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Sample records for experiments probe relevant

  1. Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser Probe of Chemical Dynamics of Aerospace Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 09/12/12 01/15/09-11/30/11 VACUUM ULTRAVIOLET LASER PROBES OF CHEMICAL DYNAMICS PF...is to be limited. Standard Form 298 Back (Rev. 8/98) FINAL AFOSR REPORT (Dec. 1, 2008-Nov. 30, 2011) I. Grant Title: Vacuum Ultraviolet ...goal of this research program is to provide pertinent information about the energetics, photochemistry , and chemical dynamics of spacecraft effluents

  2. Experiments with positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, R.; Kamps, J.; Li, R.; Hiemstra, D.

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using Dirichlet smoothing

  3. Probing noncommutative theories with quantum optical experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Dey

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the major difficulties of modern science underlies at the unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics. Different approaches towards such theory have been proposed. Noncommutative theories serve as the root of almost all such approaches. However, the identification of the appropriate passage to quantum gravity is suffering from the inadequacy of experimental techniques. It is beyond our ability to test the effects of quantum gravity thorough the available scattering experiments, as it is unattainable to probe such high energy scale at which the effects of quantum gravity appear. Here we propose an elegant alternative scheme to test such theories by detecting the deformations emerging from the noncommutative structures. Our protocol relies on the novelty of an opto-mechanical experimental setup where the information of the noncommutative oscillator is exchanged via the interaction with an optical pulse inside an optical cavity. We also demonstrate that our proposal is within the reach of current technology and, thus, it could uncover a feasible route towards the realization of quantum gravitational phenomena thorough a simple table-top experiment.

  4. Two-probe STM experiments at the atomic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmer, Marek; Olszowski, Piotr; Zuzak, Rafal; Godlewski, Szymon; Joachim, Christian; Szymonski, Marek

    2017-11-08

    Direct characterization of planar atomic or molecular scale devices and circuits on a supporting surface by multi-probe measurements requires unprecedented stability of single atom contacts and manipulation of scanning probes over large, nanometer scale area with atomic precision. In this work, we describe the full methodology behind atomically defined two-probe scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments performed on a model system: dangling bond dimer wire supported on a hydrogenated germanium (0 0 1) surface. We show that 70 nm long atomic wire can be simultaneously approached by two independent STM scanners with exact probe to probe distance reaching down to 30 nm. This allows direct wire characterization by two-probe I-V characteristics at distances below 50 nm. Our technical results presented in this work open a new area for multi-probe research, which can be now performed with precision so far accessible only by single-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM) experiments.

  5. Two-probe STM experiments at the atomic level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmer, Marek; Olszowski, Piotr; Zuzak, Rafal; Godlewski, Szymon; Joachim, Christian; Szymonski, Marek

    2017-11-01

    Direct characterization of planar atomic or molecular scale devices and circuits on a supporting surface by multi-probe measurements requires unprecedented stability of single atom contacts and manipulation of scanning probes over large, nanometer scale area with atomic precision. In this work, we describe the full methodology behind atomically defined two-probe scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments performed on a model system: dangling bond dimer wire supported on a hydrogenated germanium (0 0 1) surface. We show that 70 nm long atomic wire can be simultaneously approached by two independent STM scanners with exact probe to probe distance reaching down to 30 nm. This allows direct wire characterization by two-probe I-V characteristics at distances below 50 nm. Our technical results presented in this work open a new area for multi-probe research, which can be now performed with precision so far accessible only by single-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM) experiments.

  6. Performing probe experiments in the SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, L-M; Chen, Q; Liang, X L; Gao, S; Wang, J Y; Kleindiek, S; Tai, S W

    2004-01-01

    A four nanoprobe system has been installed inside a FEI XL30 F scanning electron microscope (SEM), and shown to be fully compatible with the normal functions of the SEM and also a Gatan cold stage (model C1003, -185-400 degrees C). With some selected examples of applications, we have shown that this nanoprobe system may be used effectively for gripping, moving and manipulating nanoobjects, e.g. carbon nanotubes, setting up electric contacts for electronic measurements, tailoring the structure of the nanoobject by cutting, etc. and even for making unexpected nanostructures, e.g. a nanohook. Applications in other areas have also been speculated, limitations or disadvantages of the current design of the probe system were discussed, and methods for possible improvement were suggested.

  7. Gravitational redshift space-probe experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Levine, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    A Scout D rocket was launched from Wallops Island, Virginia, carrying an atomic hydrogen maser oscillator system as the payload. The frequency of signals from the oscillator was monitored on the ground at Merritt Island, Florida, by using two hydrogen masers as comparison oscillators. The first-order Doppler shift in the signals was eliminated by a go-return transponder link to the payload, and the resulting data, representing the relativistic shifts, were recovered and recorded. The objective was to measure directly the effect of gravitational potential on the frequency of an atomic hydrogen maser assuming it to be a 'proper' clock. A gravitational effect amounting to some 4.5 parts in 10 to the 10th power was measured with an oscillator having a stability better than 1 part in 10 to the 14th power. Therefore, to make the best possible use of the oscillator, all frequency shifts at the 2 to 5 X 10 to the -15 power level in delta f/f in the system must be accounted for. This includes all the phase variations that can cause such a shift to appear. The experiment, the data available and the manner in which they were processed, and the results are described.

  8. A Simple Refraction Experiment for Probing Diffusion in Ternary Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Cecil A.; Mankidy, Bijith D.; Gupta, Vinay K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion is a fundamental phenomenon that is vital in many chemical processes such as mass transport in living cells, corrosion, and separations. We describe a simple undergraduate-level experiment based on Weiner's Method to probe diffusion in a ternary aqueous mixture of small molecular-weight molecules. As an illustration, the experiment…

  9. Culturally Relevant Management Education: Insights from Experience in Nunavut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wihak, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The author's experience with a Nunavut business management education program illustrates how to develop culturally relevant organizational behavior curriculum. The process initially involved interviews with Inuit Elders about culturally appropriate responses to scenarios of cultural conflicts in the workplace identified by Inuit managers. The…

  10. Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Kim, C. K.; Stokes, M.; Ho, G.; Cooper, S.; Ukhorskiy, A.; Manweiler, J. W.; Jaskulek, S.; Haggerty, D. K.; Brandt, P.; Sitnov, M.; Keika, K.; Hayes, J. R.; Brown, L. E.; Gurnee, R. S.; Hutcheson, J. C.; Nelson, K. S.; Paschalidis, N.; Rossano, E.; Kerem, S.

    2013-11-01

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) on the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft is the magnetosphere ring current instrument that will provide data for answering the three over-arching questions for the Van Allen Probes Program: RBSPICE will determine "how space weather creates the storm-time ring current around Earth, how that ring current supplies and supports the creation of the radiation belt populations," and how the ring current is involved in radiation belt losses. RBSPICE is a time-of-flight versus total energy instrument that measures ions over the energy range from ˜20 keV to ˜1 MeV. RBSPICE will also measure electrons over the energy range ˜25 keV to ˜1 MeV in order to provide instrument background information in the radiation belts. A description of the instrument and its data products are provided in this chapter.

  11. Metrics for rapid quality control in RNA structure probing experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Krishna; Shih, Nathan P; Deng, Fei; Ledda, Mirko; Li, Bo; Aviran, Sharon

    2016-12-01

    The diverse functionalities of RNA can be attributed to its capacity to form complex and varied structures. The recent proliferation of new structure probing techniques coupled with high-throughput sequencing has helped RNA studies expand in both scope and depth. Despite differences in techniques, most experiments face similar challenges in reproducibility due to the stochastic nature of chemical probing and sequencing. As these protocols expand to transcriptome-wide studies, quality control becomes a more daunting task. General and efficient methodologies are needed to quantify variability and quality in the wide range of current and emerging structure probing experiments. We develop metrics to rapidly and quantitatively evaluate data quality from structure probing experiments, demonstrating their efficacy on both small synthetic libraries and transcriptome-wide datasets. We use a signal-to-noise ratio concept to evaluate replicate agreement, which has the capacity to identify high-quality data. We also consider and compare two methods to assess variability inherent in probing experiments, which we then utilize to evaluate the coverage adjustments needed to meet desired quality. The developed metrics and tools will be useful in summarizing large-scale datasets and will help standardize quality control in the field. The data and methods used in this article are freely available at: http://bme.ucdavis.edu/aviranlab/SPEQC_software CONTACT: saviran@ucdavis.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Probing polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallo, Dario, E-mail: Dario.cavallo@unige.it [University of Genoa, Dept. of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genoa (Italy); Portale, Giuseppe [ESRF, Dubble CRG, Netherlands Organization of Scientific Research (NWO), 38043 Grenoble (France); Androsch, René [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Center of Engineering Sciences, D-06099 Halle/S. (Germany)

    2015-12-17

    Processing of polymeric materials to produce any kind of goods, from films to complex objects, involves application of flow fields on the polymer melt, accompanied or followed by its rapid cooling. Typically, polymers solidify at cooling rates which span over a wide range, from a few to hundreds of °C/s. A novel method to probe polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates is proposed. Using a custom-built quenching device, thin polymer films are ballistically cooled from the melt at rates between approximately 10 and 200 °C/s. Thanks to highly brilliant synchrotron radiation and to state-of-the-art X-ray detectors, the crystallization process is followed in real-time, recording about 20 wide angle X-ray diffraction patterns per second while monitoring the instantaneous sample temperature. The method is applied to a series of industrially relevant polymers, such as isotactic polypropylene, its copolymers and virgin and nucleated polyamide-6. Their crystallization behaviour during rapid cooling is discussed, with particular attention to the occurrence of polymorphism, which deeply impact material’s properties.

  13. THE COMPLEX OF EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCES, RELEVANT MANIFESTATIONS OF INSPIRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel A. Starikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to investigate structure of emotional experiences, relevant manifestations of inspiration creative activities of students.Methods. The proposed methods of mathematical statistics (correlation analysis, factor analysis, multidimensional scaling are applied.Results and scientific novelty. The use of factor analysis, multidimensional scaling allowed to reveal a consistent set of positive experiences of the students, the relevant experience of inspiration in creative activities. «Operational» rueful feelings dedicated by M. Chiksentmihaji («feeling of full involvement, and dilution in what you do», «feeling of concentration, perfect clarity of purpose, complete control and a feeling of total immersion in a job that does not require special efforts» and experiences of the «spiritual» nature, more appropriate to peaks experiences of A. Maslow («feeling of love for all existing, all life»; «a deep sense of self importance, the inner feeling of approval of self»; «feeling of unity with the whole world»; «acute perception of the beauty of the world of nature, “beautiful instant”»; «feeling of lightness, flowing» are included in this complex in accordance with the study results. The interrelation of degree of expressiveness of the given complex of experiences with inspiration experience is considered.Practical significance. The results of the study show structure of emotional experiences, relevant manifestations of inspiration. Research materials can be useful both to psychologists, and experts in the field of pedagogy of creative activity.

  14. Probing the bioactivity-relevant chemical space of robust reactions and common molecular building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenfeller, Markus; Eberle, Martin; Meier, Peter; Nieto-Oberhuber, Cristina; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Schneider, Gisbert; Jacoby, Edgar; Renner, Steffen

    2012-05-25

    In the search for new bioactive compounds, there is a trend toward increasingly complex compound libraries aiming to target the demanding targets of the future. In contrast, medicinal chemistry and traditional library design rely mainly on a small set of highly established and robust reactions. Here, we probe a set of 58 such reactions for their ability to sample the chemical space of known bioactive molecules, and the potential to create new scaffolds. Combined with ~26,000 common available building blocks, the reactions retrieve around 9% of a scaffold-diverse set of compounds active on human target proteins covering all major pharmaceutical target classes. Almost 80% of generated scaffolds from virtual one-step synthesis products are not present in a large set of known bioactive molecules for human targets, indicating potential for new discoveries. The results suggest that established synthesis resources are well suited to cover the known bioactivity-relevant chemical space and that there are plenty of unexplored regions accessible by these reactions, possibly providing valuable "low-hanging fruit" for hit discovery.

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy of roGFP2-based redox probes responding to various physiologically relevant oxidant species in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Müller

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article contains representative fluorescence excitation spectra of roGFP2-based probes used for ratiometric analysis of redox changes as presented in the article "Systematic in vitro assessment of responses of roGFP2-based probes to physiologically relevant oxidant species" [1]. The recombinant probes roGFP2, roGFP2-Orp1, and Grx1-roGFP2 were exposed to various oxidative and nitrosative species, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, aldrithiol-2 (AT-2, glutathione disulfide (GSSG, hypochlorous acid (HOCl, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, peroxynitrite (ONOO−, potassium polysulfide (K2Sx, spermine NONOate (SperNO, and diethyl amino NONOate (DeaNO at different molar ratios. Fluorescence excitation spectra of the probes were recorded in the excitation wavelength range between 350 and 500 nm and for a total of 60 min. Analysis and interpretation of the data is presented in an associated article [1].

  16. FIRST experiment: Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, C.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Balestra, F.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Bohlen, T. T.; Bondì, M.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Carbone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Finck, C.; Foti, A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Lavagno, A.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in different fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, has been designed for the measurement of different ions fragmentation cross sections at different energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The experiment is performed by an international collaboration made of institutions from Germany, France, Italy and Spain. The experimental apparatus is partly based on an already existing setup made of the ALADIN magnet, the MUSIC IV TPC, the LAND2 neutron detector and the TOFWALL scintillator TOF system, integrated with newly designed detectors in the interaction Region (IR) around the carbon removable target: a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger for detection of light fragments emitted at large angles (KENTROS). The scientific program of the FIRST experiment started on summer 2011 with the study of the 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8mm) carbon target.

  17. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glownia, James; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Cryan, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Andreasson, J.; /Uppsala U.; Belkacem, A.; /LBNL, Berkeley; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U.; Blaga, C.L.; /Ohio State U.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; /SLAC; DiMauro, L.F.; /Ohio State U.; Fang, L.; /Western Michigan U.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Gessner, O.; /LBNL; Guhr, M.; /SLAC; Hajdu, J.; /Uppsala U.; Hertlein, M.P.; /LBNL; Hoener, M.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; /LBNL; Marangos, J.P.; /Imperial Coll., London; March, A.M.; /Argonne; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  18. Progress of LMJ-relevant implosions experiments on OMEGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casner A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In preparation of the first ignition attempts on the Laser Mégajoule (LMJ, an experimental program is being pursued on OMEGA to investigate LMJ-relevant hohlraums. First, radiation temperature levels close to 300 eV were recently achieved in reduced-scale hohlraums with modest backscatter losses. Regarding the baseline target design for fusion experiments on LMJ, an extensive experimental database has also been collected for scaled implosions experiments in both empty and gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums. We acquired a full picture of hohlraum energetics and implosion dynamics. Not only did the rugby hohlraums show significantly higher x-ray drive energy over the cylindrical hohlraums, but symmetry control by power balance was demonstrated, as well as high-performance D2 implosions enabling the use of a complete suite of neutrons diagnostics. Charged particle diagnostics provide complementary insights into the physics of these x-ray driven implosions. An overview of these results demonstrates our ability to control the key parameters driving the implosion, lending more confidence in extrapolations to ignition-scale targets.

  19. Weightless experiments to probe universality of fluid critical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoutre, C; Guillaument, R; Marre, S; Garrabos, Y; Beysens, D; Hahn, I

    2015-06-01

    Near the critical point of fluids, critical opalescence results in light attenuation, or turbidity increase, that can be used to probe the universality of critical behavior. Turbidity measurements in SF6 under weightlessness conditions on board the International Space Station are performed to appraise such behavior in terms of both temperature and density distances from the critical point. Data are obtained in a temperature range, far (1 K) from and extremely close (a few μK) to the phase transition, unattainable from previous experiments on Earth. Data are analyzed with renormalization-group matching classical-to-critical crossover models of the universal equation of state. It results that the data in the unexplored region, which is a minute deviant from the critical density value, still show adverse effects for testing the true asymptotic nature of the critical point phenomena.

  20. Weightless experiments to probe universality of fluid critical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoutre, C.; Guillaument, R.; Marre, S.; Garrabos, Y.; Beysens, D.; Hahn, I.

    2015-06-01

    Near the critical point of fluids, critical opalescence results in light attenuation, or turbidity increase, that can be used to probe the universality of critical behavior. Turbidity measurements in SF6 under weightlessness conditions on board the International Space Station are performed to appraise such behavior in terms of both temperature and density distances from the critical point. Data are obtained in a temperature range, far (1 K) from and extremely close (a few μ K ) to the phase transition, unattainable from previous experiments on Earth. Data are analyzed with renormalization-group matching classical-to-critical crossover models of the universal equation of state. It results that the data in the unexplored region, which is a minute deviant from the critical density value, still show adverse effects for testing the true asymptotic nature of the critical point phenomena.

  1. Highly Reducing Partitioning Experiments Relevant to the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Rick, II; Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Danielson, Lisa R.

    2017-01-01

    's surface by MESSENGER (K, Na, Fe, Ti, Cl, Al, Cr, Mn, U, Th) and other geochemically relevant elements (P, F, H, N, C, Co, Ni, Mo, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Yb) are added to the starting composition at trace abundances (approximately 500 ppm) so that they are close enough to infinite dilution to follow Henry's law of trace elements, and their partitioning behavior can be measured between the metal, silicate, and sulfide phases. The results of these experiments will allow us to assess the thermal and magmatic evolution of the planet Mercury from a geochemical standpoint.

  2. Electric Field Double Probe Measurements for Ionospheric Space Plasma Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.

    1999-01-01

    Double probes represent a well-proven technique for gathering high quality DC and AC electric field measurements in a variety of space plasma regimes including the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and mesosphere. Such experiments have been successfully flown on a variety of spacecraft including sounding rockets and satellites. Typical instrument designs involve a series of trades, depending on the science objectives, type of platform (e.g., spinning or 3-axis stabilized), expected plasma regime where the measurements will be made, available telemetry, budget, etc. In general, ionospheric DC electric field instruments that achieve accuracies of 0.1 mV/m or better, place spherical sensors at large distances (10m or more) from the spacecraft body in order to extend well beyond the spacecraft wake and sheath and to achieve large signal-to-noise ratios for DC and long wavelength measurements. Additional sets of sensors inboard of the primary, outermost sensors provide useful additional information, both for diagnostics of the plasma contact potentials, which particularly enhance the DC electric field measurements on non-spinning spacecraft, and for wavelength and phase velocity measurements that use the spaced receiver or "interferometer" technique. Accurate attitude knowledge enables B times V contributions to be subtracted from the measured potentials, and permits the measured components to be rotated into meaningful geophysical reference frames. We review the measurement technique for both DC and wave electric field measurements in the ionosphere discussing recent advances involving high resolution burst memories, multiple baseline double probes, new sensor surface materials, biasing techniques, and other considerations.

  3. Probing antimatter gravity – The AEGIS experiment at CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellerbauer A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The weak equivalence principle states that the motion of a body in a gravitational field is independent of its structure or composition. This postulate of general relativity has been tested to very high precision with ordinary matter, but no relevant experimental verification with antimatter has ever been carried out. The AEGIS experiment will measure the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen to ultimately 1% precision. For this purpose, a pulsed horizontal antihydrogen beam with a velocity of several 100 m s−1 will be produced. Its vertical deflection due to gravity will be detected by a setup consisting of material gratings coupled with a position-sensitive detector, operating as a moiré deflectometer or an atom interferometer. The AEGIS experiment is installed at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator, currently the only facility in the world which produces copious amounts of low-energy antiprotons. The construction of the setup has been going on since 2010 and is nearing completion. A proof-of-principle experiment with antiprotons has demonstrated that the deflection of antiparticles by a few μm due to an external force can be detected. Technological and scientific development pertaining to specific challenges of the experiment, such as antihydrogen formation by positronium charge exchange or the position-sensitive detection of antihydrogen annihilations, is ongoing.

  4. Attentional bias modification based on visual probe task: methodological issues, results and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Lopes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Attentional bias, the tendency that a person has to drive or maintain attention to a specific class of stimuli, may play an important role in the etiology and persistence of mental disorders. Attentional bias modification has been studied as a form of additional treatment related to automatic processing. Objectives: This systematic literature review compared and discussed methods, evidence of success and potential clinical applications of studies about attentional bias modification (ABM using a visual probe task. Methods: The Web of Knowledge, PubMed and PsycInfo were searched using the keywords attentional bias modification, attentional bias manipulation and attentional bias training. We selected empirical studies about ABM training using a visual probe task written in English and published between 2002 and 2014. Results: Fifty-seven studies met inclusion criteria. Most (78% succeeded in training attention in the predicted direction, and in 71% results were generalized to other measures correlated with the symptoms. Conclusions: ABM has potential clinical utility, but to standardize methods and maximize applicability, future studies should include clinical samples and be based on findings of studies about its effectiveness.

  5. Fire analysis. Relevant aspects from Spanish nuclear power plants experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Pedro; Villar, Tomas [Empresarios Agrupados A.I.E., Madrid (Spain). Nuclear Safety Dept.

    2015-12-15

    Empresarios Agrupados A.I.E. leads the development and updating of fire analysis for the Spanish NPP's. Some of them decided to voluntarily adopt standard NFPA-805 as an alternative to the current fire protection rules. Fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methodologies have been continuously evolving during recent years. This paper will briefly present experience gained in relationship with some relevant aspects of fire risk analysis. Associated circuits need to be evaluated to determine if cable faults can prevent or cause the maloperation of redundant safety related systems. If a circuit is not properly protected by an isolation device, fire damage to a cable could propagate to other safe shutdown cables. In order to check that the coordination is adequate, existing electrical protections coordination studies have been analyzed and, for some plants, additional analyses have been performed for DC and AC for instrumentation an control (I and C) systems. Spurious actuations are also a basic part of the analysis of the consequence of a fire, which should consider any possible actuation that can prevent or affect the performance of a system or safety function. In this context, it was furthermore necessary to take into account the possibility of a combination of several spurious actuations that can result in a specific consequence, according to Appendix G of NEI 00-01 Rev. 2. These are the so-called Multiple Spurious Operations (MSOs). One key element in fire analysis is the availability of validated fire models used to estimate the spread of fire and the failure time of cable raceways. NFPA 805 states that fire models shall only be applied within the limitations of the given model. The applicability of the validation results is determined using normalized parameters traditionally used in fire modeling applications. Normalized parameters assessed in NUREG-1934 may be used to compare NPP fire scenarios with validation experiments. If some of the parameters do

  6. Designing assisted living technologies ‘in the wild’: preliminary experiences with cultural probe methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wherton Joseph

    2012-12-01

    , limited emotional or psychological resources, life events, and acute illness. Discussions between researchers and participants about the materials collected (and sometimes about what had prevented them completing the tasks helped elicit further information relevant to assisted living technology design. The probe materials were particularly helpful when having conversations with non-English speaking participants through an interpreter. Conclusions Cultural probe methods can help build a rich picture of the lives and experiences of older people to facilitate the co-production of assisted living technologies. But their application may be constrained by the participant’s physical, mental and emotional capacity. They are most effective when used as a tool to facilitate communication and development of a deeper understanding of older people’s needs.

  7. GALILEO PROBE DOPPLER WIND EXPERIMENT DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A total of seven data sets are used to derive the wind profile. These include two trajectory data files (probe and orbiter), three frequency data files including the...

  8. Aiming for User Experience in Information Retrieval: Towards User-Centered Relevance (USR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Frans; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; van den Broek, Egon; Chen, Hsin-Hsi; Efthimiadis, Efthimis N.; Savoy, Jacques; Crestani, Fabio; Marchand-Maillet, Stephane

    2010-01-01

    As widely recognized, there is more to relevance than topicality. By looking at the user experience of Information Retrieval (IR), this proposal takes a broader perspective on relevance. Several facets of relevance are structured according to how the user will experience an information object. In

  9. Academic Library Department Experience Fosters the Development of Leadership Skills Relevant to Academic Library Directorship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joanne M. Muellenbach

    2017-01-01

    A Review of: Harris-Keith, Colleen S. (2015). The Relationship Between Academic Library Department Experience and Perceptions of Leadership Skill Development Relevant to Academic Library Directorship...

  10. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Modules for Probing Gold Nanoparticle Interfacial Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunanayake, Akila G.; Gunatilake, Sameera R.; Ameer, Fathima S.; Gadogbe, Manuel; Smith, Laura; Mlsna, Deb; Zhang, Dongmao

    2015-01-01

    Three gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) undergraduate experiment modules that are focused on nanoparticles interfacial phenomena have been developed. Modules 1 and 2 explore the synthesis and characterization of AuNPs of different sizes but with the same total gold mass. These experiments enable students to determine how particle size affects the AuNP…

  11. Synthesis and Binding Ability of Molecular Probes Based on a Phenanthroline Derivative: Theory and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefang Shang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescent and colorimetric molecular probe containing phenol groups has been designed and synthesized. The anion binding ability was evaluated for biolgically important anions (F−, Cl−, Br−, I−, AcO− and H2PO4− by theoretical investigation, UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy and 1H-NMR titration experiments. Results indicated the probe showed strong binding ability for H2PO4− without the interference of other anions tested and the interaction process was accompanied by color changes. Theoretical investigation analysis revealed that intramolecular hydrogen bonds existed in the structure of the probe and the roles of molecular frontier orbitals in molecular interplay were determined.

  12. Synthesis and binding ability of molecular probes based on a phenanthroline derivative: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xuefang; Wang, Yingling; Wei, Xiaofang; Fu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Jinlian; Xu, Xiufang

    2013-12-03

    A fluorescent and colorimetric molecular probe containing phenol groups has been designed and synthesized. The anion binding ability was evaluated for biolgically important anions (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, AcO- and H2PO4-) by theoretical investigation, UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy and 1H-NMR titration experiments. Results indicated the probe showed strong binding ability for H2PO4- without the interference of other anions tested and the interaction process was accompanied by color changes. Theoretical investigation analysis revealed that intramolecular hydrogen bonds existed in the structure of the probe and the roles of molecular frontier orbitals in molecular interplay were determined.

  13. PIENU experiment at TRIUMF: A sensitive probe of new physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, A.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; von Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, N.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S.; Kuno, Y.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R.; Numao, T.; Sandorfi, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.; Yoshida, Y.

    2013-10-01

    A TRIUMF experiment, PIENU, which aims to measure the branching ratio of pion decays, R = Γ(π→eν+eνγ)/Γ(π→μν+μνγ) to a precision of 0.1% or better is described. Such a measurement provides the best test of electron-muon universality in weak interactions and is sensitive to an effective mass scale of up to 1000 TeV in new physics.

  14. Electron beam sounding rocket experiments for probing the distant magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzek, R. J.; Winckler, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Electron accelerators on sounding rockets have injected 8-40-keV electrons on closed magnetospheric tail field lines near 250 km altitude in the northern auroral zone. These beams mirrored at the southern conjugate point ad returned as 'echoes' which were detected on the rocket system. The 20 percent of the beam that returned was sufficient to measure field line lengths and verify magnetospheric magnetic models, to measure fluctuating electric fields, and electron pitch angle scattering (6-10) R(E) distant, and to identify 10-100 V field-aligned potentials above the rocket. The experiment gives new insight into the motion of natural electrons in the outer Van Allen radiation belt.

  15. Pump-probe SAXS experiments on ultrafast demagnetization of magnetic multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfau, B.; Schaffert, S.; Mohanty, J.; Geilhufe, J.; Flewett, S.; Eisebitt, S. [IOAP, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Buettner, F. [IOAP, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Mueller, L.; Gutt, C.; Al-Shemmary, A.; Duesterer, S.; Redlin, H.; Gruebel, G. [HASYLAB, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Vodungbo, B. [ENSTA ParisTech, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Luening, J. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Stickler, D.; Froemter, R.; Oepen, H.P. [Universitaet Hamburg (Germany); Schlotter, W.F. [LCLS, SLAC, Menlo Park (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We have investigated the ultrafast optical demagnetization of domain patterns in magnetic multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in an infrared-pump x-ray-probe experiment. As a probe we used small angle x-ray scattering which, via x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co M-edge, allows us to simultaneously obtain information on the magnitude of the local magnetization and the characteristic length scale of the magnetic domains. The free-electron laser source FLASH at Hamburg was tuned to deliver {lambda}=20.9nm x-ray pulses of approx. 25 fs duration which were synchronized to an infrared fs laser for pump-probe experiments with sub-ps time resolution. In addition to ultrafast demagnetization, we observe sub-ps structural changes of the magnetic domain configuration. Models to explain this ultrafast structural change will be discussed.

  16. Adsorption of Arsenate Anions and Divalent Cations as a Probe for Surface Reactivity of Environmentally-Relevant Birnessite Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivos-Suarez, A. I.; Villalobos, M.

    2007-05-01

    Layer-type Mn oxides of the birnessite family are widespread minerals in natural aqueous environments that may be found in the nanometer size range, as individual particles, or in diverse aggregated forms or films. They are believed to be originally formed by microbial catalysis and are extremely reactive towards cation adsorption. In particular, certain heavy metals preferentially bind to these Mn oxides versus to other natural metal oxides. These metals include lead, zinc, and cobalt cations, among others. This high affinity is due to the presence of both highly-negatively charged cation vacant sites within the Mn oxide layer structure and to unsatisfied oxigen bonds at the crystal surfaces. Both types of sites contribute approximately equivalently to total cation adsorption, but as specific surface area increases above values of 40 m2/g (i.e., particle size decreases correspondingly), the contribution of the latter type of sites is presumed to be predominant. The magnitude of the charge on both types of sites is also presumed to be pH dependent, and thus variable, mostly of negative nature, and thus explaining its high affinity towards cations. However, several literature reports exist on the binding of anions such as arsenate, phosphate, and borate, by birnessite-type Mn oxides. The present work investigates the chemical conditions upon which binding of anions occurs in layer-type Mn oxides, and their stability. For this, arsenate ions were chosen as probes because they have been reported in the literature to bind in inner-sphere mode at the surface of birnessite-type minerals, through X-ray absorption spectroscopy work. Two synthetic birnessite minerals, analogs to biogenically produced Mn oxide nanoparticles, were synthesized and characterized for BET specific surface area, X-ray diffraction, and average Mn oxidation state. Suspensions of these oxides were equilibrated in the presence of arsenate ions to investigate the chemical conditions and stability of

  17. A wide-range model for simulation of pump-probe experiments with metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E., E-mail: povar@ihed.ras.ru [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Andreev, Nikolay E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Institutsky lane 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Apfelbaum, Eugeny M. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Itina, Tatiana E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, 18 rue Benoit Lauras, Bat. F, 42000, St-Etienne (France); Khishchenko, Konstatntin V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Institutsky lane 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Kostenko, Oleg F. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Levashov, Pavel R. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Institutsky lane 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Veysman, Mikhail E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pump-probe experiments provide an integral test of the models in the theoretically difficult regime of warm dense matter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The target material motion is evident for heating by femtosecond pulses of intensity more than 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase shift of S and P-polarized pulses is different because of separated zones of absorption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainty in the pulse energy determination of {approx}10% gives substantial deflection of the theoretical curves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface target oxide films may result in bigger phase shift in experiment. - Abstract: High precision pump-probe experiments can provide a valuable information about material states out of equilibrium. A wide-range numerical model is used for the description of material response on ultrashort laser action. The model is developed on the basis of two-temperature hydrodynamics with heat transport, ionization, plasma expansion, electron-ion collisions and two-temperature equation of state for an irradiated substance. Comparison of experimental findings with the results of simulation is used both for the numerical model verification and for calculation of plasma thermodynamic parameters that cannot be measured directly in experiment. An aluminum target is heated by an intense 400 nm (2{omega}) pump laser pulse that is incident normal to the planar target. Weak S- and P-polarized probe pulses with wavelength 800 nm (1{omega}) are used for diagnostics of the plasma. Both probe pulses illuminate the target at a 45 Degree-Sign angle. Calculation of the reflectivity and phase shift of probe pulses with both polarizations are in good agreement with experiment.

  18. Probe experiment characterizing 30-MHz radio wave scatter in the high-latitude ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, M.; Gorokhov, N.; Tanaka, Y.; Yamagishi, H.; Hansen, T.

    1999-07-01

    A probe experiment, consisting of radio links between a common 30-MHz transmitter located at Murmansk, Russia, and two receivers used as the imaging riometer (two-dimensional 64 multiple-beam antenna) located at Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, and Tjornes, Iceland, was carried out to characterize wave scatter in the high-latitude ionosphere. They are nearly aligned with and perpendicular to the geomagnetic meridian, respectively. In experiments conducted in March-April 1994, the 30-MHz probe signals were identified at nighttime more frequently than during the day at both receiver stations during periods of increased geomagnetic activity near the path midpoints, indicating that a relationship between the propagation path and the location of the auroral oval controls signal identification. For the nighttime propagation paths within or crossing through the auroral oval, duty cycles of the probe signals were roughly correlated with increases in geomagnetic activity. Their arrival directions showed a spread with a dominant power on the low elevation and a normal distribution in azimuth. These results indicate that the probe signals are characterized as nonmeteoric "auroral E" scatter caused by irregular, large-scale profiles of electron density enhancements at the lower edge of the ionosphere. However, on 2 days of weak geomagnetic activity, strong probe signals with bursty behavior were identified by an extremely high duty cycle (˜98%) for the nighttime meridian path only, and their arrival directions showed an isotropic spread in azimuth. Such nonmeteoric probe signals are characterized as "coherent" scatter caused by small-scale (˜5 m) field-aligned irregularities in electron density in the E region ionosphere, related to "sporadic E" occurrence.

  19. Academic Library Department Experience Fosters the Development of Leadership Skills Relevant to Academic Library Directorship

    OpenAIRE

    Joanne M. Muellenbach

    2017-01-01

    A Review of: Harris-Keith, Colleen S. (2015). The Relationship Between Academic Library Department Experience and Perceptions of Leadership Skill Development Relevant to Academic Library Directorship. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 41(3), 246-263. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2015.03.017 Objective – This study sought to identify if the perception of library leadership skill and quality development is equal across departmental experience, and what are the leadership skills and qualities...

  20. Task-Relevant Sound and User Experience in Computer-Mediated Firefighter Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtkamp, Joske M.; Toet, Alexander; Bos, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors added task-relevant sounds to a computer-mediated instructor in-the-loop virtual training for firefighter commanders in an attempt to raise the engagement and arousal of the users. Computer-mediated training for crew commanders should provide a sensory experience that is sufficiently intense to make the training viable and effective.…

  1. Task-relevant sound and user experience in computer-mediated firefighter training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtkamp, J.M.; Toet, A.; Bos, F.A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors added task-relevant sounds to a computer-mediated instructor in-the-loop virtual training for firefighter commanders in an attempt to raise the engagement and arousal of the users. Computer-mediated training for crew commanders should provide a sensory experience that is sufficiently

  2. Task-Relevant Sound and User Experience in Computer- Mediated Firefighter Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtkamp, J.M.; Toet, A.; Bos, F.A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors added task-relevant sounds to a computer-mediated instructor in-the-loop virtual training for firefighter commanders in an attempt to raise the engagement and arousal of the users. Computer-mediated training for crew commanders should provide a sensory experience that is sufficiently

  3. Adsorption of probe molecules in pillared interlayered clays: Experiment and computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, A., E-mail: a.gallardo@iqfr.csic.es; Guil, J. M.; Lomba, E.; Almarza, N. G.; Khatib, S. J. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Cabrillo, C.; Sanz, A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Pires, J. [Centro de Química e Bioquímica da Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-06-14

    In this paper we investigate the adsorption of various probe molecules in order to characterize the porous structure of a series of pillared interlayered clays (PILC). To that aim, volumetric and microcalorimetric adsorption experiments were performed on various Zr PILC samples using nitrogen, toluene, and mesitylene as probe molecules. For one of the samples, neutron scattering experiments were also performed using toluene as adsorbate. Various structural models are proposed and tested by means of a comprehensive computer simulation study, using both geometric and percolation analysis in combination with Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations in order to model the volumetric and microcalorimetric isotherms. On the basis of this analysis, we propose a series of structural models that aim at accounting for the adsorption experimental behavior, and make possible a microscopic interpretation of the role played by the different interactions and steric effects in the adsorption processes in these rather complex disordered microporous systems.

  4. Probing the Action of Chemical Denaturant on an Intrinsically Disordered Protein by Simulation and Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wenwei; Borgia, Alessandro; Buholzer, Karin; Grishaev, Alexander; Schuler, Benjamin; Best, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical denaturants are the most commonly used agent for unfolding proteins, and are thought to act by better solvating the unfolded state. Improved solvation is expected to lead to an expansion of unfolded chains with increasing denaturant concentration, providing a sensitive probe of the denaturant action. However, experiments have so far yielded qualitatively different results concerning the effects of chemical denaturation, with studies using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and ...

  5. Understanding in-line probing experiments by modeling cleavage of nonreactive RNA nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlýnský, Vojtěch; Bussi, Giovanni

    2017-05-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is involved in many regulatory and catalytic processes in the cell. The function of any RNA molecule is intimately related with its structure. In-line probing experiments provide valuable structural data sets for a variety of RNAs and are used to characterize conformational changes in riboswitches. However, the structural determinants that lead to differential reactivities in unpaired nucleotides have not been investigated yet. In this work, we used a combination of theoretical approaches, i.e., classical molecular dynamics simulations, multiscale quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations, and enhanced sampling techniques in order to compute and interpret the differential reactivity of individual residues in several RNA motifs, including members of the most important GNRA and UNCG tetraloop families. Simulations on the multinanosecond timescale are required to converge the related free-energy landscapes. The results for uGAAAg and cUUCGg tetraloops and double helices are compared with available data from in-line probing experiments and show that the introduced technique is able to distinguish between nucleotides of the uGAAAg tetraloop based on their structural predispositions toward phosphodiester backbone cleavage. For the cUUCGg tetraloop, more advanced ab initio calculations would be required. This study is the first attempt to computationally classify chemical probing experiments and paves the way for an identification of tertiary structures based on the measured reactivity of nonreactive nucleotides. © 2017 Mlýnský and Bussi; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. Teaching Plasmonics, Scanning Probe Microscopy and Other Useful Experiments at the Upper Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Erik

    2012-10-01

    It is important to teach students concepts and experimental skills relating to modern research being performed today. Experiments that help educate students about the latest research helps them get jobs and into the doors at many great academic institutions. PSU's Advanced Experimental Class for physics undergraduates offers many novel experiments to help the students accomplish this task. Labs involving Plasmonics, thin film deposition, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and more will be discussed. In addition, a new NSF funded project involving the building of a Do-It-Yourself (DIY) SPM will be discussed.

  7. Probing Pre- and In-service Physics Teachers' Knowledge Using the Double-Slit Thought Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2014-09-01

    This study describes the use of the double-slit thought experiment as a diagnostic tool for probing physics teachers' understanding. A total of 9 pre-service teachers and 18 in-service teachers with a variety of different experience in modern physics teaching at the upper secondary level responded in a paper-and-pencil test and three of these teachers were interviewed. The results showed that the physics teachers' thought experiments with classical particles, light, and electrons were often partial. Many teachers also suffered a lack of the basic ideas and principles of physics, which probably hindered thought experimenting. In particular, understanding the ontological nature of classical particles, light and electrons seemed to be essential in performing the double-slit experiment in an appropriate way. However, the in-service physics teachers who had teaching experience in modern physics were more prepared for the double-slit thought experiment than the pre-service teachers. The results suggest that both thought experiments and the double-slit experiment should be given more weight in physics teacher education, even if experience in modern physics teaching at upper secondary school seems to some extent to develop teachers' abilities.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of probes for combined scanning electrochemical/optical microscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngmi; Bard, Allen J

    2002-08-01

    A technique that combines scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and optical microscopy (OM) was implemented with a new probe tip. The tip for scanning electrochemicaVoptical microscopy (SECM/OM) was constructed by insulating a typical gold-coated near-field scanning optical microscopy tip using electrophoretic anodic paint. Once fabricated, the tip was characterized by steady-state cyclic voltammetry, as well as optical and electrochemical approach experiments. This tip generated a stable steady-state current and well-defined SECM approach curves for both conductive and insulating substrates. Durable tips whose geometry was a ring with < 1 microm as outer ring radius could be consistently fabricated. Simultaneous electrochemical and optical images of an interdigitated array electrode were obtained with a resolution on the micrometer scale, demonstrating good performance of the tip as both an optical and an electrochemical probe for imaging microstructures. The SECM feedback current measurements were successfully employed to determine tip-substrate distances for imaging.

  9. BFPTool: a software tool for analysis of Biomembrane Force Probe experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmít, Daniel; Fouquet, Coralie; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Pincet, Frédéric; Trembleau, Alain; Zapotocky, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The Biomembrane Force Probe is an approachable experimental technique commonly used for single-molecule force spectroscopy and experiments on biological interfaces. The technique operates in the range of forces from 0.1 pN to 1000 pN. Experiments are typically repeated many times, conditions are often not optimal, the captured video can be unstable and lose focus; this makes efficient analysis challenging, while out-of-the-box non-proprietary solutions are not freely available. This dedicated tool was developed to integrate and simplify the image processing and analysis of videomicroscopy recordings from BFP experiments. A novel processing feature, allowing the tracking of the pipette, was incorporated to address a limitation of preceding methods. Emphasis was placed on versatility and comprehensible user interface implemented in a graphical form. An integrated analytical tool was implemented to provide a faster, simpler and more convenient way to process and analyse BFP experiments.

  10. A theoretical study of pump–probe experiment in single-layer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-06-03

    Jun 3, 2014 ... number of graphene layers and type of substrate. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is a powerful tool in the investigation of carrier dynamics in semiconductors [22]. The work on multilayer graphene nanostructures [23,24] are particularly relevant for applications in optoelectronics. The experiments ...

  11. The Design of PSB-VVER Experiments Relevant to Accident Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Alessandro Del; D'Auria, Francesco; Mazzini, Marino; Bykov, Michael; Elkin, Ilya V.; Suslov, Alexander

    Experimental programs carried-out in integral test facilities are relevant for validating the best estimate thermal-hydraulic codes(1), which are used for accident analyses, design of accident management procedures, licensing of nuclear power plants, etc. The validation process, in fact, is based on well designed experiments. It consists in the comparison of the measured and calculated parameters and the determination whether a computer code has an adequate capability in predicting the major phenomena expected to occur in the course of transient and/or accidents. University of Pisa was responsible of the numerical design of the 12 experiments executed in PSB-VVER facility (2), operated at Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center (Russia), in the framework of the TACIS 2.03/97 Contract 3.03.03 Part A, EC financed (3). The paper describes the methodology adopted at University of Pisa, starting form the scenarios foreseen in the final test matrix until the execution of the experiments. This process considers three key topics: a) the scaling issue and the simulation, with unavoidable distortions, of the expected performance of the reference nuclear power plants; b) the code assessment process involving the identification of phenomena challenging the code models; c) the features of the concerned integral test facility (scaling limitations, control logics, data acquisition system, instrumentation, etc.). The activities performed in this respect are discussed, and emphasis is also given to the relevance of the thermal losses to the environment. This issue affects particularly the small scaled facilities and has relevance on the scaling approach related to the power and volume of the facility.

  12. Application of high stability oscillators to radio science experiments using deep space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursinski, Emil R.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave telecommunication links between the earth and deep space probes have long been used to conduct radio science experiments which take advantage of the phase coherency and stability of these links. These experiments measure changes in the phase delay of the signals to infer electrical, magnetic and gravitational properties of the solar system environment and beyond through which the spacecraft and radio signals pass. The precision oscillators, from which the phase of the microwave signals are derived, play a key role in the stability of these links and therefore the sensitivity of these measurements. These experiments have become a driving force behind recent and future improvements in the Deep Space Network and spacecraft oscillators and frequency and time distribution systems. Three such experiments which are key to these improvements are briefly discussed and relationship between their sensitivity and the signal phase stability is described. The first is the remote sensing of planetary atmospheres by occultation in which the radio signal passes through the atmosphere and is refracted causing the signal pathlength to change from which the pressure and the temperature of the atmosphere can be derived. The second experiment is determination of the opacity of planetary rings by passage of the radio signals through the rings. The third experiment is the research for very low frequency gravitational radiation. The fractional frequency variation of the signal is comparable to the spatial strain amplitude the system is capable of detecting. A summary of past results and future possibilities for these experiments are presented.

  13. Deducing fast electron density changes in randomly orientated uncrystallized biomolecules in a pump-probe experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, K; Schwander, P; Schmidt, M; Saldin, D K

    2014-07-17

    We propose a method for deducing time-resolved structural changes in uncrystallized biomolecules in solution. The method relies on measuring the angular correlations of the intensities, when averaged over a large number of diffraction patterns from randomly oriented biomolecules in solution in a liquid solvent. The experiment is somewhat like a pump-probe version of an experiment on small angle X-ray scattering, except that the data expected by the algorithm are not just the radial variation of the averaged intensities. The differences of these correlation functions as measured from a photoexcited and dark structure enable the direct calculation of the difference electron density with a knowledge of only the dark structure. We exploit a linear relation we derive between the difference in these correlation functions and the difference electron density, applicable for small structural changes.

  14. Status-Relevant Experiences and Conspicuous Consumption - the Moderating Role of Prenatal Androgen Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Gert; Palacios-Fenech, Javier

    2016-09-20

    In this paper we study consumers' interest in acquiring and displaying expensive luxury products. Based on recent insights in consumer psychology, which build on developments in evolutionary biology, we consider luxury products as "costly signals": wasteful and costly goods, whose purpose is to communicate one's biological fitness, and social status, to others. In line with previous research, we show that experiences that trigger mate attraction goals (Study 1: Exposure to others in bathing outfit) or status display goals (Study 2: Experiencing a vicarious victory of one's favorite sports team) can increase people's interest in luxury products. However, we demonstrate that some individuals are predictably more responsive to those experiences than others. We used a physiological measure (the proportion of the length of the index finger and ring finger of the right hand, 2D:4D) as a proxy for individual differences in exposure to prenatal androgens (i.e., testosterone). This measure has been related to dominant and competitive behavior later in life. We predict and find that individuals with a low 2D:4D (i.e., high exposure to prenatal androgens) were more responsive to the status-relevant experiences: they became more interested in luxury goods after these experiences. This was not the case for high 2D:4D individuals.

  15. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Sugawara, Sho K; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener.

  16. Conical Probe Calibration and Wind Tunnel Data Analysis of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Samson Siu

    2011-01-01

    For a multi-hole test probe undergoing wind tunnel tests, the resulting data needs to be analyzed for any significant trends. These trends include relating the pressure distributions, the geometric orientation, and the local velocity vector to one another. However, experimental runs always involve some sort of error. As a result, a calibration procedure is required to compensate for this error. For this case, it is the misalignment bias angles resulting from the distortion associated with the angularity of the test probe or the local velocity vector. Through a series of calibration steps presented here, the angular biases are determined and removed from the data sets. By removing the misalignment, smoother pressure distributions contribute to more accurate experimental results, which in turn could be then compared to theoretical and actual in-flight results to derive any similarities. Error analyses will also be performed to verify the accuracy of the calibration error reduction. The resulting calibrated data will be implemented into an in-flight RTF script that will output critical flight parameters during future CCIE experimental test runs. All of these tasks are associated with and in contribution to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center s F-15B Research Testbed s Small Business Innovation Research of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment.

  17. Ring-averaged ion velocity distribution function probe for laboratory magnetized plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Chen, Jinting; Lin, Chiahsuan; Lee, Zongmau

    2017-10-01

    Ring-averaged velocity distribution function of ions at a fixed guiding center position is a fundamental quantity in the gyrokinetic plasma physics. We have developed a diagnostic tool for the ring averaged velocity distribution function of ions for laboratory plasma experiments, which is named as the ring-averaged ion distribution function probe (RIDFP). The RIDFP is a set of ion collectors for different velocities. It is designed to be immersed in magnetized plasmas and achieves momentum selection of incoming ions by the selection of the ion Larmor radii. To nullify the influence of the sheath potential surrounding the RIDFP on the orbits of the incoming ions, the electrostatic potential of the RIDFP body is automatically adjusted to coincide with the space potential of the target plasma with the use of an emissive probe and a voltage follower. The developed RIDFP successfully measured the equilibrium ring-averaged velocity distribution function of a laboratory magnetized plasma, which was in accordance with the Maxwellian distribution having an ion temperature of 0.2 eV.

  18. Adjoint Monte Carlo Simulation of Fusion Product Activation Probe Experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Tardini, Giovanni; Kurki-Suonio, Taina

    2015-01-01

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material makig it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte-Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitated, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within 40%, which can be considered remarkable considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations. Also an alternative probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized...

  19. Ring-averaged ion velocity distribution function probe for laboratory magnetized plasma experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Chen, Jinting; Lin, Chiahsuan; Lee, Zongmau

    2017-10-01

    Ring-averaged velocity distribution function of ions at a fixed guiding center position is a fundamental quantity in the gyrokinetic plasma physics. We have developed a diagnostic tool for the ring averaged velocity distribution function of ions for laboratory plasma experiments, which is named as the ring-averaged ion distribution function probe (RIDFP). The RIDFP is a set of ion collectors for different velocities. It is designed to be immersed in magnetized plasmas and achieves momentum selection of incoming ions by the selection of the ion Larmor radii. To nullify the influence of the sheath potential surrounding the RIDFP on the orbits of the incoming ions, the electrostatic potential of the RIDFP body is automatically adjusted to coincide with the space potential of the target plasma with the use of an emissive probe and a voltage follower. The developed RIDFP successfully measured the equilibrium ring-averaged velocity distribution function of a laboratory magnetized plasma, which was in accordance with the Maxwellian distribution having an ion temperature of 0.2 eV.

  20. Probing Pre-and In-Service Physics Teachers' Knowledge Using the Double-Slit Thought Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the use of the double-slit thought experiment as a diagnostic tool for probing physics teachers' understanding. A total of 9 pre-service teachers and 18 in-service teachers with a variety of different experience in modern physics teaching at the upper secondary level responded in a paper-and-pencil test and three of these…

  1. Experience gained with the Synroc demonstration plant at ANSTO and its relevance to plutonium immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jostsons, A.; Ridal, A.; Mercer, D.J.; Vance, E.R.L. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1996-05-01

    The Synroc Demonstration Plant (SDP) was designed and constructed at Lucas Heights to demonstrate the feasibility of Synroc production on a commercial scale (10 kg/hr) with simulated Purex liquid HLW. Since commissioning of the SDP in 1987, over 6000 kg of Synroc has been fabricated with a range of feeds and waste loadings. The SDP utilises uniaxial hot-pressing to consolidate Synroc. Pressureless sintering and hot-isostatic pressing have also been studied at smaller scales. The results of this extensive process development have been incorporated in a conceptual design for a radioactive plant to condition HLW from a reprocessing plant with a capacity to treat 800 tpa of spent LWR fuel. Synroic containing TRU, including Pu, and fission products has been fabricated and characterised in a glove-box facility and hot cells, respectively. The extensive experience in processing of Synroc over the past 15 years is summarised and its relevance to immobilization of surplus plutonium is discussed.

  2. Gravity Probe B: final results of a space experiment to test general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C W F; DeBra, D B; Parkinson, B W; Turneaure, J P; Conklin, J W; Heifetz, M I; Keiser, G M; Silbergleit, A S; Holmes, T; Kolodziejczak, J; Al-Meshari, M; Mester, J C; Muhlfelder, B; Solomonik, V G; Stahl, K; Worden, P W; Bencze, W; Buchman, S; Clarke, B; Al-Jadaan, A; Al-Jibreen, H; Li, J; Lipa, J A; Lockhart, J M; Al-Suwaidan, B; Taber, M; Wang, S

    2011-06-03

    Gravity Probe B, launched 20 April 2004, is a space experiment testing two fundamental predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR), the geodetic and frame-dragging effects, by means of cryogenic gyroscopes in Earth orbit. Data collection started 28 August 2004 and ended 14 August 2005. Analysis of the data from all four gyroscopes results in a geodetic drift rate of -6601.8±18.3  mas/yr and a frame-dragging drift rate of -37.2±7.2  mas/yr, to be compared with the GR predictions of -6606.1  mas/yr and -39.2  mas/yr, respectively ("mas" is milliarcsecond; 1  mas=4.848×10(-9)  rad).

  3. Development of an X-ray delay unit for correlation spectroscopy and pump-probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roseker, Wojciech

    2008-07-15

    Probing condensed matter on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds will be one of the key topics for future X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) sources. The accessible time windows are, however, compromised by the intrinsic time structure of the sources. One way to overcome this limitation is the usage of a time delay unit. A prototype device capable of splitting an X-ray pulse into two adjustable fractions, delaying one of them with the aim to perform X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and pump-probe type studies was designed and manufactured. The device utilizes eight perfect crystals in vertical 90 scattering geometry. Its performance has been verified with 8.39 keV and 12.4 keV Xrays at various synchrotron sources. The measured throughput of the device with a Si(333) monochromator at 8.39 keV under ambient conditions is 0.6%. The stability was verified at 12.4 keV and operation without realignment and feedback was possible for more than 30 minutes. Time delays up to 2.95 ns have been achieved. The highest resolution achieved in an experiment was 15.4 ps, a value entirely determined by the diagnostics system. The influence of the delay unit optics on the coherence properties of the beam was investigated by means of Fraunhofer diffraction and static speckle analysis. The obtained high fringe visibility and contrast values larger than 23% indicate the feasibility of performing coherence based experiments with the delay line. (orig.)

  4. Benchmark Shock Tube Experiments for Radiative Heating Relevant to Earth Re-Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandis, A. M.; Cruden, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Detailed spectrally and spatially resolved radiance has been measured in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility for conditions relevant to high speed entry into a variety of atmospheres, including Earth, Venus, Titan, Mars and the Outer Planets. The tests that measured radiation relevant for Earth re-entry are the focus of this work and are taken from campaigns 47, 50, 52 and 57. These tests covered conditions from 8 km/s to 15.5 km/s at initial pressures ranging from 0.05 Torr to 1 Torr, of which shots at 0.1 and 0.2 Torr are analyzed in this paper. These conditions cover a range of points of interest for potential fight missions, including return from Low Earth Orbit, the Moon and Mars. The large volume of testing available from EAST is useful for statistical analysis of radiation data, but is problematic for identifying representative experiments for performing detailed analysis. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to select a subset of benchmark test data that can be considered for further detailed study. These benchmark shots are intended to provide more accessible data sets for future code validation studies and facility-to-facility comparisons. The shots that have been selected as benchmark data are the ones in closest agreement to a line of best fit through all of the EAST results, whilst also showing the best experimental characteristics, such as test time and convergence to equilibrium. The EAST data are presented in different formats for analysis. These data include the spectral radiance at equilibrium, the spatial dependence of radiance over defined wavelength ranges and the mean non-equilibrium spectral radiance (so-called 'spectral non-equilibrium metric'). All the information needed to simulate each experimental trace, including free-stream conditions, shock time of arrival (i.e. x-t) relation, and the spectral and spatial resolution functions, are provided.

  5. Probing the Action of Chemical Denaturant on an Intrinsically Disordered Protein by Simulation and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenwei; Borgia, Alessandro; Buholzer, Karin; Grishaev, Alexander; Schuler, Benjamin; Best, Robert B

    2016-09-14

    Chemical denaturants are the most commonly used agents for unfolding proteins and are thought to act by better solvating the unfolded state. Improved solvation is expected to lead to an expansion of unfolded chains with increasing denaturant concentration, providing a sensitive probe of the denaturant action. However, experiments have so far yielded qualitatively different results concerning the effects of chemical denaturation. Studies using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and other methods found an increase in radius of gyration with denaturant concentration, but most small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies found no change. This discrepancy therefore challenges our understanding of denaturation mechanism and more generally the accuracy of these experiments as applied to unfolded or disordered proteins. Here, we use all-atom molecular simulations to investigate the effect of urea and guanidinium chloride on the structure of the intrinsically disordered protein ACTR, which can be studied by experiment over a wide range of denaturant concentration. Using unbiased molecular simulations with a carefully calibrated denaturant model, we find that the protein chain indeed swells with increasing denaturant concentration. This is due to the favorable association of urea or guanidinium chloride with the backbone of all residues and with the side-chains of almost all residues, with denaturant-water transfer free energies inferred from this association in reasonable accord with experimental estimates. Interactions of the denaturants with the backbone are dominated by hydrogen bonding, while interactions with side-chains include other contributions. By computing FRET efficiencies and SAXS intensities at each denaturant concentration, we show that the simulation trajectories are in accord with both experiments on this protein, demonstrating that there is no fundamental inconsistency between the two types of experiment. Agreement with experiment also supports the

  6. Vibrational Probes: From Small Molecule Solvatochromism Theory and Experiments to Applications in Complex Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błasiak, Bartosz; Londergan, Casey H; Webb, Lauren J; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-04-18

    The vibrational frequency of a chosen normal mode is one of the most accurately measurable spectroscopic properties of molecules in condensed phases. Accordingly, infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopy have provided valuable information on both distributions and ensemble-average values of molecular vibrational frequencies, and these frequencies are now routinely used to investigate structure, conformation, and even absolute configuration of chemical and biological molecules of interest. Recent advancements in coherent time-domain nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy have allowed the study of heterogeneous distributions of local structures and thermally driven ultrafast fluctuations of vibrational frequencies. To fully utilize IR probe functional groups for quantitative bioassays, a variety of biological and chemical techniques have been developed to site-specifically introduce vibrational probe groups into proteins and nucleic acids. These IR-probe-labeled biomolecules and chemically reactive systems are subject to linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopic investigations and provide information on the local electric field, conformational changes, site-site protein contacts, and/or function-defining features of biomolecules. A rapidly expanding library of data from such experiments requires an interpretive method with atom-level chemical accuracy. However, despite prolonged efforts to develop an all-encompassing theory for describing vibrational solvatochromism and electrochromism as well as dynamic fluctuations of instantaneous vibrational frequencies, purely empirical and highly approximate theoretical models have often been used to interpret experimental results. They are, in many cases, based on the simple assumption that the vibrational frequency of an IR reporter is solely dictated by electric potential or field distribution around the vibrational chromophore. Such simplified description of vibrational solvatochromism generally referred to as

  7. Probing Cellular Mechanoadaptation Using Cell-Substrate De-Adhesion Dynamics: Experiments and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    S S, Soumya; Sthanam, Lakshmi Kavitha; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Sen, Shamik

    2014-01-01

    Physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to regulate cellular processes ranging from spreading to differentiation, with alterations in cell phenotype closely associated with changes in physical properties of cells themselves. When plated on substrates of varying stiffness, fibroblasts have been shown to exhibit stiffness matching property, wherein cell cortical stiffness increases in proportion to substrate stiffness up to 5 kPa, and subsequently saturates. Similar mechanoadaptation responses have also been observed in other cell types. Trypsin de-adhesion represents a simple experimental framework for probing the contractile mechanics of adherent cells, with de-adhesion timescales shown to scale inversely with cortical stiffness values. In this study, we combine experiments and computation in deciphering the influence of substrate properties in regulating de-adhesion dynamics of adherent cells. We first show that NIH 3T3 fibroblasts cultured on collagen-coated polyacrylamide hydrogels de-adhere faster on stiffer substrates. Using a simple computational model, we qualitatively show how substrate stiffness and cell-substrate bond breakage rate collectively influence de-adhesion timescales, and also obtain analytical expressions of de-adhesion timescales in certain regimes of the parameter space. Finally, by comparing stiffness-dependent experimental and computational de-adhesion responses, we show that faster de-adhesion on stiffer substrates arises due to force-dependent breakage of cell-matrix adhesions. In addition to illustrating the utility of employing trypsin de-adhesion as a biophysical tool for probing mechanoadaptation, our computational results highlight the collective interplay of substrate properties and bond breakage rate in setting de-adhesion timescales. PMID:25197799

  8. Proposals for Pump-Probe Experiments in the Gas Phase using the TTF2-FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Many processes induced by the interaction of XUV light with atoms and molecules take place on a very short time scale. The temporal width of the soft X-Ray FEL pulses (100-300 fs) and of the synchronized, tunable optical laser (150 fs) will therefore be ideally suited to gain an insight into the dynamics of these processes. A first series of proposed experiments will serve to characterize the FEL pulses themselves, in particular the intensity, frequency and time structure of the individual pulses by using a cross correlation technique between the XUV photons and a strong infrared pulse. Depending on the final characteristics of the FEL with respect to photon energy range and tunability, these two-photon pump-probe experiments will be extended to further studies, like the investigation of resonances, which are only accessible by a two-photon excitation, the coupling of autoionization states by a strong laser field, which induces drastic changes in the resonance profiles, the wavepacket formation of higher Rydb...

  9. Survey of Field Programmable Gate Array Design Guides and Experience Relevant to Nuclear Power Plant Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL; Bouldin, Don [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Smith, Stephen Fulton [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    From a safety perspective, it is difficult to assess the correctness of FPGA devices without extensive documentation, tools, and review procedures. NUREG/CR-6463, "Review Guidelines on Software Languages for Use in Nuclear Power Plant Safety Systems," provides guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on auditing of programs for safety systems written in ten high-level languages. A uniform framework for the formulation and discussion of language-specific programming guidelines was employed. Comparable guidelines based on a similar framework are needed for FPGA-based systems. The first task involves evaluation of regulatory experience gained by other countries and other agencies, and those captured in existing standards, to identify regulatory approaches that can be adopted by NRC. If existing regulations do not provide a sufficient regulatory basis for adopting relevant regulatory approaches that are uncovered, ORNL will identify the gaps. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

  10. Varieties of Castration Experience: Relevance to Contemporary Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Graeme J

    2016-03-01

    Although Freud considered castration to be one of the two major anxieties of human life, the castration complex has been relatively neglected in contemporary psychoanalytic writing and is insufficiently discussed in presentations of clinical cases. This article discusses the relevance of the concept to contemporary psychoanalysis and psychodynamic psychotherapy, in particular the important contributing role of castration conflicts in the pathogenesis of a wide range of clinical symptoms. The author begins by briefly reviewing some classical and contemporary psychoanalytic ideas about castration to show how the concept has broadened and is currently used not only to signify fear of damage to or loss of the genital, but also metaphorically to indicate a threat to or loss of any valued human characteristic or function. He outlines Brenner's distinction between castration anxiety and castration depression, and reviews the role of childhood trauma in intensifying castration conflicts. He then illustrates the clinical application of these ideas by describing aspects of his psychotherapeutic work with three male patients who presented with a variety of symptoms and distressing psychological experiences that were gradually resolved through the analysis of underlying castration anxiety and/or castration depression. Although castration anxiety is frequently intermingled with separation anxiety, the author concludes that with many traumatized patients castration conflicts are in the foreground and the therapist needs to focus on the patient's proneness to humiliation, powerlessness, and shame.

  11. Judging Managerial Actions as Ethical or Unethical: Decision Bias and Domain Relevant Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J. Bailey, Ph.D.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This is an empirical study comparing the susceptibility of managers and students to a decision-making bias when making judgments about ethical business practices. The managers and students read through vignettes and made judgments about how ethical they perceived the described business actions to be. Half of the participants (half of the managers and half of the students were exposed to three situations in which the actions being judged were clearly unethical. The other half of each group was exposed to situations in which the actions being judged were clearly ethical. All were exposed to the same fourth situation of a business decision. In this ambiguous situation it was not clear if the business decision being evaluated was ethical or unethical. The decision bias examined here addressed the question of ‘to what extent does exposure to prior unethical (or ethical actions influence one’s evaluation of how ethical a particular business decision is when it is not a clearly right or wrong action. The results demonstrated that students’ ethical judgments about the action in the fourth scenario (the same scenario for everyone differed depending on what they were previously exposed to. Significant assimilation effects were found in the student sample suggesting support for the perceptual readiness models. The managerial sample yielded differences in the opposite direction, one of a contrast effect, but these did not reach statistical significance. Assimilation effects occurred in the sample without domain relevant experience and contrast effects occurred with the experienced sample. Implications are discussed.

  12. Inexpensive Ultrasound Demonstrations as Analogs of Radio Diffraction in the field : Huygens Probe Bistatic experiment on Titan and the Sea Interferometer (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    The wave nature of electromagnetic radiation can be exploited in a number of astronomical and remote sensing methods, but is often challenging to visualize in the classroom. One approach with conveniently-inexpensive components is to use sound as an analog. Readily-available ultrasonic transducers at 40 kHz can be driven with a 555 oscillator and received intensity detected with an op-amp and visualized with a digital voltmeter, a lightbulb, or even acoustically. The wavelength of 9mm is convenient for tabletop experiments, with a relevant example being Lloyds Mirror, the interference of a direct wave from a source just above a surface with the reflected wave. As a distant receiver moves in angle through this interference pattern, a series of peaks and nulls in recorded intensity can be interpreted as the height of the transmitter and the reflectivity (i.e. with some assumptions, the roughness) of the reflecting surface. This $10 experiment will be demonstrated at the poster. Such an observation was (serendipitously) made in 2005 after the landing of the Huygens probe on the surface of Titan, where the radio signal measured by Cassini as it set on the horizon as seen from the probe underwent sharp dips in strength that were inverted into a precise measurement of the post-impact probe height. A similar technique in reverse was applied a half century earlier in early Australian radio astronomy to measure the position and width of astrophysical sources from a single clifftop antenna. Ultrasound can be convenient to emulate other radio work, exploiting Doppler effects and (for pulsed sources, like those used in rangers for amateur robotics) propagation time rather than diffraction. Some experiments on tracking Frisbees as an analog for measuring planetary winds by tracking descent probes, and on bistatic delay/Doppler scatterometry as in the CYGNSS GPS-based experiment to measure hurricane winds via sea state, will also be discussed. Huygens probe on the surface of

  13. A tunable, linac based, intense, broad-band THz source forpump-probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmerge, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Corbett, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Durr, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fazio, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fisher, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Frisch, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gaffney, K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Guehr, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hettel, B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hoffmann, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hogan, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Holtkamp, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kirchmann, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Limborg, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lindenberg, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nilsson, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Raubenheimer, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Reis, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ross, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Shen, Z. -X. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stupakov, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tantawi, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tian, K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wu, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Xiang, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-02

    We propose an intense THz source with tunable frequency and bandwidth that can directly interact with the degrees of freedom that determine the properties of materials and thus provides a new tool for controlling and directing these ultrafast processes as well as aiding synthesis of new materials with new functional properties. This THz source will broadly impact our understanding of dynamical processes in matter at the atomic-scale and in real time. Established optical pumping schemes using femtosecond visible frequency laser pulses for excitation are extended into the THz frequency regime thereby enabling resonant excitation of bonds in correlated solid state materials (phonon pumping), to drive low energy electronic excitations, to trigger surface chemistry reactions, and to all-optically bias a material with ultrashort electric fields or magnetic fields. A linac-based THz source can supply stand-alone experiments with peak intensities two orders of magnitude stronger than existing laser-based sources, but when coupled with atomic-scale sensitive femtosecond x-ray probes it opens a new frontier in ultrafast science with broad applications to correlated materials, interfacial and liquid phase chemistry, and materials in extreme conditions.

  14. Indirect monitoring shot-to-shot shock waves strength reproducibility during pump–probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikuz, T. A., E-mail: tatiana.pikuz@eie.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 Japan (Japan); Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 Japan (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Faenov, A. Ya. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Institute for Academic Initiatives, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ozaki, N.; Habara, H.; Tanaka, K. A.; Kodama, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 Japan (Japan); Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 Japan (Japan); Hartley, N. J.; Matsuoka, T. [Institute for Academic Initiatives, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Albertazzi, B.; Matsuyama, S.; Yamauchi, K.; Ochante, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 Japan (Japan); Takahashi, K.; Sueda, K. [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 Japan (Japan); Tange, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Sakata, O. [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, NIMS, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Sekine, T.; Sato, T.; Umeda, Y. [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Inubushi, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN Spring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 Japan (Japan); and others

    2016-07-21

    We present an indirect method of estimating the strength of a shock wave, allowing on line monitoring of its reproducibility in each laser shot. This method is based on a shot-to-shot measurement of the X-ray emission from the ablated plasma by a high resolution, spatially resolved focusing spectrometer. An optical pump laser with energy of 1.0 J and pulse duration of ∼660 ps was used to irradiate solid targets or foils with various thicknesses containing Oxygen, Aluminum, Iron, and Tantalum. The high sensitivity and resolving power of the X-ray spectrometer allowed spectra to be obtained on each laser shot and to control fluctuations of the spectral intensity emitted by different plasmas with an accuracy of ∼2%, implying an accuracy in the derived electron plasma temperature of 5%–10% in pump–probe high energy density science experiments. At nano- and sub-nanosecond duration of laser pulse with relatively low laser intensities and ratio Z/A ∼ 0.5, the electron temperature follows T{sub e} ∼ I{sub las}{sup 2/3}. Thus, measurements of the electron plasma temperature allow indirect estimation of the laser flux on the target and control its shot-to-shot fluctuation. Knowing the laser flux intensity and its fluctuation gives us the possibility of monitoring shot-to-shot reproducibility of shock wave strength generation with high accuracy.

  15. Fragmentation of molecules studied with laser-induced Coulomb explosion imaging and femtosecond pump-probe experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergler, Th.; Rudenko, A. A.; Feuerstein, B.; Zrost, K.; Schröter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2006-04-01

    We rejort on the experimental realisation of time-resolved coincident Coulomb explosion imaging of H2-fragmentation in 10 14 W/cm2 laser fields. Combining a high-resolution 'reaction microscope' and a fs pump-probe setup, we map the motion of wave packets dissociating via one- or two-photon channels, respectively, and observe two region of enhanced ionization in accordance with earlier theoretical predictions. The long-term interferometric stability of our system allows us to extend pump-probe experiments into the region of overlapping pulses, which offers new possibilities for the manipulation of ultrafast molecular fragmentation dynamics.

  16. Radial probe endobronchial ultrasound for peripheral pulmonary lesions. A 5-year institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alexander; Chenna, Praveen; Loiselle, Andrea; Massoni, Jennifer; Mayse, Martin; Misselhorn, David

    2014-05-01

    Technological advances have improved the ability of bronchoscopists to access peripheral pulmonary lesions for tissue sampling. Radial probe endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) provides real-time feedback to guide biopsies of peripheral lesions, thereby potentially improving diagnostic yield over conventional bronchoscopy. We assessed the overall diagnostic yield of peripheral bronchoscopy using radial probe EBUS for peripheral pulmonary lesions, as well as factors that might influence the diagnostic yield, such as radial ultrasound view, lesion size, and ability to locate the peripheral lesion. We conducted a retrospective review of peripheral bronchoscopy cases in which radial probe EBUS was utilized to diagnose peripheral pulmonary lesions at a tertiary care university hospital. Our study cohort comprised 496 patients who underwent bronchoscopies between January 2008 and December 2012 for the diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions. Radial probe EBUS was used alone for diagnostic purposes in 467 patients. A diagnosis was made on that basis in 321 (69%) of 467 patients. A diagnosis was obtained for 83 of 144 (58%) of nodules 1-2 cm in diameter, 99 of 137 (72%) of nodules 2.1-3 cm, 54 of 70 (77%) of nodules 3.1-4 cm, 41 of 47 (87%) of nodules 4.1-5 cm, and 35 of 40 (88%) of nodules larger than 5.1 cm. Of all 467 nodules, 446 (96%) were successfully identified using radial probe EBUS. When the radial probe position was within the target lesion, the diagnostic yield was 84% compared with 48% when the probe was positioned adjacent to the lesion. Radial probe EBUS can be used to guide biopsy during peripheral bronchoscopy. This technique provides real-time ultrasound-based confirmation of target lesion localization prior to biopsy. Using radial probe EBUS, the vast majority of peripheral pulmonary nodules can be identified. Radial EBUS probe position relative to the target lesion significantly affects the diagnostic yield.

  17. Academic Library Department Experience Fosters the Development of Leadership Skills Relevant to Academic Library Directorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne M. Muellenbach

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Harris-Keith, Colleen S. (2015. The Relationship Between Academic Library Department Experience and Perceptions of Leadership Skill Development Relevant to Academic Library Directorship. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 41(3, 246-263. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2015.03.017 Objective – This study sought to identify if the perception of library leadership skill and quality development is equal across departmental experience, and what are the leadership skills and qualities most commonly perceived to be used in each department. Design – Quantitative online survey instrument. Setting – Master’s colleges and universities from 728 institutions in the United States of America, as classified by the Carnegie Foundation. Subjects – 666 academic library directors. Methods – Selected participants, representing academic library administrative leadership, were contacted by email a maximum of four times and were invited to complete an online survey instrument composed of six sections. The first three sections contained the purpose and confidentiality statements, demographic information, and data on the past five positions held by respondents prior to their current directorship. The next two sections each had 25 statements on a 5-point Likert scale, to collect data on perceived leadership skills and qualities exercised by respondents in their most recent three positions. The final section had four open-ended questions to help explain the academic library directors’ responses and provide context for the ratings in previous sections of the instrument. Main results – A total of 296 responses were received, for a 40.66% response rate, which was representative of the institution type demographics, including private non-profit, public, and private for-profit. The first research question asked: is the perception of library leadership skill and quality development equal across departmental experience? The data used for this question

  18. Pump-probe experiments at the TEMPO beamline using the low-α operation mode of Synchrotron SOLEIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silly, Mathieu G; Ferté, Tom; Tordeux, Marie Agnes; Pierucci, Debora; Beaulieu, Nathan; Chauvet, Christian; Pressacco, Federico; Sirotti, Fausto; Popescu, Horia; Lopez-Flores, Victor; Tortarolo, Marina; Sacchi, Maurizio; Jaouen, Nicolas; Hollander, Philippe; Ricaud, Jean Paul; Bergeard, Nicolas; Boeglin, Christine; Tudu, Bharati; Delaunay, Renaud; Luning, Jan; Malinowski, Gregory; Hehn, Michel; Baumier, Cédric; Fortuna, Franck; Krizmancic, Damjan; Stebel, Luigi; Sergo, Rudi; Cautero, Giuseppe

    2017-07-01

    The SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source is regularly operated in special filling modes dedicated to pump-probe experiments. Among others, the low-α mode operation is characterized by shorter pulse duration and represents the natural bridge between 50 ps synchrotron pulses and femtosecond experiments. Here, the capabilities in low-α mode of the experimental set-ups developed at the TEMPO beamline to perform pump-probe experiments with soft X-rays based on photoelectron or photon detection are presented. A 282 kHz repetition-rate femtosecond laser is synchronized with the synchrotron radiation time structure to induce fast electronic and/or magnetic excitations. Detection is performed using a two-dimensional space resolution plus time resolution detector based on microchannel plates equipped with a delay line. Results of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, circular dichroism and magnetic scattering experiments are reported, and their respective advantages and limitations in the framework of high-time-resolution pump-probe experiments compared and discussed.

  19. Theoretical Simulations and Ultrafast Pump-probe Spectroscopy Experiments in Pigment-protein Photosynthetic Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, D. R. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-09-12

    Theoretical simulations and ultrafast pump-probe laser spectroscopy experiments were used to study photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes and antennae found in green sulfur bacteria such as Prosthecochloris aestuarii, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, and Chlorobium tepidum. The work focused on understanding structure-function relationships in energy transfer processes in these complexes through experiments and trying to model that data as we tested our theoretical assumptions with calculations. Theoretical exciton calculations on tubular pigment aggregates yield electronic absorption spectra that are superimpositions of linear J-aggregate spectra. The electronic spectroscopy of BChl c/d/e antennae in light harvesting chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus differs considerably from J-aggregate spectra. Strong symmetry breaking is needed if we hope to simulate the absorption spectra of the BChl c antenna. The theory for simulating absorption difference spectra in strongly coupled photosynthetic antenna is described, first for a relatively simple heterodimer, then for the general N-pigment system. The theory is applied to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) BChl a protein trimers from Prosthecochloris aestuarii and then compared with experimental low-temperature absorption difference spectra of FMO trimers from Chlorobium tepidum. Circular dichroism spectra of the FMO trimer are unusually sensitive to diagonal energy disorder. Substantial differences occur between CD spectra in exciton simulations performed with and without realistic inhomogeneous distribution functions for the input pigment diagonal energies. Anisotropic absorption difference spectroscopy measurements are less consistent with 21-pigment trimer simulations than 7-pigment monomer simulations which assume that the laser-prepared states are localized within a subunit of the trimer. Experimental anisotropies from real samples likely arise from statistical averaging over states with diagonal energies shifted by

  20. Probing soil C metabolism in response to temperature: results from experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, P.; Dalder, J.; Blankinship, J.; Selmants, P. C.; Schwartz, E.; Koch, G. W.; Hart, S.; Hungate, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    C use efficiency (CUE) is one of the least understood aspects of soil C cycling, has a very large effect on soil respiration and C sequestration, and decreases with elevated temperature. CUE is directly related to substrate partitioning over energy production and biosynthesis. The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We have developed a new stable isotope approach using position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers to measure these fundamental metabolic processes in intact soil communities (1). We use this new approach, combined with models of soil metabolic flux patterns, to analyze the response of microbial energy production, biosynthesis, and CUE to temperature. The method consists of adding small but precise amounts of position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is iteratively solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and information on microbial precursor demand under different temperatures. This new method enables direct study of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, C use efficiency, and soil organic matter formation in response to temperature. (1) Dijkstra P, Blankinship JC, Selmants PC, Hart SC, Koch GW, Schwarz E and Hungate BA. Probing metabolic flux patterns of soil microbial communities using parallel position-specific tracer labeling. Soil Biology and Biochemistry (accepted)

  1. Supernova / Acceleration Probe: A Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldering, G; Althouse, W; Amanullah, R; Annis, J; Astier, P; Baltay, C; Barrelet, E; Basa, S; Bebek, C; Bergstrom, L; Bernstein, G; Bester, M; Bigelow, B; Blandford, R; Bohlin, R; Bonissent, A; Bower, C; Brown, M; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Commins, E; Craig, W; Day, C; DeJongh, F; Deustua, S; Diehl, T; Dodelson, S; Ealet, A; Ellis, R; Emmet, W; Fouchez, D; Frieman, J; Fruchter, A; Gerdes, D; Gladney, L; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Groom, D; Heetderks, H; Hoff, M; Holland, S; Huffer, M; Hui, L; Huterer, D; Jain, B; Jelinsky, P; Karcher, A; Kent, S; Kahn, S; Kim, A; Kolbe, W; Krieger, B; Kushner, G; Kuznetsova, N; Lafever, R; Lamoureux, J; Lampton, M; Fevre, OL; Levi, M; Limon, P; Lin, H; Linder, E; Loken, S; Lorenzon, W; Malina, R; Marriner, J; Marshall, P; Massey, R; Mazure, A; McKay, T; McKee, S; Miquel, R; Morgan, N; Mortsell, E; Mostek, N; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nugent, P; Oluseyi, H; Pain, R; Palaio, N; Pankow, D; Peoples, J; Perlmutter, S; Prieto, E; Rabinowitz, D; Refregier, A; Rhodes, J; Roe, N; Rusin, D; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sholl, M; Smadja, G; Smith, RM; Smoot, G; Snyder, J; Spadafora, A; Stebbins, A; Stoughton, C; Szymkowiak, A; Tarle, G; Taylor, K; Tilquin, A; Tomasch, A; Tucker, D; Vincent, D; Lippe, HVD; Walder, J-P; Wang, G; Wester, W

    2004-05-12

    The Supernova / Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universe's expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled measurements. We describe a self-consistent reference mission design for building a Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and for performing a wide-area weak gravitational lensing study. A 2-m wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The SNAP mission will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for several thousand supernovae at redshifts between z=0.1 and 1.7. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees resolves ~100 galaxies per square arcminute. If we assume we live in a cosmological-constant-dominated Universe, the matter density, dark energy density, and flatness of space can all be measured with SNAP supernova and weak-lensing measurements to a systematics-limited accuracy of 1%. For a flat universe, the density-to-pressure ratio of dark energy can be similarly measured to 5% for the present value w0 and ~0.1 for the time variation w'. The large survey area, depth, spatial resolution, time-sampling, and nine-band optical to NIR photometry will support additional independent and/or complementary dark-energy measurement approaches as well as a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

  2. Measurements of plasma profiles using a fast swept Langmuir probe in the VINETA-II magnetic reconnection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shesterikov, I.; Von Stechow, A.; Grulke, O.; Stenzel, R.; Klinger, T.

    2017-07-01

    A fast-swept Langmuir probe capable to be biased at a high voltages has been constructed and successfully operated at the VINETA-II magnetic reconnection experiment. The presented circuit has two main features beneficial for fast transient parameter changes in laboratory experiments as, e.g., plasma guns or magnetic reconnection: the implementation simplicity and the high voltage sweep range. This work presents its design and performance for time-dependent measurements of VINETA-II plasmas. The probe is biased with a sinusoidal voltage at a fixed frequency. Current - voltage characteristics are measured along the falling and rising slopes of the probe bias. The sweep frequency is fsweep= 150 kHz. The spatiotemporal evolution of radial plasma profiles is obtained by evaluation of the probe characteristics. The plasma density measurements agree with those derived from a microwave interferometer, demonstrating the reliability of the measurements. As a model plasma system, a plasma gun discharge with typical pulse times of 60 μ s is chosen.

  3. Gravitational experiments on a solar probe mission: Scientific objectives and technology considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1989-08-01

    The concept of a solar impact probe (either solar plunger or sun grazer) led to the initiation of a NASA study at JPL in 1978 on the engineering and scientific feasibility of a Solar Probe Mission, named Starprobe, in which a spacecraft is placed in a high eccentricity orbit with a perihelion near 4 solar radii. The Starprobe study showed that the concept was feasible and in fact preliminary mission and spacecraft designs were developed. In the early stages of the Solar Probe studies the emphasis was placed on gravitational science, but by the time of a workshop at Caltech in May 1978 (Neugebauer and Davies, 1978) there was about an equal division of interest between heliospheric physics and gravitation. The last of the gravitational studies for Solar Probe was conducted at JPL in 1983. Since that time, the Committee on Solar and Space Physics (CSSP) of the National Academy of Sciences has recommended the pursuit of a focused mission, featuring fields and particles instrumentation and emphasizing studies of the solar wind source region. Such a solar probe mission is currently listed as the 1994 Major New Star candidate. In the remainder of this review, the unique gravitational science that can be accomplished with a solar probe mission is reviewed. In addition the technology issues that were identified in 1980 by the ad hoc working group for Gravity and Relativity Science are addressed.

  4. Treatment of male infertility due to spinal cord injury using rectal probe electroejaculation: the Israeli experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heruti, R J; Katz, H; Menashe, Y; Weissenberg, R; Raviv, G; Madjar, I; Ohry, A

    2001-03-01

    Male infertility caused by anejaculation is common among patients with spinal cord injury (SCIP). The fertility options for SCIP have improved impressively over the past 10 years. We present the Israeli experience in the treatment of infertility in a large series of SCIP. The issues which are addressed include the treatment of ejaculatory dysfunction, seminal quality and fertility management in SCIP. Sexual rehabilitation clinic, Neuro-Rehabilitation department, Sheba Medical Center, Israel. Between June 1992 and May 1998, a total of 84 consecutive SCIP were treated in our clinic with electro-ejaculation (EEJ), representing a sample of the SCIP population, composed mostly of young men traumatically injured. The patients have sustained different levels and completeness of spinal injury. Among the patients 33 were interested in achieving pregnancy (39.3%), while the rest were interested in determining fertility potential for family. With EEJ, a low-current stimulation of the ejaculatory organs via a rectal probe is done. The collected semen is used for fertility determination or for fertilization. Eighty-four patients were treated by EEJ. Mean age was 31.3 and mean age at injury was 21.7. There were 29 cervical, 50 thoracic and five lumbar lesions. Sixty-three had complete injury (ASIA A) and 21 incomplete (ASIA B -15, ASIC C -5, ASIA D -1). Fifty-nine had upper motor neuron lesions, and 25 had lower motor neuron. A total of 355 stimulations were performed. Ejaculate was obtained in all patients in 350 stimulations (98.6%), and sperm was present in 74 patients (88.1%) in 296 of the stimulations (83.4%). Fairly good numbers of spermatozoa were obtained, whereas sperm motility and morphology of spermatozoa were low in most cases. A significant difference in sperm count, motility and morphology was noted between antegrade and retrograde samples. No significant improvement in sperm quality after four repeated consecutive stimulations was noted in 38 SCIP. Side effects

  5. Comparative Analysis of Biologically Relevant Response Curves in Gene Expression Experiments: Heteromorphy, Heterochrony, and Heterometry

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    To gain biological insights, investigators sometimes compare sequences of gene expression measurements under two scenarios (such as two drugs or species). For this situation, we developed an algorithm to fit, identify, and compare biologically relevant response curves in terms of heteromorphy (different curves), heterochrony (different transition times), and heterometry (different magnitudes). The curves are flat, linear, sigmoid, hockey-stick (sigmoid missing a steady state), transient (sigm...

  6. Information Retrieval eXperience (IRX): Towards a Human-Centered Personalized Model of Relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Frans; van den Broek, Egon; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Hoeber, O.; Li, Y.; Huang, X.J.

    2010-01-01

    We approach Information Retrieval (IR) from a User eXperience (UX) perspective. Through introducing a model for Information Retrieval eXperience (IRX), this paper operationalizes a perspective on IR that reaches beyond topicality. Based on a document's topicality, complexity, and emotional value, a

  7. Resistivity Correction Factor for the Four-Probe Method: Experiment III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masato; Nishii, Toshifumi; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Enjoji, Hideo; Iwata, Atsushi

    1990-04-01

    Experimental verification of the theoretically derived resistivity correction factor F is presented. Factor F is applied to a system consisting of a rectangular parallelepiped sample and a square four-probe array. Resistivity and sheet resistance measurements are made on isotropic graphites and crystalline ITO films. Factor F corrects experimental data and leads to reasonable resistivity and sheet resistance.

  8. Resistivity Correction Factor for the Four-Probe Method: Experiment I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masato; Yamaguchi, Shoji; Enjoji, Hideo

    1988-05-01

    Experimental verification of the theoretically derived resistivity correction factor (RCF) is presented. Resistivity and sheet resistance measurements by the four-probe method are made on three samples: isotropic graphite, ITO film and Au film. It is indicated that the RCF can correct the apparent variations of experimental data to yield reasonable resistivities and sheet resistances.

  9. Percutaneous probe stimulation for intraoperative neuromonitoring in total endoscopic thyroidectomy: A preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daqi; Li, Fang; Wu, Che-Wei; Liu, Xiaoli; Xin, Jingwei; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Sun, Hui

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and value of using intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) performed via percutaneous probe stimulation during total endoscopic thyroidectomy. This study prospectively enrolled a series of 132 consecutive patients with 156 recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLNs) at risk who received total endoscopic thyroidectomy performed via bilateral breast approach using standardized IONM. The stimulation probe was introduced into the working space by percutaneous puncture. During lateral thyroid dissection, the proximal RLN was periodically stimulated to monitor adverse electromyography (EMG) changes. Preoperative and postoperative vocal cord mobility was routinely examined with laryngofiberoscopy. All IONMs were successfully performed via percutaneous probe stimulation with no morbidity or scarring in the neck. Twelve nerves (7.7%) showed significant changes in EMG (amplitude reduction, 50% to 90% from baseline EMG) during the lateral thyroid dissection. Compression near the inferior thyroid artery (70%) and traction near the Berry's ligament (30%) were the most common causative mechanisms, and modification of the surgical maneuver resulted in partial recovery of the EMG changes (amplitude reduction, 10% to 80% before wound closure). Of the 12 nerves with adverse EMG changes (final amplitude reduction, 65% to 80%), 8 nerves showed temporary (3 months or less) vocal cord palsy. No cases of permanent vocal cord palsy occurred in this series. Percutaneous probe stimulation is a simple, effective, and safe method of performing IONM in total endoscopic thyroidectomy when the operating space is limited. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 1001-1007, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Gravity Probe B Experiment in 7D Space-and-Time Continuum

    OpenAIRE

    Portnov, Yu. A.

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with application of field equations in seven-dimensional space-and-time continuum to calculate geodetic and orbital gyroscope precession. It was demonstrated that unlike the classic theory the assumptions made completely correspond to the Gravity Probe B findings.

  11. Meaning making after a near-death experience: The relevance of intrapsychic and interpersonal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Simone; Sambin, Marco; Palmieri, Arianna

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the processes used by individuals to integrate a near-death experience (NDE) and to discuss the use of a meaning-making component to help people who have had such experiences. A psychotherapist interviewed six individuals who reported having had a NDE. Transcripts of the interviews were coded using an interpretative phenomenological analysis. The authors identified intrapsychic and interpersonal dynamics implicated in the individuals' meaning-making processes, and the problems encountered during their integration of the experience. Meaning-based approaches are a feasible theoretical framework for shedding light on the NDE and providing support for people who have lived through them.

  12. An electro-optical timing diagnostic for pump-probe experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azima, Armin

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond pump-probe experiments have extensively been used to follow atomic and molecular motion in time. The very intense extreme ultraviolet XUV light of the Free electron LASer in Hamburg FLASH facility allows to investigate fundamental processes such as direct one or few photon inner shell ionizations. A supplementary Ti:Sapphire near infrared femtosecond laser system allows to perform two-color pump-probe experiments with FLASH involving intense laser fields of hugely different photon energies. Within this work a bunch arrival measurement system has been built, which assists these two-color pump-probe experiments to reduce the temporal jitter of FLASH and to increase the temporal resolution. The diagnostic is based upon an electro-optical detection scheme and measures the relative arrival time between the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse and the electron bunch, which generates the self-amplified by stimulated emission SASE XUV pulse in the undulator section of FLASH. Key feature of the diagnostic is a 150 m long glass fiber pulse transport line, which inflicts non-linear dispersion. A dispersion control system to compensate for this higher order dispersion has been developed including the control and programming of a spatial light phase modulator. It was possible to transport a 90 fs FWHM short near infrared femtosecond laser pulse Fourier limited by the dispersion compensated glass fiber. The electro-optical signal induced by the FLASH electron bunch was generated, characterized and optimized. The signal features beside the designated bunch arrival timing capability the additional possibility to measure the longitudinal electron bunch density distribution of an arbitrary bunch of FLASH in a single shot with a temporal resolution of below 100 fs RMS. Timing and bunch analysis capabilities of the developed diagnostic have been cross-checked with other comparable diagnostics at FLASH like the transversal deflecting cavity structure named LOLA. Finally, the

  13. How Body Orientation Affects Concepts of Space, Time and Valence: Functional Relevance of Integrating Sensorimotor Experiences during Word Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmair, Martin; Ruiz Fernandez, Susana; Bury, Nils-Alexander; Gerjets, Peter; Fischer, Martin H; Bock, Otmar L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the functional relevance of the spatial concepts UP or DOWN for words that use these concepts either literally (space) or metaphorically (time, valence). A functional relevance would imply a symmetrical relationship between the spatial concepts and words related to these concepts, showing that processing words activate the related spatial concepts on one hand, but also that an activation of the concepts will ease the retrieval of a related word on the other. For the latter, the rotation angle of participant's body position was manipulated either to an upright or a head-down tilted body position to activate the related spatial concept. Afterwards participants produced in a within-subject design previously memorized words of the concepts space, time and valence according to the pace of a metronome. All words were related either to the spatial concept UP or DOWN. The results including Bayesian analyses show (1) a significant interaction between body position and words using the concepts UP and DOWN literally, (2) a marginal significant interaction between body position and temporal words and (3) no effect between body position and valence words. However, post-hoc analyses suggest no difference between experiments. Thus, the authors concluded that integrating sensorimotor experiences is indeed of functional relevance for all three concepts of space, time and valence. However, the strength of this functional relevance depends on how close words are linked to mental concepts representing vertical space.

  14. A qualitative exploration of people's experiences of pain neurophysiological education for chronic pain: The importance of relevance for the individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Victoria; King, Richard; Ryan, Cormac G; Martin, Denis J

    2016-04-01

    Pain neurophysiology education (PNE) is a distinct form of patient education in pain management. The aims of this study were to explore the experience of PNE for people with chronic pain and to gain insight into their understanding of their pain after PNE. This was a qualitative study, based on Interpretive Phenomenology Analysis, using individual semi-structured interviews to collect data. We recruited a purposive sample of 10 adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain (men and women; mean age 48 years; with a mean pain duration of 9 years) who had recently completed PNE delivered as a single 2-h group session. The interview transcripts were analysed for emerging themes. We identified three themes: perceived relevance for the individual participant; perceived benefits for the individual participant; and evidence of reconceptualisation. An interlinking narrative was the importance of relevance. Eight participants viewed the session as relevant and reported benefits ranging from a better understanding of pain, improved ability to cope with the pain, and some suggested improved levels of physical activity. Four of these participants showed evidence of reconceptualisation, which we describe as partial and patchy. Two participants reported no benefit and did not perceive the material delivered within PNE to be relevant to themselves. Relevance to the individual needs of a person with chronic pain may be a key factor in the success of PNE, and this is a particular challenge when it is delivered in a group situation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. How Relevant is an Expert Evaluation of User Experience based on a Psychological Needs-Driven Approach?

    OpenAIRE

    Lallemand, Carine; Koenig, Vincent; Gronier, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Many methods and tools have been proposed to assess the User Experience (UX) of interactive systems. However, while researchers have empirically studied the relevance and validity of several UX evaluation methods, few studies only have explored expert-based evaluation methods for the assessment of UX. If experts are able to assess something as complex and inherently subjective as UX, how they conduct such an evaluation and what criteria they rely on, thus remain open questions. In the present...

  16. Computational modeling of joint U.S.-Russian experiments relevant to magnetic compression/magnetized target fusion (MAGO/MTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) experiments, in which a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions, present some challenging computational modeling problems. Recently, joint experiments relevant to MTF (Russian acronym MAGO, for Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) have been performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). Modeling of target plasmas must accurately predict plasma densities, temperatures, fields, and lifetime; dense plasma interactions with wall materials must be characterized. Modeling of magnetically driven imploding solid liners, for compression of target plasmas, must address issues such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in the presence of material strength, and glide plane-liner interactions. Proposed experiments involving liner-on-plasma compressions to fusion conditions will require integrated target plasma and liner calculations. Detailed comparison of the modeling results with experiment will be presented.

  17. Frequency-domain modelling of gain in pump-probe experiment by an inhomogeneous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkyung; Oh, Sang Soon; Hess, Ortwin; Rho, Junsuk

    2018-02-01

    Introduction of a gain medium in lossy plasmonic metamaterials reduces and compensates losses or even amplifies an incident light often with nonlinear optical effect. Here, optical gain in a pump-probe experimental setup is effectively calculated in the frequency-domain by approximating a gain material as an inhomogeneous medium. Spatially varying local field amplitudes of the pump and probe beams are included in the model to reproduce the inhomogeneous gain effect, in which population inversion occurs most strongly near the surface and decays along the propagation direction. We demonstrate that transmission spectra calculated by this method agree well with finite-difference time-domain simulation results. This simplified approach of gain modelling offers an easy and reliable way to analyze wave propagation in a gain medium without nonlinear time-domain calculation.

  18. Supernova / Acceleration Probe: a Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Fermilab /Paris U., VI-VII /Yale U.

    2005-08-15

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universe's expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark

  19. Supernova/Acceleration Probe: A Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, C.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Craig, W.; Day, C.; DeJongh, F.; Deustua, S.; Diehl, T.; Dodelson, S.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmet, W.; Fouchez, D.; Frieman, J.; Fruchter, A.; Gerdes, D.; Gladney, L.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Hoff, M.; Holland, S.; Huffer, M.; Hui, L.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jelinsky, P.; Karcher, A.; Kent, S.; Kahn, S.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Kushner, G.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Le Fevre, O.; Levi, M.; Limon, P.; Lin, H.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Lorenzon, W.; Malina, R.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, P.; Massey, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Peoples, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Roe, N.; Rusin, D.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Samdja, G.; Smith, R.M.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Stebbine, A.; Stoughton, C.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle, G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Tucker, D.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.; Wester, W.

    2004-05-12

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universes expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy

  20. Resistivity Correction Factor for the Four-Probe Method: Experiment II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masato; Yamaguchi, Shoji; Nishii, Toshifumi; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Enjoji, Hideo

    1989-05-01

    Experimental verification of the theoretically derived resistivity correction factor F is presented. Factor F can be applied to a system consisting of a disk sample and a four-probe array. Measurements are made on isotropic graphite disks and crystalline ITO films. Factor F can correct the apparent variations of the data and lead to reasonable resistivities and sheet resistances. Here factor F is compared to other correction factors; i.e. FASTM and FJIS.

  1. Radial Probe Endobronchial Ultrasound for Peripheral Pulmonary Lesions: Initial Experience in an Indian Tertiary Healthcare Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Nair

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary nodules is confusing; therefore, an accurate and safe lung biopsy can prevent unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures. This study soughtto study the diagnostic yield, sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values (NPV and PPV of radial probe endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS-guided biopsy for peripheral pulmonary lesions. Materials and Methods: Patients referred to the Division of Pulmonary Medicine for evaluation of peripheral pulmonary lesions were subjected to radial probe EBUS-guided transbronchial lung biopsy under conscious sedation after reviewing positron emission tomography scan/computed tomography results. The obtained specimens were considered diagnostic when the cytological, histopathological, or microbiological diagnosis was consistent with the clinical presentations. Results: Totally, 14 procedures were performed on 13 patients with mean lesion size of 30.42 mm. Mean distance between the lesion and pleura was 1.17±0.68 cm, and the diagnostic yield of this technique was 78.57%. Furthermore, the sensitivity, specificity, and NPV were 70% (range: 34.75 to 93.33, 100% (range: 39.76 to 100, and 57.14% (range: 18.41 to 90.10, respectively. This procedure was not associated with any major complications. Conclusion: Radial probe EBUS with satisfactory diagnostic yield and low complication rate is a promising tool for early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Biologically Relevant Response Curves in Gene Expression Experiments: Heteromorphy, Heterochrony, and Heterometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stuart G

    2014-02-14

    To gain biological insights, investigators sometimes compare sequences of gene expression measurements under two scenarios (such as two drugs or species). For this situation, we developed an algorithm to fit, identify, and compare biologically relevant response curves in terms of heteromorphy (different curves), heterochrony (different transition times), and heterometry (different magnitudes). The curves are flat, linear, sigmoid, hockey-stick (sigmoid missing a steady state), transient (sigmoid missing two steady states), impulse (with peak or trough), step (with intermediate-level plateau), impulse+ (impulse with an extra parameter), step+ (step with an extra parameter), further characterized by upward or downward trend. To reduce overfitting, we fit the curves to every other response, evaluated the fit in the remaining responses, and identified the most parsimonious curves that yielded a good fit. We measured goodness of fit using a statistic comparable over different genes, namely the square root of the mean squared prediction error as a percentage of the range of responses, which we call the relative prediction error (RPE). We illustrated the algorithm using data on gene expression at 14 times in the embryonic development in two species of frogs. Software written in Mathematica is freely available.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Biologically Relevant Response Curves in Gene Expression Experiments: Heteromorphy, Heterochrony, and Heterometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart G. Baker

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To gain biological insights, investigators sometimes compare sequences of gene expression measurements under two scenarios (such as two drugs or species. For this situation, we developed an algorithm to fit, identify, and compare biologically relevant response curves in terms of heteromorphy (different curves, heterochrony (different transition times, and heterometry (different magnitudes. The curves are flat, linear, sigmoid, hockey-stick (sigmoid missing a steady state, transient (sigmoid missing two steady states, impulse (with peak or trough, step (with intermediate-level plateau, impulse+ (impulse with an extra parameter, step+ (step with an extra parameter, further characterized by upward or downward trend. To reduce overfitting, we fit the curves to every other response, evaluated the fit in the remaining responses, and identified the most parsimonious curves that yielded a good fit. We measured goodness of fit using a statistic comparable over different genes, namely the square root of the mean squared prediction error as a percentage of the range of responses, which we call the relative prediction error (RPE. We illustrated the algorithm using data on gene expression at 14 times in the embryonic development in two species of frogs. Software written in Mathematica is freely available.

  4. Design, Realization and Experiments with a new RF Head Probe Coil for Human Vocal Tract Imaging in an NMR device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Přibil, J.; Gogola, D.; Dermek, T.; Frollo, I.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is nowadays widely used in medicine for diagnostic imaging and in research studies. The modeling of the human vocal tract acoustics has recently attracted considerable interest. This paper describes the design, realization and first MR scan experiments with a new head probe coil for vocal tract imaging in the open-air MRI equipment working in a weak magnetic field up to 0.2 T. The paper also describes an experimental setting for sound recording during the MR imaging.

  5. Relevance of Nuclear Weapons Clean-Up Experience to Dirty Bomb Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vantine, H C; Crites, T R

    2002-08-19

    During the past 50 years, the United States has experienced 32 major nuclear weapons accidents, nine of which released special nuclear material to the environment. Response to these accidents, coupled with recovery experience following the Russian satellite reentry and weapons test site cleanup, form the basis for determining actions that might be required following a nuclear terrorist event involving the release of radioactive material. Though valuable information has been gained following the recovery from various commercial accidents, most notably the Chernobyl nuclear power plant failure and the dismantled radiography source in the Brazilian city of Goi nia, this paper will focus on the lessons learned from the U.S. nuclear weapons program.

  6. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  7. Aboriginal Australians' experience of social capital and its relevance to health and wellbeing in urban settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne-Yung, Kathryn; Ziersch, Anna; Baum, Fran; Gallaher, Gilbert

    2013-11-01

    Social capital has been linked to physical and mental health. While definitions of social capital vary, all include networks of social relationships and refer to the subsequent benefits and disadvantages accrued to members. Research on social capital for Aboriginal Australians has mainly focused on discrete rural and remote Aboriginal contexts with less known about the features and health and other benefits of social capital in urban settings. This paper presents findings from in-depth interviews with 153 Aboriginal people living in urban areas on their experiences of social capital. Of particular interest was how engagement in bonding and bridging networks influenced health and wellbeing. Employing Bourdieu's relational theory of capital where resources are unequally distributed and reproduced in society we found that patterns of social capital are strongly associated with economic, social and cultural position which in turn reflects the historical experiences of dispossession and disadvantage experienced by Aboriginal Australians. Social capital was also found to both reinforce and influence Aboriginal cultural identity, and had both positive and negative impacts on health and wellbeing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy in head and neck malignancies: early preclinical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englhard, Anna; Girschick, Susanne; Mack, Brigitte; Volgger, Veronika; Gires, Oliver; Conderman, Christian; Stepp, Herbert; Betz, Christian Stephan

    2013-06-01

    Background: Malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) are conventionally diagnosed by white light endoscopy, biopsy and histopathology. Probe-based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (pCLE) is a novel non-invasive technique which offers in vivo surface and sub-surface imaging of tissue. It produces pictures of cellular architecture comparable to histology without the need for biopsy. It has already been successfully used in different clinical subspecialties to help in the diagnosis and treatment planning of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. PCLE needs to be used in combination with specific or non-specific contrast agents. In this study we evaluated the potential use of pCLE in combination with non-specific and specific contrast agents to distinguish between healthy mucosa and invasive carcinoma. Methods: Tissue samples from healthy mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were taken during surgery. After topical application of three different contrast agents, samples were examined using different pCLE-probes and a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM). Images were then compared to the corresponding histological slides and cryosections. Results: Initial results show that pCLE in combination with fluorophores allows visualization of cellular and structural components. Imaging of different layers was possible using three distinct pCLEprobes. Conclusion: pCLE is a promising non-invasive technique that may be a useful adjunct in the evaluation, diagnosis and treatment planning of head and neck malignancies.

  9. The Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) Experiment on the Huygens Entry Probe of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasko, M. G.; Buchhauser, D.; Bushroe, M.; Dafoe, L. E.; Doose, L. R.; Eibl, A.; Fellows, C.; Farlane, E. M.; Prout, G. M.; Pringle, M. J.; Rizk, B.; See, C.; Smith, P. H.; Tsetsenekos, K.

    2002-07-01

    The payload of the Huygens Probe into the atmosphere of Titan includes the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR). This instrument includes an integrated package of several optical instruments built around a silicon charge coupled device (CCD) detector, a pair of linear InGaAs array detectors, and several individual silicon detectors. Fiber optics are used extensively to feed these detectors with light collected from three frame imagers, an upward and downward-looking visible spectrometer, an upward and downward looking near-infrared spectrometer, upward and downward looking violet phtotometers, a four-channel solar aerole camera, and a sun sensor that determines the azimuth and zenith angle of the sun and measures the flux in the direct solar beam at 940 nm. An onboard optical calibration system uses a small lamp and fiber optics to track the relative sensitivity of the different optical instruments relative to each other during the seven year cruise to Titan. A 20 watt lamp and collimator are used to provide spectrally continuous illumination of the surface during the last 100 m of the descent for measurements of the reflection spectrum of the surface. The instrument contains software and hardware data compressors to permit measurements of upward and downward direct and diffuse solar flux between 350 and 1700 nm in some 330 spectral bands at approximately 2 km vertical resolution from an alititude of 160 km to the surface. The solar aureole camera measures the brightness of a 6° wide strip of the sky from 25 to 75° zenith angle near and opposite the azimuth of the sun in two passbands near 500 and 935 nm using vertical and horizontal polarizers in each spectral channel at a similar vertical resolution. The downward-looking spectrometers provide the reflection spectrum of the surface at a total of some 600 locations between 850 and 1700 nm and at more than 3000 locations between 480 and 960 nm. Some 500 individual images of the surface are expected which can

  10. Long-term flow-through column experiments and their relevance to natural granitoid weathering rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Art F.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Lawrence, Corey R.; Vivit, Davison V.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-04-01

    Four pairs of fresh and partly-weathered granitoids, obtained from well-characterized watersheds-Merced River, CA, USA; Panola, GA, USA; Loch Vale, CO, USA, and Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico-were reacted in columns under ambient laboratory conditions for 13.8 yrs, the longest running experimental weathering study to date. Low total column mass losses (surface roughening of primary silicate grains. BET surface area (SBET) increased, primarily due to Fe-oxyhydroxide precipitation. Surface areas returned to within factors of 2-3 of their original values after dithionite extraction. Miscible displacement experiments indicated homogeneous plug flow with negligible immobile water, commonly cited for column experiments. Fresh granitoid effluent solute concentrations initially declined rapidly, followed by much slower decreases over the next decade. Weathered granitoid effluent concentrations increased modestly over the same time period, indicating losses of natural Fe-oxide and/or clay coatings and the increased exposure of primary mineral surfaces. Corresponding (fresh and weathered) elemental effluent concentrations trended toward convergence during the last decade of reaction. NETPATH/PHREEQC code simulations indicated non-stoichiometric dissolution involving Ca release from disseminated calcite and excess K release from interlayer biotite. Effluent 87Sr/85Sr ratios reflected a progressive weathering sequence beginning and ending with 87Sr/85Sr values of plagioclase with an additional calcite input and a radiogenic biotite excursion proportional to the granitoid ages. Effluents became thermodynamically saturated with goethite and gibbsite, slightly under-saturated with kaolinite and strongly under-saturated with plagioclase, consistent with kinetically-limited weathering in which solutes such as Na varied with column flow rates. Effluent Na concentrations showed no clear trend with time during the last decade of reaction (fresh granitoids) or increased slowly with time

  11. Long-term flow-through column experiments and their relevance to natural granitoid weathering rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Arthur F.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Lawrence, Corey R.; Vivit, Davison V.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Four pairs of fresh and partly-weathered granitoids, obtained from well-characterized watersheds—Merced River, CA, USA; Panola, GA, USA; Loch Vale, CO, USA, and Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico—were reacted in columns under ambient laboratory conditions for 13.8 yrs, the longest running experimental weathering study to date. Low total column mass losses (flow rates. Effluent Na concentrations showed no clear trend with time during the last decade of reaction (fresh granitoids) or increased slowly with time (weathered granitoids). Analysis of cumulative Na release indicated that plagioclase dissolution achieved steady state in 3 of the 4 fresh granitoids during the last decade of reaction. Surface-area normalized plagioclase dissolution rates exhibited a narrow range (0.95 to 1.26 10-13 moles m-2 s-1), in spite of significant stoichiometric differences (An0.21 to An0.50). Rates were an order of magnitude slower than previously reported in shorter duration experiments but generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude faster than corresponding natural analogs. CrunchFlow simulations indicated that more than a hundredfold decrease in column flow rates would be required to produce near-saturation reaction affinities that would start to slow plagioclase weathering to real-world levels. Extending simulations to approximate long term weathering in naturally weathered profiles required additional decreases in the intrinsic plagioclase dissolution and kaolinite precipitation rates and relatively large decreases in the fluid flow rate, implying that exposure to reactive mineral surfaces is significantly limited in the natural environment compared to column experiments.

  12. Border cases between autonomy and relevance: Economic sciences in Berlin--A natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düppe, Till

    2015-06-01

    The faculty of economics at today's Humboldt University in Berlin, as no other institution of economics, has witnessed three radical ruptures in its history: in 1933, National Socialism replaced the pluralism prevailing in the Weimar Republic by imposing a "German economics"; after WWII, GDR authorities replaced this NS regime by imposing a Marxist imperative, which after the fall of the wall was replaced by the Western standards of neoclassical economics. In reconstructing these three reforms, institutional history can serve as a context in which questions about the political nature of economic knowledge can be answered that remain speculative in a conceptual context. I thus present a natural experiment in the political epistemology of economics: How do economists respond to, resist, and stabilize, changing political regimes? How do economists renegotiate the autonomy of economic knowledge given changing demands as of its social task? Among others, I show that contrary to Robert Merton's old, but still widely held thesis in political epistemology-that the values of science are compatible only with democratic regimes-the totalitarian and authoritarian regimes created better conditions for methodological pluralism in economics than democratic society. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of Accretion as Grain Growth Mechanism in Astrophysically Relevant Water–Ice Dusty Plasma Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Ryan S.; Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M. [Applied Physics and Materials Science, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The grain growth process in the Caltech water–ice dusty plasma experiment has been studied using a high-speed camera and a long-distance microscope lens. It is observed that (i) the ice grain number density decreases fourfold as the average grain major axis increases from 20 to 80 μ m, (ii) the major axis length has a log-normal distribution rather than a power-law dependence, and (iii) no collisions between ice grains are apparent. The grains have a large negative charge resulting in strong mutual repulsion and this, combined with the fractal character of the ice grains, prevents them from agglomerating. In order for the grain kinetic energy to be sufficiently small to prevent collisions between ice grains, the volumetric packing factor (i.e., ratio of the actual volume to the volume of a circumscribing ellipsoid) of the ice grains must be less than ∼0.1 depending on the exact relative velocity of the grains in question. Thus, it is concluded that direct accretion of water molecules is very likely to dominate the observed ice grain growth.

  14. Soft and hard probes of high-temperature matter with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions provide an experimental setting for studying a variety of novel QCD phenomena. In particular, they enable the study of QCD at high temperatures and provide accessibility to a medium, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), containing a high density of unscreened color charges. Measurements performed in the LHC era have revolutionized our understanding of phenomena such as harmonic flow and jet quenching in the QGP and have altered the paradigm underlying proton-ion collisions. The high-quality calorimetry make the ATLAS detector an ideal apparatus to study jet observables and the large acceptance enables detailed measurements of soft particle correlations. In this talk I will summarize measurements performed by the ATLAS Collaboration. These include jet observables that are directly sensitive to jet quenching as well as a comprehensive set of color-neutral probes that provide control over hard scattering rates. Also presented are flow measurements that elucidate the role of initial geo...

  15. Using ferrule-top opto-mechanical probes as a new tool in VCSEL reliability experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoorn, Camiel H; Ariese, Freek; Iannuzzi, Davide; Mank, Arjan J G

    2015-11-16

    Today, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) are used in many high-end applications, for which the laser lifetime is a critical parameter. Changes in the spatial distribution of the various emission modes of the VCSEL can be used as an early sign of device degradation, enhancing the speed and detail of failure mode analysis. We have developed a ferrule-top combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) probe that can be used to analyze the transverse mode pattern of the 850 nm radiation at a <200 nm spatial resolution. During accelerated lifetime testing, the newly developed method shows that small local changes in the optical output can already be detected before any sign of device degradation is observed with conventional methods.

  16. Relevance of excitable media theory and retinal spreading depression experiments in preclinical pharmacological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V M, Fernandes de Lima; W, Hanke

    2014-09-01

    In preclinical neuropharmacological research, molecular, cell-based, and systems using animals are well established. On the tissue level the situation is less comfortable, although during the last decades some effort went into establishing such systems, i.e. using slices of the vertebrate brain together with optical and electrophysiological techniques. However, these methods are neither fast, nor can they be automated or upscaled. By contrast, the chicken retina can be used as a suitable model. It is easy accessible and can be kept alive in vitro for hours up to days. Due to its structure, in addition the retina displays remarkable intrinsic optical signals, which can be easily used in experiments. Also to electrophysiological methods the retina is well accessible. In excitable tissue, to which the brain and the retina belong, propagating excitation waves can be expected, and the spreading depression is such a phenomenon. It has been first observed in the forties of the last century. Later, Martins-Ferreira established it in the chicken retina (retinal spreading depression or RSD). The electrophysiological characteristics of it are identical with those of the cortical SD. The metabolic differences are known and can be taken into account. The experimental advantage of the RSD compared to the cortical SD is the pronounced intrinsic optical signal (IOS) associated with the travelling wave. This is due to the maximum transparency of retinal tissue in the functional state; thus any physiological event will change it markedly and therefore can be easily seen even by naked eye. The theory can explain wave spread in one (action potentials), two (RSDs) and three dimensions (one heart beat). In this review we present the experimental and the excitable media context for the data interpretation using as example the cholinergic pharmacology in relation to functional syndromes. We also discuss the intrinsic optical signal and how to use it in pre-clinical research.

  17. Picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe experiments using a gated single-photon-counting area detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejdrup, T.; Lemke, H.T.; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA...... limited time-resolution of 60 ps using the gated PILATUS detector. This is the first demonstration of X-ray pulse duration limited data recorded using an area detector without the use of a mechanical chopper array at the beamline........ The capability of the gated PILATUS detector to selectively detect the signal from a given X-ray pulse in 24 bunch mode at the APS storage ring is demonstrated. A test experiment performed on polycrystalline organic thin films of [alpha]-perylene illustrates the possibility of reaching an X-ray pulse duration...

  18. Laboratory experiments on ammoniated clay minerals with relevance for asteroid (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Simone; Stefani, Stefania; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Ammannito, Eleonora

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations with VIR spectrometer onboard Dawn spacecraft [1] have suggested the presence of ammoniated phyllosilicates widespread on the surface of asteroid (1) Ceres [2,3]. The global surface composition of Ceres as suggested by VIR average infrared spectrum in the 1-4 micron range appears to be due to a mixture of NH4-bearing phyllosilicates, serpentine, carbonates and a dark absorbing phase (magnetite or amorphous carbon) [2]. An absorption feature occurring near 3.1 micron in the average spectrum is considered the main evidence for the presence of NH4-bearing phase; nevertheless in the past several authors tried to explain this feature, as observed with telescopic spectra, invoking the presence of brucite, cronstedtite, water ice or clays [4]. In this project we are carrying out laboratory experiments with the aim of studying ammoniated phyllosilicates in the visible-infrared range. A suite of 9 clay minerals has been used for this study, including illite, nontronite and montmorillonite. In order to produce the ammoniated species we followed a modified procedure based on the one described in Bishop et al. (2002) [5]. All minerals were reduced in fine grain size (treated with ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) and heated in oven at 200°C for 24 h at normal pressure conditions, before the measurements. Reflectance spectra were acquired with the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) in use at INAF-IAPS/P-LAB, in the range 1-14 μm, on both clay minerals and NH4-treated clays. Almost all spectra of NH4-treated species are characterized by the occurrence of several new absorption features, appearing at different wavelengths near 2, 3, 6 and 7 micron. In some cases the spectral shape of already existent absorption bands resulted deeply modified. A few species did not show the appearance of new features. These results suggest that NH4+ ions fix in various ways in different minerals. Nontronite and montmorillonite appear to be the best candidates, among the

  19. RAI1 Alternate Probe Identifies Additional Breast Cancer Cases as Amplified Following Equivocal HER2 Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Testing: Experience From a National Reference Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ling; Geiersbach, Katherine B; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Gulbahce, H Evin

    2017-02-01

    -In 2013 the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists updated the HER2 guidelines and changed the equivocal category for HER2 in situ hybridization testing to an average HER2 copy number of 4.0 to 5.9 with a HER2:CEP17 ratio of less than 2.0 and proposed retesting, with an option of using another control probe to avoid false-negative results. RAI1, located at band position 17p11.2, is a popular alternate probe locus for retesting equivocal changes. -To review experience with the RAI1 alternate probe in HER2 fluorescence in situ hybridization equivocal breast cancers. -Primary and metastatic breast cancers with equivocal HER2 fluorescence in situ hybridization, retested with an alternate (RAI1) probe, were identified. HER2, RAI1, and CEP17 copy numbers, HER2 to control probe ratios, and genetic heterogeneity were recorded. Hematoxylin-eosin-stained slides were reviewed for type and grade of cancer. -Of 876 cases tested with CEP17 as the reference probe, 97 (11.1%) had equivocal HER2 fluorescence in situ hybridization results. Additional testing with the RAI1 probe classified 39.2% cases (38 of 97) as amplified with a HER2:RAI1 ratio ranging from 2.0 to 3.2 (mean, 2.37); 3.1% (3 of 97) were still unclassifiable because of a deletion of RAI1. -RAI1 identified close to 40% of original HER2 fluorescence in situ hybridization equivocal cases as amplified, making these patients eligible for targeted therapies. It is not known whether guidelines for US Food and Drug Administration-approved probes can be extrapolated to alternate probes when an alternate control probe shows losses or gains. Because of the lack of guidelines for reporting HER2 status with alternate probes, laboratories face challenges in interpreting results.

  20. Toward sub-femtosecond pump-probe experiments: a dispersionless autocorrelator with attosecond resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constant, E.; Mevel, E.; Zair, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Salin, F. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Talence (FR). Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA)

    2001-07-01

    We designed a dispersionless autocorrelator with a sub-femtosecond resolution suitable for the characterization of ultrashort X-UV pulses. We present a proof of feasibility experiment with 11 fs infrared pulses. (orig.)

  1. Saving Your Students' Skin. Undergraduate Experiments That Probe UV Protection by Sunscreens and Sunglasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, James R.; Scalettar, Bethe A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes absorption spectroscopy experiments that allow students to explore the mechanisms by which sunscreens and sunglasses provide protection from ultraviolet radiation. Exposes students to absorption phenomena in an engaging way. (DDR)

  2. A Polarized Drell-Yan Experiment to Probe the Dynamics of the Nucleon Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinjan, David William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-26

    After presenting the nucleon spin puzzle as motivation for the experiment, the authors turn to a theoretical overview: sea quark flavor asymmetry and meson cloud model, and accessing quark angular momentum via the Sivers function. Then they describe the experimental equipment and conditions needed to carry out a fixed, polarized target Drell-Yan experiment, E1039. Data taking is expected to start in the middle of 2016.

  3. Perfect/complete scattering experiments probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinpoppen, Hans; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter.  The feasibility of such perfect' and-or `complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory.  It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment `complete'.  The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases.  This book captures the spi...

  4. A priori checking of the light-response and data quality before extended data collection in pump–probe photocrystallography experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, Philip; Makal, Anna; Fournier, Bertrand; Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Kami; #324; ski, Rados; #322; aw; Basuroy, Krishnayan; Trzop, Elzbieta (Buffalo)

    2017-01-23

    In picosecond and slower pump–probe diffraction experiments, collection of response–ratio correlation sets prior to full data collection provides an invaluable confirmation of the existence of a light-induced signal prior to full data collection. If a response to light exposure is observed, the quality of the data being collected can be assessed. We present a number of such correlation plots both for synchrotron and in-house pump–probe data collection.

  5. Dynamics in a Water Interfacial Boundary Layer Investigated with IR Polarization-Selective Pump-Probe Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Rongfeng; Yan, Chang; Nishida, Jun; Fayer, Michael D

    2017-05-04

    The dynamics of water molecules near the surfactant interface in large Aerosol-OT reverse micelles (RMs) (w 0 = 16-25) was investigated with IR polarization-selective pump-probe experiments using the SeCN - anion as a vibrational probe. Linear absorption spectra of RMs (w 0 = 25-2) can be decomposed into the weighted sum of the SeCN - spectra in bulk water and the spectrum of the SeCN - anion interacting with the interfacial sulfonate head groups (w 0 = 1). The spectra of the large RMs, w 0 ≥ 16, are overwhelmingly dominated by the bulk water component. Anisotropy decays (orientational relaxation) of the anion for w 0 ≥ 16 displayed bulk water relaxation (1.4 and 4.5 ps) plus an additional slow decay with a time constant of ∼13 ps. The amplitude of the slow decay was too large to be associated with SeCN - in contact with the interface on the basis of the linear spectrum decomposition. The results indicate that the observed slow components arise from SeCN - in a water boundary layer, in which water molecules are perturbed by the interface but are not directly associated with it. This layer is the transition between water in direct contact with the interface and bulk water in the large RM cores. In the boundary layer, the water dynamics is slow compared to that in bulk water.

  6. Progress in Barium Tagging on a Cryogenic Probe for the nEXO Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craycraft, Adam; Walton, Timothy; Chambers, Christopher; Fairbank, William; nEXO Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    nEXO is a next-generation experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of the isotope Xe-136 in a liquid xenon time projection chamber. Positive observation of this decay would determine the nature of the neutrino to be a Majorana particle. Detecting the presence of the daughter Ba-136 at a decay site (called ``barium tagging'') provides strong rejection of backgrounds. Barium tagging may be available for a second phase of nEXO operation, allowing neutrino mass sensitivity beyond the inverted mass hierarchy. Here we present progress on a barium tagging method that involves trapping the barium ion/atom in solid xenon (SXe) at the end of a cold probe, and then detecting the ion/atom by its fluorescence in the SXe. Recent results on imaging small numbers of Ba atoms in SXe on a sapphire window, and progress toward capture of Ba atoms/ions on a cold probe and extraction from LXe, will be presented.

  7. Probing the frontiers of particle physics with tabletop-scale experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMille, David; Doyle, John M; Sushkov, Alexander O

    2017-09-08

    The field of particle physics is in a peculiar state. The standard model of particle theory successfully describes every fundamental particle and force observed in laboratories, yet fails to explain properties of the universe such as the existence of dark matter, the amount of dark energy, and the preponderance of matter over antimatter. Huge experiments, of increasing scale and cost, continue to search for new particles and forces that might explain these phenomena. However, these frontiers also are explored in certain smaller, laboratory-scale "tabletop" experiments. This approach uses precision measurement techniques and devices from atomic, quantum, and condensed-matter physics to detect tiny signals due to new particles or forces. Discoveries in fundamental physics may well come first from small-scale experiments of this type. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  8. Investigating two-photon double ionization of D2 by XUV-Pump -- XUV-Probe experiments at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLASH Collaboration; Jiang, Y.; Rudenko, A.; Perez-Torres, J.; Foucar, L.; Kurka, M.; Kuhnel, K.; Toppin, M.; Plesiat, E.; Morales, F.; Martin, F.; Herrwerth, O.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M.; Jahnke, T.; Dorner, R.; Sanz-Vicario, J.; van Tilborg, J.; Belkacem, A.; Schulz, M.; Ueda, K.; Zouros, T.; Dusterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Schroter, C.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2010-08-02

    Using a novel split-mirror set-up attached to a Reaction Microscope at the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) we demonstrate an XUV-pump -- XUV-probe ((hbar omega = 38 eV) experiment by tracing the ultra-fast nuclear wave-packet motion in the D2+ (1s sigma g-state) with<10 fs time resolution. Comparison with time-dependent calculations yields excellent agreement with the measured vibrational period of 22+-4 fs in D2+, points to the importance of the inter-nuclear distance dependent ionization probability and paves the way to control sequential and non-sequential two-photon double ionization contributions.

  9. A high-altitude balloon experiment to probe stratospheric electric fields from low latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gurubaran

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's electrical environment hosts a giant electrical circuit, often referred to as the global electric circuit (GEC, linking the various sources of electrical generators located in the lower atmosphere, the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. The middle atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere has been traditionally believed to be passively transmitting electric fields generated elsewhere. Some observations have reported anomalously large electric fields at these altitudes, and the scientific community has had to revisit the earlier hypothesis time and again. At stratospheric altitudes and especially at low latitudes, horizontal electric fields are believed to be of ionospheric origin. Though measurements of these fields from a balloon platform are challenging because of their small magnitudes (around a few mV m−1, a suitably designed long-duration balloon experiment capable of detecting such small fields can provide useful information on the time evolution of ionospheric electric fields, which is otherwise possible only using radar or satellite in situ measurements. We present herein details of one such experiment, BEENS (Balloon Experiment on the Electrodynamics of Near Space, carried out from a low-latitude site in India. The instrument package for this experiment is comprised of four deployable booms for measurements of horizontal electric fields and one inclined boom for vertical electric field measurements, all equipped with conducting spheres at the tip. The experiment was conducted from Hyderabad (17.5° N, 78.6° E during the post-midnight hours on 14 December 2013. In spite of a few shortcomings we report herein, a noticeable feature of the observations has been the detection of horizontal electric fields of ∼ 5 mV m−1 at the stratospheric altitudes of ∼ 35 km.

  10. Moving from irrelevant intellectual capital (IC) reporting to value-relevant IC disclosures: key learning points from the Danish experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaper, Stefan; Nielsen, Christian; Roslender, Robin

    2017-01-01

    companies involved in the DGP between 1999 and 2003. Findings – The interviews suggested a rather critical perspective towards IC reporting using the ICS framework. Despite the attempt of the DGP to establish a reporting standard, a range of experiments resulted in changes to the framework’s original...... with a recognised reporting vehicle such as the annual report, were also encountered. Research limitations/implications – The implications of this study are that timely, value-relevant IC disclosures and compliant reporting, primarily for accountability purposes, have the potential to coexist. In addition......Purpose – Informed by the findings of a follow-up research study of companies originally involved in the Danish Guideline Project (DGP) for intellectual capital statements (ICS), the purpose of this paper is to provide valuable insights for a potential shift from intellectual capital (IC) reporting...

  11. A corrective emotional experience - or just a bit of exercise? The relevance of interpersonal learning in Exercise on prescription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    2011-01-01

    Roessler, K. K. (2011). A corrective emotional experience - or just a bit of exercise? The relevance of interpersonal learning in Exercise on prescription. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology. The objective of the present study was to examine psychological aspects of intra- and interpersonal...... learning for patients with Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia treated with Exercise on prescription. The research design consists of a qualitative investigation of 30 patients in Denmark undergoing a community-based exercise treatment at baseline, a post-intervention investigation after four...... a person could not handle in the past - to occur requires two conditions: the group and the environment must be experienced as sufficiently safe, and there must be feedback to permit reality-testing. However, existential psychological aspects such as fear of dying or the universality of suffering triggered...

  12. Optical afterburner for an x-ray free electron laser as a tool for pump-probe experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Saldin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme for two-color operation of an x-ray self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL. The scheme is based on an intrinsic feature of such a device: chaotic modulations of electron beam energy and energy spread on the scale of FEL coherence length are converted into large density modulations on the same scale with the help of a dispersion section, installed behind the x-ray undulator. Powerful radiation is then generated with the help of a dedicated radiator (like an undulator that selects a narrow spectral line, or one can simply use, for instance, broadband edge radiation. A typical radiation wavelength can be as short as a FEL coherence length, and can be redshifted by increasing the dispersion section strength. In practice it means the wavelength ranges from vacuum ultraviolet to infrared. The long-wavelength radiation pulse is naturally synchronized with the x-ray pulse and can be either directly used in pump-probe experiments or cross correlated with a high-power pulse from a conventional laser system. In this way experimenters overcome jitter problems and can perform pump-probe experiments with femtosecond resolution. Additional possibilities like on-line monitoring of x-ray pulse duration (making “optical replica” of an x-ray pulse are also discussed in the paper. The proposed scheme is very simple, cheap, and robust, and therefore can be easily realized in facilities like FLASH, European XFEL, LCLS, and SCSS.

  13. Probing light sterile neutrino signatures at reactor and Spallation Neutron Source neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Papoulias, D. K.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the impact of a fourth sterile neutrino at reactor and Spallation Neutron Source neutrino detectors. Specifically, we explore the discovery potential of the TEXONO and COHERENT experiments to subleading sterile neutrino effects through the measurement of the coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering event rate. Our dedicated χ2-sensitivity analysis employs realistic nuclear structure calculations adequate for high purity sub-keV threshold Germanium detectors.

  14. Recent Results from the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) Experiment in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Donald C.; PAPER Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) experiment is detection of the power spectrum of the fluctuations of 21cm emission at high redshift (7-11) when the first stars were forming. The design of PAPER consists of broad-band dipoles, active balun, coaxial cable transmission, analog gain/filtering, digitization and correlation. Analysis of PAPER data requires RFI excision, iterative calibration and source removal, and full-hemisphere imaging. A 16-dipole engineering test array has been deployed at the NRAO Green Bank, WV site; a 4-dipole was deployed in Western Australia in 2007. See Parsons et al. arXiv:0904.2334 for a brief description of the status of the experiment in the middle of 2009. This poster will describe the first deployment of a PAPER experiment at the Karoo SKA development site in South Africa. Our work has been supported by the National Science Foundation; we thank the South African MeerKAT team for their generous contributions.

  15. Discrepancies between adolescents' attributed relevance and experiences regarding communication are associated with poorer client participation and learning processes in psychosocial care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Margot; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Metselaar, Janneke; Knorth, Erik J.; De Winter, Andrea F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine adolescents' attributed relevance and experiences regarding communication, and whether discrepancies in these are associated with clients' participation and learning processes in psychosocial care. Methods: Adolescents receiving psychosocial care (n = 211) completed measures of

  16. Lab Experiments Probe Interactions Between Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents and 3D Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauria, K.; Andrews, B. J.; Manga, M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted scaled laboratory experiments of unconfined dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) to examine interactions between three - dimensional obstacles and dilute PDCs. While it is known that PDCs can surmount barriers by converting kinetic energy into potential energy, the signature of topography on PDC dynamics is unclear. To examine the interplay between PDCs and topography, we turbulently suspended heated and ambient-temperature 20 μm talc powder in air within an 8.5 x 6.1 x 2.6 m tank. Experimental parameters (Froude number, densimetric and thermal Richardson number, particle Stokes and Settling numbers) were scaled such that the experimental currents were dynamically similar to natural PCS. The Reynolds number, however, is much smaller than in natural currents, but still large enough for the flows to be turbulent. We placed cylindrical and ridge-like objects in the path of the currents, illuminated the currents with orthogonal laser sheets, and recorded each experiment with high definition cameras. We observed currents surmounting ridge-like barriers (barrier height = current height). Slanted ridges redirected the currents upward and parallel to the upstream face of the ridges (~45° from horizontal). Down stream of the slanted ridges, ambient-temperature currents reattached to the floor. By comparison, hot currents reversed buoyancy and lifted off. These observations suggest that obstacles enhance air entrainment, a process key to affecting runout distance and the depletion of fine particles in ignimbrites. Moreover, we observed vortex shedding in the wake of cylinders. Our experiments demonstrate that barriers of various shapes affect PDC dynamics and can shorten PDC runout distances. Understanding the effects of topography on PDCs is required for interpreting many deposits because processes such as vortex shedding and topographically-induced changes in turbulent length scales and entrainment likely leave depositional signatures.

  17. Observational constraints of stellar collapse: Diagnostic probes of nature's extreme matter experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Fryer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Supernovae are Nature's high-energy, high density laboratory experiments, reaching densities in excess of nuclear densities and temperatures above 10 MeV. Astronomers have built up a suite of diagnostics to study these supernovae. If we can utilize these diagnostics, and tie them together with a theoretical understanding of supernova physics, we can use these cosmic explosions to study the nature of matter at these extreme densities and temperatures. Capitalizing on these diagnostics will require understanding a wide range of additional physics. Here we review the diagnostics and the physics neeeded to use them to learn about the supernova engine, and ultimate nuclear physics.

  18. Danish Experiences with Deposit Probe Measurements in Grate and Pulverized Fuel Biomass Power Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Several measuring campaigns with focus on deposition behavior have been conducted at full-scale power plants firing biomass in Denmark. These campaigns have been reviewed in this work. The focus is the obtained experiences on deposit formation, shedding and chemistry. When comparing results from...... grate- and suspension-firing, it is found that the rates of deposit formation are comparable, while the chemical composition of the fly ashes are quite different, even for the same type of fuel. The flue gas temperature is considered to be an important parameter in the deposit behavior. Increasing...

  19. The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF : a sensitive probe for new physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbrunot, Chloé; Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doornbos, J.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hurst, C.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, N.; Kettell, S.; Kuno, Y.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L.; Numao, T.; Poutissou, R.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.; Yoshida, M.

    2011-09-01

    Study of rare decays is an important approach for exploring physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). The branching ratio of the helicity suppressed pion decays, R = , is one of the most accurately calculated decay process involving hadrons and has so far provided the most stringent test of the hypothesis of electron-muon universality in weak interactions. The branching ratio has been calculated in the SM to better than 0.01% accuracy to be RSM = 1.2353(1) × 10 . The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF, which started taking physics data in September 2009, aims to reach an accuracy five times better than the previous experiments, so as to confront the theoretical calculation at the level of ±0.1%. If a deviation from the RSM is found, "new physics" beyond the SM, at potentially very high mass scales (up to 1000 TeV), could be revealed. Alternatively, sensitive constraints on hypotheses can be obtained for interactions involving pseudoscalar or scalar interactions. So far, 4 million π+ → e+ νe ue events have been accumulated by PIENU. This paper will outline the physics motivations, describe the apparatus and techniques designed to achieve high precision and present the latest results.

  20. Probing supersymmetry based on precise jet measurements at the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Goebel, Kristin; Sander, Christian

    Abstract The search for new physics beyond the standard model of particle physics is one of the main goals of the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Many theories, for instance supersymmetry, involve the possible production of new coloured particles which feature jets as their experimental signature. Thus, it is important to have a good understanding of jet-related properties in order to allow such searches. In the rst part of this thesis, a measurement of the jet transverse-momentum resolution is presented. This is based on the analysis of proton-proton collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of p s = 8 TeV by the CMS experiment. The measurement utilizes the transverse momentum balance of dijet events at particle level. The main focus is on the determination of the data-to-simulation ratio of the jet transverse-momentum resolution which can be used to correct the jet resolution in simulated events to match the one observed in data. This ratio has been determined with a signicantly i...

  1. Covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water can be probed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgabarty, Hossam; Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-09-15

    The concept of covalency is widely used to describe the nature of intermolecular bonds, to explain their spectroscopic features and to rationalize their chemical behaviour. Unfortunately, the degree of covalency of an intermolecular bond cannot be directly measured in an experiment. Here we established a simple quantitative relationship between the calculated covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water and the anisotropy of the proton magnetic shielding tensor that can be measured experimentally. This relationship enabled us to quantify the degree of covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water using the experimentally measured anisotropy. We estimated that the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is on the order of 10  m while the stabilization energy due to this charge transfer is ∼15 kJ mol(-1). The physical insight into the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding provided in this work will facilitate new studies of intermolecular bonding in a variety of molecular systems.

  2. Probing nuclear shell structure beyond the N=40 subshell using multiple Coulomb excitation and transfer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellgartner, Stefanie Christine

    2015-11-13

    In this work, the N=40 subshell closure is investigated with two complementary methods using a radioactive {sup 72}Zn ISOLDE beam: One- and two-neutron transfer reactions and multiple Coulomb excitation. In the one-neutron transfer reaction, two new levels of {sup 73}Zn were discovered. The two-neutron transfer channel allowed to study the differential cross section of the ground state and the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state of {sup 74}Zn. In the Coulomb excitation experiment, the measured B(E2) values and quadrupole moments of {sup 72}Zn showed that the yrast states 0{sup +}{sub 1}, 2{sup +}{sub 1} and 4{sup +}{sub 1} are moderately collective. Contrary, the 0{sup +}{sub 2} state has a different structure, since it features a stronger closed N=40 configuration compared to the ground state.

  3. Mini-Review: Probing the limits of extremophilic life in extraterrestrial environment-simulated experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Claudia A. S.; Dalmaso, Gabriel Z. L.; Teixeira, Lia C. R. S.; Bendia, Amanda G.; Paulino-Lima, Ivan G.; Galante, Douglas; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; Abrevaya, Ximena C.; Azúa-Bustos, Armando; Pelizzari, Vivian H.; Rosado, Alexandre S.

    2012-10-01

    Astrobiology is a relatively recent scientific field that seeks to understand the origin and dynamics of life in the Universe. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain life in the cosmic context throughout human history, but only now, technology has allowed many of them to be tested. Laboratory experiments have been able to show how chemical elements essential to life, such as carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen combine in biologically important compounds. Interestingly, these compounds are ubiquitous. How these compounds were combined to the point of originating cells and complex organisms is still to be unveiled by science. However, our 4.5 billion years old Solar system appeared in a 10 billion years old Universe. Thus, simple cells such as micro-organisms may have had time to form in planets older than ours or in other suitable places in the Universe. One hypothesis related to the appearance of life on Earth is called panspermia, which predicts that microbial life could have been formed in the Universe billions of years ago, travelling between planets, and inseminating units of life that could have become more complex in habitable planets such as Earth. A project designed to test the viability of extremophile micro-organisms exposed to simulated extraterrestrial environments is in progress at the Carlos Chagas Filho Institute of Biophysics (UFRJ, Brazil) to test whether microbial life could withstand inhospitable environments. Radiation-resistant (known or novel ones) micro-organisms collected from extreme terrestrial environments have been exposed (at synchrotron accelerators) to intense radiation sources simulating Solar radiation, capable of emitting radiation in a few hours equivalent to many years of accumulated doses. The results obtained in these experiments reveal an interesting possibility of the existence of microbial life beyond Earth.

  4. Probing Properties of Hot and Dense QCD Matter with Heavy Flavor in the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Hadrons carrying heavy quarks, i.e. charm or bottom, are important probes of the hot and dense medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Heavy quark-antiquark pairs are mainly produced in initial hard scattering processes of partons. While some of the produced pairs form bound quarkonia, the vast majority hadronize into particles carrying open heavy flavor. Heavy quark production has been studied by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC via measurements of single leptons from semi-leptonic decays in both the electron channel at mid-rapidity and in the muon channel at forward rapidity. A large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of single electrons have been observed in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. The PHENIX experiment has also measured ${J/\\psi}$ production at $\\sqrt{s_{nn}}$ = 200 GeV in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions, both at mid- and forward-rapidities, and additionally Cu+Au and U+U at forward-rapiditi...

  5. Probing CP violation with non-unitary mixing in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments: DUNE as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrihuela, F. J.; Forero, D. V.; Miranda, O. G.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2017-09-01

    When neutrino masses arise from the exchange of neutral heavy leptons, as in most seesaw schemes, the effective lepton mixing matrix N describing neutrino propagation is non-unitary, hence neutrinos are not exactly orthonormal. New CP violation phases appear in N that could be confused with the standard phase {δ }{CP} characterizing the three neutrino paradigm. We study the potential of the long-baseline neutrino experiment DUNE in probing CP violation induced by the standard CP phase in the presence of non-unitarity. In order to accomplish this we develop our previous formalism, so as to take into account the neutrino interactions with the medium, important in long baseline experiments such as DUNE. We find that the expected CP sensitivity of DUNE is somewhat degraded with respect to that characterizing the standard unitary case. However the effect is weaker than might have been expected thanks mainly to the wide neutrino beam. We also investigate the sensitivity of DUNE to the parameters characterizing non-unitarity. In this case we find that there is no improvement expected with respect to the current situation, unless the near detector setup is revamped.

  6. Physiological, evolutionary, and genetic experiments with hopanoids in Methylobacterium: probing the function of geologically stable molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, A. S.; Muller, E.; Bringel, F.; Vuilleumier, S.; Pearson, A.; Marx, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Hopanoids are geologically stable triterpenoids with a rock record extending to the Archean (1), but little information exists regarding their physiological role in modern organisms. Determining the physiological role of hopanoids is a key step in deciphering their geological and evolutionary history. To this end, we are investigating the function of hopanoids in the facultative methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacterium through a series of experiments in which we compare the behavior of wild type strains to mutants deficient in key genes associated with hopanoid biosynthesis. Mutant strains of bacteria deficient in the gene shc for squalene-hopene cyclase (SHC) lack hopanoids, but show only a subtle growth defect under pH and temperature stress in Rhodopseudomonas (2), and no growth defect in Streptomyces (3). In contrast, mutant strains of Methylobacterium deficient in SHC show a severe growth defect under usual growth conditions, with slower growth rates, alterations in cell morphology, increased sensitivity to toxic compounds, and severe flocculation during growth in liquid media. This severe phenotype offered an opportunity to investigate the function of hopanoids through an experimental evolution protocol. By serial passage through batch culture, sixteen replicate populations of the mutant strain were evolved in liquid media for approximately 120 generations. Populations evolved on each substrate show improved growth rates, approaching that of wild type strains. Current work is aimed at characterizing the physiology, and resequencing genomes of evolved isolates to determine the adaptations corresponding improved fitness. We predict that these adaptations will lead to hypotheses regarding hopanoid function. Mutations of other hopanoid-associated genes in Methylobacterium produce an altered suite of hopanoid compounds. Through mutation of hopanoid-associated genes, we have identified the first steps of hopanoid side chain biosynthesis (4). These mutant strains

  7. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    of their particle size distributions. The experiments were performed in a manipulated office setting containing a constant source of d-limonene and an ozone generator that was remotely turned "on" or "off" at 6h intervals. The particle number concentrations were monitored using an optical particle counter...... in these studies, at an air exchange rate of 1.6h $+-1$/ particle number concentration in the 0.1-0.2$mu@m size-range peaked 1.2h after the ozone generator was switched on. In the ensuing 4.8h particle counts increased in successive size-ranges up to the 0.5-0.7$mu@m diameter range. At higher air exchange rates......Reactions between ozone and terpenes have been shown to increase the concentrations of submicron particles in indoor settings. The present study was designed to examine the influence of air exchange rates on the concentrations of these secondary organic aerosols as well as on the evolution...

  8. Simulations for an experiment to probe the in-medium properties of photoproduced vector mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tur, Clarisse [Univ. of Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)

    2003-01-01

    The g7 experiment has been devised to measure the modifications of the vector meson properties, such as mass or width, inside nuclear medium, based on the ideas presented in the numerous papers published during the fifteen years that preceded its run. It consisted in sending a bremstrahlung photon beam on a target that contained elements with different densities, a liquid deuterium cell, and seven solid foils: carbon, iron, carbon, lead, carbon, titanium, carbon. The goal of the experiment is to examine the inclusive e+e- photoproduction in the incoherent region. The reaction of interest to g7 is γA → VA' → e+e-A' where V could be a ρ an ω or a Ψ meson. The goal of the present thesis was to present the simulation work done prior to the g7 run in the fall of 2002 at Jlab, essential for the choice of the ideal experimental setup and conditions, as well as the test run of June 2002. The simulations needed a particular attention, given the many experimental challenges that awaited the g7 team. First, one had to prove that the resolution of the CLAS detector was sufficient to properly locate the vertices of the events given the multi-segmented target, and the simulations proved that fact. They also provided a rough idea of the systematic errors that one had to expect. Using nuclei bigger than carbon was a first time for CLAS. Given the very small branching ratio for ρ → e+e-, a very intense beam had to be sent on the target containing high-Z material. Thus, a huge background, formed of low energy e+e- pairs, was expected around the target and the region I of the drift chambers and which one had to reduce in an efficient way. The simulations showed that using the mini torus with its current set to 75% of its maximum value would give a reduction of about a factor of 3 in the number of hits in the region I of the drift chambers, compared to the case with no mini

  9. Toward an epistemology of nano-technosciences: Probing technoscience from a historical perspective: on today's surprising prevalence and relevance of Francis Bacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jan C

    2011-12-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the attempts to clarify and classify the vague notion of "technosciences" from a historical perspective. A key question that is raised is as follows: Does Francis Bacon, one of the founding fathers of the modern age, provide a hitherto largely undiscovered programmatic position, which might facilitate a more profound understanding of technosciences? The paper argues that nearly everything we need today for an ontologically well-informed epistemology of technoscience can be found in the works of Bacon-this position will be called epistemological real-constructivism. Rather than realist or constructivist, empiricist or rationalist, Bacon's position can best be understood as real-constructivist since it challenges modern dichotomies. Reflection upon the contemporary relevance of Bacon could contribute to the expanding and critical discussion on technoscience. In the following I will reconstruct the term "technoscience". My finding is that at least four different understandings or types of the term "technoscience" co-exist. In a second step, I will analyze and elaborate on Bacon's epistemological position. I will identify central elements of the four different understandings in Bacon's work. Finally, I will conclude that the epistemology of technoscience is, indeed, very old-it is the epistemological position put forward by Bacon.

  10. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  11. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings......Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  12. Thermal ion measurements on board Interball Auroral Probe by the Hyperboloid experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dubouloz

    Full Text Available Hyperboloid is a multi-directional mass spectrometer measuring ion distribution functions in the auroral and polar magnetosphere of the Earth in the thermal and suprathermal energy range. The instrument encompasses two analyzers containing a total of 26 entrance windows, and viewing in two almost mutually perpendicular half-planes. The nominal angular resolution is defined by the field of view of individual windows ≈13° × 12.5°. Energy analysis is performed using spherical electrostatic analyzers providing differential measurements between 1 and 80 eV. An ion beam emitter (RON experiment and/or a potential bias applied to Hyperboloid entrance surface are used to counteract adverse effects of spacecraft potential and thus enable ion measurements down to very low energies. A magnetic analyzer focuses ions on one of four micro-channel plate (MCP detectors, depending on their mass/charge ratio. Normal modes of operation enable to measure H+, He+, O++, and O+ simultaneously. An automatic MCP gain control software is used to adapt the instrument to the great flux dynamics encountered between spacecraft perigee (700 km and apogee (20 000 km. Distribution functions in the main analyzer half-plane are obtained after a complete scan of windows and energies with temporal resolution between one and a few seconds. Three-dimensional (3D distributions are measured in one spacecraft spin period (120 s. The secondary analyzer has a much smaller geometrical factor, but offers partial access to the 3D dependence of the distributions with a few seconds temporal resolution. Preliminary results are presented. Simultaneous, local heating of both H+ and O+ ions resulting in conical distributions below 80 eV is observed up to 3 Earth's radii altitudes. The thermal ion signatures associated with large-scale nightside magnetospheric boundaries are investigated and a new ion outflow feature is

  13. Deep learning relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lioma, Christina; Larsen, Birger; Petersen, Casper

    2016-01-01

    train a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) on existing relevant information to that query. We then use the RNN to "deep learn" a single, synthetic, and we assume, relevant document for that query. We design a crowdsourcing experiment to assess how relevant the "deep learned" document is, compared...... to existing relevant documents. Users are shown a query and four wordclouds (of three existing relevant documents and our deep learned synthetic document). The synthetic document is ranked on average most relevant of all....

  14. VLBI experiment with the Huygens Probe during its descent in the atmosphere of Titan : An evidence for meridional wind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pogrebenko, Sergei; Gurvits, Leonid; Avruch, Ian; Cimo, Giuseppe; Team, Huygens VLBI Tracking

    Phase-referencing VLBI observations of the Huygens Probe were performed during its descent in the atmosphere of Titan on 14 January 2005 using a global network of 17 radio telescopes. The Probe's position in the Titanographic frame was determined with the accuracy of about 1 km relative to a priori

  15. Initial experience with a new laparoscopic ultrasound probe for guided biopsy in the staging of upper gastrointestinal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Hazem; Vilmann, Peter; Sharma, Vijay

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Until recently, laparoscopic ultrasound (LUS)-guided biopsy has been difficult with the available probes on the market. This study aimed to present a new laparoscopic ultrasound probe (Hitachi, EUP-OL531) for guided biopsy and describe its impact on the clinical outcome for patients w...

  16. Measurements of hard probes of the quark-gluon plasma with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wosiek, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS results on the production of high-transverse momentum probes in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC are presented. The focus is on the jet measurements, which provide a useful tool to study the hot, dense and coloured matter created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The ATLAS experiment has measured inclusive jet yields in pp and Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 2.76 TeV and in p+Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 5.02 TeV. The jet nuclear modification factor, RAA, is shown as a function of jet pT, rapidity and collision centrality. The RAA weakly increases with pT, shows no dependence on rapidity and smoothly decreases with the collision centrality. In 10% of the most central collisions, jet production is suppressed by a factor of two relative to pp yields scaled by the number of binary nucleonnucleon collisions. Charged-particle fragmentation functions of jets are also measured and ratios of fragmentation functions between di erent centrality intervals show a centrality-dependent modification. T...

  17. Optical beam transport to a remote location for low jitter pump-probe experiments with a free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cinquegrana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a scheme that allows a strong reduction of the timing jitter between the pulses of a free electron laser (FEL and external laser pulses delivered simultaneously at the FEL experimental stations for pump-probe–type experiments. The technique, applicable to all seeding-based FEL schemes, relies on the free-space optical transport of a portion of the seed laser pulse from its optical table to the experimental stations. The results presented here demonstrate that a carefully designed laser beam transport, incorporating also a transverse beam position stabilization, allows one to keep the timing fluctuations, added by as much as 150 m of free space propagation and a number of beam folding mirrors, to less than 4 femtoseconds rms. By its nature our scheme removes the major common timing jitter sources, so the overall jitter in pump-probe measurements done in this way will be below 10 fs (with a margin to be lowered to below 5 fs, much better than the best results reported previously in the literature amounting to 33 fs rms.

  18. Probing new physics at the LHC: searches for heavy top-like quarks with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Succurro, Antonella; Casado Lechuga, María Pilar

    Is our Standard Model (SM) of the fundamental particle interactions complete? Apparently, the answer is “no”. Many theories have been proposed to explain what is currently not understood, like the nature of Dark Matter, or the reason why the Higgs boson is so light. Now that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is fully operational, it is possible for experiments like ATLAS to explore very high-energy regimes where new physics can be probed. The work presented in this dissertation consists of two analyses aimed at the discovery (or exclusion) of a signal from a new particle: a quark similar to the top quark (the heaviest particle of the Standard Model) but with a larger mass. This new “top-like” quark could be a simple replica of the SM top quark, just with higher mass, i.e. a chiral fourth-generation up-type quark, or it could have exotic features. The latter hypothesis is particularly interesting as many “beyond-Standard Model” theories predict new heavy so-called vector-like quarks. Both sea...

  19. Probing properties of hot and dense QCD matter with heavy flavor in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouicer Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hadrons carrying heavy quarks, i.e. charm or bottom, are important probes of the hot and dense medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Heavy quarkantiquark pairs are mainly produced in initial hard scattering processes of partons. While some of the produced pairs form bound quarkonia, the vast majority hadronize into particles carrying open heavy flavor. Heavy quark production has been studied by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC via measurements of single leptons from semi-leptonic decays in both the electron channel at mid-rapidity and in the muon channel at forward rapidity. A large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of single electrons have been observed in Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. The PHENIX experiment has also measured J/ψ production at 200 GeV in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions, both at mid- and forward-rapidities, and additionally Cu + Au and U + U at forward-rapidities. In the most energetic collisions, more suppression is observed at forward rapidity than at central rapidity. This can be interpreted either as a sign of quark recombination, or as a hint of additional cold nuclear matter effects. The centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor, RAA(pT, for J/ψ in U + U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV shows a similar trend to the lighter systems, Au + Au and Cu + Cu, at similar energy 200 GeV.

  20. Sea salt irradiation experiments relevant to the surface conditions of ocean worlds such as Europa and Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Kevin P.; Carlson, Robert W.

    2015-11-01

    We have conducted a set of laboratory experiments to measure changes in NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and mixtures of these salts, as a function of exposure to the temperature, pressure, and radiation conditions relevant to ice covered ocean worlds in our solar system. Reagent grade salts were placed onto a diffuse aluminum target at the end of a cryostat coldfinger and loaded into an ultra-high vacuum chamber. The samples were then cooled to 100 K and the chamber pumped down to ~10-8 Torr, achieving conditions comparable to the surface of several moons of the outer solar system. Samples were subsequently irradiated with 10 keV electrons at an average current of 1 µA.We examined a range of conditions for NaCl including pure salts grains (~300 µm diameter), salt grains with water ice deposited on top, and evaporites. For the evaporites saturated salt water was loaded onto the cryostat target, the chamber closed, and then slowly pumped down to remove the water, leaving behind a salt evaporate for irradiation.The electron bombardment resulted in the trapping of electrons in halogen vacancies, yielding the the F- and M- color centers. After irraditiation we observed yellow-brown discoloration in NaCl. KCl was observed to turn a distinct violet. In NaCl these centers have strong absorptions at 450 nm and 720 nm, respectively, providing a highly diagnostic signature of otherwise transparent alkali halides, making it possible to remotely characterize and quantify the composition and salinity of ocean worlds.

  1. $^{204m}$Pb: A new Probe for TDPAC Experiments in Biology Complementing the Well Established Probes $^{111}$Cd and $^{199m}$Hg

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The short-lived nuclear probes $\\,^{111m}$Cd( t$_{1/2}$ = 49 min) , $^{199m}$Hg ( t$_{1/2}$ = 43 min) , and $^{204m}$Pb( t$_{1/2}$ = 43 min) supplied by ISOLDE are used to study the interaction of metals with biological macromolecules like, e.g., DNA and proteins. The structure and dynamics of metal sites in biomolecules are important in determining the functional efficiency of these macromolecules. Many life processes are based on such interactions. In order to study those metal sites close to physiological conditions a highly sensitive spectroscopic method is required, like Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation (TDPAC). Here, a radioactive atom is placed at the site of interest and by correlating the emitted $\\gamma$-quanta in space and on a nanosecond time scale local structural information is provided via the Nuclear Quadrupole Interaction. These investigations will allow a deeper insight into the adaptivity and rigidity of metal sites in the blue copper proteins (electron transfer proteins), th...

  2. HTSSIP: An R package for analysis of high throughput sequencing data from nucleic acid stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblut, Nicholas D; Barnett, Samuel E; Buckley, Daniel H

    2018-01-01

    Combining high throughput sequencing with stable isotope probing (HTS-SIP) is a powerful method for mapping in situ metabolic processes to thousands of microbial taxa. However, accurately mapping metabolic processes to taxa is complex and challenging. Multiple HTS-SIP data analysis methods have been developed, including high-resolution stable isotope probing (HR-SIP), multi-window high-resolution stable isotope probing (MW-HR-SIP), quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP), and ΔBD. Currently, there is no publicly available software designed specifically for analyzing HTS-SIP data. To address this shortfall, we have developed the HTSSIP R package, an open-source, cross-platform toolset for conducting HTS-SIP analyses in a straightforward and easily reproducible manner. The HTSSIP package, along with full documentation and examples, is available from CRAN at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/HTSSIP/index.html and Github at https://github.com/buckleylab/HTSSIP.

  3. Preliminary experiments about the measure of the magnetic properties of a material by means of TDR probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution, the possibility of measuring possible magnetic properties of materials by means of a TDR probe is studied. A transmission line model is adopted and data in time and frequency domain are exploited together. Simulation results are shown, at the moment based on a bifilar line model. Magnetic properties of materials can be of interest for several applications. In particular, the presence of magnetic features in the soil or in any substance, might be associated to some contaminant (presumably containing some metallic element as iron, nickel or chromium [1]). This kind of pollution might occur close to some farms, especially regarding the dying of dresses, the production of some medicines, the tanning of leather issues. Moreover, modern agriculture puts in the soil several fertilizing substances, and there is a debate about the quantity of heavy metals spread in the terrain by these activities [2]. Still, some depuration-mud can be affected by an excessive presence of metallic elements, because of the presence of batteries, skins, varnishes, cosmetics, and so on [2]. Moreover, it is thought that the soil on the planet Mars might show magnetic properties [3]. Finally, in GPR prospecting, possible magnetic characteristics of the soil or of the targets might be of interest too [4], but they cannot be retrieved by means of only GPR data [5]. In the present paper, the results of a preliminary study are exposed with regard to the possibility to measure the magnetic properties of a material by mean of a TDR probe [6-7]. In particular a TDR probe is essentially a transmission line (a bifilar model will be exploited in this work) open at the end, form which most of the impinging energy (ideally the whole of thi energy in a lossless medium) is back reflected. In particular, this allows a customary measure of the propagation velocity in the medium if an impulsive signal is generated. In fact, the return time along a path of known length is measured. The

  4. Colorimeric and fluorescence ON-OFF probe for acetate anion based on thiourea derivative: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xuefang; Tian, Shuanbao; Xi, Nankai; Li, Yue; Liang, Dong; Liu, Yun; Yin, Zhenya; Zhang, Jinlian; Xu, Xiufang

    2013-02-15

    Based on thiourea moiety, three colorimetric and fluorescent anion probes have been synthesized. Results indicated the probe 1 containing p-NO(2) group showed the strongest binding ability for AcO(-) among the anions tested (F(-), AcO(-), H(2)PO(4)(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)), which was not influenced by the existence of other anions. The interaction of host-guest was accompanied with a dramatic color change from colorless to orange. However, the addition of various anions did not cause noticeable spectral response of the probes (2 and 3) containing o, m-NO(2) groups. Theoretical investigation demonstrated the electron transition of the highest LUMO aroused the red-shift phenomenon in UV-vis spectra of 1-anion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. X-ray absorption and reflection as probes of the GaN conduction bands: Theory and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, W.R.L.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    X-ray absorption measurements are a well-known probe of the unoccupied states in a material. The same information can be obtained by using glancing angle X-ray reflectivity. In spite of several existing band structure calculations of the group III nitrides and previous optical studies in UV range, a direct probe of their conduction band densities of states is of interest. The authors performed a joint experimental and theoretical investigation using both of these experimental techniques for wurtzite GaN.

  6. Characterisation of the UFXC32k hybrid pixel detector for time-resolved pump-probe diffraction experiments at Synchrotron SOLEIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawiec, A.; Maj, P.; Ciavardini, A.; Gryboś, P.; Laulhé, C.; Menneglier, C.; Szczygieł, R.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental set-up for time-resolved studies of ultra-fast photo-induced structural dynamics at the Synchrotron SOLEIL is based on a general pump-probe scheme that has been developed and implemented on the CRISTAL hard X-ray diffraction beamline [1,2]. In a so-called pump-probe cycle, the sample is excited with an ultra-short laser pulse of ≈40 fs duration (the pump), and induced changes in its atomic structure are studied by measuring, with a precisely controlled delay, a diffraction pattern from a single pulse of synchrotron radiation (the probe) with a 2-D pixel detector. An improvement to the classical scheme is proposed, where the sample's response is probed at two different delays after each laser excitation. The first measurement at short delays allows studying the photo-induced dynamics. The second one is a reference measurement taken after sample's relaxation, which permits detection of drifts in the experimental conditions (e.g. beam misalignment, sample degradation). A hybrid pixel detector with a very fast readout time, a high dynamic range and extended linearity was tested to achieve the experiment objectives. In this paper, the first results obtained with the UFXC32k single photon counting detector are presented.

  7. HTSSIP: An R package for analysis of high throughput sequencing data from nucleic acid stable isotope probing (SIP experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D Youngblut

    Full Text Available Combining high throughput sequencing with stable isotope probing (HTS-SIP is a powerful method for mapping in situ metabolic processes to thousands of microbial taxa. However, accurately mapping metabolic processes to taxa is complex and challenging. Multiple HTS-SIP data analysis methods have been developed, including high-resolution stable isotope probing (HR-SIP, multi-window high-resolution stable isotope probing (MW-HR-SIP, quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP, and ΔBD. Currently, there is no publicly available software designed specifically for analyzing HTS-SIP data. To address this shortfall, we have developed the HTSSIP R package, an open-source, cross-platform toolset for conducting HTS-SIP analyses in a straightforward and easily reproducible manner. The HTSSIP package, along with full documentation and examples, is available from CRAN at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/HTSSIP/index.html and Github at https://github.com/buckleylab/HTSSIP.

  8. OpenCV-Based Nanomanipulation Information Extraction and the Probe Operation in SEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongjie Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at the established telenanomanipulation system, the method of extracting location information and the strategies of probe operation were studied in this paper. First, the machine learning algorithm of OpenCV was used to extract location information from SEM images. Thus nanowires and probe in SEM images can be automatically tracked and the region of interest (ROI can be marked quickly. Then the location of nanowire and probe can be extracted from the ROI. To study the probe operation strategy, the Van der Waals force between probe and a nanowire was computed; thus relevant operating parameters can be obtained. With these operating parameters, the nanowire in 3D virtual environment can be preoperated and an optimal path of the probe can be obtained. The actual probe runs automatically under the telenanomanipulation system's control. Finally, experiments were carried out to verify the above methods, and results show the designed methods have achieved the expected effect.

  9. Theoretical Investigation of Dynamic Properties of Magnetic Molecule Systems as Probed by NMR and Pulsed Fields Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-12-17

    The field of molecular magnetism[l-6] has become a subject of intense theoretical and experimental interest and has rapidly evolved during the last years. This inter-disciplinary field concerns magnetic systems at the molecular or "nanoscopic" level, whose realization has become feasible due to recent advances in the field of chemical synthesis. The present theoretical work provides a first step towards exploiting the possibilities that are offered by probing magnetic molecules using external magnetic fields with high sweep rates. These probes, apart for providing information specific to magnetic molecules, offer the possibility of conducting a detailed study of the relaxational behavior of interacting spin systems as a result of their coupling with a "heat bath" and in particular the excitations of the host lattice. Development of a broad theoretical framework for dealing with relaxational phenomena induced by dynamical magnetic fields is indeed a worthy goal.

  10. Foreground and Sensitivity Analysis for Broadband (2D) 21 cm-Lyα and 21 cm-Hα Correlation Experiments Probing the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neben, Abraham R.; Stalder, Brian; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Tonry, John L.

    2017-11-01

    A detection of the predicted anticorrelation between 21 cm and either Lyα or Hα from the epoch of reionization (EOR) would be a powerful probe of the first galaxies. While 3D intensity maps isolate foregrounds in low-{k}\\parallel modes, infrared surveys cannot yet match the field of view and redshift resolution of radio intensity mapping experiments. In contrast, 2D (I.e., broadband) infrared intensity maps can be measured with current experiments and are limited by foregrounds instead of photon or thermal noise. We show that 2D experiments can measure most of the 3D fluctuation power at k181 ({\\text{kJy sr}}-1 {{mK}}) (95%) at {\\ell }˜ 800. We predict levels of foreground correlation and sample variance noise in future experiments, showing that higher-resolution surveys such as LOFAR, SKA-LOW, and the Dark Energy Survey can start to probe models of the 21 cm-Lyα EOR cross spectrum.

  11. If Cell Mechanics Can Be Described by Elastic Modulus: Study of Different Models and Probes Used in Indentation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guz, Nataliia; Dokukin, Maxim; Kalaparthi, Vivekanand; Sokolov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Here we investigated the question whether cells, being highly heterogeneous objects, could be described with the elastic modulus (effective Young’s modulus) in a self-consistent way. We performed a comparative analysis of the elastic modulus derived from the indentation data obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM) on human cervical epithelial cells (both normal and cancerous). Both sharp (cone) and dull (2500-nm radius sphere) AFM probes were used. The indentation data were processed through different elastic models. The cell was approximated as a homogeneous elastic medium that had either 1), smooth hemispherical boundary (Hertz/Sneddon models) or 2), the boundary covered with a layer of glycocalyx and membrane protrusions (“brush” models). Consistency of these approximations was investigated. Specifically, we tested the independence of the elastic modulus of the indentation depth, which is assumed in these models. We demonstrated that only one model showed consistency in treating cells as a homogeneous elastic medium, namely, the brush model, when processing the indentation data collected with the dull AFM probe. The elastic modulus demonstrated strong depth dependence in all models: Hertz/Sneddon models (no brush taken into account), and when the brush model was applied to the data collected with sharp conical probes. We conclude that it is possible to describe the elastic properties of the cell body by means of an effective elastic modulus, used in a self-consistent way, when using the brush model to analyze data collected with a dull AFM probe. The nature of these results is discussed. PMID:25099796

  12. Relevance and attitudes toward histology and embryology course through the eyes of freshmen and senior medical students: Experience from Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaletel, Ivan; Marić, Gorica; Gazibara, Tatjana; Rakočević, Jelena; Labudović Borović, Milica; Puškaš, Nela; Bajčetić, Miloš

    2016-11-01

    Histology and embryology are prerequisite for understanding the complexity of cell and tissue organization, function and development. The aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of medical students toward relevance of histology and embryology in their pre-clinical and clinical medical practice. The study sample consisted of 900 undergraduate students of 1st and 6th study year at the School of Medicine in Belgrade, Serbia. Data were collected using an anonymous questionnaire. Senior students reported the relevance of histology and embryology knowledge for learning pathology, dermatology, physiology, gynecology and obstetrics, pathophysiology and pediatrics. Examination of students' attitudes revealed that 1st year participants more often acknowledged histology and embryology as being of great importance for their professional career. Analysis according to gender indicated that female students consider embryology as of greater importance for further medical education and future clinical practice than male students. Overall, study results suggest that medical students have a positive attitude toward histology and embryology undergraduate course. This evidence could be used as an additional motive for the development of histology and embryology courses, with special emphasis on practical application of knowledge in clinically-oriented setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and evaluation of a capacity building program in gender-relevant tobacco control research: A Brazilian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Regina C; Person, Sharina D; Bittencourt, Lorna; Efing, Ana C; Scarinci, Isabel C

    2018-02-02

    There is an increased need for capacity building of researchers and professionals in low- and middle-income countries with evidence-based approaches across the tobacco control continuum, particularly with regard to gender-relevant strategies. We describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a Career Development and Research Training Program (CDRTP) in tobacco control. The CDRTP is organized into two modules: Module I is open to the public and provides an overview of tobacco control; Module II, consists of a one-year program with multi-mode sessions toward the development of a pilot research project. Activities are implemented through co-learning to facilitate cross-fertilization of knowledge, collaborations, and team science. Between 2010 and 2015, 255 individuals participated in Module I with 57 applying for Module II's selective process. Out of these, 35 were selected, 29 completed the program (83%), 21 submitted pilot research projects that have undergone review, and 16 were approved for funding. Pre- and post-tests among the 29 participants who completed the training indicated improvement in scholars' perceived knowledge and skills on all of the components. In addition to attracting researchers and professionals who have not been working in tobacco control, the capacity building program has promoted knowledge, skills, and confidence among participants to pursue gender-relevant tobacco control research. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Does Internship Experience Beget Academic Relevance and Employment Prospects: An Assessment of Graduate Interns from a Nigerian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Adebakin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Basically, the objective of internship programme is to expose students to the real world of work and in the process, provide feedback to institutions on the relevance or otherwise of the curriculum. This study therefore assessed the academic relevance of internship programme and employment prospect of graduate interns from Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Population of the descriptive study were graduate students in the Department of Educational Management of the university. A sample of 120 graduate students from 2012/2013, 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 academic sessions were randomly selected. The post internship semester results, a structured interview and a Likert scale type questionnaire were used in the study. The Cronbach alpha reliability test on the questionnaire showed 0.79 reliability index. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used at 5% level of significance. The study found that graduate students� participation in internship has impact on academic performance and also has a significance influence on employment prospect. It was recommended that internship should be geared towards enhancing the knowledge, skills, attitude and personality of graduate students to prepare them in more holistic approach for employment.

  15. Relevance of the hadronic interaction model in the interpretation of multiple muon data as detected with the MACRO experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Aramo, C; Auriemma, G; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bisi, V; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Castellano, M G; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Coutu, S; De Benedictis, L; De Cataldo, G; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Grassi, M; Gray, L; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Guarnaccia, P; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Hawthorne, A; Heinz, R; Iarocci, Enzo; Katsavounidis, E; Kearns, E T; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta-Neri, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Mazzotta, C; Michael, D G; Mikheyev, S P; Miller, L; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S L; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Okada, C; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Rastelli, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rubizzo, U; Sanzgiri, A; Satriano, C; Satta, L; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra-Lugaresi, P; Severi, M; Sioli, M; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, Lawrence R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Walter, C W; Webb, R

    1999-01-01

    With the aim of discussing the effect of the possible sources of systematic uncertainties in simulation models, the analysis of multiple muon events from the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso is reviewed. In particular, the predictions $9 from different currently available hadronic interaction models are compared. (9 refs).

  16. Space Flight Research Relevant to Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, With Particular Reference to Skylab's Life Science Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Huss, Wayne D.; Heusner, William W.

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) studies dealing with the effect of extended space flight on the human body is presented. The results of experiments investigating weight loss, posture change, sleep habits, limb size, and motor skills are some of the topics discussed. Bibliographies, source lists, charts, and…

  17. Disentangling breast cancer patients' perceptions and experiences with regard to endocrine therapy: nature and relevance for non-adherence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, H.; Geffen, E.C.G. van; Baas-Thijssen, M.C.; Krol-Warmerdam, E.M.; Stiggelbout, A.M.; Belitser, S.; Bouvy, M.L.; Dijk, L. van

    2013-01-01

    Background & study aims: Adjuvant endocrine therapy effectively prevents recurrence and progression of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. However, studies reveal substantial non-adherence. The objective was therefore to identify the nature of the experiences and beliefs of women treated with

  18. The Impact of Nursing Students' Prior Chemistry Experience on Academic Performance and Perception of Relevance in a Health Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddey, Kerrie; de Berg, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students have typically found the study of chemistry to be one of their major challenges in a nursing course. This mixed method study was designed to explore how prior experiences in chemistry might impact chemistry achievement during a health science unit. Nursing students (N = 101) studying chemistry as part of a health science unit were…

  19. Data analysis to separate particles of different speed regimes and charges. [lunar ejecta and meteorite experiment and pioneer space probe data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, H.

    1977-01-01

    Although the instruments on the lunar ejecta and meteorite experiment (LEAM) and the Pioneer 8 and 9 space probes were essentially similar, a comparison of their results indicates that different sets of particles caused the different responses. On Pioneer, the events were caused by the impact of cosmic dust, the so-called beta particles expelled from the vicinity of the sun by solar radiation pressure, augmented by extremely high energy but definitely identifiable interstellar grains. On the moon, the events were due to the impact of slowly moving, highly charged lunar dust being propelled electrostatically across the terminator. Both theoretical analysis and experimental testing confirming these conclusions are discussed.

  20. Experience-Driven Differences in Childhood Cortisol Predict Affect-Relevant Brain Function and Coping in Adolescent Monozygotic Twins

    OpenAIRE

    Burghy, Cory A.; Fox, Michelle E.; M. Daniela Cornejo; Stodola, Diane E.; Sommerfeldt, Sasha L.; Westbrook, Cecilia A.; Carol Van Hulle; Schmidt, Nicole L.; H Hill Goldsmith; Davidson, Richard J; Birn, Rasmus M

    2016-01-01

    Stress and emotion involve diverse developmental and individual differences. Partially attributed to the development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), the amygdala, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the precise genetic and experiential contributions remain unknown. In previous work, childhood basal cortisol function predicted adolescent resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) and psychopathology. To parse experience-driven (non-genetic) contributions, we investigated these relation...

  1. Recent Results on Soft Probes of the Quark-Gluon Plasma from the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Przybycien, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of low-pT (< 5 GeV) particle production have provided valuable insight on the production and evolution of the quark-gluon plasma in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC. In particular, measurements of elliptic and higher order collective flow imprinted on the azimuthal angle distributions of low-pT particles directly probe the strongly-coupled dynamics of the quark-gluon plasma and test hydrodynamic model descriptions of its evolution. The large acceptance of detectors like ATLAS has made it possible to measure flow event-by-event and to determine the correlations between different harmonics. Recent measurements of low-pT particle production and multi-particle correlations in proton-lead collisions have shown features similar to the collective flow observed in Pb+Pb collisions. Results will be presented from a variety of single and multi-particle measurements in Pb+Pb and proton-Pb collisions that probe the collective dynamics of the quark-gluon plasma and possibly provide evidence for collectivity in ...

  2. An observing system simulation experiment for FORMOSAT-5/AIP probing topside ionospheric plasma irregularities by using DEMETER/IAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jann-Yenq Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ion density probed by IAP (Instrument d’Analyse du Plasma on board the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite is used to find whether the science payload of Advanced Ionospheric Probe (AIP on board FORMOSAT-5 can be employed to observe space weather of ionospheric plasma irregularities. The low-latitude irregularities within ±15° dip latitudes of the DEMETER/IAP ion density are nighttime phenomena, and become prominent in the South America-Central Africa sector almost all year round, especially during May to August. The high-latitude irregularities of the DEMETER/IAP ion density appear around ±65° dip latitude worldwide in both daytime and nighttime, and become very intense in the winter and the equinox month/hemisphere. DEMETER/IAP results show that FORMOSAT-5/AIP can be used to monitor space weather of ionospheric daytime/nighttime plasma irregularities in not only the low- but also high-latitude ionosphere.

  3. Subtle eye movement metrics reveal task-relevant representations prior to visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Anouk M; Olmos-Solis, Katya; Olivers, Christian N L

    2017-06-01

    Visual search is thought to be guided by an active visual working memory (VWM) representation of the task-relevant features, referred to as the search template. In three experiments using a probe technique, we investigated which eye movement metrics reveal which search template is activated prior to the search, and distinguish it from future relevant or no longer relevant VWM content. Participants memorized a target color for a subsequent search task, while being instructed to keep central fixation. Before the search display appeared, we briefly presented two task-irrelevant colored probe stimuli to the left and right from fixation, one of which could match the current target template. In all three experiments, participants made both more and larger eye movements towards the probe matching the target color. The bias was predominantly expressed in microsaccades, 100-250 ms after probe onset. Experiment 2 used a retro-cue technique to show that these metrics distinguish between relevant and dropped representations. Finally, Experiment 3 used a sequential task paradigm, and showed that the same metrics also distinguish between current and prospective search templates. Taken together, we show how subtle eye movements track task-relevant representations for selective attention prior to visual search.

  4. Generation of isolated attosecond pulses with double optical gating and electronic dynamics in molecules studied via attosecond pump-probe experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiko, Hiroki

    2010-03-01

    Single isolated attosecond pulses are useful tools for studying electron dynamics. Previously, such as pulses can be generated by few cycle 5 fs driving lasers. It is still a technical challenge to reproduce daily such pulses. In order to allow longer driving laser pulses, two optical gating methods of polarization gating and two-color gating are combined. This approach is dubbed double optical gating. Due to less depletion of the ground state population by the leading edge of the field, this technique can produce isolated 250 as pulses using up to ˜25 fs driving laser pulses. Also, the supercontinuous spectra (28-620 eV) can in principle support a 16 as pulse duration, obtained from 8 fs driving lasers. Because of the relaxation on the driving laser requirements, more laboratories can enter the isolated attosecond pulse science field. Pump-probe experiments with such isolated attosecond pulses and IR pulses can provide quantitative information on electronic dynamics. In recent work, the photoelectron spectra of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) clearly indicates the precise shape of the IR driving pulse (1.5 eV), verifying that isolated ˜400 as pulses (93 eV) are achieved and these pulses produce an instantaneous inner valence ionization in the molecule. The pump-probe spectra of cation fragments resulting from double and triple ionization show 6-7 fs rise times (SF4^2+, SF3^2+, SF2^2+ and S^2+) or decay times (SF^+ and S^+) times governed by the overlap of the IR and XUV pulses. A suppression or enhancement of certain fragmentation channels is tentatively interpreted as resulting from the IR laser exciting the initial cations to higher states that exhibit different decay channels. This type of pump-probe experiment with isolated attosecond pulses is powerful for the study of electronic dynamics as well as resulting nuclear fragmentation measurements.

  5. Radial space potential measurements in the central cell of the tandem mirror experiment with a heavy-ion-beam probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallock, G.A.

    1983-04-11

    Spatial and temporal profiles of the space potential in the central-cell midplane of TMX have been obtained with a heavy-ion-beam probe. The absolute accuracy of measurements is +- 25 volts (with respect to the machine vacuum walls) with a resolution of approx. 2 volts. During moderate fueling with the gas boxes (i/sub gas/ approx. = 1200 Atom-Amperes D/sub 2/), the plasma potential is parabolic to at least 25 cm radius, with phi/sub e/ approx. = phi/sub max/(1-(r/32)/sup 2/) and 300 < phi/sub max/ <450 volts. With puffer-valve fueling, the space potential is relatively flat to at least 27 cm radius, with 250 < phi/sub e/ < 350 volts.

  6. Design and Evaluation of Virtual Reality-Based Therapy Games with Dual Focus on Therapeutic Relevance and User Experience for Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lian Ting; Fehlings, Darcy; Biddiss, Elaine

    2014-06-01

    Virtual reality (VR)-based therapy for motor rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy (CP) is growing in prevalence. Although mainstream active videogames typically offer children an appealing user experience, they are not designed for therapeutic relevance. Conversely, rehabilitation-specific games often struggle to provide an immersive experience that sustains interest. This study aims to design and evaluate two VR-based therapy games for upper and lower limb rehabilitation and to evaluate their efficacy with dual focus on therapeutic relevance and user experience. Three occupational therapists, three physiotherapists, and eight children (8-12 years old), with CP Level I-III on the Gross Motor Function Classification System, evaluated two games for the Microsoft(®) (Redmond, WA) Kinect™ for Windows and completed the System Usability Scale (SUS), Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES), and custom feedback questionnaires. Children and therapists unanimously agreed on the enjoyment and therapeutic value of the games. Median scores on the PACES were high (6.24±0.95 on the 7-point scale). Therapists considered the system to be of average usability (50th percentile on the SUS). The most prevalent usability issue was detection errors distinguishing the child's movements from the supporting therapist's. The ability to adjust difficulty settings and to focus on targeted goals (e.g., elbow/shoulder extension, weight shifting) was highly valued by therapists. Engaging both therapists and children in a user-centered design approach enabled the development of two VR-based therapy games for upper and lower limb rehabilitation that are dually (a) engaging to the child and (b) therapeutically relevant.

  7. Relevant patient perceptions and experiences for evaluating quality of interaction with physiotherapists during outpatient rehabilitation: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Baño-Aledo, M Elena; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Collins, Sean M

    2014-03-01

    To identify elements of the physiotherapist-patient interaction considered by patients when they evaluate the quality of care in outpatient rehabilitation settings. A qualitative study with nine focus groups, Two researchers conducted the focus groups, and a topic guide with predetermined questions was used. Each group discussion was audiotaped,, transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically according to a modified grounded theory approach. Three postacute ambulatory centers in Barcelona, Madrid and Seville (Spain). Fifty-seven adults undergoing outpatient rehabilitation for musculoskeletal conditions/injuries. Patients based their evaluations of quality of care on their assessment of physiotherapists' willingness to provide information and education, technical expertise and interpersonal manners (eg. respect, emotional support and sensitivity changes in the patient's status). Both positive and negative aspects of the physiotherapist-patient interaction emerged under all these themes, except for friendly and respectful communication. This study identified which elements of the physiotherapist-patient interaction are considered by patients when evaluating the quality of care in rehabilitation outpatient settings. Further research should work to develop self-report questionnaires about patients' experiences of the physiotherapist-patient interaction in rehabilitation services to provide empirical and quantitative evidence. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Electronic Transitions as a Probe of Tetrahedral versus Octahedral Coordination in Nickel(II) Complexes: An Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueiras, Carlos A. L.; Carazza, Fernando

    1980-01-01

    Discusses procedures, theoretical considerations, and results of an experiment involving the preparation of a tetrahedral nickel(II) complex and its transformation into an octahedral species. Suggests that fundamental aspects of coordination chemistry can be demonstrated by simple experiments performed in introductory level courses. (Author/JN)

  9. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  10. Rotational symmetry breaking in the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 probed by upper-critical field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y; Nikitin, A M; Araizi, G K; Huang, Y K; Matsushita, Y; Naka, T; de Visser, A

    2016-06-28

    Recently it was demonstrated that Sr intercalation provides a new route to induce superconductivity in the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Topological superconductors are predicted to be unconventional with an odd-parity pairing symmetry. An adequate probe to test for unconventional superconductivity is the upper critical field, Bc2. For a standard BCS layered superconductor Bc2 shows an anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied parallel and perpendicular to the layers, but is isotropic when the field is rotated in the plane of the layers. Here we report measurements of the upper critical field of superconducting SrxBi2Se3 crystals (Tc = 3.0 K). Surprisingly, field-angle dependent magnetotransport measurements reveal a large anisotropy of Bc2 when the magnet field is rotated in the basal plane. The large two-fold anisotropy, while six-fold is anticipated, cannot be explained with the Ginzburg-Landau anisotropic effective mass model or flux flow induced by the Lorentz force. The rotational symmetry breaking of Bc2 indicates unconventional superconductivity with odd-parity spin-triplet Cooper pairs (Δ4-pairing) recently proposed for rhombohedral topological superconductors, or might have a structural nature, such as self-organized stripe ordering of Sr atoms.

  11. Electronic structure calculations and physicochemical experiments quantify the competitive liquid ion association and probe stabilisation effects for nitrobenzospiropyran in phosphonium-based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Damien; Coleman, Simon; Diamond, Dermot; Byrne, Robert

    2011-04-07

    Liquid ion association in ionic liquids (ILs) has been examined using a comprehensive series of electronic structure calculations that measure the relative extents of ion association and probe stabilisation for the photochromic dye nitrobenzospiropyran (BSP) in a range of ILs featuring both long-tailed phosphonium cations and short-tailed imidazolium cations, paired with both chloride and NTf(2) anions. New physicochemical experiments measured the photochromic properties of BSP in the phosphonium-based room temperature ILs. Taken together, the computed complexation energies and measured spectroscopic properties support recent Walden plots of unusual conductivity-viscosity behaviour obtained for the same ILs and reveal some new features in the atom-scale structure and energetics of local, ion-ion and ion-molecule interactions. Calculations show inter-ion interactions strengthened by between 0.4 and 0.7 eV as stronger constituent ions are used, which contributes to the longer range rigidity of the Cl-based IL structure as reflected in the doubled |zwitterion → closed| probe relaxation time measured for Cl(-)vs. NTf(2)(-) in phosphonium-based ILs. Calculations further reveal a similar, approximately 0.6-0.7 eV maximum "residual" IL headgroup-mediated probe stabilisation potentially available for the anion-probe-cation complexes via the stabilising interaction that remains following the "quenching" interaction between the IL anion and cation. This potential stabilisation, however, is offset by both longer-range charge networks, beyond the scope of the current purely quantum mechanical simulations, and also energetic penalties for disruption of the highly-interdigitated alkyl tail networks in the phosphonium-based ILs which may be estimated from known diffusion data. Overall the electronic calculations of local, individual ion-ion and ion-molecule interactions serve to clarify some of the measured physicochemical properties and provide new data for the development of

  12. Probing the Interplay of Size, Shape, and Solution Environment in Macromolecular Diffusion Using a Simple Refraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankidy, Bijith D.; Coutinho, Cecil A.; Gupta, Vinay K.

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of polymers is a critical parameter in biomedicine, catalysis, chemical separations, nanotechnology, and other industrial applications. Here, measurement of macromolecular diffusion in solutions is described using a visually instructive, undergraduate-level optical refraction experiment based on Weiner's method. To…

  13. Stable isotope probing and dynamic loading experiments provide insight into the ecophysiology of novel ammonia oxidizers in rapid gravity sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, Jane; Palomo, Alejandro; Gülay, Arda

    Nitrification is often the dominant microbial process in rapid gravity sand filters (RSF), used to treat aerated groundwater to produce drinking water. RSFs harbor diverse microbial communities including a range of ammonia oxidizing clades; Betaproteobacteria (Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira), Archaea......, diverse potentially ammonia oxidizing heterotrophs and abundant Nitrospira spp., recently shown to comprise both canonical nitrite oxidizing as well as complete ammonium oxidizing (comammox) types. We examined the contributions of the different ammonia oxidizers to in situ ammonia oxidation, and aimed...... to elucidate the differences in ecophysiology between the ammonia oxidizing clades that enable them to co-exist in this unique environment. Experiments were conducted using sand columns designed and operated to mimic the conditions in the full-scale parent RSF. RNA and DNA stable isotope probing based on 13C...

  14. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Laboratory experiments on Mars-relevant clay and phosphate minerals yield insights into the aqueous history and potential for habitability on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausrath, E.; Adcock, C. T.; Gainey, S.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Tu, V.

    2012-12-01

    Data from Mars landers and orbiters increasingly indicate the occurrence of aqueous geochemical processes, suggesting the presence of environments that may be habitable. These environments, however, differ from terrestrial environments in significant ways. Laboratory experiments can therefore be vital in providing further insight into environmental conditions on Mars, and the implications for habitability. Here we report the results of experiments designed to interpret observations of Mars from landers, orbiters and martian meteorites. Dissolution rates of the Mars-relevant phosphate minerals whitlockite, merrillite, and chlorapatite, as well as amorphous Al- and Fe-phosphates, suggest rapid dissolution of these phases. Phosphate release on Mars may therefore have been greater than on Earth, with important implications for habitability. Measured dissolution rates of nontronite when compared to montmorillonite dissolution rates from the literature suggest that preferential dissolution of nontronite may be able to account for enrichments of montmorillonite and kaolinite in profiles at Mawrth Vallis. Synthesis experiments of clay minerals under oxidizing and reducing conditions may help interpret transitions in clay mineral chemistry as a possible paleoredox indicator.

  16. Probing quantum and classical turbulence analogy in von Kármán liquid helium, nitrogen, and water experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Michel, B. [Laboratoire SPHYNX, CEA/IRAMIS/SPEC, CNRS URA 2464, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Centrale Marseille, IRPHE UMR 7342, 13384 Marseille (France); Herbert, E. [Laboratoire SPHYNX, CEA/IRAMIS/SPEC, CNRS URA 2464, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Université Paris Diderot – Sorbonne Paris Cité, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire des Énergies de Demain (LIED) – CNRS UMR 8236, Paris (France); Salort, J.; Castaing, B.; Chevillard, L. [Laboratoire de Physique de l’ÉNS de Lyon, CNRS/Université Lyon- F-69364 Lyon CEDEX 7 (France); Baudet, C.; Bourgoin, M.; Gagne, Y. [Laboratoire des Écoulements Géophysiques et Industriels, CNRS/UJF/INPG, F-38041 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Bon Mardion, M.; Bonnay, P.; Diribarne, P.; Girard, A.; Rousset, B. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SBT, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, INAC-SBT, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Daviaud, F.; Dubrulle, B. [Laboratoire SPHYNX, CEA/IRAMIS/SPEC, CNRS URA 2464, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gibert, M.; Hébral, B. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble, France and CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Lehner, Th. [LUTH, Observatoire Paris-Meudon, 5 Pl. Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon CEDEX (France)

    2014-12-15

    We report measurements of the dissipation in the Superfluid helium high REynold number von Kármán flow experiment for different forcing conditions. Statistically steady flows are reached; they display a hysteretic behavior similar to what has been observed in a 1:4 scale water experiment. Our macroscopical measurements indicate no noticeable difference between classical and superfluid flows, thereby providing evidence of the same dissipation scaling laws in the two phases. A detailed study of the evolution of the hysteresis cycle with the Reynolds number supports the idea that the stability of the steady states of classical turbulence in this closed flow is partly governed by the dissipative scales. It also supports the idea that the normal and the superfluid components at these temperatures (1.6 K) are locked down to the dissipative length scale.

  17. Probing Sub-GeV Mass Strongly Interacting Dark Matter with a Low-Threshold Surface Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2017-11-24

    Using data from the ν-cleus detector, based on the surface of Earth, we place constraints on dark matter in the form of strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) which interact with nucleons via nuclear-scale cross sections. For large SIMP-nucleon cross sections, the sensitivity of traditional direct dark matter searches using underground experiments is limited by the energy loss experienced by SIMPs, due to scattering with the rock overburden and experimental shielding on their way to the detector apparatus. Hence, a surface-based experiment is ideal for a SIMP search, despite the much larger background resulting from the lack of shielding. We show using data from a recent surface run of a low-threshold cryogenic detector that values of the SIMP-nucleon cross section up to approximately 10^{-27}  cm^{2} can be excluded for SIMPs with masses above 100 MeV.

  18. Prognostic relevance of DNA flow cytometry in breast cancer revisited: The 25-year experience of the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Lisbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, António E.; Pereira, Teresa; Silva, Giovani L.; André, Saudade

    2017-01-01

    The potential prognostic significance of DNA flow cytometric measurements (DNA ploidy and S-phase fraction) in breast cancer remains in dispute. Inconclusive data, primarily due to the lack of consistent standardization and quality control programs, have limited its translation into clinical practice. The aim of the present review, based on the 25-year experience of the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Lisbon, is to assess the clinical relevance and application of DNA flow cytometry for the prognosis of breast cancer. Overall, data from Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Lisbon indicate that DNA flow cytometry provides significant prognostic information that is biologically relevant and clinically useful for the management of patients with breast cancer. Furthermore, this data has demonstrated the independent value of DNA aneuploidy as a prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in various subgroups of patients with early or locally advanced breast cancer at short- and long-term follow-up. Notably, aneuploidy identifies subsets of patients with grade (G)1 or G2 tumours who exhibit a poor clinical outcome. These patients may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, particularly those with luminal A and luminal B/human epidermal growth factor-2-negative endocrine-responsive breast cancer. In conclusion, data from Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Lisbon reinforces the clinical importance and utility of DNA flow cytometric analysis, particularly DNA ploidy, in the prognostic assessment and therapeutic planning for patients with breast cancer. PMID:28454358

  19. Fast Magic-Angle Spinning Three-Dimensional NMR Experiment for Simultaneously Probing H-H and N-H Proximities in Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, G N Manjunatha; Malon, Michal; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P

    2016-12-06

    A fast magic-angle spinning (MAS, 70 kHz) solid-state NMR experiment is presented that combines 1H Double-Quantum (DQ) and 14N-1H HMQC (Heteronuclear Multiple-Quantum Coherence) pulse-sequence elements, so as to simultaneously probe H-H and N-H proximities in molecular solids. The proposed experiment can be employed in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) versions: first, a 2D 14N HMQC-filtered 1H-DQ experiment provides specific DQ-SQ correlation peaks for proton pairs that are in close proximities to the nitrogen sites, thereby achieving spectral filtration. Second, a proton-detected three-dimensional (3D) 1H(DQ)-14N(SQ)-1H(SQ) experiment correlates 1H(DQ)-1H(SQ) chemical shifts with 14N shifts such that longer range N···H-H correlations are observed between protons and nitrogen atoms with internuclear NH distances exceeding 3 Å. Both 2D and 3D versions of the proposed experiment are demonstrated for an amino acid hydrochloride salt, l-histidine·HCl·H2O, and a DNA nucleoside, guanosine·2H2O. In the latter case, the achieved spectral filtration ensures that DQ cross peaks are only observed for guanine NH and CH8 1H resonances and not ribose and water 1H resonances, thus providing insight into the changes in the solid-state structure of this hydrate that occur over time; significant changes are observed in the NH and NH21H chemical shifts as compared to the freshly recrystallized sample previously studied by Reddy et al., Cryst. Growth Des. 2015, 15, 5945.

  20. Monitoring membrane hydration with 2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes fluorescent probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2015-01-01

    of LAURDAN and PRODAN are exquisitely sensitive to cholesterol effects, allowing interpretations that correlate changes in membrane packing with membrane hydration. Different membrane model systems as well as innate biological membranes have been studied with this family of probes allowing interesting...... comparative studies. This chapter presents a short historical overview about these fluorescent reporters, discusses on different models proposed to explain their sensitivity to membrane hydration, and includes relevant examples from experiments performed in artificial and biological membranes....

  1. Probing Flavor Asymmetry of Anti-quarks in the Proton by Drell-Yan Experiment SeaQuest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyasaka, Shou [Tokyo Inst. Tech.

    2016-01-01

    A new measurement on the avor asymmetry between d and u in the proton is reported in this thesis. The proton contains a substantial number of antiquarks which arise from dynamical interactions of gluons such as gluon dissociation to a quark-antiquark pair, g ! q + q, and from non-perturbative processes as described by the pion-cloud model, for example. The antiquarks in the proton undertake an important role in determining the dynamic characteristics of the internal structure of the proton, although its distribution in the proton and its origin are not fully understood. Understanding sea quarks in hadron is an important subject for QCD. The SeaQuest experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is a xed target experiment using the 120 GeV proton beam extracted from the Fermilab Main Injector. One of the goals of the experiment is to measure the avor asymmetry between d quark and u quark in the proton as a function of the target Bjorken x using the Drell-Yan process in the p-p or p-d reactions. This process takes place in hadron-hadron collisions when a quark in one hadron in the beam and an antiquark in other hadron in the target annihilate into a virtual photon that decays into a lepton pair. The avor asymmetry between d and u quarks was found by deep-inelastic scattering experiment NMC at CERN. The E866/NuSea experiment at Fermilab obtained the avor asymmetry in the proton for 0:015 < x < 0:35 using the 800 GeV proton beam extracted from the Fermilab Tevatron. The result indicates the dominance of d; it is 70% larger than u at lower x. The SeaQuest experiment was planned to do a new precise measurement at higher x region. The lower energy beam (120 GeV) increases the Drell-Yan cross section and suppresses the background primarily arising from J/ decays. Therefore, SeaQuest will obtain more statistics in a shorter time than the E866 experiment. After detector construction, detector commissioning and accelerator upgrade, physics data taking started

  2. Development of Mackintosh Probe Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Noor Khazanah A.; Kaamin, Masiri; Suwandi, Amir Khan; Sahat, Suhaila; Jahaya Kesot, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic probing is a continuous soil investigation technique, which is one of the simplest soil penetration test. It basically consist of repeatedly driving a metal tipped probe into the ground using a drop weight of fixed mass and travel. Testing was carried out continuously from ground level to the final penetration depth. Once the soil investigation work done, it is difficult to pull out the probe rod from the ground, due to strong soil structure grip against probe cone and prevent the probe rod out from the ground. Thus, in this case, a tool named Extracting Probe was created to assist in the process of retracting the probe rod from the ground. In addition, Extracting Probe also can reduce the time to extract the probe rod from the ground compare with the conventional method. At the same time, it also can reduce manpower cost because only one worker involve to handle this tool compare with conventional method used two or more workers. From experiment that have been done we found that the time difference between conventional tools and extracting probe is significant, average time difference is 155 minutes. In addition the extracting probe can reduce manpower usage, and also labour cost for operating the tool. With all these advantages makes this tool has the potential to be marketed.

  3. Flexible attosecond beamline for high harmonic spectroscopy and XUV/near-IR pump probe experiments requiring long acquisition times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, S. J.; Manschwetus, B.; Billon, M.; Böttcher, M.; Bougeard, M.; Breger, P.; Géléoc, M.; Gruson, V.; Huetz, A.; Lin, N.; Picard, Y. J.; Ruchon, T.; Salières, P.; Carré, B.

    2015-03-01

    We describe the versatile features of the attosecond beamline recently installed at CEA-Saclay on the PLFA kHz laser. It combines a fine and very complete set of diagnostics enabling high harmonic spectroscopy (HHS) through the advanced characterization of the amplitude, phase, and polarization of the harmonic emission. It also allows a variety of photo-ionization experiments using magnetic bottle and COLTRIMS (COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Microscopy) electron spectrometers that may be used simultaneously, thanks to a two-foci configuration. Using both passive and active stabilization, special care was paid to the long term stability of the system to allow, using both experimental approaches, time resolved studies with attosecond precision, typically over several hours of acquisition times. As an illustration, applications to multi-orbital HHS and electron-ion coincidence time resolved spectroscopy are presented.

  4. Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD) of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase satellite: specifications and initial evaluation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaba, Yasumasa; Ishisaka, Keigo; Kasahara, Yoshiya; Imachi, Tomohiko; Yagitani, Satoshi; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Matsuda, Shoya; Shoji, Masafumi; Kurita, Satoshi; Hori, Tomoaki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Teramoto, Mariko; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Nakagawa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Naoko; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Matsuoka, Ayako; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Nomura, Reiko

    2017-12-01

    This paper summarizes the specifications and initial evaluation results of Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD), the key components for the electric field measurement of the Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase (ERG) satellite. WPT consists of two pairs of dipole antennas with 31-m tip-to-tip length. Each antenna element has a spherical probe (60 mm diameter) at each end of the wire (15 m length). They are extended orthogonally in the spin plane of the spacecraft, which is roughly perpendicular to the Sun and enables to measure the electric field in the frequency range of DC to 10 MHz. This system is almost identical to the WPT of Plasma Wave Investigation aboard the BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter, except for the material of the spherical probe (ERG: Al alloy, MMO: Ti alloy). EFD is a part of the EWO (EFD/WFC/OFA) receiver and measures the 2-ch electric field at a sampling rate of 512 Hz (dynamic range: ± 200 mV/m) and the 4-ch spacecraft potential at a sampling rate of 128 Hz (dynamic range: ± 100 V and ± 3 V/m), with the bias control capability of WPT. The electric field waveform provides (1) fundamental information about the plasma dynamics and accelerations and (2) the characteristics of MHD and ion waves in various magnetospheric statuses with the magnetic field measured by MGF and PWE-MSC. The spacecraft potential provides information on thermal electron plasma variations and structure combined with the electron density obtained from the upper hybrid resonance frequency provided by PWE-HFA. EFD has two data modes. The continuous (medium-mode) data are provided as (1) 2-ch waveforms at 64 Hz (in apoapsis mode, L > 4) or 256 Hz (in periapsis mode, L < 4), (2) 1-ch spectrum within 1-232 Hz with 1-s resolution, and (3) 4-ch spacecraft potential at 8 Hz. The burst (high-mode) data are intermittently obtained as (4) 2-ch waveforms at 512 Hz and (5) 4-ch spacecraft potential at 128 Hz and downloaded with the WFC

  5. The Lao Experience in Deploying Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccine: Lessons Made Relevant in Preparing for Present Day Pandemic Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xeuatvongsa, Anonh; Mirza, Sara; Winter, Christian; Feldon, Keith; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Phonekeo, Darouny; Denny, Justin; Khanthamaly, Viengphone; Kounnavong, Bounheuang; Lylianou, Doualy; Phousavath, Sisouphane; Norasingh, Sisouveth; Boutta, Nao; Olsen, Sonja; Bresee, Joseph; Moen, Ann; Corwin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Lao PDR, as did most countries of the Mekong Region, embarked on a pandemic vaccine initiative to counter the threat posed by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Overall, estimated vaccine coverage of the Lao population was 14%, with uptake in targeted health care workers and pregnant women 99% and 41%, respectively. Adverse Events Following Immunization accounted for only 6% of survey driven, reported vaccination experiences, with no severe consequences or deaths. Public acceptability of the vaccine campaign was high (98%). Challenges to vaccine deployment included: 1) no previous experience in fielding a seasonal influenza vaccine, 2) safety and efficacy concerns, and 3) late arrival of vaccine 10 months into the pandemic. The Lao success in surmounting these hurdles was in large measure attributed to the oversight assigned the National Immunization Program, and national sensitivities in responding to the avian influenza A(H5N1) crisis in the years leading up to the pandemic. The Lao "lessons learned" from pandemic vaccine deployment are made even more relevant four years on, given the many avian influenza strains circulating in the region, all with pandemic potential.

  6. The Lao Experience in Deploying Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 Vaccine: Lessons Made Relevant in Preparing for Present Day Pandemic Threats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anonh Xeuatvongsa

    Full Text Available The Lao PDR, as did most countries of the Mekong Region, embarked on a pandemic vaccine initiative to counter the threat posed by influenza A(H1N1pdm09. Overall, estimated vaccine coverage of the Lao population was 14%, with uptake in targeted health care workers and pregnant women 99% and 41%, respectively. Adverse Events Following Immunization accounted for only 6% of survey driven, reported vaccination experiences, with no severe consequences or deaths. Public acceptability of the vaccine campaign was high (98%. Challenges to vaccine deployment included: 1 no previous experience in fielding a seasonal influenza vaccine, 2 safety and efficacy concerns, and 3 late arrival of vaccine 10 months into the pandemic. The Lao success in surmounting these hurdles was in large measure attributed to the oversight assigned the National Immunization Program, and national sensitivities in responding to the avian influenza A(H5N1 crisis in the years leading up to the pandemic. The Lao "lessons learned" from pandemic vaccine deployment are made even more relevant four years on, given the many avian influenza strains circulating in the region, all with pandemic potential.

  7. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Historical microbiology, is it relevant in the 21st century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Lesley A

    2015-05-01

    Facsimile microscopes have been used to examine the possibilities of van Leeuwenhoek microscopes with a range of magnifications, particularly to confirm that bacteria can be seen if the microscope is strong enough. The relevance of historical microbiology in education is also illustrated by adapting versions of van Leeuwenhoek's pepper water experiment and Beijerinck's use of bioluminescent bacteria as oxygen probes. These experiments can demonstrate fundamentals such as enrichment and isolation cultures, physiology and experimental planning as well as critical reading of published material. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  10. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...

  11. Introducing a standard method for experimental determination of the solvent response in laser pump, x-ray probe time-resolved wide-angle x-ray scattering experiments on systems in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kasper Skov; Brandt van Driel, Tim; Kehres, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In time-resolved laser pump, X-ray probe wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments on systems in solution the structural response of the system is accompanied by a solvent response. The solvent response is caused by reorganization of the bulk solvent following the laser pump event, and in order to ...

  12. Final Technical Report for Award DESC0011912, "Trimodal Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy: Simultaneous 4D Mapping of Conservative and Dissipative Probe-Sample Interactions of Energy-Relevant Materials”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solares, Santiago D. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-09-22

    The final project report covering the period 7/1/14-6/30/17 provides an overview of the technical accomplishments in the areas of (i) fundamental viscoelasticity, (ii) multifrequency atomic force microscopy, and (iii) characterization of energy-relevant materials with atomic force microscopy. A list of publications supported by the project is also provided.

  13. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...

  14. An investigation into adult nursing students' experience of the relevance and application of behavioural sciences (biology, psychology and sociology) across two different curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowforth, Gillian; Harrison, Judy; Morris, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Curriculum development for nurse education is constantly changing to reflect the sociopolitical context and medical advancement. Throughout this process the contribution of the behavioural sciences to each curriculum has been widely debated. Nurse educators encourage students to acquire and develop academic knowledge to underpin their practical skills and professional competencies. However with new political agendas science content within the new curricula is being marginalised, [United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing Midwifery and Health Visiting, 1999. Fitness for Practice. London, UKCC]. This qualitative study investigated adult branch nursing students' experiences of the behavioural sciences while studying two different curricula: one a new integrated delivery of the sciences, the other involving discrete science modules. The study utilised focus group interviews at two distinct phases of their courses: 12-18 and 24-30 months. Each interview was tape recorded, transcribed verbatim and inductive thematic analysis [Hayes, N., 1997. Doing Qualitative Analysis in Psychology. Psychology Press Erlbaum Taylor & Francis Ltd.] was applied. This article reports the findings and discusses the relevance of the sciences to students and their patient care, and how the sciences underpin their view of health and illness.

  15. Initial laboratory experience with a novel ultrasound probe for standard and single-port robotic kidney surgery: increasing console surgeon autonomy and minimizing instrument clashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoubi, Rachid; Autorino, Riccardo; Laydner, Humberto; Guillotreau, Julien; White, Michael A; Hillyer, Shahab; Spana, Gregory; Khanna, Rakesh; Isaac, Wahib; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Stein, Robert J; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel ultrasound probe specifically developed for robotic surgery by determining its efficiency in identifying renal tumors. The study was carried out using the Da Vinci™ surgical system in one female pig. Renal tumor targets were created by percutaneous injection of a tumor mimic mixture. Single-port and standard robotic partial nephrectomy were performed. Intraoperative ultrasound was performed using both standard laparoscopic probe and the new ProART™ Robotic probe. Probe maneuverability and ease of handling for tumor localization were recorded. The standard laparoscopic probe was guided by the assistant. Significant clashing with robotic arms was noted during the single-port procedure. The novel robotic probe was easily introduced through the assistant trocar, and held by the console surgeon using the robotic Prograsp™ with no registered clashing in the external operative field. The average time for grasping the new robotic probe was less than 10 s. Once inserted and grasped, no limitation was found in terms of instrument clashing during the single-port procedure. This novel ultrasound probe developed for robotic surgery was noted to be user-friendly when performing porcine standard and especially single-port robotic partial nephrectomy. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Designing thiophene-based fluorescent probes for the study of neurodegenerative protein aggregation diseases : From test tube to in vivo experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Åslund, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Protein aggregation is an event related to numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzhemier’s disease and prion diseases. However little is known as to how and why the aggregates form and furthermore, the toxic specie may not be the mature fibril but an on route or off route specie towards mature aggregates. During this project molecular probes were synthesized that may shed some light to these questions. The probes are thiophene based and the technique used for detection was mainly flu...

  17. Vertical-probe-induced asymmetric dust oscillation in complex plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, B J; Matthews, L S; Hyde, T W

    2013-05-01

    A complex plasma vertical oscillation experiment which modifies the bulk is presented. Spherical, micron-sized particles within a Coulomb crystal levitated in the sheath above the powered lower electrode in a GEC reference cell are perturbed using a probe attached to a Zyvex S100 Nanomanipulator. By oscillating the probe potential sinusoidally, particle motion is found to be asymmetric, exhibiting superharmonic response in one case. Using a simple electric field model for the plasma sheath, including a nonzero electric field at the sheath edge, dust particle charges are found by employing a balance of relevant forces and emission analysis. Adjusting the parameters of the electric field model allowed the change predicted in the levitation height to be compared with experiment. A discrete oscillator Green's function is applied using the derived force, which accurately predicts the particle's motion and allows the determination of the electric field at the sheath edge.

  18. Probing intercultural competence in Malaysia: A Relational Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalib Syarizan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies in intercultural competence are quite numerous but they were mainly derived from Eurocentric experiences. Since Eurocentric scholars may become oblivious to certain elements or issues of intercultural communication that are pertinent to Asian people, the Western conception of intercultural competence have been argued for its relevance in the Asian world. This paper aims to revisit the current (Eurocentric perspective of intercultural competence and probes an alternative perspective of intercultural competence by reviewing current Asian literature. Our review suggests that the conception intercultural competence must consider relational aspects when it is situated within Asian experiences. Since relational aspects were a noted gap in the existing Eurocentric definitions, this paper proposes a relational framework in probing intercultural competence in Malaysia.

  19. On the accuracy of the void fraction measurements using optical probes in bubbly flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrique Juliá, J.; Harteveld, Wouter K.; Mudde, Robert F.; Van den Akker, Harrie E. A.

    2005-03-01

    The accuracy of the measurement of the void fraction in bubbly flows using an optical probe is investigated. Experiments were performed in tap water with ellipsoidal-shaped air bubbles with equivalent diameters and velocities in the range of 2.8-5.2 mm and 0.22-0.28 m/s. Comparison of charge coupled devices (CCD) images of dynamic bubble piercing events with optical probe signals shows that for piercing in the area around the bubble side, the so-called low-level criterion gives the best agreement with the actual gas-liquid transition for the undisturbed bubble. In addition, residence time underestimation due to a partial blinding effect is observed in the outer regions of the bubble. Residence times of the probe inside the bubble are obtained from the probe signal and from CCD images of the undisturbed bubble. These are compared to study the relevance of various probe-bubble interaction effects. The crawling effect is found to play an important role. For perpendicular piercing, the experiment shows that in the central area of the bubble deceleration effects induced by the probe lead to local overestimation of residence times. In the outer region of the bubble, large-scale deformation leads to local underestimation of residence times. The larger cross-sectional area associated with the underestimation leads to a net underestimation of the total bubble volume. For nonperpendicular piercing, the probe inclination is found to generate an additional drifting effect, creating an additional source of underestimation.

  20. Probe depth matters in dermal microdialysis sampling of benzoic acid after topical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Bangsgaard, N

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) in the skin - dermal microdialysis (DMD) - is a unique technique for sampling of topically as well as systemically administered drugs at the site of action, e.g. sampling of dermatological drug concentrations in the dermis. Debate has concerned the existence of a correlation...... chromatography. Probe depth was measured by 20-MHz ultrasound scanning. The area under the time-versus-concentration curve (AUC) describes the drug exposure in the tissue during the experiment and is a relevant parameter to compare for the 3 dermal probe depths investigated. The AUC(0-12) were: superficial...... be predicted that the differences in sampling at different probe depths will have a more significant impact in the beginning of a study or in studies of short duration. Based on this study it can be recommended that studies of topical drug penetration using DMD sampling should include measurements of probe...

  1. Pre-Service Teachers and Study Abroad: A Reflective, Experiential Sojourn to Increase Intercultural Competence and Translate the Experience into Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Kathleen Marie

    2012-01-01

    This study used a randomized experimental, mixed methods approach to examine whether a stand-apart course curriculum based on experiential learning theory, Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS) theory (Bennett, 1993) and culturally relevant pedagogy influenced students' intercultural competence within the context of a study…

  2. Pre-Service Teachers and Study Abroad: A Reflective, Experiential Sojourn to Increase Intercultural Competence and Translate the Experience into Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    OpenAIRE

    Roller, Kathleen Marie

    2012-01-01

    This study used a randomized experimental, mixed methods approach to examine whether a stand-apart course curriculum based on experiential learning theory, Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS) theory (Bennett, 1993) and culturally relevant pedagogy influenced students' intercultural competence within the context of a study abroad semester. The methods employed allowed the researcher to measure the intercultural competence of pre-service teachers engaged in an experiential, ...

  3. A three dimensional probe positioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T; Sun, X; Dorf, L; Furno, I; Lapenta, G

    2008-10-01

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a "wobbly" probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  4. A three dimensional probe positionera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Dorf, L.; Furno, I.; Lapenta, G.

    2008-10-01

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a "wobbly" probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  5. Hard Probes at RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielčíková Jana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of jets and heavy flavour, the so called hard probes, play a crucial role in understanding properties of hot and dense nuclear matter created in high energy heavy-ion collisions. The measurements at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC showed that in central Au+Au collisons at RHIC energy ( √sNN = 200 GeV the nuclear matter created has properties close to those of perfect liquid, manifests partonic degrees of freedom and is opaque to hard probes. In order to draw quantitative conclusions on properties of this hot and dense nuclear matter reference measurements in proton-proton collisions and d+Au collisions are essential to estimate cold nuclear matter effects. In this proceedings a review of recent results on hard probes measurements in p+p, d+Au and A+A collisions as well as of beam energy dependence of jet quenching from STAR and PHENIX experiments at RHIC is presented.

  6. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  7. Langmuir probes for SPIDER (source for the production of ions of deuterium extracted from radio frequency plasma) experiment: Tests in BATMAN (Bavarian test machine for negative ions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brombin, M., E-mail: matteo.brombin@igi.cnr.it; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Pomaro, N.; Taliercio, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Schiesko, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    A prototype system of the Langmuir probes for SPIDER (Source for the production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) was manufactured and experimentally qualified. The diagnostic was operated in RF (Radio Frequency) plasmas with cesium evaporation on the BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) test facility, which can provide plasma conditions as expected in the SPIDER source. A RF passive compensation circuit was realised to operate the Langmuir probes in RF plasmas. The sensors’ holder, designed to better simulate the bias plate conditions in SPIDER, was exposed to a severe experimental campaign in BATMAN with cesium evaporation. No detrimental effect on the diagnostic due to cesium evaporation was found during the exposure to the BATMAN plasma and in particular the insulation of the electrodes was preserved. The paper presents the system prototype, the RF compensation circuit, the acquisition system (as foreseen in SPIDER), and the results obtained during the experimental campaigns.

  8. Langmuir probes for SPIDER (source for the production of ions of deuterium extracted from radio frequency plasma) experiment: Tests in BATMAN (Bavarian test machine for negative ions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, M.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Pomaro, N.; Taliercio, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Schiesko, L.

    2014-11-01

    A prototype system of the Langmuir probes for SPIDER (Source for the production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) was manufactured and experimentally qualified. The diagnostic was operated in RF (Radio Frequency) plasmas with cesium evaporation on the BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) test facility, which can provide plasma conditions as expected in the SPIDER source. A RF passive compensation circuit was realised to operate the Langmuir probes in RF plasmas. The sensors' holder, designed to better simulate the bias plate conditions in SPIDER, was exposed to a severe experimental campaign in BATMAN with cesium evaporation. No detrimental effect on the diagnostic due to cesium evaporation was found during the exposure to the BATMAN plasma and in particular the insulation of the electrodes was preserved. The paper presents the system prototype, the RF compensation circuit, the acquisition system (as foreseen in SPIDER), and the results obtained during the experimental campaigns.

  9. Laser-pump/X-ray-probe experiments with electrons ejected from a Cu(111) target: space-charge acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiwietz, G; Kühn, D; Föhlisch, A; Holldack, K; Kachel, T; Pontius, N

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the emission characteristics for electrons induced by X-rays of a few hundred eV at grazing-incidence angles on an atomically clean Cu(111) sample during laser excitation is presented. Electron energy spectra due to intense infrared laser irradiation are investigated at the BESSY II slicing facility. Furthermore, the influence of the corresponding high degree of target excitation (high peak current of photoemission) on the properties of Auger and photoelectrons liberated by a probe X-ray beam is investigated in time-resolved pump and probe measurements. Strong electron energy shifts have been found and assigned to space-charge acceleration. The variation of the shift with laser power and electron energy is investigated and discussed on the basis of experimental as well as new theoretical results.

  10. Preliminary results of a gamma-ray burst study in the Konus experiment on the Venera-11 and Venera-12 space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazets, Y. P.; Golentskiy, S. V.; Ilinskiy, V. N.; Panov, V. N.; Aptekar, R. L.; Guryan, Y. A.; Sokolov, I. A.; Sokolova, Z. Y.; Kharitonova, T. V.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-one gamma-ray bursts and 68 solar flares in the hard X-ray range were detected on Venera-11 and Venera-12 space probes during the initial 50-day observation period. Major characteristics of the equipment used and preliminary data on the temporal structure and energy spectra of the gamma-ray bursts are considered. The pattern of gamma-ray burst frequency distribution vs. intensity, N(S), is established.

  11. Probing the dynamics of polyatomic multichannel elementary reactions by crossed molecular beam experiments with soft electron-ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Leonori, Francesca; Balucani, Nadia; Petrucci, Raffaele; Capozza, Giovanni; Segoloni, Enrico

    2009-01-07

    environments via computer models. Examples are taken from recent on-going work (partly published) on the reactions of atomic oxygen with acetylene, ethylene and allyl radical, of great importance in combustion. A reaction of relevance in interstellar chemistry, as that of atomic carbon with acetylene, is also discussed briefly. Comparison with theoretical results is made wherever possible, both at the level of electronic structure calculations of the potential energy surfaces and dynamical computations. Recent complementary CMB work as well as kinetic work exploiting soft photo-ionization with synchrotron radiation are noted. The examples illustrated in this article demonstrate that the type of dynamical results now obtainable on polyatomic multichannel radical-molecule and radical-radical reactions might well complement reaction kinetics experiments and hence contribute to bridging the gap between microscopic reaction dynamics and thermal reaction kinetics, enhancing significantly our basic knowledge of chemical reactivity and understanding of the elementary reactions which occur in real-world environments.

  12. A Discussion of the Effect of Musical Context on Perception of Succession of Musical Events, and its Relevance for Philosophical Models of Temporal Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Phillips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article reviewed in this commentary takes philosophical models of temporal experience as its starting point, in an exploration of how an "experience of succession" may be distinguished from a mere "succession of experience". It is proposed that context is the important factor in differentiating the two experiences, rather than duration. Context is accounted for in broad terms, with specific discussion of gesture, performance environment, and mental imagery. The discussion may usefully pave the way for future collaboration between philosophers and psychologists. However, there are multiple fundamental findings in music cognition research, vital to any consideration of the context in which musical experiences occur (e.g. meter, tonality, expectation, familiarity, that could be factored into this discussion. The ideas discussed could be developed with greater consideration of recent empirical studies in music perception. Perhaps then a theoretical model of the experience of succession of musical events could give rise to experimental hypotheses, which may then be tested in order to further refine such models.

  13. The impact of positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, Rianne; Kamps, Jaap; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using only relevant

  14. The impact of positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, R.; Kamps, J.; Hiemstra, D.; Voorhees, E.M.; Buckland, L.P.

    2009-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using only relevant

  15. Spin of Planetary Probes in Atmospheric Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    Probes that enter planetary atmospheres are often spun during entry or descent for a variety of reasons. Their spin rate histories are influenced by often subtle effects. The spin requirements, control methods and flight experience from planetary and earth entry missions are reviewed. An interaction of the probe aerodynamic wake with a drogue parachute, observed in Gemini wind tunnel tests, is discussed in connection with the anomalous spin behaviour of the Huygens probe.

  16. Space pruning monotonic search for the non-unique probe selection problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Elisa; Ozkok, Beyza Ahlatcioglu; Pardalos, Panos M

    2014-01-01

    Identification of targets, generally viruses or bacteria, in a biological sample is a relevant problem in medicine. Biologists can use hybridisation experiments to determine whether a specific DNA fragment, that represents the virus, is presented in a DNA solution. A probe is a segment of DNA or RNA, labelled with a radioactive isotope, dye or enzyme, used to find a specific target sequence on a DNA molecule by hybridisation. Selecting unique probes through hybridisation experiments is a difficult task, especially when targets have a high degree of similarity, for instance in a case of closely related viruses. After preliminary experiments, performed by a canonical Monte Carlo method with Heuristic Reduction (MCHR), a new combinatorial optimisation approach, the Space Pruning Monotonic Search (SPMS) method, is introduced. The experiments show that SPMS provides high quality solutions and outperforms the current state-of-the-art algorithms.

  17. Why relevance theory is relevant for lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothma, Theo; Tarp, Sven

    2014-01-01

    This article starts by providing a brief summary of relevance theory in information science in relation to the function theory of lexicography, explaining the different types of relevance, viz. objective system relevance and the subjective types of relevance, i.e. topical, cognitive, situational...... that is very important for lexicography as well as for information science, viz. functional relevance. Since all lexicographic work is ultimately aimed at satisfying users’ information needs, the article then discusses why the lexicographer should take note of all these types of relevance when planning a new...... dictionary project, identifying new tasks and responsibilities of the modern lexicographer. The article furthermore discusses how relevance theory impacts on teaching dictionary culture and reference skills. By integrating insights from lexicography and information science, the article contributes to new...

  18. Soil Properties from Low-Velocity Probe Penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome B. Johnson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A physical model of low-velocity probe penetration is developed to characterize soil by type, strength, maximum compaction, and initial density using Newton's second law to describe the processes controlling probe momentum loss. The probe loses momentum by causing soil failure (strength, accelerating and compacting soil around the probe (inertia, and through frictional sliding at the probe/soil interface (friction. Probe geometry, mass, and impact velocity influences are incorporated into the model. Model predictions of probe deceleration history and depth of penetration agree well with experiments, without the need for free variables or complex numerical simulations.

  19. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  20. Probing the Top-Yukawa Coupling by Searching for Associated Higgs Boson Production with a Single Top Quark at the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, Simon; Quast, Günter

    In this thesis the associated production of a single top quark with a Higgs boson is studied. This process is especially well suited for probing of the Top-Yukawa coupling, as the cross section of the tH process increases for couplings deviating from the Standard Model prediction. Upper exclusion limits are set on the tH production by analyzing the data recorded during Run-I and recorded in 2015 during Run-II of the LHC with the CMS detector.

  1. The Experience of a Highly Skilled Student during Handball Lessons in Physical Education: A Relevant Pointer to the Gap between School and Sports Contexts of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crance, Marie-Cecile; Trohel, Jean; Saury, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the experience of a highly skilled student during a handball physical education unit in a French high school. More specifically, the analysis describes the nature of his involvement during two lessons that follow a pedagogical model close to the principles of Sport Education. The present case study of a…

  2. Do lab-derived distribution coefficient values of pesticides match distribution coefficient values determined from column and field-scale experiments? A critical analysis of relevant literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, H; Vanderborght, J; Kasteel, R; Spiteller, M; Schäffer, A; Close, M

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed sorption parameters for pesticides that were derived from batch and column or batch and field experiments. The batch experiments analyzed in this study were run with the same pesticide and soil as in the column and field experiments. We analyzed the relationship between the pore water velocity of the column and field experiments, solute residence times, and sorption parameters, such as the organic carbon normalized distribution coefficient ( ) and the mass exchange coefficient in kinetic models, as well as the predictability of sorption parameters from basic soil properties. The batch/column analysis included 38 studies with a total of 139 observations. The batch/field analysis included five studies, resulting in a dataset of 24 observations. For the batch/column data, power law relationships between pore water velocity, residence time, and sorption constants were derived. The unexplained variability in these equations was reduced, taking into account the saturation status and the packing status (disturbed-undisturbed) of the soil sample. A new regression equation was derived that allows estimating the values derived from column experiments using organic matter and bulk density with an value of 0.56. Regression analysis of the batch/column data showed that the relationship between batch- and column-derived values depends on the saturation status and packing of the soil column. Analysis of the batch/field data showed that as the batch-derived value becomes larger, field-derived values tend to be lower than the corresponding batch-derived values, and vice versa. The present dataset also showed that the variability in the ratio of batch- to column-derived value increases with increasing pore water velocity, with a maximum value approaching 3.5. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.

  3. Factores relevantes en complicaciones de fracturas mandibulares: Relato de 5 años Factors relevant to mandibular fracture complications: A 5-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Serena Gómez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Este estudio ayudará a comprender factores relevantes y su relación con complicaciones post-operatorias en pacientes con tratamiento de fracturas mandibulares. Diseño de estudio: Para el estudio fueron obtenidos datos de pacientes atendidos en un periodo de cinco años por el Área de Cirugía y Traumatología Buco-Maxilofacial de la Facultad de Odontología de Piracicaba, UNICAMP, Brasil. Los datos relevantes de los pacientes en esta investigación fueron; edad, género, actividad económica, consumo de sustancias, etiología del trauma, demora de tratamiento de fractura, tipo de fractura mandibular, complicación post-operatoria y tratamiento a la complicación. Resultados: Un total de 472 pacientes presentaron fracturas mandibulares, de los cuales 54 pacientes (11,4% desarrollaron alguna complicación postoperatoria al tratamiento. En el grupo de pacientes con complicaciones postoperatorias, el género masculino predominó con 44 pacientes y la media de edad fue de 29,3 años de edad. En este grupo se presentaron sin actividad económica 35,2% de los pacientes y 33 (61% relataron abuso en sustancias nocivas a la salud. La agresión física fue la causa mas común (35,1%. Fracturas mandibulares múltiples fueron relatadas en 34 pacientes (62,9%. Infección se presento en 32 pacientes (59,2%. Tratamiento hospitalario para las complicaciones fue necesario para 30 pacientes (55,5%. Conclusiones: Actividad económica y demora en el tratamiento de fracturas mandibulares no fueron significantes en el desarrollo de complicaciones post-operatorias. Por otra parte, la severidad del trauma y el tipo de fractura, consideradamente pueden influir, así como el consumo de sustancias, que presentó una fuerte relación en la presencia de complicaciones.Objective: This study was made to determine the factors relevant to postoperative complications in patients treated for mandibular fracture. Study design: The study was based on the medical

  4. CT Imaging Findings and Their Relevance to the Clinical Outcomes After Stent Graft Repair of Penetrating Aortic Ulcers: Six-year, Single-center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Angle, John F.; Park, Auh Whan; Anderson, Curtis; Sabri, Saher S.; Turba, Ulku C. [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Angiography, Interventional Radiology and Special Procedures, Department of Radiology (United States); Kern, John A.; Cherry, Kenneth J. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Surgery (United States); Matsumoto, Alan H., E-mail: ahm4d@virginia.edu [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Angiography, Interventional Radiology and Special Procedures, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To present the computed tomographic (CT) imaging findings and their relevance to clinical outcomes related to stent graft placement in patients with penetrating aortic ulcers (PAUs). Methods: Medical and imaging records and imaging studies were reviewed for consecutive patients who underwent stent graft repair of a PAU. The distribution and characteristics of the PAU, technical success of stent graft repair, procedure-related complications, associated aortic wall abnormalities, and outcomes of the PAUs at follow-up CT scans were evaluated. Results: Fifteen patients underwent endovascular treatment for PAU. A total of 87% of the PAUs were in the proximal (n = 8) or distal (n = 5) descending thoracic aorta. There was a broad spectrum of PAU depth (mean, 7.9 {+-} 5.6 mm; range 1.5-25.0 mm) and diameter (mean, 13.5 {+-} 9.7 mm; range 2.2-41.0 mm). Atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta and intramural hematoma were associated in 53 and 93% of the patients, respectively. Technical success was achieved in 100%. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients. Endoleaks were observed in two patients within 2 weeks of the procedure, both of which resolved spontaneously. At follow-up CT scanning, regression and thrombosis of the PAUs were observed in all patients. The average patient survival was 61.8 months, with an overall mortality of 13% (2 of 15) at follow-up. Neither death was related to the endograft device or the PAU. Conclusion: Endovascular stent graft placement was safe and effective in causing regression and thrombosis of PAUs in this small series of patients. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients (33%) with associated long-segmental atherosclerotic changes of the thoracic aorta or intramural hematoma.

  5. Enhanced magnetic field probe array for improved excluded flux calculations on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, T., E-mail: troche@trialphaenergy.com; Thompson, M. C.; Mendoza, R.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Romero, J.; Douglass, J. [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    External flux conserving coils were installed onto the exterior of the C-2U [M. W. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)] confinement vessel to increase the flux confinement time of the system. The 0.5 in. stainless steel vessel wall has a skin time of ∼5 ms. The addition of the external copper coils effectively increases this time to ∼7 ms. This led to better-confined/longer-lived field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The fringing fields generated by the external coils have the side effect of rendering external field measurements invalid. Such measurements were key to the previous method of excluded flux calculation [M. C. Thompson et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D709 (2012)]. A new array of B-dot probes and Rogowski coils were installed to better determine the amount of flux leaked out of the system and ultimately provide a more robust measurement of plasma parameters related to pressure balance including the excluded flux radius. The B-dot probes are surface mountable chip inductors with inductance of 33 μH capable of measuring the DC magnetic field and transient field, due to resistive current decay in the wall/coils, when coupled with active integrators. The Rogowski coils measure the total change in current in each external coil (150 A/2 ms). Currents were also actively driven in the external coils. This renders the assumption of total flux conservation invalid which further complicates the analysis process. The ultimate solution to these issues and the record breaking resultant FRC lifetimes will be presented.

  6. LAD Early Career Prize Talk:Laboratory astrophysics experiments investigating the effects of high energy fluxes on Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth relevant to young supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Park, Hye Sook; Huntington, Channing; Miles, Aaron R.; Remington, Bruce A.; Plewa, Tomek; Trantham, Matt; Shvarts, Dov; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Steven; Wan, Wesley; Doss, Forrest; Kline, John; Flippos, Kirk; Malamud, Guy; Handy, Timothy; Prisbey, Shon; Grosskopf, Michael; Krauland, Christine; Klein, Sallee; Harding, Eric; Wallace, Russell; Marion, Donna; Kalantar, Dan

    2017-06-01

    Energy-transport effects can alter the structure that develops as a supernova evolves into a supernova remnant. The Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability is thought to produce structure at the interface between the stellar ejecta and the circumstellar matter (CSM), based on simple models and hydrodynamic simulations. When a blast wave emerges from an exploding star, it drives a forward shock into the CSM and a reverse shock forms in the expanding stellar ejecta, creating a young supernova remnant (SNR). As mass accumulates in the shocked layers, the interface between these two shocks decelerates, becoming unstable to the RT instability. Simulations predict that RT produces structures at this interface, having a range of spatial scales. When the CSM is dense enough, as in the case of SN 1993J, the hot shocked matter can produce significant radiative fluxes that affect the emission from the SNR. Here we report experimental results from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to explore how large energy fluxes, which are present in supernovae such as SN 1993J, might affect this structure. The experiment used NIF to create a RT unstable interface subject to a high energy flux by the emergence of a blast wave into lower-density matter, in analogy to the SNR. We also preformed and with a low energy flux to compare the affect of the energy flux on the instability growth. We found that the RT growth was reduced in the experiments with a high energy flux. In analyzing the comparison with SN 1993J, we discovered that the energy fluxes produced by heat conduction appear to be larger than the radiative energy fluxes, and large enough to have dramatic consequences. No reported astrophysical simulations have included radiation and heat conduction self-consistently in modeling SNRs.

  7. As the antiworld turns probing the secrets of atoms, new experiments may sharpen lasers, aid doctors and - some say - fuel starships

    CERN Multimedia

    Hughes, J

    1999-01-01

    Experiments due to begin soon at CERN will produce large amounts of antihydrogen to compare matter and antimatter so physicists can gain a better understanding of the universe. Additionally, through the experiments they will generate new analytic instruments and technological innovations (4 pages).

  8. The Galaxy Evolution Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Galaxy Evolution Probe Team

    2018-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Probe (GEP) is a concept for a far-infrared observatory to survey large regions of sky for star-forming galaxies from z = 0 to beyond z = 3. Our knowledge of galaxy formation is incomplete and requires uniform surveys over a large range of redshifts and environments to accurately describe mass assembly, star formation, supermassive black hole growth, interactions between these processes, and what led to their decline from z ~ 2 to the present day. Infrared observations are sensitive to dusty, star-forming galaxies, which have bright polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features and warm dust continuum in the rest-frame mid infrared and cooler thermal dust emission in the far infrared. Unlike previous far-infrared continuum surveys, the GEP will measure photometric redshifts commensurate with galaxy detections from PAH emission and Si absorption features, without the need for obtaining spectroscopic redshifts of faint counterparts at other wavelengths.The GEP design includes a 2 m diameter telescope actively cooled to 4 K and two instruments: (1) An imager covering 10 to 300 um with 25 spectral resolution R ~ 8 bands (with lower R at the longest wavelengths) to detect star-forming galaxies and measure their redshifts photometrically. (2) A 23 – 190 um, R ~ 250 dispersive spectrometer for redshift confirmation and identification of obscured AGN using atomic fine-structure lines. Lines including [Ne V], [O IV], [O III], [O I], and [C II] will probe gas physical conditions, radiation field hardness, and metallicity. Notionally, the GEP will have a two-year mission: galaxy surveys with photometric redshifts in the first year and a second year devoted to follow-up spectroscopy. A comprehensive picture of star formation in galaxies over the last 10 billion years will be assembled from cosmologically relevant volumes, spanning environments from field galaxies and groups, to protoclusters, to dense galaxy clusters.Commissioned by NASA, the

  9. PERMCAT experiments with tritium at high helium flow rates relevant for the tritium extraction systems using the CAPER facility at TLK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bükki-Deme, András, E-mail: andras.buekki-deme@kit.edu; Demange, David; Le, Thanh-Long; Fanghänel, Eleonore; Simon, Karl-Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We examined PERMCAT reactor efficiency processing tritiated water at high Helium carrier flow rates. • We have found that – as expected from previous studies – that the swamping ratio (ratio between the impurity and purge side flow rates) has a key effect on the decontamination factors. • On the other hand, some rather unexpected effects tend to show that the limiting phenomena of such specific operation of PERMCAT reactors (at high impurity flow rates, thus short residence time) lies on the kinetics of the isotope exchange reactions. - Abstract: Experiments are still necessary to consolidate the processes retained for the Tritium Extraction Systems of the European ITER Test Blanket Modules (TBM). A PERMCAT reactor combines a catalyst promoting isotope exchange reactions and a Pd/Ag membrane allowing tritium recovery from complex gaseous mixtures containing tritium in different chemical forms. Originally developed for the Tokamak Exhaust Processing, the PERMCAT process is also candidate to detritiate the water arising from an adsorption column installed in the TBM ancillary systems. We discuss the results of an extensive experimental campaign using a PERMCAT reactor to process Q{sub 2}O containing impurity gas mixtures at high flow rates. Two different experimental configurations were studied, namely PERMCAT stand-alone, and PERMCAT in combination with a zeolite molecular sieve bed (MSB, previously loaded with Q{sub 2}O) under regeneration. On the one hand, many expected behaviors were observed, such as the key influence of the swamping ratio (ratio between the impurity and purge side flow rates) on the decontamination factors. On the other hand, some rather unexpected effects tend to show that the limiting phenomena of such specific operation of PERMCAT reactors (at high flow rates, thus short residence time) lies on the kinetics of the isotope exchange reactions.

  10. MR imaging of patients with localisation-related seizures: initial experience at 3.0T and relevance to the NICE guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, P.D. [Section of Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.griffiths@sheffield.ac.uk; Coley, S.C. [Department of Radiology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Trust, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Connolly, D.J.A. [Department of Radiology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Trust, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hodgson, T. [Department of Radiology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Trust, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Romanowski, C.A.J. [Department of Radiology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Trust, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Widjaja, E. [Section of Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Darwent, G. [Section of Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, I.D. [Section of Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe our initial experience of imaging adults with localisation-related epilepsy using MR imaging at 3.0T. We discuss the findings in the context of the recently released NICE guidelines that provide detailed advice on imaging people with epilepsy in the UK. 120 consecutive people over the age of 16 years with localisation-related epilepsy were referred for clinical MR examinations from a regional neuroscience centre in England. None of the people had had MR examinations prior to the present study. High resolution MR imaging was performed taking advantage of the high field strength and high performance gradients of the system. Two experienced neuroradiologists reported on the examinations independently and the presence and type of pathology was recorded. There was complete agreement between the two reporters in all 120 cases. The overall frequency of abnormalities shown by MR was 31/120 (26%) and the commonest abnormality shown was mesial temporal sclerosis found in 10/120 (8%). Tumours were shown in 4/120, all of which appeared low grade as judged by imaging criteria. Epilepsy is the commonest neurological condition and demands a significant resource in order to provide good care for sufferers. Recent guidelines published in the UK have suggested that the majority of people with epilepsy should receive brain MR as part of their routine assessment. Our work shows that using the most sophisticated MR imaging in a highly selected population there is a modest pick-up rate of brain abnormalities. If a widespread epilepsy-imaging programme is started the detection rate is likely to be much lower. Although MR is acknowledged to be a reliable way of detecting pathology in people with epilepsy there is a dearth of information studying the health economics of imaging epilepsy in relation to patient management and outcomes.

  11. Parallel Probe Readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, W.W.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis techniques are developed to read out nanoscale probes and arrays of probes.The main targeted application area is probe-based data storage.The work also contributes to other areas, such as metrology, biological sensing, materials research and nano-electro-mechanical switches. First, an

  12. Multi-Electrode Resistivity Probe for Investigation of Local Temperature Inside Metal Shell Battery Cells via Resistivity: Experiments and Evaluation of Electrical Resistance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct Current (DC electrical resistivity is a material property that is sensitive to temperature changes. In this paper, the relationship between resistivity and local temperature inside steel shell battery cells (two commercial 10 Ah and 4.5 Ah lithium-ion cells is innovatively studied by Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT. The Schlumberger configuration in ERT is applied to divide the cell body into several blocks distributed in different levels, where the apparent resistivities are measured by multi-electrode surface probes. The investigated temperature ranges from −20 to 80 °C. Experimental results have shown that the resistivities mainly depend on temperature changes in each block of the two cells used and the function of the resistivity and temperature can be fitted to the ERT-measurement results in the logistical-plot. Subsequently, the dependence of resistivity on the state of charge (SOC is investigated, and the SOC range of 70%–100% has a remarkable impact on the resistivity at low temperatures. The proposed approach under a thermal cool down regime is demonstrated to monitor the local transient temperature.

  13. Precipitates in Al-Cu alloys revisited: Atom-probe tomographic experiments and first-principles calculations of compositional evolution and interfacial segregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Aniruddha [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Siegel, Donald J., E-mail: djsiege@umich.edu [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, 2350 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States); Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, 2350 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States); Wolverton, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Seidman, David N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Northwestern University Center for Atom-Probe Tomography, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Atom-probe tomography, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and first-principles calculations are employed to study: (i) compositional evolution of GPII zones and {theta}' precipitates; and (ii) solute segregation at {alpha}-Al/{theta}' interfaces in Al-1.7 at.% Cu (Al-4 wt.% Cu) alloys. GPII zones are observed after aging at 438 K for 8 h, whereas higher aging temperatures, 463 K for 8 h and 533 K for 4 h, reveal only {theta}' precipitates. Most GPII zones and {theta}' precipitates are demonstrated to be Cu-deficient at the lower two aging temperatures; only the 533 K treatment resulted in {theta}' stoichiometries consistent with the expected Al{sub 2}Cu equilibrium composition. For alloys containing {approx}200 at. ppm Si we find evidence of Si partitioning to GPII zones and {theta}' precipitates. Significant Si segregation is observed at the coherent {alpha}-Al/{theta}' interface for aging at 533 K, resulting in an interfacial Si concentration more than 11 times greater than in the {alpha}-Al matrix. Importantly, the Si interfacial concentration undergoes a transition from a non-equilibrium delocalized profile to an equilibrium localized profile as the aging temperature is increased from 463 to 533 K. Consistent with these measurements, first-principles calculations predict a strong thermodynamic driving force favoring Si partitioning to Cu sites in {theta}'. Silicon segregation at, and partitioning to, {theta}' precipitates results in a decrease in interfacial free energy, and concomitantly an increase in the nucleation current. Our results suggest that Si catalyzes the early stages of precipitation in these alloys, consistent with the higher precipitate number densities observed in commercial Al-Cu-Si alloys.

  14. Compression of space for low visibility probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eBorn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stimuli briefly flashed just before a saccade are perceived closer to the saccade target, a phenomenon known as perisaccadic compression of space (Ross, Morrone, & Burr, 1997. More recently, we have demonstrated that brief probes are attracted towards a visual reference when followed by a mask, even in the absence of saccades (Zimmermann, Born, Fink, & Cavanagh, 2014. Here, we ask whether spatial compression depends on the transient disruptions of the visual input stream caused by either a mask or a saccade. Both of these degrade the probe visibility but we show that low probe visibility alone causes compression in the absence of any disruption. In a first experiment, we varied the regions of the screen covered by a transient mask, including areas where no stimulus was presented and a condition without masking. In all conditions, we adjusted probe contrast to make the probe equally hard to detect. Compression effects were found in all conditions. To obtain compression without a mask, the probe had to be presented at much lower contrasts than with masking. Comparing mislocalizations at different probe detection rates across masking, saccades and low contrast conditions without mask or saccade, Experiment 2 confirmed this observation and showed a strong influence of probe contrast on compression. Finally, in Experiment 3, we found that compression decreased as probe duration increased both for masks and saccades although here we did find some evidence that factors other than simply visibility as we measured it contribute to compression. Our experiments suggest that compression reflects how the visual system localizes weak targets in the context of highly visible stimuli.

  15. Compression of Space for Low Visibility Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Sabine; Krüger, Hannah M; Zimmermann, Eckart; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli briefly flashed just before a saccade are perceived closer to the saccade target, a phenomenon known as perisaccadic compression of space (Ross et al., 1997). More recently, we have demonstrated that brief probes are attracted towards a visual reference when followed by a mask, even in the absence of saccades (Zimmermann et al., 2014a). Here, we ask whether spatial compression depends on the transient disruptions of the visual input stream caused by either a mask or a saccade. Both of these degrade the probe visibility but we show that low probe visibility alone causes compression in the absence of any disruption. In a first experiment, we varied the regions of the screen covered by a transient mask, including areas where no stimulus was presented and a condition without masking. In all conditions, we adjusted probe contrast to make the probe equally hard to detect. Compression effects were found in all conditions. To obtain compression without a mask, the probe had to be presented at much lower contrasts than with masking. Comparing mislocalizations at different probe detection rates across masking, saccades and low contrast conditions without mask or saccade, Experiment 2 confirmed this observation and showed a strong influence of probe contrast on compression. Finally, in Experiment 3, we found that compression decreased as probe duration increased both for masks and saccades although here we did find some evidence that factors other than simply visibility as we measured it contribute to compression. Our experiments suggest that compression reflects how the visual system localizes weak targets in the context of highly visible stimuli.

  16. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  17. Overestimation of Mach number due to probe shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, J. J.; Thakur, S. C.; Sears, S. H.; McKee, J. S.; Scime, E. E.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-07-01

    Comparisons of the plasma ion flow speed measurements from Mach probes and laser induced fluorescence were performed in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment. We show the presence of the probe causes a low density geometric shadow downstream of the probe that affects the current density collected by the probe in collisional plasmas if the ion-neutral mean free path is shorter than the probe shadow length, Lg = w2 Vdrift/D⊥, resulting in erroneous Mach numbers. We then present a simple correction term that provides the corrected Mach number from probe data when the sound speed, ion-neutral mean free path, and perpendicular diffusion coefficient of the plasma are known. The probe shadow effect must be taken into account whenever the ion-neutral mean free path is on the order of the probe shadow length in linear devices and the open-field line region of fusion devices.

  18. High pressure optical combustion probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod in a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.

  19. Probing ice clouds by broadband mid-infrared extinction spectroscopy: case studies from ice nucleation experiments in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Series of infrared extinction spectra of ice crystals were recorded in the 6000–800 cm−1 wavenumber regime during expansion cooling experiments in the large aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Either supercooled sulphuric acid solution droplets or dry mineral dust particles were added as seed aerosols to initiate ice formation after having established ice supersaturated conditions inside the chamber. The various ice nucleation runs were conducted at temperatures between 237 and 195 K, leading to median sizes of the nucleated ice particles of 1–15 µm. The measured infrared spectra were fitted with reference spectra from T-matrix calculations to retrieve the number concentration as well as the number size distribution of the generated ice clouds. The precise evaluation of the time-dependent ice particle number concentrations, i.e., the rates of new ice particle formation, is of particular importance to quantitatively analyse the ice nucleation experiments in terms of nucleation rates and ice activation spectra. The ice particles were modelled as finite circular cylinders with aspect ratios ranging from 0.5 to 3.0. Benefiting from the comprehensive diagnostic tools for the characterisation of ice clouds which are available at the AIDA facility, the infrared retrieval results with regard to the ice particle number concentration could be compared to independent measurements with various optical particle counters. This provided a unique chance to quantitatively assess potential errors or solution ambiguities in the retrieval procedure which mainly originate from the difficulty to find an appropriate shape representation for the aspherical particle habits of the ice crystals. Based on these inter-comparisons, we demonstrate that there is no standard retrieval approach which can be routinely applied to all different experimental scenarios. In particular, the concept to account for the asphericity of the ice crystals

  20. Stark-effect measurement of high FEL (free-electron laser) electric fields in MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) by laser-aided particle-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, T.; Takiyama, K. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Odajima, K.; Ohasa, K.; Shiho, M. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Mizuno, K. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA) Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA)); Foote, J.H.; Nilson, D.G. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA))

    1990-05-04

    We are constructing a diagnostic system to measure the electric field (>100 kV/cm) of a free-electron laser (FEL) beam when injected into the plasma of the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX). The apparatus allows a crossed-beam measurement, with 2-cm spatial resolution in the plasma, involving the FEL beam (with 140-GHz, {approx}1-GW ECH pulses), a neutral-helium beam, and a dye-laser beam. After the laser beam pumps metastable helium atoms to higher excited states, their decay light is detected by a collimated optical system. Because of the Stark effect due to the FEL electric field ({rvec E}), a forbidden transition can be strongly induced. The intensity of emitted light resulting from the forbidden transition is proportional to E{sup 2}. Because photon counting rates are calculated to be low, extra effort is made to minimize background and noise levels. It is possible that the lower {rvec E} of an MTX gyrotron-produced ECH beam with its longer-duration pulses also can be measured using this method. Other applications may include measurements of ion temperature (using charge-exchange recombination), edge-density fluctuations, and core impurity concentrations. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Start-effect measurement of high FEL (free-electron laser) electric fields in MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) by laser-aided particle-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, T.; Takiyama, K. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Odajima, K.; Ohasa, K.; Shiho, M. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Mizuno, K. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA) Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Foote, J.H.; Nilson, D.G. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-05-10

    We are constructing a diagnostic system to measure the electric field (>100 kV/cm) of a free-electron laser (FEL) beam when injected into the plasma of the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX). The apparatus allows a crossed-beam measurement, with 2-cm spatial resolution in the plasma, involving the FEL beam (with 140-GHz, {approx}1-GW ECH pulses), a neutral-helium beam, and a dye-laser beam. After the laser beam pumps metastable helium atoms to higher excited states, their decay light is detected by an efficient optical system. Because of the Stark effect arising from the FEL electric field ({rvec E}), a forbidden transition can be strongly induced. The intensity of emitted light resulting from the forbidden transition is proportional to E{sup 2}. Because photon counting rates are estimated to be low, extra effort is made to minimize background and noise levels. It is possible that the lower {rvec E} of an MTX gyrotron-produced ECH beam with its longer-duration pulses can also be measured using this method. Other applications of the apparatus described here may include measurements of ion temperature (using charge-exchange recombination), edge-density fluctuations, and core impurity concentrations.

  2. Formative Assessment Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  3. Towards 4-D Noise-based Seismic Probing of Volcanoes: Perspectives from a Large-N Nodal Experiment on Piton de la Fournaise Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenguier, F.; Ackerley, N. J.; Nakata, N.; Boué, P.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Shapiro, N.

    2015-12-01

    Noise-based seismology is proving to be a complementary approach to active source or earthquake-based methods for imaging and monitoring the Earth's interior and in particular volcanoes and active faults. Until recently, noise-based imaging and monitoring relied only on the inversion of surface waves reconstructed from correlations of mostly microseismic seismic noise. Compared to body-wave tomography, surface wave tomography succeeds in retrieving lateral sub-surface velocity contrasts but is less efficient in resolving velocity perturbations at depth. Moreover reflected body-waves can carry direct information about sharp interfaces at depth. Extracting body-waves from noise correlations is challenging and the use of Large-N seismic arrays proves to be of great benefit for extracting noisy body-waves from noise-correlations by stacking over a large number of receiver pairs and by applying array processing. The purpose of VolcArray Large-N seismic experiment on Piton de la Fournaise Volcano is to extract body-waves travelling directly through the active magma reservoir located at ~2.5 km depth below the summit crater using noise correlations between arrays of seismic nodes. By beamforming noise on individual arrays, we found an unusual strong directional source of body-wave noise. This is thus a favorable context for retrieving the body-wave component of the Green's function between arrays. However, standard correlation techniques between nodes do not allow deciphering between the reconstructed Green's function and artifacts from the correlation of the strong directional source of body-waves. By applying double beamforming to the noise correlations between arrays, we are able to isolate ballistic body-waves travelling across the magma storage zone at depth. The stability of these reconstructed waves over time is encouraging in the perspectives of high resolution monitoring of the volcano feeding system.

  4. Dot probe performance in two specific phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, A; Holt, C S

    1999-11-01

    The present study applied MacLeod, Mathews & Tata's (1986) dot probe attentional deployment methodology to individuals with specific phobias. Attentional deployment towards spider-related, blood-related, positive, negative, and neutral words was examined. Individuals with either spider phobia (N = 13) or blood/injury phobia (N = 14) and non-anxious controls (N = 14) completed the dot probe attentional deployment task. Individuals with specific phobias did not demonstrate an attentional bias towards phobia-related stimuli relevant to their particular fears. Semantic-based information processing paradigms may not be sufficiently potent to demonstrate biased performance towards threatening stimuli in individuals with mild specific phobias who are otherwise healthy.

  5. Relevance Matrices in LVQ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, Petra; Biehl, Michael; Hammer, Barbara; Verleysen, Michel

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new matrix learning scheme to extend Generalized Relevance Learning Vector Quantization (GRLVQ). By introducing a full matrix of relevance factors in the distance measure, correlations between different features and their importance for the classification scheme can be taken into

  6. Inflatable traversing probe seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An inflatable seal acts as a pressure-tight zipper to provide traversing capability for instrumentation rakes and probes. A specially designed probe segment with a teardrop cross-section in the vicinity of the inflatable seal minimizes leakage at the interface. The probe is able to travel through a lengthwise slot in a pressure vessel or wind tunnel section, while still maintaining pressure integrity. The design uses two commercially available inflatable seals, opposing each other, to cover the probe slot in a wind tunnel wall. Proof-of-concept tests were conducted at vessel pressures up to 30 psig, with seals inflated to 50 psig, showing no measurable leakage along the seal's length or around the probe teardrop cross-section. This seal concept can replace the existing technology of sliding face plate/O-ring systems in applications where lengthwise space is limited.

  7. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sagar; Lo, Meng-Chen; Damodaran, Vinod B.; Kaplan, Hilton M.; Kohn, Joachim; Zahn, Jeffrey D.; Shreiber, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM) to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (probe length were the most important features in influencing insertion potential. The model also revealed the effects of manufacturing flaws on insertion potential. PMID:26959021

  8. Study of probe-sample distance for biomedical spectra measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fiber-based optical spectroscopy has been widely used for biomedical applications. However, the effect of probe-sample distance on the collection efficiency has not been well investigated. Method In this paper, we presented a theoretical model to maximize the illumination and collection efficiency in designing fiber optic probes for biomedical spectra measurement. This model was in general applicable to probes with single or multiple fibers at an arbitrary incident angle. In order to demonstrate the theory, a fluorescence spectrometer was used to measure the fluorescence of human finger skin at various probe-sample distances. The fluorescence spectrum and the total fluorescence intensity were recorded. Results The theoretical results show that for single fiber probes, contact measurement always provides the best results. While for multi-fiber probes, there is an optimal probe distance. When a 400- μm excitation fiber is used to deliver the light to the skin and another six 400- μm fibers surrounding the excitation fiber are used to collect the fluorescence signal, the experimental results show that human finger skin has very strong fluorescence between 475 nm and 700 nm under 450 nm excitation. The fluorescence intensity is heavily dependent on the probe-sample distance and there is an optimal probe distance. Conclusions We investigated a number of probe-sample configurations and found that contact measurement could be the primary choice for single-fiber probes, but was very inefficient for multi-fiber probes. There was an optimal probe-sample distance for multi-fiber probes. By carefully choosing the probe-sample distance, the collection efficiency could be enhanced by 5-10 times. Our experiments demonstrated that the experimental results of the probe-sample distance dependence of collection efficiency in multi-fiber probes were in general agreement with our theory.

  9. UPS 2.0: unique probe selector for probe design and oligonucleotide microarrays at the pangenomic/genomic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Hwa; Lo, Chen-Zen; Su, Sheng-Yao; Kuo, Bao-Han; Hsiung, Chao A; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2010-12-02

    Nucleic acid hybridization is an extensively adopted principle in biomedical research, in which the performance of any hybridization-based method depends on the specificity of probes to their targets. To determine the optimal probe(s) for detecting target(s) from a sample cocktail, we developed a novel algorithm, which has been implemented into a web platform for probe designing. This probe design workflow is now upgraded to satisfy experiments that require a probe designing tool to take the increasing volume of sequence datasets. Algorithms and probe parameters applied in UPS 2.0 include GC content, the secondary structure, melting temperature (Tm), the stability of the probe-target duplex estimated by the thermodynamic model, sequence complexity, similarity of probes to non-target sequences, and other empirical parameters used in the laboratory. Several probe background options,Unique probe within a group,Unique probe in a specific Unigene set,Unique probe based on the pangenomic level, and Unique Probe in the user-defined genome/transcriptome, are available to meet the scenarios that the experiments will be conducted. Parameters, such as salt concentration and the lower-bound Tm of probes, are available for users to optimize their probe design query. Output files are available for download on the result page. Probes designed by the UPS algorithm are suitable for generating microarrays, and the performance of UPS-designed probes has been validated by experiments. The UPS 2.0 evaluates probe-to-target hybridization under a user-defined condition to ensure high-performance hybridization with minimal chance of non-specific binding at the pangenomic and genomic levels. The UPS algorithm mimics the target/non-target mixture in an experiment and is very useful in developing diagnostic kits and microarrays. The UPS 2.0 website has had more than 1,300 visits and 360,000 sequences performed the probe designing task in the last 30 months. It is freely accessible at http

  10. Small-Scale Design Experiments as Working Space for Larger Mobile Communication Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Sarah; Stuedahl, Dagny

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a design experiment using Instagram as a cultural probe is submitted as a method for analyzing the challenges that arise when considering the implementation of social media within a distributed communication space. It outlines how small, iterative investigations can reveal deeper research questions relevant to the education of…

  11. Foldable polymers as probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2007-07-03

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  12. Ablation of metals using ultrashort laser pulses in a pump-probe experiment dynamics of laser induced particle emission from metal surfaces on the femto and picosecond time scale

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, V

    2001-01-01

    The main part of this work deals with the dynamics of the laser ablation process of metals (Al, Ag, Fe and Ni) initiated by approx. 50 fs laser pulses. The phenomena have been investigated by interferometric time resolved pump and probe measurements. This work reports one of the first yield measurements of emitted singly charged ions and neutrals from a metal surface induced by laser light. The experiments have been performed using a two-pulse autocorrelation setup in which the differential yield of emitted metal ions is measured as a function of the temporal separation between a pair of excitation pulses with a reflectron-type time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer. The intensity of each pulse is kept below the ablation threshold, thus only the combined interaction of both pulses causes particle emission. It must be pointed out, that the time information obtained in this way concerns only the initial excitation responsible for ablation, but does not yield information about the dynamics of the way this excitation ...

  13. Small molecule probes for cellular death machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Qian, Lihui; Yuan, Junying

    2017-08-01

    The past decade has witnessed a significant expansion of our understanding about the regulated cell death mechanisms beyond apoptosis. The application of chemical biological approaches had played a major role in driving these exciting discoveries. The discovery and use of small molecule probes in cell death research has not only revealed significant insights into the regulatory mechanism of cell death but also provided new drug targets and lead drug candidates for developing therapeutics of human diseases with huge unmet need. Here, we provide an overview of small molecule modulators for necroptosis and ferroptosis, two non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms, and discuss the molecular pathways and relevant pathophysiological mechanisms revealed by the judicial applications of such small molecule probes. We suggest that the development and applications of small molecule probes for non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms provide an outstanding example showcasing the power of chemical biology in exploring novel biological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Culturally Relevant Cyberbullying Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Gregory John

    2017-01-01

    In this action research study, I, along with a student intervention committee of 14 members, developed a cyberbullying intervention for a large urban high school on the west coast. This high school contained a predominantly African American student population. I aimed to discover culturally relevant cyberbullying prevention strategies for African American students. The intervention committee selected video safety messages featuring African American actors as the most culturally relevant cyber...

  15. Soft QGP probes with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Graczykowski, Łukasz Kamil

    2016-01-01

    In heavy-ion collisions at the LHC a hot and dense medium of deconfided partons, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), is created. Its global properties can be characterized by the measurements of particles in the low transverse momentum (or "soft") regime, which represent the majority of created particles. In this report we outline a selection of measurements of the soft probes by the ALICE experiment in pp, p--Pb, and Pb--Pb collisions. The paper focuses on recent flow measurements via angular correlations and femtoscopic studies. The first ever preliminary analysis of $\\mathrm{K}^0_{\\rm S}\\mathrm{K}^{\\pm}$ femtoscopy is also presented.

  16. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  17. Observation of Energetic Particle Driven Modes Relevant to Advanced Tokamak Regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Nazikian; B. Alper; H.L. Berk; D. Borba; C. Boswell; R.V. Budny; K.H. Burrell; C.Z. Cheng; E.J. Doyle; E. Edlund; R.J. Fonck; A. Fukuyama; N.N. Gorelenkov; C.M. Greenfield; D.J. Gupta; M. Ishikawa; R.J. Jayakumar; G.J. Kramer; Y. Kusama; R.J. La Haye; G.R. McKee; W.A. Peebles; S.D. Pinches; M. Porkolab; J. Rapp; T.L. Rhodes; S.E. Sharapov; K. Shinohara; J.A. Snipes; W.M. Solomon; E.J. Strait; M. Takechi; M.A. Van Zeeland; W.P. West; K.L. Wong; S. Wukitch; L. Zeng

    2004-10-21

    Measurements of high-frequency oscillations in JET [Joint European Torus], JT-60U, Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, and TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas are contributing to a new understanding of fast ion-driven instabilities relevant to Advanced Tokamak (AT) regimes. A model based on the transition from a cylindrical-like frequency-chirping mode to the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) has successfully encompassed many of the characteristics seen in experiments. In a surprising development, the use of internal density fluctuation diagnostics has revealed many more modes than has been detected on edge magnetic probes. A corollary discovery is the observation of modes excited by fast particles traveling well below the Alfven velocity. These observations open up new opportunities for investigating a ''sea of Alfven Eigenmodes'' in present-scale experiments, and highlight the need for core fluctuation and fast ion measurements in a future burning-plasma experiment.

  18. Probing a dark photon using rare leptonic kaon and pion decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Chiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Rare leptonic kaon and pion decays K+(π+→μ+νμe+e− can be used to probe a dark photon of mass O(10 MeV, with the background coming from the mediation of a virtual photon. This is most relevant for the 16.7-MeV dark photon proposed to explain a 6.8σ anomaly recently observed in 8Be transitions by the Atomki Collaboration. We evaluate the reach of future experiments for the dark photon with vectorial couplings to the standard model fermions except for the neutrinos, and show that a great portion of the preferred 16.7-MeV dark photon parameter space can be decisively probed. We also show the use of angular distributions to further distinguish the signal from the background.

  19. Gravity Probe B Experiment and Gravitomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veto, B.

    2010-01-01

    Gravitomagnetism is a low velocity and weak gravitational field approximation of general relativity. It provides a simple approach to post-Newtonian gravitational phenomena via electromagnetic analogy. Intended for advanced undergraduate students, the present paper applies gravitomagnetism to the quantitative study of the geodetic precession and…

  20. Novel Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Approaches In Hearing Aid Applications Using Probe Noise and Probe Noise Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    and annoying; this makes the traditional probe noise approach less useful in practical applications. In this work, we explain theoretically the decreased convergence rate when using low-level probe noise in the traditional approach, before we propose and study analytically two new probe noise approaches...... the proposed approaches much more attractive in practical applications. We demonstrate this through a simulation experiment with audio signals in a hearing aid acoustic feedback cancellation system, where the convergence rate is improved by as much as a factor of 10....

  1. Huygens probe on target

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    In October 1997, a Titan/Centaur rocket lifting-off from Cape Canaveral will boost the spacecraft into a 6.7 year trajectory to reach Saturn. The trajectory will use two swing-bys of Venus in April 1998 and June 1999, followed by an Earth swing-by in August 1999 and a Jupiter swing-by in December 2000 to boost speed and reach Saturn in July 2004. A few months after going into orbit around Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft will release the Huygens probe for its descent through the atmosphere of Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn. The Huygens probe will measure the abundance of elements and compounds in Titan's atmosphere, the distribution of trace gases and aerosols, winds, temperature, pressure and surface state and its composition. A multi-spectral camera on the probe will provide images of the landscape of Titan. Titan is a unique planetary body in the solar system. It has an atmosphere which is primarily nitrogen. but is also rich in hydrocarbons. Due to the vast distance of the Saturnian system from the Sun, this atmosphere is at a very low temperature, thus greatly slowing down all the chemical processes. A study of this atmosphere will throw light on the development of our own atmosphere and contribute to our understanding of the origins of life on Earth. The Huygens probe is being developed by ESA with Aerospatiale (F) as the industrial prime contractor. Since the start of the programme in April 1990, very good progress has been made in design and hardware development. The entry into the Titan atmosphere will result in a very high surface temperature on the probe, generated as it decelerates due to the friction of the upper atmospheric layers. After the probe has slowed down sufficiently, a system of parachutes ensures a slow descent to the surface of Titan in approximately two and a half hours. The scientific measurements can only begin after the heat shield, which is needed to protect the probe during the high temperature entry phase, has been ejected

  2. Design principles of spectroscopic probes for biological applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jin; Ma, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic (chromogenic, fluorescent, or chemiluminescent) probes have been widely used in many fields due to their high sensitivity and unrivaled spatiotemporal resolution. This area is an old one but always full of activity, because the rapid development of science and technology requires not only new probes for specific purposes (e.g., subcellular imaging) but also the update of current probes with more satisfactory properties. Based on our experiences and including existing knowledge, ...

  3. Korrek, volledig, relevant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Henning; Gouws, Rufus

    2007-01-01

    as detrimental to the status of a dictionary as a container of linguistic knowledge. This paper shows that, from a lexicographic perspective, such a distinction is not relevant. What is important is that definitions should contain information that is relevant to and needed by the target users of that specific......In explanatory dictionaries, both general language dictionaries and dictionaries dealing with languages for special purposes, the lexicographic definition is an important item to present the meaning of a given lemma. Due to a strong linguistic bias, resulting from an approach prevalent in the early...

  4. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  5. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: Clashes and Confrontations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherff, Lisa, Ed.; Spector, Karen, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The authors in this edited volume reflect on their experiences with culturally relevant pedagogy--as students, as teachers, as researchers--and how these experiences were often at odds with their backgrounds and/or expectations. Each of the authors speaks to the complexity and difficulty in attempting to address students' cultures, create learning…

  6. The infinite line pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, D. R.; Richards, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The infinite line pressure probe provides a means for measuring high frequency fluctuating pressures in difficult environments. A properly designed infinite line probe does not resonate; thus its frequency response is not limited by acoustic resonance in the probe tubing, as in conventional probes. The characteristics of infinite line pressure probes are reviewed and some applications in turbine engine research are described. A probe with a flat-oval cross section, permitting a constant-impedance pressure transducer installation, is described. Techniques for predicting the frequency response of probes with both circular and flat-oval cross sections are also cited.

  7. The Relevance of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, L. L.

    1971-01-01

    The "legacy" of the humanities is discussed in terms of relevance, involvement, and other philosophical considerations. Reasons for studying foreign literature in language classes are developed in the article. Comment is also made on attitudes and ideas culled from the writings of Clifton Fadiman, Jean Paul Sartre, and James Baldwin. (RL)

  8. Is Information Still Relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  9. Severe disruption of the cytoskeleton and immunologically relevant surface molecules in a human macrophageal cell line in microgravity-Results of an in vitro experiment on board of the Shenzhou-8 space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Katrin; Tauber, Svantje; Goelz, Nadine; Simmet, Dana Michaela; Engeli, Stephanie; Birlem, Maria; Dumrese, Claudia; Karer, Anissja; Hunziker, Sandra; Biskup, Josefine; Konopasek, Shalimar; Suh, Durie; Hürlimann, Eva; Signer, Christoph; Wang, Anna; Sang, Chen; Grote, Karl-Heinrich; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Ullrich, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    During spaceflight the immune system is one of the most affected systems of the human body. During the SIMBOX (Science in Microgravity Box) mission on Shenzhou-8, we investigated microgravity-associated long-term alterations in macrophageal cells, the most important effector cells of the immune system. We analyzed the effect of long-term microgravity on the cytoskeleton and immunologically relevant surface molecules. Human U937 cells were differentiated into a macrophageal phenotype and exposed to microgravity or 1g on a reference centrifuge on-orbit for 5 days. After on-orbit fixation, the samples were analyzed with immunocytochemical staining and confocal microscopy after landing. The unmanned Shenzhou-8 spacecraft was launched on board a Long March 2F (CZ-2F) rocket from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center (JSLC) and landed after a 17-day-mission. We found a severely disturbed actin cytoskeleton, disorganized tubulin and distinctly reduced expression of CD18, CD36 and MHC-II after the 5 days in microgravity. The disturbed cytoskeleton, the loss of surface receptors for bacteria recognition, the activation of T lymphocytes, the loss of an important scavenger receptor and of antigen-presenting molecules could represent a dysfunctional macrophage phenotype. This phenotype in microgravity would be not capable of migrating or recognizing and attacking pathogens, and it would no longer activate the specific immune system, which could be investigated in functional assays. Obviously, the results have to be interpreted with caution as the model system has some limitations and due to numerous technical and biological restrictions (e.g. 23 °C and no CO2 supply during in-flight incubation). All parameter were carefully pre-tested on ground. Therefore, the experiment could be adapted to the experimental conditions available on Shenzhou-8.

  10. Muon probe and connected instrumentation for the study of quark-gluon plasma in ALICE experiment; Sonde muonique et instrumentation associee pour l'etude du plasma de quarks et de gluons dans l'experience ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerin, Fabien [Ecole Doctorale des Sciences Fondamentales, Universite Blaise Pascal, U.F.R de Recherches Scientifiques et Techniques, 34, avenue Carnot - BP 185, 63006 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the LHC detector dedicated to the study of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The main goal of ALICE is the study of a new phase of the nuclear matter predicted by the Quantum Chromodynamics theory (QCD): the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). One of the possible signatures is a suppression of quarkonia yields by color screening in the heavy ion collisions, in which the formation of the QGP is expected. The muon spectrometer will allow measuring of the quarkonia yields (J/{psi}, {upsilon}) in heavy ion collisions via their dimuon decay. A fast trigger, associated to muon spectrometer, has to select events with at least one muon or one dimuon by using a track search algorithm. The study of muon trigger performance will be presented with emphasis on the trigger efficiency and rates in Ar-Ar and Pb-Pb collisions. We will also present the reconstruction of unlike-sign dimuon mass spectrum with the ALICE muon spectrometer. The expected yields of Upsilon states will be extracted from a simulation based on a fit of this spectrum for one month running for Pb-Pb collisions and for different collision centralities. (author)

  11. Electrospray deposition from fountain pen AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, J.; Sarajlic, Edin; Berenschot, Johan W.; Abelmann, Leon; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present for the first time electrospraying from fountain pen probes. By using electrospray contactless deposition in an AFM setup becomes possible. Experiments on a dedicated setup were carried out as first step towards this goal. Spraying from 8 and 2 µm apertures was observed. For

  12. Quantum metrology to probe atomic parity violation

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, M.

    2009-01-01

    An entangled state prepared in the decoherence free sub-space together with a Ramsey type measurement can probe parity violation in heavy alkali ions like Ba+ or Ra+. Here we propose an experiment with Ba+ ions as an example to measure the small parity violating effect in this system.

  13. Encounter with Jupiter. [Pioneer 10 space probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Pioneer 10 space probe's encounter with the Jupiter is discussed in detail. Tables are presented which include data on the distances during the encounter, times of crossing satellite orbits, important events in the flight near Jupiter, and time of experiments. Educational study projects are also included.

  14. Astrophysical Probes of New Models of Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Kathryn

    One of the most pressing and relevant cosmological questions is on the nature of the dark matter. I propose a comprehensive program at the boundary of astrophysics and cosmology with particle physics, focused on the question on the nature of the Dark Matter (DM). Research at the boundary of the two fields is critically important as a plethora of experiments in both particle physics and astrophysics, such as direct and indirect detection of Dark Matter (DM) by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope (FGST), AMS-02, and Cosmic Microwave Background probes such as Planck, come online. At the same time, data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will probe fundamental questions about Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and its implications for astrophysics and cosmology, as concerns especially the nature of the DM and the generation of the baryon asymmetry. Physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) is required to explain the astrophysical observation that DM dominates over ordinary matter by a ratio 5:1, as we learned through WMAP, as well as large scale structure surveys. Despite lacking an understanding of the properties of the DM, its presence is crucial for the formation of structure in the universe. Particle physics provides a framework for understanding what the DM could be. This proposal centers on building new models of DM, as well as studying their signatures both in the galaxy and on earth. While particle physics has provided a few popular candidates for DM (such as the supersymmetric neutralino), whose signatures have been extensively studied in the literature, it is important to consider other theoretically motivated candidates which provide distinct signatures. This proposal focuses on such new models of DM, especially models of DM from hidden sectors. For example, recently, the PAMELA experiment has observed a rise in the ratio of positron to electron flux at high energies. The flux may likely come from astrophysical objects nearby, such as pulsars. An intriguing

  15. Automated design of genomic Southern blot probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komiyama Noboru H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sothern blotting is a DNA analysis technique that has found widespread application in molecular biology. It has been used for gene discovery and mapping and has diagnostic and forensic applications, including mutation detection in patient samples and DNA fingerprinting in criminal investigations. Southern blotting has been employed as the definitive method for detecting transgene integration, and successful homologous recombination in gene targeting experiments. The technique employs a labeled DNA probe to detect a specific DNA sequence in a complex DNA sample that has been separated by restriction-digest and gel electrophoresis. Critically for the technique to succeed the probe must be unique to the target locus so as not to cross-hybridize to other endogenous DNA within the sample. Investigators routinely employ a manual approach to probe design. A genome browser is used to extract DNA sequence from the locus of interest, which is searched against the target genome using a BLAST-like tool. Ideally a single perfect match is obtained to the target, with little cross-reactivity caused by homologous DNA sequence present in the genome and/or repetitive and low-complexity elements in the candidate probe. This is a labor intensive process often requiring several attempts to find a suitable probe for laboratory testing. Results We have written an informatic pipeline to automatically design genomic Sothern blot probes that specifically attempts to optimize the resultant probe, employing a brute-force strategy of generating many candidate probes of acceptable length in the user-specified design window, searching all against the target genome, then scoring and ranking the candidates by uniqueness and repetitive DNA element content. Using these in silico measures we can automatically design probes that we predict to perform as well, or better, than our previous manual designs, while considerably reducing design time. We went on to

  16. Clinical Relevance of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Blüher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity has increased dramatically during recent decades. Obesity increases the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and may therefore contribute to premature death. With increasing fat mass, secretion of adipose tissue derived bioactive molecules (adipokines changes towards a pro-inflammatory, diabetogenic and atherogenic pattern. Adipokines are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, energy expenditure, activity, endothelial function, hemostasis, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, energy metabolism in insulin sensitive tissues, adipogenesis, fat distribution and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, adipokines are clinically relevant as biomarkers for fat distribution, adipose tissue function, liver fat content, insulin sensitivity, chronic inflammation and have the potential for future pharmacological treatment strategies for obesity and its related diseases. This review focuses on the clinical relevance of selected adipokines as markers or predictors of obesity related diseases and as potential therapeutic tools or targets in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  18. Nanoparticle Probes for Structural and Functional Photoacoustic Molecular Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haobin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, nanoparticle probes have received extensive attention largely due to its potential biomedical applications in structural, functional, and molecular imaging. In addition, photoacoustic tomography (PAT, a method based on the photoacoustic effect, is widely recognized as a robust modality to evaluate the structure and function of biological tissues with high optical contrast and high acoustic resolution. The combination of PAT with nanoparticle probes holds promises for detecting and imaging diseased tissues or monitoring their treatments with high sensitivity. This review will introduce the recent advances in the emerging field of nanoparticle probes and their preclinical applications in PAT, as well as relevant perspectives on future development.

  19. Robust Langmuir probe circuitry for fusion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedo, J.; Gunner, G.; Gray, D.; Conn, R.

    2001-02-01

    Langmuir probes attached to the plasma facing components of fusion experiments are biased with constant or swept voltages to obtain measurements of plasma parameters such as electron temperature and density. The circuitry used must be rugged and protect the power supplies and electronics against generally harsh conditions and sudden discharge terminations, or disruptions. Modularity, ease of repair and expandability are important because short-lived radiation from neutron activation is often present after the discharges, preventing access to the circuitry. We report the implementation of modular probe circuitry featuring robust protection, remote testing and reset and easy maintenance and expandability, achieved by using DIN-rail modules.

  20. Hard Probes at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has measured several hard probe observables in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC. These measurements include jets which show modification in the hot dense medium of heavy ion collisions as well as color neutral electro-weak bosons. Together, they elucidate the nature of heavy ion collisions.

  1. The solar probe antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Randolph, J. E.; Embuido, E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the design of the antenna intended for use on the Solar Probe Mission. The antenna consists of a carbon-carbon reflector jointly used as the antenna and thermal shield and helical feed using tungsten wire and ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials for the back plate, coaxial cable waveguide. A complete prototype feed assembly was fabricated and tested.

  2. Probing the Solar Interior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 3. Probing the Solar Interior Hearing the Heartbeats of the Sun. Ashok Ambastha. General Article Volume 3 Issue 3 March 1998 pp 18-31. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Mobile Probing Kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mobile Probing Kit is a low tech and low cost methodology for obtaining inspiration and insights into user needs, requirements and ideas in the early phases of a system's development process. The methodology is developed to identify user needs, requirements and ideas among knowledge workers...

  4. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  5. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  6. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  7. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content, the probe may be released upon virus uncoating. Our results collectively thus show that the gold and fluorescently labeled probes may be used to track and visualize the studied enteroviruses during the early phases of infection opening new avenues to follow virus uncoating in cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis of the probes, UV-Vis absorption spectra of the probe (2), PAGE separation and the absorption spectra of the gold labeled probe (3), details of the NMR experiments, determination of the cytotoxicity of the studied molecules, TEM micrographs of the gold labeled probe (3) with enteroviruses, live cell imaging of the fluorescent probe (4) in cells, and additional details of modeling of the hydrophobic pockets. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04139b

  8. Mechanosensitive membrane probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Molin, Marta; Verolet, Quentin; Soleimanpour, Saeideh; Matile, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    This article assembles pertinent insights behind the concept of planarizable push-pull probes. As a response to the planarization of their polarized ground state, a red shift of their excitation maximum is expected to report on either the disorder, the tension, or the potential of biomembranes. The combination of chromophore planarization and polarization contributes to various, usually more complex processes in nature. Examples include the color change of crabs or lobsters during cooking or the chemistry of vision, particularly color vision. The summary of lessons from nature is followed by an overview of mechanosensitive organic materials. Although often twisted and sometimes also polarized, their change of color under pressure usually originates from changes in their crystal packing. Intriguing exceptions include the planarization of several elegantly twisted phenylethynyl oligomers and polymers. Also mechanosensitive probes in plastics usually respond to stretching by disassembly. True ground-state planarization in response to molecular recognition is best exemplified with the binding of thoughtfully twisted cationic polythiophenes to single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides. Molecular rotors, en vogue as viscosity sensors in cells, operate by deplanarization of the first excited state. Pertinent recent examples are described, focusing on λ-ratiometry and intracellular targeting. Complementary to planarization of the ground state with twisted push-pull probes, molecular rotors report on environmental changes with quenching or shifts in emission rather than absorption. The labeling of mechanosensitive channels is discussed as a bioengineering approach to bypass the challenge to create molecular mechanosensitivity and use biological systems instead to sense membrane tension. With planarizable push-pull probes, this challenge is met not with twistome screening, but with "fluorescent flippers," a new concept to insert large and bright monomers into oligomeric

  9. EDITORIAL: Probing the nanoworld Probing the nanoworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mervyn

    2009-10-01

    In nanotechnology, it is the unique properties arising from nanometre-scale structures that lead not only to their technological importance but also to a better understanding of the underlying science. Over the last twenty years, material properties at the nanoscale have been dominated by the properties of carbon in the form of the C60 molecule, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and recently graphene. During this period, research published in the journal Nanotechnology has revealed the amazing mechanical properties of such materials as well as their remarkable electronic properties with the promise of new devices. Furthermore, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires from metals and dielectrics have been characterized for their electronic, mechanical, optical, chemical and catalytic properties. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has become the main characterization technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM) the most frequently used SPM. Over the past twenty years, SPM techniques that were previously experimental in nature have become routine. At the same time, investigations using AFM continue to yield impressive results that demonstrate the great potential of this powerful imaging tool, particularly in close to physiological conditions. In this special issue a collaboration of researchers in Europe report the use of AFM to provide high-resolution topographical images of individual carbon nanotubes immobilized on various biological membranes, including a nuclear membrane for the first time (Lamprecht C et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 434001). Other SPM developments such as high-speed AFM appear to be making a transition from specialist laboratories to the mainstream, and perhaps the same may be said for non-contact AFM. Looking to the future, characterisation techniques involving SPM and spectroscopy, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, could emerge as everyday methods. In all these advanced techniques, routinely available probes will

  10. Novel laser contact probe for periodontal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hisashi; Kataoka, Kenzo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2001-04-01

    Application of the erbium: YAG laser to periodontal treatment has been attempted and preferable results have been reported for calculus removal, vaporization of granulation tissue, periodontal pocket sterilization and so on. However, it has been difficult to reach and treat some conditions involving complex root morphology and furcated rots with conventional probes. The new broom probe was designed and tested to overcome these obstacles. The probe was made of 20 super-fine optical fibers bound into a broom shape. The experiments were carried out to evaluate the destructive power of a single fiber and to examine the morphology of tissue destruction and the accessibility to a bifurcated root of a human tooth using the broom probe. The Er:YAG laser prototype was used. A flat specimen plate was made by cutting the root of a cow tooth and then attached to an electrically operated table and irradiated under various conditions. The specimens were examined with both an optical and scanning electron microscope. The irradiated surfaces were also examined with a roughness meter. An irradiation applied with a single fiber with an energy level of 1 to 1.5 mJ at its tip results in a destruction depth of 3 to 24 micrometers . The optimum conditions for the fibers of this probe was 1.0 mJ at 10 pps and a scanning speed of 100 mm/min. No part of the tooth surface remained un-irradiated after using the broom probe to cover the surface 5 times parallel to the tooth axis and then five times at a 30 degree angle to the previous irradiation at a power of 20 mJ at 10 pps. Also curved and irregular surface were destroyed to a maximum depth of 19 micrometers . In conclusion, these results suggest that the broom probe would be applicable for periodontal laser treatments even if the tooth surface has a complex and irregular shape.

  11. Giant machine set to probe secrets of the universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Deep underground on the Franco-Swiss border someone will throw a switch next year to start one of the most ambitious experiments in history, probing the secrets of the universe and possibly finding new dimensions." (2/3 page)

  12. Giant machine set to probe secrets of the universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Deep underground on the Franco-Swiss border someone will throw a switch next year to start one of the most ambitious experiments in history, probing the secrets of the universe and possibly finding new dimensions." (1 page)

  13. SMEX03 ThetaProbe Soil Moisture Data: Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes soil moisture data measured with Delta-T Devices’ ThetaProbe ML2 sensors for the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03), conducted during June...

  14. Machine set to probe secrets of the universe

    CERN Multimedia

    Lovell, Jeremy

    2006-01-01

    "Deep underground on the Franco-Swiss border someonw will throw a switch next year to start one of the most ambitious experiments in history, probing the secrets of the universe and possibly finding new dimensions."

  15. Solar Probe - System concepts and requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronroos, H. G.; Hollert, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The design and related constraints relevant to the development of the Solar Probe are examined with reference to the environmental conditions and mission trajectory. The science-related requirements of the Solar Probe mission include instruments with 360-deg sweep on a platform that spins at 60 rpm and carries a magnetometer on a boom. The mission trajectory of a 4-solar-radii perihelion is designed to eliminate angular velocity about the sun, and the unusual requirements of dense interplanetary dust and enhanced gamma-ray radiation are mentioned. A list of specific functional requirements that directly affect the system configuration is given which includes those for the high-gain antenna and the main shield. These requirements are translated into a full-science-scope spacecraft design, and specific mass and power estimates are given. Reduced-scope and baseline configurations are also presented that allow good scientific return with significantly reduced development costs.

  16. Physical probing of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2017-11-01

    In the last two decades, it has become evident that the mechanical properties of the microenvironment of biological cells are as important as traditional biochemical cues for the control of cellular behavior and fate. The field of cell and matrix mechanics is quickly growing and so is the development of the experimental approaches used to study active and passive mechanical properties of cells and their surroundings. Within this topical review we will provide a brief overview, on the one hand, over how cellular mechanics can be probed physically, how different geometries allow access to different cellular properties, and, on the other hand, how forces are generated in cells and transmitted to the extracellular environment. We will describe the following experimental techniques: atomic force microscopy, traction force microscopy, magnetic tweezers, optical stretcher and optical tweezers pointing out both their advantages and limitations. Finally, we give an outlook on the future of the physical probing of cells.

  17. Novel Eddycurrent Probe Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    oVCut MVc AVu inc F C -- -(1)(-jlOOO AZC (23)0 --2--M F1 (23) If the Thevenin source voltages, V0, are adjusted so that Vinc is the same for both the...as small as 1.2 cm. The differential probe assembly was spring loaded about a pivot post (see Figure 12) so it could scan noncircular or eccentric

  18. Space Probe Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combinations of its three primary modules (crew, propulsion, and cargo) and a variety of supplementary kits, the Space Tug was capable of numerous space applications. This 1970 artist's concept depicts the Tug's propulsion module launching a space probe into lunar orbit.

  19. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  20. Probing dimensionality using a simplified 4-probe method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldby, Snorre B; Evenstad, Otto M; Cooil, Simon P; Wells, Justin W

    2017-10-04

    4-probe electrical measurements have been in existence for many decades. One of the most useful aspects of the 4-probe method is that it is not only possible to find the resistivity of a sample (independently of the contact resistances), but that it is also possible to probe the dimensionality of the sample. In theory, this is straightforward to achieve by measuring the 4-probe resistance as a function of probe separation. In practice, it is challenging to move all four probes with sufficient precision over the necessary range. Here, we present an alternative approach. We demonstrate that the dimensionality of the conductive path within a sample can be directly probed using a modified 4-probe method in which an unconventional geometry is exploited; three of the probes are rigidly fixed, and the position of only one probe is changed. This allows 2D and 3D (and other) contributions the to resistivity to be readily disentangled. The required experimental instrumentation can be vastly simplified relative to traditional variable spacing 4-probe instruments.

  1. The intermolecular interaction in D2 - CX4 and O2 - CX4 (X = F, Cl) systems: Molecular beam scattering experiments as a sensitive probe of the selectivity of charge transfer component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, David; Falcinelli, Stefano; Pirani, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Gas phase collisions of a D2 projectile by CF4 and by CCl4 targets have been investigated with the molecular beam technique. The integral cross section, Q, has been measured for both collisional systems in the thermal energy range and oscillations due to the quantum "glory" interference have been resolved in the velocity dependence of Q. The analysis of the measured Q(v) data provided novel information on the anisotropic potential energy surfaces of the studied systems at intermediate and large separation distances. The relative role of the most relevant types of contributions to the global interaction has been characterized. Extending the phenomenology of a weak intermolecular halogen bond, the present work demonstrates that while D2 - CF4 is basically bound through the balance between size (Pauli) repulsion and dispersion attraction, an appreciable intermolecular bond stabilization by charge transfer is operative in D2 - CCl4. We also demonstrated that the present analysis is consistent with that carried out for the F(2P)-D2 and Cl(2P)-D2 systems, previously characterized by scattering experiments performed with state-selected halogen atom beams. A detailed comparison of the present and previous results on O2-CF4 and O2-CCl4 systems pinpointed striking differences in the behavior of hydrogen and oxygen molecules when they interact with the same partner, mainly due to the selectivity of the charge transfer component. The present work contributes to cast light on the nature and role of the intermolecular interaction in prototype systems, involving homo-nuclear diatoms and symmetric halogenated molecules.

  2. Comparative evaluation of probing depth and clinical attachment level using a manual probe and Florida probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kour, Amandeep; Kumar, Ashish; Puri, Komal; Khatri, Manish; Bansal, Mansi; Gupta, Geeti

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the intra- and inter-examiner efficacy and reproducibility of the first-generation manual (Williams) probe and the third-generation Florida probe in terms of measuring pocket probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Forty subjects/4000 sites were included in this comparative, cross-sectional study. Group- and site-wise categorizations were done. Based on gingival index, PD, and CAL, patients were divided into four groups, i.e., periodontally healthy, gingivitis, mild to moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis. Further, based on these parameters, a total of 4000 sites, with 1000 sites in each category randomly selected from these 40 patients, were taken. Full mouth PD and CAL measurements were recorded with two probes, by Examiner 1 and on Ramfjord teeth by Examiner 2. Full mouth and Ramfjord teeth group- and site-wise PD obtained with the manual probe by both the examiners were statistically significantly deeper than that obtained with the Florida probe. The full mouth and Ramfjord teeth mean CAL measurement by Florida probe was higher as compared to manual probe in mild to moderate periodontitis group and sites, whereas in severe periodontitis group and sites, manual probe recorded higher CAL as compared to Florida probe. Mean PD and CAL measurements were deeper with the manual probe as compared to the Florida probe in all the groups and sites, except for the mild-moderate periodontitis group and sites where the CAL measurements with the manual probe were less than the Florida probe. Manual probe was more reproducible and showed less interexaminer variability as compared to the Florida probe.

  3. EvoOligo: oligonucleotide probe design with multiobjective evolutionary algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Lee, In-Hee; Cho, Young-Min; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2009-12-01

    Probe design is one of the most important tasks in successful deoxyribonucleic acid microarray experiments. We propose a multiobjective evolutionary optimization method for oligonucleotide probe design based on the multiobjective nature of the probe design problem. The proposed multiobjective evolutionary approach has several distinguished features, compared with previous methods. First, the evolutionary approach can find better probe sets than existing simple filtering methods with fixed threshold values. Second, the multiobjective approach can easily incorporate the user's custom criteria or change the existing criteria. Third, our approach tries to optimize the combination of probes for the given set of genes, in contrast to other tools that independently search each gene for qualifying probes. Lastly, the multiobjective optimization method provides various sets of probe combinations, among which the user can choose, depending on the target application. The proposed method is implemented as a platform called EvoOligo and is available for service on the web. We test the performance of EvoOligo by designing probe sets for 19 types of Human Papillomavirus and 52 genes in the Arabidopsis Calmodulin multigene family. The design results from EvoOligo are proven to be superior to those from well-known existing probe design tools, such as OligoArray and OligoWiz.

  4. Wearable probes for service design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullane, Aaron; Laaksolahti, Jarmo Matti; Svanæs, Dag

    2014-01-01

    Probes are used as a design method in user-centred design to allow end-users to inform design by collecting data from their lives. Probes are potentially useful in service innovation, but current probing methods require users to interrupt their activity and are consequently not ideal for use...... by service employees in reflecting on the delivery of a service. In this paper, we present the ‘wearable probe’, a probe concept that captures sensor data without distracting service employees. Data captured by the probe can be used by the service employees to reflect and co-reflect on the service journey......, helping to identify opportunities for service evolution and innovation....

  5. Floating harmonic probe measurements in the low-temperature plasma jet deposition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanáška, M.; Hubička, Z.; Čada, M.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.

    2018-01-01

    The floating harmonic probe is a relatively new plasma diagnostic method, which was proposed for applications at conditions when insulating films are deposited on the probe and, consequently, the classical Langmuir probe method fails. In the floating harmonic probe method a purely sinusoidal AC voltage is applied to the probe constructed in a standard manner via a capacitor. From the spectral components of the measured AC probe current waveforms, the electron temperature and the positive ion density can be obtained. In this contribution we present the comparison of the electron temperature and density acquired by the floating harmonic probe method with those obtained by the classical Langmuir probe. The experiments are performed in the flowing DC discharge in argon. In addition, the results from the floating harmonic probe method obtained during deposition of an insulating iron oxide thin film are shown. All the data is complemented by the qualitative discussion.

  6. Reproducibility of the cutoff probe for the measurement of electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, S. J., E-mail: sjyou@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, J. H.; You, K. H.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H., E-mail: jhkim86@kriss.re.kr [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.-S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan 573-540 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Since a plasma processing control based on plasma diagnostics attracted considerable attention in industry, the reproducibility of the diagnostics using in this application has become a great interest. Because the cutoff probe is one of the potential candidates for this application, knowing the reproducibility of the cutoff probe measurement becomes quit important in the cutoff probe application research. To test the reproducibility of the cutoff probe measurement, in this paper, a comparative study among the different cutoff probe measurements was performed. The comparative study revealed remarkable result: the cutoff probe has a great reproducibility for the electron density measurement, i.e., there are little differences among measurements by different probes made by different experimenters. The discussion including the reason for the result was addressed via this paper by using a basic measurement principle of cutoff probe and a comparative experiment with Langmuir probe.

  7. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  8. Impedimentric and microscopic probes of the integrities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrical and structural integrities of Self-assembled Monolayers (SAMs) of some organosulphur-metal complexes, formed on polycrystalline gold disc electrode, were probed, using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) respectively. Values of relevant circuit elements in the ...

  9. Accurate borehole probe calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchen, T.; Eisler, P. (CSIRO, Mount Waverley, Vic. (Australia). Division of Geomechanics)

    The In Situ Minerals Analysis Group in the CSIRO Division of Geomechanics has developed quantitative borehole logging techniques applicable to iron-ore and coal deposits. They are used currently to determine the formation density, either the iron-ore grades or the raw coal-ash contents, as appropriate, and the borehole diameter. The in-situ analyses depend on probe-calibration equations which were formulated by linear regression analysis that related the probe's spectral outputs with the required geological variable. Calibration equations consisting of a linear combination of first-order terms gave excellent assaying accuracy. The group achieved further improvements in assaying accuracy by developing a more generalised calibration model based on second-order terms and cross-product terms of the probe's spectral parameters. The logging data used for the statistical analysis were recorded in mine development boreholes at three Pilbara iron-ore mines and at a Queensland coal mine. Application of the generalised model, in place of the first-order model, resulted in a reduction of the root mean square (RMS) deviation between assays obtained in the laboratory and by logging, of about 15% relative for iron-ore grades and of about 8% relative for raw coal-ash content. The study also shows that the accuracy obtained using the conventional, non-spectrometric calibration model is inferior to that obtained by using either of the two spectrometric models, where the comparisons made are based on the same set of logging data. 8 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  11. Incidence and predictors of clinically relevant cardiac perforation associated with systematic implantation of active-fixation pacing and defibrillation leads: a single-centre experience with over 3800 implanted leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Óscar; Andrés, Ana; Alonso, Pau; Osca, Joaquín; Sancho-Tello, María-José; Olagüe, José; Martínez-Dolz, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Active-fixation leads have been associated with higher incidence of cardiac perforation. Large series specifically evaluating this complication are lacking. We sought to evaluate the incidence and predictors of clinically relevant cardiac perforation in a consecutive series of patients implanted with active-fixation pacing and defibrillation leads. We conducted a retrospective observational study including all consecutive patients implanted with an active-fixation pacing/defibrillation lead at our institution from July 2008 to July 2015. The incidence of clinically relevant cardiac perforation and cardiac tamponade was evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify predictors of cardiac perforation. Acute and long-term management of these patients was also investigated. A total of 3822 active-fixation pacing (n = 3035) and defibrillation (n = 787) leads were implanted in 2200 patients. Seventeen patients (0.8%) had clinically relevant cardiac perforation (13 acute and 4 subacute perforations), and 13 (0.5%) had cardiac tamponade resolved with pericardiocentesis. None of the patients with cardiac perforation required surgical treatment. In multivariate analysis, an age >80 years (OR 3.84, 95% CI 1.14-12.87, P = 0.029), female sex (OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.07-9.22, P = 0.037), and an apical position of the right ventricular lead (OR 3.37, 95% CI 1.17-9.67, P = 0.024) were independent predictors of cardiac perforation. Implantation of active-fixation leads is associated with a low incidence of clinically relevant cardiac perforation. Older and female patients have a higher risk of perforation as well as those patients receiving the ventricular lead in an apical position. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Gravity Probe B Gyroscope Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. This photograph is a close up of a niobium-coated gyroscope motor and its housing halves. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Don Harley.)

  13. Gravity Probe B Space Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The space vehicle for Gravity Probe B (GP-B) arrives at the launch site at Vandenburg Air Force Base. GP-B is the relativity experiment being developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Scheduled for launch in 2003 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center, development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University, with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation.

  14. Proteomic Stable Isotope Probing Reveals Biosynthesis Dynamics of Slow Growing Methane Based Microbial Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey eMarlow

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine methane seep habitats represent an important control on the global flux of methane. Nucleotide-based meta-omics studies outline community-wide metabolic potential, but expression patterns of environmentally relevant proteins are poorly characterized. Proteomic stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP provides additional information by characterizing phylogenetically specific, functionally relevant activity in mixed microbial communities, offering enhanced detection through system-wide product integration. Here we applied proteomic SIP to 15NH4+ and CH4 amended seep sediment microcosms in an attempt to track protein synthesis of slow-growing, low-energy microbial systems. Across all samples, 3495 unique proteins were identified, 11% of which were 15N-labeled. Consistent with the dominant anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM activity commonly observed in anoxic seep sediments, proteins associated with sulfate reduction and reverse methanogenesis – including the ANME-2 associated methylenetetrahydromethanopterin reductase (Mer – were all observed to be actively synthesized (15N-enriched. Conversely, proteins affiliated with putative aerobic sulfur-oxidizing epsilon- and gammaproteobacteria showed a marked decrease over time in our anoxic sediment incubations. The abundance and phylogenetic range of 15N-enriched methyl-coenzyme M reductase (Mcr orthologs, many of which exhibited novel post-translational modifications, suggests that seep sediments provide niches for multiple organisms performing analogous metabolisms. In addition, twenty-six proteins of unknown function were consistently detected and actively expressed under conditions supporting AOM, suggesting that they play important roles in methane seep ecosystems. Stable isotope probing in environmental proteomics experiments provides a mechanism to determine protein durability and evaluate lineage-specific responses in complex microbial communities placed under environmentally relevant

  15. Probes, Moons, and Kinetic Plasma Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Malaspina, D.; Zhou, C.

    2017-10-01

    Nonmagnetic objects as varied as probes in tokamaks or moons in space give rise to flowing plasma wakes in which strong distortions of the ion and electron velocity distributions cause electrostatic instabilities. Non-linear phenomena such as electron holes are then produced. Historic probe theory largely ignores the resulting unstable character of the wake, but since we can now simulate computationally the non-linear wake phenomena, a timely challenge is to reassess the influence of these instabilities both on probe measurements and on the wakes themselves. Because the electron instability wavelengths are very short (typically a few Debye-lengths), controlled laboratory experiments face serious challenges in diagnosing them. That is one reason why they have long been neglected as an influence in probe interpretation. Space-craft plasma observations, by contrast, easily obtain sub-Debye-length resolution, but have difficulty with larger-scale reconstruction of the plasma spatial variation. In addition to surveying our developing understanding of wakes in magnetized plasmas, ongoing analysis of Artemis data concerning electron holes observed in the solar-wind lunar wake will be featured. Work partially supported by NASA Grant NNX16AG82G.

  16. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (<10% error. The ratio of the predicted buckling force-to-predicted insertion force, where a value greater than one would ideally be expected to result in successful insertion, was plotted against the actual success rate from experiments. A sigmoidal relationship was observed, with a ratio of 1.35 corresponding to equal probability of insertion and failure, and a ratio of 3.5 corresponding to a 100% success rate. This ratio was dubbed the “safety factor”, as it indicated the degree to which the coating

  17. Overestimation of Mach number due to probe shadow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosselin, J. J.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Sears, S. H. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, 53706 (United States); McKee, J. S.; Scime, E. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Comparisons of the plasma ion flow speed measurements from Mach probes and laser induced fluorescence were performed in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment. We show the presence of the probe causes a low density geometric shadow downstream of the probe that affects the current density collected by the probe in collisional plasmas if the ion-neutral mean free path is shorter than the probe shadow length, L{sub g} = w{sup 2} V{sub drift}/D{sub ⊥}, resulting in erroneous Mach numbers. We then present a simple correction term that provides the corrected Mach number from probe data when the sound speed, ion-neutral mean free path, and perpendicular diffusion coefficient of the plasma are known. The probe shadow effect must be taken into account whenever the ion-neutral mean free path is on the order of the probe shadow length in linear devices and the open-field line region of fusion devices.

  18. Particle Physics Probes of Extra Spacetime Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, JoAnne L

    2002-05-13

    The possibility that spacetime is extended beyond the familiar 3+1-dimensions has intrigued physicists for a century. Indeed, the consequences of a dimensionally richer spacetime would be profound. Recently, new theories with higher dimensional spacetimes have been developed to resolve the hierarchy problem in particle physics. These scenarios make distinct predictions which allow for experiment to probe the existence of extra dimensions in new ways. We review the conceptual framework of these scenarios, their implications in collider and short-range gravity experiments, their astrophysical and cosmological effects, as well as the constraints placed on these models from present data.

  19. Nanofabrication of magnetic scanned-probe microscope sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Chong, B K

    2001-01-01

    experiments were carried out under ambient conditions. The experiments required no extra preparation to be done to the specimen before imaging and measurements were carried out under ambient conditions. These probes offer the prospect of direct magnetic field measurement, non- invasiveness, very close proximity, possible local manipulation, better control over the tip- specimen interaction distance and topographic imaging. It is hoped that these magnetic microscope probes will be of great interest and general utility for academic and industrial magneticians. This thesis presents the development of novel magnetic sensor combined with Atomic Force Microscope probe (AFM) using conventional semiconductor processing techniques and Electron Beam Lithography (EBL). The fabrication of these magnetic sensors was performed on a common micromachined silicon substrate using a generic batch fabrication technique. Sub-micron Hall bar for Scanning Hall probe Microscopy (SHPM) and electromagnetic force coil magnet for Scanni...

  20. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  1. A relevância das metáforas como conceitualização das experiências: uma reflexão sobre o ensino/aprendizagem de inglês no ensino regular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela da Cunha Barbosa Saldanha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Concebendo a metáfora como um meio de conceitualização do mundo a partir de nossas experiências cotidianas, o presente estudo tem como objetivo central identificar as metáforas de estudantes do ensino médio acerca de sua aprendizagem de inglês no ensino fundamental. A pesquisa, realizada em agosto de 2015, apresenta uma natureza mista, utilizando dados qualitativos e quantitativos. A análise do corpus se apoiou nos pressupostos da Teoria da Metáfora Conceitual, em trabalhos já realizados por autores renomados nesse campo, bem como no marco de referência de experiências. Os resultados revelam que, apesar de haver um número maior de metáforas sobre experiências de insucesso relativas à aprendizagem e ao professor, também foram identificadas metáforas acerca de experiências bem-sucedidas, o que demonstra um rompimento com a lógica do “inglês de colégio” e corrobora a tese de que é possível, sim, aprender inglês na escola regular.Palavras-chave: Metáforas. Experiências. Ensino/aprendizagem de inglês. Escola regular.

  2. Vygotsky's Crisis: Argument, context, relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Ludmila

    2012-06-01

    Vygotsky's The Historical Significance of the Crisis in Psychology (1926-1927) is an important text in the history and philosophy of psychology that has only become available to scholars in 1982 in Russian, and in 1997 in English. The goal of this paper is to introduce Vygotsky's conception of psychology to a wider audience. I argue that Vygotsky's argument about the "crisis" in psychology and its resolution can be fully understood only in the context of his social and political thinking. Vygotsky shared the enthusiasm, widespread among Russian leftist intelligentsia in the 1920s, that Soviet society had launched an unprecedented social experiment: The socialist revolution opened the way for establishing social conditions that would let the individual flourish. For Vygotsky, this meant that "a new man" of the future would become "the first and only species in biology that would create itself." He envisioned psychology as a science that would serve this humanist teleology. I propose that The Crisis is relevant today insofar as it helps us define a fundamental problem: How can we systematically account for the development of knowledge in psychology? I evaluate how Vygotsky addresses this problem as a historian of the crisis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The largest Swiss diffusion storage system - Geology, petrophysics, hydro-geology and experience gained from the realisation of heat probes; Groesster saisonaler Diffusionsspeicher der Schweiz D4 in Root (LU): Geologie, Petrophysik, Hydrogeologie und Erfahrungen mit der Realisation des Sondenfeldes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, B.

    2007-07-15

    This article takes a look at a large heat-diffusion storage system that is to be implemented in stages at a business and innovation centre in Root, near Lucerne in Switzerland. The aim is to meet 50 percent of energy needs using renewable energy. Apart from conventional oil and gas-fired systems, a combined heat and power (CHP) unit, heat and cold storage, a solar roof and photovoltaics, a seasonal underground diffusion storage system is used. This storage system is 'filled' with heat in summer from the roof and waste heat. It then functions in winter as a heat source. The system features two fields of 49, 160 metre-long heat probes that use a volume of 376,000 cubic metres of rock. The dimensioning of the rock-storage system was simulated using the PILESIM program and the first field was implemented in 2001. A geological overview is presented and the physical properties of the rock structures used are discussed. The temperature profile measured is presented and the precautions taken as a result of the possibility of meeting pockets of natural gas are discussed. Know-how gained from the implementation of the first probe field is discussed.

  4. Implementation of a high energy 4w probe beam on the Omega Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A; Shiromizu, S; Antonini, G; Haney, K; Froula, D; Moody, J; Gregori, G; Sorce, C; Divol, L; Griffith, R; Glenzer, S; Huff, R; Thorp, K; Armstrong, W; Bahr, R; Seka, W; Pien, G; Mathers, J; Morse, S; Loucks, S

    2004-04-15

    An ultraviolet high-energy Thomson scattering probe beam has been implemented on the Omega laser facility at the University of Rochester. The new probe operates at a wavelength of 264nm, with a maximum energy of 260J in a pulselength of 1ns. The probe is focused with an F/6.7 lens to a minimum focal spot of 40{micro}m within a pointing tolerance of <50{micro}m. Data obtained from this probe beam has provided new diagnostic information on plasmas relevant for inertial confinement fusion and atomic physics studies.

  5. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapley, Ralph; Aquino de Muro, Marilena

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  6. Non-inductive current probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christen Kjeldahl

    1977-01-01

    The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is......The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is...

  7. Raman imaging of biofilms using gold sputtered fiber optic probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Christina Grace Charlet; Manoharan, Hariharan; Subrahmanyam, Aryasomayajula; Sai, V. V. Raghavendra

    2016-12-01

    In this work we report characterization of bacterial biofilm using gold sputtered optical fiber probe as substrates for confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements. The chemical composition and the heterogeneity of biofilms in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was evaluated. The spatial distribution of bacterial biofilm on the substrates during their growth phase was studied using Raman imaging. Further, the influence of substrate's surface on bacterial adhesion was investigated by studying growth of biofilms on surfaces with hydrophilic and hydrophobic coatings. This study validates the use of gold sputtered optical fiber probes as SERS substrates in confocal microscopic configuration to identify and characterize clinically relevant biofilms.

  8. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Dennis P [Albuquerque, NM; Walkington, Phil [Albuquerque, NM; Rackow, Kirk A [Albuquerque, NM; Hohman, Ed [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-04-01

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  9. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard...... silicon processing. Using a microgripper they were detached from an array and fixed to a standard pyramidal AFM probe or alternatively inserted into a tipless cantilever equipped with a narrow slit. The nanobit-enhanced probes were used for imaging of deep trenches, without visible deformation, wear...... or dislocation of the tips of the nanobit after several scans. This approach allows an unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of scanning probe tips to the surface topology or to the specific application....

  10. Novel Probes of Gravity and Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; et al.

    2013-09-20

    The discovery of cosmic acceleration has stimulated theorists to consider dark energy or modifications to Einstein's General Relativity as possible explanations. The last decade has seen advances in theories that go beyond smooth dark energy -- modified gravity and interactions of dark energy. While the theoretical terrain is being actively explored, the generic presence of fifth forces and dark sector couplings suggests a set of distinct observational signatures. This report focuses on observations that differ from the conventional probes that map the expansion history or large-scale structure. Examples of such novel probes are: detection of scalar fields via lab experiments, tests of modified gravity using stars and galaxies in the nearby universe, comparison of lensing and dynamical masses of galaxies and clusters, and the measurements of fundamental constants at high redshift. The observational expertise involved is very broad as it spans laboratory experiments, high resolution astronomical imaging and spectroscopy and radio observations. In the coming decade, searches for these effects have the potential for discovering fundamental new physics. We discuss how the searches can be carried out using experiments that are already under way or with modest adaptations of existing telescopes or planned experiments. The accompanying paper on the Growth of Cosmic Structure describes complementary tests of gravity with observations of large-scale structure.

  11. Transient Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2017-08-01

    Transient Astrophysics Probe (TAP), selected by NASA for a funded Concept Study, is a wide-field high-energy transient mission proposed for flight starting in the late 2020s. TAP’s main science goals, called out as Frontier Discovery areas in the 2010 Decadal Survey, are time-domain astrophysics and counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) detections. The mission instruments include unique imaging soft X-ray optics that allow ~500 deg2 FoV in each of four separate modules; a high sensitivity, 1 deg2 FoV soft X-ray telescope based on single crystal silicon optics; a passively cooled, 1 deg2 FoV Infrared telescope with bandpass 0.6-3 micron; and a set of ~8 small NaI gamma-ray detectors. TAP will observe many events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, and high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts. Perhaps most exciting is TAP’s capability to observe X-ray and IR counterparts of GWs involving stellar mass black holes detected by LIGO/Virgo, and possibly X-ray counterparts of GWs from supermassive black holes, detected by LISA and Pulsar Timing Arrays.

  12. User perspectives on relevance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    implications for relevance feedback in information retrieval systems, suggesting that systems accept and utilize multiple positive and negative relevance criteria from users. Systems designers may want to focus on supporting content criteria followed by full text criteria as these may provide the greatest cost...

  13. Pico Reentry Probes: Affordable Options for Reentry Measurements and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailor, William H.; Kapoor, Vinod B.; Allen, Gay A., Jr.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Arnold, James O.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally very costly to perform in-space and atmospheric entry experiments. This paper presents a new platform - the Pico Reentry Probe (PREP) - that we believe will make targeted flight-tests and planetary atmospheric probe science missions considerably more affordable. Small, lightweight, self-contained, it is designed as a "launch and forget" system, suitable for experiments that require no ongoing communication with the ground. It contains a data recorder, battery, transmitter, and user-customized instrumentation. Data recorded during reentry or space operations is returned at end-of-mission via transmission to Iridium satellites (in the case of earth-based operations) or a similar orbiting communication system for planetary missions. This paper discusses possible applications of this concept for Earth and Martian atmospheric entry science. Two well-known heritage aerodynamic shapes are considered as candidates for PREP: the shape developed for the Planetary Atmospheric Experiment Test (PAET) and that for the Deep Space II Mars Probe.

  14. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wang Ai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  15. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2013-11-11

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  16. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L [Denver, CO; Hambarian, Artak [Yerevan, AM

    2008-09-02

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  17. Design principles of spectroscopic probes for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Ma, Huimin

    2016-10-01

    Spectroscopic (chromogenic, fluorescent, or chemiluminescent) probes have been widely used in many fields due to their high sensitivity and unrivaled spatiotemporal resolution. This area is an old one but always full of activity, because the rapid development of science and technology requires not only new probes for specific purposes (e.g., subcellular imaging) but also the update of current probes with more satisfactory properties. Based on our experiences and including existing knowledge, in this mini-review we briefly discuss the design strategies, response modes, and bioapplications of small molecular spectroscopic probes, in particular their advantages and disadvantages as well as possible research trends, which may be helpful to those who are interested in this continually growing research area.

  18. Energy calibration at LEP using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance probes

    CERN Document Server

    Bravin, Enrico; Mugnai, G

    1998-01-01

    The accurate Standard Model investigations carried out at LEP require knowledge of the beam energies of the order of a few 10-5. The resonant depolarisation method, used for absolute calibration in de dicated experiments, cannot be used to monitor continuously the beam energy during the physics runs. Moreover appreciable polarisation of the beams has not been measured above energies of 55 GeV. A me thod for continuous energy monitoring based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) probes mounted in tunnel magnets has been in use at LEP since 1995. The average field of the dipole magnets is sampled v ia 24 NMR probes mounted in the gap of the C-shaped yokes on top of the vacuum chamber. The probes are distributed over the 27 km of the accelerator. The probes are used for the continuous monitoring of the field during LEP operation and to determine the absolute field value.

  19. High-Resolution and Frequency, Printed Miniature Magnetic Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Picard, Julian

    2013-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) is developing a technique to significantly reduce the cost and development time of producing magnetic field diagnostics. EHT is designing probes that can be printed on flexible PCBs thereby allowing for extremely small coils to be produced while essentially eliminating the time to wind the coils. The coil size can be extremely small when coupled with the EHT Hybrid Integrator, which is capable of high bandwidth measurements over short and long pulse durations. This integrator is currently being commercialized with the support of a DOE SBIR. Additionally, the flexible PCBs allow probes to be attached to complex surface and/or probes that have a complex 3D structure to be designed and fabricated. During the Phase I, EHT will design and construct magnetic field probes on flexible PCBs, which will be tested at the University of Washington's HIT-SI experiment and in EHT's material science plasma reactor. Funding provided by DOE SBIR/STTR Program.

  20. A 282 GHz Probe for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Bowen, Sean; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    Introduction In DNP, microwave irradiation of a sample facilitates the transfer of spin polarization from electrons tonuclei. One of the way to improve the DNP enhancement is to transfer microwave power from the mm-wave source tothe sample more effectively. Several methods and techniques to effic......Introduction In DNP, microwave irradiation of a sample facilitates the transfer of spin polarization from electrons tonuclei. One of the way to improve the DNP enhancement is to transfer microwave power from the mm-wave source tothe sample more effectively. Several methods and techniques...... and power dissipation in free space are negligible. In our construction of the probe we have optimized relevant parameters of the probe. Conclusion We have demonstrated the feasibility of the probe design for DNP applicationsat 10.1 T from the microwave and RF point of view. The performance simulations...

  1. Imaging of neurosphere oxygenation with phosphorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Zhdanov, Alexander V; Nolan, Yvonne M; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2013-12-01

    Multicellular spheroids are useful models of mammalian tissue for studies of cell proliferation, differentiation, replacement therapies and drug action. Having a size of 100-500 μm they mimic in vivo micro-environment and characteristic gradients of O2, pH and nutrients. We describe the use of cell-penetrating O2 probes based on phosphorescent Pt-porphyrins to perform high-resolution 2D and 3D mapping of O2 in spheroid structures by live cell fluorescence imaging technique. Optimised procedures for preparation of neurospheres from cortical neural cells isolated from embryonic rat brain, their staining with the phosphorescent O2 probes NanO2 and MM2 and subsequent analysis of oxygenation on different live cell imaging platforms, including widefield and confocal phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (PLIM), conventional confocal and two-photon ratiometric intensity based O2 detection are presented. This is followed by a series of physiological experiments in which oxygenation patterns of the neurospheres are correlated with culturing conditions (atmospheric hypoxia and hyperoxia, size, growth factors), distribution of stem cells, mature neurons and astrocytes, HIF-2α stabilisation and responses to metabolic stimulation. The O2 imaging method allows multiplexing with many conventional fluorescent probes to perform multi-parametric imaging analysis of cells in 3D microenvironment. It can be applied to other types of spheroids and 3D tissue models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Probing energetics with second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konek, Christopher; Mason, Brian; Stoltz, Chad; Gump, Jared; Wilkinson, John

    2009-06-01

    We focus on the insensitive high explosive 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6- trinitrobenzene (TATB) with the goal of obtaining structural information as a function of pressure and temperature. Prior experiments from Los Alamos (Son et al. J. Phys. Chem. B. 1999, 103 (26) 5434) demonstrated that in high temperature environments (approaching 300^o C) TATB increases in efficiency as a nonlinear optical medium, possibly undergoing structural changes which alter the crystal symmetry. We use the nonlinear optical technique second harmonic generation (SHG) to probe TATB in a diamond anvil cell experimental setup to perform measurements at high pressure. Additionally, by exploiting the electronic absorption features of TATB to perform resonantly enhanced second harmonic generation (RE-SHG) experiments, we probe the electronic transitions in the visible range as a function of pressure and temperature, to observe electronic changes that would occur. Polarization resolved SHG experiments allow further insight into changes in crystal structure. These static measurements may have implications for shocked TATB.

  3. Probing Dark Energy models with neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignol, Guillaume

    2015-07-01

    There is a deep connection between cosmology — the science of the infinitely large — and particle physics — the science of the infinitely small. This connection is particularly manifest in neutron particle physics. Basic properties of the neutron — its Electric Dipole Moment and its lifetime — are intertwined with baryogenesis and nucleosynthesis in the early Universe. I will cover this topic in the first part, that will also serve as an introduction (or rather a quick recap) of neutron physics and Big Bang cosmology. Then, the rest of the paper will be devoted to a new idea: using neutrons to probe models of Dark Energy. In the second part, I will present the chameleon theory: a light scalar field accounting for the late accelerated expansion of the Universe, which interacts with matter in such a way that it does not mediate a fifth force between macroscopic bodies. However, neutrons can alleviate the chameleon mechanism and reveal the presence of the scalar field with properly designed experiments. In the third part, I will describe a recent experiment performed with a neutron interferometer at the Institut Laue Langevin that sets already interesting constraints on the chameleon theory. Last, the chameleon field can be probed by measuring the quantum states of neutrons bouncing over a mirror. In the fourth part, I will present the status and prospects of the GRANIT experiment at the ILL.

  4. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  5. Tunneling spectroscopy using a probe qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkley, A. J.; Przybysz, A. J.; Lanting, T.; Harris, R.; Dickson, N.; Altomare, F.; Amin, M. H.; Bunyk, P.; Enderud, C.; Hoskinson, E.; Johnson, M. W.; Ladizinsky, E.; Neufeld, R.; Rich, C.; Smirnov, A. Yu.; Tolkacheva, E.; Uchaikin, S.; Wilson, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a quantum tunneling spectroscopy technique that requires only low-bandwidth control. The method involves coupling a probe qubit to the system under study to create a localized probe state. The energy of the probe state is then scanned with respect to the unperturbed energy levels of the probed system. Incoherent tunneling transitions that flip the state of the probe qubit occur when the energy bias of the probe is close to an eigenenergy of the probed system. Monitoring these transitions allows the reconstruction of the probed system eigenspectrum. We demonstrate this method on an rf SQUID flux qubit.

  6. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in prenatal diagnosis-experience of a large series of rapid testing for aneuploidy of chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Tommy; Kirchhoff, Maria; Lind, Anne-Marie; Vestergaard Larsen, Gitte; Kjaergaard, Susanne

    2008-12-01

    Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) is a relatively new method for rapid prenatal diagnosis of common aneuploidies, and larger series to evaluate its performance remain to be reported. A total of 2400 prenatal chorionic villus samples (CVS) and 1525 prenatal samples of amniotic fluids (AF) were analyzed using a commercial MLPA kit (SALSA P095) for aneuploidy of chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y, and subsequent G-banding. MLPA gave conclusive results in 2330 (97.1%) CVS and 1417 (92.9%) AF samples. MLPA and G-banding showed concordant results except for five CVS and two AF. These were acceptable differences, as MLPA is not expected to detect all cases of mosaicism or partial deletions. MLPA gave inconclusive results for 19 (0.79%) CVS and 20 (1.31%) AF samples in which mosaicism, triploidy, contamination by maternal cells, or structural abnormalities were suspected by MLPA. Finally, 30 (1.97%) AF were discarded because of maternal blood staining, and 51 (2.1%) CVS and 58 (3.8%) AF were discarded because of technical problems. The data presented confirm that MLPA is a rapid, simple and reliable method for large scale testing for nonmosaic aneuploidy of chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, or Y in trypsin-digested CVS and in AF. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Hui-Wang Ai; Wei Ren

    2013-01-01

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, adv...

  8. The navigation of space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Ohandley, D. A.; Zielenbach, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A new navigational method combining electronic measurement procedures and celestial mechanics makes it possible to conduct a space probe very close to a desired point in the neighborhood of a remote planet. Approaches for the determination of the position of the space probe in space are discussed, giving attention to the effects of errors in the employed data. The application of the navigational methods in a number of space missions is also considered.

  9. Optical sensors and their applications for probing biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina

    There is a great interest in exploring and developing new optical sensitive methodologies for probing complex biological systems. In this project we developed non-invasive and sensitive biosensor strategies for studying physiologically relevant chemical and physical properties of plant and mammal......There is a great interest in exploring and developing new optical sensitive methodologies for probing complex biological systems. In this project we developed non-invasive and sensitive biosensor strategies for studying physiologically relevant chemical and physical properties of plant...... be trapped and deformed via variations of the light intensity through the optical fibers. Of key importance was the ability to create stable laminar flows at low velocity fields. We therefore optimized the presented device to be able to trap a large number of cells and to exchange the local environment...

  10. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  11. Relevance theory: pragmatics and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearing, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Relevance Theory is a cognitively oriented theory of pragmatics, i.e., a theory of language use. It builds on the seminal work of H.P. Grice(1) to develop a pragmatic theory which is at once philosophically sensitive and empirically plausible (in both psychological and evolutionary terms). This entry reviews the central commitments and chief contributions of Relevance Theory, including its Gricean commitment to the centrality of intention-reading and inference in communication; the cognitively grounded notion of relevance which provides the mechanism for explaining pragmatic interpretation as an intention-driven, inferential process; and several key applications of the theory (lexical pragmatics, metaphor and irony, procedural meaning). Relevance Theory is an important contribution to our understanding of the pragmatics of communication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Relevance theory explains the selection task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, D; Cara, F; Girotto, V

    1995-10-01

    We propose a general and predictive explanation of the Wason Selection Task (where subjects are asked to select evidence for testing a conditional "rule"). Our explanation is based on a reanalysis of the task, and on Relevance Theory. We argue that subjects' selections in all true versions of the Selection Task result from the following procedure. Subjects infer from the rule directly testable consequences. They infer them in their order of accessibility, and stop when the resulting interpretation of the rule meets their expectations of relevance. Subjects then select the cards that may test the consequences they have inferred from the rule. Order of accessibility of consequences and expectations of relevance vary with rule and context, and so, therefore, does subjects' performance. By devising appropriate rule-context pairs, we predict that correct performance can be elicited in any conceptual domain. We corroborate this prediction with four experiments. We argue that past results properly reanalyzed confirm our account. We discuss the relevance of the Selection Task to the study of reasoning.

  13. Customized MFM probes with high lateral resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Iglesias-Freire

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic force microscopy (MFM is a widely used technique for magnetic imaging. Besides its advantages such as the high spatial resolution and the easy use in the characterization of relevant applied materials, the main handicaps of the technique are the lack of control over the tip stray field and poor lateral resolution when working under standard conditions. In this work, we present a convenient route to prepare high-performance MFM probes with sub-10 nm (sub-25 nm topographic (magnetic lateral resolution by following an easy and quick low-cost approach. This allows one to not only customize the tip stray field, avoiding tip-induced changes in the sample magnetization, but also to optimize MFM imaging in vacuum (or liquid media by choosing tips mounted on hard (or soft cantilevers, a technology that is currently not available on the market.

  14. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles.......The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  15. Optimal approaches for inline sampling of organisms in ballast water: L-shaped vs. Straight sample probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wier, Timothy P.; Moser, Cameron S.; Grant, Jonathan F.; Riley, Scott C.; Robbins-Wamsley, Stephanie H.; First, Matthew R.; Drake, Lisa A.

    2017-10-01

    Both L-shaped (;L;) and straight (;Straight;) sample probes have been used to collect water samples from a main ballast line in land-based or shipboard verification testing of ballast water management systems (BWMS). A series of experiments was conducted to quantify and compare the sampling efficiencies of L and Straight sample probes. The findings from this research-that both L and Straight probes sample organisms with similar efficiencies-permit increased flexibility for positioning sample probes aboard ships.

  16. Evaporative evolution of a Na–Cl–NO3–K–Ca–SO4–Mg–Si brine at 95°C: Experiments and modeling relevant to Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Susan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff water representative of one type of pore water at Yucca Mountain, NV was evaporated at 95°C in a series of experiments to determine the geochemical controls for brines that may form on, and possibly impact upon the long-term integrity of waste containers and drip shields at the designated high-level, nuclear-waste repository. Solution chemistry, condensed vapor chemistry, and precipitate mineralogy were used to identify important chemical divides and to validate geochemical calculations of evaporating water chemistry using a high temperature Pitzer thermodynamic database. The water evolved toward a complex "sulfate type" brine that contained about 45 mol % Na, 40 mol % Cl, 9 mol % NO3, 5 mol % K, and less than 1 mol % each of SO4, Ca, Mg, ∑CO2(aq, F, and Si. All measured ions in the condensed vapor phase were below detection limits. The mineral precipitates identified were halite, anhydrite, bassanite, niter, and nitratine. Trends in the solution composition and identification of CaSO4 solids suggest that fluorite, carbonate, sulfate, and magnesium-silicate precipitation control the aqueous solution composition of sulfate type waters by removing fluoride, calcium, and magnesium during the early stages of evaporation. In most cases, the high temperature Pitzer database, used by EQ3/6 geochemical code, sufficiently predicts water composition and mineral precipitation during evaporation. Predicted solution compositions are generally within a factor of 2 of the experimental values. The model predicts that sepiolite, bassanite, amorphous silica, calcite, halite, and brucite are the solubility controlling mineral phases.

  17. Evaporative Evolution of a Na-Cl-NO3-K-Ca-SO4-Mg-Si Brine at 95(degree)C: Experiments and Modeling relevant to Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alai, M; Sutton, M; Carroll, S A

    2004-08-24

    A synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff water representative of one type of pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (USA) was evaporated at 95 C in a series of experiments to determine the geochemical controls for brines that may form on, and possibly impact upon the long-term integrity of waste containers and drip shields at the designated high-level, nuclear-waste repository. Solution chemistry, condensed vapor chemistry, and precipitate mineralogy were used to identify important chemical divides and to validate geochemical calculations of evaporating water chemistry using a high temperature Pitzer thermodynamic database. The water evolved towards a complex ''sulfate type'' brine that contained about 45 mol% Na, 40 mol% Cl, 9 mol% NO{sub 3}, 5 mol% K, and less than 1 mol% each of SO{sub 4}, Ca, Mg, {Sigma}CO{sub 2}(aq), F, and Si. All measured ions in the condensed vapor phase were below detection limits. The mineral precipitates identified were halite, anhydrite, bassanite, niter and nitratine. Trends in the solution composition and identification of CaSO{sub 4} solids suggest that fluorite, carbonate, sulfate, and magnesium-silicate precipitation control the aqueous solution composition of sulfate type waters by removing fluoride, calcium, and magnesium during the early stages of evaporation. In most cases, the high temperature Pitzer database, used by EQ3/6 geochemical code, sufficiently predicts water composition and mineral precipitation during evaporation. Predicted solution compositions are generally within a factor of two of the experimental values. The model predicts that sepiolite, bassanite, amorphous silica, calcite, halite and brucite are the solubility controlling mineral phases.

  18. The automatic orienting of attention to goal-relevant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Julia; De Houwer, Jan; Moors, Agnes; Van Damme, Stefaan; Crombez, Geert

    2010-05-01

    It is often assumed that attention is automatically allocated to stimuli relevant to one's actual goals. However, the existing evidence for this idea is limited in several ways. We investigated whether words relevant to a person's current goal influence the orienting of attention even when an intention to attend to the goal-relevant stimuli is not present. In two experiments, participants performed a modified spatial cueing paradigm combined with a second task that induced a goal. The results of the experiments showed that the induced goal led to the orientation of attention to goal-relevant words in the spatial cueing task. This effect was not found for words semantically related to the goal-relevant words. The results provide evidence for motivational accounts of attention, which state that the automatic allocation of attention is guided by the current goals of a person. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Probe pressure effects on human skin diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Tunnell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are popular research techniques for noninvasive disease diagnostics. Most systems include an optical fiber probe that transmits and collects optical spectra in contact with the suspected lesion. The purpose of this study is to investigate probe pressure effects on human skin spectroscopic measurements. We conduct an in-vivo experiment on human skin tissue to study the short-term (30 s) effects of probe pressure on diffuse reflectance and fluor...

  20. Nanolithography by scanning probes on calixarene molecular glass resist using mix-and-match lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Marcus; Hofer, Manuel; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2013-07-01

    Going "beyond the CMOS information-processing era," taking advantage of quantum effects occurring at sub-10-nm level, requires novel device concepts and associated fabrication technologies able to produce promising features at acceptable cost levels. Herein, the challenge affecting the lithographic technologies comprises the marriage of down-scaling the device-relevant feature size towards single-nanometer resolution with a simultaneous increase of the throughput capabilities. Mix-and-match lithographic strategies are one promising path to break through this trade-off. Proof-of-concept combining electron beam lithography (EBL) with the outstanding capabilities of closed-loop electric field current-controlled scanning probe nanolithography (SPL) is demonstrated. This combination, whereby also extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is possible instead of EBL, enables more: improved patterning resolution and reproducibility in combination with excellent overlay and placement accuracy. Furthermore, the symbiosis between EBL (EUVL) and SPL expands the process window of EBL (EUVL) beyond the state of the art, allowing SPL-based pre- and post-patterning of EBL (EUVL) written features at critical dimension levels with scanning probe microscopy-based pattern overlay alignment capability. Moreover, we are able to modify the EBL (EUVL) pattern even after the development step. The ultra-high resolution mix-and-match lithography experiments are performed on the molecular glass resist calixarene using a Gaussian e-beam lithography system operating at 10 keV and a home-developed SPL setup.

  1. Relevance in the science classroom: A multidimensional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Matthew F.

    While perceived relevance is considered a fundamental component of adaptive learning, the experience of relevance and its conceptual definition have not been well described. The mixed-methods research presented in this dissertation aimed to clarify the conceptual meaning of relevance by focusing on its phenomenological experience from the students' perspective. Following a critical literature review, I propose an identity-based model of perceived relevance that includes three components: a contextual target, an identity target, and a connection type, or lens. An empirical investigation of this model that consisted of two general phases was implemented in four 9th grade-biology classrooms. Participants in Phase 1 (N = 118) completed a series of four open-ended writing activities focused on eliciting perceived personal connections to academic content. Exploratory qualitative content analysis of a 25% random sample of the student responses was used to identify the main meaning-units of the proposed model as well as different dimensions of student relevance perceptions. These meaning-units and dimensions provided the basis for the construction of a conceptual mapping sentence capturing students' perceived relevance, which was then applied in a confirmatory analysis to all other student responses. Participants in Phase 2 (N = 139) completed a closed survey designed based on the mapping sentence to assess their perceived relevance of a biology unit. The survey also included scales assessing other domain-level motivational processes. Exploratory factor analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling indicated a coherent conceptual structure, which included a primary interpretive relevance dimension. Comparison of the conceptual structure across various groups (randomly-split sample, gender, academic level, domain-general motivational profiles) provided support for its ubiquity and insight into variation in the experience of perceived relevance among students of different

  2. Development of novel fluorescent probes for the analysis of protein interactions under physiological conditions with medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafina, Marc-Krystelle; Hing, Karin A; Sullivan, Alice C

    2013-02-05

    In this article, a method to analyze protein adsorption on porous, clinically relevant samples under physiologically relevant conditions is described. The use of fluorescent probes was identified as a methodology that would facilitate analysis under a range of conditions including fully competitive conditions where a protein of interest may be labeled in isolation and then allowed to compete with unlabeled proteins on samples that require no specialized surface pretreatment. As a first step, this article describes the covalent labeling of isolated bovine serum albumin (BSA) with fluorescent fluoresceinthioureidoaminocaproic acid, FTCA, giving FTCA-BSA. The fluorescence intensity of FTCA-BSA was then used to monitor the adsorption and desorption of the protein under noncompetitive conditions with two forms of hydroxyapatite discs (silicate-substituted, SA and stoichiometric, HA) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and minimum essential Eagles' medium (MEM). Noncompetitive conditions were used to facilitate the validation of the technique in which data obtained from these experiments were corroborated against data obtained using an established total protein assay method (Quant-IT kit, Invitrogen). These experiments demonstrated that the FTCA-BSA probe had several advantages including a greater sensitivity at lower concentrations and a considerably longer lifetime. The results also demonstrated that the interaction of BSA with SA and HA was also highly temperature- and media-dependent. Under the most physiologically relevant conditions of MEM at 37 °C, BSA was more readily adsorbed to SA with significant differences between biomaterials, but no differences were observed during the desorption process. The use of this method to analyze adsorption under competitive conditions will be the subject of further investigations.

  3. [Mood-congruency effects in self-relevant words].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, M

    1997-04-01

    In this experiment, one of three moods: positive, negative, neutral, was induced with Velten technique and music. Subjects were then presented with a word at a time from a list of trait words, which were pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral. They were to decide whether the word described their self, and respond with 'yes' (relevant) or 'no' (irrelevant) buttons. After the task, they were given five minutes for an incidental free recall test. Results indicated that induced mood affected memory, but not judgements of self-relevance. Mood congruent recall effects were found only for self-relevant words, and more self-relevant than irrelevant words were recalled if they were mood congruent. It was concluded that mood effects were different depending on whether the information was self-relevant, and that mood-congruency effects were found only for self-relevant information.

  4. The Hard Probe Cafe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The advent of finite temperature lattice QCD in 1980 confirmed that hot strongly interacting matter will be transformed into a new medium of deconfined quarks and gluons, the primordial quark-gluon plasma. It was thus natural to see if this state of the early universe could somehow still be produced today, in terrestrial laboratories. An experimental program based on high energy nuclear collisions was developed at a meeting which Maurice Jacob and I convened in Bielefeld in 1982, and in the mid-eighties the planning and construction of "heavy ion experiments" was well underway both at CERN and at Brookhaven. At the 1987 Quark Matter Meeting in Nordkirchen/Germany, the first results were reported.

  5. Probing human response times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Anders

    2004-07-01

    In a recent preprint (Dialog in e-mail traffic, preprint cond-mat/0304433), the temporal dynamics of an e-mail network has been investigated by Eckmann, Moses and Sergi. Specifically, the time period between an e-mail message and its reply were recorded. It will be shown here that their data agrees quantitatively with the frame work proposed to explain a recent experiment on the response of “internauts” to a news publication (Physica A 296(3-4) (2001) 539) despite differences in communication channels, topics, time-scale and socio-economic characteristics of the two population. This suggest a generalized response time distribution ∼ t-1 for human populations in the absence of deadlines with important implications for psychological and social studies as well the study of dynamical networks.

  6. Magnetic diagnostics on the Lockheed Martin T4 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, John

    2015-11-01

    The Lockheed Martin T4 Experiment is a magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp confinement device designed to study the physics relevant to the Compact Fusion Reactor program. As part of the diagnostics suite, an invasive three-axis magnetic probe and several flux loops have been constructed and installed. The probe was designed to reduce electrostatic pick-up by differentially amplifying two counter-wound coils for each axis. The flux loops are designed to detect plasma diamagnetism after accounting for the flux due to the background magnetic field. This mandates that the temporal evolution of the background field must be properly taken into account in order to discern the plasma response. To this end, both hardware and software techniques have been employed. Diagnostic designs and preliminary measurements will be presented.

  7. Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) to probe monolayers of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataka, Kenichi; Stripp, Sven Timo; Heberle, Joachim

    2013-10-01

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) represents a variation of conventional infrared spectroscopy and exploits the signal enhancement exerted by the plasmon resonance of nano-structured metal thin films. The surface enhancement decays in about 10nm with the distance from the surface and is, thus, perfectly suited to selectively probe monolayers of biomembranes. Peculiar to membrane proteins is their vectorial functionality, the probing of which requires proper orientation within the membrane. To this end, the metal surface used in SEIRAS is chemically modified to generate an oriented membrane protein film. Monolayers of uniformly oriented membrane proteins are formed by tethering His-tagged proteins to a nickel nitrilo-triacetic acid (Ni-NTA) modified gold surface and SEIRAS commands molecular sensitivity to probe each step of surface modification. The solid surface used as plasmonic substrate for SEIRAS, can also be employed as an electrode to investigate systems where electron transfer reactions are relevant, like e.g. cytochrome c oxidase or plant-type photosystems. Furthermore, the interaction of these membrane proteins with water-soluble proteins, like cytochrome c or hydrogenase, is studied on the molecular level by SEIRAS. The impact of the membrane potential on protein functionality is verified by monitoring light-dark difference spectra of a monolayer of sensory rhodopsin (SRII) at different applied potentials. It is demonstrated that the interpretations of all of these experiments critically depend on the orientation of the solid-supported membrane protein. Finally, future directions of SEIRAS including cellular systems are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: FTIR in membrane proteins and peptide studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In silico microarray probe design for diagnosis of multiple pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geyer Jeanne

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With multiple strains of various pathogens being sequenced, it is necessary to develop high-throughput methods that can simultaneously process multiple bacterial or viral genomes to find common fingerprints as well as fingerprints that are unique to each individual genome. We present algorithmic enhancements to an existing single-genome pipeline that allows for efficient design of microarray probes common to groups of target genomes. The enhanced pipeline takes advantage of the similarities in the input genomes to narrow the search to short, nonredundant regions of the target genomes and, thereby, significantly reduces the computation time. The pipeline also computes a three-state hybridization matrix, which gives the expected hybridization of each probe with each target. Results Design of microarray probes for eight pathogenic Burkholderia genomes shows that the multiple-genome pipeline is nearly four-times faster than the single-genome pipeline for this application. The probes designed for these eight genomes were experimentally tested with one non-target and three target genomes. Hybridization experiments show that less than 10% of the designed probes cross hybridize with non-targets. Also, more than 65% of the probes designed to identify all Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei strains successfully hybridize with a B. pseudomallei strain not used for probe design. Conclusion The savings in runtime suggest that the enhanced pipeline can be used to design fingerprints for tens or even hundreds of related genomes in a single run. Hybridization results with an unsequenced B. pseudomallei strain indicate that the designed probes might be useful in identifying unsequenced strains of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei.

  9. Superconducting detector dynamics studied by quantum pump-probe spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, R.W.; Zwiller, V.

    2012-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) on the picosecond time-scale using a correlated photon-pair source based on spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), corresponding to a pump-probe experiment at the single-photon level. We show that the detector can

  10. High sensitivity probe absorption technique for time-of-flight ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Absorption imaging using a high sensitivity CCD camera gives the size of the expanding cloud and hence ... (LVIS) [2], the peak signal in a 1 mm thick resonant probe beam corresponds to the absorption by 3 × 105 ... used in our atom optics experiments on the reflection of atoms from magnetic thin films [13]. The sensitivity ...

  11. Variables for probing neutrino oscillation at super-Kamiokande and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... We propose several new variables, insensitive to the absolute flux of the incident solar or supernova neutrino beam, which probe the shape of the observed spectrum at super-Kamiokande and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiments and can sensitively signal neutrino oscillations. One class of such ...

  12. A wireless subglacial probe for deep ice applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C.J.P.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/191522236; Boot, W.; Hubbard, A.; Pettersson, R.; Wilhelms, F.; van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; van de Wal, R.S.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101899556

    2012-01-01

    We present the design and first results from two experiments using a wireless subglacial sensor system (WiSe) that is able to transmit data through 2500m thick ice. Energy consumption of the probes is minimized, enabling the transmission of data for at least 10 years. In July 2010 the first

  13. Mission to Jupiter. [Pioneer 10 and 11 space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 space probes and their missions to Jupiter are discussed along with the experiments and investigations which will be conducted onboard. Jupiter's atmosphere, its magnetic fields, radiation belts, the spacecraft instruments, and the Jovian system will be investigated. Educational study projects are also included.

  14. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Sam; Mihalusova, Mariana; Valles, Jim

    2003-01-01

    At Brown University, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means to simulate variable gravity body forces on biological systems. This tool promises new means to probe gravi-sensing and the gravi-response of biological systems. It also has the potential as a technique for screening future systems for space flight experiments.

  15. Hysteresis in force probe measurements: a dynamical systems perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, B E; Qian, H

    1998-10-21

    Macromolecular binding forces between single protein-ligand pairs have been directly measured with the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) in several recent experiments. In a typical measurement, the AFM probe, or cantilever, is attached to the ligand and exerts a disruptive force on the bond between the macromolecular pair while the receptor is held fixed; the probe is then moved away from the substrate until the bond is broken. When the bond actually breaks, the tip is observed to slip; in fact, the ligand is jumping to a new equilibrium point determined purely by the cantilever, as if the receptor had been instantaneously moved to infinity. This "jumping-off" or "minimum rupture force" is determined by measuring cantilever deflection. In a similar manner, the two molecules can be brought together and the "jumping-on" force can be determined. These two measurements will result in different estimates of the binding force due to hysteresis. This hysteresis is caused by a cusp catastrophe in the space defined by probe position and cantilever stiffness. The phenomena of "jumping-off" in macromolecular rupture experiments and "jumping-on" when molecules are brought together occur when the system passes through a saddle-node bifurcation as the probe position is varied. Probe approach and withdrawal result in different post-bifurcation equilibria, different energy dissipation, and different force measurements. Copyright 1998 Academic Press

  16. Scanning probe studies of the pilus nanowires in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Joshua P.

    In microbial organisms like bacteria, pili (singular: pilus) are filament-like appendages that are nanometers in diameter and microns long. The sizes and structures of the different types of pili found in nature are adapted to serve one of many distinct functions for the organism from which they come. The pili expressed by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens act as electrically conductive nanowires that provide conduits for electrons to leave the cell during its respiratory cycle. Biological experiments have suggested that long range electron transfer across micron distances may proceed along the protein matrix, rather than by metal cofactors (metal atoms bound to the protein). Protein conductivity across such distances would require a novel transport mechanism. In an effort to elucidate this mechanism, our lab has used two electronically sensitive scanning probe techniques: Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Conductive Probe Atomic Force Microscopy (CP-AFM). I employed the high resolution imaging and electronic sensitivity of STM to resolve the molecular sub-structure and local electronic density of states (LDOS) at different points above pili from purified preparations, deposited onto a conducting substrate. The significant and stable tunneling currents achieved for biologically relevant voltages, in the absence of metal cofactors, demonstrated conduction between tip and substrate via the protein matrix. We observed periodicity of roughly 10 nm and 2.5 nm in topographs of the pili. In our acquisition of LDOS, we observed gap-like asymmetric energy spectra that were dependent upon the location of the tip above the pilus, suggestive of easier current flow out of one side of the cylindrical pilus and into the opposite side. Voltage-dependent STM imaging, which also contains information about the LDOS at each pixel, was consistent with this interpretation. The asymmetry in spectra observed on one pilus edge had a slightly larger magnitude than the other edge

  17. Encouragement from Jupiter for Europe's Titan Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    continue about whether the Probe hit by chance a patch of unusual weather, whether instruments were misreading, or whether ideas about the giant planet need a thorough shake-up. "The Jupiter experience teaches us to be more modest in our predictions about what a new world will be like," says Dr Lebreton. "It shows the limitations of theories made from telescope studies and flybys, and confirms the need for on-the-spot observations. We know far less about Titan than about Jupiter. So a real understanding of Titan must await the arrival of Cassini/ Huygens in eight years' time." Hazy orange clouds obscure Titan and leave scientists guessing about what Huygens will find. As speculation and debate continue, the biggest uncertainty concerns the nature of Titan's surface. Some experts expect to find large lakes of liquid hydrocarbons, while others suspect that the surface is dry. The hypothesis that a global ocean might cover Titan is out of fashion at present, because of radar results and reasoning about the effects of tides in a global ocean. The multinational teams of scientists who have developed the instruments on Huygens are prepared for surprises. For example, the Surface Science Package is designed for a wet or a dry landing, and will give appropriate results in either case. Further tests planned With just eighteen months to go until the launch of the joint Cassini/Huygens mission in October 1997, the spring of 1996 is a busy time for the Huygens teams. The first European flight hardware reached NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for incorporation in the Flight Model of the Cassini Orbiter. This is the Probe Support Avionics, which receives and processes the signals from the Probe at Titan. The Engineering Model of Huygens has also gone to JPL, for comprehensive electrical tests of the Cassini spacecraft. ESA is planning to carry out further tests on the Flight Model of Huygens, which is due for delivery in less than a year's time. The aim is to settle questions

  18. Hand-held survey probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kevin L [Idaho Falls, ID; Hungate, Kevin E [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A system for providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include an optical sensor to generate data corresponding to a position of the detection probe with respect to a surface; a microprocessor to receive the data; a software medium having code to process the data with the microprocessor and pre-programmed parameters, and making a comparison of the data to the parameters; and an indicator device to indicate results of the comparison. A method of providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include generating output data with an optical sensor corresponding to the relative position with respect to a surface; processing the output data, including comparing the output data to pre-programmed parameters; and indicating results of the comparison.

  19. Spaser as a biological probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Weingold, Robert; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nolan, Jacqueline; Harrington, Walter; Kuchyanov, Alexander S.; Parkhomenko, Roman G.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid; Biris, Alexandru S.; Plekhanov, Alexander I.; Stockman, Mark I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding cell biology greatly benefits from the development of advanced diagnostic probes. Here we introduce a 22-nm spaser (plasmonic nanolaser) with the ability to serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of generating stimulated emission directly inside living cells and animal tissues. We have demonstrated a lasing regime associated with the formation of a dynamic vapour nanobubble around the spaser that leads to giant spasing with emission intensity and spectral width >100 times brighter and 30-fold narrower, respectively, than for quantum dots. The absorption losses in the spaser enhance its multifunctionality, allowing for nanobubble-amplified photothermal and photoacoustic imaging and therapy. Furthermore, the silica spaser surface has been covalently functionalized with folic acid for molecular targeting of cancer cells. All these properties make a nanobubble spaser a promising multimodal, super-contrast, ultrafast cellular probe with a single-pulse nanosecond excitation for a variety of in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications.

  20. Electroweak probes with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Milov, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measuring electroweak bosons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at high energy provide an opportunity to understand temporal evolution of the quark-gluon plasma created in such collisions by constraining the initial state of the interaction. Due to lack of colour charges the bosons and or particles produced in their leptonic decays are unaffected by the quark-gluon plasma and therefore preserve the information about the very early stage of the collision when they were born. This singles EW bosons as a unique and very interesting class of observables in HI collisions. The ATLAS experiment at LHC measures production of electroweak bosons in $pp$, $p$+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions systems. A review of the existing results is given in this proceeding that includes studies made with isolated photons to constraint kinematic properties and flavour composition of associated jets, measurements of $W$ and $Z$ bosons used to estimate nuclear modification of PDF and the production rates of the bosons used to verify geometric...

  1. The Accidental Transgressor: Morally-Relevant Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Melanie; Mulvey, Kelly Lynn; Richardson, Cameron; Jampol, Noah; Woodward, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    To test young children's false belief theory of mind in a morally relevant context, two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, children (N=162) at 3.5, 5.5, and 7.5 years of age were administered three tasks: prototypic moral transgression task, false belief theory of mind task (ToM), and an "accidental transgressor" task, which measured a…

  2. Probe microphone measurements: 20 years of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H G

    2001-06-01

    Probe-microphone testing was conducted in the laboratory as early as the 1940s (e.g., the classic work of Wiener and Ross, reported in 1946), however, it was not until the late 1970s that a "dispenser friendly" system was available for testing hearing aids in the real ear. In this case, the term "dispenser friendly," is used somewhat loosely. The 1970s equipment that I'm referring to was first described in a paper that was presented by Earl Harford, Ph.D. in September of 1979 at the International Ear Clinics' Symposium in Minneapolis. At this meeting, Earl reported on his clinical experiences of testing hearing aids in the real ear using a miniature (by 1979 standards) Knowles microphone. The microphone was coupled to an interfacing impedance matching system (developed by David Preves, Ph.D., who at the time worked at Starkey Laboratories) which could be used with existing hearing aid analyzer systems (see Harford, 1980 for review of this early work). Unlike today's probe tube microphone systems, this early method of clinical real-ear measurement involved putting the entire microphone (about 4mm by 5mm by 2mm) in the ear canal down by the eardrum of the patient. If you think cerumen is a problem with probe-mic measurements today, you should have seen the condition of this microphone after a day's work! While this early instrumentation was a bit cumbersome, we quickly learned the advantages that probe-microphone measures provided in the fitting of hearing aids. We frequently ran into calibration and equalization problems, not to mention a yelp or two from the patient, but the resulting information was worth the trouble. Help soon arrived. In the early 1980s, the first computerized probe-tube microphone system, the Rastronics CCI-10 (developed in Denmark by Steen Rasmussen), entered the U.S. market (Nielsen and Rasmussen, 1984). This system had a silicone tube attached to the microphone (the transmission of sound through this tube was part of the calibration process

  3. The importance of being relevant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehlata eJaswal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review aims at an understanding of the binding process by synthesizing the extant perspectives regarding binding. It begins with a consideration of the biological explanations of binding, viz., conjunctive coding, synchrony, and reentrant mechanisms. Thereafter binding is reviewed as a psychological process guided by top down signals. The stages and types of binding proposed by various researchers are discussed in this section. The next section introduces Working Memory as the executive directing the top-down signals. After that it is described how Working Memory works by selecting relevant sensory input, followed by a detailed consideration of the debate regarding objects vs. features with the conclusion that relevance is the key factor determining what is processed. The next section considers other factors affecting the selection of relevant input. Then, we shift focus to describe what happens to irrelevant input – whether it is discarded at the outset or is gradually inhibited, and whether inhibition is a perceptual or post-perceptual process. The concluding section describes the process of binding as currently understood on the basis of the literature included in the review. To summarize, it appears that initially the ‘object’ is conceptualized as an instantaneous bundle of all features. However, only relevant features of stimuli are gradually integrated to form a stable representation of the object. Concomitantly, irrelevant features are removed from the object representations. Empirical evidence suggests that the inhibition of irrelevant features occurs over time and is thus presumably a process within Working Memory.

  4. Regularization in Matrix Relevance Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, Petra; Bunte, Kerstin; Stiekema, Han; Hammer, Barbara; Villmann, Thomas; Biehl, Michael

    A In this paper, we present a regularization technique to extend recently proposed matrix learning schemes in learning vector quantization (LVQ). These learning algorithms extend the concept of adaptive distance measures in LVQ to the use of relevance matrices. In general, metric learning can

  5. Making Plant Biology Curricula Relevant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews rationale, purposes, challenges, and relevance of hands-on, plant biology curricula that have been developed in response to the limited use of plants in biology education. Discusses methods to maintain both instructional rigor and student interest in the following topics: cut flowers, container-growing media, fertilizers, hydroponics,…

  6. BIBLE TRANSLATION AND RELEVANCE THEORY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wilss's text book (Wilss 1982) suggests that the situation in general translation theory is not very different. It was precisely this model of communication theory that was challenged by Sperber and Wilson's relevance theory (Sperber & Wilson 1986; see also Wilson & Sperber 1987). Set within this context this paper seeks to ...

  7. Lexicography and the Relevance Criterion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This will be done within the framework of the function theory .... Gouws (2011) supports this vision and stresses that learning from each other .... specific type of need, e.g. to solve a communicative or cognitive problem, ..... According to Borlund (2000) "the judgement of situational relevance ..... Management 36(4): 533-550.

  8. Using phylogenetic probes for quantification of stable isotope labeling and microbial community analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Eoin L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Karaoz, Ulas; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-12-09

    Herein is described methods for a high-sensitivity means to measure the incorporation of stable isotope labeled substrates into RNA following stable isotope probing experiments (SIP). RNA is hybridized to a set of probes such as phylogenetic microarrays and isotope incorporation is quantified such as by secondary ion mass spectrometer imaging (NanoSIMS).

  9. Permittivity measurements using coaxial probes

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver Riera, Bartomeu

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to characterize, using the ADS software, the coaxial probe provided by the faculty ETSETB and utilize such probe in order to calculate the permittivity of different materials El objetivo principal de esta tesis el de caracterizar, con el programa ADS, la sonda coaxial proporcionada por la facultad de la ETSETB y utilizar-la para el calculo de la permitividad de diferentes materiales. L'objectiu d'aquesta tesis es el de caracteritzar, amb el programa ...

  10. Radioactive Probes on Ferromagnetic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    On the (broad) basis of our studies of nonmagnetic radioactive probe atoms on magnetic surfaces and at interfaces, we propose to investigate the magnetic interaction of magnetic probe atoms with their immediate environment, in particular of rare earth (RE) elements positioned on and in ferromagnetic surfaces. The preparation and analysis of the structural properties of such samples will be performed in the UHV chamber HYDRA at the HMI/Berlin. For the investigations of the magnetic properties of RE atoms on surfaces Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements and Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) are proposed.

  11. Probe Project Status and Accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burris, RD

    2001-05-07

    The Probe project has completed its first full year of operation. In this document we will describe the status of the project as of December 31, 2000. We will describe the equipment configuration, then give brief descriptions of the various projects undertaken to date. We will mention first those projects performed for outside entities and then those performed for the benefit of one of the Probe sites. We will then describe projects that are under consideration, including some for which initial actions have been taken and others which are somewhat longer-term.

  12. Work on Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Atmosphere Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A summary final report of work accomplished is presented. Work was performed in the following areas: (1) Galileo Probe science analysis, (2) Galileo probe Atmosphere Structure Instrument, (3) Mars Pathfinder Atmosphere Structure/Meteorology instrument, (4) Mars Pathfinder data analysis, (5) Science Definition for future Mars missions, (6) Viking Lander data analysis, (7) winds in Mars atmosphere Venus atmospheric dynamics, (8) Pioneer Venus Probe data analysis, (9) Pioneer Venus anomaly analysis, (10) Discovery Venus Probe Titan probe instrument design, and (11) laboratory studies of Titan probe impact phenomena. The work has resulted in more than 10 articles published in archive journals, 2 encyclopedia articles, and many working papers. This final report is organized around the four planets on which there was activity, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Titan, with a closing section on Miscellaneous Activities. A major objective was to complete the fabrication, test, and evaluation of the atmosphere structure experiment on the Galileo probe, and to receive, analyze and interpret data received from the spacecraft. The instrument was launched on April 14, 1989. Calibration data were taken for all experiment sensors. The data were analyzed, fitted with algorithms, and summarized in a calibration report for use in analyzing and interpreting data returned from Jupiter's atmosphere. The sensors included were the primary science pressure, temperature and acceleration sensors, and the supporting engineering temperature sensors. Computer programs were written to decode the Experiment Data Record and convert the digital numbers to physical quantities, i.e., temperatures, pressures, and accelerations. The project office agreed to obtain telemetry of checkout data from the probe. Work to extend programs written for use on the Pioneer Venus project included: (1) massive heat shield ablation leading to important mass loss during entry; and (2) rapid planet rotation, which introduced

  13. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Nitrifying Biofilm Relevant ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, biological monochloramine removal (i.e., cometabolism) by a pure culture ammonia–oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, and a nitrifying mixed–culture have been shown to increase monochloramine demand. Although important, these previous suspended culture batch kinetic experiments were not representative of drinking water distribution systems where bacteria grow predominantly as biofilm attached to pipe walls or sediments and physiological differences may exist between suspension and biofilm growth. Therefore, the current research was an important next step in extending the previous results to investigate monochloramine cometabolism by biofilm grown in annular reactors under drinking water relevant conditions. Estimated monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism was a significant loss mechanism (25–40% of the observed monochloramine loss). These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in drinking water relevant nitrifying biofilm; thus, cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in distribution systems. Investigate whether or not nitrifying biofilm can biologically transform monochloramine under drinking water relevant conditions.

  14. A white-box approach to microarray probe response characterization: the BaFL pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solka Jeffrey L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays depend on appropriate probe design to deliver the promise of accurate genome-wide measurement. Probe design, ideally, produces a unique probe-target match with homogeneous duplex stability over the complete set of probes. Much of microarray pre-processing is concerned with adjusting for non-ideal probes that do not report target concentration accurately. Cross-hybridizing probes (non-unique, probe composition and structure, as well as platform effects such as instrument limitations, have been shown to affect the interpretation of signal. Data cleansing pipelines seldom filter specifically for these constraints, relying instead on general statistical tests to remove the most variable probes from the samples in a study. This adjusts probes contributing to ProbeSet (gene values in a study-specific manner. We refer to the complete set of factors as biologically applied filter levels (BaFL and have assembled an analysis pipeline for managing them consistently. The pipeline and associated experiments reported here examine the outcome of comprehensively excluding probes affected by known factors on inter-experiment target behavior consistency. Results We present here a 'white box' probe filtering and intensity transformation protocol that incorporates currently understood factors affecting probe and target interactions; the method has been tested on data from the Affymetrix human GeneChip HG-U95Av2, using two independent datasets from studies of a complex lung adenocarcinoma phenotype. The protocol incorporates probe-specific effects from SNPs, cross-hybridization and low heteroduplex affinity, as well as effects from scanner sensitivity, sample batches, and includes simple statistical tests for identifying unresolved biological factors leading to sample variability. Subsequent to filtering for these factors, the consistency and reliability of the remaining measurements is shown to be markedly improved. Conclusions The

  15. Probing ultra-fast processes with high dynamic range at 4th-generation light sources: Arrival time and intensity binning at unprecedented repetition rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kovalev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding dynamics on ultrafast timescales enables unique and new insights into important processes in the materials and life sciences. In this respect, the fundamental pump-probe approach based on ultra-short photon pulses aims at the creation of stroboscopic movies. Performing such experiments at one of the many recently established accelerator-based 4th-generation light sources such as free-electron lasers or superradiant THz sources allows an enormous widening of the accessible parameter space for the excitation and/or probing light pulses. Compared to table-top devices, critical issues of this type of experiment are fluctuations of the timing between the accelerator and external laser systems and intensity instabilities of the accelerator-based photon sources. Existing solutions have so far been only demonstrated at low repetition rates and/or achieved a limited dynamic range in comparison to table-top experiments, while the 4th generation of accelerator-based light sources is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology, which enables operation at MHz or even GHz repetition rates. In this article, we present the successful demonstration of ultra-fast accelerator-laser pump-probe experiments performed at an unprecedentedly high repetition rate in the few-hundred-kHz regime and with a currently achievable optimal time resolution of 13 fs (rms. Our scheme, based on the pulse-resolved detection of multiple beam parameters relevant for the experiment, allows us to achieve an excellent sensitivity in real-world ultra-fast experiments, as demonstrated for the example of THz-field-driven coherent spin precession.

  16. Two Curriculum-Relevant/Open Day Physics Experiments Concerning Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosabowski, Michael Hal; Young, Clive; Matkin, Judy; Ponikwer, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Gravity is an intangible abstract force when considered theoretically and yet we are affected by it constantly. The apparently "strong" nature of gravity, which in the layperson's mind causes him or her to stick to the Earth, is belied by the fact that it is the weakest of the fundamental forces. Demonstrations that allow pupils,…

  17. Pharmacovigilance in Calabria (Italy): Local experiences resonate international relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Pimpinella; Loriana Tartaglia

    2013-01-01

    The new European Union (EU) regulations on pharmacovigilance require that the national systems are strengthened in order to fit the new requirements. The Italian Pharmacovigilance System, coordinated by the Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA), is made by local and regional structures. In 2007, a program for funding active pharmacovigilance projects in the Italian Regions was established by the National law. The AIFA is responsible for the preparation of guidelines aimed at the identification of r...

  18. Rapid in situ hybridization using digoxigenin probe and microwave oven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besançon, R; Bencsik, A; Voutsinos, B; Belin, M F; Févre-Montange, M

    1995-11-01

    In situ hybridization has been developed with probes labelled with a non-radioactive nucleotide, especially digoxigenin-coupled nucleotides. These non-radioactive probes significantly reduce safety problems and experimentation time. In this paper, we have studied by in situ hybridization the messenger RNA (mRNA) of the neuropeptide pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), in the rat pituitary gland using digoxigenin labelled oligonucleotide and a microwave oven. Our protocol permitted us to visualize POMC mRNA in all cells of the intermediate lobe and a few corticotroph cells in the anterior lobe, as it has been already demonstrated and to complete the experiment in less than 24 hrs.

  19. SUB-SLAB PROBE INSTALLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sub-slab sampling has become an integral part of vapor intrusion investigations. It is now recommended in guidance documents developed by EPA and most states. A method for sub-slab probe installation was devised in 2002, presented at conferences through 2005, and finally docume...

  20. Upgrade of the Mirnov probe arrays on the J-TEXT tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Daojing; Hu, Qiming; Li, Da; Shen, Chengshuo; Wang, Nengchao; Huang, Zhuo; Huang, Mingxiang; Ding, Yonghua; Xu, Guo; Yu, Qingquan; Tang, Yuejin; Zhuang, Ge

    2017-12-01

    The magnetic diagnostic of Mirnov probe arrays has been upgraded on the J-TEXT tokamak to measure the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities with higher spatial resolution and better amplitude-frequency characteristics. The upgraded Mirnov probe array contains one poloidal array with 48 probe modules and two toroidal arrays with 25 probe modules. Each probe module contains two probes which measure both the poloidal and the radial magnetic fields (Bp and Br). To ensure that the Mirnov probe possess better amplitude-frequency characteristics, a novel kind of Mirnov probe made of low temperature co-fired ceramics is utilized. The parameters and frequency response of the probe are measured and can meet the experiment requirement. The new Mirnov arrays have been normally applied for a round of experiments, including the observation of tearing modes and their coupling as well as high frequency magnetic perturbation due to the Alfvén eigenmode. In order to extract useful information from raw signals, visualization processing methods based on singular value decomposition and cross-power spectrum are applied to decompose the coupled modes and to determine the mode number.

  1. Water-soluble BODIPY-based fluorescent probe for mitochondrial imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Binglin; Tang, Simon; Woodward, Adam W.; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2016-03-01

    A new mitochondrial targeting fluorescent probe is designed, synthesized, characterized, and investigated. The probe is composed of three moieties, a BODIPY platform working as the fluorophore, two triphenylphosphonium (TPP) groups serving as mitochondrial targeting moiety, and two long highly hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains to increase its water solubility and reduce its cytotoxicity. As a mitochondria-selective fluorescent probe, the probe exhibits a series of desirable advantages compared with other reported fluorescent mitochondrial probes. It is readily soluble in aqueous media and emits very strong fluorescence. Photophysical determination experiments show that the photophysical properties of the probe are independent of solvent polarity and it has high quantum yield in various solvents examined. The probe also has good photostability and pH insensitivity over a broad pH range. Results obtained from cell viability tests indicate that the cytotoxicity of the probe is very low. Confocal fluorescence microscopy colocalization experiments reveal that this probe possesses excellent mitochondrial targeting ability and it is suitable for imaging mitochondria in living cells.

  2. A fast spatial scanning combination emissive and Mach probe for edge plasma diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, R. D.; Labombard, B.; Conn, R. W.

    1989-04-01

    A fast spatially scanning emissive and Mach probe has been developed for the measurement of plasma profiles in the PISCES facility at UCLA. A pneumatic cylinder is used to drive a multiple tip probe along a 15 cm stroke in less than 400 msec, giving single shot profiles while limiting power deposition to the probe. A differentially pumped sliding O-ring seal allows the probe to be moved between shots to infer two and three dimensional profiles. The probe system has been used to investigate the plasma potential, density, and parallel Mach number profiles of the presheath induced by a wall surface and scrape-off-layer profile modifications in biased limiter simulation experiments. Details of the hardware, data acquisition electronics, and tests of probe reliability are discussed.

  3. A Split Ring Resonator Dielectric Probe for Near-Field Dielectric Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Dmitry; Stevens, Chris J; Castles, Flynn; Grant, Patrick S

    2017-05-17

    A single split-ring resonator (SRR) probe for 2D surface mapping and imaging of relative dielectric permittivity for the characterisation of composite materials has been developed. The imaging principle, the analysis and the sensitivity of the SRR surface dielectric probe data is described. The surface dielectric properties of composite materials in the frequency range 1-3 GHz have been measured based on the magnetic resonance frequency of the transmission loss of the SRR dielectric probe when in contact with the surface. The SRR probe performance was analysed analytically and using full-wave simulation, and predictions showed close agreement with experiment for composite materials with spatially varying dielectric permittivity manufactured by 3D printing. The spatial and permittivity resolution of the SRR dielectric probe were controlled by the geometrical parameters of the SRR which provided flexibility to tune the SRR probe. The best accuracy of the dielectric permittivity measurements was within 5%.

  4. A Generative Theory of Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    latent representation space . 2We need the Fubini -Tonelli theorem because the parameter space h is uncountable and the information representation space i...models can be expressed in a simple common form that is a direct consequence of De-Finetti’s representation theorem . We draw several unexpected...who defines relevance in terms of entailment (as in theorem -proving). Suppose G represents a logical proposition corresponding to a user’s request

  5. Researching experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa; Ingemann, Bruno

    for researching experiences in a variety of settings ranging from the museum, to news photography, and interactive media. The research led to the development of a set of methodological tools and approaches we term the reflexivity lab. The interaction in the experimental situation between the media and body......, dialogue, moods, values and narratives have been investigated qualitatively with more than sixty informants in a range of projects. The processual methodological insights are put into a theoretical perspective and also presented as pragmatic dilemmas. Researching Experiences is relevant not only...... for students and researchers in media and communication studies but also for practitioners within the fields of media, communication and experience design....

  6. Researching experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa; Ingemann, Bruno

    , dialogue, moods, values and narratives have been investigated qualitatively with more than sixty informants in a range of projects. The processual methodological insights are put into a theoretical perspective and also presented as pragmatic dilemmas. Researching Experiences is relevant not only...... for students and researchers in media and communication studies but also for practitioners within the fields of media, communication and experience design....... for researching experiences in a variety of settings ranging from the museum, to news photography, and interactive media. The research led to the development of a set of methodological tools and approaches we term the reflexivity lab. The interaction in the experimental situation between the media and body...

  7. RF sheath and admittance characteristics of a spherical plasma probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Development of a radio-frequency sheath model for a spherical probe in a collisionless plasma. The method of solution is based on the quasi-static approximation and the electrostatic probe theory of Bernstein and Rabinowitz (1959). The resistive part of the admittance is ascribed to the sheath transit-time collisionless dissipation mechanism suggested by Mayer (1963) and developed by Gould (1964). Expressions are obtained for the effective sheath thickness and the equivalent resistance of the transit-time dissipation. The sheath model and, hence, the admittance are completely determined in terms of the bias potential, the probe radius, the plasma frequency, and the Debye length - i.e., there are no adjustable parameters in the proposed theory which are to be determined by experiment. The results obtained agree favorably with Cohen and Bekefi's (1971) experimental data on the conductance resonant frequency and the width of the conductance peak.

  8. Design and Calibration Tests of an Active Sound Intensity Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kletschkowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an active sound intensity probe that can be used for sound source localization in standing wave fields. The probe consists of a sound hard tube that is terminated by a loudspeaker and an integrated pair of microphones. The microphones are used to decompose the standing wave field inside the tube into its incident and reflected part. The latter is cancelled by an adaptive controller that calculates proper driving signals for the loudspeaker. If the open end of the actively controlled tube is placed close to a vibrating surface, the radiated sound intensity can be determined by measuring the cross spectral density between the two microphones. A one-dimensional free field can be realized effectively, as first experiments performed on a simplified test bed have shown. Further tests proved that a prototype of the novel sound intensity probe can be calibrated.

  9. Phase imaging quality improvement by modification of AFM probes' cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinski, J; Rebis, J; Kaczmarek, L; Wejrzanowski, T; Plocinski, T; Rozniatowski, K

    2017-08-16

    Imaging of the surface of materials by atomic force microscopy under tapping and phase imaging mode, with use of modified probes is addressed. In this study, the circularly shaped holes located in varying distance from the probe base, were cut out by focused ion beam. Such modification was a consequence of the results of the previous experiments (probe tip sharpening and cantilever thinning) where significant improvement of image quality in tapping and phase imaging mode has been revealed. The solution proposed herein gives similar results, but is much simpler from the technological point of view. Shorter exposition time of the tip onto gallium ions during FIB processing allows to reduce material degradation. The aim of this modification was to change harmonic oscillators' properties in the simplest and fastest way, to obtain stronger signal for higher resonant frequencies, which can be advantageous for improving the quality of imaging in PI mode. Probes shaped in that way were used for AFM investigations with Bruker AFM nanoscope 8. As a testing material, titanium roughness standard sample, supplied by Bruker, was used. The results have shown that the modifications performed within these studies influence the oscillation of the probes, which in some cases may result in deterioration of the imaging quality under tapping mode for one or both self-resonant frequencies. However, phase imaging results obtained using modified probes are of higher quality. The numerical simulations performed by application of finite element method were used to explain the results obtained experimentally. Phenomenon described within this study allows to apply developed modelling methodology for prediction of effects of various modifications on the probes' tip, and as a result, to predict how proposed modifications will affect AFM imaging quality. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. GPM GROUND VALIDATION NCAR CLOUD MICROPHYSICS PARTICLE PROBES MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NCAR Cloud Microphysics Particle Probes MC3E dataset was collected during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E),...

  11. A fast heuristic algorithm for a probe mapping problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumey, B

    1997-01-01

    A new heuristic algorithm is presented for mapping probes to locations along the genome, given noisy pairwise distance data as input. The model considered is quite general: The input consists of a collection of probe pairs and a confidence interval for the genomic distance separating each pair. Because the distance intervals are only known with some confidence level, some may be erroneous and must be removed in order to find a consistent map. A novel randomized technique for detecting and removing bad distance intervals is described. The technique could be useful in other contexts where partially erroneous data is inconsistent with the remaining data. These algorithms were motivated by the goal of making probe maps with inter-probe distance confidence intervals estimated from fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. Experimentation was done on synthetic data sets (with and without errors) and FISH data from a region of human chromosome 4. Problems with up to 100 probes could be solved in several minutes on a fast workstation. In addition to FISH mapping, we describe some other possible applications that fall within the problem model. These include: mapping a backbone structure in folded DNA, finding consensus maps between independent maps covering the same genomic region, and ordering clones in a clone library.

  12. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne' , Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  13. Transient-absorption phases with strong probe and pump pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becquet, Vadim; Cavaletto, Stefano M.

    2018-02-01

    The quantum dynamics of a system of Rb atoms, modeled by a V-type three-level system interacting with intense probe and pump pulses, are studied. The time-delay-dependent transient-absorption spectrum of an intense probe pulse is thus predicted, simulating pump-probe experiments in which this is preceded or followed by a strong pump pulse. Numerical results are interpreted in terms of an analytical model based on interaction operators, which quantify the transformation undergone by the system under the action of an intense pulse. The oscillating features of the resulting transient-absorption spectra, due to the coupling of several excited states, are thus interpreted in terms of the atomic population and phase changes imposed by the pump and probe pulses. Strong-field-induced phases and their influence on the resulting transient-absorption spectra are thereby investigated for different values of pump and probe intensities and frequencies, focusing on the atomic properties which are encoded in the absorption line shapes for positive and negative time delays.

  14. Neptune Polar Orbiter with Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienstock, Bernard; Atkinson, David; Baines, Kevin; Mahaffy, Paul; Steffes, Paul; Atreya, Sushil; Stern, Alan; Wright, Michael; Willenberg, Harvey; Smith, David; hide

    2005-01-01

    The giant planets of the outer solar system divide into two distinct classes: the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn, which consist mainly of hydrogen and helium; and the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, which are believed to contain significant amounts of the heavier elements oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon and sulfur. Detailed comparisons of the internal structures and compositions of the gas giants with those of the ice giants will yield valuable insights into the processes that formed the solar system and, perhaps, other planetary systems. By 2012, Galileo, Cassini and possibly a Jupiter Orbiter mission with microwave radiometers, Juno, in the New Frontiers program, will have yielded significant information on the chemical and physical properties of Jupiter and Saturn. A Neptune Orbiter with Probes (NOP) mission would deliver the corresponding key data for an ice giant planet. Such a mission would ideally study the deep Neptune atmosphere to pressures approaching and possibly exceeding 1000 bars, as well as the rings, Triton, Nereid, and Neptune s other icy satellites. A potential source of power would be nuclear electric propulsion (NEP). Such an ambitious mission requires that a number of technical issues be investigated, however, including: (1) atmospheric entry probe thermal protection system (TPS) design, (2) probe structural design including seals, windows, penetrations and pressure vessel, (3) digital, RF subsystem, and overall communication link design for long term operation in the very extreme environment of Neptune's deep atmosphere, (4) trajectory design allowing probe release on a trajectory to impact Neptune while allowing the spacecraft to achieve a polar orbit of Neptune, (5) and finally the suite of science instruments enabled by the probe technology to explore the depths of the Neptune atmosphere. Another driving factor in the design of the Orbiter and Probes is the necessity to maintain a fully operational flight system during the lengthy transit time

  15. Masking of a brief probe by sinusoidal frequency modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B W; Viemeister, N F

    1997-02-01

    Contrary to level detection models, the thresholds for a brief-duration probe masked by a sinusoidal frequency modulation (FM) masker increases as the modulation index (beta) of FM increases [Zwicker, Acustica 31, 243-256 (1974)]. In this paper the reason for this phenomenon is investigated. In experiment 1, a 10-ms, 1-kHz probe was detected in the presence of an FM masker centered at 1 kHz and sinusoidally modulated at 16 Hz. Thresholds increased by over 15 dB with increasing beta, consistent with Zwicker's findings. In experiment 2, the instantaneous frequency changes of the masker used in experiment 1 were clipped and the resulting thresholds indicated that detection was determined primarily by the masker's total frequency excursion rather than by its instantaneous sweep rate. In experiment 3, the FM maskers from the first two experiments were passed through a roex filter centered at 1 kHz and the resulting envelope was used to amplitude modulate a 1-kHz tone, producing approximately the same effective envelope at 1 kHz as the FM maskers. Threshold functions for the amplitude modulated (AM) maskers were similar to those for their corresponding FM maskers. Thresholds increased by over 15 dB while the total energy of the AM masker decreased by over 10 dB, again contrary to standard level-detection models. The results from these experiments can be explained, at least qualitatively, by a model based on envelope shape discrimination: similarities between the envelopes of the masker alone and masker-plus-probe at the output of an auditory filter centered on the frequency of the probe are primarily responsible for the observed masking, particularly at large beta's.

  16. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  17. Thermoelectrically-cooled variable-temperature probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, R. M.; Richmond, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    Variable-temperature probe for electron spectroscopy requires no cryogenic liquids or resistance heating elements. Device consists of heat sink, probe tip, and nickel-plated copper body which resists oxidation and transfers heat efficiently between tip and heat sink.

  18. Probing quintessence potential with future cosmological surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoshitaka; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2014-03-01

    Quintessence, a scalar field model, has been proposed to account for the acceleration of the Universe at present. We discuss how accurately quintessence models are discriminated by future cosmological surveys, which include experiments of CMB, galaxy clustering, weak lensing, and the type Ia SNe surveys, by making use of the conventional parameterized dark energy models. We can see clear differences between the thawing and the freezing quintessence models at more than 1σ (2σ) confidence level as long as the present equation of state for quintessence is away from -1 as wXgtrsim-0.95(-0.90). However, it is found to be difficult to probe the effective mass squared for the potential in thawing models, whose signs are different between the quadratic and the cosine-type potentials. This fact may require us to invent a new estimator to distinguish quintessence models beyond the thawing and the freezing ones.

  19. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    . Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle......-based simulation techniques cannot capture such a broad range. Consequently, at long length scales, models have often been of the Mass Action variety, in which molecular constituents are represented by density fields that vary continuously in space and time, rather than involving discrete molecules....... But these models struggle to represent processes that are localized in space and time or involve the transport of material through a crowded environment. A novel class of mesoscopic simulation techniques are now able to span length and time scales from nanometers to microns for hundreds of microseconds, and may...

  20. Mismatch and G-stack modulated probe signals on SNP microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Binder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays are important tools widely used for genotyping and copy number estimation. This technology utilizes the specific affinity of fragmented DNA for binding to surface-attached oligonucleotide DNA probes. We analyze the variability of the probe signals of Affymetrix GeneChip SNP arrays as a function of the probe sequence to identify relevant sequence motifs which potentially cause systematic biases of genotyping and copy number estimates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The probe design of GeneChip SNP arrays enables us to disentangle different sources of intensity modulations such as the number of mismatches per duplex, matched and mismatched base pairings including nearest and next-nearest neighbors and their position along the probe sequence. The effect of probe sequence was estimated in terms of triple-motifs with central matches and mismatches which include all 256 combinations of possible base pairings. The probe/target interactions on the chip can be decomposed into nearest neighbor contributions which correlate well with free energy terms of DNA/DNA-interactions in solution. The effect of mismatches is about twice as large as that of canonical pairings. Runs of guanines (G and the particular type of mismatched pairings formed in cross-allelic probe/target duplexes constitute sources of systematic biases of the probe signals with consequences for genotyping and copy number estimates. The poly-G effect seems to be related to the crowded arrangement of probes which facilitates complex formation of neighboring probes with at minimum three adjacent G's in their sequence. CONCLUSIONS: The applied method of "triple-averaging" represents a model-free approach to estimate the mean intensity contributions of different sequence motifs which can be applied in calibration algorithms to correct signal values for sequence effects. Rules for appropriate sequence corrections are suggested.

  1. Design Strategies for Bioorthogonal Smart Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Peyton; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has enabled the selective labeling and detection of biomolecules in living systems. Bioorthogonal smart probes, which become fluorescent or deliver imaging or therapeutic agents upon reaction, allow for the visualization of biomolecules or targeted delivery even in the presence of excess unreacted probe. This review discusses the strategies used in the development of bioorthogonal smart probes and highlights the potential of these probes to further our understanding of biology. PMID:25315039

  2. Fluorescent Probes for Exploring Plant Cell Wall Deconstruction: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Paës

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant biomass is a potential resource of chemicals, new materials and biofuels that could reduce our dependency on fossil carbon, thus decreasing the greenhouse effect. However, due to its chemical and structural complexity, plant biomass is recalcitrant to green biological transformation by enzymes, preventing the establishment of integrated bio-refineries. In order to gain more knowledge in the architecture of plant cell wall to facilitate their deconstruction, many fluorescent probes bearing various fluorophores have been devised and used successfully to reveal the changes in structural motifs during plant biomass deconstruction, and the molecular interactions between enzymes and plant cell wall polymers. Fluorescent probes are thus relevant tools to explore plant cell wall deconstruction.

  3. Probing Solitons in Brane Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Youm, Donam

    2000-01-01

    We study dynamics of a probe p-brane and a test particle in the field background of fully localized solutions describing the source p-brane within the worldvolume of the source domain wall. We find that the probe dynamics in the background of the source p-brane in one lower dimensions is not reproduced, indicating that p-branes within the worldvolume of domain walls perhaps describe an exotic phase of p-branes in brane worlds. We speculate therefore that a (p+1)-brane where one of its longitudinal directions is along the direction transverse to the domain wall is the right describtion of the p-brane in the brane world with the expected properties.

  4. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    by means of fiber components. Assuming the possibility to use a fiber laser with a fundamental radiation at 1064nm, in-fiber efficient second harmonic generation is achieved by optically poling the core of the waveguide delivering the excitation light to the sample. In this way, Raman spectroscopy...... of the collected Raman scattering from the inner-cladding region of the double-clad fiber, thus replacing the bulk dichroic component normally used to demultiplex the pump and Raman signal. A tunable Rayleigh-rejection filter based on a liquid filled-photonic bandgap fiber is also demonstrated in this work......The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...

  5. Situating relevance: exploring individual relevance assessments in context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Dirndorfer Anderson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some of the challenges encountered whilst researching and writing a thesis that explores individual understandings of relevance and topic. It is based upon a discussion paper and presentation prepared as part of the Doctoral Workshop held during the ISIC 2000 Conference in Borås, Sweden. The focus of this paper is the doing of qualitative research. To provide a framework for this discussion, the key assumptions that have shaped the author's thesis are presented in the first section of this paper. The paper then focuses on some of the dilemmas of qualitative research encountered during the research and writing of this thesis, giving particular attention to the notion of context and the writing of qualitative research. Forthcoming results from the thesis are mentioned in the closing section. A Thesis Summary is also provided at the end of this paper.

  6. Distance probes of dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D' Andrea, C B; Dalal, N; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Kuhlmann, S.

    2015-03-15

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  7. Distance probes of dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Finley, D. A.; Freedman, W. L.; Ho, S.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S. M.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Linder, E. V.; Martini, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Riess, A. G.; Rubin, D.; Sako, M.; Suntzeff, N. V.; Suzuki, N.; Thomas, R. C.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Woosley, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  8. Characterization of near-field optical probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation and collection characteristics of four different near-field optical-fiber probes, namely, three uncoated probes and an aluminium-coated small-aperture probe, are investigated and compared. Their radiation properties are characterized by observation of light-induced topography changes...... characterization....

  9. 21 CFR 870.1915 - Thermodilution probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thermodilution probe. 870.1915 Section 870.1915...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1915 Thermodilution probe. (a) Identification. A thermodilution probe is a device that monitors cardiac output by use of...

  10. The Van Allen Probes mission

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, James

    2014-01-01

    This collection of articles provides broad and detailed information about NASA’s Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin-spacecraft Earth-orbiting mission. The mission has the objective of achieving predictive understanding of the dynamic, intense, energetic, dangerous, and presently unpredictable belts of energetic particles that are magnetically trapped in Earth’s space environment above the atmosphere. It documents the science of the radiation belts and the societal benefits of achieving predictive understanding. Detailed information is provided about the Van Allen Probes mission design, the spacecraft, the science investigations, and the onboard instrumentation that must all work together to make unprecedented measurements within a most unforgiving environment, the core of Earth’s most intense radiation regions.
 This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in space science, solar-terrestrial interactions and studies of the up...

  11. Graphene oxide based contacts as probes of biomedical signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallfors, N. G.; Devarajan, A.; Farhat, I. A. H.; Abdurahman, A.; Liao, K.; Gater, D. L.; Elnaggar, M. I.; Isakovic, A. F.

    We have developed a series of graphene oxide (GOx) on polymer contacts and have demonstrated these to be useful for collection of standard biomedically relevant signals, such as electrocardiogram (ECG). The process is wet solution-based and allows for control and tuning of the basic physical parameters of GOx, such as electrical and optical properties, simply by choosing the number of GOx layers. Our GOx characterization measurements show spectral (FTIR, XPS, IR absorbance) features most relevant to such performance, and point towards the likely explanations about the mechanisms for controlling the physical properties relevant for the contact performance. Structural (X-ray topography) and surface characterization (AFM, SEM) indicates to what degree these contacts can be considered homogeneous and therefore provide information on yield and repeatability. We compare the ECG signals recorded by standard commercial probes (Ag/AgCl) and GOx probes, displaying minor differences the solution to which may lead to a whole new way we perform ECG data collection, including wearable electronics and IoT friendly ECG monitoring. We acknowledge support from Mubadala-SRC AC4ES and from SRC 2011-KJ-2190. We thank J. B. Warren and G. L. Carr (BNL) for assistance.

  12. ¿CÓMO SE TRADUCE EL CURRICULUM FORMAL EN UNA EXPERIENCIA ESCOLAR RELEVANTE PARA LOS ALUMNOS DE UNA ESCUELA TELESECUNDARIA DE MÉXICO? (HOW DO THE STUDENTS OF A TELESECONDARY SCHOOL IN MEXICO TRANSLATE THE FORMAL CURRICULUM IN A RELEVANT SCHOOL EXPERIENCE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez Tepatzi José de la luz

    2011-08-01

    ways how students translate the formal curriculum in a relevant school experience and how this meanings influences on the permanence. The main results indicate that the teacher-student relationship, peer treatment and family support are important elements for improving retention and quality of learning also influence the assignment of relevant meanings to the school experience. The conclusions of the study shows that the positive value to the school and the importance of school experience, are not sufficient to ensure the permanence, other factors affect that decision. That is, each student, in their world of life builds a sense of reality and it guides their decisions, one of which is to remain or withdraw from school. In this context of relative autonomy, the teachers are required to offer students the opportunity to enjoy a relevant school experience to enable them to function in a complex world and to learn throughout life, regardless of their status and willingness to stay at school.

  13. Gravity Probe B - Testing Einstein at the Limits of Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencze, W.J.; Buchman, S.; Clarke, B.; DeBra, D.; Everitt, C.W.F.; Green, G.; Heifetz, M.I. [Gravity Probe B Relativity Mission, W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Hipkins, D.N.; Keiser, G.M.; Li, J.; Lipa, J.A.; Muhlfelder, B.; Parkinson, B.W.; Silbergleit, A.S.; Taber, M.; Turneaure, J.P.; Wang, S. [Gravity Probe B Relativity Mission, W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    The Gravity Probe B experiment was developed to test two predictions of General Relativity; the Geodetic and the frame-dragging precessions of a mechanical gyroscope due to the gravitational field of the Earth. This space-based, cryogenic experiment was carried into orbit on 20 April 2004 atop a Boeing Delta II rocket. On-orbit operations consisted of 4.3 months of experiment setup, 11.6 months of science data collection, and 1.4 months of post-science calibrations. Analysis of the science data is now in progress, scheduled to complete in 2007.

  14. Influence of probe geometry on the response of an electrostatic probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Torben; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1999-01-01

    The response of an electrostatic probe is examined with reference to the probe geometry. The study involves the evaluation of the probe lambda function, from which response-related characteristic parameters can be derived. These parameters enable the probe detection sensitivity Se and spatial...

  15. Relevancy Ranking of Satellite Dataset Search Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Quinn, Patrick; Norton, James

    2017-01-01

    As the Variety of Earth science datasets increases, science researchers find it more challenging to discover and select the datasets that best fit their needs. The most common way of search providers to address this problem is to rank the datasets returned for a query by their likely relevance to the user. Large web page search engines typically use text matching supplemented with reverse link counts, semantic annotations and user intent modeling. However, this produces uneven results when applied to dataset metadata records simply externalized as a web page. Fortunately, data and search provides have decades of experience in serving data user communities, allowing them to form heuristics that leverage the structure in the metadata together with knowledge about the user community. Some of these heuristics include specific ways of matching the user input to the essential measurements in the dataset and determining overlaps of time range and spatial areas. Heuristics based on the novelty of the datasets can prioritize later, better versions of data over similar predecessors. And knowledge of how different user types and communities use data can be brought to bear in cases where characteristics of the user (discipline, expertise) or their intent (applications, research) can be divined. The Earth Observing System Data and Information System has begun implementing some of these heuristics in the relevancy algorithm of its Common Metadata Repository search engine.

  16. Fluorescence Dynamics of a FRET Probe Designed for Crowding Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Megan; Leopold, Hannah; Schwarz, Jacob; Boersma, Arnold J; Sheets, Erin D; Heikal, Ahmed A

    2017-06-15

    Living cells are crowded with macromolecules and organelles. As a result, there is an urgent need for molecular sensors for quantitative, site-specific assessment of the macromolecular crowding effects on a myriad of biochemical processes toward quantitative cell biology and biophysics. Here we investigate the excited-state dynamics and translational diffusion of a novel FRET sensor (mCerulean-linker-mCitrine) in a buffer (PBS, pH 7.4) at room temperature. Complementary experiments were carried out on free CFP, YFP, and the cleaved FRET probe as controls. The wavelength-dependent fluorescence lifetime measurements of the donor and acceptor in the FRET probe, using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, indicate an energy transfer efficiency of 6.8 ± 0.9% in PBS, with distinct excited-state dynamics from the recombinant CFP and YFP. The estimated mCerulean-mCitrine distance in this FRET probe is 7.7 ± 0.2 nm. The energy transfer efficiency increases (11.5 ± 0.9%) as the concentration of Ficoll-70 increases over the range of 0-300 g/L with an estimated mCerulean-mCitrine distance of 6.1 ± 0.2 nm. Complementary time-resolved anisotropy measurements suggest that the rotational diffusion of hetero-FRET in PBS is sensitive to the energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor. The results also suggest that the linker, -(GSG)6A(EAAAK)6A(GSG)6A(EAAAK)6A(GSG)6-, is rather flexible, and the observed rotational dynamics is likely to be due to a segmental mobility of the FRET pairs rather than an overall tumbling motion of a rigid probe. Comparative studies on a new construct of a FRET probe with a shorter, more flexible linker, mCerulean-(GSG)18-mCitrine, reveal enhanced energy transfer efficiency. On the millisecond time scale, fluorescence fluctuation analyses of the acceptor (excited at 488 nm) provide a means to examine the translational diffusion coefficient of the FRET probe. The results also suggest that the linker is flexible in this FRET probe, and

  17. Relevant Animal Models in Dermatophyte Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Ludivine; Heinen, Marie-Pierre; Mignon, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    Dermatophytoses are common superficial fungal infections affecting both humans and animals. They are provoked by filamentous fungi called dermatophytes specialized in the degradation of keratinized structures, which allows them to induce skin, hair and nail infections. Despite their high incidence, little investigation has been performed for the understanding of these infections compared to fungal opportunistic infections and most of the studies were based on in vitro experiments. The development of animal models for dermatophyte research is required to evaluate new treatments against dermatophytoses or to increase knowledge about fungal pathogenicity factors or host immune response mechanisms. The guinea pig has been the most often used animal model to evaluate efficacy of antifungal compounds against dermatophytes, while mouse models were preferred to study the immune response generated during the disease. Here, we review the relevant animal models that were developed for dermatophyte research and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the selected species, especially guinea pig and mouse.

  18. A Novel Method for Imaging Apoptosis Using a Caspase-1 Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanta M. Messerli

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a novel method for imaging apoptosis in cells using a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF probe selective for caspase-1 (interleukin β-converting enzyme, ICE. This biocompatible, optically quenched ICE-NIRF probe incorporates a peptide substrate, which can be selectively cleaved by caspase-1, resulting in the release of fluorescence signal. The specificity of this probe for caspase-1 is supported by various lines of evidence: 1 activation by purified caspase-1, but not another caspase in vitro; 2 activation of the probe by infection of cells with a herpes simplex virus amplicon vector (HGC-ICE-IacZ expressing a catalytically active caspase-1-IacZ fusion protein; 3 inhibition of HGC-ICE-IacZ vector-induced activation of the probe by coincubation with the caspase-1 inhibitor YVAD-cmk, but not with a caspase-3 inhibitor; and 4 activation of the probe following standard methods of inducing apoptosis with staurosporine, ganciclovir, or ionizing radiation in culture. These results indicate that this novel ICE-NIRF probe can be used in monitoring endogenous and vector-expressed caspase-1 activity in cells. Furthermore, tumor implant experiments indicate that this ICE-NIRF probe can be used to detect caspase-1 activity in living animals. This novel ICE-NIRF probe should prove useful in monitoring endogenous and vector-expressed caspase-1 activity, and potentially apoptosis in cell culture and in vivo.

  19. Zero voltage mass spectrometry probes and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Wleklinski, Michael Stanley; Bag, Soumabha; Li, Yafeng

    2017-10-10

    The invention generally relates to zero volt mass spectrometry probes and systems. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system including a mass spectrometry probe including a porous material, and a mass spectrometer (bench-top or miniature mass spectrometer). The system operates without an application of voltage to the probe. In certain embodiments, the probe is oriented such that a distal end faces an inlet of the mass spectrometer. In other embodiments, the distal end of the probe is 5 mm or less from an inlet of the mass spectrometer.

  20. Semiautomatic Probe-And-Drogue Attachment Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanagas, John D.

    1988-01-01

    Spring-loaded pawls provide quick coupling. As probe enters drogue during coupling, three spring-loaded pawls in probe latch probe in drogue, preventing accidental uncoupling. Then worm-gear mechanism turned by standard 0.25-in. (6.35-mm) tool transfers motion to central threaded shaft, extending cap at tip of probe until all play taken up. This centers probe in drogue and renders coupling pawls to extend again. New mechanism useful for coupling modular components in other applications where ease and security of attachment, precise final alignment, and ease of removal important and where stresses and bending reasonably low.

  1. Diketopyrrolopyrrole: brilliant red pigment dye-based fluorescent probes and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Matinder; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2015-01-07

    The development of fluorescent probes for the detection of biologically relevant species is a burgeoning topic in the field of supramolecular chemistry. A number of available dyes such as rhodamine, coumarin, fluorescein, and cyanine have been employed in the design and synthesis of new fluorescent probes. However, diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) and its derivatives have a distinguished role in supramolecular chemistry for the design of fluorescent dyes. DPP dyes offer distinctive advantages relative to other organic dyes, including high fluorescence quantum yields and good light and thermal stability. Significant advancements have been made in the development of new fluorescent probes based on DPP in recent years as a result of tireless research efforts by the chemistry scientific community. In this tutorial review, we highlight the recent progress in the development of DPP-based fluorescent probes for the period spanning 2009 to the present time and the applications of these probes to recognition of biologically relevant species including anions, cations, reactive oxygen species, thiols, gases and other miscellaneous applications. This review is targeted toward providing the readers with deeper understanding for the future design of DPP-based fluorogenic probes for chemical and biological applications.

  2. The Relevance of Hegel's Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Burbidge

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hegel defines his Logic as the science that thinks about thinking.nbsp; But when we interpret that work as outlining what happens when we reason we are vulnerable to Fregersquo;s charge of psychologism.nbsp; I use Hegelrsquo;s tripartite distinction among understanding, dialectical and speculative reason as operations of pure thought to suggest how thinking can work with objective concepts.nbsp; In the last analysis, however, our ability to move from the subjective contingency of representations and ideas to the pure concepts we think develops from mechanical memory, which separates sign from sense so hat we can focus simply on the latter.nbsp; By becoming aware of the connections that underlie our thinking processes we may be able to both move beyond the abstractions of symbolic logic and clarify what informal logicians call relevance.

  3. The Improved Relevance Voxel Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; Sabuncu, Mert; Van Leemput, Koen

    Machine (RVM) [4] in 2001. While the concept of RVM was intriguing, problems with the approach were the run time which is approximately cubic in the number of basis functions as well as the greedy optimization. Hence, different approaches to overcome these shortcomings were developed, e.g. [5] or [6......The concept of sparse Bayesian learning has received much attention in the machine learning literature as a means of achieving parsimonious representations of features used in regression and classification. It is an important family of algorithms for sparse signal recovery and compressed sensing......] as well as Tipping himself in [7] (FastRVM). Recently, Sabuncu and Van Leemput [8, 9] extended the relevance vector machine by incorporating an additional spatial regularization term in the Gaussian prior on the regression weights or classification features (RVoxM). RVoxM encourages spatial clustering...

  4. Probing a self-assembled fd virus membrane with a microtubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sheng; Pelcovits, Robert A; Hagan, Michael F

    2016-06-01

    The self-assembly of highly anisotropic colloidal particles leads to a rich variety of morphologies whose properties are just beginning to be understood. This article uses computer simulations to probe a particle-scale perturbation of a commonly studied colloidal assembly, a monolayer membrane composed of rodlike fd viruses in the presence of a polymer depletant. Motivated by experiments currently in progress, we simulate the interaction between a microtubule and a monolayer membrane as the microtubule "pokes" and penetrates the membrane face-on. Both the viruses and the microtubule are modeled as hard spherocylinders of the same diameter, while the depletant is modeled using ghost spheres. We find that the force exerted on the microtubule by the membrane is zero either when the microtubule is completely outside the membrane or when it has fully penetrated the membrane. The microtubule is initially repelled by the membrane as it begins to penetrate but experiences an attractive force as it penetrates further. We assess the roles played by translational and rotational fluctuations of the viruses and the osmotic pressure of the polymer depletant. We find that rotational fluctuations play a more important role than the translational ones. The dependence on the osmotic pressure of the depletant of the width and height of the repulsive barrier and the depth of the attractive potential well is consistent with the assumed depletion-induced attractive interaction between the microtubule and viruses. We discuss the relevance of these studies to the experimental investigations.

  5. Stability mechanisms of a thermophilic laccase probed by molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2013-01-01

    to variable ionic strengths, temperatures, and glycosylation status. Near-physiological conditions provided excellent agreement with the crystal structure (average RMSD ∼0.92 Å) and residual agreement with experimental B-factors. The persistence of backbone hydrogen bonds was identified as a key descriptor...... of structural response to environment, whereas solvent-accessibility, radius of gyration, and fluctuations were only locally relevant. Backbone hydrogen bonds decreased systematically with temperature in all simulations (∼9 per 50 K), probing structural changes associated with enthalpy-entropy compensation...

  6. Poetic Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahab Yar Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature of poetic experience is hereby redefined. The present article initially deals with the perennial nature of true poetic experience and its essential relevance to the world. It attempts to elaborate the process through which a poet is uplifted in a creative moment beyond terrestrial boundaries and is aligned with the ‘state of Perfection'. The role of successive generations of audiences in rediscovering the meaning of a poetic image is defined as life principle of all great poetry. Shakespeare is discussed as the ultimate example of this principle since his popularity remains an irreversible phenomenon

  7. Pixel Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Augustesen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    elucidate and exemplify already well-known problems in relation to the experience of vertical and horizontal lighting. Pixel Experiments exist as a synergy between speculative test setups and lighting design in practice. This book is one of four books that is published in connection with the research...... design it became relevant to investigate the use of LEDs as the physical equivalent of a pixel as a design approach. In this book our interest has been in identifying how the qualities of LEDs can be used in lighting applications. With experiences in the planning and implementation of architectural...... lighting design in practice, one quickly experiences and realises that there are untapped potentials in the attributes of LED technology. In this research, speculative studies have been made working with the attributes of LEDs in architectural contexts, with the ambition to ascertain new strategies...

  8. New integrated imaging high intensity focused ultrasound probe for transrectal prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo, S; Gelet, A; Curiel, L; Chesnais, S; Chapelon, J-Y

    2008-07-01

    The present study proposes a new integrated imaging (II) high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) probe intended as an improvement to the Ablatherm prostate cancer treatment. Because of a perforation in the center of the II probe, the expected lesion differs from the one obtained for the original Ablatherm probe. In this paper, the new geometry and the strategy followed to establish the treatment parameters are presented. The original probe has a 40-mm focal length, a 50-mm aperture and is truncated at 31 mm. The II probe has a 45-mm focal length, a 61-mm aperture, a central perforation of 25 mm and is truncated at 31 mm. Both probes operate at 3 MHz. A mathematical model for lesion prediction was used for setting the treatment parameters for the II probe. These parameters should ensure equivalence between the lesions obtained with the original and II probes. Simulation-obtained parameters were validated by in-vitro and in-vivo (on liver of 70 New Zealand rabbits) experiments. The new II probe was used clinically to treat 30 patients. The mean age was 70.9 +/- 5.3 years (SD), the mean prostate volume 26.9 +/- 7.7 mL and the mean serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentration before treatment was 9.2 +/- 5.5 ng/mL. Simulations showed that for the II probe acoustical power and duration when the transducer is inactive should be reduced of 14% and 1s. In-vitro and in-vivo experiments confirmed the equivalence between the lesions obtained with the two probes. The lesion volume obtained under in-vitro conditions (for a traversed tissue depth of 16 mm to the focus) was 5 +/- 0.4 cm(3) and 5.1 +/- 0.5 cm(3) for the original and II probes, respectively. Under in-vivo conditions, the lesion volume (for a traversed tissue depth of 18 mm) was 5.3 +/- 1.1 cm(3) and 5.1 +/- 1.1 cm(3) for the original and II probes, respectively. During the clinical trial, a correction of + 1s in the exposure time was required to recreate the same degree of efficacy observed with the

  9. Probing Gravity with Spacetime Sirens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffayet, Cédric; Menou, Kristen

    2007-10-01

    A gravitational observatory such as LISA will detect coalescing pairs of massive black holes, accurately measure their luminosity distance, and help identify a host galaxy or an electromagnetic counterpart. If dark energy is a manifestation of modified gravity on large scales, gravitational waves from cosmologically distant spacetime sirens are direct probes of this new physics. For example, a gravitational Hubble diagram based on black hole pair luminosity distances and host galaxy redshifts could reveal a large distance extradimensional leakage of gravity. Various additional signatures may be expected in a gravitational signal propagated over cosmological scales.

  10. Scanning Probe Microscopy of Organic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Obadiah G.

    Nanostructured composites of organic semiconductors are a promising class of materials for the manufacture of low-cost solar cells. Understanding how the nanoscale morphology of these materials affects their efficiency as solar energy harvesters is crucial to their eventual potential for large-scale deployment for primary power generation. In this thesis we describe the use of optoelectronic scanning-probe based microscopy methods to study this efficiency-structure relationship with nanoscale resolution. In particular, our objective is to make spatially resolved measurements of each step in the power conversion process from photons to an electric current, including charge generation, transport, and recombination processes, and correlate them with local device structure. We have achieved two aims in this work: first, to develop and apply novel electrically sensitive scanning probe microscopy experiments to study the optoelectronic materials and processes discussed above; and second, to deepen our understanding of the physics underpinning our experimental techniques. In the first case, we have applied conductive-, and photoconductive atomic force (cAFM & pcAFM) microscopy to measure both local photocurrent collection and dark charge transport properties in a variety of model and novel organic solar cell composites, including polymer/fullerene blends, and polymer-nanowire/fullerene blends, finding that local heterogeneity is the rule, and that improvements in the uniformity of specific beneficial nanostructures could lead to large increases in efficiency. We have used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) and time resolved-electrostatic force microscopy (trEFM) to characterize all-polymer blends, quantifying their sensitivity to photochemical degradation and the subsequent formation of local charge traps. We find that while trEFM provides a sensitive measure of local quantum efficiency, SKPM is generally unsuited to measurements of efficiency, less sensitive than tr

  11. Probing and Manipulating Ultracold Fermi Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei

    Ultracold Fermi gas is an exciting field benefiting from atomic physics, optical physics and condensed matter physics. It covers many aspects of quantum mechanics. Here I introduce some of my work during my graduate study. We proposed an optical spectroscopic method based on electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) as a generic probing tool that provides valuable insights into the nature of Fermi paring in ultracold Fermi gases of two hyperfine states. This technique has the capability of allowing spectroscopic response to be determined in a nearly non-destructive manner and the whole spectrum may be obtained by scanning the probe laser frequency faster than the lifetime of the sample without re-preparing the atomic sample repeatedly. Both quasiparticle picture and pseudogap picture are constructed to facilitate the physical explanation of the pairing signature in the EIT spectra. Motivated by the prospect of realizing a Fermi gas of 40K atoms with a synthetic non-Abelian gauge field, we investigated theoretically BEC-HCS crossover physics in the presence of a Rashba spin-orbit coupling in a system of two-component Fermi gas with and without a Zeeman field that breaks the population balance. A new bound state (Rashba pair) emerges because of the spin-orbit interaction. We studied the properties of Rashba pairs using a standard pair fluctuation theory. As the two-fold spin degeneracy is lifted by spin-orbit interaction, bound pairs with mixed singlet and triplet pairings (referred to as rashbons) emerge, leading to an anisotropic superfluid. We discussed in detail the experimental signatures for observing the condensation of Rashba pairs by calculating various physical observables which characterize the properties of the system and can be measured in experiment. The role of impurities as experimental probes in the detection of quantum material properties is well appreciated. Here we studied the effect of a single classical impurity in trapped ultracold Fermi

  12. STANDING WAVE PROBES FOR DIMENSIONAL METROLOGY OF LOW DENSITY FOAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seugling, R M; Woody, S C; Bauza, M B

    2010-03-23

    Typically, parts and geometries of interest to LLNL are made from a combination of complex geometries and a wide array of different materials ranging from metals and ceramics to low density foams and plastic foils. These parts are combined to develop physics experiments for studying material properties, equation of state (EOS) and radiation transport. Understanding the dimensional uncertainty of the parts contained within an experiment is critical to the physical understanding of the phenomena being observed and represents the motivation for developing probe metrology capability that can address LLNL's unique problems. Standing wave probes were developed for measuring high aspect ratio, micrometer scaled features with nanometer resolution. Originally conceived of for the use in the automotive industry for characterizing fuel injector bores and similar geometries, this concept was investigated and improved for use on geometries and materials important to LLNL needs within target fabrication. As part of the original project, detailed understanding of the probe dynamics and interactions with the surface of the sample was investigated. In addition, the upgraded system was utilized for measuring fuel injector bores and micro-lenses as a means of demonstrating capability. This report discusses the use of the standing wave probe for measuring features in low density foams, 55 mg/cc SiO{sub 2} and 982 mg/cc (%6 relative density) copper foam respectively. These two foam materials represent a difficult metrology challenge because of their material properties and surface topography. Traditional non-contact metrology systems such as normal incident interferometry and/or confocal microscopy have difficulty obtaining a signal from the relatively absorptive characteristics of these materials. In addition to the foam samples, a solid copper and plastic (Rexolite{trademark}) sample of similar geometry was measured with the standing wave probe as a reference for both conductive

  13. Small Probes for Orbital Return of Experiments (SPORE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analogous to the CubeSat standardization of micro-satellites, the SPORE flight system architecture will utilize a modular design approach to provide low-cost...

  14. Probe experiment with RIKI device on a meteorological rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapknov, S.K.; Ivanova, T.N.; Gusheva, M.N.; Knchev, A.G.; Tsvetkov, Z.I.

    1979-01-01

    The RIKI device carried on board the Centaure-II ionospheric sounding rocket launched on October 31, 1978 from the equatorial rocket base at Tumba, India in order to measure local plasma ion concentrations and temperatures is described. The device consists of a four-spherical-electrode and a three-spherical-electrode spherical ion trap and a block of measuring electronics mounted in the air-tight rocket container. The volt-ampere characteristics of protons traversing a system of concentric grids are determined in fine or coarse resolution as sweeping voltages are supplied to the grids from a sawtooth wave generator. Positive ions which penetrate the grids are collected by the ion trap collectors, and the current generated is used to determine operational modes. Measurements of ion concentration obtained with the RIKI device have been found to be in good agreement with electron concentration measurements obtained concurrently.

  15. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper J. van Thor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/σI must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe” which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ΔF, in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.

  16. Ligand Exchange Kinetics of Environmentally Relevant Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasci, Adele Frances [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The interactions of ground water with minerals and contaminants are of broad interest for geochemists but are not well understood. Experiments on the molecular scale can determine reaction parameters (i.e. rates of ligand exchange, activation entropy, activation entropy, and activation volume) that can be used in computations to gain insight into reactions that occur in natural groundwaters. Experiments to determine the rate of isotopic ligand exchange for three environmentally relevant metals, rhodium (Rh), iron (Fe), and neptunium (Np), are described. Many environmental transformations of metals (e.g. reduction) in soil occur at trivalent centers, Fe(III) in particular. Contaminant ions absorb to mineral surfaces via ligand exchange, and the reversal of this reaction can be dangerous, releasing contaminants into the environment. Ferric iron is difficult to study spectroscopically because most of its complexes are paramagnetic and are generally reactive toward ligand exchange; therefore, Rh(III), which is diamagnetic and less reactive, was used to study substitution reactions that are analogous to those that occur on mineral oxide surfaces. Studies on both Np(V) and Np(VI) are important in their own right, as 237Np is a radioactive transuranic element with a half-life of 2 million years.

  17. The Relevance of Business Exit for Future Entrepreneurial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Judit Albiol-Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    The Relevance of Business Exit for Future Entrepreneurial Activity Territories can capitalize on knowledge resulting from business exit by designing policies that distinguish first-time entrepreneurs who need specific support and information from individuals with an entrepreneurial background whose experience might help enhance the quality of future entrepreneurial activity.

  18. The relevance of developmental-psychobiological metatheory to developmental neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, G

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews 4 aspects of developmental-psychobiological metatheory that are of particular relevance to developmental conceptions of neuropsychology: probabilistic epigenesis, the various roles of experience in affecting the development of the nervous system, and the developmental principles of equifinality and equipotentiality, the latter being especially pertinent to the understanding of compensatory phenomena observed in studies of early brain damage.

  19. 9/11: Maintaining Relevance for the Classroom Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterson, Robert A.; Rickey, Matt

    2011-01-01

    The experience of 9/11 prompted a transformation in one secondary teacher's approach to teaching controversial subjects based on the relevance to today's students. Soon after that fateful day, this teacher found a purpose and rationale for developing a very demanding curriculum on 9/11, and relates how his teaching unit has evolved by expanding…

  20. Operations Management Teaching: Establishing Content and Relevance to Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Desmond; Hill, Alex; Brown, Steve; Aktas, Emel; Kuula, Markku

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the relevance to industry's needs of operations management (OM) teaching in higher education, by researching the content of OM modules delivered by UK academics and comparing the results of this research with the views of business practitioners having had first-hand experience of OM teaching on MBA programmes. To determine…

  1. Probing Majorana neutrino textures at DUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Kalpana; Borah, Debasish; Dutta, Debajyoti

    2017-10-01

    We study the possibility of probing different texture zero neutrino mass matrices at the long baseline neutrino experiment DUNE, particularly focusing on its sensitivity to the octant of atmospheric mixing angle θ23 and leptonic Dirac C P phase δcp. Assuming a diagonal charged lepton basis and Majorana nature of light neutrinos, we first classify the possible light neutrino mass matrices with one and two texture zeros and then numerically evaluate the parameter space which satisfies the texture zero conditions. Apart from using the latest global fit 3 σ values of neutrino oscillation parameters, we also use the latest bound on the sum of absolute neutrino masses (∑i |mi|) from the Planck mission data and the updated bound on effective neutrino mass Me e from neutrinoless double beta decay (0 ν β β ) experiments to find the allowed Majorana texture zero mass matrices. For the allowed texture zero mass matrices from all these constraints, we then feed the corresponding light neutrino parameter values satisfying the texture zero conditions into the numerical analysis in order to study the capability of DUNE to allow or exclude them once it starts taking data. We find that DUNE will be able to exclude some of these texture zero mass matrices which restrict (θ23-δcp) to a very specific range of values, depending on the values of the parameters that nature has chosen.

  2. Measuring Motion-Induced B0-Fluctuations in the Brain Using Field Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Hanson, Lars G.; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Fluctuations of the background magnetic field (B0) due to body and breathing motion can lead to significant artifacts in brain imaging at ultrahigh field. Corrections based on real-time sensing using external field probes show great potential. This study evaluates different aspects...... of field interpolation from these probes into the brain which is implicit in such methods. Measurements and simulations were performed to quantify how well B0-fluctuations in the brain due to body and breathing motion are reflected in external field probe measurements. Methods: Field probe measurements...... were compared with scanner acquired B0-maps from experiments with breathing and shoulder movements. A realistic simulation of B0-fluctuations caused by breathing was performed, and used for testing different sets of field probe positions. Results: The B0-fluctuations were well reflected in the field...

  3. Failure analysis on false call probe pins of microprocessor test equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L. W.; Ong, N. R.; Mohamad, I. S. B.; Alcain, J. B.; Retnasamy, V.

    2017-09-01

    A study has been conducted to investigate failure analysis on probe pins of test modules for microprocessor. The `health condition' of the probe pin is determined by the resistance value. A test module of 5V power supplied from Arduino UNO with "Four-wire Ohm measurement" method is implemented in this study to measure the resistance of the probe pins of a microprocessor. The probe pins from a scrapped computer motherboard is used as the test sample in this study. The functionality of the test module was validated with the pre-measurement experiment via VEE Pro software. Lastly, the experimental work have demonstrated that the implemented test module have the capability to identify the probe pin's `health condition' based on the measured resistance value.

  4. Probe Measurements of Ash Deposit Formation Rate and Shedding in a Biomass Suspension-Fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    . The video recordings of all deposit probe experiments revealed that deposit shedding was primarily through debonding from the surface of the tubes in the superheater region. Chemical analysis of fly ashes indicated that during suspension-firing of straw and wood, the fly ashes were rich in Si, K, Ca and Cl......The aim of this study was to investigate ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake reduction and deposit removal by using advanced online ash deposition and sootblowing probes in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, utilizing wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type (straw share...... in wood), probe exposure time, probe surface temperature (500, 550 and 600 oC) and flue gas temperature (600 - 1050 oC) on ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake by the probe, the fly ash and deposit characteristics, and deposit removal have been investigated. The results indicated that increase in flue...

  5. Soil moisture calibration of TDR multilevel probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrarens Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Time domain reflectometry (TDR probes are increasingly used for field estimation of soil water content. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the multilevel TDR probe under field conditions. For this purpose, eight such TDR probes were installed in small plots that were seeded with beans and sorghum. Data collection from the probes was such that soil moisture readings were automated and logged using a standalone field unit. Neutron probe measurements were used to calibrate the TDR probes. Soil-probe contact and soil compaction were critical to the accuracy of the TDR, especially when a number of TDR probes are combined for a single calibration curve. If each probe is calibrated individually, approximate measurement errors were between 0.005 and 0.015 m³ m-3. However, measurement errors doubled to approximately 0.025 to 0.03 m³ m-3, when TDR probes were combined to yield a single calibration curve.

  6. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  7. Tracking the Path of Carbon from Plants to Rhizobiomes using Protein Stable Isotope Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, M. S.; Nicora, C.; Shaw, J. B.; Karaoz, U.; Nuccio, E. E.; Zhalnina, K.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Brodie, E.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Firestone, M.

    2016-12-01

    Plants and microorganisms have complex relationships that mediate terrestrial carbon fluxes. Understanding the functional roles of belowground biotic communities and their interactions with plant roots is critical to understanding the fate of plant carbon in soil. Currently many `omics-driven technologies reveal only a static snap shot of functionality in biological communities, but temporally-resolved tools are necessary describe biological processes that change and evolve over time. Stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments are temporal in nature, and can track the flow of carbon from the atmosphere through the plant and into the soil microbial community through space and time, and ultimately reveal both plant-microbe interactions and the fate of the carbon within the system. The combination of 'omics approaches with SIP allows us to selectively target and characterize metabolically active organisms in a community, and elucidate functional potential over time-scales relevant to biological processes. Protein stable isotope probing (Pro-SIP) offers a unique perspective into the interaction between plants and microbial communities, and potentially links taxonomic, functional and metabolic information. We developed a Pro-SIP approach amenable for use in soil systems using soils collected from an annual grassland in Northern CA amended with 13C labeled glucose. Using this approach we determined the overall proteomic profile and recently synthesized proteins within the plant-associated microbial community. The mass spectrometric analysis of the proteins extracted from the soil identified over 60,000 proteins that correspond to about 2200 protein functions. Of these functions, over 500 were found to contain a labeled peptide. Proteins related to glucose metabolism, carbohydrate storage, sugar transport and sulfur metabolism were found to be actively synthesized after glucose amendment. In systems where plants were grown with 13CO2 revealed synthesis of central metabolism

  8. Design and application of a fish-shaped lateral line probe for flow measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhtan, J A; Fuentes-Pérez, J F; Strokina, N; Toming, G; Musall, M; Noack, M; Kämäräinen, J K; Kruusmaa, M

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the lateral line probe (LLP) as a measurement device for natural flows. Hydraulic surveys in rivers and hydraulic structures are currently based on time-averaged velocity measurements using propellers or acoustic Doppler devices. The long-term goal is thus to develop a sensor system, which includes spatial gradients of the flow field along a fish-shaped sensor body. Interpreting the biological relevance of a collection of point velocity measurements is complicated by the fact that fish and other aquatic vertebrates experience the flow field through highly dynamic fluid-body interactions. To collect body-centric flow data, a bioinspired fish-shaped probe is equipped with a lateral line pressure sensing array, which can be applied both in the laboratory and in the field. Our objective is to introduce a new type of measurement device for body-centric data and compare its output to estimates of conventional point-based technologies. We first provide the calibration workflow for laboratory investigations. We then provide a review of two velocity estimation workflows, independent of calibration. Such workflows are required as existing field investigations consist of measurements in environments where calibration is not feasible. The mean difference for uncalibrated LLP velocity estimates from 0 to 50 cm/s under in a closed flow tunnel and open channel flume was within 4 cm/s when compared to conventional measurement techniques. Finally, spatial flow maps in a scale vertical slot fishway are compared for the LLP, direct measurements, and 3D numerical models where it was found that the LLP provided a slight overestimation of the current velocity in the jet and underestimated the velocity in the recirculation zone.

  9. On determining defects identity in carbon nanotubes using charge probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyrko, T. [Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); García-Suárez, V.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Research Center (CINN), Oviedo (Spain); Wawrzyniak-Adamczewska, M., E-mail: mwaw@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Ferrer, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Research Center (CINN), Oviedo (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Conductance maps in defected carbon nanotube were computed using an ab initio method. • H-passivation can transform a vacancy from a donor type to an acceptor type defect. • Means to use a point charge probe to identify defect types in carbon nanotubes were shown. • Carbon nanotubes with defects can be applied as static charge detectors in nanoscale. - Abstract: A metallic carbon nanotube with point-like defects under influence of a local potential due to a point charge probe is theoretically studied. A combination of density functional theory and the Landauer–Büttiker formalism is used to compute the electronic conductance in the zero-voltage limit. From a collection of the results obtained by varying the probe position around different defects the conductance maps are created. The analysis of the conductance maps allows us to formulate conditions under which several point-like defects (the Stone–Wales defect, a simple carbon vacancy, hydrogen-passivated vacancies) can be distinguished and identified in experiments with the help of scanning probe microscopy.

  10. Suppression of probe background signals via B1 field inhomogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jian; Reimer, Jeffrey

    2011-01-27

    A new approach combining a long pulse with the DEPTH sequence (Cory and Ritchey, Journal of Magnetic Resonance, 1988) greatly improves the efficiency for suppressing probe background signals arising from spinning modules. By applying a long initial excitation pulse in the DEPTH sequence, instead of a {pi}/2 pulse, the inhomogeneous B{sub 1} fields outside the coil can dephase the background coherence in the nutation frame. The initial long pulse and the following two consecutive EXORCYCLE {pi} pulses function complementarily and prove most effective in removing background signals from both strong and weak B{sub 1} fields. Experimentally, the length of the long pulse can be optimized around odd multiples of the {pi}/2 pulse, depending on the individual probe design, to preserve signals inside the coil while minimizing those from probe hardware. This method extends the applicability of the DEPTH sequence to probes with small differences in B{sub 1} field strength between the inside and outside of the coil, and can readily combine with well-developed double resonance experiments for quantitative measurement. In general, spin systems with weak internal interactions are required to attain efficient and uniform excitation for powder samples, and the principles to determine the applicability are discussed qualitatively in terms of the relative strength of spin interactions, r.f. power and spinning rate.

  11. Research and application of transnasal transesophageal echocardiography probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Shao-Ping; He, Lin; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xin-Fang; Xie, Ming-Xing

    2017-10-01

    The intubation of conventional transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) probes into patients causes serious esophagus irritation, and thus the use of TEE probes in pediatric practice is limited. In this study, we aimed at the development of a special probe which could be inserted through the nasopharyngeal cavity into the esophagus to obtain the same high-quality echocardiography images as those obtained by conventional TEE and improve patients' experience. During the examination, the patients felt relaxed for a longer time and cooperated with the sonographers in the process of cardiac catheterization conducted in the surgery room or the intensive care unit (ICU), resulting in improved accuracy of the diagnosis and timely administration of appropriate treatment. Two years ago, Prof. Xin-fang WANG put theories into practice by inserting the probe through the nasal cavity and pharynx into the esophagus of volunteers to successfully detect the heart and great vessels at the retrocardiac space. Later, Prof. Ming-xing XIE performed the transnasal TEE examination in 12 atrial septal defect (ASD) patients and proved the safety and reliability of this method, which could become a new way for clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Heavy quark resonances as a probe of quark-gluon plasma: optimization of the muon spectrometer of ALICE experiment and study of the J/{psi} production in the NA60 experiment; Les resonances de quarks lourds comme sonde du plasma de quarks et de gluons: optimisation du spectrometre a muons de l'experience ALICE et etude de la production du J/{psi} dans l'experience NA60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillot, Ph

    2005-05-15

    The study of heavy quark production such as J/{psi} (cc-bar resonance) and {upsilon} (bb-bar resonance) in heavy ion collisions at high incident energies has been proposed as a tool to investigate the formation of a Quark Gluon Plasma. Experimentally, these resonances can be detected through their decay channel into a muon pair, using a muon spectrometer. The optimal resolution of a muon spectrometer cannot be reached unless the position of the different tracking detectors are accurately known. In the first part of the work reported in this thesis are presented the design and performances of the Geometry Monitoring System of the ALICE experiment's muon spectrometer at LHC. This system, which is composed of several hundreds of RASNIK derived optical devices, allows to measure displacements and deformations of the chambers with a precision better than a hundred of microns. Thanks to its muon spectrometer associated with a vertex telescope, the NA60 experiment studies the dimuon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN SPS. The second part of the work reported in this thesis is related to the analysis of the data collected in indium-indium collisions at 158 GeV/c/nucleon. More specifically, the J/{psi} production together with its transverse momentum and transverse mass distributions are studied as a function of the centrality of the collision. The different results arising from our analysis are then compared to those obtained previously by NA38 and NA50, allowing a better understanding of the ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. (author)

  13. Fluorescent and colorimetric ion probes based on conjugated oligopyrroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yubin; Tang, Yunyu; Zhu, Weihong; Xie, Yongshu

    2015-03-07

    Metal ions and anions play important roles in many industrial and biochemical processes, and thus it is highly desired to detect them in the relevant systems. Small organic molecule based sensors for selective and sensitive detection of target ions show the advantages of low cost, high sensitivity and convenient implementation. In this area, pyrrole has incomparable advantages. It can be easily incorporated into linear and macrocyclic conjugated structures such as dipyrrins, porphyrins, and N-confused porphyrins, which may utilize the imino N and amino NH moieties for binding metal ions and anions, respectively. In this tutorial review, we focus on representative examples to describe the design, syntheses, sensing mechanisms, and applications of the conjugated oligopyrroles. These compounds could be used as colorimetric or fluorescent ion probes, with the advantages of vivid colour and fluorescence changes, easy structural modification and functionalization, and tunable emission wavelengths. Compared with normal porphyrins, simple di- and tripyrrins, as well as some porphyrinoids are more suitable for designing fluorescence "turn-on" metal probes, because they may exhibit flexible confirmations, and metal coordination will improve the rigidity, resulting in vivid fluorescence enhancement. It is noteworthy that the oligopyrrolic moieties may simultaneously act as the binding unit as well as the reporting moiety, which simplifies the design and syntheses of the probes.

  14. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arntz, Y.; Chambron, J.; Dumitresco, B.; Eclancher, B. E-mail: eclan@alsace.u-strasbg.fr; Prat, V

    1999-06-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5x5x2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) which well depicted the filling and ejection of the cardiac beats, allowing to compare the clinically relevant parameters of the cardiac performance, proportional variables of the stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and ventricular flow-rate with the known absolute values programmed on the model. The portable system is now in operation for clinical assessment of cardiac patients.

  15. Laboratory Animal Medicine: Teaching for Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    A mechanism for augmenting the relevance of instruction in laboratory animal medicine is suggested: the identification of practice-relevant content. This identification helps foster a positive attitude toward the subject and facilitates the retention of information. (LBH)

  16. Does relevance matter in academic policy research?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    A reflection on whether relevance matters in tourism policy research. A debate among tourism scholars.......A reflection on whether relevance matters in tourism policy research. A debate among tourism scholars....

  17. Positron radiography of ignition-relevant ICF capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. J.; Chen, Hui; Field, J. E.; Landen, O. L.; Strozzi, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Laser-generated positrons are evaluated as a probe source to radiograph in-flight ignition-relevant inertial confinement fusion capsules. Current ultraintense laser facilities are capable of producing 2 × 1012 relativistic positrons in a narrow energy bandwidth and short time duration. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the unique characteristics of such positrons allow for the reconstruction of both capsule shell radius and areal density between 0.002 and 2 g/cm2. The energy-downshifted positron spectrum and angular scattering of the source particles are sufficient to constrain the conditions of the capsule between preshot and stagnation. We evaluate the effects of magnetic fields near the capsule surface using analytic estimates where it is shown that this diagnostic can tolerate line integrated field strengths of 100 T mm.

  18. The Need for Culturally Relevant Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy-Brown, Nyama

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for culturally relevant teaching in dance education. Many dance teachers have heard the buzz words "culturally relevant teaching methods." Yet these dance educators acknowledge that the "dance culture" is not always synonymous with "culturally relevant." This paper examines the issue of culturally…

  19. The Personal Relevance of the Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptualizes a personal-relevance framework derived from Ronald L. VanSickle's five areas of life integrated with four general motivating goals from Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Richard and Patricia Schmuck's social motivation theory. Illustrates ways to apply the personal relevance framework to make social studies more relevant to…

  20. Effect of plasma shielding on the fidelity of magnetic probe in a plasma focus environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucker, O.S.

    1978-04-28

    This paper examines the fidelity of a dielectric, encapsulated magnetic probe in the adverse plasma environment encountered in plasma focus experiments. The ionization of the surface of the probe produces a conductive layer that tends to shield it from external magnetic fields. The solution of the wave equation is used to show the allowed regions of conductivity, sigma, and thickness, d, for the ionized layer. The results show that as d approaches the penetration depth, delta = (..omega mu..sigma)/sup /sup 1///sub 2//, severe attenuation and distortion results, rendering the probe useless. When d is much less than delta, we encounter attenuation only, which also may be too severe for use. Finally, an experiment is described, which allows the experimenter to determine the fidelity of the probe.