conclusions of the workshop will be issued in November 2011 and the main results will be reported to the IAEA

  10. Data Evaluation and the Establishment of a Standard Library of Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion. Summary Report of an IAEA Consultants' Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.

    2012-08-01

    Seven experts in the field of atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M+PMI) data and data evaluation for fusion plasma physics met with IAEA A+M Data Unit staff at IAEA Headquarters to provide advice towards the establishment of an evaluated and recommended library of A+M+PMI data for fusion. The proceedings and conclusions of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  11. IAEA Nobel Prize money fights cancer crisis in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: More than 60 of the world's leading cancer experts are being brought together in Buenos Aires, 23-27 April 2007, by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assess Latin America's growing cancer burden. Poor medical facilities and lack of trained personnel and funding are limiting countries' ability to expand cancer care services and treat patients, while cancer rates are expected to double by 2020. More than 70 per cent of all cancer deaths occur in low and middle income countries and globally cancer kills more people than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Through its Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) the IAEA is using funds, awarded for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize, to sponsor training workshops, such as the Buenos Aires event, that alert policy makers and health experts to the pressing need for national cancer control plans and programmes. 'I hope that this event in Latin America is the first of many that will enable us to work together to help combat this dreadful disease and provide quality of life to our fellow human beings,' said Director General of the IAEA, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei. 'Cancer is a disease that is spreading very fast in the developing world and we have come to realise that we have to do much more to combat it in this part of the world.' In Latin America, there are an estimated 450,000 cancer deaths annually. The most commonly occurring cancers in men are prostate, stomach, lung, and colorectal and in women the most commonly occurring cancers are breast, cervix, stomach and colorectal. Breast and cervical cancer can be prevented through screening and early detection and can be cured in the early stages with effective treatment. The World Health Organization (WHO) warns that cancer will soon reach epidemic proportions, causing up to 10 million deaths a year by 2020. Yet at least one third of all cancers are preventable. A further one third of cases can be effectively treated if detected early. PACT was

  12. IAEA Nobel Prize money fights cancer crisis in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: More than 60 of the world's leading cancer experts are being brought together in Buenos Aires, 23-27 April 2007, by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assess Latin America's growing cancer burden. Poor medical facilities and lack of trained personnel and funding are limiting countries' ability to expand cancer care services and treat patients, while cancer rates are expected to double by 2020. More than 70 per cent of all cancer deaths occur in low and middle income countries and globally cancer kills more people than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Through its Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) the IAEA is using funds, awarded for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize, to sponsor training workshops, such as the Buenos Aires event, that alert policy makers and health experts to the pressing need for national cancer control plans and programmes. 'I hope that this event in Latin America is the first of many that will enable us to work together to help combat this dreadful disease and provide quality of life to our fellow human beings,' said Director General of the IAEA, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei. 'Cancer is a disease that is spreading very fast in the developing world and we have come to realise that we have to do much more to combat it in this part of the world.' In Latin America, there are an estimated 450,000 cancer deaths annually. The most commonly occurring cancers in men are prostate, stomach, lung, and colorectal and in women the most commonly occurring cancers are breast, cervix, stomach and colorectal. Breast and cervical cancer can be prevented through screening and early detection and can be cured in the early stages with effective treatment. The World Health Organization (WHO) warns that cancer will soon reach epidemic proportions, causing up to 10 million deaths a year by 2020. Yet at least one third of all cancers are preventable. A further one third of cases can be effectively treated if detected early. PACT was

  13. Revised IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    The revised Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources is aimed primarily at Governments, with the objective of achieving and maintaining a high level of safety and security of radioactive sources through the development, harmonization and enforcement of national policies, laws and regulations; and through the fostering of international co-operation. It focuses on sealed radioactive sources and provides guidance on legislation, regulations and the regulatory body, and import/export controls. Nuclear materials (except for sources containing 239Pu), as defined in the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials, are not covered by the revised Code, nor are radioactive sources within military or defence programmes. An earlier version of the Code was published by IAEA in 2001. At that time, agreement was not reached on a number of issues, notably those relating to the creation of comprehensive national registries for radioactive sources, obligations of States exporting radioactive sources, and the possibility of unilateral declarations of support. The need to further consider these and other issues was highlighted by the events of 11th September 2001. Since then, the IAEA's Secretariat has been working closely with Member States and relevant International Organizations to achieve consensus. The text of the revised Code was finalized at a meeting of technical and legal experts in August 2003, and it was submitted to IAEA's Board of Governors for approval in September 2003, with a recommendation that the IAEA General Conference adopt it and encourage its wide implementation. The IAEA General Conference, in September 2003, endorsed the revised Code and urged States to work towards following the guidance contained within it. This paper summarizes the history behind the revised Code, its content and the outcome of the discussions within the IAEA Board of Governors and General Conference. (Author) 8 refs

  14. The IAEA Focuses on Global Nutritional Needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2014-01-01

    For over fifty years, the IAEA has been helping its Member States to harness peaceful nuclear science and technology to bring demonstrable benefits to their people. Nutrition is one area in which the IAEA’s partnership with Member States has steadily deepened. This issue of the IAEA Bulletin focuses on the IAEA’s work in nutrition. Topics include our initiatives to measure human milk intake in breastfed infants, lean body mass (muscle mass) in lactating mothers, and the bioavailability of iron in infants and young children. We also look at the paradox of the simultaneous occurrence of both undernutrition and overnutrition that is often found within communities, and even households, across the globe. The IAEA is committed to doing everything it can to make peaceful nuclear technology available to help give all the children of the world a brighter future

  15. Safety standards of IAEA for management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincze, P.

    2005-01-01

    IAEA has developed a new series of safety standards which are assigned for constitution of the conditions and which give the instruction for setting up the management systems that integrate the aims of safety, health, life environment and quality. The new standard shall replace IAEA 50-C-Q - Requirements for security of the quality for safety in nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities as well as 14 related safety instructions mentioned in the Safety series No. 50-C/SG-Q (1996). When developing of this complex, integrated set of requirements for management systems, the IAEA requirements 50-C-Q (1996) were taken into consideration as well as the publications developed within the International organisation for standardization (ISO) ISO 9001:2000 and ISO14001: 1996. The experience of European Union member states during the development, implementation and improvement of the management systems were also taken into consideration

  16. Concluding statement by the President of the Conference [International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yizhong

    2009-01-01

    development of the understanding of nuclear technology and the technical options, and facilitating and supporting financing of new nuclear power plants. -International cooperation should be continually strengthened to carry forward research and development of advanced nuclear technologies. While further enhancing the safety, security and proliferation resistance of nuclear power plants, technology developers should pay due attention to the economic competitiveness of nuclear power in accordance with the needs of both developing and developed countries. -The Secretary General of OECD and other participants expressed the view that nuclear energy should have an important role to play in post Kyoto flexibility mechanisms. To conclude, the progress made by the nuclear industry since the 2005 Paris Conference has been significant, as indicated by the number of countries expressing interest in new nuclear plants. The IAEA plays an essential role in assisting States to develop the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. The IAEA was encouraged to continue its international cooperation with Member States and international organizations such as the OECD/NEA. In this regard, participants are looking forward to a further conference at the Ministerial level in another four years, which would be a valuable step in the direction of developing the support and assurance by all countries involved in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy

  17. Concluding Remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    I have no intention of trying to summarise or comment on the wide range of areas covered under the very general title of this meeting. Partly because, to use a colloquial English expression, I am knackered by a combination of scientific concentration and social excess. Partly because the science has been presented in such a way that for me to reinterpret and comment on it would be redundant. On the other hand, I have often been accused of never being able to keep my mouth shut and given this captive audience, it hardly seems the place to alter the habits of a lifetime. So before travel plans and exhaustion intervene too much, I will take the opportunity to make some very brief general comments.

  18. Concluding remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.H.

    1996-06-01

    This paper reviews the shift in the emphasis of the conference series that began as the International Conference on High Energy Physics and Nuclear Structure (1963) and evolved to the Particle and Nuclei International Conferences, PANIC, the latest of which was held at CEBAF in 1996. The author reviews the papers presented leading to a better appreciation of the EMC effect,, recent understanding of QCD-based effects and the quark structure of the neutron. The author examines the future roles of HERA and CEBAF in the extension of improved experiments on nuclear structure

  19. Concluding remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.

    1989-01-01

    There appeared to be unanimity on the proposition that energy and environmental problems are following a course which threatens to overwhelm all nations and all peoples unless we take corrective actions and soon. There also was unanimity on the thesis that many of the global problems require international cooperation and collaboration on a scale never before experienced and that this is a matter of survival. Nuclear energy, in its most horrible form, not only brought an end to a terrible war but has also served to discourage war between the major powers for more than 40 years, the longest such period in all of modern history, which dates back about 350 years. Nuclear arsenals, obnoxious though they are, have helped buy time for the world to put its political establishment on a path which makes global war less and less probable. This must continue but, in addition, we now need to buy time (50-100 years) to develop environmentally benign energy sources that are affordable and that will alleviate the instabilities imposed by islands of affluence in a sea of despair. This conference reinforces belief that nuclear energy can help mightily to solve that problem. In fact, it appears to be one of very few realistic options available to us. But we will fail in making this option available if we do find a way to increase the literacy of the world's people, and especially their leaders, about environmental matters generally and about the nuclear-energy option in particular. We must find ways to provide factual information with impeccable honesty and high credibility. I am hopeful that the information generated by this conference, widely disseminated, will help to do that and also to foster such conferences in the future

  20. Concluding Remarks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rwanda Journal Series F: Medicine and Health Sciences Vol. 2 No. ... in Kigali earlier this year, and the resulting journal issue dedicated to nursing and midwifery, are the first steps towards reaching the ... issue promotes leadership, delivery of high quality healthcare, the use of evidence to guide practice, and highlights the.

  1. Concluding remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. Arno; Michael G. Harrington

    1999-01-01

    The 88-year photo sequences, descriptions of historical changes, and the initial results from ecosystembased management treatments at Lick Creek portray a dynamic, ever-changing forest. The goals of ecosystem- based management at Lick Creek are to continuously maintain an open forest containing old growth as well as younger age classes of ponderosa pine. Half a century...

  2. Concluding remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The papers, all indexed separately, have been taking stock of the overall position as regards the development of fast reactors in Europe, the USSR, the USA and Japan. Good technical progress has been made with the development of this major source of electrical power for the next century. In Europe, there are two large prototypes operating, Phenix and PFR. There is also a 1200 MW e demonstration reactor (Superphenix), which is now continuing with its commissioning programme after the interruption caused by the leak from the fuel storage vessel. The Soviet Union is pressing ahead with its programme; in the USA FFTF has given outstanding reliability and in Japan the construction of Monju is going well and is on schedule for criticality in 1992. There has been general agreement on the basic economic and performance parameters of the fast reactor and its fuel cycle. In particular, after the first of a kind costs have been met, fast reactor and PWR generating costs are likely to be broadly similar, in the absence of large increases in uranium prices. However, the future of fast reactors is uncertain and the reasons for this are discussed. (author)

  3. Concluding Thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilvinskis, John; Borden, Victor M. H.

    2017-01-01

    Constructively engaging with learning analytics enables institutions of higher education to support students in more personalized, empowering ways, but to do so requires sustained levels of collaboration not commonly found within colleges and universities. Themes that emerge from the chapters of this volume provide useful principles for leveraging…

  4. Concluding remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2005-01-01

    It is own goal to realize commercial tokamak fusion plants by the middle of this century. In this special issue, the problems that should be solved for the goal, the ITER's role as the way of solution and the development programs that could not be verified in ITER are described. Acquisition of marketability for practical use of fusion plants is not easy. However, it is expected that compactification of plants, realization of high-performance and low cost are proceeded by some new ideas. So we think that there is a good feasibility for the acquisition. In about 2100, the primary energy of maximum 20% will be supplied if the economic rationality is satisfied enough, and thus there is big significance in aiming at this. In addition, the characteristics such as inexpensiveness and stability in long-term use, security, environmental safety are also important elements. In the future, we will have to obtain fruitful results through participation to ITER, and it is essential to carry steadily out the projects to activate domestic research and development. For helping to understand this special issue, the summary of fusion development by tokamaks is attached as an appendix. (T.O.)

  5. Concluding Remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budker, G.I.

    1969-01-01

    I feel that the changes which have taken place in science in the last few years open up new possibilities, about which I should like to say a few words. In 1951 we began work on thermonuclear reactions in the confident belief that we would solve the problem with a rush and immediately. I was assigned the task of ensuring that our future thermonuclear reactor would not get too much out of hand. It was like the story of the man who wished to invent a perpetual motion machine and had taken out a patent on a method for keeping it under control. This attitude stemmed from the successes in developing ''explosive thermonuclear reactors'', a task which was achieved within a very short period of time, leaving physicists with the impression that they could do everything - and do it fast. However, experience soon showed that here we had a scientific rather than a technological problem and that it would be necessary to study in detail the physics of plasmas - which we have now been doing for over ten years. [ru

  6. Status of the IAEA safety standards programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation describes the status of the IAEA safety standards program to May 2002. The safety standards program overcome whole main nuclear implementations as General safety, Nuclear safety, Radiation safety, Radioactive waste safety, and Transport safety. Throughout this report the first column provides the list of published IAEA Safety Standards. The second gives the working identification number (DS) of standards being developed or revised. The bold type indicates standard issued under the authority the Board of Governors, others are issued under authority of the Director General. The last column provides the list of Committees, the first Committee listed has the lead in the preparation and review of the particular standard

  7. Highlights of IAEA Waste Safety Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, Phil

    2004-01-01

    Phil Metcalf (IAEA, Austria) gave an overview of the background, content, sources of information and schedule for the document that is proposed to be published jointly with the NEA currently known as the 'IAEA Safety Standards Series, Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Draft Safety Requirements (DS-154)'. Discussion focused on the status of such a document, in respect of which the primacy of national laws and regulations was acknowledged by the speaker, as well as in the document, and on the safety case definition and description in the document

  8. IAEA Safeguards: Past, Present, and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santi, Peter A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-14

    This talk will present an overview of the International Atomic Energy Agency with a specific focus on its international safeguards mission and activities. The talk will first present a brief history of the IAEA and discuss its current governing structure. It will then focus on the Safeguards Department and its role in providing assurance that nuclear materials are being used for peaceful purposes. It will then look at how the IAEA is currently evolving the way in which it executes its safeguards mission with a focus on the idea of a state-level approach.

  9. IAEA safeguards: Stemming the spread of nuclear weapons. As the world's nuclear inspectorate, the IAEA performs an indispensable role in furthering nuclear non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Following the completion of the Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) in 1968, the IAEA has become the instrument with which to verify that the peaceful use commitments made under the NPT or similar agreements are kept through performing what is known as its safeguards role. Under the NPT, governments around the world have committed to three common objectives: preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons; pursuing nuclear disarmament; and promoting the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The NPT has made it obligatory for all its non-nuclear weapon State parties to submit all nuclear material in nuclear activities to IAEA safeguards, and to conclude a comprehensive safeguards agreement with the Agency. With all but a handful of the world community as State parties, the NPT is by far the most widely adhered to legal agreement in the field of disarmament and non-proliferation. The IAEA takes account of all source and special fissionable material in countries under safeguards. Monitoring and verification activities focus on those types of nuclear material that are the most crucial and relevant to nuclear weapons manufacturing. This includes plutonium-239, uranium-233 and -235 and any material containing one or more of these. Safeguards activities are applied routinely at over 900 facilities in 71 countries. In 2001 alone, more than 21,000 calendar days in the field were devoted to verifying hundreds of tons of special fissionable material by more than IAEA 250 inspectors

  10. IAEA Nuclear Security Assessment Methodologies (NUSAM) Project for Regulated Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Sung Soon

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Security Assessment Methodologies (NUSAM) is a coordinate research project. The objectives of the NUSAM project is to establish a risk informed, performance-based methodological framework in a systematic, structured, comprehensive and appropriately transparent manner; to provide an environment for the sharing and transfer of knowledge and experience; and to provide guidance on, and practical examples of good practices in assessing the security of nuclear and other radioactive materials, as well as associated facilities and activities. The author worked as an IAEA scientific secretary of the NUAM project from 2013 to 2015. IAEA launched this project in 2013 and performed many activities: meetings, document development, table-top exercises and computer simulations. Now the project is in the final stage and will be concluded in the late 2016. The project will produce documents on NUSAM assessment methods and case study documents on NPP, Irradiator Facility and Transport. South Korea as a main contributor to this project will get benefits from the NUSAM. In 2014, South Korea introduced force-on-force exercises, which could be used as the assessment of physical protection system by the methods of NUSAM

  11. Expert Systems: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiga, Sadashiv

    1984-01-01

    Discusses: (1) the architecture of expert systems; (2) features that distinguish expert systems from conventional programs; (3) conditions necessary to select a particular application for the development of successful expert systems; (4) issues to be resolved when building expert systems; and (5) limitations. Examples of selected expert systems…

  12. IAEA INTOR workshop report, group 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Sanae; Shimada, Ryuichi; Miya, Naoyuki; Shinya, Kichiro; Kishimoto, Hiroshi

    1979-10-01

    This report provides material for discussion in Group 8, Power Supply and Transfer, of the IAEA Workshop on INTOR. A new system for the poloidal field power supply for INTOR is proposed and its overall system design is described. The results of simulation calculation of the system are also given. (author)

  13. New IAEA guidance on safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haage, Monica; )

    2012-01-01

    Monica Haage described a project for Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant in Bulgaria which was also funded by the Norwegian government. This project included the development of guidance documents and training on self-assessment and continuous improvement of safety culture. A draft IAEA safety culture survey was also developed as part of this project in collaboration with St Mary's University, Canada. This project was conducted in parallel with an IAEA project to develop new safety reports on safety culture self-assessment and continuous improvement. A safety report on safety culture during the pre-operational phases of NPPs has also been drafted. The IAEA approach to safety culture assessment was outlined and core principles of the approach were discussed. These include the use of several assessment methods (survey, interview, observation, focus groups, document review), and two distinct levels of analysis. The first is a descriptive analysis of the observed cultural characteristics from each assessment method and overarching themes. This is followed by a 'normative' analysis comparing what has been observed with the desirable characteristics of a strong, positive, safety culture, as defined by the IAEA safety culture framework. The application of this approach during recent Operational Safety Assessment Review Team (OSART) missions was described along with key learning points

  14. 17. IAEA fusion energy conference. Extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Book of extended synopses of the papers, accepted by a international programme committee for presentation at the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Yokohama, Japan. The subjects covered are magnetic confinement experiments, plasma heating and current drive, ITER EDA, inertial fusion energy, innovative concepts, fusion technology and theory

  15. Inspections talks with IAEA again broken off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    North Korea again appears likely to resist more detailed safeguards inspections of its disputed nuclear facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The country's loner status was reinforced during the IAEA General Conference in September, when no other nation joined North Korea in voting against the placement of the inspection issue on the conference's agenda

  16. IAEA inspection activities in the model country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madueme, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the activities undertaken by IAEA inspectors at the model research reactor and research laboratories is given. The basic philosophy behind nuclear material stratification and the concepts of Material Balance Areas and Key Measurement Points are explained. Diversion routes and plausible diversion scenarios are analysed. 8 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs., poster presentations included

  17. The IAEA isotope and radiation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The main activities of the IAEA program in Isotope and Radiation are grouped into three fields: Food and Agriculture, Human Health and Life Sciences, Industry and Physical Sciences. In addition to a brief description of the main features of each program some of the activities performed at the Agency's Laboratories at Seibersdorf, Vienna and Monaco are presented

  18. Return of IAEA assistance team from Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document informs about the return from Thailand of the IAEA team sent (upon the request of the Thai Government under the Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency) to Bangkok to help Thai counterparts in the wake of an accident involving a discarded radioactive cobalt 60 source used in hospitals

  19. Concepts of IAEA nuclear materials accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakberg, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes nuclear material accounting from the standpoint of IAEA Safeguards and how this accounting is applied by the Agency. The basic concepts of nuclear material accounting are defined and the way these apply to States with INFCIRC/153-type safeguards agreements is presented. (author)

  20. IAEA Fact-Finding Team Completes Visit to Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A team of international nuclear safety experts today completed a preliminary assessment of the safety issues linked with TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. The team - created by an agreement of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Government of Japan - sought to identify lessons learned from the accident that can help improve nuclear safety around the world. To conduct its work, the team held extensive discussions with officials from the full range of Japanese nuclear-related agencies and visited three nuclear sites, including the nuclear power plant at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi. These visits gave the team a first-hand appreciation of the scale of devastation wreaked by the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March and of the extraordinary efforts Japanese workers have been applying ever since to stabilize the situation. ''Our entire team was humbled by the enormous damage inflicted by the tsunami on Japan. We are also profoundly impressed by the dedication of Japanese workers working to resolve this unprecedented nuclear accident,'' said team leader Mike Weightman, the United Kingdom's Chief Inspector of Nuclear Installations. The team was comprised of international experts with experience across a range of nuclear specialties. They came from 12 countries: Argentina, China, France, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom and the United States. In a draft report summary delivered to Japanese authorities today, the team prepared a set of preliminary conclusions and identified lessons learned in three broad areas: external hazards, severe accident management and emergency preparedness. The final report will be delivered to the Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety at IAEA headquarters in Vienna from 20 to 24 June. The expert team made several preliminary findings and lessons learned, including: Japan's response to the nuclear

  1. Update: Tests confirm no radioactivity release to environment from IAEA Seibersdorf Lab after 3 August incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Independent analysis has confirmed that there was no release of radioactive material to the environment following an incident at the IAEA's Seibersdorf Laboratory on 3 August. The test results were provided by the Austrian Research Centers (ARC), from analysis of soil, plant and water samples collected from outside the IAEA's Laboratories in Seibersdorf, where the incident occurred. The radiation protection experts of the ARC confirmed the initial findings from the laboratory's automatic monitoring system which indicated that there had been no release of radioactivity to the environment. Since the incident, constant air monitoring near the laboratory, undertaken by the IAEA, has also provided no evidence of any radioactive contamination. A tiny amount of plutonium contained in an acid solution spilled from five small glass vials when one of them burst after a build up of pressure in it. The vials were stored in a secure steel safe. In total there was less than one gram of plutonium in the five vials. The material was in the laboratory for scientific reference purposes and virtually all of the contamination was confined within the steel walled safe. As previously reported, the automatic alarm was triggered when highly sensitive detectors of the continuous air monitoring system identified minor amounts of radioactive aerosols in the storage room containing the safe. The air contamination was trapped entirely in the filters of the ventilation system. No one was working in the laboratory at the time of the accident, which occurred at 02:31. The IAEA emergency response team promptly secured and sealed off the windowless storage room. An investigation into the circumstances and causes of the incident is still underway. In the meantime the first stage of the clean-up of the storage room was successfully completed on Friday, 22 August. According to the IAEA's nuclear regulator's assessment of the incident, the lab's safety systems worked properly and

  2. The IAEA and Control of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation discusses the authoritative functions and the departments of the IAEA, especially the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security and its Safety and Security of Radiation Sources Unit. IAEA safety series and IAEA safety standards series inform about international standards, provide underlying principles, specify obligations and responsibilities and give recommendations to support requirements. Other IAEA relevant publications comprise safety reports, technical documents (TECDOCs), conferences and symposium papers series and accident reports. Impacts of loss of source control is discussed, definitions of orphan sources and vulnerable sources is given. Accidents with orphan sources, radiological accidents statistic (1944-2000) and its consequences are discussed. These incidents lead to development of the IAEA guidance. The IAEA's action plan for the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive material was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors and the General Conference in September 1999. This led to the 'Categorization of Radiation Sources' and the 'Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources'. After 0911 the IAEA developed a nuclear security plan of activities including physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities, detection of malicious activities involving nuclear and other radioactive materials, state systems for nuclear material accountancy and control, security of radioactive material other than nuclear material, assessment of safety and security related vulnerability of nuclear facilities, response to malicious acts, or threats thereof, adherence to and implementation of international agreements, guidelines and recommendations and nuclear security co-ordination and information management. The remediation of past problems comprised collection and disposal of known disused sources, securing vulnerable sources and especially high-risk sources (Tripartite initiative), searching for

  3. Nuclear power information at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg-Planer, R.

    2001-01-01

    The reliable and adequate supply of energy, and especially electricity, is necessary not only for economic development but, for economic and political stability. Since its establishment in the in the second half of the 20th century, nuclear power has evolved from the research and development stage to a mature industry that supplies more than 17% of the world's total electricity. Well designed, constructed and operated nuclear power plants have proved to be reliable, safe and economic. Although many countries are heavily reliant on nuclear power, in the last decade, expansion of nuclear power has been almost stagnating in the Western industrialized world, experiencing a low growth in Eastern Europe and expanding only in East Asia. On one side, one of the most important aims of the IAEA is to support the national effort to improve the nuclear power generation and to assist in promoting improvements in their safe, reliable and economic performance. On the other side, the IAEA also provides the only truly international forum for exchange, collection and dissemination of information in many areas related to nuclear energy. The Power Reactor Information System, PRIS, is one fundamental tool for these activities. The PRIS database is managed by the staff of the Nuclear Power Division in the IAEA. In the scope of PRIS various publications and reports have been published, as well as the IAEA has been satisfying request from Member States ranging from simple query to complex analysis. This paper presents an overview of the status of nuclear power world-wide and the related IAEA activities on collecting and disseminating nuclear power information. (author)

  4. Nuclear power information at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg-Planer, R.

    1999-01-01

    The reliable and adequate supply of energy, and especially electricity, is necessary not only for economic development but, for economic and political stability. Since its establishment in the second half of the 20th century, nuclear power has evolved from the research and development stage to a mature industry that supplies more than 17% of the world's total electricity. Well designed, constructed and operated nuclear power plants have proved to be reliable, safe and economic. Although many countries are heavily reliant on nuclear power, in the last decade, expansion of nuclear power has been almost stagnating in the Western industrialized world, experiencing a low growth in Eastern Europe and expanding only in East Asia. On one side, one of the most important aims of the IAEA is to support the national effort to improve the nuclear power generation and to assist in promoting improvements in their safe, reliable and economic performance. On the other side, the IAEA also provides the only truly international forum for exchange, collection and dissemination of information in many areas related to nuclear energy. The Power Reactor Information System, PRIS, is one fundamental tool for these activities. The PRIS database is managed by the staff of the Nuclear Power Division in the IAEA. In the scope of PRIS various publications and reports have been published, as well as the IAEA has been satisfying request from Member States ranging from simple query to complex analysis. This paper presents an overview of the status of nuclear power world-wide and the related IAEA activities on collecting and disseminating nuclear power information. (author)

  5. IAEA safeguards and non-proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry, R.J.S.

    1995-02-01

    An overview is given of efforts to contain the nuclear weapons proliferation during half a century of man-controlled nuclear fission. An initial policy of denial did not work, a following period of cooperation needed a gradual strengthening of international assurances on the peaceful character of the flourishing use of nuclear techniques for power generation and of other applications. The focus of the nuclear weapon proliferation concern changed from the highly developed states to developing states. The Non-Proliferation Treaty laid the basis for a unique system of voluntarily accepted international inspections to verify the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The IAEA got the task to implement this `Full Scope Safeguards` on all nuclear material and all nuclear activities in the non-nuclear weapon states. Thanks to the structure of the IAEA, in which both proponent and states with a critical attitude take part in the decision making process on the IAEA execution of its tasks, a balanced, and widely acceptable system emerged. International developments necessitated additional improvements of the non-proliferation system. The increase of strength of sub-national groups triggered international cooperation on physical protection, about a quarter of a century ago. More recently, it appeared that NPT states with assumed nuclear weapon ambitions operated in the margins between the interpretation of IAEA safeguards and the spirit and purpose of NPT. Improvements of the IAEA safeguards and a stronger cooperation between states, including the constraints which exporting states have imposed on nuclear supplies, strengthen the safeguards system. The important reductions in the two largest nuclear weapon arsenals lead, together with the delay in the fast breeder implementation, to large stockpiles of nuclear weapon usable materials. Also in this areas new internationally credible assurances have to be obtained, that these materials will never return to nuclear weapon applications.

  6. IAEA safeguards and non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, R.J.S.

    1995-02-01

    An overview is given of the efforts to contain the nuclear weapons proliferation during half a century of man-controlled nuclear fission. An initial policy of denial did not work, a following period of cooperation needed a gradual strengthening of international assurances on the exclusively peaceful character of the flourishing use of nuclear techniques for power generation and of other applications. The focus of the nuclear weapon proliferation concern changed from the highly developed states to developing states. The Non-Proliferation Treaty laid the basis for a unique system of voluntarily accepted international inspections to verify the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The IAEA got the task to implement this 'Full Scope Safeguards' on all nuclear material and all nuclear activities in the non-nuclear weapon states. Thanks to the structure of the IAEA, in which both proponent and states with a critical attitude take part in the decision making process on the IAEA execution of its tasks, a balanced, and widely acceptable system emerged. International developments necessitated additional improvements of the non-proliferation system. The increase of strength of sub-national groups triggered international cooperation on physical protection, about a quarter of a century ago. More recently, it appeared that NPT states with assumed nuclear weapon ambitions operated in the margins between the interpretation of IAEA safeguards and the spirit and purpose of NPT. Improvements of the IAEA safeguards and a stronger cooperation between states, including the constraints which exporting states have imposed on nuclear supplies, strengthen the safeguards system. The important reductions in the two largest nuclear weapon arsenals lead, together with the delay in the fast breeder implementation, to large stockpiles of nuclear weapon usable materials. Also in this areas new internationally credible assurances have to be obtained, that these materials will never return to nuclear

  7. IAEA Safeguards: Cost/benefit analysis of commercial satellite imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Christer

    1999-03-01

    feasible undertaking. Such a unit capable of performing advanced image processing as a tool for various safeguard tasks will give the Agency an effective instrument for reference, monitoring, verification, and detection of declared and undeclared activities. It is also demonstrated in the study that more than 20% of the envisaged work tasks in all of the major Safeguards applications will achieve a better decision support from the use of commercial satellite imagery. At the same time the potential savings in costs is calculated to approximately USD 500,000 per year by reductions in on-site inspections and by more efficient planning and logistics. The total cost for implementing commercial satellite imagery at the Department for Safeguards, as simulated in this study, is approximately USD 1,500,000 per year. This cost rises when utilising the full potential of high-resolution imagery in all five applications including monitoring and detection of undeclared facilities. The cost/benefit simulation is founded on an activity scenario with a staff of 4 experts working in an IAEA imagery unit with a workload of three dossiers or 'issues' per week. The imagery unit is built around an advanced workstation PC image processing system capable of handling several hundreds of pre-processed imagery per year

  8. IAEA Safeguards: Cost/benefit analysis of commercial satellite imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer [SSC Satellitbild AB, Kiruna (Sweden)

    1999-03-01

    feasible undertaking. Such a unit capable of performing advanced image processing as a tool for various safeguard tasks will give the Agency an effective instrument for reference, monitoring, verification, and detection of declared and undeclared activities. It is also demonstrated in the study that more than 20% of the envisaged work tasks in all of the major Safeguards applications will achieve a better decision support from the use of commercial satellite imagery. At the same time the potential savings in costs is calculated to approximately USD 500,000 per year by reductions in on-site inspections and by more efficient planning and logistics. The total cost for implementing commercial satellite imagery at the Department for Safeguards, as simulated in this study, is approximately USD 1,500,000 per year. This cost rises when utilising the full potential of high-resolution imagery in all five applications including monitoring and detection of undeclared facilities. The cost/benefit simulation is founded on an activity scenario with a staff of 4 experts working in an IAEA imagery unit with a workload of three dossiers or `issues` per week. The imagery unit is built around an advanced workstation PC image processing system capable of handling several hundreds of pre-processed imagery per year 10 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  9. Organization and conduct of IAEA fire safety reviews at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The importance of fire safety in the safe and productive operation of nuclear power plants is recognized worldwide. Lessons learned from experience in nuclear power plants indicate that fire poses a real threat to nuclear safety and that its significance extends far beyond the scope of a conventional fire hazard. With a growing understanding of the close correlation between the fire hazard in nuclear power plants and nuclear safety, backfitting for fire safety has become necessary for a number of operating plants. However, it has been recognized that the expertise necessary for a systematic independent assessment of fire safety of a NPP may not always be available to a number of Member States. In order to assist in enhancing fire safety, the IAEA has already started to offer various services to Member States in the area of fire safety. At the request of a Member State, the IAEA may provide a team of experts to conduct fire safety reviews of varying scope to evaluate the adequacy of fire safety at a specific nuclear power plant during various phases such as construction, operation and decommissioning. The IAEA nuclear safety publications related to fire protection and fire safety form a common basis for these reviews. This report provides guidance for the experts involved in the organization and conduct of fire safety review services to ensure consistency and comprehensiveness of the reviews

  10. Making a real difference: Working for the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) offers challenging assignments and provides a stimulating multicultural environment for people who are interested in international work experience in a specific area of expertise. This brochure provides general information on the possibilities for employment as a Professional staff member of the IAEA and other information which may be useful to persons interested in joining the IAEA's Professional staff.

  11. IAEA Leads Operational Safety Mission to Rajasthan Atomic Power Station 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today completed a review of safety practices at Units 3 and 4 of the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station in Rawatbhata. The team noted a series of good practices and made recommendations and suggestions to reinforce safety practices. The IAEA assembled the Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) at the request of the Government of India. Led by the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, the team performed an in-depth operational safety review from 29 October to 14 November 2012. The team was comprised of experts from Canada, Belgium, Finland, Germany, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden and the IAEA. The team conducted an in-depth review of the aspects essential to the safe operation of the Power Plant. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards and good international practices. The review covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Training; Operations; Maintenance; Technical Support; Operating Experience; Radiation Protection; Chemistry; Emergency Planning and Preparedness; and Severe Accident Management. The OSART team identified a number of good practices of the plant. These will be shared in due course by the IAEA with the global nuclear industry for consideration. Examples include the following: - The Power Plant's safety culture cultivates a constructive work environment and a sense of accountability among the Power Plant personnel, and gives its staff the opportunity to expand skills and training; - The Power Plant's Public Awareness Programme provides educational opportunities to the local community about nuclear and radiation safety; - The Power Plant has a Management of Training and Authorization system for effective management of training activities; and - The Power Plant uses testing facilities and mockups to improve the quality of maintenance work and to reduce radiation doses. The OSART

  12. Establishment of strengthening technical cooperation system through the IAEA advisory committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Si Hwan; Lee, H. Y.; Kim, Y. T. and others

    2001-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency(IAEA) operates seventeen(17) Standing Advisory Groups(SAG) and nine(9) International Working Groups(IWG). Korean experts are currently participating in most of these advisory groups, but there is something yet to improve especially in faithful reflection of Korean nuclear policy as well as a systematic and effective utilization technical information received in the committee meetings. Therefore, it is necessary firstly to analyze results and systematic follow-up of technology developments for each IAEA committee group to solidate activities of Korean members. Based on these analyses, we can hence support administratively Korean members to do faithful reflection of Korean nuclear policy. In addition, a scheme for systematic management of the information should be drawn up for use of these information effectively for nuclear power projects, R and D, safety regulation, and establishment of nuclear policy in Korea

  13. Setting the standard: The IAEA safety standards set the global reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.

    2003-01-01

    For the IAEA, setting and promoting standards for nuclear radiation, waste, and transport safety have been priorities from the start, rooted in the Agency's 1957 Statute. Today, a corpus of international standards are in place that national regulators and industries in many countries are applying, and more are being encouraged and assisted to follow them. Considerable work is done to keep safety standards updated and authoritative. They cover five main areas: the safety of nuclear facilities; radiation protection and safety of radiation sources; safe management of radioactive waste; safe transport of radioactive material; and thematic safety areas, such as emergency preparedness or legal infrastructures. Overall, the safety standards reflect an international consensus on what constitutes a high level of safety for protecting people and the environment. All IAEA Member States can nominate experts for the Agency standards committees and provide comments on draft standards. Through this ongoing cycle of review and feedback, the standards are refined, updated, and extended where needed

  14. Establishment of strengthening technical cooperation system through the IAEA advisory committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Hwan; Lee, H. Y.; Kim, Y. T. and others

    2001-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency(IAEA) operates seventeen(17) Standing Advisory Groups(SAG) and nine(9) International Working Groups(IWG). Korean experts are currently participating in most of these advisory groups, but there is something yet to improve especially in faithful reflection of Korean nuclear policy as well as a systematic and effective utilization technical information received in the committee meetings. Therefore, it is necessary firstly to analyze results and systematic follow-up of technology developments for each IAEA committee group to solidate activities of Korean members. Based on these analyses, we can hence support administratively Korean members to do faithful reflection of Korean nuclear policy. In addition, a scheme for systematic management of the information should be drawn up for use of these information effectively for nuclear power projects, R and D, safety regulation, and establishment of nuclear policy in Korea.

  15. The Australian Safeguards assistance program to IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorokowski, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    With the pressure on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to apply safeguards more effectively and efficiently, continued research and development in the improvement of safeguards techniques and concepts remains of paramount importance. The resources available to the IAEA do not allow necessary R and D to be performed by the IAEA and this need is met by voluntary R and D support programs offered by Member States. Australia is assisting the IAEA by the development of safeguards technology and concepts and providing this R and D to the IAEA under the aegis of the Australian support program

  16. IAEA and International Science and Technology Center sign cooperative agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA and the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) today signed an agreement that calls for an increase in cooperation between the two organizations. The memorandum of understanding seeks to amplify their collaboration in the research and development of applications and technology that could contribute to the IAEA's activities in the fields of verification and nuclear security, including training and capacity building. IAEA Safeguards Director of Technical Support Nikolay Khlebnikov and ISTC Executive Director Adriaan van der Meer signed the Agreement at IAEA headquarters in Vienna on 22 October 2008. (IAEA)

  17. IAEA support of international research and development of materials for sustainable energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, Andrej; Kaiser, Ralf; Simon, Aliz

    2013-01-01

    Full-text:The key mandate of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is to promote the peaceful application of nuclear science and technology, verification as well as nuclear safety in the world. This includes a number of activities which aim to support the Member States and stimulate international cooperation in order for sustainable development. During the last 35 years, a well-established mechanism called the Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) has been effectively used to stimulate international research and scientific interaction among the Member States, covering various topics in the nuclear science and technology. Besides direct support of, so called coordinated research, the IAEA is also involved in organizing a number of highly specific international conferences and technical meetings which help to provide a broader platform for the specialist and experts in dedicated areas of nuclear science and technology. In view of support for renewable energy and its application, the IAEA organized series of meetings in 2009 (IEA France), 2010 (UQTR Canada) and 2011 (ANL USA) in order to discuss the scientific and technical issues of particular of national research initiatives related to the hydrogen storage and conversion technologies. All selected outputs of the meetings were published in a technical document publication series which are available to all member states. More recent initiatives are focus on the key nuclear techniques which are extremely valuable in research and development of new innovative materials, methods and technologies, characterization and performance testing of functional materials for innovative energy technologies and their application in sustainable energy sources (nuclear and non-nuclear). It is also important to underline that these programmatic activities are an integral part of the IAEA program on the Road to Rio+20: Applying Nuclear Technology for Sustainable Development. The paper summarizes the IAEA actions relevant to the

  18. Standardized quality audit procedures for on-site dosimetry visits to radiotherapy hospitals. Report of the IAEA consultants' meeting, IAEA, Vienna, 27 September - 1 October 1999; revised in 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, Joanna; Dutreix, A.; Followill, D.S.; Nisbet, A.; Novotny, J.; Sipila, P.; Dam, J. van

    2002-01-01

    Since 1969 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), together with the World Health Organization (WHO), has performed postal TLD audits to verify the calibration of radiotherapy beams in developing countries. The IAEA over the past 30 years, has verified the calibration of more than 3500 clinical photon beams at approximately 1000 radiotherapy hospitals. Detailed follow-up procedures have been implemented since 1996. When the TLD result of a participating institution falls outside the acceptance limits of ±5%, the institution is initially informed that there is a discrepancy and requested to try to identify the reasons why it occurred. The institution is not informed of the actual magnitude of the discrepancy (blind conditions) but is offered a second TLD audit. If the deviation cannot be resolved by the local radiotherapy institution or the national SSDL, then an on-site visit is suggested which, if accepted, is made by an IAEA expert in clinical dosimetry. The on-site visit includes a review of the dosimetry data and techniques, corrective measurements and ad-hoc training. The reasons for the discrepancy are then traced, explained, corrected and reported. Until the discrepancies are resolved and changes have been implemented by hospitals to ensure that the discrepancies do not reoccur, the safe and effective delivery of radiation doses to patients is questionable. This document provides a standardised set of procedures for resolving discrepancies during onsite visits to radiotherapy hospitals by the IAEA experts. The table below summarises the acceptance criteria to be used by the IAEA experts for dosimetry and mechanical parameters of the hospital treatment units. If some of the parameters are outside the acceptance criterion, it will not be possible for an institution to assure the adequate quality of the dosimetry practices in radiotherapy. The criteria are based on analyses of clinical data and the measurement uncertainties for various dosimetry and

  19. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 9, no. 4(66). Oct 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA Analyzing effect of US-DPRK Agreed Framework, Statement to General Assembly in New-York, Council on Foreign Relations, 19 October 1994, Congress of the European Nuclear Society, 4 October 1994, IAEA General Conference, 19 September 1994, Illicit Trafficking in Nuclear Materials, IAEA Director General Blix honoured, Ukraine and IAEA sign Safeguards Agreement, International Convention on Nuclear Safety, Highlights of the 1994 General Conference, IAEA safeguards in the DPRK, Monitoring and verification in Iraq, IAEA safeguards system, Measures against illicit trafficking in nuclear materials, African nuclear-weapon-free zone, South Africa's participation in IAEA activities, Application of IAEA safeguards in the Middle East, IAEA technical co-operation activities, Technical assistance in the Middle East, Radioactive waste management, Water resources and production, IAEA budget and extrabudgetary resources for 1995, Staffing of the IAEA Secretariat, Nuclear safety and radiological protection, Scientific Programme at the General Conference, Environmental monitoring, High-energy accelerators and radioactive waste management, Global food security and sustainability, Other meetings, Air Transport of Radioactive materials, Accelerators for Research, Water Resources, Radiation Technologies in Health Care, Spent Fuel Storage, Nuclear Techniques in Agriculture, Comprehending Radiation Risks, Environmental Impact of Radioactive Releases, Strengthening Radiation Protection Infrastructures, and other short information

  20. New IAEA training initiatives in the field of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormai, P.; Kinker, J.

    2014-01-01

    More than 50 Member States have requested assistance from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to help them develop the necessary competencies and skills that will allow them to implement technically viable, safe, secure and cost-effective radioactive waste management (RWM) solutions. At the present time the IAEA provides numerous opportunities for the training of managers and experts representing national programmes, regulatory bodies, and organizations related to RWM, and staff of national regulatory bodies responsible for licensing and inspection of such facilities, either through bilateral agreements or through the mechanism of thematic networks. The training events may be lecture based or comprise hands-on training, or may be a combination of the two. However, it is recognised that there are some limitations in the current approach. In order to overcome these limitations, the IAEA is committed to identify and utilise alternative and more cost effective avenues for the delivery of its training. To this end a decision has been made to develop a comprehensive RWM curriculum that jointly covers aspects of both safety and technology with an appropriate balance and that ensures that the two dimensions are delivered in a complimentary and consistent manner, including integration where appropriate. The training materials that will result from the development of the curriculum will be delivered through the medium of the internet and personal computers (eLearning) and also through extended face-face courses to be delivered in Regional Centres of Learning (which are still to be established). The curriculum will be developed collaboratively between the IAEA, international experts and the learning centres. (orig.)

  1. Project for export system construction of nuclear equipment to IAEA; survey on current market status of the nuclear related international organizations and the domestic possible suppliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, T. S.; Cho, H. K.; Kim, H. J. [Korea Atomic Industrial Forum, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    Republic of Korea are keeping the dynamic activities in IAEA as the 8th advanced nuclear country over the world but has occupied very low late less than 0.01% in supplying the equipments to IAEA. About 6,000 nuclear equipment suppliers are registered in IAEA Supply Roster over the world but only 3 Suppliers of our country are registered in IAEA Supply Roster. The supply of nuclear industrial products equivalent to about 100 million dollars into IAEA market will endorse not only the international authorization for our technology and products but also give contribution to activate the domestic nuclear industries in order to increase its expert. The explanation for IAEA procurement market to the 53 nuclear companies will be made on May 16, 2001, and the participants for the export of their goods will be selected. And then we will do all possible supports by the government and related organizations for them to register in IAEA Supply Roster. 21 refs. (Author)

  2. IAEA safeguards for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The publication includes the lectures held during the seminar on IAEA safeguards for the 21st century. The topics covered are as follows: the nuclear non-proliferation regime; Legal instruments related to the application of safeguards; multilateral nuclear export controls; physical protection and its role in nuclear non-proliferation; the evolution of safeguards; basis for the strengthening of safeguards; information required from states, including 'small quantities protocol'; processing and evaluation of new information for strengthened safeguards; additional physical access and new technologies for strengthened safeguards; equipping the IAEA Inspectorate with new skills; achievements to date the strengthened safeguards; complement of regional non-proliferation arrangements in international nuclear verification; promotion of transparency through Korean experience; and the future prospects of safeguards

  3. Joint IAEA/NEA IRS guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an international system jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The fundamental objective of the IRS is to contribute to improving the safety of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) which are operated worldwide. This objective can be achieved by providing timely and detailed information on both technical and human factors related to events of safety significance which occur at these plants. The purpose of these guidelines, which supersede the previous IAEA Safety Series No. 93 (Part II) and the NEA IRS guidelines, is to describe the system and to give users the necessary background and guidance to enable them to produce IRS reports meeting a high standard of quality while retaining the high efficiency of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants

  4. Speech spectrogram expert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannsen, J.; Macallister, J.; Michalek, T.; Ross, S.

    1983-01-01

    Various authors have pointed out that humans can become quite adept at deriving phonetic transcriptions from speech spectrograms (as good as 90percent accuracy at the phoneme level). The authors describe an expert system which attempts to simulate this performance. The speech spectrogram expert (spex) is actually a society made up of three experts: a 2-dimensional vision expert, an acoustic-phonetic expert, and a phonetics expert. The visual reasoning expert finds important visual features of the spectrogram. The acoustic-phonetic expert reasons about how visual features relates to phonemes, and about how phonemes change visually in different contexts. The phonetics expert reasons about allowable phoneme sequences and transformations, and deduces an english spelling for phoneme strings. The speech spectrogram expert is highly interactive, allowing users to investigate hypotheses and edit rules. 10 references.

  5. The IAEA energy and economic data bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, J.P.; Russell, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    In 1976, the IAEA established a computerized energy and economic data bank not only on nuclear energy but on other forms of energy as well. The purpose of the data bank is to provide in a unified and systematic way energy and related economic data needed for long-term energy planning. A computer program permits the production of a variety of up-to-date tables and graphs

  6. IAEA Nuclear Security - Achievements 2002-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    The possibility that nuclear or other radioactive material could be used for malicious purposes is real. This calls for a collective commitment to the control of, and accountancy for, material, as well as to adequate levels of protection in order to prevent criminal or unauthorized access to the material or associated facilities. Sharing of knowledge and experience, coordination among States and collaboration with other international organizations, initiatives and industries supports an effective international nuclear security framework. In 2001, the Board of Governors tasked the IAEA with improving nuclear security worldwide. The report that follows provides an overview of accomplishments over the last decade and reflects the importance that States assign to keeping material in the right hands. The IAEA has established a comprehensive nuclear security programme, described first in the Nuclear Security Plan of 2002-2005 and subsequently in the second plan of 2006- 2009. Activities included developing internationally accepted nuclear security guidance, supporting international legal instruments, protecting material and facilities, securing transport and borders, detecting and interdicting illicit nuclear trafficking, strengthening human resource capacity and preparing response plans should a nuclear security event occur. The IAEA has begun the implementation of its third Nuclear Security Plan, to be completed at the end of 2013. This approach to nuclear security recognizes that an effective national nuclear security regime builds on a number of factors: the implementation of relevant international legal instruments; IAEA guidance and standards; information protection; physical protection; material accounting and control; detection of, and response to, trafficking in such material; national response plans and contingency measures. Implemented in a systematic manner, these building blocks make up a sustainable national nuclear security regime and contribute to global

  7. IAEA and the international nuclear law development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowitsh, O.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the different objectives of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) as far as nuclear energy use is concerned. It presents the status of the organization, its action int the non-proliferation treaty, and its work on the safeguard regulations. These measures have been taken during the Convention on nuclear safety in 1994. This convention concerns nuclear power plants as well as storage of radioactive wastes. (TEC)

  8. Directory of IAEA databases. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This second edition of the Directory of IAEA Databases has been prepared within the Division of Scientific and Technical Information. Its main objective is to describe the computerized information sources available to staff members. This directory contains all databases produced at the IAEA, including databases stored on the mainframe, LAN's and PC's. All IAEA Division Directors have been requested to register the existence of their databases with NESI. For the second edition database owners were requested to review the existing entries for their databases and answer four additional questions. The four additional questions concerned the type of database (e.g. Bibliographic, Text, Statistical etc.), the category of database (e.g. Administrative, Nuclear Data etc.), the available documentation and the type of media used for distribution. In the individual entries on the following pages the answers to the first two questions (type and category) is always listed, but the answer to the second two questions (documentation and media) is only listed when information has been made available

  9. IAEA Nutrition Programmes Feed Global Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, Sasha

    2014-01-01

    As an organization, the IAEA has a statutory requirement to “accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.” Good nutrition is the cornerstone of good health and the development of nations. That’s why the IAEA is involved in nutrition. The IAEA’s Member States use nuclear methods to move their nutrition programmes forward. These nuclear techniques include the use of stable isotopes (which have no radioactivity) to better understand how nutrients are absorbed, utilized, or stored in the body. These very precise and powerful techniques can be safely and non-invasively used on everyone, from babies to the elderly, in order to determine nutritional status, and measure the effectiveness of nutrition programmes. Nuclear techniques often provide answers that are not available by any other means. By training Member States in the use of nuclear techniques for nutrition, the IAEA complements the work that these countries are doing with other international organizations and not-for-profit groups around the world to combat malnutrition in all its forms and to promote health

  10. IAEA Technical Meeting on Status of IAEA Fast Reactor Knowledge Preservation Initiative. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In response to needs expressed by Member States and within a broader IAEA-wide effort in nuclear knowledge preservation, the IAEA has been carrying out a dedicated initiative on Fast Reactor Data Knowledge Preservation (FRKP). The main objectives of the FRKP initiative are to: • Halt the on-going loss of information related to Fast Reactors (FR); • Collect, retrieve, preserve and make accessible already existing data and information on FR. These objectives require the implementation of activities supporting digital document archival, exchange, search and retrieval and facilitating, by developing and using suitable standards and IT tools, the knowledge preservation over the next decades. To this purpose the IAEA has developed the Fast Reactor Knowledge Organization System (FRKOS), a web-based application employing IAEA methodology and approach for categorization of FR knowledge domain, which allows creating a comprehensive and well-structured international inventory of fast reactor data and information provided by different Member States. The resulting Web Portal is established and maintained by the IAEA. The IAEA knowledge preservation initiatives and tools in the field of fast neutron systems - which were presented and very well received during the recent IAEA Fast Reactor and Related Fuel Cycles Conference (FR13) - are supposed to be of interest for national nuclear authorities, regulators, scientific and research organizations, commercial companies and all other stakeholders involved in fast reactor activities at national or international level. The objectives of the technical meeting were to: • Exchange information between the member states/international organizations on national and international initiatives addressing knowledge preservation and data retrieval/collection in the field of fast neutron systems; • Present and discuss the member states’/international organizations’ policies and conditions for releasing to the IAEA both publicly

  11. Analysis on IAEA 2006-2007 Programme and Cooperation Directions between Korea and IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Keun Bae; Lee, H. M.; Yang, M. H.; Lee, B. W.; Ko, H. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. P.

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the structure of the IAEA programme and the major changes in 2004/2005 programme cycle are analyzed. Also renewed programming process and major issues in 2006/2007 programme and budget are analyzed. Based on the analyses, the detailed proposal to strengthen cooperation with IAEA is prepared in the fields of nuclear power, nuclear application, nuclear safety and nuclear cooperation. As a result, the following 9 themes are identified to strengthen the relation between Korea and the IAEA. - Nuclear Production of Hydrogen - Sea Water Desalination - Nuclear Knowledge Management - Application of Food Irradiation - Cancer Treatment using Cyclotron - Global Nuclear Safety Network; - Management of Radiation Source by Global Positioning System (GPS) - Global Network for Radiological Emergency Response - Enhanced relationship between Regional Cooperation Frameworks

  12. IAEA Review for Gap Analysis of Safety Analysis Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic, Ivica; Kim, Manwoong; Huges, Peter; Lim, B-K; D'Auria, Francesco; Louis, Vidard Michael

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA Asian Nuclear Safety Network (ANSN) was launched in 2002 in the framework of the Extra Budgetary Programme (EBP) on the Safety of Nuclear Installations in the South East Asia, Pacific and Far East Countries. The main objective is to strengthen and expand human and advanced Information Technology (IT) network to pool, analyse and share nuclear safety knowledge and practical experience for peaceful uses in this region. Under the ANSN framework, a technical group on Safety Analysis (SATG) was established in 2004 aimed to providing a forum for the exchange of experience in the following areas of safety analysis: · To provide a forum for an exchange of experience in the area of safety analysis, · To maintain and improve the knowledge on safety analysis method, · To enhance the utilization of computer codes, · To pool and analyse the issues related with safety analysis of research reactor, and · To facilitate mutual interested on safety analysis among member countries. A sustainable and successful nuclear energy programme requires a strong technical infrastructure, including a workforce made up of highly specialized and well-educated professionals. A significant portion of this technical capacity must be dedicated to safety- especially to safety analysis- as only then can it serve as the basis for making the right decisions during the planning, licensing, construction and operation of new nuclear facilities. In this regard, the IAEA has provided ANSN member countries with comprehensive training opportunities for capacity building in safety analysis. Nevertheless, the SATG recognizes that it is difficult to achieve harmonization in this area among all member countries because of their different competency levels. Therefore, it is necessary to quickly identify the most obvious gaps in safety analysis capability and then to use existing resources to begin to fill those gaps. The goal of this Expert Mission (EM) for gap finding service is to facilitate

  13. IAEA progress report. Highlights of report to ECOSOC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    explains that its resources for carrying out these activities are of three kinds: (a) voluntary financial contributions to the General Fund, (b) donations in kind made by Member States in the form of the services of experts, of fellowships and scholarships at national institutions, and of equipment, etc., and (c) funds made available to the Agency as a result of its participation in the United Nations Expanded Programme of Technical Assistance (EPTA). A joint IAEA/FAO training course is to be held at Cornell University from 20 July to 10 September 1959, in co-operation with the US Government and Cornell University. This will be the first international training course on radioisotope techniques designed specifically for the needs of the research worker in agriculture, fishery, forestry and nutrition. Regarding equipment and supplies, the report states: 'Owing to the highly technical nature of nuclear energy, a number of requests for technical assistance experts are supplemented by requests for equipment'

  14. Cancer in developing countries - Facing the challenge, 20 September 2010, Vienna, Austria, 13th Scientific Forum during the 54th Session of the IAEA General Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Ladies and Gentlemen, It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you to the 2010 IAEA Scientific Forum, devoted to cancer in developing countries. I am delighted that we have been able to secure the participation of so many top cancer specialists, scientists and experts from all over the world, as well as distinguished representatives from government, the private sector and leading foundations. I am grateful to Dr Margaret Chan, Director General of the World Health Organization - our key partner in the fight against cancer - for participating by video message. We are especially honoured by the presence of the First Ladies of Egypt and Mongolia, both of whom have been outstanding advocates on behalf of cancer patients. Your support for this Scientific Forum means a lot and I thank you most warmly. During my first year as Director General of the IAEA, I have had an opportunity to visit cancer treatment centres in a number of Member States. In Egypt, I was inspired by my visit to the Children's Cancer Hospital in Cairo. The hospital was established through the good will and generosity of the people of Egypt and the selfless energy and commitment of its founders. I was particularly touched by the way in which the young patients help each other. Children who have already been through a treatment provide reassurance to others who are about to undergo it for the first time. At St Mary's Hospital in Seoul, I saw not only world-class medical care being offered to cancer patients. I was also impressed by the generosity of the Korean people, who have contributed more than $50,000 to the IAEA's cancer programme through a unique system of small donations. That money is raised through collection boxes in St Mary's Hospital and many other locations. The lesson for all of us here is obvious: we too need to work together, to share our experience, expertise and knowledge with each other and to pool our resources to ensure that cancer patients in developing countries gain

  15. Summary of the IAEA's BIOMASS reference biosphere methodology for Environment Agency staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) programme on BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment (BIOMASS) was launched in October 1996, and will complete during 2001. The BIOMASS programme aimed to develop and apply a methodology for defining biospheres for practical radiological assessment of releases from radioactive waste disposal. This report provides a summary description of the BIOMASS methodology. The BIOMASS methodology has been developed through international collaboration and represents a major milestone in biosphere modelling. It provides an approach supported by a wide range of developers, regulators, biosphere experts and safety assessment specialists. The Environment Agency participated actively in the BIOMASS programme

  16. WHO/IAEA joint research programme on trace elements in cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    After several years of support by WHO and IAEA for the joint research programme on trace elements in cardiovascular diseases, a consultants' meeting was held (1) to examine the present status of the programme with a view to advising on actions necessary for its completion, and (2) to advise on the form, content and timing of a final report. The meeting was attended by the invited experts and other persons. The main work of this research programme is divided, as before, between two projects, (1) on Cd, Cr, Cu, Se, Zn and other elements in relation to ischaemic heart disease, and (2) on Cd, Se and Zn in relation to arterial hypertension

  17. IAEA technical meeting on fissile material strategies for sustainable nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Chaitanyamoy; Koyama, Kazutoshi

    2005-01-01

    A Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Fissile Material Management Strategies for Sustainable Nuclear Energy' was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna from 12 to 15 September 2005. Prior to the TM, three Working Groups (WG) composed of experts from 10 countries prepared Key Issues papers on: 1) Uranium Demand and Supply through 2050; 2) Back-end Fuel Cycle Options; and 3) Sustainable Nuclear Energy beyond 2050: Cross-cutting Issues. Some 36 papers, including 3 key issue papers, were presented during the TM in 3 different sessions. The present paper summarizes the deliberations of the TM. (author)

  18. The IAEA Assistance and Training Programme for Transport Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Eriksson, Ann-Margret [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Rawl, Richard [Transport Security and Safety, Oak Ridge; Anderson, Kimberly K [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security is working cooperatively with the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, European Union and Australia to provide transport security assistance to countries throughout the world. Assistance is available to countries in reviewing and upgrading their transport security programs at all levels: (1) National level (regulatory and other government agencies); and (2) Operator level (shippers and carriers). Assistance is directed at implementing a consistent level of security throughout the life cycle of radioactive material (same level of security during transport as when in a fixed facility) Upgrade assistance can include: (1) Expert advisory missions to provide advice and guidance; (2) Training courses for regulatory, governmental and industry personnel; (3) Transport security awareness; (4) Detailed training on designing and implementing transport security programs; (5) Planning to identify and prioritize needs (developing security approaches and plans); (6) Developing model security plans and procedures; and (7) Equipment (vehicles, packages, command and control equipment, etc.). Country visits are now being scheduled to initiate transport security cooperative activities. A training course has been developed to assist countries in developing and implementing transport security programs. The training course has been given as a national training course (three times) and as a Regional training course (three times). The course addresses recommended security provisions for the transport of all radioactive material.

  19. The IAEA Assistance Training Programme for Transport Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Ann-Margret [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Rawl, Richard R [ORNL; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Anderson, Kimberly K [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security is working cooperatively with the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, European Union and Australia to provide transport security assistance to countries throughout the world. Assistance is available to countries in reviewing and upgrading their transport security programs at all levels: (1) National level (regulatory and other government agencies); and (2) Operator level (shippers and carriers). Assistance is directed at implementing a consistent level of security throughout the life cycle of radioactive material (same level of security during transport as when in a fixed facility) Upgrade assistance can include: (1) Expert advisory missions to provide advice and guidance; (2) Training courses for regulatory, governmental and industry personnel; (3) Transport security awareness; (4) Detailed training on designing and implementing transport security programs; (5) Planning to identify and prioritize needs (developing security approaches and plans); (6) Developing model security plans and procedures; and (7) Equipment (vehicles, packages, command and control equipment, etc.). Country visits are now being scheduled to initiate transport security cooperative activities. A training course has been developed to assist countries in developing and implementing transport security programs. The training course has been given as a national training course (three times) and as a Regional training course (three times). The course addresses recommended security provisions for the transport of all radioactive material.

  20. Radwaste knowledge management in cooperation with the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyukhnova, O.G.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Ozhovan, M.I.; Drejs, Z.; )

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on the emerging of the term knowledge management, and the practice of accumulation and preservation of nuclear knowledge. They emphasize that in addition to collecting and keeping scientific knowledge and identification of practical skills, management of nuclear knowledge includes setting the priorities to take into account the expected departure of retiring experts, and creating the mechanisms for attracting and training future employees. Education and training in radwaste management, as in the entire nuclear sector, is of a multi-disciplinary nature. It requires understanding of subjects such as geology, civil construction, mining, hydrogeology, chemistry, geophysics, mechanics, computing, etc. Moreover, this field is plagued with difficulty of reaching scientific, technical and even social consensus. Creation of effective and efficiently-operating systems for maintaining and disseminating knowledge is a complex and labour-consuming task. The role of the IAEA in the field of radwaste knowledge management is underlined. The SUE SIA Radon Moscow' experience and practice in training specialists of various professions and levels (including regulatory personnel) are described [ru

  1. What Are Expert Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Agapeyeff, A.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for potential business users, this paper describes the main characteristics of expert systems; discusses practical use considerations; presents a taxonomy of the systems; and reviews several expert system development projects in business and industry. (MBR)

  2. IAEA Patient Protection Effort Reaches Key Milestone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) effort to help people track their radiation exposure from medical procedures achieved a significant milestone this week. The Agency received the final approval from a group of medical oversight organizations for the 'Joint Position Statement on the IAEA Patient Radiation Exposure Tracking', a set of principles to guide patient protection efforts at the sub-national, national, and international level. The joint statement endorses the IAEA's three-year-old Smart Card/SmartRadTrack project, which aims to help nations develop systems to track medical radiation procedures and radiation doses. The statement has been agreed by the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Society of Radiology (ESR), the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), the International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT), and the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, USA (CRCPD). 'This system is critical if the medical community is going to keep patients safe when they are being referred for more and more diagnostic scans. These scans, over the years, are made using more and more powerful machines', said Madan Rehani, Radiation Safety Specialist in the IAEA's Radiation Protection of Patients Unit. 'The tracking system will draw doctors' attention to previous radiological examinations, both in terms of clinical information and radiation dose and thus help them assess whether the 11th or 20th CT scan is really appropriate, whether it will do more good than harm.' Advances in radiation-based diagnostic technologies, such as the CT scan, have led to patients receiving such procedures more frequently. The convenience of CT with the added advantage of increased information has resulted in increased usage to the point that there are instances of patients getting tens of CT scans in a few years, not all of which may be justified, or getting CT

  3. Expert auditors’ services classification

    OpenAIRE

    Jolanta Wisniewska

    2013-01-01

    The profession of an expert auditor is a public trust occupation with a distinctive feature of taking responsibility for actions in the public interest. The main responsibility of expert auditors is performing financial auditing; however, expert auditors are prepared to carry out different tasks which encompass a wide plethora of financial and auditing services for different kinds of institutions and companies. The aim of the article is first of all the description of expert auditors’ service...

  4. The IAEA desalination economic evaluation programme (DEEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, I.

    2009-01-01

    DEEP is derived from desalination cost evaluation package developed in the eighties by General Atomics on behalf of the IAEA. The old version, named 'Co-generation and Desalination Economic Evaluation' Spreadsheet, CDEE) was used for feasibility studies related to nuclear desalination in the IAEA and other Member States. Subsequently, with its increasing popularity, a user-friendly version was issued by the Agency towards the end of 1998 under the name of DEEP. Through the next years the software was updated constantly within DEEP-1 family (versions 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 and working version 1.7). Both the user interface and model structure were further developed and in 2000 a new upgrade - first version from the DEEP-2 family was released. Its salient feature was the complete modularization of various cases. As the user group enlarged, new ideas as well as criticisms of the DEEP models appeared. Some of them were implemented gradually in different working versions (versions 2.0, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.6). The four year period of continuous development culminated in the development of DEEP 3.0, released in August 2005. Following further development, the latest version of DEEP 3.1 is currently available for user to down load freely from the web site of the IAEA at no cost. This paper summarizes the salient features of DEEP software and echoes some of the information presented in the TECDOC draft prepared as a result of the CRP on 'Economic Research on, and Assessment of, Selected Nuclear Desalination Projects and Case Studies' which was closed at the end of 2006

  5. Nuclear knowledge management at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear Knowledge Management as a part of the IAEA mission and its aim to help organizations to achieve competitive advantage; costs reduction; accelerated time to market in companies and large private sector organisations; innovation, supports error free decision making are discussed. The most important outputs such as nuclear knowledge management methodology; identifying endangered areas of nuclear science and technology; developing knowledge repositories; knowledge preservation technology; dedicated projects with Member States, (Atucha, Angra, KNK2, ) are presented. A brief review of the currently implemented with Agency's assistance project ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology) is also given

  6. IAEA safeguards: Staying ahead of the game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    What are nuclear safeguards and why are they important? Answers are provided in the booklet, describing and explaining the fundamentals of the IAEA safeguards system and its role as a key element of international security, and addressing the system's implementation, costs, requirements, resources and historical development, with an emphasis on trends and strengthening measures over the past 10-15 years. Topics discussed include the safeguards State evaluation process and and the key requirements of the safeguards system including information sources (open source information, commercial satellite imagery and nuclear trade related information) and the state of the art equipment, techniques and technology (unattended and remote monitoring equipment, environmental sampling, etc.)

  7. IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ''Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated

  8. IAEA work with guides for PSA quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellstroem, Per

    2004-09-01

    IAEA has a project on development of a TECDOC 'PSA Quality for Various Applications'. The project develops the guidance document in stages with intermediate meetings with exchange of ideas, thoughts and experience. Draft versions are being produced successively. The objective with the project is to use attributes to describe the quality of different elements of a PSA (Analysis of initiating events, accident progression, system, data, human reliability, etc) making the PSA suitable for application in various risk informed activities. Two of the meetings in this project took place in February 2004 and in July 2004. The February meeting discussed different aspects of PSA quality in relation to applications and a draft of the TECDOC was reviewed. The meeting made recommendations for preparation of a final document and set priorities for further work in the area. The July meeting elaborated the document further in a small working group and a new draft version was prepared. A final version is expected to be published during 2005. The project has come to the conclusion that it is a limited number of PSA element attributes that are specific for a certain application. Most of the attributes concern plant specificity, realism and level of detail in a general manner, how plant specific is the model, how realistic and how detailed? Many attributes have the characteristic that they are good to have, but not necessarily needed to do the job. This last statement is valid both for a baseline PSA and a PSA application. The IAEA project has identified a limited number of attributes that are necessary to describe characteristics needed for specific applications. The PSA scope needed for a specific application is not covered by the project/document, even though it is obvious that different applications will need different scope or approaches to handle scope limitations. The guidance on performing a PSA available today is old. It is a need to review these guides and update with regard

  9. Protection against nuclear terrorism: the IAEA response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: As a result of the events of 11 September 2001, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) identified possible threats from acts of nuclear terrorism. A report to the Board of Governors in November 2001 summarized the IAEA's ongoing work in areas relevant to the prevention and mitigation of the consequences of such acts and outlined proposals for a number of new and/or enhanced activities. Four main threats were addressed: theft of a nuclear weapon; acquisition of nuclear material; acquisition of other radioactive material; and violent acts against nuclear facilities. These proposals have been further refined and the new plan was approved in principle at the March 2002 board meeting. In the beginning, implementation will be dependent on member state contributions to a voluntary fund. Proposed new or enhanced activities are grouped into eight areas: I. Physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities; II. Detection of malicious activities involving nuclear and other radioactive materials; III. State systems for nuclear material accountancy and control; IV. Security of radioactive material other than nuclear material; V. Assessment of safety/security related vulnerability of nuclear facilities; VI. Response to malicious acts, or threats thereof; VII. Adherence to and implementation of international agreements, guidelines and recommendations; VIII. Nuclear security co-ordination and information management. After an overview, this paper focuses on activity area IV, which deals with the radiological terrorism issues involving radioactive sources. A strategy for evaluation of the IAEA's role is presented, covering an analysis of the likely threats and possible scenarios. This leads to an assessment of the most desirable sources from a terrorist's viewpoint. The strategy then examines how terrorists might acquire such sources and attempts to determine the best ways to prevent their acquisition. Further activities are proposed to prevent the use

  10. Persuasiveness of expert systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, JJ; Liebrand, WBG; Timminga, E; Liebrand, Wim B.G.

    1998-01-01

    Expert system advice is not always evaluated by examining its contents. Users can be persuaded by expert system advice because they have certain beliefs about advice given by a computer. The experiment in this paper shows that subjects (n = 84) thought that, given the same argumentation, expert

  11. IAEA/CRP for decommissioning techniques for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Kim, K. N.; Lee, K. W.; Jung, C. H.

    2001-03-01

    The following were studied through the project entitled 'IAEA/CRP for decommissioning techniques for research reactors 1. Decontamination technology development for TRIGA radioactive soil waste - Electrokinetic soil decontamination experimental results and its mathematical simulation 2. The 2nd IAEA/CRP for decommissioning techniques for research reactors - Meeting results and program 3. Hosting the 2001 IAEA/RCA D and D training course for research reactors and small nuclear facilities

  12. Euratom's accounting procedures to comply with IAEA requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kschwendt, H.

    1980-01-01

    The accounting concept used by the operators for nuclear materials accountancy is different from the evaluation concept used by IAEA. Euratom integrated these two concepts thus allowing for an automatic transformation from the one to the other concept (establishment of reports to IAEA by computer). Particular procedures have been developed to ensure the corrections of the accountancy in both concepts and to perform the retrospective corrections as required by IAEA. 4 refs

  13. IAEA/CRP for decommissioning techniques for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Kim, K. N.; Lee, K. W.; Jung, C. H

    2001-03-01

    The following were studied through the project entitled 'IAEA/CRP for decommissioning techniques for research reactors 1. Decontamination technology development for TRIGA radioactive soil waste - Electrokinetic soil decontamination experimental results and its mathematical simulation 2. The 2nd IAEA/CRP for decommissioning techniques for research reactors - Meeting results and program 3. Hosting the 2001 IAEA/RCA D and D training course for research reactors and small nuclear facilities.

  14. The IAEA research project on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Vidal, C.; Graham, D.; Batandjieva, B.

    2002-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Research Coordinated Project on Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities (ISAM) was launched in November 1997 and it has been underway for three years. The ISAM project was developed to provide a critical evaluation of the approaches and tools used in long-term safety assessment of near surface repositories. It resulted in the development of a harmonised approach and illustrated its application by way of three test cases - vault, borehole and Radon (a particular range of repository designs developed within the former Soviet Union) type repositories. As a consequence, the ISAM project had over 70 active participants and attracted considerable interest involving around 700 experts from 72 Member States. The methodology developed, the test cases, the main lessons learnt and the conclusions have been documented and will be published in the form of an IAEA TECDOC. This paper presents the work of the IAEA on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface waste disposal facilities and the application of these methodologies for different purposes in the individual stages of the repository development. The paper introduces the main objectives, activities and outcome of the ISAM project and summarizes the work performed by the six working groups within the ISAM programme, i.e. Scenario Generation and Justification, Modelling, Confidence Building, Vault, Radon Type Facility and Borehole test cases. (author)

  15. The U.S./IAEA Workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper S. E.; .; Worrall, L.; Pickett, C.; Bachner, K.; Queirolo, A.

    2014-08-08

    The U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, the U.S. Department of State, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a a workshop on the subject of ”Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation.” The workshop was held at the Vienna International Centre in Vienna, Austria, May 6-8, 2014. The workshop participants included software and hardware experts from national laboratories, industry, government, and IAEA member states who were specially selected by the workshop organizers based on their experience with software that is developed for the control and operation of safeguards instrumentation. The workshop included presentations, to orient the participants to the IAEA Department of Safeguards software activities related to instrumentation data collection and processing, and case studies that were designed to inspire discussion of software development, use, maintenance, and upgrades in breakout sessions and to result in recommendations for effective software practices and management. This report summarizes the results of the workshop.

  16. Japanese authorities inform IAEA about accident at nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA today received information from Japanese nuclear regulatory authorities about an accident in the steam generator turbine circuit of the Mihama Nuclear Power Plant (unit 3). According to the Japanese nuclear authorities this is a non-radioactive part of the plant. The regulatory body has reported that four contract employees died and 7 were injured, and stated that there was no release of radioactivity. The IAEA continues to be in contact with Japanese authorities and expects to receive updates on a continuous basis. No request for IAEA assistance has been received at this time. (IAEA)

  17. IAEA Team Reviews Safety Progress at French Nuclear Power Plant 19-23 May 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    An international team of nuclear installation safety experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has evaluated the Gravelines Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in France to assess how the station has followed up on an Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) mission undertaken in 2012. The IAEA assembled a team of experts at the request of the Government of France to conduct the follow-up OSART mission at Gravelines NPP from 19 to 23 May 2014. Follow-up missions are standard components of the OSART programme; they are typically conducted 15-24 months after the initial OSART mission. The IAEA mission in 2012 made a number of recommendations and suggestions for consideration by the Gravelines NPP operators. The station thoroughly analyzed the OSART recommendations and suggestions and developed corrective action plans. In 18 months, the Gravelines plant has achieved the level ''resolved;; or ''satisfactory progress'' in almost all of the recommendations and suggestions made by the OSART in November 2012. During the follow-up mission, the team assessed that the operators have resolved the issues in several areas, including: Undertaking initiatives to improve fire prevention; Reinforcing contamination control practices; and Enhancing capabilities to protect emergency workers in the event of a release of radioactivity. The team identified some issues which have achieved satisfactory progress toward resolution, but need further work, including: Further improvement of measures to preventing the ingress of items or chemicals into circuits and equipment; Comprehensive application of the corrective actions programme; and Reinforcement of the containment protection system in the event of an extremely adverse situation. The team identified the following issue as one which has made insufficient progress toward resolution and needs further work: Emergency response arrangements do not follow current IAEA safety standards recommending that the plant should have a person on

  18. OSART Guidelines. 2015 Edition. Reference Report for IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    missions for both the review experts and their plant counterparts to ensure the consistency and comprehensiveness of the operational safety review. OSART reviews are performance oriented in that they accept different approaches to commissioning and operational safety that represent good practices and may contribute to ensuring a good safety performance for the operating organization. Recommendations are made on items which are so far not covered by the safety standards, and proposed suggestions might help to find more effective ways to ensure, and further enhance, plant safety. Recognition is also given to the efforts made by the plant to develop and implement an action plan for specific safety improvements identified prior to the IAEA mission. Commendable good practices identified at plants are registered in an IAEA database, to which access is provided to other plants to put in place operational safety improvements worldwide. This publication updates OSART Guidelines (2005 Edition)

  19. Statement by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA's 151 Member States have today endorsed the Agency's Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. This Action Plan - the product of intensive consultations with Member States - is both a rallying point and a blueprint for strengthening nuclear safety worldwide. It contains concrete and achievable actions to make nuclear safety post-Fukushima more robust and effective than before. At its core is greater transparency. If there is more transparency, there is more incentive to implement all the actions in the Plan, and to be seen to do so. We count on Member States to implement the Action Plan fully and vigorously. It will need their sustained commitment and full involvement. I am confident that the UN High-Level Meeting on Nuclear Safety and Security, which is taking place in New York today, will continue to build on the foundations laid here in Vienna. We must not lose our sense of urgency. Public expectations are very high. This is an Action Plan. It is time for action. (IAEA)

  20. IAEA responds to cancer crisis in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Full text: On the occasion of World Cancer Day (4 February), the IAEA announced that its Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) will establish its first Centre of Excellence in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. This low-income East African country has one of the continent's highest cancer rates and only one cancer treatment centre. 'Cancer is a growing crisis all across the developing world,' explains IAEA Director General and Nobel Laureate Mohammed ElBaradei. 'We can save thousands of lives if we put together the tools, the knowledge and the political will to fight cancer effectively,' he said. Cancer is the second most common cause of death worldwide after cardiovascular disease. Over 7 million people died of cancer in 2005, and close to 11 million new cancer cases were diagnosed, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). More than 70 percent of cancer deaths now occur in low and middle income countries - the very countries least able to address this growing burden. Cancer-related deaths are projected to increase to more than 9 million people annually by 2015. Already cancer claims twice the number of lives worldwide as AIDS. Low income nations now face a dual burden of communicable and chronic diseases such as cancer. The IAEA spends about 12 million dollars each year for improving cancer treatment in the developing world. Last year, it established the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT), to build partnerships with the WHO and other organizations dedicated to controlling cancer. Much of the IAEA's share of the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize Award has been dedicated to helping the developing world deal with the dramatic rise in cancer that is overwhelming limited health resources and equipment. The harsh reality of developing nations is one of overburdened health systems with little cancer screening and unnecessarily late cancer diagnosis and non-curative treatment. The IAEA estimates that approximately 5,000 cancer care centres and systems - plus the

  1. The IAEA intercomparison for individual monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Boehm, J.; Herrman, D.; Strachotinsky, C.; Thompson, I.M.G.

    1990-01-01

    In 1985 the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements introduced a new set of operational quantities for radiation protection purposes through Report 39. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been concerned with the impact of possible adoption of these quantities by its 113 Member States. Thus the Agency implemented a Coordinated Research Programme on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring in 1987. The first phase completed with a Research Coordination meeting of the participants in April, 1989. Photon exposures were provided at 11 energies over a range from 18 keV to 1.25 MeV at three standards laboratories in Austria, the GDR and the UK. Technical coordination was provided by the PTB, Braunschweig. Twenty one laboratories from 19 countries participated with film, TLD of various types, and combination dosemeters. Irradiations were performed on the IAEA 30 cm cubic, water-filled phantom that is in use throughout its network of 61 Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. Conversion coefficients for the IAEA phantom were calculated by the PTB and confirmed through measurements at ASMW in the GDR. Preliminary results indicated that the type of dosemeter (film or TLD) had little effect on the quality of results. The most important factor appears to be the specific techniques used for data interpretation. (author)

  2. Expert status and performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Burgman

    Full Text Available Expert judgements are essential when time and resources are stretched or we face novel dilemmas requiring fast solutions. Good advice can save lives and large sums of money. Typically, experts are defined by their qualifications, track record and experience. The social expectation hypothesis argues that more highly regarded and more experienced experts will give better advice. We asked experts to predict how they will perform, and how their peers will perform, on sets of questions. The results indicate that the way experts regard each other is consistent, but unfortunately, ranks are a poor guide to actual performance. Expert advice will be more accurate if technical decisions routinely use broadly-defined expert groups, structured question protocols and feedback.

  3. IAEA Activities supporting education and training at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peld, N.D.; Ridikas, D.

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: Through the provision of neutrons for experiments and their historical association with universities, research reactors have played a prominent role in nuclear education and training of students, scientists and radiation workers. Today education and training remains the foremost application of research reactors, involving close to 160 facilities out of 246 operational. As part of its mandate to facilitate and expand the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world, the IAEA administers a number of activities intended to promote nuclear research and enable access to nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, one of which is the support of various education and training measures involving research reactors. In the last 5 years, education and training has formed one pillar for the creation of research reactor coalitions and networks to pool their resources and offer joint programmes, such as the on-going Group Fellowship Training Course. Conducted mainly through the Eastern European Research Reactor Initiative, this programme is a periodic sic week course for young scientists and engineers on nuclear techniques and administration jointly conducted at several member research reactor institutes. Organization of similar courses is under consideration in Latin America and the Asia-Pacific Region, also with support from the IAEA. Additionally, four research reactor institutes have begun offering practical education courses through virtual reactor experiments and operation known as the Internet Reactor Laboratory. Through little more than an internet connection and projection screens, university science departments can be connected regionally or bilaterally with the control room o a research reactor for various training activities. Finally, two publications are being prepared, namely Hands-On Training Courses Using Research Reactors and Accelerators, and Compendium on Education and training Based on Research Reactors. These

  4. Strengthening IAEA Safeguards for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Bruce D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anzelon, George A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Budlong-Sylvester, Kory [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    During their December 10-11, 2013, workshop in Grenoble France, which focused on the history and future of safeguarding research reactors, the United States, France and the United Kingdom (UK) agreed to conduct a joint study exploring ways to strengthen the IAEA’s safeguards approach for declared research reactors. This decision was prompted by concerns about: 1) historical cases of non-compliance involving misuse (including the use of non-nuclear materials for production of neutron generators for weapons) and diversion that were discovered, in many cases, long after the violations took place and as part of broader pattern of undeclared activities in half a dozen countries; 2) the fact that, under the Safeguards Criteria, the IAEA inspects some reactors (e.g., those with power levels under 25 MWt) less than once per year; 3) the long-standing precedent of States using heavy water research reactors (HWRR) to produce plutonium for weapons programs; 4) the use of HEU fuel in some research reactors; and 5) various technical characteristics common to some types of research reactors that could provide an opportunity for potential proliferators to misuse the facility or divert material with low probability of detection by the IAEA. In some research reactors it is difficult to detect diversion or undeclared irradiation. In addition, infrastructure associated with research reactors could pose a safeguards challenge. To strengthen the effectiveness of safeguards at the State level, this paper advocates that the IAEA consider ways to focus additional attention and broaden its safeguards toolbox for research reactors. This increase in focus on the research reactors could begin with the recognition that the research reactor (of any size) could be a common path element on a large number of technically plausible pathways that must be considered when performing acquisition pathway analysis (APA) for developing a State Level Approach (SLA) and Annual Implementation Plan (AIP). To

  5. Development of a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, K.B.; Salzbrenner, R.; Nickell, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    An effort has been undertaken to develop a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for structural components of nuclear material transportation casks. The need for such a criterion was twofold. First, new generation cask designs have proposed the use of ferritic steels and other materials to replace the austenitic stainless steel commonly used for structural components in transport casks. Unlike austenitic stainless steel which fails in a high-energy absorbing, ductile tearing mode, it is possible for these candidate materials to fail via brittle fracture when subjected to certain combinations of elevated loading rates and low temperatures. Second, there is no established brittle fracture criterion accepted by the regulatory community that covers a broad range of structural materials. Although the existing IAEA Safety Series number-sign 37 addressed brittle fracture, its the guidance was dated and pertained only to ferritic steels. Consultant's Services Meetings held under the auspices of the IAEA have resulted in a recommended brittle fracture criterion. The brittle fracture criterion is based on linear elastic fracture mechanics, and is the result of a consensus of experts from six participating IAEA-member countries. The brittle fracture criterion allows three approaches to determine the fracture toughness of the structural material. The three approaches present the opportunity to balance material testing requirements and the conservatism of the material's fracture toughness which must be used to demonstrate resistance to brittle fracture. This work has resulted in a revised Appendix IX to Safety Series number-sign 37 which will be released as an IAEA Technical Document within the coming year

  6. The WMO/IAEA rapid data exchange system in support of the early notification convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asculai, E.; Mildner, S.

    1990-01-01

    Following the adoption, in September 1986, of the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, the IAEA and the WMO began work on the development of a methodology for the rapid dissemination of information and data following a nuclear accident. Expert Group meetings defined the data and information which needs to be disseminated, under the requirements of the Conventions. The Global Telecommunication System (GTS) of the WMO was identified as the suitable technical means of transmission since it combines immediate availability during times of emergency, rapidity of transmission and permanent connections to all Member States through their National Meteorological Centres. In order to utilize the GTS, special procedures and transmission formats have to be observed ad a specific code was jointly developed by WMO and IAEA to make the message Language-independent. Relevant instructions were issued in the WMO/IAEA Manual on the use of the WMO-GTS for the Early Notification Conventions. National arrangements for access by competent authorities to the information provided under the Early Notification Convention and for the provision of basic radiological data are of critical importance. Preparations are being made to provide specialized analyses and predictions on the atmospheric transport of radionuclides using the GTS and other means. The format and number of special output products is being specified in accordance with the requirements of the Member States. Requirements for meteorological and radiological data need to be kept under review in the light of model developments. The IAEA is presently engaged in the production of a software package for the coding/decoding of the data transmission

  7. Future direction for implementing the multilateral cooperation with the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Hong, Young Don

    1999-03-01

    Korea has achieved remarkable results in the development of nuclear technology over the past years. Nuclear R and D programs have been actively pursued with the aim of enhancing nuclear technological capability to the level of nuclear advanced countries by early 2000. Worth noting is the fact that the IAEA has played an important role in facilitating Korea's acquisition of advanced nuclear technologies by participating in IAEA technical cooperation programmes, and technical cooperation with the IAEA has laid a firm groundwork for Korea to achieve self-reliance in nuclear technology. Technical cooperation with the IAEA should be steadily pursued so that Korea can play a leading role in the international nuclear arena in the years to come. Up to now, the study of major programmes and of the current status of overall technical cooperation projects, which have been implemented by the IAEA, has been insufficient. It should be noted that analysis of the assistance provided by the IAEA leaves something to be desired. In this regard, analyzing the current status of technical cooperation projects as well as recommending policy direction is required in a bid to implement IAEA technical cooperation projects systematically. Korea's status within the IAEA, including activities in the Advisory Committee and the current status of its participation in Coordinated Research Programmes (CRP) and other major programmes underway, is presented in this report. The policy direction for and implementation status of IAEA technical cooperation programmes are explained at length. The current status of technical cooperation programmes carried out in the 1997-1998 cycle and those to be implemented in the 1992-2000 cycle are also described in this report. Strategies for upgrading Korea's status within the IAEA as well as directions for nuclear cooperation through the IAEA were presented in this study to positively deal with rapid changes in the international nuclear arena and to efficiently

  8. Future direction for implementing the multilateral cooperation with the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Hong, Young Don

    1999-03-01

    Korea has achieved remarkable results in the development of nuclear technology over the past years. Nuclear R and D programs have been actively pursued with the aim of enhancing nuclear technological capability to the level of nuclear advanced countries by early 2000. Worth noting is the fact that the IAEA has played an important role in facilitating Korea's acquisition of advanced nuclear technologies by participating in IAEA technical cooperation programmes, and technical cooperation with the IAEA has laid a firm groundwork for Korea to achieve self-reliance in nuclear technology. Technical cooperation with the IAEA should be steadily pursued so that Korea can play a leading role in the international nuclear arena in the years to come. Up to now, the study of major programmes and of the current status of overall technical cooperation projects, which have been implemented by the IAEA, has been insufficient. It should be noted that analysis of the assistance provided by the IAEA leaves something to be desired. In this regard, analyzing the current status of technical cooperation projects as well as recommending policy direction is required in a bid to implement IAEA technical cooperation projects systematically. Korea's status within the IAEA, including activities in the Advisory Committee and the current status of its participation in Coordinated Research Programmes (CRP) and other major programmes underway, is presented in this report. The policy direction for and implementation status of IAEA technical cooperation programmes are explained at length. The current status of technical cooperation programmes carried out in the 1997-1998 cycle and those to be implemented in the 1992-2000 cycle are also described in this report. Strategies for upgrading Korea's status within the IAEA as well as directions for nuclear cooperation through the IAEA were presented in this study to positively deal with rapid changes in the international nuclear arena and to

  9. International symposium concluded that uranium supply for nuclear power is secure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document informs that stable uranium supply to fuel nuclear power plants will continue to be available according to the conclusion reached at the International Symposium on the Uranium Production Cycle and the Environment held from 2 to 6 October 2000 at the IAEA in Vienna. The meeting included specialists from about 40 countries, in addition to the Arab Atomic Energy Agency, European Commission, OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Office of Supervising Scientist (OSS)/Environment Australia, United Nations, Uranium Institute, World Bank, the World Energy Council and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI)

  10. IAEA looks ahead. Highlights of 1960 programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    The Agency performed an initial assessment of most countries' requirements so that assistance could be given where it was most needed and where it could be best utilized. For many of these countries the stage has now arrived for the actual provision of assistance to specific projects which, in many cases, have emerged out of the preliminary surveys and consultations. The training and fellowship programme of the Agency will gather further momentum in 1960. The Agency thins that its importance as a supplier of nuclear materials and equipment will increase during the next year and that several agreements involving the supply of fissionable and source materials will be concluded and implemented. The Agency also will provide expert advice in regard to prospecting, mining and ore processing. Work is also expected to arise in 1960 in connexion with the verification and analysis of materials to be delivered to or by the Agency. As regards equipment, work on the cataloguing and classification of nuclear instruments will increase in 1960. A handbook explaining the advantages of different types of instrumentation for various nuclear applications will be prepared during the year. The Agency will continue its technical and economic studies on the utilization of atomic power in the less developed countries. With regard to research the Agency's functional laboratory at Seibersdorf is expected to be in operation in the last quarter of 1960, where the Agency will undertake scientific analyses, testing and measurements needed in connexion with its other substantive activities. Much of this work will be concerned with the establishment of international standards for radioactive substances and radiation measurements, special materials for nuclear technology and in connexion with the Agency's safeguards and health and safety programme. Agency's scientific staff will be enable to carry out special analyses and measurements on behalf of Member States. Research concerning the disposal and

  11. Roche and IAEA announce joint initiative to train healthcare workers for Africa's fight against cancer. EDUCARE partnership to launch IAEA's VUCCnet training networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    governed and managed by an expert steering committee of representatives from Roche, the IAEA and WHO. The programme will be piloted in Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia, all of which will be able to learn from each other and transfer cancer control skills. The main priorities of the programme will be as follows: - Establishing a regional training network by linking cancer centres of competence within the pilot countries and conducting training through the network; - Assisting in the design and implementation of a comprehensive cancer control curricula that is appropriate for the specific needs of the four pilot countries; and - Virtual University for Cancer Control (VUCC): Implementing a web-based portal for delivery of curriculum content and establishing a certification process. The launch of the EDUCARE initiative will be marked with an initial meeting scheduled for May, involving the IAEA, Roche, the WHO and participating pilot country representatives. To initiate the VUCCnet, Roche and the IAEA will focus on enhancing the skills at cancer centres in each of the pilot countries. Through an intense training programme for healthcare workers taking place over five years, the EDUCARE project will provide resources and support to establish four pilot centres as recognized National Cancer Centres of Competence. It is estimated that each Cancer Centre of Competence will enable access to diagnostic testing and cancer treatment for a catchment area of approximately five million people. (IAEA)

  12. IAEA activities on steam generator life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueorguiev, B.; Lyssakov, V.; Trampus, P.

    2002-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) carries out a set of activities in the field of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) life management. Main activities within this area are implemented through the Technical Working Group on Life Management of NPPs, and mostly concentrated on studies of understanding mechanisms of degradation and their monitoring, optimisation of maintenance management, economic aspects, proven practices of and approaches to plant life management including decommissioning. The paper covers two ongoing activities related to steam generator life management: the International Database on NPP Steam Generators and the Co-ordinated Research Project on Verification of WWER Steam Generator Tube Integrity (WWER is the Russian designed PWR). The lifetime assessment of main components relies on an ability to assess their condition and predict future degradation trends, which to a large extent is dependent on the availability of relevant data. Effective management of ageing and degradation processes requires a large amount of data. Several years ago the IAEA started to work on the International Database on NPP Life Management. This is a multi-module database consisting of modules such as reactor pressure vessels materials, piping, steam generators, and concrete structures. At present the work on pressure vessel materials, on piping as well as on steam generator is completed. The paper will present the concept and structure of the steam generator module of the database. In countries operating WWER NPPs, there are big differences in the eddy current inspection strategy and practice as well as in the approach to steam generator heat exchanger tube structural integrity assessment. Responding to the need for a co-ordinated research to compare eddy current testing results with destructive testing using pulled out tubes from WWER steam generators, the IAEA launched this project. The main objectives of the project are to summarise the operating experiences of WWER

  13. Water chemistry-related activities at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.; Onufriev, V.

    2005-01-01

    Water chemistry activities and publications in the past are listed. IAEA Coordinated Research Programmes, WWER-1000 SG water chemistry database, materials issues TM in Vienna, TC workshops and attendance of international meetings, publications. There is a list of IAEA publications related to water chemistry and corrosion. Finally water chemistry activities planned for 2006-2008 are detailed. (N.T.)

  14. Reference dosimeter system of the iaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kishor; Girzikowsky, Reinhard

    1995-09-01

    Quality assurance programmes must be in operation at radiation processing facilities to satisfy national and international Standards. Since dosimetry has a vital function in these QA programmes, it is imperative that the dosimetry systems in use at these facilities are well calibrated with a traceability to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory. As a service to the Member States, the International Atomic Energy Agency operates the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) to assist in this process. The transfer standard dosimetry system that is used for this service is based on ESR spectrometry. The paper describes the activities undertaken at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory to establish the QA programme for its reference dosimetry system. There are four key elements of such a programme: quality assurance manual; calibration that is traceable to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory; a clear and detailed statement of uncertainty in the dose measurement; and, periodic quality audit.

  15. IAEA Convenes Board Meeting on Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Full text: ''I welcome the recent announcement by the EU High Representative Catherine Ashton regarding the implementation of the Joint Plan of Action on the Iranian nuclear programme, which is to take effect as of 20 January. ''I have received a request from Iran and the E3/EU+3 that the Agency conducts monitoring and verification of nuclear-related measures in relation to the Joint Plan of Action. ''I have requested that a meeting of the Board of Governors be convened on 24 January, to consult with the Board regarding the request by Iran and the E3/EU+3 for the Agency to undertake monitoring and verification of nuclear-related measures in relation to the Joint Plan of Action.'' (IAEA)

  16. IAEA research contracts. Ninth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    This volume is the seventh annual publication of the summaries of final reports received during 1968 in connection with contracts and agreements awarded by the IAEA Research Contract Programme. Ninety nine such summaries are included, thus bringing to 323 the total number published so far. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology, food preservation by irradiation

  17. IAEA research contracts. Seventh annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    This volume is the seventh annual report and presents full summaries of 52 final reports from contracts, sponsored under the Agency's Research Contract Programme, which were completed during 1966. Including these, a total of 188 summaries have been published in the various fields in which support is provided under the IAEA Research contract program. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology, food preservation by irradiation

  18. IAEA research contracts. Sixth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This volume is the sixth annual report and presents full summaries of 37 final reports from contracts, sponsored under the Agency's Research Contract Programme, which were completed during 1965. Including these, a total of 136 summaries have been published in the various fields in which support is provided under the IAEA Research contract program. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology

  19. Being an expert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechet, Y.; Musseau, O.; Bruna, G.; Sperandio, M.; Roulleaux-Dugage, M.; Andrieux, S.; Metteau, L.

    2014-01-01

    This series of short articles are dedicated to the role of the expert in the enterprise. There is an important difference between a scientific counsellor and an expert, the expert, recognized by his peers, can speak publicly in his field of expertise but has a duty of transparency while the job of a scientific counsellor requires confidentiality. The making and the use of an expert in an enterprise requires a dedicated organization. The organization of the expertise in 5 enterprises in nuclear industry are considered: CEA (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission), IRSN (Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety), AREVA, ANDRA (National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) and EDF (Electricity of France)

  20. The next twenty years - IAEA's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tape, G.F.

    1977-01-01

    The twentieth anniversary of an institution is an appropriate time to look back and to ask what has been achieved. It is also an appropriate time to look ahead and to ask what should be the mission for the future. How can the strengths of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) be best utilized, what new opportunities should be seized upon, and what challenges should the IAEA be prepared to meet in the next twenty years? Forward planning is a very necessary activity in today's world. There are so many demands on national or institutional resources that careful analysis of options is necessary to establish priorities and ultimately to provide for implementation. But such planning must be done carefully with full appreciation for the validity and sensitivity of the input assumptions and data. Furthermore, today's plan, while setting goals and directions, cannot be so inflexible that it cannot be responsive to ever-changing political, economic and technical constraints or opportunities. Thus in looking ahead, the plan must contain provisions for flexibility to provide for further modifications in the light of ever-changing knowledge, attitudes, and world conditions. The experience of the past five years in the energy field, and especially in nuclear energy, underscores this need. In looking ahead for the next twenty years, we are attempting to describe the International Atomic Energy Agency and its role through the twentieth century. In doing so, we are automatically laying the base for the Agency's work going into the twenty-first century. In short, we are trying to visualize a programme that can serve the coming generation and, in doing so, creating a base from which the needs of the succeeding generation can be met. This is a large order and the crystal ball is less than clear. (author)

  1. IAEA Perspectives on Preparation for Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michal, Vladimir; Ljubenov, Vladan

    2016-01-01

    There are about 160 power reactors in decommissioning phase worldwide. In addition, more than 400 other nuclear facilities, such as research reactors or nuclear fuel cycle facilities, have been shutdown for decommissioning, have been undergoing active decommissioning or have already been fully dismantled. Planned and systematic preparation for decommissioning is very important for further effective implementation of dismantling activities. While some preparatory activities for decommissioning start early in the facility life-cycle, the main preparatory activities are implemented towards the end of the operational period and during the transition period from operation to decommissioning. These may include a wide range of technical actions, such as physical and radiological characterization, pre-decommissioning decontamination, management of spent fuel and operational waste, establishment of new waste management facilities and modification of safety systems needed to support decommissioning. In parallel, some non-technical tasks are to be completed, e.g. preparation of the final decommissioning plan and its supporting documents, licensing activities, organizational changes, training of personnel for decommissioning, etc. Preparatory activities may be organized in various ways depending on considered decommissioning strategies and physical and radiological status of the nuclear facility after its routine operation is over. The IAEA published numerous safety and technical reports providing guidance, recommendations, experiences, good practices and lessons learned, fully or to some extent covering the preparatory phase for decommissioning. Many training courses, workshops, seminars etc. were organized to support sharing of good practices among specialists and organizations involved. This paper provides an overview of relevant activities and perspectives of the IAEA in this area. The paper also draws some general conclusions and identifies lessons learned on the basis of

  2. Nuclear Knowledge Management: the IAEA Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, M.; De Grosbois, J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge in an organization is residing in people, processes and technology. Adequate awareness of their knowledge assets and of the risk of losing them is vital for safe and secure operations of nuclear installations. Senior managers understand this important linkage, and in the last years there is an increasing tendency in nuclear organizations to implement knowledge management strategies to ensure that the adequate and necessary knowledge is available at the right time, in the right place. Specific and advanced levels of knowledge are clearly required to achieve and maintain technical expertise, and experience must be developed and be available throughout the nuclear technology lifecycle. If a nuclear organization does not possess or have access to the required technical knowledge, a full understanding of the potential consequences of decisions and actions may not be possible, and safety, security and safeguards might be compromised. Effective decision making during design, licencing, procurement, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance, refurbishment, and decommissioning of nuclear facilities needs to be risk-informed and knowledge-driven. Nuclear technology is complex and brings with it inherent and unique risks that must be managed to acceptably low levels. Nuclear managers have a responsibility not only to establish adequate technical knowledge and experience in their nuclear organizations but also to maintain it. The consequences of failing to manage the organizations key knowledge assets can result in serious degradations or accidents. The IAEA Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) sub-programme was established more than 10 years ago to support Nuclear Organizations, at Member States request, in the implementation and dissemination of the NKM methodology, through the development of guidance and tools, and by providing knowledge management services and assistance. The paper will briefly present IAEA understanding of and approach to knowledge

  3. The IAEA power reactor information system - PRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.; Qureshi, A.; Skjoeldebrand, R.; White, D.

    1983-01-01

    The IAEA Power Reactor Information System, PRIS, is based on a collection of basic design data and operating experience data which the IAEA started in 1970. PRIS is used for annual publications on 'Power Reactors in Member States', 'Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States', which gives annual operating information for individual plants, and a 'Performance Analysis Report' summarizing each year's and earlier experience. Since 1973 information has been collected in a systematic manner on significant plant outages (= more than 10 full power hours). There is now information on more than 10,000 outages in the system which permits some conclusions to be drawn both in regard to individual plants and to categories of plants on the significance of different outage reasons and different types of equipment failures. PRIS has not been intended to be a component reliability information system as an international data collection must stop short of the level of detail which would be needed for that purpose. The objectives of PRIS have been to provide a factual background for assumptions on parameters which are essential for economic evaluations and for systems operation planning (load factor and availability). The outage information does, however, lend itself to conclusions about generic problems in different categories of plants and it can be used by an individual operator to find other plants where information about particular problems can be obtained. It would also now be possible to use PRIS for setting availability goals based on experience and not only on theoretical design considerations. The paper demonstrates the conclusions which can be drawn from 662 reactor years of operation of light and heavy water pressurized reactors and 390 reactor years of boiling water reactors and, in particular, the role that the main heat removal system and its components have played in the equipment failure category

  4. FAO/IAEA research and training in soil fertility at the IAEA's Seibersdorf Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, F.; Hardarson, G.

    1989-01-01

    The Soil Science Unit of the Agency's Seibersdorf Laboratories provides invaluable research and development support for the co-ordinated research programmes and field technical co-operation projects co-ordinated by the soil fertility, irrigation, and crop production section of the Joint Division of the IAEA and FAO. This article describes how nuclear technology in soil and plant sciences is being developed and transferred through various mechanisms to help countries establish better conditions for crop and livestock production

  5. Certified reference materials for radionuclides in Bikini Atoll sediment (IAEA-410) and Pacific Ocean sediment (IAEA-412)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, M. K.; van Beek, P.; Carvalho, F. P.

    2016-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of certified reference materials (CRMs) for radionuclide content in sediments collected offshore of Bikini Atoll (IAEA-410) and in the open northwest Pacific Ocean (IAEA-412) are described and the results of the certification process are presented. The certifi...

  6. IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear structure and decay data. IAEA, Vienna 21-25 April 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1980-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the fourth meeting of the international nuclear structure and decay data network at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 21-25 April 1980. The meeting was attended by 23 Scientists from 11 Member States and 2 international organizations, concerned with the compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. (author)

  7. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 14, no. 1(82). Jan-Feb 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: 2000 Budget Goes Before IAEA Board of Governors, IAEA, Inspectors Relocated from Iraq, Review Meeting of Nuclear Safety Convention Set in April, Statements of IAEA Director General, The IAEA and Y2K Issues: Clearinghouse and Contact Point, Strengthened Safeguards System: Status of Additional Protocols, More States Join International Conventions in Nuclear Fields, IAEA International Scientific Symposia and Seminars in 1999, New IAEA Books, and othe short information

  8. International ministerial conference on nuclear energy in the 21. century, Beijing, China, 20-22 April 2009. Concluding statement by the President of the Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    forward research and development of advanced nuclear technologies; The Secretary General of OECD and other participants expressed the view that nuclear energy should have an important role to play in post Kyoto flexibility mechanisms. To conclude, the progress made by the nuclear industry since the 2005 Paris Conference has been significant, as indicated by the number of countries expressing interest in new nuclear plants. The IAEA plays an essential role in assisting States to develop the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. The IAEA was encouraged to continue its international cooperation with Member States and international organizations such as the OECD/NEA. In this regard, participants are looking forward to a further conference at the Ministerial level in another four years, which would be a valuable step in the direction of developing the support and assurance by all countries involved in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy

  9. International ministerial conference on nuclear energy in the 21. century, Beijing, China, 20-22 April 2009. Concluding statement by the President of the Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    forward research and development of advanced nuclear technologies. The Secretary General of OECD and other participants expressed the view that nuclear energy should have an important role to play in post Kyoto flexibility mechanisms. To conclude, the progress made by the nuclear industry since the 2005 Paris Conference has been significant, as indicated by the number of countries expressing interest in new nuclear plants. The IAEA plays an essential role in assisting States to develop the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. The IAEA was encouraged to continue its international cooperation with Member States and international organizations such as the OECD/NEA. In this regard, participants are looking forward to a further conference at the Ministerial level in another four years, which would be a valuable step in the direction of developing the support and assurance by all countries involved in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy

  10. Database for the OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Emese; Hozer, Zoltan; Gyori, Csaba; Hegyi, Gyoergy

    2010-01-01

    On 10 April 2003 severe damage of fuel assemblies took place during an incident at Unit 2 of Paks Nuclear Power Plant in Hungary. The assemblies were being cleaned in a special tank below the water level of the spent fuel storage pool in order to remove crud buildup. That afternoon, the chemical cleaning of assemblies was completed and the fuel rods were being cooled by circulation of storage pool water. The first sign of fuel failure was the detection of some fission gases released from the cleaning tank during that evening. The cleaning tank cover locks were released after midnight and this operation was followed by a sudden increase in activity concentrations. The visual inspection revealed that all 30 fuel assemblies were severely damaged. The first evaluation of the event showed that the severe fuel damage happened due to inadequate coolant circulation within the cleaning tank. The damaged fuel assemblies will be removed from the cleaning tank in 2005 and will be stored in special canisters in the spent fuel storage pool of the Paks NPP. Following several discussions between expert from different countries and international organisations the OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project was proposed. The project is envisaged in two phases. - Phase 1 is to cover organization of visual inspection of material, preparation of database, performance of analyses and preparatory work for fuel examination. - Phase 2 is to cover the fuel transport and the hot cell examination. The first meeting of the project was held in Budapest on 30-31 January 2006. Phase 1 of the Paks Fuel Project will focus on the numerical simulation of the most important aspects of the incident. This activity will help in the reconstruction of the accidental scenario. The first step of Phase 1 was the collection of a database necessary for the code calculations. The main objective of database collection was to provide input data for calculations. For this reason the collection was focused on such data that are

  11. Real time expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asami, Tohru; Hashimoto, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    1992-01-01

    Recently, aiming at the application to the plant control for nuclear reactors and traffic and communication control, the research and the practical use of the expert system suitable to real time processing have become conspicuous. In this report, the condition for the required function to control the object that dynamically changes within a limited time is presented, and the technical difference between the real time expert system developed so as to satisfy it and the expert system of conventional type is explained with the actual examples and from theoretical aspect. The expert system of conventional type has the technical base in the problem-solving equipment originating in STRIPS. The real time expert system is applied to the fields accompanied by surveillance and control, to which conventional expert system is hard to be applied. The requirement for the real time expert system, the example of the real time expert system, and as the techniques of realizing real time processing, the realization of interruption processing, dispersion processing, and the mechanism of maintaining the consistency of knowledge are explained. (K.I.)

  12. Trendwatch combining expert opinion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrix, E.M.T.; Kornelis, M.; Pegge, S.M.; Galen, van M.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, focus is on a systematic way to detect future changes in trends that may effect the dynamics in the agro-food sector, and on the combination of opinions of experts. For the combination of expert opinions, the usefulness of multilevel models is investigated. Bayesian data analysis is

  13. Expert systems: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdejo, F.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce readers to the basic principles of rule-based expert systems. Four topics are discussed in subsequent sections: (1) Definition; (2) Structure of an expert system; (3) State of the art and (4) Impact and future research. (orig.)

  14. Expert Systems in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartschuh, Wayne

    This paper argues that the concepts and techniques used in the development of expert systems should be expanded and applied to the field of education, particularly in the area of intelligent tutoring systems. It is noted that expert systems are a well known area of artificial intelligence and have been proven effective in well-defined topic areas.…

  15. Combining Expert Advice Efficiently

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Koolen-Wijkstra (Wouter); S. de Rooij (Steven)

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractWe show how models for prediction with expert advice can be defined concisely and clearly using hidden Markov models (HMMs); standard HMM algorithms can then be used to efficiently calculate, among other things, how the expert predictions should be weighted according to the model. We

  16. IAEA Contribution to International Peace, Security and Prosperity, 27 July 2011, Matsumoto, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    expert peer review missions; To enhance the effectiveness of national nuclear regulatory bodies and ensure their independence; To strengthen the global emergency preparedness and response system; and To expand the Agency's role in receiving and disseminating information. Translating these goals into action quickly is the Agency's highest priority at the moment. We are working on an Action Plan which will be presented to the Agency's Board of Governors and General Conference in September. Hard work will be required from all Member States, and from the IAEA, in the years ahead to make all nuclear power plants in the world as safe as humanly possible. The Fukushima Daiichi accident is one of the most serious and complex disasters which human beings have ever had to deal with. I greatly appreciate the considerable efforts being made internationally to ensure that the right lessons are learned. I welcome Japan's proposal to host an international conference, together with the IAEA, in 2012 so that its first- hand experience of dealing with a major disaster can be shared for the benefit of all countries. Despite Fukushima Daiichi, global use of nuclear power will continue to grow in the coming decades and it will remain an important option for many countries. Nuclear safety is the responsibility of individual States, but the IAEA - the only international organization with expertise in all aspects of nuclear energy - will play the lead role in shaping a safer nuclear future throughout the world

  17. The IAEA/WHO TLD postal programme for radiotherapy hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, J.; Andreo, P.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1969 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), together with the World Health Organization (WHO), has performed postal TLD audits to verify the calibration of radiotherapy beams in developing countries. A number of changes have recently been implemented to improve the efficiency of the IAEA/WHO TLD programme. The IAEA has increased the number of participants and reduced significantly the total turn-around time to provide results to the hospitals within the shortest possible time following the TLD irradiations. The IAEA has established a regular follow-up programme for hospitals with results outside acceptance limits of ±5%. The IAEA has, over 30 years, verified the calibration of more than 3300 clinical photon beams at approximately 1000 radiotherapy hospitals. Only 65% of those hospitals who receive TLDs for the first time have results within the acceptance limits, while more than 80% of the users that have benefited from a previous TLD audit are successful. The experience of the IAEA in TLD audits has been transferred to the national level. The IAEA offers a standardized TLD methodology, provides Guidelines and gives technical back-up to the national TLD networks. The unsatisfactory status of the dosimetry for radiotherapy, as noted in the past, is gradually improving however, the dosimetry practices in many hospitals in developing countries need to be revised in order to reach adequate conformity to hospitals that perform modern radiotherapy in Europe, USA and Australia. (author)

  18. IAEA Nobel Peace Prize cancer and nutrition fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinley, D. III

    2006-05-01

    The Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize to the IAEA and Director General ElBaradei in equal shares. The IAEA and its Director General won the 2005 Peace Prize for their efforts to prevent nuclear energy from being used for military purposes and to ensure that nuclear energy for peaceful purposes is used in the safest possible way. The IAEA Board of Governors subsequently decided that the IAEA's share of the prestigious prize would be used to create a special fund for fellowships and training to improve cancer control and childhood nutrition in the developing world. This fund is known as the 'IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Cancer and Nutrition Fund'. The money will be dedicated to enhancing human resources in developing regions of the world for improved cancer control and childhood nutrition. In the area of cancer control, the money will be spent on establishing regional cancer training institutes for the training of new doctors, medical physicists and technologists in radiation oncology to improve cancer treatment and care, as part of the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT). In the realm of nutrition, the focus of the Fund will be on capacity building in the use of nuclear techniques to develop interventions to contribute to improved nutrition and health for children in the developing world. Fund-supported fellowship awards will target young professionals, especially women, from Member States, through the IAEA's Technical Cooperation (TC) Programme. Alongside such awards, regional events will be organized in Africa, Asia and Latin America in cancer control and nutrition during 2006. The IAEA Secretariat is encouraging Member States and donors to contribute to the IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Cancer and Nutrition Fund by providing additional resources, in cash and in-kind

  19. The IAEA's Illicit Trafficking Database Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzelon, G.; Hammond, W.; Nicholas, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: As part of its overall programme on nuclear material security, the IAEA has since 1995 maintained a database of incidents of trafficking in nuclear materials and other radioactive sources. The Illicit Trafficking Database Programme (ITDP) is intended to assist Member States by alerting them to current incidents, by facilitating exchange of reliable, detailed information about incidents, and by identifying any common threads or trends that might assist States in combating illicit trafficking. The ITDP also seeks to better inform the public by providing basic information to the media concerning illicit trafficking events. Approximately 70 States have joined this programme for collecting and sharing information on trafficking incidents. Reporting States have the opportunity to designate what information may be shared with other States and what may be shared with the public. In cases where the IAEA's first information about a possible incident comes from news media or other open sources rather than from a State notification, the information first is evaluated, and then, if warranted, the relevant State or States are contacted to request confirmation or clarification of an alleged incident. During 2000, as a result of experience gained working with information on illicit nuclear trafficking, the IAEA developed of a flexible and comprehensive new database system. The new system has an open architecture that accommodates structured information from States, in-house information, open-source articles, and other information sources, such as pictures, maps and web links. The graphical user interface allows data entry, maintenance and standard and ad-hoc reporting. The system also is linked to a Web-based query engine, which enables searching of both structured and open-source information. For the period 1 January 1993 through 31 March 2001, the database recorded more than 550 incidents, of which about two-thirds have been confirmed by States. (Some of these

  20. Appraisal for France of the safety of the transport of radioactive material. Provision for the application of the IAEA safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA has the specific statutory function within the United Nations system of establishing standards of safety for the protection of health against exposure to ionizing radiation. As part of this mandate, the IAEA has issued Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, and has also established the Transport Safety Appraisal Service (TranSAS) to carry out, at the request of States, appraisals of the implementation of these regulations. The IAEA carried out such an appraisal in France from 27 March to 8 April 2004. The appraisal addressed all relevant transport activities in France, both national and international, for all modes of transport, with special emphasis on the maritime transport and air transport of radioactive material. This report summarizes the findings of the 13 independent experts who participated in the appraisal

  1. United States Program for Technical assistance to IAEA Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, F.A.; Toquam, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    This concept paper explores the potential contribution of ''Knowledge Acquisition Skills'' in enhancing the effectiveness of international safeguards inspections by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA, or Agency) and identifies types of training that could be provided to develop or improve such skills. For purposes of this concept paper, Knowledge Acquisition Skills are defined broadly to include all appropriate techniques that IAEA safeguards inspectors can use to acquire and analyze information relevant to the performance of successful safeguards inspections. These techniques include a range of cognitive, analytic, judgmental, interpersonal, and communications skills that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively

  2. Development through science: The IAEA research contract programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson Wiltschegg, T.; Gillen, V.

    1991-01-01

    The IAEA strives to stimulate the growth of science in developing countries by assuring that the IAEA and the scientific communities of developed and developing countries share their knowledge and experience. If the assistance provided is well organized and in keeping with the needs of developing countries it can make the crucial difference in sustainable development. This booklet provides a survey of the historical development of the IAEA's Research Contract Programme and outlines the aims and achievements of selected Co-ordinated Research Programmes. A complete listing of Co-ordinated Research Programmes is provided

  3. Establishing a Nuclear Power Programme: IAEA Recommended approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sickle, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    IAEA Recommended approach: All newcomers are working closely with the IAEA, using IAEA guidance and hosting international peer review missions. Newcomers’ Top Issues: • How do I start? • Is there public support? • Do I have the people? • Can I find the money? • What am I going to do with the waste? • Is it safe? Can I manage if there is an accident? A pre-feasibility study should provide high level answers to all these questions and allow a knowledgeable decision

  4. Steam generator collector integrity of WWER-1000 reactors. IAEA extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.; Strupczewski, A.

    1995-01-01

    At the Consultants' Meeting on 'The Safety of WWER-1000 Model 320 Nuclear Power Plants' organized by the IAEA within the framework of its Extrabudgetary Programme on the Safety of WWER-1000 NPPs, which was held in Vienna, 1-5 June 1992, the problem of WWER-1000 steam generator integrity was identified as an important issue of safety concern. Considering the safety importance of this issue, a Consultants' Meeting on 'The Steam Generator Integrity of WWER-1000 Nuclear Power Plants' was convened in Vienna in May 1993, attended by 15 international experts in the area to compile information on the steam generator operating experience, deficiencies and corrective measures implemented and planned. In order to also include information from the main designer OKB Gidropress and to finalize the meeting report the IAEA convened a second meeting on the issue on 23-27 November 1993. The present paper summarizes the information and conclusions from those meetings

  5. Steam generator collector integrity of WWER-1000 reactors. IAEA extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.; Strupczewski, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1995-12-31

    At the Consultants` Meeting on `The Safety of WWER-1000 Model 320 Nuclear Power Plants` organized by the IAEA within the framework of its Extrabudgetary Programme on the Safety of WWER-1000 NPPs, which was held in Vienna, 1-5 June 1992, the problem of WWER-1000 steam generator integrity was identified as an important issue of safety concern. Considering the safety importance of this issue, a Consultants` Meeting on `The Steam Generator Integrity of WWER-1000 Nuclear Power Plants` was convened in Vienna in May 1993, attended by 15 international experts in the area to compile information on the steam generator operating experience, deficiencies and corrective measures implemented and planned. In order to also include information from the main designer OKB Gidropress and to finalize the meeting report the IAEA convened a second meeting on the issue on 23-27 November 1993. The present paper summarizes the information and conclusions from those meetings.

  6. Expert and Naive Raters Using the PAG: Does it Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Edwin T.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Questions the observed correlation between job experts and naive raters using the Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ); and conducts a replication of the Smith and Hakel study (1979) with college students (N=39). Concluded that PAQ ratings from job experts and college students are not equivalent and therefore are not interchangeable. (LLL)

  7. Production and availability of 99mTc generators and of 99Mo: technology considerations and the IAEA's contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamoorthy, N.; )

    2007-01-01

    The serendipitous discovery of 99m T c generator at the BNL, USA in 1957 laid the foundation for the subsequent revolution of in vivo imaging of physiological functions in humans to aid diagnostic decisions and patient management. The widespread use of diagnostic imaging in nuclear medicine would not have attained a pre-eminent status world over but for the 99m T c generator and 99m T c labelled products. In order to sustain the nearly 20 million studies annually performed using 99m T c , it is of utmost importance to assure access to appropriate technologies for continued, reliable availability of 99m T c generators and in turn, that of the raw material radionuclide 99 Mo required in extremely large quantities. A walk down the path of their production technologies to trace the trends and issues reveals several major milestones. The IAEA has been involved for well over three decades in fostering developments in 99m T c generator systems through (i) implementation of a number of CRPs including an on-going one related to the production of 99 Mo using LEU targets, (ii) arranging expert reviews through Technical/Consultancy Meetings and (iii) publication of various technical documents, e.g. IAEA-TECDOC: 515 (1989), 852, (1995), 1051 (1998) and 1065 (1999). The IAEA has also supported a number of interested Member States in establishing and/or operating 99m T c generator production facilities, as for example in Bangladesh, China, Indonesia, Iran, Pakistan and Syria. The author has been involved in several of the above initiatives of the IAEA and was also an active participant in the Indian programmes on 99m T c generators during 1972 to 2003. The present review is accordingly tailored as a narration, interspersed with the IAEA's important contributions and glimpses of the Indian scenario. (author)

  8. Experts on public trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blok, Anders

    2007-01-01

    a case study of the May 2003 Danish consensus conference on environmental economics as a policy tool, the article reflects on the politics of expert authority permeating practices of public participation. Adopting concepts from the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK), the conference is seen......-than-successful defense in the citizen perspective. Further, consensus conferences are viewed alternatively as "expert dissent conferences," serving to disclose a multiplicity of expert commitments. From this perspective, some challenges for democratizing expertise through future exercises in public participation...

  9. The IAEA's role in international information exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brittinger, M.T.M.; Selling, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency strives to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information in the transport safety area through a dual work programme covering the development and maintenance of the Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, on the one hand, and their implementation, on the other. Under the implementation aspect of its transport safety programme the IAEA takes advantage of the increased availability of mass storage media and the equipment to access them to use databases for information exchange. Information is collected on the identification of national competent authorities, package approval certificates, events in radioactive material transport, research and development, shipments, and exposure data. Data on national competent authorities and the package approval certificates that they issue is updated and disseminated annually to all Member States. Research in progress is described in a document that is published every two years. Databases on events, shipments and radiation exposure are in the development phase. Member States experience difficulty in obtaining the appropriate information and thus, the reporting periods for these subject areas are extended. Information gathered through these activities serve as regulatory aids to the national competent authorities responsible in the Member States for the transport of radioactive material, both internationally and nationally. In addition, it is useful in support of the continuous review and revision process of the transport Regulations and their supporting documents. (J.P.N.)

  10. The IAEA's programme on analytical quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radecki, Zbigniew

    2001-01-01

    In the early 1960s, the IAEA decided to launch a programme for the assessment of the reliability of low level radiochemical analysis and since then, the Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) has developed into a major organiser of world-wide intercomparison runs. Over the intervening years, the types of matrices studied and the analytes of interest have been extended beyond the limits of radioactivity measurements to encompass: trace elements, organic contaminants, stable isotopes and methyl mercury. The Agency provides assistance to its Member States through the AQCS programme to improve the standard of analytical results in their laboratories. These results must be of a certain quality (i.e. accuracy and precision) which is determined by their intended use and should be comparable with other analytical measurements produced elsewhere. In order to enable laboratories in Member States to generate analytical measurements with appropriate and internationally recognised quality the main objectives of AQCS programme are: to provide the analyst with tools to compare and evaluate their performance relative to other laboratories, to assess the accuracy and precision of the analytical method used, to provide objective evidence on the quality of the results, and to ensure comparable analytical results within projects and networks

  11. IAEA occupational radiation protection programme: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deboodt, P.; Mrabit, K.

    2006-01-01

    As stated in Art.III.A.6 of its Statute, the International Atomic Energy Agency (commonly referred to as the Agency) is authorized to establish or adopt, in consultation and, where appropriate, in collaboration with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned, standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property (including such standards for labour conditions), and to provide for the application of these standards to its own operation as well as to the operations making use of materials, services, equipment, facilities, and information made available by the Agency or at its request or under its control or supervision. The Agency s Occupational Radiation Protection Programme aims at harmonizing infrastructures for the control of radiation exposure of workers and for optimizing radiation protection in situation s of exposures due to external radiation and intakes of radionuclides from both artificial and natural sources of radiation. Under its regular and technical cooperation programmes, the Agency has been assigning high priority to both the establishment of safety standards for labour conditions and for the application of these standards through, Interalia, direct assistance under its technical cooperation (TC) programme, the rendering of services, the promotion of education and training, the fostering of information exchange and the coordination of research and development. The purpose of this paper is to present the current status and future IAEA activities in support of occupational radiation protection. (authors)

  12. Highlights on the IAEA project QUATRO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milano, F.

    2012-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy in term of prob- ability of local control of the tumor and the limiting factor in treatments in term of probability of complications are strictly depending on the accuracy and precision of the pa- tient treatment. An overall Quality Assurance programme (QAP) has been recognized as an essential tool to assure that the goals of radiotherapy are achieved. As part of a comprehensive approach to QAP an independent external audit is considered a very effective method of checking that the quality of activities in an Institution permits to achieve the required objectives. Since many years the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has audited Member States for radiotherapy dosimetry, for educating and training radio- therapy professionals and for reviewing the radiotherapy process. Recently a new approach has been developed and named ''Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology (QUATRO)''. The principal aim of QUATRO is to review all the radiotherapy process, including organization, infra- structure, clinical and medical physics aspects of the radio- therapy services. It also includes a review of the hospital's professional competence with a view to quality improve- ment. The aim of this paper is to introduce and to highlight the QUATRO methodology describing its effectiveness on improving either the quality of the radiotherapy treatments and in general the management of the patient.

  13. The IAEA quality audits in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, J.; Vatnitsky, S.T.; Salminen, E.

    2009-01-01

    The quality audits are considered as an essential component of management systems of quality in radiotherapy. this method consists in checking that the quality of activities of a radiotherapy center is consistent with the rules of correct practices. The principal objective of the quality audit is to contribute to an improvement of the quality. IAEA developed a method of complete audit in the framework of the quality assurance team in radio-oncology (Q.U.A.T.R.O.). The Q.U.A.T.R.O. missions consist in an evaluation of the radiotherapy infrastructure, including the aspects related to the patient and equipment and where appropriate, an assessment of the safety of using ionizing radiation and radiation protection of the patients. The assessment also covers the staffing and training programs for radiation oncologists and medical radiation physicists. These missions allow to identify the insufficiencies in term of infrastructures, material, human resources and procedures and to enlighten the points to improve. Their results proved useful to improve the dosimetry practices at the worldwide level. (N.C.)

  14. The IAEA isotope and radiation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    The IAEA isotope and radiation programme is characterized by the very large number of topics dealt with and the broad range of activities where nuclear methods and techniques are utilized. The main activities of the programme can be grouped into: food and agriculture, human health and life science, industry and physical science, and laboratory services. Radioisotope and radiation based techniques are applied to such areas as plant breeding, insect and pest control, soil fertility studies, animal health and production, studies on the fate of pesticide residues and radionuclides in the food chain, and food preservation. General objectives of the second group of activities are to assist hospitals and research institutes in developing member states in the introduction and development of radionuclide tracers in medical diagnosis and research, to promote use of radiation therapy for cancer treatment, etc. The major objective of the third group is to foster research and application of nuclear methodologies for industrial applications in developing countries. The Agency's Laboratories at Seibersdorf and in Vienna and the Monaco Laboratory play a relevant role in providing laboratory services as a back-up for various programmes, and in the training of scientists from developing countries. (Nogami, K.)

  15. Romanian perspective on IAEA-INPRO initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banches, E.; Constantin, M.; Nicolae, R.

    2009-01-01

    INPRO objectives and status of the IAEA project started in 2001 and concerns the deployment of Innovative Nuclear Systems (INS) in 21st century, as solution to sustainable power development. The last achievements and the new INPRO Steering Committee directions established for 2010-2011 period, are presented. A balanced analysis of needs, resources and expectations, justifies the Romanian Statement at the 14th Steering Committee Meeting (SCM), and participant as an observer in three Collaborative Projects, in Common User Considerations (CUC) by Developing Countries for Future NPP and in SCM. The feedback of the last participatory actions in the project, justifies the Nuclear Agency recommendations for Nuclear National Program (PNN) adjustments: first, the need to apply INPRO methodology in a new national study regarding INS perspective and opportunity in Romania to use CANDU NPPs for LWRs fuel closing cycle at international level; secondly, the need to improve commitment of policy makers in forecasting financial INS support; and thirdly, to sustain the European legislation and international and national arrangements in order to facilitate nuclear regional services. (authors)

  16. The IAEA safety standards on emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; McKenna, T.

    1997-01-01

    During the past decade considerable progress has been made in developing internationally recognized principles for decisions on protective measures following accidents involving radioactive materials. Efforts have involved the IAEA, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), World Health Organization (WHO), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Commission of the European Communities (CEC), and Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). Prior to the Chernobyl accident, the Agency had published Safety Series No. 72, which set out guidance on the principles for establishing intervention levels for the protection of the public in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. That guidance was aimed at assisting national and regional authorities having responsibility for emergency response planning. A range of values were given within which it was expected that intervention levels would be specified. It recognized a need for practical quantities that could be readily compared with the results of measurements made in environmental materials and in food stuffs, so-called Derived Intervention Levels (DILs). Shortly after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986, the Agency published Safety Series No. 81, which addressed the principles, procedures, and data needed to establish these DILs

  17. United States Program for Technical assistance to IAEA Standards. Concept Paper: Knowledge Acquisition, Skills training for enhanced IAEA safeguards inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, F.A.; Toquam, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    This concept paper explores the potential contribution of ``Knowledge Acquisition Skills`` in enhancing the effectiveness of international safeguards inspections by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA, or Agency) and identifies types of training that could be provided to develop or improve such skills. For purposes of this concept paper, Knowledge Acquisition Skills are defined broadly to include all appropriate techniques that IAEA safeguards inspectors can use to acquire and analyze information relevant to the performance of successful safeguards inspections. These techniques include a range of cognitive, analytic, judgmental, interpersonal, and communications skills that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively.

  18. Report on the intercomparison run IAEA-373: Determination of radionuclides in grass sample IAEA-373

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachnov, V.; Larosa, J.; Dekner, R.; Fajgelj, A.; Zeisler, R.

    1996-02-01

    Activities in environmental monitoring of radioactive substances require natural matrix reference materials for laboratory quality assessment and support of international compatibility. A grass sample collected in the Ukraine by the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) programme on Analytical Quality Assurance Services (AQCS) has been prepared and distributed for a world-wide intercomparison on the determination of natural and man-made radionuclides and selected trace elements. The data from 110 laboratories representing 42 countries have been evaluated and allowed the establishment of recommended activity values for K-40, Sr-90, Cs-134 and Cs-137. Information values are given for the concentrations of Mn, Rb, Th and Zn. (author)

  19. The Expert Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Peter F.; Henson, Kenneth T.

    1982-01-01

    The curriculum and instruction specialist should not fall prey to the "expert syndrome," in which the specialist decides on the "best" curriculum or instructional method without considering the teacher's discipline or personality. (CJ)

  20. Experts' meeting: Maintenance '83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The brochure presents, in full wording, 20 papers read at the experts' meeting ''Maintenance '83'' in Wiesbaden. Most of the papers discuss reliability data (acquisition, evaluation, processing) of nearly all fields of industry. (RW) [de

  1. Workshop for Coordinators/Assistants/Alternate Coordinators of IAEA Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the workshop was to discuss the roles and responsibilities of IAEA projects co-coordinators and the challenges they encounter in the implementation of such projects. Solutions were suggested.(Lead Record)

  2. NIFS contributions to 19th IAEA fusion energy conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    NIFS has presented 21 papers at the 19th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (Lyon, France, 14-19 October 2002). The contributed papers are collected in this report. The 21 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  3. Stress Tests Worldwide - IAEA Nuclear Safety Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA nuclear safety action plan relies on 11 important issues. 1) Safety assessments in light of the Fukushima accident: the IAEA secretariat will develop a methodology for stress tests against specific extreme natural hazards and will provide assistance for their implementation; 2) Strengthen existing IAEA peer reviews; 3) Emergency preparedness and response; 4) National Regulatory bodies in terms of independence and adequacy of human and financial resources; 5) The development of safety culture and scientific and technical capacity in Operating Organizations; 6) The upgrading of IAEA safety standards in a more efficient way; 7) A better implementation of relevant conventions concerning nuclear safety and nuclear accidents; 8) To provide a broad assistance on safety standard for countries embarking on a nuclear power program; 9) To facilitate the use of available information, expertise and techniques concerning radiation protection; 10) To enhance the transparency of nuclear industry; and 11) To promote the cooperation between member states in nuclear safety. (A.C.)

  4. IAEA programme on nuclear fuel cycle and materials technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a brief description and the main objectives of IAEA Programme B on Nuclear fuel cycle are given. The coordinated research project on Improvement of Models Used For Fuel Behaviour Simulation (FUMEX II) is also presented

  5. IAEA technical co-operation activities in the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The desire to extend the many benefits of the peaceful uses of nuclear technology to all countries led as long ago as 1957 to the establishment of the IAEA and to immediate introduction of a technical co-operation programme. In the more than thirty years that have passed since that time, the potential applications of nuclear techniques have greatly expanded. Over the period, many of the applications have moved from research laboratories into hospitals, farms and industrial enterprises. The direct resources made available to the IAEA by its Member States to support technology transfer processes have grown rapidly since the late 1950s. The current trends in the technical co-operation activities of the IAEA and some examples of projects supported by the IAEA are briefly presented in this document

  6. INF and IAEA: A comparative analysis of verification strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheinman, L.; Kratzer, M.

    1992-07-01

    This is the final report of a study on the relevance and possible lessons of Intermediate Range Nuclear Force (INF) verification to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) international safeguards activities

  7. Introductory statement. IAEA Board of Governors. Vienna, 10 September 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2001-01-01

    In his speech to open the IAEA General Conference, the Director General spoke on a broad range of IAEA interests including: Safety of Research Reactors, Radiological protection of Patients, Safety of Radiation Sources, Environmental Restoration of of Areas Affected by Radioactive Residues, Transport Safety, Plan for Protecting Public Water Economically, Servicing Immediate Human Needs, Security of Nuclear Material, Status of the Safeguards Agreement with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, and Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolutions Relating to Iraq

  8. An international peer review of the biosphere modelling programme of the US Department of Energy's Yucca mountain site characterization project. Report of the IAEA International Review Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has a project for characterizing the site of a facility for disposing of radioactive waste located at Yucca Mountain Nevada, USA (the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project). This Project has developed an approach for assessing the future potential impact of any releases of radionuclides to the biosphere from a potential disposal facility sited at Yucca Mountain The DOE requested the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to organize an independent international expert review of the assessment methodology being used in its biosphere modelling programme. The IAEA accepted the request in the context of its statutory obligation to provide for the application of its established international standards of safety for the protection of health, at the request of a State, to any of that State's activities in the field of atomic energy. The terms of reference of the peer review were to review the biosphere assessment methodology being used for the total system performance assessment of the potential disposal facility. The main purpose was to analyze critically the proposed rationale and methodology and to identify consistencies and inconsistencies between methods being used in the frame of the Project and those established in international standards or in international programmes such as the IAEA's Biosphere Modelling and Assessment Programme (BIOMASS). This report presents the consensus view of the international experts convened by the IAEA for carrying out the review

  9. Future strategies on IAEA activities and technical cooperation programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Hong, Young Don

    1998-10-01

    This study provides basic background information about the establishment of the IAEA, its mission, major activities, General Conference , and Board of Governors, structure and functions of the Secretariat. The IAEA Mid-term plan, to be implemented in the years 1998 - 2003, includes the enhancement of its functional effectiveness, analysis of the changing developments, adjustment of its priorities, and evaluation of its programmes, are describes in full detail. This plan is divided into 6 major areas ; nuclear power and the fuel cycle, nuclear applications, nuclear, radiation and radwaste safety, verification and security of nuclear material, management of technical cooperation for development, policy making, coordination and support. It is also expected that the IAEA plan provides an opportunity to understand the future directions of IAEA programmes and its operational philosophy, thus greatly contributing to Koreas establishment of its own future directions for expanded cooperation with the IAEA, and urges to device effective domestic strategies. This plan will also contribute to the evaluation of Koreas responsibility as a member of the Board of Governors as well as enhance Koreas role as an Advisory Group Member. It is expected that this study is useful for nuclear-related organizations wishing to establish basic directions for the efficient implementation of IAEA technical cooperation programs in the future. (author). 16 refs., 6 tabs., 16 figs

  10. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 10, no. 3(69). Nov-Dec 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA Director General Addresses United Nations, IAEA Board of Governors' December Meetings, UN General Assembly Commends Work of IAEA, Oceanographic Investigations of Radioactive Pollution, Cancer Radiotherapy Using Heavy Charged Particles, Highlights of the 1995 IAEA General Conference, Director General's Statement to 1995 IAEA General Conference, General Conference Scientific Programme, Countries Invited to More Widely Apply INES Scale, Safety Meeting on Kozloduy in Bulgaria, Selection of Dry Storage Technologies for Spent Fuel, India Presents Sculpture to the IAEA, IAEA Seminars and Symposia, and other short information

  11. Selection of decommissioning strategies: Issues and factors. Report by an expert group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    A comprehensive assessment of possible strategies is the key step in a decommissioning process. It should be initiated at an early stage in a facility's lifecycle and include a number of factors. The IAEA has provided extensive guidance on decommissioning strategy selection, but there are a number of cases - particularly in countries with limited resources, but not limited to them - where the selection is forced and constrained by prevailing factors and conditions. In its role of an international expert committee assisting the IAEA, the Technical Group on Decommissioning (TEGDE) debates and draws conclusions on topics omitted from general guidance. TEGDE members met in Vienna in 2003, 2004 and 2005 to develop the basis for this publication. The views expressed here reflect those of TEGDE and not necessarily those of the IAEA

  12. IAEA support to medical physics in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Sgouros, George

    2013-05-01

    Through its programmatic efforts and its publications, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has helped define the role and responsibilities of the nuclear medicine physicist in the practice of nuclear medicine. This paper describes the initiatives that the IAEA has undertaken to support medical physics in nuclear medicine. In 1984, the IAEA provided guidance on how to ensure that the equipment used for detecting, imaging, and quantifying radioactivity is functioning properly (Technical Document [TECDOC]-137, "Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments"). An updated version of IAEA-TECDOC-137 was issued in 1991 as IAEA-TECDOC-602, and this included new chapters on scanner-computer systems and single-photon emission computed tomography systems. Nuclear medicine physics was introduced as a part of a project on radiation imaging and radioactivity measurements in the 2002-2003 IAEA biennium program in Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics. Ten years later, IAEA activities in this field have expanded to cover quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of nuclear medicine equipment, education and clinical training, professional recognition of the role of medical physicists in nuclear medicine physics, and finally, the coordination of research and development activities in internal dosimetry. As a result of these activities, the IAEA has received numerous requests to support the development and implementation of QA or QC programs for radioactivity measurements in nuclear medicine in many Member States. During the last 5 years, support was provided to 20 Member States through the IAEA's technical cooperation programme. The IAEA has also supported education and clinical training of medical physicists. This type of support has been essential for the development and expansion of the Medical Physics profession, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The need for basic as well as specialized clinical training in medical physics was identified as a

  13. The Golden Age of Cataclysmic Variables and Related Objects - II Concluding Address

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Giovannelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Before to conclude officially this workshop — far from me the idea to attempt some concluding remarks already dealt at the meeting with various burning by Joseph Patterson, Mariko Kato, Dmitry Bisikalo, and Rene Hudec —, I would like to comment few highlights coming out from our fruitful week of discussions about The Golden Age of Cataclysmic Variables and Related Objects - II, without any pretension of completeness.

  14. Past Arguments in IMO/IAEA etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    In International Maritime Organization, subject to the decisions in the 18th General Assembly (1993) and in the 19th General Assembly (1995), ''the Special Consultative Meeting of Entities Involved in the Maritime Transport of Nuclear Materials covered by the INF Code'' (SCM) was held in IMO Headquarters in London during the 4th to 6th of March, 1996. From 32 countries and international organizations over 100 persons attended SCM. Based on the results of SCM, the following issues were discussed and solved by 2001. INF Code became madatory since the 1st of January 2001 as Part D ''Special requirements for the carriage of packaged irradiated nuclear fuel, plutonium and high-level radioactive wastes on board ships'' of Chapter VII (Carriage of dangerous goods) of ANNEX of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Seas (SOLAS). Concerning the response to an incident with radioative contamination ''Protocol on preparedness, response and co-operation to pollution incidents by harzardous and noxious substances, 2000'' were established for inter-governmental co-operation, in addition to the pollution manual in the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL). In IMO, 'hazardous and noxious substances' are identified in the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code). Radioactive substance is one of the eight categories of IMDG Code. (Oil pollution is treated separately under OPRC.) Just after the completion of a decade of study and review in IMO some countries requested a similar process in the IAEA

  15. IAEA safety standards for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.

    2007-01-01

    The general structure of the IAEA Safety Standards and the process for their development and revision are briefly presented and discussed together with the progress achieved in the development of Safety Standards for research reactor. These documents provide the safety requirements and the key technical recommendations to achieve enhanced safety. They are intended for use by all organizations involved in safety of research reactors and developed in a way that allows them to be incorporated into national laws and regulations. The author reviews the safety standards for research reactors and details their specificities. There are 4 published safety standards: 1) Safety assessment of research reactors and preparation of the safety analysis report (35-G1), 2) Safety in the utilization and modification of research reactors (35-G2), 3) Commissioning of research reactors (NS-G-4.1), and 4) Maintenance, periodic testing and inspection of research reactors (NS-G-4.2). There 5 draft safety standards: 1) Operational limits and conditions and operating procedures for research reactors (DS261), 2) The operating organization and the recruitment, training and qualification of personnel for research reactors (DS325), 3) Radiation protection and radioactive waste management in the design and operation of research reactors (DS340), 4) Core management and fuel handling at research reactors (DS350), and 5) Grading the application of safety requirements for research reactors (DS351). There are 2 planned safety standards, one concerning the ageing management for research reactor and the second deals with the control and instrumentation of research reactors

  16. Special symposium for the IAEA 50th anniversary: Global challenges for the future of nuclear energy and the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the symposium was to review the 50 years history of the activities of the IAEA and the current status of nuclear power and fuel cycle in the world and discuss the future vision regarding development and safety of nuclear power and fuel cycle and international cooperation. Topics covered were nuclear power and fuel cycle, nuclear safety and security, non proliferation, and national, regional, and IAEA's challenges for the future

  17. Excerpts from the introductory statement by IAEA Director General. IAEA Board of Governors, Vienna, 8 December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1997-01-01

    The document contains excerpts from the Introductory Statement made by the Director General of the IAEA at the IAEA Board of Governors on 8 December 1997. The following aspects from the Agency's activity are presented: nuclear energy, Agency's inspections in Iraq in relation to its clandestine nuclear programme, Agency's involvement in safeguards verification in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), and conclusion of safeguards agreements and additional protocols

  18. IAEA report on the Fukushima-Daiichi accident and safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    On March 11th, 2011, 4th largest earthquake attacked Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant and around one hour later, the enormous Tsunami attacked it also. After the large earthquake attacked, the automatic shutdown was performed and the emergency diesel generators automatically started and Isolation condenser cooled down the core for unit 1 and RCIC cooled down the cores for unit 2 and 3. However, the large Tsunami damaged all emergency diesel generators and all ECCS pumps. The core melted and the hydrogen gas were generated by the steam and the zircaloy reaction. The hydrogen leaked into the reactor building and then the reactor building blasted by the hydrogen. IAEA has organized the Great East Japan Earthquake Expert Mission on Fukushima-daiichi accident and they reported to the formal meeting in the headquater in Viena. They made 15 conclusions and 16 lessons and learned. IAEA chairman officially summarized 28 recommendations from them. USNRC published 'Recommendations for Enhanuing Reactor Safety in the 21st Century 'where they summarized 12 Recommendations on Fukushima Accident. Here is the summary of these recommendations. (author)

  19. Overview of IAEA guidelines for fire safety inspection and operation in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowrer, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    In 1992, the International Atomic Energy Agency began an ambitious project on fire safety in nuclear power plants. The purpose of this ongoing project is to provide specific guidance on compliance with the requirements set forth through the IAEA Nuclear Safety Standards program established in 1974. The scope of the Fire Safety project encompasses several tasks, including the development of new standards and guidelines to assist Member States in assessing the level of fire safety in existing plants. Five new Safety Practices, one new Safety Guide and a Technical Document have been developed for use by the fire safety community. The primary intent of these new documents is to provide detailed guidance and a consistent format for the assessment of the overall level of fire safety being provided in existing nuclear power plants around the world and especially in developing countries. Sufficient detail is provided in the Safety Guide and Safety Practices to allow technically knowledgeable plant personnel, outside consultants or other technical experts to assess the adequacy of fire safety within the plant facilities. This paper describes topics addressed by each of the IAEA Fire Safety documents and discussed the relationship of each document to others in the series. (author)

  20. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 14, no. 4(85). Oct-Nov 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: the new IAEA Board of Governors, conclusions of the 1999 IAEA General Conference, the return of the IAEA fact-finding team from Japan, future energy and nuclear power, talks on future IAEA verification of ex-weapon material, the IAEA and Y2K (steps against the bug intensify), African partnership for technology transfer extended, strengthened safeguards system (status of additional protocols), and other short information

  1. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 15, no. 4(89). Oct-Nov 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This issue gives information about the following topics: IAEA 2000 General Conference; IAEA Board for 2000-2001; Scientific forum on radioactive waste management: turning options into solutions; the Director General's statement to the General Conference; National case studies on nuclear power and sustainable development; Progress toward IAEA verification under Trilateral Initiative with Russia and the USA; Uranium production and the environment; IAEA publications; States joining international conventions in nuclear fields; Upcoming IAEA international symposia and seminars, and other short information

  2. IAEA safety glossary. Terminology used in nuclear safety and radiation protection, multilingual 2007 edition, including the IAEA safety fundamentals [no. SF-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    The IAEA Safety Glossary defines and explains technical terms used in the IAEA Safety Standards and other safety related IAEA publications, and provides information on their usage.The publication is multilingual and covers the six official IAEA languages,, Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish. It has been in use since April 2000. The 2007 Edition is a revised and updated version. The primary purpose of the publication is to harmonize terminology and usage in the IAEA Safety Standards. It is a source of information for users of the IAEA Safety Standards and other safety related IAEA publications and provides guidance for the drafters and reviewers of publications, including IAEA technical officers and consultants, and members of technical committees, advisory groups, working groups and bodies for the endorsement of safety standards

  3. Senior expert group for the review of the Agency's programme of activities. Opening remarks by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the opening remarks made by the Director General of the IAEA on 23 March 1998 at the first meeting of the Senior Expert Group for the review of the Agency's programme and activities. The Director General explains his considerations in establishing the group, and the major challenges facing the safe use of nuclear energy and technologies

  4. IAEA Co-ordinated Research Program (CRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrenk, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Coordinated Research Project is a topical collection of research agreements and contracts. The research contracts are awarded with financial support of about 10-20% of the total contract cost. Among the activities of the project is the organization of consultant group meetings and workshops involving several international experts and representatives of users and developers of border radiation monitoring equipment. The project also supports in coordinating the development of equipment and techniques for up-to-date border monitoring and in establishing of a process for providing nuclear forensics support to member states

  5. The Status and Trends of Isotopes Technology and Application——Based on NTR Printed by IAEA in Last Five Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Hua-ming

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Every year IAEA organizes experts to produce a review on nuclear technology and its application all over the world, namely NTR (Nuclear Technology Review, in which the status of isotopes technologies and applications are totally involved. From recent five years’ reports (2010-2014, the forward concerning isotope technology and applications were presented, such as radioisotopes produced by accelerator, stable- and radio- isotopes and their applications to environment, nuclear medicine, food and agriculture. etc.

  6. Atomic data for heavy element impurities in fusion reactors. Summary report of first IAEA research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Twelve international experts discussed in detail the properties of heavy elements relevant to fusion energy research participated at the first Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Atomic data for heavy element impurities in fusion reactors' at IAEA Headquarters on 14-15 November 2005. The participants summarized all recent relevant developments in their research efforts. Detailed discussions took place to formulate specific objectives for the CRP. From a list of data needs and a review of current research capabilities, a detailed work plan was formulated for the first phase of the CRP. The discussions, conclusions and recommendations of the RCM are briefly described in this report. (author)

  7. Findings from working for the IAEA initiative on research reactor ageing and ageing management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.

    2010-01-01

    1995 the last sharing and compiling the existing knowledge about of the Research Reactor (RR) Ageing and the respective Fighting took place during a well attended conference at Geesthacht, Germany, documented in a bulky conference report. In 2008, the International Atomic Energy Agency has initiated another collecting and evaluating in order to make the recent experience in that field available to the entire RR Community. In this respect, RR operators, plant and system fabricators, and authorities as well as independent experts have been approached worldwide for providing contributions and fortunately about every second member of the RR Community replied. The paper is going to inform on the experience gained by the contacts and communication, the replies as well as the non-replies, underlying motives as problems, and mainly, some statistical evaluation of the findings. The respective IAEA data base being accessible to all members of the RR Community will be briefly characterised in structures and contents. (author)

  8. High Temperature Reactors for a proposed IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Energy Neutral Mineral Development Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneklaus, Nils; Reitsma, Frederik; Tulsidas, Harikrishnan

    2014-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is promoting a new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to elaborate on the applicability and potential of using High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) to provide process heat and/or electricity to power energy intensive mineral development processes. The CRP aims to provide a platform for cooperation between HTR-developers and mineral development processing experts. Energy intensive mineral development processes with (e.g. phosphate-, gold-, copper-, rare earth ores) or without (e.g. titanium-, aluminum ore) the possibility to recover accompanying uranium and/or thorium that could be developed and used to run the HTR for “energy neutral” processing of the primary ore shall be discussed according to the participants needs. This paper specifically focuses on the aspects that need to be addressed by HTR-designers and developers. First requirements that should be fulfilled by the HTR-designs are highlighted together with the desired outcomes of the research project. (author)

  9. Establishment of A+M Computer Code Network. Summary report of IAEA technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Eleven international experts on computational aspects of atomic and molecular data for fusion energy research participated in a technical meeting arranged to discuss the establishment of an A and M Computer Code Network, and held at IAEA Headquarters on 23-25 May 2005. Each participant reviewed the current status of their own speciality and current lines of research, as well as anticipated needs in new data for nuclear fusion energy research. A preliminary method for making these valuable resources more readily available was outlined, and implementation will proceed. Several of the computational tools presented are already available through Internet connections. All the goals of the meeting were achieved, and every participant indicated a desire to see more collaboration and cooperation in fulfilling the A and M data needs for fusion. The discussions, conclusions and recommendations of the meeting are briefly described in this report. (author)

  10. Atoms in industry can make a difference: The IAEA Scientific Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    Industry has become indispensable to modern life. As the world travels further and faster, cities sprawl into large conglomerates, trade crosses barriers, and friendships are held together by the invisible strings of the Internet, it is hard to imagine a world untouched by large-scale industrial products and processing. This year's Scientific Forum will focus on the uses of radiation technologies in industry, and how they are applied to control the quality of the products we use in our daily lives, such as car tyres and cables, enhance the durability of a variety of materials, and even sanitize wastewater. Leading experts, academics and industrial representatives will meet in Vienna, Austria, from 15 to 16 September 2015 on the margins of the IAEA General Conference to review the multitude of benefits these techniques offer, particularly in the context of sustainable development.

  11. Atoms in industry can make a difference: The IAEA Scientific Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    Industry has become indispensable to modern life. As the world travels further and faster, cities sprawl into large conglomerates, trade crosses barriers, and friendships are held together by the invisible strings of the Internet, it is hard to imagine a world untouched by large-scale industrial products and processing. This year’s Scientific Forum will focus on the uses of radiation technologies in industry, and how they are applied to control the quality of the products we use in our daily lives, such as car tyres and cables, enhance the durability of a variety of materials, and even sanitize wastewater. Leading experts, academics and industrial representatives will meet in Vienna, Austria, from 15 to 16 September 2015 on the margins of the IAEA General Conference to review the multitude of benefits these techniques offer, particularly in the context of sustainable development.

  12. Expert tool use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Kathrine Liedtke; Ravn, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    and autoethnographic material from one former elite skipper, we take some initial steps toward the development of a more nuanced understanding of the concept of incorporation; one that is able to accommodate the experiences of expert tool users. In sum, our analyses indicate that the possibility for experiencing...... a tool as incorporated depends on the existence of an extraordinary kind of relationship between the tool and the expert tool user. This relation, that can persist even when successful manipulation of the tool fails, is not only cultivated through deliberate practice of physical skills, but also through...... the collective sense-making process going on within a particular community of practice. Therefore, expert tool users may experience a more profound kind of incorporation that can persist even when normal motor incorporation fails....

  13. Experts on public trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blok, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Citizen deliberation on technoscientific developments is regularly regarded as a hallmark of Danish democracy, embodied in particular by the Danish Board of Technology. Few empirically guided questions have been raised, however, as to how the Board's democratic projects actually work. Through...... a case study of the May 2003 Danish consensus conference on environmental economics as a policy tool, the article reflects on the politics of expert authority permeating practices of public participation. Adopting concepts from the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK), the conference is seen......-than-successful defense in the citizen perspective. Further, consensus conferences are viewed alternatively as "expert dissent conferences," serving to disclose a multiplicity of expert commitments. From this perspective, some challenges for democratizing expertise through future exercises in public participation...

  14. Soft Expert Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawkat Alkhazaleh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1999, Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft set theory as a general mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. Many researchers have studied this theory, and they created some models to solve problems in decision making and medical diagnosis, but most of these models deal only with one expert. This causes a problem with the user, especially with those who use questionnaires in their work and studies. In our model, the user can know the opinion of all experts in one model. So, in this paper, we introduce the concept of a soft expert set, which will more effective and useful. We also define its basic operations, namely, complement, union intersection AND, and OR. Finally, we show an application of this concept in decision-making problem.

  15. IAEA Activities on Education and training in Radiation and Waste Safety: Strategic approach for a sustainable system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marabit, K.; Sadagopan, G.

    2003-01-01

    The statutory safety functions of the International Atomic Energy(IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place, enabling the Government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. the IAEA education and training activities follow the resolutions of its General Conference and reflect the latest IAEA standards and guidance. Several General Conference resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training (e. g. GC(XXXV)/RES/552 in 1991; GC(XXXVI)/RES/584 in 1992; GC(43)/RES/13 in 1999 and more recently GC(44)/RES/13 in 2000). In response to GC(44)/RES/13, the IAEA prepared a Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation and Waste Safety (Strategy on Education and Training) aiming at establishing, by 2010, sustainable education and training programmes in its Member States. This Strategy was endorsed by the General Conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the Secretariat to implement the Strategy on Education and Training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member States national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. A technical meeting was held in Vienna in March 2002 and concluded with an action plan for implementing the strategy up to 2010, the immediate action being the formation of a Steering Committee by the middle of 2002. This Steering Committee has the general remit to advise on the development and implementation of the strategy, as well as monitoring its progress. The first technical meeting of the Steering Committee took place on 25

  16. IAEA outlines measures to enhance protection against nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Mr. ElBaradei, head of the IAEA presented a report today to the Agency's Board of Governors, outlining plans for substantially expanding and strengthening IAEA programmes relevant to improving nuclear security. The report addresses the IAEA's response to the following threats from acts of nuclear terrorism by a subnational group: acquisition of a nuclear weapon; acquisition of nuclear material to construct a nuclear weapon or to cause a radiological hazard; acquisition of other radioactive materials to cause a radiological hazard; and violent acts against nuclear facilities to cause a radiological hazard. The report puts a price tag on its proposed programme upgrades at $30-50 million per year, representing an initial 10-15% increase in the IAEA's overall resources. Additionally, Mr. ElBaradei said the IAEA's budget is currently underfeed by about $40 million due to a budgetary policy over many years of 'zero real growth', and called on Member States to provide the resources required to cope with the newly emerging threat. 'In addition to the resources required for urgent international assistance,' Mr. ElBaradei said, 'the necessary global upgrades to meet the full range of possible threats would be in the range of hundreds of millions of dollars and would have to be carried out by individual States and through bilateral and multilateral assistance'. The IAEA would play a coordinating role in delivering this assistance.If States provide adequate funding, Mr. ElBaradei predicts that the enhanced and additional activities proposed in his report should lead over time to a powerful national and international security framework for nuclear facilities and material. The Summary of Report on 'Protection Against Nuclear Terrorism' presented to the IAEA Board of Governors on 30.11.2001 is attached

  17. Challenging curriculum. Training the IAEA international safeguards inspectorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidaurre-Henry, Jaime; Killeen, Thomas; Lichliter, William

    2001-01-01

    Each year, the IAEA recruits a group of highly qualified specialists to join its experienced international team of safeguards inspectors. Their work will take them to nuclear facilities around the world, to utilize instrumentation and gather information for verifying national pledges that nuclear activities and materials under IAEA safeguards are exclusively used for peaceful purposes, and in those States which have signed a protocol in addition to their safeguards agreement, they will provide assurances that there are no undeclared nuclear activities or materials. Under more than 220 safeguards agreements with 139 States, the IAEA has served as the world's nuclear safeguards inspectorate for the past four decades. The Agency carries out verification activities at more than 900 facilities worldwide, conducting about 2200 inspections a year. Before the new inspectors take to the field, however, they enter the classroom - participating in an extensive series of IAEA training courses, workshops, and seminars. The courses comprehensively cover the nuclear fuel cycle, the IAEA's safeguards role and responsibilities, and the skills and competence that safeguards inspectors need to do their jobs effectively and efficiently. Once on the job, training reinforces the evolving safeguards mission. Under the Agency's 'enhanced' safeguards training curriculum, experienced inspectors participate in seminars and courses designed to upgrade their skills and keep them fully informed of safeguards developments with respect to, for example, legal responsibilities, technological capabilities, and inspection procedures. The enhanced curriculum was developed in response to the IAEA's increasing safeguards responsibilities. The system has been strengthened in many ways since 1991, particularly for detecting any undeclared nuclear material and activities that should have been declared by a State under its safeguards agreement. This article presents an overview of the IAEA's safeguards

  18. All-Source Information Acquisition and Analysis in the IAEA Department of Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, Matthew; Norman, Claude

    2010-01-01

    All source information analysis enables proactive implementation of in-field verification activities, supports the State Evaluation process, and is essential to the IAEA's strengthened safeguards system. Information sources include State-declared nuclear material accounting and facility design information; voluntarily supplied information such as nuclear procurement data; commercial satellite imagery; open source information and information/results from design information verifications (DIVs), inspections and complementary accesses (CAs). The analysis of disparate information sources directly supports inspections, design information verifications and complementary access, and enables both more reliable cross-examination for consistency and completeness as well as in-depth investigation of possible safeguards compliance issues. Comparison of State-declared information against information on illicit nuclear procurement networks, possible trafficking in nuclear materials, and scientific and technical information on nuclear-related research and development programmes, provides complementary measures for monitoring nuclear developments and increases Agency capabilities to detect possible undeclared nuclear activities. Likewise, expert analysis of commercial satellite imagery plays a critical role for monitoring un-safeguarded sites and facilities. In sum, the combination of these measures provides early identification of possible undeclared nuclear material or activities, thus enhancing deterrence of safeguards system that is fully information driven, and increasing confidence in Safeguards conclusions. By increasing confidence that nuclear materials and technologies in States under Safeguards are used solely for peaceful purposes, information-driven safeguards will strengthen the nuclear non-proliferation system. Key assets for Agency collection, processing, expert analysis, and integration of these information sources are the Information Collection and Analysis

  19. Joint ICTP-IAEA advanced workshop on model codes for spallation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filges, D.; Leray, S.; Yariv, Y.; Mengoni, A.; Stanculescu, A.; Mank, G.

    2008-08-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) organised an expert meeting at the ICTP from 4 to 8 February 2008 to discuss model codes for spallation reactions. These nuclear reactions play an important role in a wide domain of applications ranging from neutron sources for condensed matter and material studies, transmutation of nuclear waste and rare isotope production to astrophysics, simulation of detector set-ups in nuclear and particle physics experiments, and radiation protection near accelerators or in space. The simulation tools developed for these domains use nuclear model codes to compute the production yields and characteristics of all the particles and nuclei generated in these reactions. These codes are generally Monte-Carlo implementations of Intra-Nuclear Cascade (INC) or Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) models, followed by de-excitation (principally evaporation/fission) models. Experts have discussed in depth the physics contained within the different models in order to understand their strengths and weaknesses. Such codes need to be validated against experimental data in order to determine their accuracy and reliability with respect to all forms of application. Agreement was reached during the course of the workshop to organise an international benchmark of the different models developed by different groups around the world. The specifications of the benchmark, including the set of selected experimental data to be compared to the models, were also defined during the workshop. The benchmark will be organised under the auspices of the IAEA in 2008, and the first results will be discussed at the next Accelerator Applications Conference (AccApp'09) to be held in Vienna in May 2009. (author)

  20. IAEA A+M Unit Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Sheikh, K.

    2011-01-01

    Research on fusion energy devices requires a large amount of data for atomic, molecular and plasma-surface interactions. As current machines are updated and future machines are designed, data for a variety of different materials for a wide range of plasma parameters arise. The Atomic and Molecular (A+M) Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency works to coordinate efforts to establish databases for this fusion research effort. Current activities for database development include a number of Coordinated Research Projects (CRP), Technical Meetings, Consultant Meetings and a number of collaborations. These activities generate significant new data in support of fusion research. These data are published in journals as well as IAEA publications and are included in numerical databases ALADDIN accessible by all fusion researchers. Historically a number of institutions have contributed to development of such databases and continue to participate in a Data Centre Network, supported by the A+M Unit. Members of this network maintain individual databases, many of which can be searched using the GENIE search engine. The A+M Unit host the OPEN-ADAS system that allows access to most of the numerical data stored within the ADAS system. An effort on development of an XML schema for data exchange among the databases is underway. Many numerical data for specific processes in fusion relevant materials are not available. In many cases computer codes exist with the capability of generating such data as needed. An informal network of institutions with such capabilities is in the process of formation to provide a means quickly generating such data. The A+M Unit maintains on-line code capabilities to generate atomic and molecular data and serves as an access point to LANL atomic physics codes and FLYCHK, Non-LTE kinetics codes at NIST. Currently, a wiki-style knowledge base is under the development. It will host a wealth of information on atomic, molecular, plasma-surface data for

  1. Appraisal for Brazil of the safety of the transport of radioactive material. Provision for the application of the IAEA safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    States. The service was termed the Transport Safety Appraisal Service (TranSAS). Since then the IAEA General Conference, through resolutions GC(43)/RES/11, GC(44)/RES/17, GC(45)/RES/10 and GC(46)/RES/9, has commended the Secretariat for establishing TranSAS, commended those Member States that have requested an appraisal, and encouraged other Member States to avail themselves of the appraisal service. On 10 May 2000 the Head of the International Relations Office of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) requested assistance from the IAEA within the framework of the Transport Safety Appraisal Service. To lay the groundwork for the appraisal, a preparatory mission was undertaken in August 2000. At that time a preliminary agreement was developed addressing the scope of the appraisal as well as the tasks and activities to be undertaken prior to and during the appraisal. Because of the difficulty in obtaining funding for the appraisal, the actual appraisal, initially planned for November 2000, was postponed until April 2002. The TranSAS appraisal for Brazil involved five independent experts from the IAEA and Member States of the IAEA and was conducted between 15 and 26 April 2002. This report presents its findings

  2. Common Risk Target for severe accidents of nuclear power plants based on IAEA INES scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitázková, Jiřina; Cazzoli, Errico

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA has repeatedly recommended that the nuclear community should arrive at a common understanding and definition of safety goals for severe accidents in nuclear power plants. The recommendation has only found partial answers, despite the numerous working groups and forums devoted to this effort. The most widely accepted definition of goals is based on the concept of Large (Early) Release Frequencies (L(E)RF) and its derivatives, a surrogate concept derived from results of Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs) which was first introduced in the USA almost twenty years ago and much later accepted by the USNRC for risk informed decision making, but not for safety demonstrations. Other types of Safety Goals have been adopted by some nuclear authorities, but the main drawback of all current definitions is that they may apply only to LWRs. The lack of unifying safety/risk parameter throughout of PSAs worldwide is the basis of the present work, and an attempt is made to arrive at the definition of a Risk Target for severe accidents in NPPs, consistent with the IAEA definitions having a technical basis, which can be adopted without modifications for Generation IV power plants. The proposal of Common Risk Target in this work represents an attempt to define a Common Risk Target based on technical reasoning, reflecting IAEA definitions as well as harmonization requirements raised by the whole European Community in various OECD, ASAMPSA2 and SARNET (Guentay et al., 2006) conclusions and Council Directive of The European Union (Community Framework, 2009) as well as lastly performed stress tests of nuclear power plants throughout the Europe (Peer Review Report, 2012). The basic concept of CRT was first introduced and developed within the European project ASAMPSA2 by the authors of this article and was accepted by majority of world PSA experts participating in final evaluation and survey of the project (Guentay, 2011). In the proposed Risk Target concept an innovative

  3. IAEA contribution towards R and D in agriculture in Malaysia with emphasis in sustainability of rice production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainul hayati Daud; Rabiah Abu Hassan

    2002-01-01

    Malaysia became a member of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) of the United Nations in 1969. One of the IAEA main activities in which Malaysia actively participates is the Technical Assistance and Cooperation (TQ Programme, through this TC Programme, Malaysia receives assistance in the form of provision of project components namely expert service, equipment and fellowship training. Since 1970, Malaysia implemented more than 70 projects, valued at more than USD 9 million, of which 16 projects were related to the development of agriculture. The TC Programme is complemented by the Contract Research Project (CRP) of the IAEA. Malaysia completed more than 60 Research Projects, of which more than 25 projects were in the agricultural sector. Both the TC and CRP Programmes contributed towards the development of trained manpower and the establishment of facilities for agricultural research and technology transfer. This report reviews the assistance received through these TC and CRP Programmes and its contribution towards the development of agricultural research with emphasis on sustainability of rice production. (Author)

  4. Role of the IAEA in the radiological protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Lopez, P.; Wrixon, A.D.; Meghzifene, A.; Izewska, J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses the role of the IAEA in relation to the radiological protection of patients. Within the IAEA there are two major programmes which have an impact on the protection of the patient. Firstly, patient protection is part of the programme on radiation safety; secondly, the human health programme contains a number of activities related to quality assurance (QA), and these also contribute to the protection of patients. A function of the IAEA, as stipulated in its Statute, is 'to establish or adopt, in consultation and, where appropriate, in collaboration with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned, standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' and to provide for the application of these standards...'. There are three different levels of the IAEA Safety Standards: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. The Standards are supported by other documents such as Safety Reports. There are five means used by the IAEA in providing for the application of the Standards: co-ordinating research, promoting education and training, providing assistance, fostering information exchange and rendering services to its Member States. All these means are used in the programme on radiological protection of patients as described in the paper. The IAEA is assisting its Member Sates in the development and implementation of QA programmes. These activities help disseminate not only the technical knowledge but also the basic ingredients of the QA culture. The IAEA assistance is directed at: (1) national regulatory bodies for the establishment of a regulatory framework which complies with the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources; (2) standards laboratories for metrological traceability; and (3) end users at medical institutions for the development and implementation of QA programmes

  5. USSP-IAEA WORKSHOP ON ADVANCED SENSORS FOR SAFEGUARDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEPPER, S.; QUEIROLO, A.; ZENDEL, M.; WHICHELLO, J.; ANNESE, C.; GRIEBE, J.; GRIEBE, R.

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA Medium Term Strategy (2006-2011) defines a number of specific goals in respect to the IAEA's ability to provide assurances to the international community regarding the peaceful use of nuclear energy through States adherences to their respective non-proliferation treaty commitments. The IAEA has long used and still needs the best possible sensors to detect and measure nuclear material. The Department of Safeguards, recognizing the importance of safeguards-oriented R and D, especially targeting improved detection capabilities for undeclared facilities, materials and activities, initiated a number of activities in early 2005. The initiatives included letters to Member State Support Programs (MSSPs), personal contacts with known technology holders, topical meetings, consultant reviews of safeguards technology, and special workshops to identify new and novel technologies and methodologies. In support of this objective, the United States Support Program to IAEA Safeguards hosted a workshop on ''Advanced Sensors for Safeguards'' in Santa Fe, New Mexico, from April 23-27, 2007. The Organizational Analysis Corporation, a U.S.-based management consulting firm, organized and facilitated the workshop. The workshop's goal was to help the IAEA identify and plan for new sensors for safeguards implementation. The workshop, which was attended by representatives of seven member states and international organizations, included presentations by technology holders and developers on new technologies thought to have relevance to international safeguards, but not yet in use by the IAEA. The presentations were followed by facilitated breakout sessions where the participants considered two scenarios typical of what IAEA inspectors might face in the field. One scenario focused on an enrichment plant; the other scenario focused on a research reactor. The participants brainstormed using the technologies presented by the participants and other technologies known to them to propose

  6. IAEA Sets Up Team to Drive Nuclear Safety Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency is setting up a Nuclear Safety Action Team to oversee prompt implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety and ensure proper coordination among all stakeholders. The 12-point Action Plan, drawn up in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 13 September and endorsed by all 151 Member States at its General Conference last week. The team will work within the Agency's Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, headed by Deputy Director General Denis Flory, and will coordinate closely with the Director General's Office for Policy. ''The Action Plan requires immediate follow-up,'' Director General Yukiya Amano said. ''This compact, dedicated team will assist Deputy Director General Flory in implementing the measures agreed in the Action Plan.'' Gustavo Caruso, Head of the Regulatory Activities Section in the IAEA's Division of Installation Safety, has been designated as the team's Special Coordinator for the implementation of the Action Plan. The IAEA has already started implementing its responsibilities under the Action Plan, including development of an IAEA methodology for stress tests for nuclear power plants. The methodology will be ready in October. (IAEA)

  7. An IAEA Survey of Dosimetry Audit Networks for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grochowska, Paulina; Izewska, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    A Survey: In 2010, the IAEA undertook a task to investigate and review the coverage and operations of national and international dosimetry audit programmes for radiotherapy. The aim was to organize the global database describing the activities of dosimetry audit networks in radiotherapy. A dosimetry audit questionnaire has been designed at an IAEA consultants' meeting held in 2010 for organizations conducting various levels of dosimetry audits for radiotherapy. Using this questionnaire, a survey was conducted for the first time in 2010 and repeated in 2011. Request for information on different aspects of the dosimetry audit was included, such as the audit framework and resources, its coverage and scope, the dosimetry system used and the modes of audit operation, i.e. remotely and through on-site visits. The IAEA questionnaire was sent to over 80 organizations, members of the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and other organizations known for having operated dosimetry audits for radiotherapy in their countries or internationally. Survey results and discussion: In response to the IAEA survey, 53 organizations in 45 countries confirmed that they operate dosimetry audit services for radiotherapy. Mostly, audits are conducted nationally, however there are five organizations offering audits abroad, with two of them operating in various parts of the world and three of them at the regional level, auditing radiotherapy centres in neighbouring countries. The distribution of dosimetry audit services in the world is given. (author)

  8. International Scavenging for First Responder Guidance and Tools: IAEA Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berthelot, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bachner, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-05-05

    In fiscal years (FY) 2016 and 2017, with support from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) examined the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) radiological emergency response and preparedness products (guidance and tools) to determine which of these products could be useful to U.S. first responders. The IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC), which is responsible for emergency preparedness and response, offers a range of tools and guidance documents for responders in recognizing, responding to, and recovering from radiation emergencies and incidents. In order to implement this project, BNL obtained all potentially relevant tools and products produced by the IAEA IEC and analyzed these materials to determine their relevance to first responders in the U.S. Subsequently, BNL organized and hosted a workshop at DHS National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL) for U.S. first responders to examine and evaluate IAEA products to consider their applicability to the United States. This report documents and describes the First Responder Product Evaluation Workshop, and provides recommendations on potential steps the U.S. federal government could take to make IAEA guidance and tools useful to U.S. responders.

  9. IAEA safeguards and detection of undeclared nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, R.J.S.

    1996-03-01

    Verfication of State declarations is an essential feature of IAEA safeguards. The issue of completeness of the declaration of all nuclear material, nuclear activities and nuclear facilities arises only in full scope safeguards, like those pursuant to NPT. Concentrating on the accountability aspect of nuclear material, the NPT safeguards system has achieved a high level of objective and quantified performance. Some of the basic ideas of the drafters of INFCIRC/153 (corrected) have been stalled. Non-proliferation concerns demand also for a detection probability for undeclared nuclear activities. Following the example of the Chemical Weapon Convention (CWC), advanced detection techniques are proposed, which go beyond the classical nuclear material accountability approach. Recent proposals for additional measures to strengthen IAEA safeguards conform to rules of NPT and related safeguards. Some proposals have been agreed generally, others can only be implemented on a voluntary basis between the State and the IAEA. The implementation will require additional resources and support for the IAEA. Great care is required to maintain the existing capability of the IAEA for a technically sound, independent, objective, and internationally acceptable judgement with available resources, and at the same time to change emphasis on certain elements of the existing safeguards system. (orig.)

  10. The IAEA's role in safe radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flory, D.; Bruno, G.

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with its statute, IAEA is authorized to develop and maintain safety standards. This mission is reflected in the main programme of the IAEA on nuclear safety and security. In the field of the safety of radioactive waste management the IAEA is responsible for the delineation of a global safety regime to protect the public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. This delineation is established on the basis of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, as well as on the development of safety standards for the management of all radioactive waste. The safety standards are the fruit of an international consensus on a high level of safety for the protection of people and environment. Safety guides are edited by IAEA, 7 volumes concern general safety requirements and 6 volumes deal with specific safety requirements (for instance for research reactors or for radioactive waste disposal facilities). Furthermore the IAEA assists Member States in the implementation of the safety standards and provides related services

  11. Skill in expert dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, William S

    2007-09-01

    The motor control of novice participants is often cognitively demanding and susceptible to interference by other tasks. As people develop expertise, their motor control becomes less susceptible to interference from other tasks. Researchers propose a transition in human motor skill from active control to automaticity. This progression may also be the case with nonhuman animals. Differences in performance characteristics between expert, advanced, intermediate, and novice dogs competing in the sport of agility were investigated. There were statistically significant differences between dogs of varying competitive levels in speed, motor control, and signal detections suggestive of increasing motor control automaticity in highly skilled, or expert, dogs. The largest sequential motor control difference was between novice and intermediate dogs, d = .96, whereas the largest sequential signal detection difference was between advanced and expert dogs, d = .90. These findings have two significant implications for expertise researchers: first, the observed similarities between dogs and humans may enable dogs to be used as expert models; and second, expertise science and methods may be profitably employed in the future to create more proficient canine workers.

  12. Capital Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, Laurie; Gary, Jack; Illingworth, Bill; Sargent, Tom

    1987-05-01

    Gathering information, necessary forms, and financial calculations needed to generate a "capital investment proposal" is an extremely complex and difficult process. The intent of the capital investment proposal is to ensure management that the proposed investment has been thoroughly investigated and will have a positive impact on corporate goals. Meeting this requirement typically takes four or five experts a total of 12 hours to generate a "Capital Package." A Capital Expert System was therefore developed using "Personal Consultant." The completed system is hybrid and as such does not depend solely on rules but incorporates several different software packages that communicate through variables and functions passed from one to another. This paper describes the use of expert system techniques, methodology in building the knowledge base, contexts, LISP functions, data base, and special challenges that had to be overcome to create this system. The Capital Expert System is the successful result of a unique integration of artificial intelligence with business accounting, financial forms generation, and investment proposal expertise.

  13. Neural Expert Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Jiří

    1995-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (1995), s. 261-271 ISSN 0893-6080 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/95/0976 Keywords : expert system * knowledge representation * multilayered neural network * back propagation * interval neuron function * incomplete information * explanation Impact factor: 1.262, year: 1995

  14. Expert Cold Structure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  15. Economic and legal consequences of concluded apparent legal on national interests in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuksanović Draginja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Concluding contracts on long-term leases of state-owned properties, beaches and bathing grounds should bring about positive economic effects through the payment of lease fees and the construction of tourist complexes, which in turn should be reflected on the development of tourism, and therefore on a better quality of life of citizens. In order to have legal effect, a contract as a legal transaction must be concluded in accordance with positive legal regulations. The respect for the institution of public order is the only condition limiting the fundamental principle of the law of obligations - the freedom of contract (autonomy of will. Through a detailed legal analysis, we want to draw attention to the examples of contracts on long-term leases that are unlawful. It is a particular type of apparent legal transactions (simulated contracts, because in concluding contracts on long-term leases of state-owned property, leases are simulated in public, while the contracts actually contain elements of sales. It is particularly interesting that the lessor in the concluded contracts is a relevant state authority (a ministry, on whose behalf the contract is signed by an authorized representative who had also led the negotiations with foreign investors. The consequences of such contracts negatively influence the economic development, tourism industry, and therefore also the standard of living of citizens.

  16. OSART guidelines - 2005 edition. Reference report for IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    when exchanging ideas, at the working level, for enhancing safety. The OSART programme is based on the IAEA's Nuclear Safety Standard Series (Fundamentals, Requirements and Safety Guides) for nuclear power plants and the Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection. The Nuclear Safety Standards reflect the consensus of Member States on nuclear safety matters. The reports of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group, identifying important current nuclear safety issues also serve as references during an OSART review. The OSART Guidelines provide overall guidance for the experts to ensure the consistency and comprehensiveness of the operational safety review. Additional guidance and reference material prepared by the IAEA and the expertise of the OSART members contribute to the bases of the review. OSART reviews are performance oriented in that they accept different approaches to commissioning and operational safety that represent good practices and may contribute to ensuring a good safety record on the part of the operating organization. Recommendations are made on items of direct relevance to safety, whereas suggestions made might enhance plant safety indirectly but would certainly improve performance. Commendable good practices identified at plants are communicated to other plants where relevant in order to effect improvements. This revision of the OSART guidelines supersedes the 1994 Edition (IAEA-TECDOC-744)

  17. OSART guidelines - 2005 edition. Reference report for IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    when exchanging ideas, at the working level, for enhancing safety. The OSART programme is based on the IAEA's Nuclear Safety Standard Series (Fundamentals, Requirements and Safety Guides) for nuclear power plants and the Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection. The Nuclear Safety Standards reflect the consensus of Member States on nuclear safety matters. The reports of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group, identifying important current nuclear safety issues also serve as references during an OSART review. The OSART Guidelines provide overall guidance for the experts to ensure the consistency and comprehensiveness of the operational safety review. Additional guidance and reference material prepared by the IAEA and the expertise of the OSART members contribute to the bases of the review. OSART reviews are performance oriented in that they accept different approaches to commissioning and operational safety that represent good practices and may contribute to ensuring a good safety record on the part of the operating organization. Recommendations are made on items of direct relevance to safety, whereas suggestions made might enhance plant safety indirectly but would certainly improve performance. Commendable good practices identified at plants are communicated to other plants where relevant in order to effect improvements. This revision of the OSART guidelines supersedes the 1994 Edition (IAEA-TECDOC-744)

  18. Special event launches new partnership. IAEA and NFCR join forces to fight cancer in developing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: IAEA Director General and Nobel Laureate Mohamed ElBaradei will join more than 100 leading public figures, philanthropists and cancer experts at the United Nations Headquarters in New York on 29 October to mark the launch of a new partnership between the IAEA and the US based National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR). Through this partnership, and the endowment fund called the PACT Fund at NFCR, Americans can support the IAEA and its partners in helping poor countries to combat the looming cancer epidemic. 'The IAEA has long provided radiotherapy machines and expertise to developing countries, but the growing cancer crisis cannot be fought with radiotherapy alone,' says Mohamed ElBaradei. 'Our Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT), which draws on the Agency's long experience in radiation therapy, is building international partnerships to assist in cancer prevention, early detection, treatment and palliative care. Now, through the PACT Fund at NFCR, Americans have the opportunity to support these efforts and bring hope to millions of cancer patients in developing nations.' According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the world is on the brink of a cancer crisis. New cases are expected to double to more than 16 million a year by 2020, unless action is taken now. Hardest hit will be low-income countries, whose health systems are already overburdened by infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. PACT, which was created within the IAEA in 2004, is forging international partnerships with other cancer organizations in both the public and private sectors. Together with partners such as WHO, the American Cancer Society (ACS), the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), it has established pilot projects called Model Demonstration Sites (PMDS) in six countries (Albania, Nicaragua, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Vietnam and Yemen) to develop and implement comprehensive, integrated

  19. Report from the FAO/IAEA Plant Breeding and Genetics Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In spite of a financial crisis of the UN-system, we were able to keep up essential activities. The co-ordinated research programme on cereal improvement using doubled-haploids but also heterosis from induced mutations started in 1986 and continued during the past year. A new regional co-ordinated research programme for Latin America, primarily for rice improvement had its first co-ordination meeting 30 March - 3 April 1987 in Quito, Ecuador. The co-ordinated research programme for identification and use of induced semi-dwarf mutants as alternative genetic sources for rice breeding completed its work with the final co-ordination meeting at Hangzhou, China, July 1987. In-vitro culture technology for mutation breeding is given high priority, e.g. for improving crop plant resistance to diseases. At the first co-ordination meeting of a new programme in September 1987, it was decided to concentrate efforts first on studying the use of toxins for in-vitro screening of resistant mutants and comparing toxin resistance with the reaction to pathogen attack under greenhouse and field conditions. Oil seeds and industrial crops have unfortunately so far received lower priority in FAO/IAEA projects, but we now look forward with some optimism to establish a global network on sesame improvement, in co-operation with the FAO Plant Production and Protection Division. A consultants meeting for this purpose was hosted by IAEA in Vienna in September 1987. The use of mutagenesis to accelerate the domestication of new crop plants - relevant for developing as well as for developed countries - had been subject of an expert discussion already in November 1986 (see MBNL No. 29). FAO and IAEA were advised to pay attention to this important task, but we still have to see whether funds become available. Vegetatively propagated plants like root and tuber crops, bananas and plantains, or woody perennials are looked upon frequently as a particular domaine of mutation breeding, which is not yet

  20. OSART guidelines - 2005 edition. Reference report for IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    when exchanging ideas, at the working level, for enhancing safety. The OSART programme is based on the IAEA's Nuclear Safety Standard Series (Fundamentals, Requirements and Safety Guides) for nuclear power plants and the Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection. The Nuclear Safety Standards reflect the consensus of Member States on nuclear safety matters. The reports of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group, identifying important current nuclear safety issues also serve as references during an OSART review. The OSART Guidelines provide overall guidance for the experts to ensure the consistency and comprehensiveness of the operational safety review. Additional guidance and reference material prepared by the IAEA and the expertise of the OSART members contribute to the bases of the review. OSART reviews are performance oriented in that they accept different approaches to commissioning and operational safety that represent good practices and may contribute to ensuring a good safety record on the part of the operating organization. Recommendations are made on items of direct relevance to safety, whereas suggestions made might enhance plant safety indirectly but would certainly improve performance. Commendable good practices identified at plants are communicated to other plants where relevant in order to effect improvements. This revision of the OSART guidelines supersedes the 1994 Edition (IAEA-TECDOC-744)

  1. Expert systems - basic principles and possible applications in nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.; Schmidt, F.

    1987-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the application of mathematical methods and computational techniques in reactor physics is the effective and accurate solution of the neutron diffusion equation under various conditions. To reach this goal still requires much skill, experience, knowledge and imagination as can be seen from various contributions at this and other conferences. Experts are necessary. Will expert systems replace them. We shall discuss this question by describing the basic principles of problem solving by expert systems as compared to problem solving by mathematical and computational methods. From this we shall identify areas of possible applications of the new techniques in nuclear energy and develop some thoughts on present limitations. As a result we conclude that expert systems will not be able to replace experts as long as the experts use the systems to improve their own expertise

  2. Statement to Fifty-Fifth Regular Session of IAEA General Conference 2011, 19 September 2011, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Since the last General Conference, the most important single item on the IAEA agenda has been the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. This caused deep public anxiety throughout the world and damaged confidence in nuclear power. I will therefore begin my statement by reporting to you in some detail about the aftermath of the accident and the current situation at the plant. As you will recall, the accident was caused by an earthquake and tsunami of unprecedented severity, which struck the east of Japan on 11 March. The IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre went into action immediately, working around the clock to advise Japan and to share information with all Member States. A few days after the accident, I went to Japan to meet then-Prime Minister Kan. I offered the full support of the IAEA and stressed that Japan needed to demonstrate the highest transparency in its handling of the accident. On my return to Vienna, I convened a special meeting of the Board of Governors and dispatched a number of expert teams to Japan to assist in areas such as radiological monitoring and food safety. An IAEA International Fact-Finding Expert Mission subsequently undertook a 10-day mission to Japan and produced a detailed report. In June, I convened an IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in Vienna, which many of you attended. The Conference adopted a Ministerial Declaration aimed at strengthening nuclear safety, emergency preparedness, and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide. The Ministerial Conference was chaired by the distinguished Permanent Representative of Brazil to the IAEA, Antonio Guerreiro, who skilfully steered the work that led to the adoption of the Ministerial Declaration. I am very grateful to Ambassador Guerreiro for his outstanding contribution. The June Ministerial Declaration formed the basis of the first ever IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was approved by consensus by the Board of Governors

  3. Studies of some IAEA candidate reference materials for microanalytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuanxun; Qian Yine; Li Deyi; Wang Yinsong; Tan Mingguang; Wang Xuepeng; Gu Yingmei; Zhu Jieqing

    2002-01-01

    In order to develop new reference materials for microanalytical nuclear techniques, the Scanning Proton Microprobe (SPM) technique was used to determine homogeneity level within 100x200 μm 2 micro-area on the small pieces of IAEA Urban Dust reference materials. In part 1 of this paper, the experimental methods are described in detail. The results show that IAEA-396A/M Vienna Urban Dust is homogeneous enough for small sample analysis. As a task we prepared the IAEA-386 bovine liver as a new candidate reference material to meet this purpose. In part 2, the preparation process including material collection, dried, pulverize, sieve, homogenization and preliminary test is described in detail. The more effective grinding methods were established to achieve the median particle size of 22 μm. Also in part.3 we performed the qualitative determinations of some candidate reference materials by NAA and AFS. (author)

  4. IAEA perspective on remote monitoring development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparo, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    The IAEA has made rapid progress in exploiting remote monitoring in 84 systems and 302 cameras, which are spread over 15 states and Taiwan. The increased use, since 2003, of remote monitoring of VACOSS electronic seals is a new feature. Successful use of remote monitoring to spot potential breakdowns through state-of-health diagnostics on 14 occasions is also an important motivation for further implementation. This paper gave detailed descriptions of installed systems for data acquisition and transmission, particularly the SDIS (up to six cameras) and DMOS (up to 16 cameras). IAEA policy for data security and data sharing raise important issues that are relevant to cooperation in transparency that might be based on sharing of data from safeguards systems. Implementation of new remote monitoring systems may utilize satellite links, as under testing now in cooperation between the IAEA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (author)

  5. Iran and the IAEA: Verification and monitoring under the JCPOA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    On 16 January 2016, IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano announced that Iran had completed the necessary preparatory steps to start implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). This ushers in a new phase in the relations between the IAEA and Iran, and represents the start of an increased effort of the IAEA’s verification and monitoring activities in Iran. The JCPOA was agreed last July between Iran and China, France, Germany, Russia, the United Kingdom, the United States and the European Union, the so called E3/EU+3. The IAEA, which is not party to the JCPOA, is undertaking a wide range of verification and monitoring of nuclear-related commitments set out in the document.

  6. IAEA sends out samples of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Full text: Governments and organizations interested in developing uranium resources will be assisted by a new service, now being inaugurated by the Agency's laboratories, for the distribution of reference samples of uranium ores. This is an addition to the service which began at Seibersdorf in January 1962 for the distribution of calibrated radionuclides, and which has met with a steadily increasing demand. * Uranium deposits consisting of ores with a uranium content in the range 0.5 - 0.05 per cent occur in a number of countries, including developing countries and can present considerable analytical difficulties. In 1962 the Agency asked Member States whether they would be interested in receiving reference samples of uranium ores to assist them in checking their methods of chemical analysis. The response encouraged the Agency to proceed. There is a multiplicity of types of uranium ores and, initially, three of the most commonly occurring have been selected - torbernite, uraninite and carnotite. Member States have provided the laboratory with supplies of these three types of ore. In order to determine the uranium content, samples are sent to leading laboratories throughout the world, so as to arrive at the most accurate values possible. This work has proved to be useful to the laboratories themselves ; in searching for reasons for discrepancies between the different collaborating laboratories, they enlarge their own knowledge and improve their methods. The reference samples are sent out in the form of fine powder, and are available to atomic energy commissions, research laboratories or mining companies. The requesting laboratory, having worked out the analytical process best suited to its needs, is then able to check its results by analysing an IAEA reference sample of known uranium content. By the end of 1966, reference samples will be available of the three ores mentioned, and later also of pure uranium oxide and of uranium oxide containing trace impurities, the

  7. Certified Reference Materials for Radioactivity Measurements in Environmental Samples of Soil and Water: IAEA-444 and IAEA-445

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Reference Materials are an important requirement for any sort of quantitative chemical and radiochemical analysis. Laboratories need them for calibration and quality control throughout their analytical work. The IAEA started to produce reference materials in the early 1960's to meet the needs of the analytical laboratories in its Member States that required reference materials for quality control of their measurements. The initial efforts were focused on the preparation of environmental reference materials containing anthropogenic radionuclides for use by those laboratories employing nuclear analytical techniques. These reference materials were characterized for their radionuclide content through interlaboratory comparison involving a core group of some 10 to 20 specialist laboratories. The success of these early exercises led the IAEA to extend its activities to encompass both terrestrial and marine reference materials containing primordial radionuclides and trace elements. Within the frame of IAEA activities in production and certification of reference materials, this report describes the certification of the IAEA-444 and IAEA-445: soil and water spiked with gamma emitting radionuclides respectively. Details are given on methodologies and data evaluation

  8. IAEA calls for enhanced radiation protection of patients. Safety specialists warn against overuse of new imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Advances in medical imaging techniques are allowing doctors to detect hidden diseases and make ever more accurate diagnoses. But radiation safety experts at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) say that overuse of high-tech scanning procedures may unnecessarily expose patients to increased radiation levels. The IAEA, in collaboration with other international organizations, is developing a series of measures aimed at strengthening patient protection. The focus of recent efforts is a Smart Card project, to log how much radiation a person receives in the course of a lifetime. Concern surrounds procedures such as computed tomography (CT) scans because they deliver higher doses of radiation to patients in comparison to conventional X-rays (radiographs). It's been estimated that the average radiation dose of one CT scan is equal to roughly 500 chest X-rays. And that can increase a patient's lifetime risk of cancer, particularly if CT scans are repeated. The IAEA is one of the key international players in the field of patient radiation protection. A unit dedicated to the Radiological Protection of Patients (RPoP) was established in 2001. The IAEA's activities in radiation protection of patients include training, knowledge sharing and capacity building in the medical use of radiation. Extensive, up-to-date training material for health professionals is freely available on the RPoP website. An International Action Plan on the Radiological Protection of Patients that has been established together with leading international organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO), UNSCEAR, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and others to identify strategies for strengthening radiation protection of patients. Coordinating and managing technical cooperation projects with Member States on patient dose assessment. The aim is to identify the factors that contribute to unnecessary radiation dose to patients, provide guidance on dealing with

  9. The IAEA's WorldAtom Internet site: International news and information services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyd, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides news and public information services via the Internet through its WorldAtom home page. The page is accessible at www.iaea.org/worldatom. Following are brief highlights of the items available on the site by clicking Press Centre, Reference Centre, or other links: Daily Press Review: Summaries of selected news items pertaining to global nuclear developments and the IAEA's work are provided each day, drawing upon a wide range of global media sources. IAEA NewsBriefs: Regularly featured are updates about IAEA activities related to areas of safety, technology transfer, and nuclear safeguards. Meetings and training courses: News about IAEA-sponsored symposia, seminars, and other meetings, as well as information about international meetings on atomic energy sponsored by other organizations, are updated on a daily basis. Press releases and statements: All IAEA press releases and media advisories since 1995 are accessible on the site. Topical and feature pages: In-depth coverage and links to information resources within and outside the IAEA are regularly given to selected topics of high international interest involving the IAEA. IAEA publications: listings and overviews of IAEA technical reports, safety standards, and other publications are updated as they are issued. Scientific and technical information: WorldAtom includes links (Reference Centre) to the International Nuclear Information System, IAEA's extensive bibliographic database of references and resources, to the nuclear database, and to departmental pages at IAEA that focus on IAEA programs and activities. IAEA documents: Electronic versions of official IAEA documents are added as they are issued. These documents include the texts and status lists of international conventions under IAEA auspices; IAEA information circulars to member states; IAEA annual reports (since 1995); and background reports and documents for the IAEA General Conference related to

  10. IAEA activities on NPP personnel training and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossilov, A.

    1998-01-01

    Activities of IAEA concerning training and qualification of NPP personnel consider the availability of sufficient number of competent personnel which is one of the most critical requirements for safe and reliable NPP operation and maintenance. Competence of personnel is essential for reducing the frequency of events connected to human errors and equipment failures. The IAEA Guidebook on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation incorporates the experience gained worldwide and provides recommendations on the use of SAT being the best practice for attaining and maintaining the qualification and competence of NPP personnel and for quality assurance of training

  11. Alanine-ESR dosimetry for radiotherapy IAEA experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, K.; Girzikowsky, R.; )

    1997-01-01

    At present, the most commonly used transfer dosimeters for radiotherapy applications are TL dosemeters. They are being used for intercomparison between SSDLs (about 70) and the IAEA dosimetry laboratory. However, there are some undesirable characteristics of this dosimetry system. We have a study in progress at the IAEA to evaluate the alanine-ESR systems as an alternative to TLDs. There are several desirable qualities which make alanine an attractive dosemeter. Preliminary data suggest that the alanine-ESR dosimetry system has the potential to replace TLDs for intercomparison amongst SSDLs in the therapy-level dose regions. (Author)

  12. IAEA and Iran Hold Technical Meetings in Tehran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Full text: On 7 and 8 October 2014, the IAEA and the Islamic Republic of Iran held technical meetings within the Framework for Cooperation that was agreed between the parties in November 2013. During the meetings, the two sides held discussions in relation to the implementation of the two practical measures relating to the initiation of high explosives and to neutron transport calculations, agreed in May 2014 in the third step of the Framework for Cooperation. The Agency and Iran will continue discussions on these measures. Iran did not propose any new measures during the meetings in Tehran. Iran and the Agency agreed to meet again, at a date to be announced. (IAEA)

  13. IAEA activities in the field of NPP life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueorguiev, B.; Lyssakov, V.; Davies, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The IAEA has established programmes in the field of Nuclear Plant Lifetime in the Division of Nuclear Power and the Fuel Cycle (NEPF) and also in the Division of Nuclear Safety. In the Division of NEPF the International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants carries out its activities within the IAEA Project A2.03 ''Nuclear Power Plant Life Management''. Activities under this project have produced a wealth of information by organizing specialists meeting, preparing technical publications on related topics and arranging co-ordinated research programmes with good results. The most recent development is a database which has been developed and is being maintained. 4 figs

  14. Bioethics for Technical Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Shigetaka

    Along with rapidly expanding applications of life science and technology, technical experts have been implicated more and more often with ethical, social, and legal problems than before. It should be noted that in this background there are scientific and social uncertainty elements which are inevitable during the progress of life science in addition to the historically-established social unreliability to scientists and engineers. In order to solve these problems, therefore, we should establish the social governance with ‘relief’ and ‘reliance’ which enables for both citizens and engineers to share the awareness of the issues, to design social orders and criterions based on hypothetical sense of values for bioethics, to carry out practical use management of each subject carefully, and to improve the sense of values from hypothetical to universal. Concerning these measures, the technical experts can learn many things from the present performance in the medical field.

  15. Expert PLSQL Practices

    CERN Document Server

    Beresniewicz, John

    2011-01-01

    Expert PL/SQL Practices is a book of collected wisdom on PL/SQL programming from some of the best and the brightest in the field. Each chapter is a deep-dive into a specific problem, technology, or feature set that you'll face as a PL/SQL programmer. Each author has chosen their topic out of the strong belief that what they share can make a positive difference in the quality and scalability of code that you write. The path to mastery begins with syntax and the mechanics of writing statements to make things happen. If you've reached that point with PL/SQL, then let the authors of Expert PL/SQL

  16. Expert Systems Development Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-28

    was able to prove such a machine could exist. 3 Lady Ada Lovelace was a contemporary of George Babbage. She studied with Babbage and wrote a popular...essay explaining the analytical engine. She is sometimes credited with inventing computer languages. The Ada computer language is named in her honor. -8...documentation and logic flow charting of the whole system. If your expert system is written in a highly structured language such as Ada , logic flow

  17. ALICE Expert System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionita, C; Carena, F

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN employs a number of human operators (shifters), who have to make sure that the experiment is always in a state compatible with taking Physics data. Given the complexity of the system and the myriad of errors that can arise, this is not always a trivial task. The aim of this paper is to describe an expert system that is capable of assisting human shifters in the ALICE control room. The system diagnoses potential issues and attempts to make smart recommendations for troubleshooting. At its core, a Prolog engine infers whether a Physics or a technical run can be started based on the current state of the underlying sub-systems. A separate C++ component queries certain SMI objects and stores their state as facts in a Prolog knowledge base. By mining the data stored in different system logs, the expert system can also diagnose errors arising during a run. Currently the system is used by the on-call experts for faster response times, but we expect it to be adopted as a standard tool by regular shifters during the next data taking period

  18. IAEA to Help West African Countries Diagnose Ebola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will provide specialized diagnostic equipment to help Sierra Leone in its efforts to combat an ongoing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak, IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano announced today. Later, the support is planned to be extended to Liberia and Guinea. The support is in line with a UN Security Council appeal and responds to a request from Sierra Leone. The IAEA assistance will supplement the country's ability to diagnose EVD quickly using a diagnostic technology known as Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). The assistance, expected to be delivered in the coming weeks, initiates broader IAEA support to African Member States to strengthen their technological abilities to detect diseases transmitted from animals to humans - zoonotic diseases. The IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations have been at the forefront of developing RT-PCR, a nuclear-derived technology which allows EVD to be detected within a few hours, while other methods require growing on a cell culture for several days before a diagnosis is determined. Early diagnosis of EVD, if combined with appropriate medical care, increases the victims' chance of survival and helps curtail the spread of the disease by making it possible to isolate and treat the patients earlier. Health authorities in Sierra Leone and other affected countries are already applying RT-PCR, but their diagnostic capability is limited; there is a shortage of the diagnostic kits and other materials needed for the process and backup equipment is needed to avoid diagnostic downtime in case of equipment failure. The IAEA will support the most affected countries' sustained ability to detect the disease in cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response. The IAEA, as part of its ongoing work, has helped 32 African countries and several other Member States develop skills

  19. [Expert Opinions in Court: Liability of the Expert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltenwolf, Marcus; Beckmann, Nickolas; Gaidzik, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Experts in criminal, civil and, increasingly, in social court cases have to present their expert opinions in court. This should be regarded not only as a burden, even if this may at times appear superfluous to the expert, perhaps because the discussion is mere repetition of the opinion he has already written, or because the questions appear to be biased against the expert. Nonetheless, the expert is always advised to appear calm and objective during the interrogation by judges and parties or participants and their legal representatives, and should not allow himself or herself to be provoked by questioning. Furthermore, it may be necessary to correct the written expert statement in the course of the interrogation, but this can be a sign of a truly competent medical expert. The expert consulted can be held liable for adverse health effects resulting from the interrogation and investigation, as well as for deliberate or grossly faulty reports. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Expert and novice facilitated modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena; Papadopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    the behaviour of one expert and two novice facilitators during a Viable System Model workshop. The findings suggest common facilitation patterns in the behaviour of experts and novices. This contrasts literature claiming that experts and novices behave and use their available knowledge differently......This paper provides an empirical study based on action research in which expert and novice facilitators in facilitated modelling workshops are compared. There is limited empirical research analysing the differences between expert and novice facilitators. Aiming to address this gap we study...... and facilitation strategies in contexts in which external, expert facilitation is not always possible are also discussed, and limitations of this study are provided....

  1. Excerpts from the introductory statement by IAEA Director General. IAEA Board of Governors, Vienna, 8 June 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document contains excerpts from the Introductory Statement made by the Director General of the IAEA at the IAEA Board of Governors on 8 June 1998. The following aspects from the Agency's activity are presented: nuclear testing, technical co-operation, programme and budget, safeguards, safeguards implementation report, Agency's involvement in safeguards verification in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), Agency's inspections in Iraq in relation to its clandestine nuclear programme, security of material, measures to strengthen international co-operation in nuclear, radiation and waste safety, study of the radiological situation at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa, and Agency's role in safety assessment of the Mochovce nuclear power plant

  2. Excerpts from the introductory statement by IAEA Director General. IAEA Board of Governors, Vienna, 14 September 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document contains excerpts from the Introductory Statement made by the Director General of the IAEA at the IAEA Board of Governors on 14 September 1998. The following aspects from the Agency's activity are presented: nuclear safety, technical co-operation programme, safeguards and verification, fissile material treaty, nuclear material released from the military sector, Agency's involvement in safeguards verification in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), Agency's inspections in Iraq in relation to its clandestine nuclear programme, and Agency's safeguards in the Middle East region

  3. Grain-scale heterogeneities in the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the international standard calcite materials (NBS 19, NBS 18, IAEA-CO-1, and IAEA-CO-8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimura, Toyoho; Tsunogai, Urumu; Nakagawa, Fumiko

    2008-06-01

    We determined grain-scale heterogeneities (from 6 to 88 microg) in the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions (delta(13)C and delta(18)O) of the international standard calcite materials (NBS 19, NBS 18, IAEA-CO-1, and IAEA-CO-8) using a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) system that realizes a simultaneous determination of the delta(13)C and the delta(18)O values with standard deviations (S.D.) of less than 0.05 per thousand for CO(2) gas. Based on the S.D. of the delta(13)C and delta(18)O values determined for CO(2) gases evolved from the different grains of the same calcite material, we found that NBS 19, IAEA-CO-1, and IEAE-CO-8 were homogeneous for delta(13)C (less than 0.10 per thousand S.D.), and that only NBS 19 was homogeneous for delta(18)O (less than 0.14 per thousand S.D.). On the level of single grains, we found that both IAEA-CO-1 and IAEA-CO-8 were heterogeneous for delta(18)O (1.46 per thousand and 0.76 per thousand S.D., respectively), and that NBS 18 was heterogeneous for both delta(13)C and delta(18)O (0.34 per thousand and 0.54 per thousand S.D., respectively). Closer inspection of NBS 18 grains revealed that the highly deviated isotopic compositions were limited to the colored grains. By excluding such colored grains, we could also obtain the homogeneous delta(13)C and delta(18)O values (less than 0.18 per thousand and less than 0.16 per thousand S.D., respectively) for NBS 18. We conclude that NBS 19, IAEA-CO-1, or pure grains in NBS 18 are suitable to be used as the standard reference material for delta(13)C, and that either NBS 19 or pure grains in NBS 18 are suitable to be used as the reference material for delta(18)O during the grain-scale isotopic analyses of calcite.

  4. CERN safety expert receives international award

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    On 18 December 2004, the President of the Swiss Electro-technical Committee, Martin Reichle (left), presented the award to Helmut Schönbacher. Helmut Schönbacher, of the Safety Commission at CERN, has received, the "1906 Award" of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for his standardisation work on the influence of ionizing radiation on insulating materials. From 1986 until 2004, Schönbacher was leader of a working group on radiation composed of internationally recognised experts. It edited standards of the IEC 60544 series on the determination of the effects of ionizing radiation on electrical insulating materials. The working group also edited three IEC Technical Reports on the determination of long-term radiation ageing in polymers. This standardisation work and long-term experience from CERN on the radiation ageing of materials also contributed to research coordination programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). From 1968 until 1988, Schönbacher was a member of the Rad...

  5. IAEA Team Completes Initial Review of Japan's Plans to Decommission Fukushima Daiichi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA expert team today completed an initial review of Japan's efforts to plan and implement the decommissioning of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The International Peer Review of Japan's Mid-and-Long-Term Roadmap towards the Decommissioning of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Units 1-4 conducted its visit from 15 to 22 April 2013. As requested by the Government of Japan, the IAEA team held extensive discussions with officials from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). The team also met with officials of the Nuclear Regulation Authority. The team visited the nuclear accident site to gain first-hand information about conditions at the power plant and progress toward decommissioning the facility. ''Extraordinarily committed workers have made significant accomplishments at Fukushima Daiichi since the March 2011 accident, but Japan continues to face difficult challenges as it works to decommission the site,'' said team leader Juan Carlos Lentijo, IAEA Director of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology. ''We saw that TEPCO has achieved the stable cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools at the site.'' The 13-member IAEA team examined a wide variety of issues related to decommissioning the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, such as the Roadmap 's overall strategic approach, the current condition of the reactors and spent fuel pools, the management of the huge amount of accumulated water at the site, as well as the radioactive releases. In a draft report delivered to Japanese authorities today, the team acknowledged a number of accomplishments that have been made to prepare Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station for decommissioning. For example: Japan has addressed the plant's decommissioning in a timely manner, as demonstrated by its early preparation of the Roadmap and its acceleration of plans to remove fuel from the spent fuel pools at Units 1-4. In

  6. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists' meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists' meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  7. Making a difference in LDCs. IAEA partnerships support aims in least developed countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastens, Royal; Volkoff, Alex

    2001-01-01

    No single organization can realize the world's goals for sustainable development. Broad engagement with a variety of factors is needed. This is especially the case to help determine where science and technology can play the best role, particularly in Least Developed Countries (LDCs). One mechanism which the IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme uses for nuclear science and technology is regional agreements between governments. This brings a double benefit: it strengthens technical self-reliance and it enables more advanced institutions within a region to act as technical mentors for less advanced ones, particularly those in LDCs. The Technical Cooperation Programme for LDCs is built upon development of human resources through advanced training and expert support. Several regional projects, for example, focus upon graduate level courses in nuclear science and technology for scientists. However, deteriorating economic situation in many LDCs make it difficult for some counterpart institutions to sustain the outcomes of projects. A new strategy was adopted in 1995, to alleviate the underlying constraints. Upon request, essential spare parts and consumables which are not locally available are provided to facilitate, in particular, continuation of activities related to completed technical cooperation projects. Expert services are also utilized for consultancy missions and to assist in organizing local training events. To reinforce the scientific and technological base, training opportunities offer a 'sandwich pattern', leading to advanced degrees in basic sciences and nuclear technology as part of an alternate (local-overseas) educational training programme

  8. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  9. IAEA verification experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, D.M.; Subudhi, M.; Calvert, O.L.; Bonner, T.N.; Cherry, R.C.; Whiting, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    In April 1996, the United States (US) added the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the list of facilities eligible for the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. At that time, the US proposed that the IAEA carry out a Verification Experiment at the plant with respect to the downblending of about 13 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the form of UF 6 . This material is part of the 226 metric tons of fissile material that President Clinton has declared to be excess to US national-security needs and which will be permanently withdrawn from the US nuclear stockpile. In September 1997, the IAEA agreed to carry out this experiment, and during the first three weeks of December 1997, the IAEA verified the design information concerning the downblending process. The plant has been subject to short-notice random inspections since December 17, 1997. This paper provides an overview of the Verification Experiment, the monitoring technologies used in the verification approach, and some of the experience gained to date

  10. IAEA's role in international emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buglova, E.

    2013-01-01

    In this presentation the role of the IAEA in international emergency preparedness and response is reviewed. Experience gained in response to Fukushima accident at all levels (facility, local, national and international) provides valuable input for further enhancing and harmonizing EPR framework.

  11. Supervision of nuclear safety - IAEA requirements, accepted solutions, trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkowski, M.

    2007-01-01

    Ten principles of the nuclear safety, based on the IAEA's standards are presented. Convention on Nuclear Safety recommends for nuclear safety landscape, the control transparency, culture safety, legal framework and knowledge preservation. Examples of solutions accepted in France, Finland, and Czech Republic are discussed. New trends in safety fundamentals and Integration Regulatory Review are presented

  12. Study on Formulating Policy and Strategies for IAEA TC Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Lee, M. K.; Shin, J. Y.

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this study is to provide recommendations for formulating adequate policy and strategies for IAEA-TC programme as being of a donor Member State and to guide directions to facing the challenges of changing the status from IAEA-TC recipient to donor country. In addition, this study gives recommendations and feedbacks to the IAEA-TC programmer: how it has contributed to nation's nuclear technology development in the past on one hand and how the country has contributed to it on the other. Besides, this study also conducted to identify the following impacts expected: termination of on-going National TC projects, discontinuation of TC-based technical advices, sponsored fellowship and scientific visits for capacity building opportunities, and limitation in participations of various regional projects due to termination of IAEA financial support. In terms of financial aspect, this study has also performed to assess the nation's annual financial contribution (Technical Cooperation (TC) Fund: 1,67 million dollars in 2008) by comparing the experiences of other OECD countries cases. In conclusion, it is expected that the results of this study will contribute to develop appropriate measures in order to maximize the benefits for future national nuclear technology development and in addition, to explore the possibilities to extend the nuclear technology export market potentials

  13. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase IIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Noboru; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Shimada, Michiya; Saito, Seiji.

    1982-11-01

    This report corresponds to Chapter VI of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR workshop, Phase IIA. Special emphasis is placed on pumped limiter analysis for comparative studies between limiter and divertor concepts. Pumping characteristics of divertor/limiter and radiation cooling of diverted plasmas by impurities are also intensively studied. (author)

  14. 19. IAEA fusion energy conference. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Book of abstracts of the papers, accepted by an international programme committee for presentation at the 19th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Lyon, France. The subjects covered are magnetic confinement experiments, plasma heating and current drive, ITER EDA, inertial fusion energy, innovative concepts, fusion technology and theory

  15. The activities of the IAEA Laboratories, Vienna. Annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.B.G.

    1983-10-01

    A brief account is given on the main activities of the IAEA Laboratory in Seibersdorf during 1982. The following areas are specified: Plant breeding; Soil science; Entomology; Agrochemicals; Human nutrition; Radiation dosimetry; Electronics; Chemistry; Isotope hydrology; Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL); Health physics

  16. IAEA and the UN partnerships for development and peace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    IAEA collaborates with almost every major UN agency on a vast array of scientific challenges: improving human health; promoting food security; controlling pollution; managing freshwater resources; understanding climate change; protecting the oceans; boosting energy production; and a variety of other pressing concerns affecting economic development and the environment. This booklet illustrates such inter-agency co-operation through concrete examples

  17. IAEA: 17 countries are candidates for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    In january 2011 IAEA announced that 17 countries had officially expressed their willingness to home nuclear power plants, they have filed applications for the construction of nuclear power plants. Among the countries concerned we find: Poland, Kuwait, Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia, Nigeria, Bangladesh, Thailand, Vietnam, Chile and Uruguay

  18. How to use MAED with other IAEA models in ENPEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksijan, B.

    1997-01-01

    This paper provides an outlook of the energy situation in Croatia and describes the experience with the IAEA planning methodologies with focus on the MAED model. Furthermore, it suggests an approach to integrate the results of the MAED module of ENPEP with other modules (e.g. BALANCE) by means of commercial software (EXCEL Microsoft). (author). 2 figs, 3 tabs

  19. IAEA-MEL's AQCS programme for marine radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.P.; Gastaud, J.; Pham, M.K.

    1999-01-01

    The main objectives of the IAEA-MEL's Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) for marine radioactivity measurements are discussed and future plans for the organization of intercomparison exercises and the production of certified reference materials are presented. The new developments should also include implementation of quality assurance programmes in Member States' laboratories, training in quality management and accreditation programmes. (author)

  20. IAEA education and training programme in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.L.F.; Lederman, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the IAEA education and training (E and T) programme in nuclear safety. A strategic planning for the programme implementation is described in terms of objectives, outputs and activities. A framework based on areas of competency and the level of depth of the training is presented as well as the main achievements to date. (author)

  1. IAEA activities in the field of research reactors safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciuculescu, C.; Boado Magan, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    IAEA activities in the field of research reactor safety are included in the programme of the Division of Nuclear Installations Safety. Following the objectives of the Division, the results of the IAEA missions and the recommendations from International Advisory Groups, the IAEA has conducted in recent years a certain number of activities aiming to enhance the safety of research reactors. The following activities will be presented: (a) the new Requirements for the Safety of Research Reactors, main features and differences with previous standards (SS-35-S1 and SS-35-S2) and the grading approach for implementation; (b) new documents being developed (safety guides, safety reports and TECDOC's); (c) activities related to the Incident Reporting System for Research Reactor (IRSRR); (d) the new features implemented for the INSARR missions; (e) the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors adopted by the Board of Governors on 8 March 2004, following the General Conference Resolution GC(45)/RES/10; and (f) the survey on the safety of research reactors published on the IAEA website on February 2003 and the results obtained. (author)

  2. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 16, no. 1(90)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: depleted uranium information, nonproliferation progress towards disarmament, IAEA meetings, Chernobyl assistance, environmental studies conference, climate talks resuming, radiological protection of patients, safety and security of radiation sources, Earth Summit 2002 announcement, and other short information

  3. IAEA Director General Comments on Cooperation Framework with Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The following are remarks by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Yukiya Amano, at a News Conference after he signed a Joint Statement on a Framework for Cooperation with the Islamic Republic of Iran: ''The International Atomic Energy Agency and the Islamic Republic of Iran have just issued the Joint Statement on a Framework for Cooperation. ''Under the Framework, Iran and the IAEA will cooperate further with respect to verification activities to be undertaken by the IAEA to resolve all present and past issues. The practical measures contained in the Annex are substantive measures and will be implemented in three months starting from today. ''This is an important step forward to start with, but much more needs to be done. ''The outstanding issues that are not contained in the Annex to the Framework for Cooperation, including those in my previous reports to the Board of Governors, will be addressed in the subsequent steps under the Framework for Cooperation. ''The IAEA is firmly committed to resolving all outstanding issues through dialogue and cooperation . (IAEA)

  4. Capacity building in the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion and Future Challenges: • Momentum on Nuclear Safety; • To continue strengthening, developing, maintaining and implementing capacity building programmes, including education, training and exercises at the national, regional and international levels; • To ensure sufficient and competent human resources necessary to assume responsibility for safety; • To incorporate lessons learned from the accident based on the IEMs and IAEA Fukushima Report

  5. Application of nuclear technology for sustainable development, and IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    1998-01-01

    The role of radiation and isotopes for sustainable development in improving agriculture, industry and environmental conservation is presented. The radiation and isotope technology can increase productivity in a sustainable way. The IAEA programmes encompass mutation breeding, soil fertility and crop production, animal production, food irradiation, agrochemicals and insect pest control using nuclear technology

  6. IAEA Nuclear Data Section: Progress Report, 2010/11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simakov, S.P.; Otsuka, N.; Zerkin, V.; Semkova, V.

    2011-01-01

    Summary of Nuclear Data Activity by Staff of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section from April 2010 - May 2011 including Staff Changes, Data Compilations (EXFOR transmission, EXFOR quality control, EXFOR coverage control, Workshops and Meetings in 2010/2011 relevant to EXFOR, CINDA, Evaluated data libraries, files and programs), Services, software and Nuclear Data Developments

  7. The IAEA safety standards for radiation, waste and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Abel J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the standards for radiation, waste and nuclear safety established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). It provides a historical overview of their development and also summarizes the standards' current preparation and review process. The final paragraphs offer an outlook on future developments. (author)

  8. Review of WHO/PAHO/IAEA recommendations concerning radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the mid 1960s the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have provided recommendations concerning radiotherapy services, including organization, staff requirements and facilities. These are contained in various reports of WHO, PAHO and IAEA, which are reviewed and summarized. (author). 9 refs

  9. The IAEA Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) - Information Meeting Dublin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Khatibeh, Ahmad

    2014-05-01

    IRRS is developed to help States evaluate the current status of compliance of their regulatory infrastructures for safety with IAEA Standards. This report discusses the function of IRRS missions as a tool for evaluating the regulatory structure for Member States. It was presented to RPII staff in a Powerpoint document in preparation for the IRRS Mission to Ireland in August 2015

  10. Radiation and isotope technology for sustainable development and the role of the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, S. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria)

    1997-10-01

    This paper illustrates developments in and prospects for the application of nuclear science technology in the fields of food and agriculture, industry and environmental protection, in connection with the IAEA`s activities

  11. INDL/A IAEA Nuclear Data Library for evaluated neutron reaction data of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1982-05-01

    This Library contains evaluations performed by participants of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on the Intercomparison of Evaluations of Actinide Neutron Nuclear Data. The data are available on magnetic tape, free of charge, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  12. The use of IAEA-IRS information in Russia's nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The use of IAEA-IRS information in Russia's nuclear power industry is described, including the following issues: organizational aspects; organization of the information process; assessment of information uses; examples of using IAEA-IRS information. Figs

  13. Staying one step ahead: An IAEA inspector fits the picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohannon, J.

    2006-01-01

    At 29, Nangonya, an engineer, is the nuclear inspector at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Like any scientific research discipline, nuclear inspection requires a blend of science and technical knowledge and a sceptical mindset. But a career in nuclear inspection also demands detective and diplomatic skills sharp enough to handle sensitive political issues. Nangonya joined the IAEA in 2002 by taking the Agency's Safeguards Traineeship Programme, a foundation course on nuclear technology open only to nationals from developing countries. After finishing the year-long programme, Nangonya applied for an IAEA nuclear inspector position-he got it-and then undertook the three-month training course that all newly hired inspectors complete. Most of Nangonya's training covered the subjects that might be expected: the ins and outs of the nuclear fuel cycle, how to verify that each and every reported gram of plutonium and uranium are where they are supposed to be, and how to spot signs of illicit activity. Every year, IAEA hires 15 to 30 nuclear inspectors, typically in their 30s, many with backgrounds far removed from nuclear physics. An inspection team needs a combination of backgrounds. Inspectors come with a range of expertise, from physics, engineering, and chemistry to computer science and even biology; samples from plants and animals often play a role in detecting unreported nuclear materials. But apart from technical expertise, there are also crucial social and psychological skills to be learned, and this is where nuclear inspection diverges most from academic science. Nuclear inspectors must learn to trust their colleagues, but during their training they must learn not to trust others. Careful diplomacy, not covert intrigue, is the modus operandi. Even when nuclear inspectors turn up bad news, such as the recent discovery of what may be a secret nuclear programme in Iran, inspectors are not enforcers. When findings have been confirmed, the IAEA Director

  14. Verification ghosts. The changing political environment of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redden, K.J.

    2003-01-01

    Six years ago, Dr. Hans Blix wrote in the IAEA Bulletin of a 'general optimism about further arms control and verification.' At the time, world events warranted such a prognosis; the IAEA was riding a wave of momentum after its instrumental role in the roll-back of the South African nuclear weapons program and bringing Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan into the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) as non-nuclear-weapon States. The NPT's indefinite extension was only two years old, and the most pressing challenges, while recognizable, were somewhat stagnant. Today, some tidings elicit similar optimism. The IAEA's increasing efforts to combat terrorism and the decision by Member States to depart from nearly 20 years of zero real growth budgetary policy are remarkable testaments to the Agency's adaptability and credibility in the face of new threats. And with the worldwide frenzy over terrorism and redoubled phobia of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), the Agency garners public attention now as never before. Emblematic of this recent upsurge in political attention, US President George W. Bush's annual State of the Union address in 2003 mentioned supporting the IAEA as a specific priority of his administration, the first mention of the Agency in that speech since President Eisenhower in 1961 lauded its creation under 'Atoms for Peace'. Such visibility portends a future with prospects for overcoming bureaucratic inertia and effecting significant changes to the Agency's benefit. But with that visibility has come an uncertainty about the IAEA's role in world affairs. Despite being able to resolve most benign problems more easily, the Agency must operate in an environment haunted by the non-proliferation analogue of Charles Dickens' triumvirate specters: the ghosts of verification challenges past, present and future -namely, the cessation of UN-mandated inspections in Iraq, the difficulties ensuring compliance in North Korea and Iran, and the need to maintain the IAEA

  15. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This CD-ROM is attached to the booklet 'Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)'. It contains the background material with regard to ANENT in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentation material made by Member States, and meeting summaries during the period 2002-2005. Further information on the current ANENT activities and related IAEA activities is available at 'http://anent-iaea.org' and 'http://iaea.org/inisnkm'

  16. The IAEA Regional Training Course on Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Materials of the IAEA Regional Training Course contains 8 presented lectures. Authors deals with regulatory control of radiation sources. The next materials of the IAEA were presented: Organization and implementation of a national regulatory infrastructure governing protection against ionizing radiation and the safety of radiation sources. (IAEA-TECDOC-1067); Safety assessment plants for authorization and inspection of radiation sources (IAEA-TECDOC-1113); Regulatory authority information system RAIS, Version 2.0, Instruction manual

  17. Excerpts from the introductory statement. IAEA Board of Governors. Vienna, 20 March 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2000-01-01

    In his Introductory Statement at the IAEA Board of Governors, Vienna, 20 March 2000, the Director General of the IAEA focused on the following topics: the first Review Meeting of Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety, response to General Conference Resolutions, Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols, relations with DPRK and Iraq, Trilateral Initiative (IAEA, USA, Russian Federation) concerning the fissile material removed from nuclear weapon programmes, and IAEA's Programme and Budget for 2001

  18. The panel of experts

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    CHAIRMAN Ousmane Sy, Minister of territorial administration and local institutions (Republic of Mali) SCIENTIFIC COORDINATORS Jérôme Marie (Paris 10 University) Pierre Morand (IRD) Hamady N’Djim (Consulting engineer) MEMBERS Jean-François Bélières (Cirad) Cheik Cissé (Consulting legal expert) Lassine Diarra (IER-CRRA) Almoustapha Fofana (DNH) Pierrick Givone (Cemagref) Housseini Maïga (DNH) Mamadou Kabirou N’Diaye (IER) Didier Orange (IRD) Pierre Sibiri Traoré (Icrisat/IER)

  19. The naked experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, B.

    1982-01-01

    In an article critical of experts, the cases argued for and against nuclear power are discussed under the headings: environmental hazards arising from the nuclear fuel cycle; proliferation of nuclear weapons capabilities via expansion of the nuclear power industry; political and social threats and restraints of a nuclear society (terrorism, reduction in civil liberties, centralised political and economic power); economic and employment disadvantages of nuclear power; impact of uranium mining on (Australian) aboriginal culture; inadequacy of nuclear power as a solution to energy problems; advantages of a 'soft energy path' based around conservation and renewable energy technologies. (U.K.)

  20. Limitations of Expert Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Serpil Salaçin

    1997-01-01

    Limitations of Expert Evidence Edited by Stephen Leadbeatter MB ChB MCRPath ISBN 1 86016 029 8 Printed in Great Britain by Cathedral Print Services Ltd, Salisbury, 1996 Kitap 25 Ekim 1994 te The Royal College of Physicians ve The Royal College of Pathologists tarafından düzenlenen konferanstan sonra hekimlere ve avukatlara konuyu tartışmaya açmak için basılmış. Bilirkişi görüşünün temel filozofisinin, bu görevi yapanlar ve bu hizmeti alanların yapabileceklerin...

  1. Expert Oracle Exadata

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Throughout history, advances in technology have come in spurts. A single great idea can often spur rapid change as the idea takes hold and is propagated, often in totally unexpected directions. Exadata embodies such a change in how we think about and manage relational databases. The key change lies in the concept of offloading SQL processing to the storage layer. That concept is a huge win, and its implementation in the form of Exadata is truly a game changer. Expert Oracle Exadata will give you a look under the covers at how the combination of hardware and software that comprise Exadata actua

  2. The IAEA Transport Safety Appraisal Service (TranSAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicke, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Representatives of all Member States of the IAEA meet once a year in September at the General Conference in Vienna, Austria, to consider and approve the Agency's programme and budget and to address matters brought before it by the Board of Governors, the Director General, or Member States. In September 1998 the General Conference adopted resolution GC(42)/RES/13 on the Safety of Transport of Radioactive Materials. In adopting that resolution the General Conference recognized that compliance with regulations that take account of the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (the IAEA Transport Regulations) is providing a high level of safety during the transport of radioactive material. Good compliance requires that the regulations are implemented effectively. The General Conference therefore requested the IAEA Secretariat to provide a service for carrying out, at the request of any State, an appraisal of the implementation of the Transport Regulations by that State. In response to this request the Director General of the IAEA offered such an appraisal service to all States in letter J1.01.Circ, dated 10 December 1998. The first Transport Safety Appraisal Service (TranSAS) was undertaken and completed at the request of Slovenia in 1999. A report on the results of that appraisal was published and released for general distribution in the early fall of 1999. In each of the General Conferences since 1998, resolutions focused on transport safety have commended the Secretariat for establishing the TranSAS, commended those States that have requested the appraisal service and encouraged other States to avail themselves of this service see GC(43)/RES/11, GC(44)/RES/17, GC(45)/RES/10, GC(46)/RES/9 and GC(47)/RES/7. Six appraisals have been carried out to date as follows: Slovenia, Brazil, United Kingdom, Turkey, Panama and France. This presentation provides an overview of the Transport Safety Appraisal Service and summarizes the major findings from the

  3. The IAEA's Universal Instrument Token

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumann, I.; Wishard, B.; Morgan, K.; Christoph, B.; Schwier, A.; Frank, T.

    2015-01-01

    The IAEA currently seeks to improve the harmonization of security approaches across safeguards equipment. The protection of digital safeguards data is based on several principles: a) the signing of data in measurement devices using standard public/private-key-based signature generation, b) the storage of secret keys on certified, tamper-protected cryptographic devices, and c) well-established cryptographic algorithms and protocols based on global standards and internationally recognized cryptographic libraries. This paper discusses a cryptographic token, the Universal Instrument Token, which constitutes the core element of the architecture for signing safeguards data. This architecture supports the above principles and is compliant with the IAEA's information security policies and guidelines. An important side-condition is that the UIT must be implemented across a wide range of operating systems and hardware architectures, which mandates the use of open-source software for all software-related parts involved. The UIT is permanently connected to the measuring device (usually via the USB port) and requires complex hardware drivers and middleware components. Identifying open-source based, mature and ready-for-use smart card drivers and tools that are compatible with a range of operating systems was a major challenge. Reliable and well-established cryptographic libraries reside at the core of every information-security application. Different types of review software, typically software products used at IAEA headquarters in Vienna but occasionally also in the facilities, need to contain some specific software modules in order to verify the digital signatures attached to the data. Finally, also required are enrollment tools which generate private keys and certify their corresponding public counterparts using the IAEA's internal Certification Authority. In 2014, the roll-out of the UIT has raised the security of IAEA instrument data signing to a level which is

  4. Progress report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. P2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.; Schwerer, O.; Lammer, M.; Zerkin, V.

    2001-01-01

    The report summarises the work done in the field of nuclear data at the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA (Web: http://www-nds.iaea.org/, e-mail: services at iaeand.iaea.org) for the period 1 May 2000 - 30 April 2001. Data compilation activities are related to CINDA data collection. CINDA 2000 was published as a cumulative issue including literature published and data files compiled/updated between 1988 and 2000. After a working version of the EXFOR database updating program CSIMER was obtained and the dictionary maintenance programs DAN2X4 and MAKE B ACK were modified at NDS (to take care of last year's format change of the DANIEL dictionaries), a backlog in processing incoming TRANS files could be worked up and dictionary transmission 9077 was implemented and distributed in spring 2001 (following dictionary transmission 9076 of Summer 2000). New evaluated data libraries, files and data processing codes are advertised for distribution to the NDS customers. Some of these products were obtained through the network of co-operating centres, others comprise the results of the IAEA/NDS CRP projects. They include: IAEA Photonuclear Library; Charged-Particle Cross Section Database for Medical Radioisotope Production; FENDL/A in Pictures Presentation; PREPRO2000: 2000 ENDF/B Pre-processing Codes; Reference Neutron Activation Library (RNAL); POINT2000: A temperature Dependent ENDF/B-VI, Release 7 Cross Section Library. The EXFOR CD-ROM relational database under ACCESS-97 was finalized with a further improvement of the functionality, an acceleration of the data search, gathering statistics, simplification of the installation procedure of the plotting utility, CD-ROM Start up utility. An enhanced search facility on reaction products, including fission products specified only in data table, was developed (April 2001 EXFOR/Access version). The collaboration with other centres in the development of new approaches to the nuclear database management and data dissemination was

  5. Overview of IAEA safety standards and insights from regulatory review services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, L.

    2007-01-01

    regulatory policy issues review process creates a forum for the exchange of experience and lessons learned and identify potential solutions and methods that could be applied for solving the regulatory challenges. The regulatory policy issues will be identified after reviewing a broad spectrum of information including, but not limited to, insights resulting from convention activities, international conferences and forum and previous IAEA safety review services. The regulatory policy issues review will he further tailored to the host country's IRRS mission based on a review the host country's self-assessment and action plan. My second part is going to provide the workshop the insights from recent IRRS missions, to mare the good experience and practices among the participants. Openness and transparency in regulation is essential to encourage continuous improvement of performance and building public confidence. The international community promotes openness through several services. However, finding a proper balance between public availability of information and protection of confidential data remains a challenge. The IRRS missions provide a good opportunity for the member states and experts to discuss the important issues, to share the good practices among member states, to identify the possible improved ways for the regulatory authority in their regulatory system. (author)

  6. An Expert Map of Gambling Risk Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Michael; Blaszczynski, Alexander; Rhodes, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the moderating or mediating role played by risk perception in decision-making, gambling behaviour, and disordered gambling aetiology. Eleven gambling expert clinicians and researchers completed a semi-structured interview derived from mental models and grounded theory methodologies. Expert interview data was used to construct a comprehensive expert mental model 'map' detailing risk-perception related factors contributing to harmful or safe gambling. Systematic overlapping processes of data gathering and analysis were used to iteratively extend, saturate, test for exception, and verify concepts and emergent themes. Findings indicated that experts considered idiosyncratic beliefs among gamblers result in overall underestimates of risk and loss, insufficient prioritization of needs, and planning and implementation of risk management strategies. Additional contextual factors influencing use of risk information (reinforcement and learning; mental states, environmental cues, ambivalence; and socio-cultural and biological variables) acted to shape risk perceptions and increase vulnerabilities to harm or disordered gambling. It was concluded that understanding the nature, extent and processes by which risk perception predisposes an individual to maintain gambling despite adverse consequences can guide the content of preventative educational responsible gambling campaigns.

  7. Expert Systems and Special Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Alan M.; Ferrara, Joseph M.

    1986-01-01

    The article discusses the characteristics of expert systems (computer programs designed to replicate human expertise in a variety of areas), describes recently available expert system development tools, suggests applications within the field of special education, and reviews recent efforts to apply expert systems technology to special education…

  8. Darwin, Culture and Expert Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Romem, Yoram

    2010-01-01

    In summary, there is a close analogical relationship between Expert Systems fundamental processes and Darwinian evolution processes: Just as evolution reaches a stabilization phase only after a successful mutation survives the natural selection, so does the new knowledge of the expert become a habit and noticeable only after it has been successfully transmitted as rules in the Expert System26.

  9. Expert Systems - A Natural History

    OpenAIRE

    Shadbolt, N. R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the origins, current state and future prospects for expert systems. The origins are traced from the schism with classic Artificial Intelligence. The characteristics of early expert systems are described and contrasted with more recent developments. A number of influential forces operating on present day systems are reviewed. The future trends in the evolution of expert systems are discussed.

  10. Science serving people. IAEA-supported projects are helping countries apply the right tools to fight food, health, and water problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A new booklet 'Science Serving People' features stories about how IAEA-supported projects are making a difference in many poorer countries. The stories describe applications of nuclear science and technology that are being used through technical cooperation channels to overcome challenges of water scarcity, food shortage, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. They also illustrate how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fostering atoms for peace in the developing world. Extreme poverty and deprivation remain a problem of monumental proportions at the dawn of the 21st century, notes IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei in the booklet's Introduction. Through effective partnerships, collaborative research, and strategic direction, the IAEA is contributing to global efforts to help the poor. IAEA programmes have entered an important phase, he said, in which scientific contributions to Member States are yielding very sizeable human benefits. It's clear that science and technology must be better mobilized to meet the needs of the poor, emphasizes Jeffrey Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, USA, and Special Advisor to UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. The UN agencies, such as the IAEA, have a great role to play, he says in the booklet's Foreword. This is especially so, he points out, if they act as a bridge between the activities of advanced- country and developing country scientific centres, and if they help to harness the advances of world science for the poor as well as the rich. The bottom line, he concludes, is that rich countries should expand support for those United Nations organizations that can help in solving the unique problems confronting the world's poorest peoples. The booklet features stories on managing water resources, promoting food security, focusing science on health problems, new tools for environmental management, and strengthening nuclear

  11. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 12, no. 3(76). Jul-Aug 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA General Conference opens in Vienna 29 September, UN special session on environment and development, Safe storage of radiation sources, Implementation of IAEA Safeguards in 1996, IAEA/NEA review of 1996 performance assessment of US waste isolation pilot plant, and other short information

  12. IAEA Activities in the Area of Fast Reactors and Related Fuels and Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, S.; Basak, U.; Dyck, G.; Inozemtsev, V.; Toti, A.; Zeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: • The IAEA role to support fast reactors and associated fuel cycle development programmes; • Main IAEA activities on fast reactors and related fuel and fuel cycle technology; • Main IAEA deliverables on fast reactors and related fuel and fuel cycle technology

  13. Radiological consequences of Chernobyl accident: UN scientific committee on effects of atomic radiation confirms earlier IAEA assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document informs about a new report by the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) to the UN General Assembly containing an evaluation of the consequences of the 1986 Chernobyl accident, and which concludes that 'there is no evidence of a major public health impact attributable to radiation exposure fourteen years after the accident'. The conclusions of the UNSCEAR report are similar to those arrived at by the International Conference 'One Decade after Chernobyl: Summing up the Consequences of the Accident', organized by the IAEA in Vienna in 1996

  14. IAEA Director General observes NEA 50th anniversary, lauds five decades of NEA-IAEA 'nuclear partnership'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: No fewer than 50 countries have informed the IAEA that they are considering introducing nuclear power, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei today told a meeting marking the 50th anniversary of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD NEA) in Paris. ''When I spoke here 10 years ago as the NEA turned 40, nuclear power had stopped growing in Western Europe and North America. The outlook was uncertain in other parts of the world. Public perceptions were mainly negative. When we talked about transferring nuclear technology to developing countries, we generally meant applications in medicine and industry, not nuclear power. 'By contrast, at the IAEA General Conference in Vienna two weeks ago, so many of our Member States announced that they were considering the introduction of nuclear power that I stopped counting. Most of them were from the developing world. In the OECD, countries which used to talk about phasing out nuclear power seem to have changed their minds, while others are planning new reactors.' 'Change is definitely in the air,' he said. He also stated that much is to be done if nuclear power's future is to be 'safe, proliferation-resistant, and cost-effective.' And he called upon OECD member countries and 'nuclear newcomer' states to work responsibly together in the areas of nuclear safety and nuclear power. (IAEA)

  15. Hybrid expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoukalas, L.; Ikonomopoulos, A.; Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology that couples rule-based expert systems using fuzzy logic, to pre-trained artificial neutral networks (ANN) for the purpose of transient identification in Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In order to provide timely concise, and task-specific information about the may aspects of the transient and to determine the state of the system based on the interpretation of potentially noisy data a model-referenced approach is utilized. In it, the expert system performs the basic interpretation and processing of the model data, and pre-trained ANNs provide the model. having access to a set of neural networks that typify general categories of transients, the rule based system is able to perform identification functions. Membership functions - condensing information about a transient in a form convenient for a rule-based identification system characterizing a transient - are the output of neural computations. This allows the identification function to be performed with a speed comparable to or faster than that of the temporal evolution of the system. Simulator data form major secondary system pipe rupture is used to demonstrate the methodology. The results indicate excellent noise-tolerance for ANN's and suggest a new method for transient identification within the framework of Fuzzy Logic

  16. Demystifying the Expert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Anca; Feitosa, Klebert

    We present here a program that aims at significantly diminishing the increasingly pervasive fear of approaching scientific concepts, particularly for people without math related backgrounds or interests. We built a series of grassroots yet unique science shows delivered in an up-beat, visually, and socially appealing environment, that bring forward the crucially needed bridge between the realm of scientific research and that of ordinary people through... comedy. While staged by two physics professors as hosts, the hilarious interactions between a science expert and a student-led improvisational comedy troupe constitute the main tool to unlock, decipher, and enjoy the mystery of the scientific research. Our program gets everyone in with lots of laughs, at no expense to academic quality, community involvement, diversity, excellence, integrity, and student focus. Our independent dedicated website for this project (sites.jmu.edu/demystifying), archives the podcasts (soundcloud.com/demystifying), short segment videos, blog posts, experts' bios, photo albums, testimonials, press releases, along with quantitative results of our assessment efforts. The overarching goal of this program is to pioneer a low cost yet efficient method of science education that can be replicated world wide.

  17. Confessions and expert testimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Kenneth J

    2003-01-01

    In this clinical paper, the author discusses criminal confessions from the point of view of the expert witness who may be asked to comment on the reliability of the statement and waiver of rights. From the time a suspect is in police custody, constitutional protections against self-incrimination and for due process are in place. The Supreme Court set the standard for these situations in the 1966 Miranda v. Arizona decision. Although it has long been criticized by law enforcement, the decision was upheld in the 2000 decision in Dickerson v. U.S. For a waiver of rights to be valid, it must be a knowing, intelligent, and voluntary decision. Voluntariness is an equation of objective and subjective variables. Treatment by police, physical conditions of interrogation, the suspect's experience and mental state can alter the reliability of a confession. Accordingly, the author has devised a mnemonic for the recognition of conditions that may give rise to expert testimony. The conditions are: Mental illness, Intoxication, Retardation, Acquiescence, Narcotic withdrawal, Deception, and Abuse. These are discussed, supported by examples from the author's practice.

  18. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Asia and the Pacific. Workshop on training nuclear laboratory technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeed, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    The workshop was held to exchange information on existing facilities and programmes in Asia and the Pacific for training nuclear laboratory technicians, to identify future training needs and to assess the need for IAEA's involvement in this field. As the participants outlined the requirements for nuclear laboratory technician training and the facilities available in their respective countries, it became evident that, in addition to the training of radioisotope laboratory technicians, they also wished to review the need for technician training for the operation of nuclear power plants and industrial application of atomic energy. The terms of reference of the workshop were extended accordingly. The opening address by Chang Suk Lee, the Korean Vice Minister of Science and Technology, noted the valuable contribution to quality control and other industrial uses that nuclear techniques have made in his country. He also reviewed the application of nuclear techniques in Korean agriculture and medicine. The participants explored various forms of co-operation that could be established between countries of the region. Exchange programmes, not only for students but also for expert teachers, and the exchange or loan of equipment were suggested. It was felt that some generalized training courses could be organized on a regional basis, and two countries advocated the setting up of a regional training centre. One suggestion was to arrange regional training courses in special fields that would move from one country to another. The need was felt for periodic regional meetings on training methods, course content and other questions relating to training of laboratory technicians. The IAEA was requested to act as a clearinghouse for information on available training facilities in the region and to advise on the curricula for technician training courses. The Agency was also asked to organize short courses for the training of instructors of technicians in the various fields of atomic

  19. Nuclear Installation Safety: General Observations and Trends from IAEA Peer Reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzentkowski, G.

    2016-01-01

    The Safety Review Services (SRSs) for nuclear installations address the needs of Member States at all stages of installations’ lifecycle. SRSs are based on the IAEA Safety Standards and are provided on Member States’ request to peer review national regulatory frameworks and safety provisions for nuclear installations. They result in recommendations and suggestions to improve national regulations and operational safety, and serve to exert peer pressure to ensure that that every Member State with nuclear installations recognizes its safety responsibility and the need to comply with the IAEA Safety Standards. This presentation provides an overview of SRSs for Nuclear Installations, including their structure and main subject areas. The presentation also summarizes general findings and trends which clearly demonstrate that there is continuous improvement in regulation of nuclear installations and in safety of their operation. Nevertheless, there is the need to further enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of SRSs through review of the overall governance model and service delivery to better serve the needs of Member States. The presentation points out some areas of improvements which have already been implemented or are being considered for implementation. Just as important, SRSs are conducted by teams of experts from around the world to strengthening international cooperation, ensure diversity and impartiality, and improve the overall quality of the safety review being conducted. The review team members are also provided with the opportunity for mutual learning and sharing good practices among themselves and with the Member State undergoing the review. As a result, SRAs play an important role in a quest to harmonize regulatory requirements and approaches globally. (author)

  20. Ministers at IAEA Conference Call for Stronger Nuclear Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Despite substantial progress in strengthening nuclear security in recent years, more needs to be done worldwide to defend against the threat of nuclear terrorism and other malicious acts involving nuclear or radiological material, a Ministerial Declaration at the IAEA's International Conference on Nuclear Security: Enhancing Global Efforts stated today. More than 1 300 participants at the Conference, which is open to all 159 IAEA Member States, will analyse past and current efforts and consider how future challenges can best be met to ensure effective and sustainable nuclear security worldwide. The Conference, which started in Vienna today and ends on Friday, includes representatives from 123 countries and 21 governmental and non-governmental organizations. The Ministerial Declaration, adopted at a plenary session attended by 34 government ministers and other Heads of Delegation including the Conference President, Hungarian Foreign Affairs Minister Janos Martonyi, says they ''remain concerned about the threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism and of other malicious acts or sabotage related to facilities and activities involving nuclear and other radioactive material.'' The Declaration - the first of its kind for nuclear security - notes that all States are responsible for their own nuclear security, but that international cooperation is important in supporting States' efforts to fulfil their responsibilities. It affirms the central role of the IAEA in strengthening nuclear security globally, and leading coordination of international activities in this field. ''We encourage all States to maintain highly effective nuclear security, including physical protection, for all nuclear and other radioactive material, their transport, use and storage and their associated facilities, as well as protecting sensitive information and maintaining the necessary nuclear security systems and measures to assess and manage their nuclear security effectively,'' the