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Sample records for experimental tumor model

  1. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  2. Experimental model of ultrasound thermotherapy in rats inoculated with Walker-236 tumor Modelo experimental de termoterapia ultrassônica em ratos inoculados com tumor de Walker-236

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    José Antonio Carlos Otaviano David Morano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a model to evaluate the effects of focal pulsed ultrasound (US waves as a source of heat for treatment of murine subcutaneous implanted Walker tumor. METHODS: An experimental, controlled, comparative study was conducted. Twenty male Wistar rats (160-300 g randomized in 2 equal groups (G-1: Control and G-2: Hyperthermia were inoculated with Walker-256 carcinosarcoma tumor. After 5 days G-2 rats were submitted to 45ºC hyperthermia. Heat was delivered directly to the tumor by an ultrasound (US equipment (3 MHz frequency, 1,5W/cm³. Tumor temperature reached 45º C in 3 minutes and was maintained at this level for 5 minutes. Tumor volume was measured on days 5, 8, 11, 14 e 17 post inoculation in both groups. Unpaired t-test was used for comparison. POBJETIVO: Desenvolver um modelo para avaliar os efeitos do ultra-som focal pulsado como fonte de calor para o tratamento de tumores de Walker subcutâneos implantados em ratos. MÉTODOS: Um estudo experimental, controlado, comparativo foi realizado. Vinte ratos Wistar machos (160-300 g divididos em dois grupos (G-1: Controle e G-2: hipertermia foram inoculados com tumor de Walker carcinossarcoma-256. Após cinco dias os ratos do grupo G-2 ratos foram submetidos a hipertermia (45ºC. O calor foi aplicado diretamente no tumor por um equipamento de ultrassonografia (3 MHz, 1,5 W/cm³. A temperatura no tumor atingiu 45ºC em 3 minutos e foi mantida nesse nível por 5 minutos. O volume do tumor foi medido nos dias 5, 8, 11, 14 e 17 após a inoculação, em ambos os grupos. Teste t não pareado foi utilizado para comparação. P <0,05 foi considerado significante. RESULTADOS: O volume do tumor foi significativamente maior no 5º dia e diminuiu nos dias 11, 14 e 17 nos ratos tratados. Animais submetidos à hipertermia sobreviveram mais tempo que os animais do grupo controle. No 29º dia após a inoculação do tumor, 40% dos ratos do grupo controle e 77,78% dos ratos tratados com

  3. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekry, Sébastien; Lamont, Clare; Beheshti, Afshin; Tracz, Amanda; Ebos, John M L; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma) and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1) to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2) to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3) to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80%) extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70%) beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  4. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Benzekry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1 to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2 to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3 to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80% extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70% beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  5. Tumor hypoxia - A confounding or exploitable factor in interstitial brachytherapy? Effects of tissue trauma in an experimental rat tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, AP; van Geel, CAJF; van Hooije, CMC; van der Kleij, AJ; Visser, AG

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential effects of tumor hypoxia induced by afterloading catheter implantation on the effectiveness of brachytherapy in a rat tumor model. Methods and Materials: Afterloading catheters (4) Here implanted in subcutaneously growing R1M rhabdomyosarcoma in female Wag/Rij

  6. Action of hexachlorobenzene on tumor growth and metastasis in different experimental models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillo, Carolina Andrea, E-mail: caroponti@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Efectos Biológicos de Contaminantes Ambientales, Departamento de Bioquímica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rojas, Paola, E-mail: parojas2010@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Chiappini, Florencia, E-mail: florenciachiappini@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Efectos Biológicos de Contaminantes Ambientales, Departamento de Bioquímica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sequeira, Gonzalo, E-mail: chicon27_7@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cocca, Claudia, E-mail: cm_cocca@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Radioisótopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Crocci, Máximo, E-mail: info@crescenti.com.ar [Instituto de Inmunooncología Crescenti, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Colombo, Lucas, E-mail: lucascol2003@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Oncología Angel Roffo, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires,Argentina (Argentina); Lanari, Claudia, E-mail: lanari.claudia@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-05-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread organochlorine pesticide, considered a possible human carcinogen. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have found that HCB activates c-Src/HER1/STAT5b and HER1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and cell migration, in an AhR-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 μM) on cell invasion and metalloproteases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we examined in vivo the effect of HCB (0.3, 3, 30 mg/kg b.w.) on tumor growth, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and metastasis using MDA-MB-231 xenografts and two syngeneic mouse breast cancer models (spontaneous metastasis using C4-HI and lung experimental metastasis using LM3). Our results show that HCB (5 μM) enhances MMP2 expression, as well as cell invasion, through AhR, c-Src/HER1 pathway and MMPs. Moreover, HCB increases MMP9 expression, secretion and activity through a HER1 and AhR-dependent mechanism, in MDA-MB-231 cells. HCB (0.3 and 3 mg/kg b.w.) enhances subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. In vivo, using MDA-MB-231 model, the pesticide (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg b.w.) activated c-Src, HER1, STAT5b, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and increased MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels. Furthermore, we observed that HCB stimulated lung metastasis regardless the tumor hormone-receptor status. Our findings suggest that HCB may be a risk factor for human breast cancer progression. - Highlights: ► HCB enhances MMP2 and MMP9 expression and cell invasion in MDA-MB-231, in vitro. ► HCB-effects are mediated through AhR, HER1 and/or c-Src. ► HCB increases subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. ► HCB activates c-Src/HER1 pathway and increases MMPs levels in MDA-MB-231 tumors. ► HCB stimulates lung metastasis in C4-HI and LM3 in vivo models.

  7. Antioxidant oils and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium reduce tumor in an experimental model of hepatic metastasis

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    Sorenson BS

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Brent S Sorenson, Kaysie L Banton, Lance B Augustin, Arnold S Leonard, Daniel A SaltzmanDepartment of Surgery, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Fruit seeds high in antioxidants have been shown to have anticancer properties and enhance host protection against microbial infection. Recently we showed that a single oral dose of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing a truncated human interleukin-2 gene (SalpIL2 is avirulent, immunogenic, and reduces hepatic metastases through increased natural killer cell populations in mice. To determine whether antioxidant compounds enhance the antitumor effect seen in SalpIL2-treated animals, we assayed black cumin (BC, black raspberry (BR, and milk thistle (MT seed oils for the ability to reduce experimental hepatic metastases in mice. In animals without tumor, BC and BR oil diets altered the kinetics of the splenic lymphocyte response to SalpIL2. Consistent with previous reports, BR and BC seed oils demonstrated independent antitumor properties and moderate adjuvant potential with SalpIL2. MT oil, however, inhibited the efficacy of SalpIL2 in our model. Based on these data, we conclude that a diet high in antioxidant oils promoted a more robust immune response to SalpIL2, thus enhancing its antitumor efficacy.Keywords: antioxidants, colorectal cancer, tumor models, metastasis

  8. Tumor hepático experimental (VX-2 em coelho: implantação do modelo no Brasil Experimental liver tumor (VX-2 in rabbits: implantation of the model in Brazil

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    Rogério Saad Hossne

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Os estudos para a investigação de novas modalidades terapêuticas em biologia tumoral, deveriam passar por estudos experimentais prévios. Neste sentido dispõem-se hoje de uma grande variedade de modelos tumorais experimentais; em determinadas investigações faz-se necessária a adequação do modelo tumoral às necessidades biológicas, patológicas e experimentais dos estudos. Desta forma, em nosso serviço, buscávamos um modelo tumoral hepático para estudos experimentais que se adequasse às seguintes características: fácil manipulação, crescimento controlável, evolução e agressividade semelhantes aos seres humanos. Os dados da literatura nos levaram a busca do tumor hepático VX-2, em coelhos. Neste artigo discutimos as vantagens da utilização deste modelo experimental e a sua introdução em nosso país.Studies for investigation of new therapeutic modalities in tumoral biology should be based on previous experimental studies. Then, there are a great variety of tumoral experimental models today. Some investigations have been done necessary an adaptation of the tumoral model to the needing of the studies biological and pathological. So, in our laboratory, we looked for a tumoral hepatic model for experimental studies with the following characteristics: easy manipulation, control of growing, evolution and aggressiveness like to humans. Data of the literature took us the search of the hepatic tumor VX-2, in rabbits. In this article we discussed the advantages of use this experimental model and its introduction in our country. Experimental hepatic tumor (VX-2 in rabbit. Implantation of the model in Brazil.

  9. SUITABILITY OF RODENT TUMOR-MODELS FOR EXPERIMENTAL PET WITH L-[1-C-11]TYROSINE AND 2-[F-18]FLUORO-2-DEOXY-D-GLUCOSE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAEMEN, BJG; ELSINGA, PH; PAANS, AMJ; LEMSTRA, W; KONINGS, AWT; VAALBURG, W

    1991-01-01

    The applicability of five different rodent tumors for experimental PET has been investigated. L-[1-C-11]Tyrosine was a better indicator for the growth activity of the tumors than [F-18]FDG. For experimental PET, the three mice models studied appeared inappropriate; the Lewis lung tumor and the

  10. Experimental drug STA-8666 causes complete tumor regression in animal models of pediatric sarcomas | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    New studies from scientists in the NCI Center for Cancer Research’s (CCR) Pediatric Oncology Branch suggest that an experimental drug called STA-8666 could be an effective treatment for the childhood cancers Ewing sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. In mouse models of these diseases, STA-8666 eliminated tumors and prolonged survival beyond that of animals treated with a related drug, irinotecan. Read more…

  11. Modelo experimental de tumor na cavidade oral de ratos com carcinossarcoma de Walker 256 Experimental model of Walker 256 carcinosarcoma developed in the oral cavity of rats

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    Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes Alves

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estabelecer um modelo experimental de desenvolvimento tumoral na cavidade oral de ratos, permitindo, assim, o estudo da osteólise induzida pelo tumor nos ossos do complexo maxilomandibular como também nas estruturas dentais, através da caracterização histomorfológica da reabsorção óssea e dentária. MÉTODOS: Uma suspensão de células tumorais (0,1mL do Carcinossarcoma de Walker 256, na concentração de 10(6 células/mL foi implantado na cavidade alveolar de ratos previamente aberta por exodontia. Os animais foram observados durante 12 (doze dias consecutivos para determinação da curva de peso corpóreo, sendo posteriormente sacrificados e as mandíbulas removidas para exames radiográfico e histológico. RESULTADOS: No exame radiográfico foi verificada área lítica, sem evidência de reparo, na região dos alvéolos. No exame microscópico foi identificada infiltração óssea, periférica e central, de pequenas células hipercromáticas e pleomórficas, com leve infiltrado inflamatório mononuclear associado e áreas de necrose. O índice de pega foi de 100%. CONCLUSÃO: O modelo animal de invasão óssea, do tumor de Walker na cavidade oral, possibilita a avaliação in vivo de drogas antitumorais e esquemas terapêuticos no tratamento do câncer bucal.PURPOSE: To estabilish an experimental model of tumor development in the oral cavity of rats, that would enable to study the tumor-induced autolysis in the maxillomandibular bone complex as well as of the dental structures, through histomorphological characterization of bone and dental resorption. METHODS: Walker 256 carcinossarcoma cell suspension (0,1 mL containing 10(6 cell/mL was implanted in the alveoli of first and second molars. The animals were observed during twelve consecutive days and the body weigth were determined. Later, the animals were sacrificed and their mandibles removed to radiographic and hystologic analysis. RESULTS: The radiographic image

  12. Tumor Microenvironment In Experimental Models Of Human Cancer: Morphological Investigational Approaches

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    Lucia Minoli

    2017-05-01

    Discussion and conclusions. Due to the microenvironmental heterogeneity which influence tumor development and biological behavior, a sole quantification is unreliable for characterizing the TME. Considering that, morphological techniques proved to be a valuable approach, allowing the evaluation of the spatial distribution and mutual interaction between the different elements. Additional studies are needed for further investigate the biological significance of spatial distribution of the components of the TME.

  13. Correlated expression of HMGA2 and PLAG1 in thyroid tumors, uterine leiomyomas and experimental models.

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    Markus Klemke

    Full Text Available In pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands (PASG recurrent chromosomal rearrangements affecting either 8q12 or 12q14∼15 lead to an overexpression of the genes of the genuine transcription factor PLAG1 or the architectural transcription factor HMGA2, respectively. Both genes are also affected by recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in benign adipocytic tumors as e. g. lipomas and lipoblastomas. Herein, we observed a strong correlation between the expression of HMGA2 and PLAG1 in 14 benign and 23 malignant thyroid tumors. To address the question if PLAG1 can be activated by HMGA2, the expression of both genes was quantified in 32 uterine leiomyomas 17 of which exhibited an overexpression of HMGA2. All leiomyomas with HMGA2 overexpression also revealed an activation of PLAG1 in the absence of detectable chromosome 8 abnormalities affecting the PLAG1 locus. To further investigate if the overexpression of PLAG1 is inducible by HMGA2 alone, HMGA2 was transiently overexpressed in MCF-7 cells. An increased PLAG1 expression was observed 24 and 48 h after transfection. Likewise, stimulation of HMGA2 by FGF1 in adipose tissue-derived stem cells led to a simultaneous increase of PLAG1 mRNA. Altogether, these data suggest that HMGA2 is an upstream activator of PLAG1. Accordingly, this may explain the formation of tumors as similar as lipomas and lipoblastomas resulting from an activation of either of both genes by chromosomal rearrangements.

  14. Model of interconnection of temperature and vascular parameters of experimental S-45 tumor on growth and radiation action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkhvadze, R.Ya.; Gedenavishvili, Eh.G.; Karpov, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to search for analytical description of changes in vascularization, which could serve as the basis for a mathematical model to control without invasion the state of tumoral neoplasms in therapy 264 mongrel rats with tumor C-45 vaccinated subcutaneously and intramuscularly in the region of a right femur were examined; they were irradiated locally and once using X-ray unit with 15 and 30 Gy doses. Tumor and vascular tissue temperatures, area being under vessels are studied. Models, which can be used to estimate vascularization of tumoral tissue and to describe interaction of a vacular factor and temperature under radiation effect, are suggested. 4 refs

  15. Experimental tumor therapy - annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    The present annual report is the fifth in a regular series and documents the continuity of the investigations in the field of experimental tumor therapy. The main points of emphasis of the activities relate above all to problems of dose fractionation and combination treatment. But if the present volume is compared with the previous ones the reader may be struck by the wider range of model systems used, especially of the tumors and normal tissues in which chronic radiation effects are investigated, and also by a concentration on those investigations that are important for solving clinical problems and that make use of many small fractions. Moreover, experiments were carried through in 1982 on the neutron beam set up at the Garching research reactor in order to characterise its biologic effect, which was a preparative measure in view of the planned clinical use. (orig./MG) [de

  16. STAT3β controls inflammatory responses and early tumor onset in skin and colon experimental cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Francesca; Orecchia, Valeria; Regis, Gabriella; Musteanu, Monica; Tassone, Beatrice; Jon, Cristina; Forni, Marco; Calautti, Enzo; Chiarle, Roberto; Eferl, Robert; Poli, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a well-recognized pathogenic factor in tumor initiation and progression. Mice lacking the pro-oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 were shown to be protected from both colitis-associated and epidermal cancers induced by the AOM/DSS and DMBA/TPA protocols, respectively. However, these murine models did not distinguish between the two STAT3 isoforms, the full-length STAT3α, believed to exert most pro-oncogenic functions attributed to STAT3, and the shorter STAT3β, often referred to as a dominant-negative, but possessing specific transcriptional activities. Here we assessed the contribution of STAT3β to inflammation-driven tumorigenesis making use of mice lacking this isoform, but still expressing STAT3α (STAT3Δβ/Δβ). We show that the lack of STAT3β leads to exacerbated acute responses to both TPA and DSS, thus confirming its anti-inflammatory role. Enhanced inflammation correlates with earlier tumor onset in both the epidermis and the intestine in STAT3Δβ/Δβ mice. In contrast, overall tumor development and final tumor burden were unaffected. These results suggest that STAT3β, by limiting inflammation during the initial phases of tumorigenesis, contributes to tissue homeostasis and counteracts malignant transformation and initial tumor growth. Accordingly, the balance between the two STAT3 isoforms, likely determined by the complex signaling networks shaping the tumor microenvironment and driving tumor transformation and progression, is apparently crucial to determine the initial tumor transformation rates in inflammation-associated cancers. PMID:25232490

  17. Experimental chemotherapy of human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice.

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    Giovanella, B C

    1980-01-01

    Human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice offer the most realistic model for experimental chemotherapy of human neoplasms. Almost all the known human malignancies have been successfully transplanted in the nudes, although the rate of takes varies considerably between different tumor types. So far, a good correlation has been observed between the results obtained treating with the same drug the same tumor in the patient and in the nude mouse. Our experience in this field is, however, still too limited for the direct extrapolation of chemotherapeutic results obtained in the nudes to human tumors.

  18. Use of 99mTc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesina(7-14) peptide for the identification of prostate tumor, LNCaP line, in an experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuscaldi, Leonardo Lima

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent tumors in men, showing high mortality rates. Current diagnostic methods are not able to identify early prostate carcinoma, often resulting in a late diagnosis with established metastasis. Thus, there is by the scientific community an incessant search for diagnostic methods for early assessment of prostate cancer, facilitating the treatment and increasing the chances of cure. In this context, nuclear medicine provides a diagnostic method which can detect tumors at an early stage, because it is based on biochemical and physiological changes of the tissue, such as overexpression of gastrin releasing peptide receptors (GRPr's) by prostate cancer cells. Bombesin, a tetradecapeptide isolated from the frog Bombina bombina, has a high affinity for the GRPr's, since it is analogous to gastrin releasing peptide. Therefore, this study aims to prepare the complex 99m Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesina (7-14) and use it for the identification of prostate tumor, LNCaP line, in an experimental model. For in vitro assays, aliquots of 0.026 MBq of the radiopeptide were incubated with 2x10 6 LNCaP cells in a water bath at 37 deg C, for 1 and 4 hours, with and without prior addition of cold peptide (n=3). Prostate tumors were induced into the upper right flank of male BALB/c nude mice by subcutaneous injection of 5x106 LNCaP cells resuspended in 150 μL of Matrigel:RPMI-1640 medium (1:1). Biodistribution profile (n=5) and scintigraphic images (n=3) were obtained at 1 and 4 hours after intravenous injection of 7.4 MBq of 99m Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesina (7-14) . To assess this, healthy male BALB/c mice and tumor-bearing male BALB/c nude mice with 15, 20 and 25 days of tumor development were used. In vitro study results showed that the fraction of the radiopeptide which bound to LNCaP cells was 2.08 +- 0.30% (1 hour) and 2.44 +- 0.18% (4 hours). From the percentage which was bound, the internalized fractions were 25.64 +- 3.14% (1 hour) and 25.27 +- 2

  19. Improved Debulking of Peritoneal Tumor Implants by Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanobody Image Guidance in an Experimental Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debie, Pieterjan; Vanhoeij, Marian; Poortmans, Natalie; Puttemans, Janik; Gillis, Kris; Devoogdt, Nick; Lahoutte, Tony; Hernot, Sophie

    2017-10-31

    Debulking followed by combination chemotherapy is currently regarded as the most effective treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. Prognosis depends drastically on the degree of debulking. Accordingly, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has been proposed to revolutionize cancer surgery by acting as a sensitive, specific, and real-time tool enabling visualization of cancer lesions. We have previously developed a NIR-labeled nanobody that allows fast, specific, and high-contrast imaging of HER2-positive tumors. In this study, we applied this tracer during fluorescence-guided surgery in a mouse model and investigated the effect on surgical efficiency. 0.5 × 10 6 SKOV3.IP1-Luc+ cells were inoculated intraperitoneally in athymic mice and were allowed to grow for 30 days. Two nanomoles of IRDye800CW-anti-HER2 nanobody was injected intravenously. After 1h30, mice were killed, randomized in two groups, and subjected to surgery. In the first animal group (n = 7), lesions were removed by a conventional surgical protocol, followed by excision of remaining fluorescent tissue using a NIR camera. The second group of mice (n = 6) underwent directly fluorescence-guided surgery. Bioluminescence imaging was performed before and after surgery. Resected tissue was categorized as visualized during conventional surgery or not, fluorescent or not, and bioluminescent positive or negative. Fluorescence imaging allowed clear visualization of tumor nodules within the abdomen, up to submillimeter-sized lesions. Fluorescence guidance resulted in significantly reduced residual tumor as compared to conventional surgery. Moreover, sensitivity increased from 59.3 to 99.0 %, and the percentage of false positive lesions detected decreased from 19.6 to 7.1 %. This study demonstrates the advantage of intraoperative fluorescence imaging using nanobody-based tracers on the efficiency of debulking surgery.

  20. A comparative study of 99mTc-HL91 and 99mTc-MIBI imaging in experimental tumor and inflammatory models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, W.; Zhang, X.Y.; An, R.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: 99m Tc-HL91 is a newly developed hypoxic imaging agent for ischemic myocardium and tumor imaging. 99m Tc-MIBI is one of imaging agent for mammary tumor imaging. The aim of this experiment is to evaluate the diagnostic value of 99m Tc-HL91 in detection of solid tumor in experimental tumor and inflammatory models, via comparative study with 99m Tc-MIBI. Material and Methods: HL91 kits was provided by China Nine Star Co. Three kinds of bearing solid neoplasm mice groups (bearing Ehrlich carcinoma mice, bearing H 22 carcinoma mice and bearing human ovarian COC 1 neoplasm nude mice) and two inflammatory model groups (chemical and bacterial inflammation) underwent static whole body planar images at 1 and 4 hours post injection of 99m Tc-HL91. Two kinds of bearing neoplasm mice groups (bearing Ehrlich carcinoma mice, bearing H 22 carcinoma mice) and two inflammatory model groups (chemical and bacterial inflammation) underwent static planar images post injection of 99m Tc-MIBI, at early phase (10∼20 minutes) and delayed phase (2 hrs). All of mice were sacrificed at 4 hrs. The tumors, or inflammatory lesions, blood and contralateral muscles were removed, weighed and the radioactivity was measured. Regions of interesting (ROIs) were drawn around tumor, inflammatory lesions and contralateral muscles in planar images, and the radioactivity ratios of target (tumor or inflammatory lesions)-to-blood (T/B), target-to-non target (contralateral muscles) i. e. T/NT was calculated. Results: Neoplasm can be clearly visible in planar images at 1hr and 4 hrs post injection of 99m Tc-HL91 in all tumor models. At same time inflammatory lesions cannot be seen clearly. Neoplasm can be seen in delayed phase in 99m Tc-MIBI groups, but not easy to distinguish them from inflammation. Conclusion: Compared with 99m Tc-MIBI imaging, 99m Tc-HL91 has much more diagnostic value in detection of solid neoplasm, and can distinguish neoplasm from inflammation

  1. Comparison of the Intravenous and Epidural Administration of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Antagonists in an Experimental Rat Pain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; İnanmaz, Mustafa Erkan; Ergönenç, Tolga; Palabıyık, Onur; Tomak, Yakup; Tuna, Ayça Taş

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory cytokines secreted from the nucleus pulposus are thought to lead to lumbar nerve root compression-like symptoms. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), an inflammatory cytokine, likely plays an important role in lumbar disc hernia-related leg pain. In this experimental study, we compared the effectiveness of TNF-α antagonists administered through the intravenous or epidural route in lumbar spine pathologies. Materials and Methods: After ethics committee approval had been obtained, 24 Sprague Dawley male rats aged 70–90 days and weighing 250–300 g each were allocated to four groups. In Group I, only the surgical procedure was performed; in Group II, 1 ml of saline solution was administered into the epidural field; in Group III, 10 mg/kg of infliximab was administered into the coccygeal vein; and in Group IV (epidural group), 25 mg of etanercept was administered into the epidural region. Results: When the left leg pull values were analyzed on day 14, whereas there was not a significant difference among the three groups, a decreasing difference was observed in Group IV (P discopathy, TNF-α antagonists administered epidurally led to earlier recovery from radiculopathy-related allodynia compared to intravenous administration. PMID:29284846

  2. Improvement of Parameter Estimations in Tumor Growth Inhibition Models on Xenografted Animals: Handling Sacrifice Censoring and Error Caused by Experimental Measurement on Larger Tumor Sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrillas, Philippe B; Tod, Michel; Amiel, Magali; Chenel, Marylore; Henin, Emilie

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of censoring due to animal sacrifice on parameter estimates and tumor volume calculated from two diameters in larger tumors during tumor growth experiments in preclinical studies. The type of measurement error that can be expected was also investigated. Different scenarios were challenged using the stochastic simulation and estimation process. One thousand datasets were simulated under the design of a typical tumor growth study in xenografted mice, and then, eight approaches were used for parameter estimation with the simulated datasets. The distribution of estimates and simulation-based diagnostics were computed for comparison. The different approaches were robust regarding the choice of residual error and gave equivalent results. However, by not considering missing data induced by sacrificing the animal, parameter estimates were biased and led to false inferences in terms of compound potency; the threshold concentration for tumor eradication when ignoring censoring was 581 ng.ml(-1), but the true value was 240 ng.ml(-1).

  3. Skull base tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  4. Promotion of experimental liver metastasis by tumor necrosis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, P; Krüger, A; Hubbe, M; Rüschoff, J; Von Hoegen, P; Männel, D N

    1995-03-16

    Models for experimental metastasis were established to investigate the influence of rmTNF on tumor-colony formation in the liver. Highly metastatic lymphoma tumor cells were either injected i.v. or inoculated s.c. to form spontaneous metastases. In both systems, administration of rmTNF to the animals led to significant enhancement of the number of liver metastases in comparison with control groups. The number of metastatic tumor-cell colonies at an early stage of metastasis was increased, as well as the number of surface metastases in a late stage. Consequently, TNF-treated animals revealed a higher mortality. The optimal time for TNF to exert this metastasis-enhancing effect was found to be 7 days after tumor inoculation. In vitro adhesion of the lymphoma tumor cells to a mouse endothelioma cell line was strongly inhibited by monoclonal antibodies interfering with the interaction of VCAM-1 with VLA-4. These results support and extend earlier results with a fibrosarcoma lung colonization model. In addition, they show that stimulation of the immune system in tumor-bearing hosts activates tumor-promoting pathways, in addition to having possible beneficial effects.

  5. Perillyl Alcohol Protects against Fe-NTA-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Early Tumor Promotional Events in Rat Experimental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamanna Jahangir

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants have been widely used as protective agents against a wide variety of processes and compounds that damage tissues via free radical mechanisms. Perillyl alcohol (PA is a naturally occurring monoterpene found in the essential oils of numerous species of plants including mints, cherries and celery seeds. This monocyclic monoterpene has shown antioxidant and therapeutic activity in various studies against various xenobiotics. In this study, we have analyzed the effects of PA against single intraperitoneal dose of ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA (9 mg iron per kg body weight-induced nephrotoxicity and early tumor promotional events. The pretreatment of Fe-NTA-treated rats with 0.5% per kg body weight dose and 1% per kg body weight dose of PA for seven consecutive days significantly reversed the Fe-NTA-induced malondialdehyde formation, xanthine oxidase activity (P < 0.001, ornithine decarboxylase activity (P < 0.001 and 3[H]thymidine incorporation in renal DNA (P < 0.001 with simultaneous significant depletion in serum toxicity markers blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (P < 0.001. Significant restoration at both the doses was recorded in depleted renal glutathione content, and its dependent enzymes with prophylactic treatment of PA. Present results suggest that PA potentially attenuates against Fe-NTA-induced oxidative damage and tumor promotional events that preclude its development as a future drug to avert the free radical-induced toxicity.

  6. In silico modeling for tumor growth visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanquartier, Fleur; Jean-Quartier, Claire; Cemernek, David; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-08

    Cancer is a complex disease. Fundamental cellular based studies as well as modeling provides insight into cancer biology and strategies to treatment of the disease. In silico models complement in vivo models. Research on tumor growth involves a plethora of models each emphasizing isolated aspects of benign and malignant neoplasms. Biologists and clinical scientists are often overwhelmed by the mathematical background knowledge necessary to grasp and to apply a model to their own research. We aim to provide a comprehensive and expandable simulation tool to visualizing tumor growth. This novel Web-based application offers the advantage of a user-friendly graphical interface with several manipulable input variables to correlate different aspects of tumor growth. By refining model parameters we highlight the significance of heterogeneous intercellular interactions on tumor progression. Within this paper we present the implementation of the Cellular Potts Model graphically presented through Cytoscape.js within a Web application. The tool is available under the MIT license at https://github.com/davcem/cpm-cytoscape and http://styx.cgv.tugraz.at:8080/cpm-cytoscape/ . In-silico methods overcome the lack of wet experimental possibilities and as dry method succeed in terms of reduction, refinement and replacement of animal experimentation, also known as the 3R principles. Our visualization approach to simulation allows for more flexible usage and easy extension to facilitate understanding and gain novel insight. We believe that biomedical research in general and research on tumor growth in particular will benefit from the systems biology perspective.

  7. Tumor control induced by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) as a function of dose in an experimental model of liver metastases at 5 weeks follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzi, E C C; Trivillin, V A; Colombo, L L; Monti Hughes, A; Thorp, S; Cardoso, J E; Garabalino, M A; Molinari, A J; Heber, E M; Curotto, Paula; Miller, M; Itoiz, M E; Aromando, R F; Nigg, D W; Schwint, A E

    2012-01-01

    BNCT has been proposed for the treatment of multifocal, non-resectable, bilobar colorectal liver metastases that do not respond to chemotherapy. We recently reported that BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) induced significant remission of experimental colorectal tumor nodules in rat liver at 3 weeks follow-up with no contributory liver toxicity (Pozzi et al.,2012). The aim of the present study was to evaluate tumor control and potential liver toxicity of BPA-BNCT at 5 weeks follow-up. Prescribed dose was retrospectively evaluated based on blood boron values, allowing for assessment of response over a range of delivered dose values (author)

  8. Oxygenation level and hemoglobin concentration in experimental tumor estimated by diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, A. G.; Kirillin, M. Yu.; Volovetsky, A. B.; Shilyagina, N. Yu.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Turchin, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    Using diffuse optical spectroscopy the level of oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration in experimental tumor in comparison with normal muscle tissue of mice have been studied. Subcutaneously growing SKBR-3 was used as a tumor model. Continuous wave fiber probe diffuse optical spectroscopy system was employed. Optical properties extraction approach was based on diffusion approximation. Decreased blood oxygen saturation level and increased total hemoglobin content were demonstrated in the neoplasm. The main reason of such differences between tumor and norm was significant elevation of deoxyhemoglobin concentration in SKBR-3. The method can be useful for diagnosis of tumors as well as for study of blood flow parameters of tumor models with different angiogenic properties.

  9. The histopathology of a human mesenchymal stem cell experimental tumor model: support for an hMSC origin for Ewing's sarcoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, J S; Abdallah, B M; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2008-01-01

    -forming potential of early passage hMSC-TERT20 cells, tumors derived from late passage cells expressed early biomarkers of osteogenesis. However, hMSC-TERT20 cells were heterogeneous for alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA) expression and one out of six hMSC-TERT20 derived single cell clones was strongly ASMA positive....... Tumors from this ASMA+ clone had distinctive vascular qualities with hot spots of high CD34+ murine endothelial cell density, together with CD34- regions with a branching periodic acid Schiff reaction pattern. Such clone-specific differences in host vascular response provide novel models to explore...

  10. Augmented reality in a tumor resection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Pauline; Collins, Toby; Debize, Clement; Novais-Gameiro, Lorraine; Pereira, Bruno; Bartoli, Adrien; Canis, Michel; Bourdel, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) guidance is a technology that allows a surgeon to see sub-surface structures, by overlaying pre-operative imaging data on a live laparoscopic video. Our objectives were to evaluate a state-of-the-art AR guidance system in a tumor surgical resection model, comparing the accuracy of the resection with and without the system. Our system has three phases. Phase 1: using the MRI images, the kidney's and pseudotumor's surfaces are segmented to construct a 3D model. Phase 2: the intra-operative 3D model of the kidney is computed. Phase 3: the pre-operative and intra-operative models are registered, and the laparoscopic view is augmented with the pre-operative data. We performed a prospective experimental study on ex vivo porcine kidneys. Alginate was injected into the parenchyma to create pseudotumors measuring 4-10 mm. The kidneys were then analyzed by MRI. Next, the kidneys were placed into pelvictrainers, and the pseudotumors were laparoscopically resected. The AR guidance system allows the surgeon to see tumors and margins using classical laparoscopic instruments, and a classical screen. The resection margins were measured microscopically to evaluate the accuracy of resection. Ninety tumors were segmented: 28 were used to optimize the AR software, and 62 were used to randomly compare surgical resection: 29 tumors were resected using AR and 33 without AR. The analysis of our pathological results showed 4 failures (tumor with positive margins) (13.8%) in the AR group, and 10 (30.3%) in the Non-AR group. There was no complete miss in the AR group, while there were 4 complete misses in the non-AR group. In total, 14 (42.4%) tumors were completely missed or had a positive margin in the non-AR group. Our AR system enhances the accuracy of surgical resection, particularly for small tumors. Crucial information such as resection margins and vascularization could also be displayed.

  11. Intervertebral disc cells produce tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 immediately after herniation: an experimental study using a new hernia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masakazu; Nakamura, Takafumi; Sei, Akira; Kikuchi, Taro; Takagi, Katsumasa; Matsukawa, Akihiro

    2005-01-01

    A new hernia model that simulates human disc herniations was developed in rabbits. The herniated discs were examined by gross appearance and histology and production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 was investigated. To clarify the early mechanism of spontaneous herniated disc resorption. Macrophage infiltration in herniated discs is essential for disc resorption. However, surgically removed human herniated disc tissues and existing animal hernia models are not suitable for analyzing the mechanism of macrophage infiltration. Recently, we have demonstrated that intervertebral disc cells are capable of producing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a potent macrophage chemoattractant, after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1beta. Intervertebral disc herniations were surgically developed in rabbits using a new technique. The herniated discs were excised at appropriate time intervals after the surgery, and the size and histologic findings were examined. Expressions of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in herniated discs were investigated immunohistochemically. A new rabbit model of disc herniation was established. The herniated discs spontaneously reduced in size by 12 weeks postsurgery. Infiltrating cells, mainly composed of macrophages, were observed from day 3. Immunohistochemically, intervertebral disc cells in the herniated discs produced tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1beta on day 1, followed by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 on day 3. The new hernia model appears to be very useful for studying herniated disc resorption. Intervertebral disc cells may produce inflammatory cytokines/chemokine immediately after the onset of disc herniation, possibly triggering subsequent macrophage infiltration that leads to disc resorption.

  12. Computational modeling of brain tumors: discrete, continuum or hybrid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    In spite of all efforts, patients diagnosed with highly malignant brain tumors (gliomas), continue to face a grim prognosis. Achieving significant therapeutic advances will also require a more detailed quantitative understanding of the dynamic interactions among tumor cells, and between these cells and their biological microenvironment. Data-driven computational brain tumor models have the potential to provide experimental tumor biologists with such quantitative and cost-efficient tools to generate and test hypotheses on tumor progression, and to infer fundamental operating principles governing bidirectional signal propagation in multicellular cancer systems. This review highlights the modeling objectives of and challenges with developing such in silico brain tumor models by outlining two distinct computational approaches: discrete and continuum, each with representative examples. Future directions of this integrative computational neuro-oncology field, such as hybrid multiscale multiresolution modeling are discussed.

  13. Mouse Hepatic Tumor Vascular Imaging by Experimental Selective Angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Kyum Kim

    Full Text Available Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has unique vascular features, which require selective imaging of hepatic arterial perfusion and portal venous perfusion with vascular catheterization for sufficient evaluation. Unlike in humans, vessels in mice are too small to catheterize, and the importance of separately imaging the feeding vessels of tumors is frequently overlooked in hepatic tumor models. The purpose of this study was to perform selective latex angiography in several mouse liver tumor models and assess their suitability.In several ectopic (Lewis lung carcinoma, B16/F10 melanoma cell lines and spontaneous liver tumor (Albumin-Cre/MST1fl/fl/MST2fl/fl, Albumin-Cre/WW45fl/fl, and H-ras12V genetically modified mouse models, the heart left ventricle and/or main portal vein of mice was punctured, and latex dye was infused to achieve selective latex arteriography and/or portography.H-ras12V transgenic mice (a HCC and hepatic adenoma model developed multiple liver nodules that displayed three different perfusion patterns (portal venous or hepatic artery perfusion predominant, mixed perfusion, indicating intra-tumoral vascular heterogeneity. Selective latex angiography revealed that the Lewis lung carcinoma implant model and the Albumin-Cre/WW45fl/fl model reproduced conventional angiography findings of human HCC. Specifically, these mice developed tumors with abundant feeding arteries but no portal venous perfusion.Different hepatic tumor models showed different tumor vessel characteristics that influence the suitability of the model and that should be considered when designing translational experiments. Selective latex angiography applied to certain mouse tumor models (both ectopic and spontaneous closely simulated typical characteristics of human HCC vascular imaging.

  14. Comparative value of clinical, cytological, and histopathological features in feline mammary gland tumors; an experimental model for the study of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Radmehr; Javanbakht, Javad; Atyabi, Nahid; Bahrami, Alimohammad; Kheradmand, Danial; Safaei, Reyhaneh; Khadivar, Farshid; Hosseini, Ehsan

    2013-08-13

    The diagnosis of breast lesions is usually confirmed by fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) or histological biopsy. Although there is increasing literature regarding the advantages and limitations of both modalities, there is no literature regarding the accuracy of these modalities for diagnosing breast lesions in high-risk patients, who usually have lesions detected by screening. Moreover, few studies have been published regarding the cytopathology of mammary tumors in cats despite widespread use of the animal model for breast cancer formation and inhibition. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic interest of cytological and histopathological analysis in feline mammary tumours (FMTs), in order to evaluate its possible value as an animal model. The study was performed in 3 female cats submitted to surgical resections of mammary tumours. The mammary tumours were excised by simple mastectomy or regional mastectomy, with or without the superficial inguinal lymph nodes. Female cats were of different breeds (1 siamese and 2 persians). Before surgical excision of the tumour, FNA cytology was performed using a 0.4 mm diameter needle attached to a 8 ml syringe held in a standard metal syringe holder. The cytological sample was smeared onto a glass slide and either air-dried for May-Grünwald-stain and masses were surgically removed, the tumours were grossly examined and tissue samples were fixed in 10%-buffered-formalin and embedded in paraffin. Sections 4 μm thick were obtained from each sample and H&E stained. Cytologically, atypical epithelial cells coupled to giant nucleus, chromatin anomalies, mitotic figures, spindle shape cells, anisocytosis with anisokaryosis and hyperchromasia were found. Histologically, these tumors are characterized by pleomorphic and polygonal cell population together with mitotic figures, necrotic foci and various numbers inflammatory foci. Also, spindle shaped cells, haemorrhage localized in the different

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor-Tumor Distant Interactions Supports a Systemic Control of Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekry, Sebastien; Lamont, Clare; Barbolosi, Dominique; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2017-09-15

    Interactions between different tumors within the same organism have major clinical implications, especially in the context of surgery and metastatic disease. Three main explanatory theories (competition, angiogenesis inhibition, and proliferation inhibition) have been proposed, but precise determinants of the phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, we formalized these theories into mathematical models and performed biological experiments to test them with empirical data. In syngeneic mice bearing two simultaneously implanted tumors, growth of only one of the tumors was significantly suppressed (61% size reduction at day 15, P < 0.05). The competition model had to be rejected, whereas the angiogenesis inhibition and proliferation inhibition models were able to describe the data. Additional models including a theory based on distant cytotoxic log-kill effects were unable to fit the data. The proliferation inhibition model was identifiable and minimal (four parameters), and its descriptive power was validated against the data, including consistency in predictions of single tumor growth when no secondary tumor was present. This theory may also shed new light on single cancer growth insofar as it offers a biologically translatable picture of how local and global action may combine to control local tumor growth and, in particular, the role of tumor-tumor inhibition. This model offers a depiction of concomitant resistance that provides an improved theoretical basis for tumor growth control and may also find utility in therapeutic planning to avoid postsurgery metastatic acceleration. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5183-93. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Effects of experimental radiotherapy and hyperthermia on tumors and normal tissues in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments on responses of tumors, implanted subcutaneously in the leg, to irradiation alone or combined with heat are reported. The influence of factors modifying the fraction of hypoxic cells (e.g. anesthesia of the animal and tumor volume) is also discussed. The radiosensitivity of developing lung tumors was examined for spontaneous as well as for artificial lung metastases. Both experimental tumor models were compared with regard to their value in experimental radiotherapy. Data obtained on the response of artificial metastases and lung tissue to combined treatment with irradiation and several drugs are presented. Data on damage of the mouse foot, as a result of heat and/or irradiation treatments are presented. In particular the influence of thermotolerance on thermal enhancement of the radiation induced skin reaction was studied. Tolerance of the skin of previously irradiated mice to retreatment with irradiation, to hyperthermia alone and combined with X-rays was assessed. (Auth.)

  17. Radiosensitizing effect of nitric oxide in tumor cells and experimental tumors irradiated with gamma rays and proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Policastro, Lucia L.; Duran, Hebe; Molinari, Beatriz L.; Somacal, Hector R.; Valda, Alejandro A.

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be a radiosensitizer of mammalian cells under hypoxic conditions. In a previous study, we demonstrated an enhancement in radiation response induced by NO in mouse tumor cells under aerobic conditions, with an increasing effect as a function of malignancy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of NO in tumor cells and in experimental tumors irradiated with γ rays and proton beams. Irradiations were performed with a 137 Cs γ source and with proton beams generated by the TANDAR accelerator. Tumor cells were treated with the NO donor DETA-NO and the sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) was calculated using the α parameter of the survival curve fitted to the linear-quadratic model. Tumor cells irradiated with protons were radio sensitized by DETA-NO only in the more malignant cells irradiated with low LET protons (2.69±0.08 keV/μm). For higher LET protons there were no radiosensitizing effect. For human tumor cells pre-treated with DETA-NO and irradiated with γ rays, a significantly greater effect was demonstrated in the malignant cells (MCF-7) as compared with the near normal cells (HBL-100). Moreover, a significant decrease in tumor growth was demonstrated in mice pre-treated with the NO donor spermine and irradiated with γ rays and low LET protons as compared with mice irradiated without pre-treatment with the NO donor. In conclusion, we demonstrated a differential effect of NO as a radiosensitizer of malignant cells, both with γ rays and low LET protons. This selectivity, coupled to the in vivo inhibition of tumor growth, is of great interest for the potential use of NO releasing agents in radiotherapy. (author)

  18. Treatment with the NK1 antagonist emend reduces blood brain barrier dysfunction and edema formation in an experimental model of brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Harford-Wright

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide substance P (SP has been implicated in the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB and development of cerebral edema in acute brain injury. Cerebral edema accumulates rapidly around brain tumors and has been linked to several tumor-associated deficits. Currently, the standard treatment for peritumoral edema is the corticosteroid dexamethasone, prolonged use of which is associated with a number of deleterious side effects. As SP is reported to increase in many cancer types, this study examined whether SP plays a role in the genesis of brain peritumoral edema. A-375 human melanoma cells were injected into the right striatum of male Balb/c nude mice to induce brain tumor growth, with culture medium injected in animals serving as controls. At 2, 3 or 4 weeks following tumor cell inoculation, non-treated animals were perfusion fixed for immunohistochemical detection of Albumin, SP and NK1 receptor. A further subgroup of animals was treated with a daily injection of the NK1 antagonist Emend (3 mg/kg, dexamethasone (8 mg/kg or saline vehicle at 3 weeks post-inoculation. Animals were sacrificed a week later to determine BBB permeability using Evan's Blue and brain water content. Non-treated animals demonstrated a significant increase in albumin, SP and NK1 receptor immunoreactivity in the peritumoral area as well as increased perivascular staining in the surrounding brain tissue. Brain water content and BBB permeability was significantly increased in tumor-inoculated animals when compared to controls (p<0.05. Treatment with Emend and dexamethasone reduced BBB permeability and brain water content when compared to vehicle-treated tumor-inoculated mice. The increase in peritumoral staining for both SP and the NK1 receptor, coupled with the reduction in brain water content and BBB permeability seen following treatment with the NK1 antagonist Emend, suggests that SP plays a role in the genesis of peritumoral edema, and thus warrants

  19. Treatment with the NK1 antagonist emend reduces blood brain barrier dysfunction and edema formation in an experimental model of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Lewis, Kate M; Ghabriel, Mounir N; Vink, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP) has been implicated in the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and development of cerebral edema in acute brain injury. Cerebral edema accumulates rapidly around brain tumors and has been linked to several tumor-associated deficits. Currently, the standard treatment for peritumoral edema is the corticosteroid dexamethasone, prolonged use of which is associated with a number of deleterious side effects. As SP is reported to increase in many cancer types, this study examined whether SP plays a role in the genesis of brain peritumoral edema. A-375 human melanoma cells were injected into the right striatum of male Balb/c nude mice to induce brain tumor growth, with culture medium injected in animals serving as controls. At 2, 3 or 4 weeks following tumor cell inoculation, non-treated animals were perfusion fixed for immunohistochemical detection of Albumin, SP and NK1 receptor. A further subgroup of animals was treated with a daily injection of the NK1 antagonist Emend (3 mg/kg), dexamethasone (8 mg/kg) or saline vehicle at 3 weeks post-inoculation. Animals were sacrificed a week later to determine BBB permeability using Evan's Blue and brain water content. Non-treated animals demonstrated a significant increase in albumin, SP and NK1 receptor immunoreactivity in the peritumoral area as well as increased perivascular staining in the surrounding brain tissue. Brain water content and BBB permeability was significantly increased in tumor-inoculated animals when compared to controls (p<0.05). Treatment with Emend and dexamethasone reduced BBB permeability and brain water content when compared to vehicle-treated tumor-inoculated mice. The increase in peritumoral staining for both SP and the NK1 receptor, coupled with the reduction in brain water content and BBB permeability seen following treatment with the NK1 antagonist Emend, suggests that SP plays a role in the genesis of peritumoral edema, and thus warrants further

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Branching Morphogenesis and Vascular Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huaming

    Feedback regulation of cell lineages is known to play an important role in tissue size control, but the effect in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. We first use a non-spatial model to show that a combination of positive and negative feedback on stem and/or progenitor cell self-renewal leads to bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors and ultrasensitivity to external growth cues. Next, a spatiotemporal model is used to demonstrate spatial patterns such as local budding and branching arise in this setting, and are not consequences of Turing-type instabilities. We next extend the model to a three-dimensional hybrid discrete-continuum model of tumor growth to study the effects of angiogenesis, tumor progression and cancer therapies. We account for the crosstalk between the vasculature and cancer stem cells (CSCs), and CSC transdifferentiation into vascular endothelial cells (gECs), as observed experimentally. The vasculature stabilizes tumor invasiveness but considerably enhances growth. A gEC network structure forms spontaneously within the hypoxic core, consistent with experimental findings. The model is then used to study cancer therapeutics. We demonstrate that traditional anti-angiogenic therapies decelerate tumor growth, but make the tumor highly invasive. Chemotherapies help to reduce tumor sizes, but cannot control the invasion. Anti-CSC therapies that promote differentiation or disturb the stem cell niche effectively reduce tumor invasiveness. However, gECs inherit mutations present in CSCs and are resistant to traditional therapies. We show that anti-gEC treatments block the support on CSCs by gECs, and reduce both tumor size and invasiveness. Our study suggests that therapies targeting the vasculature, CSCs and gECs, when combined, are highly synergistic and are capable of controlling both tumor size and shape.

  1. International Workshop on Mathematical Modeling of Tumor-Immune Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Peter; Mallet, Dann

    2014-01-01

    This collection of papers offers a broad synopsis of state-of-the-art mathematical methods used in modeling the interaction between tumors and the immune system. These papers were presented at the four-day workshop on Mathematical Models of Tumor-Immune System Dynamics held in Sydney, Australia from January 7th to January 10th, 2013. The workshop brought together applied mathematicians, biologists, and clinicians actively working in the field of cancer immunology to share their current research and to increase awareness of the innovative mathematical tools that are applicable to the growing field of cancer immunology. Recent progress in cancer immunology and advances in immunotherapy suggest that the immune system plays a fundamental role in host defense against tumors and could be utilized to prevent or cure cancer. Although theoretical and experimental studies of tumor-immune system dynamics have a long history, there are still many unanswered questions about the mechanisms that govern the interaction betwe...

  2. Modelo de tumor experimental em rim de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Lúcio Flávio Gonzaga

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O carcinossarcoma 256 de Walker tem despertado o interesse de muitos pesquisadores como modelo experimental para estudo da biologia tumoral. OBJETIVO: estabelecer um modelo de tumor renal que possa ser usado para estudar in vivo e in vitro, as alterações impostas pelas neoplasias. MÉTODOS: utilizados vinte ratos Wistar, machos, adultos, pesando entre 250-300 g, oriundos do Laboratório de Cirurgia Experimental da Universidade Federal do Ceará. Sob anestesia inalatória procedia-se uma pequena incisão supraumbilical, e com manobra delicada fazia-se a exposição do rim direito. Neste órgão eram inoculadas 3x10(5 células tumorais viáveis. Os animais então eram mantidos em gaiolas individuais com as mesmas condições ambientais e com água e dieta ad libitum. RESULTADOS: o Carcinossarcoma 256 de Walker, implantado no parênquima do rim direito de ratos Wistar apresentou índice de pega de 100%, e crescimento rápido, invadiu por contiguidade as estruturas vizinhas, porém sem apresentar metástases, no entanto, levando os animais a óbito no curso médio de 14 dias. CONCLUSÃO: o modelo de implante de tumor de Walker no parênquima do rim direito de ratos Wistar é eficiente, tem reprodutibilidade, apresentando um índice de pega de 100%, e permitindo seu uso em linhas de pesquisa.

  3. In vivo BNCT in experimental and spontaneous tumors at RA-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivillin, Veronica A.; Heber, Elisa M.; Itoiz, Maria E.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Nigg, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Within the search for new applications of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and the basic research oriented towards the study of BNCT radiobiology to optimize its therapeutic gain, we previously proposed and validated the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model and showed, for the first time, the success of BNCT to treat oral cancer in an experimental model. The staff of the Ra-1 Reactor (Constituyentes Atomic Center) adapted the thermal beam and physical set-up to perform in vivo BNCT of superficial tumors in small animals. We preformed a preliminary characterization of the thermal beam, performed beam only irradiation of normal and tumor bearing hamsters and in vivo BNCT of experimental oral squamous cell carcinomas in hamsters mediated by boron phenylalanine (BPA) and GB-10 (Na 2 10 B 10 H 10 ). Having demonstrated the absence of radio toxic effects in healthy tissue and a therapeutic effect of in vivo BNCT in hamster cheek pouch tumors employing the Ra-1 thermal beam, we performed a feasibility study of the treatment by BNCT of 3 terminal cases of spontaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in cats following the corresponding biodistribution studies. This was the first treatment of spontaneous tumors by BNCT in our country and the first treatment by BNCT in cats worldwide. This preclinical study in terminal cases showed significant tumor control by BNCT with no damage to normal tissue. (author)

  4. Computer Implementation of a New Therapeutic Model for GBM Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jamali Nazari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the tumor behavior in the host organ as function of time and radiation dose has been a major study in the previous decades. Here the effort in estimation of cancerous and normal cell proliferation and growth in glioblastoma multiform (GBM tumor is presented. This paper introduces a new mathematical model in the form of differential equation of tumor growth. The model contains dose delivery amount in the treatment scheme as an input term. It also can be utilized to optimize the treatment process in order to increase the patient survival period. Gene expression programming (GEP as a new concept is used for estimating this model. The LQ model has also been applied to GEP as an initial value, causing acceleration and improvement of the algorithm estimation. The model shows the number of the tumor and normal brain cells during the treatment process using the status of normal and cancerous cells in the initiation of treatment, the timing and amount of dose delivery to the patient, and a coefficient that describes the brain condition. A critical level is defined for normal cell when the patient’s death occurs. In the end the model has been verified by clinical data obtained from previous accepted formulae and some of our experimental resources. The proposed model helps to predict tumor growth during treatment process in which further treatment processes can be controlled.

  5. Experimental Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    and discuss techniques for handling and representing uncertainty when modelling in experimental system development. These techniques are centred on patterns and styles for handling uncertainty in object-oriented software architectures. Tools We present the Knight tool designed for collaborative modelling...... in experimental system development and discuss its design, implementation, and evaluation. The tool has subsequently been successfully commercialized. In summary, this thesis presents techniques and tools that advance the effectiveness and efficiency of experimental modelling.......This thesis examines object-oriented modelling in experimental system development. Object-oriented modelling aims at representing concepts and phenomena of a problem domain in terms of classes and objects. Experimental system development seeks active experimentation in a system development project...

  6. Finite Element Modeling of Avascular Tumor Growth Using a Stress-Driven Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, Faezeh; Nazari, Mohammad Ali

    2017-08-01

    Tumor growth being a multistage process has been investigated from different aspects. In the present study, an attempt is made to represent a constitutive-structure-based model of avascular tumor growth in which the effects of tensile stresses caused by collagen fibers are considered. Collagen fibers as a source of anisotropy in the structure of tissue are taken into account using a continuous fiber distribution formulation. To this end, a finite element modeling is implemented in which a neo-Hookean hyperelastic material is assigned to the tumor and its surrounding host. The tumor is supplied with a growth term. The growth term includes the effect of parameters such as nutrient concentration on the tumor growth and the tumor's solid phase content in the formulation. Results of the study revealed that decrease of solid phase is indicative of decrease in growth rate and the final steady-state value of tumor's radius. Moreover, fiber distribution affects the final shape of the tumor, and it could be used to control the shape and geometry of the tumor in complex morphologies. Finally, the findings demonstrated that the exerted stresses on the tumor increase as time passes. Compression of tumor cells leads to the reduction of tumor growth rate until it gradually reaches an equilibrium radius. This finding is in accordance with experimental data. Hence, this formulation can be deployed to evaluate both the residual stresses induced by growth and the mechanical interactions with the host tissue.

  7. Modeling evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic mutations in hierarchically organized tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sottoriva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC concept is a highly debated topic in cancer research. While experimental evidence in favor of the cancer stem cell theory is apparently abundant, the results are often criticized as being difficult to interpret. An important reason for this is that most experimental data that support this model rely on transplantation studies. In this study we use a novel cellular Potts model to elucidate the dynamics of established malignancies that are driven by a small subset of CSCs. Our results demonstrate that epigenetic mutations that occur during mitosis display highly altered dynamics in CSC-driven malignancies compared to a classical, non-hierarchical model of growth. In particular, the heterogeneity observed in CSC-driven tumors is considerably higher. We speculate that this feature could be used in combination with epigenetic (methylation sequencing studies of human malignancies to prove or refute the CSC hypothesis in established tumors without the need for transplantation. Moreover our tumor growth simulations indicate that CSC-driven tumors display evolutionary features that can be considered beneficial during tumor progression. Besides an increased heterogeneity they also exhibit properties that allow the escape of clones from local fitness peaks. This leads to more aggressive phenotypes in the long run and makes the neoplasm more adaptable to stringent selective forces such as cancer treatment. Indeed when therapy is applied the clone landscape of the regrown tumor is more aggressive with respect to the primary tumor, whereas the classical model demonstrated similar patterns before and after therapy. Understanding these often counter-intuitive fundamental properties of (non-hierarchically organized malignancies is a crucial step in validating the CSC concept as well as providing insight into the therapeutical consequences of this model.

  8. Experimental iodine-125 seed irradiation of intracerebral brain tumors in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhoeff, Joost JC; Stalpers, Lukas JA; Coumou, Annet W; Koedooder, Kees; Lavini, Cristina; Van Noorden, Cornelis JF; Haveman, Jaap; Vandertop, William P; Furth, Wouter R van

    2007-01-01

    High-dose radiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with brain cancer. However, in preclinical research external beam radiotherapy is limited to heterotopic murine models– high-dose radiotherapy to the murine head is fatal due to radiation toxicity. Therefore, we developed a stereotactic brachytherapy mouse model for high-dose focal irradiation of experimental intracerebral (orthotopic) brain tumors. Twenty-one nude mice received a hollow guide-screw implanted in the skull. After three weeks, 5 × 10 5 U251-NG2 human glioblastoma cells were injected. Five days later, a 2 mCi iodine-125 brachytherapy seed was inserted through the guide-screw in 11 randomly selected mice; 10 mice received a sham seed. Mice were euthanized when severe neurological or physical symptoms occurred. The cumulative irradiation dose 5 mm below the active iodine-125 seeds was 23.0 Gy after 13 weeks (BED tumor = 30.6 Gy). In the sham group, 9/10 animals (90%) showed signs of lethal tumor progression within 6 weeks. In the experimental group, 2/11 mice (18%) died of tumor progression within 13 weeks. Acute side effects in terms of weight loss or neurological symptoms were not observed in the irradiated animals. The intracerebral implantation of an iodine-125 brachytherapy seed through a stereotactic guide-screw in the skull of mice with implanted brain tumors resulted in a significantly prolonged survival, caused by high-dose irradiation of the brain tumor that is biologically comparable to high-dose fractionated radiotherapy– without fatal irradiation toxicity. This is an excellent mouse model for testing orthotopic brain tumor therapies in combination with radiation therapy

  9. A novel BLK-induced tumor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, David Leander; Berthelsen, Jens; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    -hematological malignancies including breast, kidney, and lung cancers, suggesting that BLK could be a new potential target for therapy. Here, we studied the oncogenic potential of human BLK. We found that engrafted Ba/F3 cells stably expressing constitutive active human BLK formed tumors in mice, whereas neither Ba/F3 cells...... expressing wild type BLK nor non-transfected Ba/F3 cells did. Inhibition of BLK with the clinical grade and broadly reacting SRC family kinase inhibitor dasatinib inhibited growth of BLK-induced tumors. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that human BLK is a true proto-oncogene capable of inducing...... tumors, and we demonstrate a novel BLK activity-dependent tumor model suitable for studies of BLK-driven lymphomagenesis and screening of novel BLK inhibitors in vivo....

  10. Model of vascular desmoplastic multispecies tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin F; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2017-10-07

    We present a three-dimensional nonlinear tumor growth model composed of heterogeneous cell types in a multicomponent-multispecies system, including viable, dead, healthy host, and extra-cellular matrix (ECM) tissue species. The model includes the capability for abnormal ECM dynamics noted in tumor development, as exemplified by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, including dense desmoplasia typically characterized by a significant increase of interstitial connective tissue. An elastic energy is implemented to provide elasticity to the connective tissue. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) are modeled as key contributors to this ECM remodeling. The tumor growth is driven by growth factors released by these stromal cells as well as by oxygen and glucose provided by blood vasculature which along with lymphatics are stimulated to proliferate in and around the tumor based on pro-angiogenic factors released by hypoxic tissue regions. Cellular metabolic processes are simulated, including respiration and glycolysis with lactate fermentation. The bicarbonate buffering system is included for cellular pH regulation. This model system may be of use to simulate the complex interactions between tumor and stromal cells as well as the associated ECM and vascular remodeling that typically characterize malignant cancers notorious for poor therapeutic response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental iodine-125 seed irradiation of intracerebral brain tumors in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haveman Jaap

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-dose radiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with brain cancer. However, in preclinical research external beam radiotherapy is limited to heterotopic murine models– high-dose radiotherapy to the murine head is fatal due to radiation toxicity. Therefore, we developed a stereotactic brachytherapy mouse model for high-dose focal irradiation of experimental intracerebral (orthotopic brain tumors. Methods Twenty-one nude mice received a hollow guide-screw implanted in the skull. After three weeks, 5 × 105 U251-NG2 human glioblastoma cells were injected. Five days later, a 2 mCi iodine-125 brachytherapy seed was inserted through the guide-screw in 11 randomly selected mice; 10 mice received a sham seed. Mice were euthanized when severe neurological or physical symptoms occurred. The cumulative irradiation dose 5 mm below the active iodine-125 seeds was 23.0 Gy after 13 weeks (BEDtumor = 30.6 Gy. Results In the sham group, 9/10 animals (90% showed signs of lethal tumor progression within 6 weeks. In the experimental group, 2/11 mice (18% died of tumor progression within 13 weeks. Acute side effects in terms of weight loss or neurological symptoms were not observed in the irradiated animals. Conclusion The intracerebral implantation of an iodine-125 brachytherapy seed through a stereotactic guide-screw in the skull of mice with implanted brain tumors resulted in a significantly prolonged survival, caused by high-dose irradiation of the brain tumor that is biologically comparable to high-dose fractionated radiotherapy– without fatal irradiation toxicity. This is an excellent mouse model for testing orthotopic brain tumor therapies in combination with radiation therapy.

  12. Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne O. Miles

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of major signaling pathways between humans and flies has made Drosophila a useful model organism for cancer research. Our understanding of the mechanisms regulating cell growth, differentiation and development has been considerably advanced by studies in Drosophila. Several recent high profile studies have examined the processes constraining the metastatic growth of tumor cells in fruit fly models. Cell invasion can be studied in the context of an in vivo setting in flies, enabling the genetic requirements of the microenvironment of tumor cells undergoing metastasis to be analyzed. This Perspective discusses the strengths and limitations of Drosophila models of cancer invasion and the unique tools that have enabled these studies. It also highlights several recent reports that together make a strong case for Drosophila as a system with the potential for both testing novel concepts in tumor progression and cell invasion, and for uncovering players in metastasis.

  13. The influence of physical activity in the anti-tumor immune response in experimental breast tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Thiago M; Abdalla, Douglas R; Desidério, Chamberttan S; Thys, Sofie; Simoens, Cindy; Bogers, John-Paul; Murta, Eddie F C; Michelin, Márcia A

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of physical activity in innate immunity to conduce to an effective antitumoral immune response analyzing the phenotype and activation status of infiltrating cells. We analysed the intracellular cytokines and the transcription factors of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILS) and spleen leukocytes. The Nos2 gene expression was evaluated in spleen cells and futhermore the ROS production was measured and spleen cells; another cell evaluated was dendritic cells (TIDCs), their cytokines expression and membrane molecules; finally to understood the results obtained, we analysed the dendritic cells obtained from bone marrow. Were used female Balb/c mice divided into 4 groups: two controls without tumor, sedentary (GI) and trained (GII) and two groups with tumor, sedentary (GIII) or trained (GIV). The physical activity (PA) was realized acoording swimming protocol. Tumor was induced by injection of 4T1 cells. All experiments were performed in biological triplicate. After the experimental period, the tumor was removed and the cells were identified by flow cytometry with labeling to CD4, CD8, CD11c, CD11b, CD80, CD86 and Ia, and intracelular staining IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17, Tbet, GATA3, RORγt and FoxP3. The bone marrow of the animals was obtained to analyse the derivated DCs by flow cytometry and culture cells to obtain the supernatant to measure the cytokines. Our results demonstrated that the PA inhibit the tumoral growth although not to change the number of TILS, but reduced expression of GATA-3, ROR-γT, related with poor prognosis, and TNF-α intracellular; however occur one significantly reduction in TIDCS, but these cells expressed more co-stimulatory and presentation molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the induced PA stimulated the gene expression of Tbet and the production of inflammatory cytokines suggesting an increase of Th1 systemic response. The results evaluating the systemic influence in DCs

  14. Spherical Cancer Models in Tumor Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Bastien Weiswald

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D in vitro models have been used in cancer research as an intermediate model between in vitro cancer cell line cultures and in vivo tumor. Spherical cancer models represent major 3D in vitro models that have been described over the past 4 decades. These models have gained popularity in cancer stem cell research using tumorospheres. Thus, it is crucial to define and clarify the different spherical cancer models thus far described. Here, we focus on in vitro multicellular spheres used in cancer research. All these spherelike structures are characterized by their well-rounded shape, the presence of cancer cells, and their capacity to be maintained as free-floating cultures. We propose a rational classification of the four most commonly used spherical cancer models in cancer research based on culture methods for obtaining them and on subsequent differences in sphere biology: the multicellular tumor spheroid model, first described in the early 70s and obtained by culture of cancer cell lines under nonadherent conditions; tumorospheres, a model of cancer stem cell expansion established in a serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors; tissue-derived tumor spheres and organotypic multicellular spheroids, obtained by tumor tissue mechanical dissociation and cutting. In addition, we describe their applications to and interest in cancer research; in particular, we describe their contribution to chemoresistance, radioresistance, tumorigenicity, and invasion and migration studies. Although these models share a common 3D conformation, each displays its own intrinsic properties. Therefore, the most relevant spherical cancer model must be carefully selected, as a function of the study aim and cancer type.

  15. Spherical cancer models in tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Bellet, Dominique; Dangles-Marie, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have been used in cancer research as an intermediate model between in vitro cancer cell line cultures and in vivo tumor. Spherical cancer models represent major 3D in vitro models that have been described over the past 4 decades. These models have gained popularity in cancer stem cell research using tumorospheres. Thus, it is crucial to define and clarify the different spherical cancer models thus far described. Here, we focus on in vitro multicellular spheres used in cancer research. All these spherelike structures are characterized by their well-rounded shape, the presence of cancer cells, and their capacity to be maintained as free-floating cultures. We propose a rational classification of the four most commonly used spherical cancer models in cancer research based on culture methods for obtaining them and on subsequent differences in sphere biology: the multicellular tumor spheroid model, first described in the early 70s and obtained by culture of cancer cell lines under nonadherent conditions; tumorospheres, a model of cancer stem cell expansion established in a serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors; tissue-derived tumor spheres and organotypic multicellular spheroids, obtained by tumor tissue mechanical dissociation and cutting. In addition, we describe their applications to and interest in cancer research; in particular, we describe their contribution to chemoresistance, radioresistance, tumorigenicity, and invasion and migration studies. Although these models share a common 3D conformation, each displays its own intrinsic properties. Therefore, the most relevant spherical cancer model must be carefully selected, as a function of the study aim and cancer type. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  17. Datamining approaches for modeling tumor control probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqa, Issam El; Deasy, Joseph O; Mu, Yi; Huang, Ellen; Hope, Andrew J; Lindsay, Patricia E; Apte, Aditya; Alaly, James; Bradley, Jeffrey D

    2010-11-01

    Tumor control probability (TCP) to radiotherapy is determined by complex interactions between tumor biology, tumor microenvironment, radiation dosimetry, and patient-related variables. The complexity of these heterogeneous variable interactions constitutes a challenge for building predictive models for routine clinical practice. We describe a datamining framework that can unravel the higher order relationships among dosimetric dose-volume prognostic variables, interrogate various radiobiological processes, and generalize to unseen data before when applied prospectively. Several datamining approaches are discussed that include dose-volume metrics, equivalent uniform dose, mechanistic Poisson model, and model building methods using statistical regression and machine learning techniques. Institutional datasets of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are used to demonstrate these methods. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate Spearman rank correlations (rs). Over-fitting was controlled via resampling methods. Using a dataset of 56 patients with primary NCSLC tumors and 23 candidate variables, we estimated GTV volume and V75 to be the best model parameters for predicting TCP using statistical resampling and a logistic model. Using these variables, the support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance for TCP prediction with an rs=0.68 on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression (rs=0.4), Poisson-based TCP (rs=0.33), and cell kill equivalent uniform dose model (rs=0.17). The prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing datamining approaches, which are able to unravel important non-linear complex interactions among model variables and have the capacity to predict on unseen data for prospective clinical applications.

  18. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amin.oroji@siswa.um.edu.my, mohd@um.edu.my (Malaysia); Yarahmadian, Shantia [Mathematics Department Mississippi State University, USA Syarahmadian@math.msstate.edu (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  19. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan

  20. Human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes cooperatively regulate prostate tumor growth in a humanized mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Michael D; Harui, Airi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The complex interactions that occur between human tumors, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the systemic immune system are likely to define critical factors in the host response to cancer. While conventional animal models have identified an array of potential anti-tumor therapies, mouse models often fail to translate into effective human treatments. Our goal is to establish a humanized tumor model as a more effective pre-clinical platform for understanding and manipulating ...

  1. Modeling measurement error in tumor characterization studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjoram Paul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Etiologic studies of cancer increasingly use molecular features such as gene expression, DNA methylation and sequence mutation to subclassify the cancer type. In large population-based studies, the tumor tissues available for study are archival specimens that provide variable amounts of amplifiable DNA for molecular analysis. As molecular features measured from small amounts of tumor DNA are inherently noisy, we propose a novel approach to improve statistical efficiency when comparing groups of samples. We illustrate the phenomenon using the MethyLight technology, applying our proposed analysis to compare MLH1 DNA methylation levels in males and females studied in the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Results We introduce two methods for computing empirical weights to model heteroscedasticity that is caused by sampling variable quantities of DNA for molecular analysis. In a simulation study, we show that using these weights in a linear regression model is more powerful for identifying differentially methylated loci than standard regression analysis. The increase in power depends on the underlying relationship between variation in outcome measure and input DNA quantity in the study samples. Conclusions Tumor characteristics measured from small amounts of tumor DNA are inherently noisy. We propose a statistical analysis that accounts for the measurement error due to sampling variation of the molecular feature and show how it can improve the power to detect differential characteristics between patient groups.

  2. The fibrinolytic system facilitates tumor cell migration across the blood-brain barrier in experimental melanoma brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perides, George; Zhuge, Yuzheng; Lin, Tina; Stins, Monique F; Bronson, Roderick T; Wu, Julian K

    2006-01-01

    Patients with metastatic tumors to the brain have a very poor prognosis. Increased metastatic potential has been associated with the fibrinolytic system. We investigated the role of the fibrinolytic enzyme plasmin in tumor cell migration across brain endothelial cells and growth of brain metastases in an experimental metastatic melanoma model. Metastatic tumors to the brain were established by direct injection into the striatum or by intracarotid injection of B16F10 mouse melanoma cells in C57Bl mice. The role of plasminogen in the ability of human melanoma cells to cross a human blood-brain barrier model was studied on a transwell system. Wild type mice treated with the plasmin inhibitor epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) and plg -/- mice developed smaller tumors and survived longer than untreated wild type mice. Tumors metastasized to the brain of wild type mice treated with EACA and plg -/- less efficiently than in untreated wild type mice. No difference was observed in the tumor growth in any of the three groups of mice. Human melanoma cells were able to cross the human blood-brain barrier model in a plasmin dependent manner. Plasmin facilitates the development of tumor metastasis to the brain. Inhibition of the fibrinolytic system could be considered as means to prevent tumor metastasis to the brain

  3. PEMFC modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, J.V.C. [Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br; Ordonez, J.C.; Martins, L.S. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Advanced Power Systems], Emails: ordonez@caps.fsu.edu, martins@caps.fsu.edu

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a simplified and comprehensive PEMFC mathematical model introduced in previous studies is experimentally validated. Numerical results are obtained for an existing set of commercial unit PEM fuel cells. The model accounts for pressure drops in the gas channels, and for temperature gradients with respect to space in the flow direction, that are investigated by direct infrared imaging, showing that even at low current operation such gradients are present in fuel cell operation, and therefore should be considered by a PEMFC model, since large coolant flow rates are limited due to induced high pressure drops in the cooling channels. The computed polarization and power curves are directly compared to the experimentally measured ones with good qualitative and quantitative agreement. The combination of accuracy and low computational time allow for the future utilization of the model as a reliable tool for PEMFC simulation, control, design and optimization purposes. (author)

  4. Experimental study of anti-tumor activity of direct current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hisao; Hashimoto, Shozo

    1989-01-01

    The anti-tumor activity of direct current combined with radiation was studied. The experiments were performed with fibrosarcomas (FSA, NFSA) syngenetic to C3H mice. Direct current (0.6mA, 120min) alone was effective to reduce the tumor sizes, but could not cure the tumors. When the direct current therapy (DC therapy) was combined with radiation the DC therapy following radiation was more effective than that before radiation. Using TCD 50 assay, the DC therapy enhanced the effect of a single dose of radiation with the dose-modifying factor of 1.2. However, tumor control rates by the combination therapy were more improved at the smaller doses of radiation than at the larger ones. When the single DC therapy (0.6mA, 120min) was applied immediately after the first radiation of fractionated one the combination therapy still showed the enhanced effect. However, both DC therapy and the radiation therapy were divided in three fractions, and the DC therapy (0.6mA, 40min) was applied after each radiation. Tumor growth retardation by the combination therapy was no different from that by radiation alone. This result suggests that there might be a minimum required dose of coulombs to show the effect of the combination therapy. (author)

  5. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using a Generative Model with an RBM Prior on Tumor Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael; Puonti, Oula; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated generative method for brain tumor segmentation in multi-modal magnetic resonance images. The method is based on the type of generative model often used for segmenting healthy brain tissues, where tissues are modeled by Gaussian mixture models combined...... with a spatial atlas-based tissue prior. We extend this basic model with a tumor prior, which uses convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines (cRBMs) to model the shape of both tumor core and complete tumor, which includes edema and core. The cRBMs are trained on expert segmentations of training images, without...

  6. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  7. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten Haack

    2006-01-01

    An engineering course, Simulation and Experimental Modeling, has been developed that is based on a method for direct estimation of physical parameters in dynamic systems. Compared with classical system identification, the method appears to be easier to understand, apply, and combine with physical...... insight. It is based on a sensitivity approach that is useful for choice of model structure, for experiment design, and for accuracy verification. The method is implemented in the Matlab toolkit Senstools. The method and the presentation have been developed with generally preferred learning styles in mind...

  8. Two Dimensional Mathematical Model of Tumor Angiogenesis: Coupling of Avascular Growth and Vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction As a tumor grows, the demand for oxygen and nutrients increases and it grows further if acquires the ability to induce angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed to present a two-dimensional continuous mathematical model for avascular tumor growth, coupled with a discrete model of angiogenesis. Materials and Methods In the avascular growth model, tumor is considered as a single mass, which uptakes oxygen through diffusion and invades the extracellular matrix (ECM. After the tumor reaches its maximum size in the avascular growth phase, tumor cells may be in three different states (proliferative, quiescent and apoptotic, depending on oxygen availability. Quiescent cells are assumed to secrete tumor angiogenic factors, which diffuse into the surrounding tissue until reaching endothelial cells. The mathematical model for tumor angiogenesis is consisted of a five-point finite difference scheme to simulate the progression of endothelial cells in ECM and their penetration into the tumor. Results The morphology of produced networks was investigated, based on various ECM degradation patterns. The generated capillary networks involved the rules of microvascular branching and anastomosis. Model predictions were in qualitative agreement with experimental observations and might have implications as a supplementary model to facilitate mathematical analyses for anti-cancer therapies. Conclusion Our numerical simulations could facilitate the qualitative comparison between three layers of tumor cells, their TAF-producing abilities and subsequent penetration of micro-vessels in order to determine the dynamics of microvascular branching and anastomosis in ECM and three different parts of the tumor.

  9. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced experimental tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, O.; Muto, M.; Suzuki, F.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular analysis was made on mouse tumors induced by radiation and chemicals. Expression of oncogenes was studied in 12 types of 178 mouse tumors. Southern blotting was done on tumors in which overexpression of oncogenes was noted. Amplification of the myc oncogene was found in chemically induced sarcomas, but not those induced by radiations. Radiogenic thymomas were studied in detail. These thymomas were induced in two different ways. The first was thymomas induced by direct irradiation of F1 mice between C57BL/6NxC3H/He. Southern analysis of DNA revealed deletion of specific minisatellite bands in these tumors. DNA from directly induced thymomas induced focus formation when transfected into normal Golden hamster cells. The mouse K-ras oncogene was detected in these transformants. The second type of thymomas was induced by X-irradiation of thymectomized B10.thy1.2 mice in which normal thymus from congenic B10,thy1.1. mice was grafted. Thymomas of the donor origin was analysed by transfection and the transformants by DNA from those indirectly induced thymomas did not contain activated ras oncogenes. (author)

  10. Mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, James

    In this dissertation we develop mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance in cancer chemotherapy. Resistance to chemotherapy is one of the major causes of the failure of cancer treatment. Furthermore, recent experimental evidence suggests that drug resistance is a complex biological phenomena, with many influences that interact nonlinearly. Here we study the influence of such heterogeneity on treatment outcomes, both in general frameworks and under specific mechanisms. We begin by developing a mathematical framework for describing multi-drug resistance to cancer. Heterogeneity is reflected by a continuous parameter, which can either describe a single resistance mechanism (such as the expression of P-gp in the cellular membrane) or can account for the cumulative effect of several mechanisms and factors. The model is written as a system of integro-differential equations, structured by the continuous "trait," and includes density effects as well as mutations. We study the limiting behavior of the model, both analytically and numerically, and apply it to study treatment protocols. We next study a specific mechanism of tumor heterogeneity and its influence on cell growth: the cell-cycle. We derive two novel mathematical models, a stochastic agent-based model and an integro-differential equation model, each of which describes the growth of cancer cells as a dynamic transition between proliferative and quiescent states. By examining the role all parameters play in the evolution of intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, and the sensitivity of the population growth to parameter values, we show that the cell-cycle length has the most significant effect on the growth dynamics. In addition, we demonstrate that the agent-based model can be approximated well by the more computationally efficient integro-differential equations, when the number of cells is large. The model is closely tied to experimental data of cell growth, and includes a novel implementation of

  11. Radiotherapy of experimental brain tumors using radiosensitizing preparation xantobin (8-bromcaffeine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vartanyan, L.P.; Rudenko, I.Ya.; Volchkov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was made on possibility of increasing efficiency of radiotherapy of experimental brain tumors using xantobin. Statistically important effect, related with criterion of increase of the average life span (ALS) of animals, was achieved when using both single and fractional irradiation. Metronidazole under experimental conditions didn't produce statistically reliable effect on ALS of rats - tumor-carriers. Xantobin in applied dose was endured satisfactorily by animals; any toxic manifistations were not revealed

  12. Combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy against experimental malignant brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzell, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary malignant brain tumor in adults. Despite standard treatment including surgery, radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ)-based chemotherapy, the prognosis for GBM patients is dismal, and there is a need for novel treatments. One possible therapeutic treatment modality presented here is immunotherapy, either alone or combined with intratumoral TMZ. In this doctoral thesis, I report enhanced cure of rats and mice with mal...

  13. New experimental model of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegin, G B; Kalinina, A R; Ponomarenko, N A; Ovsepyan, A A; Smirnov, S V; Tsybenko, V V; Homeriki, S G

    2001-06-01

    NSO/1 (P3x63Ay 8Ut) and SP20 myeloma cells were inoculated to BALB/c OlaHsd mice. NSO/1 cells allowed adequate stage-by-stage monitoring of tumor development. The adequacy of this model was confirmed in experiments with conventional cytostatics: prospidium and cytarabine caused necrosis of tumor cells and reduced animal mortality.

  14. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, I; Peschke, P; Karger, C P

    2015-01-01

    found to be significantly more important for reoxygenation than angiogenesis or decreased oxygen consumption due to an increased fraction of dead cells. In the studied HNSSC-case, the TCD50 values (dose at 50% TCP) decreased from 71.0 Gy under hypoxic to 53.6 Gy under the oxic condition. The results obtained with the developed multiscale model are in accordance with expectations based on radiobiological principles and clinical experience. As the model is voxel-based, radiological imaging methods may help to provide the required 3D-characterization of the tumor prior to irradiation. For clinical application, the model has to be further validated with experimental and clinical data. If this is achieved, the model may be used to optimize fractionation schedules and dose distributions for the treatment of hypoxic tumors.

  15. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  16. Mathematical models of tumor growth: translating absorbed dose to tumor control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouros, G.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The dose-rate in internal emitter therapy is low and time-dependent as compared to external beam radiotherapy. Once the total absorbed dose delivered to a target tissue is calculated, however, most dosimetric analyses of radiopharmaceuticals are considered complete. To translate absorbed dose estimates obtained for internal emitter therapy to biologic effect, the growth characteristics, repair capacity, and radiosensitivity of the tumor must be considered. Tumor growth may be represented by the Gompertz equation in which tumor cells increase at an exponential growth rate that is itself decreasing at an exponential rate; as the tumor increases in size, the growth rate diminishes. The empirical Gompertz expression for tumor growth may be derived from a mechanistic model in which growth is represented by a balance between tumor-cell birth and loss. The birth rate is assumed to be fixed, while the cell loss rate is time-dependent and increases with tumor size. The birth rate of the tumors may be related to their potential doubling time. Multiple biopsies of individual tumors have demonstrated a heterogeneity in the potential doubling time of tumors. By extending the mechanistic model described above to allow for sub-populations of tumor cells with different birth rates, the effect of kinetic heterogeneity within a tumor may be examined. Model simulations demonstrate that the cell kinetic parameters of a tumor are predicted to change over time and measurements obtained using a biopsy are unlikely to reflect the kinetics of the tumor throughout its growth history. A decrease in overall tumor mass, in which each sub-population is reduced in proportion to its cell number, i.e., the log-kill assumption, leads to re-growth of a tumor that has a greater proliferation rate. Therapy that is linked to the potential doubling time or to the effective proliferation rate of the tumor may lead to re-growth of a tumor that is kinetically unchanged. The simplest model of

  17. Microvessel organization and structure in experimental brain tumors: microvessel populations with distinctive structural and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, K E; Molnar, P; Lapin, G D; Groothuis, D R

    1999-11-01

    We studied microvessel organization in five brain tumor models (ENU, MSV, RG-2, S635cl15, and D-54MG) and normal brain, including microvessel diameter (LMVD), intermicrovessel distance (IMVD), microvessel density (MVD), surface area (S(v)), and orientation. LMVD and IMVD were larger and MVD was lower in tumors than normal brain. S(v) in tumors overlapped normal brain values and orientation was random in both tumors and brain. ENU and RG-2 tumors and brain were studied by electron microscopy. Tumor microvessel wall was thicker than that of brain. ENU and normal brain microvessels were continuous and nonfenestrated. RG-2 microvessels contained fenestrations and endothelial gaps; the latter had a maximum major axis of 3.0 microm. Based on anatomic measurements, the pore area of RG-2 tumors was estimated at 7.4 x 10(-6) cm(2) g(-1) from fenestrations and 3.5 x 10(-5) cm(2) g(-1) from endothelial gaps. Increased permeability of RG-2 microvessels to macromolecules is most likely attributable to endothelial gaps. Three microvessel populations may occur in brain tumors: (1) continuous nonfenestrated, (2) continuous fenestrated, and (3) discontinuous (with or without fenestrations). The first group may be unique to brain tumors; the latter two are similar to microvessels found in systemic tumors. Since structure-function properties of brain tumor microvessels will affect drug delivery, studies of microvessel function should be incorporated into clinical trials of brain tumor therapy, especially those using macromolecules. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Therapeutic Implications from Sensitivity Analysis of Tumor Angiogenesis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Enderling, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic cancer treatments induce tumor starvation and regression by targeting the tumor vasculature that delivers oxygen and nutrients. Mathematical models prove valuable tools to study the proof-of-concept, efficacy and underlying mechanisms of such treatment approaches. The effects of parameter value uncertainties for two models of tumor development under angiogenic signaling and anti-angiogenic treatment are studied. Data fitting is performed to compare predictions of both models and to obtain nominal parameter values for sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the success of different cancer treatments depends on tumor size and tumor intrinsic parameters. In particular, we show that tumors with ample vascular support can be successfully targeted with conventional cytotoxic treatments. On the other hand, tumors with curtailed vascular support are not limited by their growth rate and therefore interruption of neovascularization emerges as the most promising treatment target. PMID:25785600

  19. Dynamical analysis of fractional order model of immunogenic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Arshad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we examine the fractional order model of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to a growing tumor cell population. We investigate the long-term behavior of tumor growth and explore the conditions of tumor elimination analytically. We establish the conditions for the tumor-free equilibrium and tumor-infection equilibrium to be asymptotically stable and provide the expression of the basic reproduction number. Existence of physical significant tumor-infection equilibrium points is investigated analytically. We show that tumor growth rate, source rate of immune cells, and death rate of immune cells play vital role in tumor dynamics and system undergoes saddle-node and transcritical bifurcation based on these parameters. Furthermore, the effect of cancer treatment is discussed by varying the values of relevant parameters. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the analytical results.

  20. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preliminary study of experimental tumor radioimmunoimagination in animals by CA-50 monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen zhizhou

    1988-01-01

    The 125 I labelling of CA-50 monoclonal antibody, the distribution of radioactivity in experimental lung cancer 739 bearing mice, and tumor radioimmunoimagination were studied. At 24 hrs after the i.v. administrations of 5.55∼8.14 MBq 125 I-CA50, the relative values of radioactivity in different tissues were: muscle 1, blood 4.1, heart 1.4, liver 6.7, spleen 2.2, lung 2.8, kidney 5.3, tumor 14.5. Radioimmunoimagination showed clearly the locatization of the tumor

  2. Reduced basal and stimulated leukocyte adherence in tumor endothelium of experimental pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J; Ryschich, E; Maksan, S M; Werner, J; Gebhard, M M; Herfarth, C; Klar, E

    1999-12-01

    The interaction between immunocompetent cells and tumor endothelium is essential for an effective immunological response. In the present study, we evaluated resting and CD11b/CD18-mediated leukocyte adhesion in tumor vessels of experimental pancreatic cancer and in healthy pancreatic venules in the rat. Solid tumor fragments (1 mm3) were interposed intrapancreatically between inert transparent polymethylmetacrylate plates for intravital microscopy (n = 12) by which tumor microcirculation, leukocyte-tumor-endothelium interaction, and the effect of the chemoattractants N-formyl-methioninleucylphenylalanine (fMLP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) on leukocyte adherence was investigated. Leukocyte adhesion in pancreatic tumor vessels was significantly reduced compared to healthy pancreatic venules. Both fMLP and PAF dramatically increased leukocyte adherence in normal pancreatic venules. No change in leukocyte adhesion was present in tumor vessels after exposure to these chemotactic substances. Resting and stimulated integrin-dependent leukocyte adhesion is strongly reduced in malignant vessels of experimental pancreatic cancer, which may be an important mechanism to escape immune control.

  3. A tumor cord model for Doxorubicin delivery and dose optimization in solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikenberry Steffen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doxorubicin is a common anticancer agent used in the treatment of a number of neoplasms, with the lifetime dose limited due to the potential for cardiotoxocity. This has motivated efforts to develop optimal dosage regimes that maximize anti-tumor activity while minimizing cardiac toxicity, which is correlated with peak plasma concentration. Doxorubicin is characterized by poor penetration from tumoral vessels into the tumor mass, due to the highly irregular tumor vasculature. I model the delivery of a soluble drug from the vasculature to a solid tumor using a tumor cord model and examine the penetration of doxorubicin under different dosage regimes and tumor microenvironments. Methods A coupled ODE-PDE model is employed where drug is transported from the vasculature into a tumor cord domain according to the principle of solute transport. Within the tumor cord, extracellular drug diffuses and saturable pharmacokinetics govern uptake and efflux by cancer cells. Cancer cell death is also determined as a function of peak intracellular drug concentration. Results The model predicts that transport to the tumor cord from the vasculature is dominated by diffusive transport of free drug during the initial plasma drug distribution phase. I characterize the effect of all parameters describing the tumor microenvironment on drug delivery, and large intercapillary distance is predicted to be a major barrier to drug delivery. Comparing continuous drug infusion with bolus injection shows that the optimum infusion time depends upon the drug dose, with bolus injection best for low-dose therapy but short infusions better for high doses. Simulations of multiple treatments suggest that additional treatments have similar efficacy in terms of cell mortality, but drug penetration is limited. Moreover, fractionating a single large dose into several smaller doses slightly improves anti-tumor efficacy. Conclusion Drug infusion time has a significant

  4. Modelling Nanoparticle Diffusion into Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podduturi, Vishwa Priya; Derosa, Pedro

    2011-03-01

    Cancer is one of the major, potentially deadly diseases and has been for years. Non-specific delivery of the drug can damage healthy tissue seriously affecting in many cases the patient's living condition. Nanoparticles are being used for a targeted drug delivery thereby reducing the dose. In addition, metallic nanoparticles are being used in thermal treatment of cancer cells where nanoparticles help concentrate heat in the tumor and away from living tissue. We proposed a model that combines random walk with diffusion principles. The particle drift velocity is taken from the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and the velocity profile of the particle at the pores in the capillary wall is obtained using the Coventorware software. Pressure gradient and concentration gradient through the capillary wall are considered. Simulations are performed in Matlab using the Monte Carlo technique. Number of particles leaving the blood vessel through a pore is obtained as a function of blood pressure, the osmotic pressure, temperature, particle concentration, blood vessel radius, and pore size, and the relative effect of each of the parameters is discussed.

  5. Modeling and testing treated tumor growth using cubic smoothing splines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Maiying; Yan, Jun

    2011-07-01

    Human tumor xenograft models are often used in preclinical study to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of a certain compound or a combination of certain compounds. In a typical human tumor xenograft model, human carcinoma cells are implanted to subjects such as severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Treatment with test compounds is initiated after tumor nodule has appeared, and continued for a certain time period. Tumor volumes are measured over the duration of the experiment. It is well known that untreated tumor growth may follow certain patterns, which can be described by certain mathematical models. However, the growth patterns of the treated tumors with multiple treatment episodes are quite complex, and the usage of parametric models is limited. We propose using cubic smoothing splines to describe tumor growth for each treatment group and for each subject, respectively. The proposed smoothing splines are quite flexible in modeling different growth patterns. In addition, using this procedure, we can obtain tumor growth and growth rate over time for each treatment group and for each subject, and examine whether tumor growth follows certain growth pattern. To examine the overall treatment effect and group differences, the scaled chi-squared test statistics based on the fitted group-level growth curves are proposed. A case study is provided to illustrate the application of this method, and simulations are carried out to examine the performances of the scaled chi-squared tests. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  7. A review of experimental models in colorectal carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Vanessa Foresto; Feitosa, Marley Ribeiro; Rocha, Jose Joaquim Ribeiro da; Féres, Omar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colorectal cancer is the leading cause of malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular changes that lead to the disease is necessary to develop early diagnosis and optimal treatment modalities. Rodent models are rapid, reproducible and exhibit an adenoma-carcinoma sequence similar to that found in humans. The objective of this manuscript is to review the most common chemical carcinogens used to induce experimental tumors and the usual...

  8. Single and 30 fraction tumor control doses correlate in xenografted tumor models: implications for predictive assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerweck, Leo E.; Dubois, Willum; Baumann, Michael; Suit, Herman D.

    1995-01-01

    , the rank-order correlation coefficient between the single dose hypoxic versus fractionated dose TCD50s under hypoxic or aerobic conditions was 1.0. For all 5 tumors examined, a trend for rank correlation was observed between the single dose and the fractionated dose TCD50s performed under normal or clamp hypoxic conditions (r=0.7, p=0.16 in both cases). The linear correlation coefficients were 0.83, p=0.08 and 0.72, p=0.17, respectively. Failure to attain a rank correlation of 1.0 was due to one tumor exhibiting an insignificant fractionation effect. The rank correlation between the TCD50s for fractionated treatments under normal versus the extrapolated TCD50s under clamp hypoxic conditions was 1.00; the linear correlation coefficient was 0.97 (p=0.01). Conclusions: In the tumor models examined, factors controlling the single fraction tumor control dose, also impact the response to fractionated treatments. These results suggest that laboratory estimates of intrinsic radiosensitivity and tumor clonogen number at the onset of treatment, will be of use in predicting radiocurability for fractionated treatments, as has been observed for single dose treatments

  9. Heralding a new paradigm in 3D tumor modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Eliza L S; Harrington, Daniel A; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Yu, Hanry

    2016-11-01

    Numerous studies to date have contributed to a paradigm shift in modeling cancer, moving from the traditional two-dimensional culture system to three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for cancer cell culture. This led to the inception of tumor engineering, which has undergone rapid advances over the years. In line with the recognition that tumors are not merely masses of proliferating cancer cells but rather, highly complex tissues consisting of a dynamic extracellular matrix together with stromal, immune and endothelial cells, significant efforts have been made to better recapitulate the tumor microenvironment in 3D. These approaches include the development of engineered matrices and co-cultures to replicate the complexity of tumor-stroma interactions in vitro. However, the tumor engineering and cancer biology fields have traditionally relied heavily on the use of cancer cell lines as a cell source in tumor modeling. While cancer cell lines have contributed to a wealth of knowledge in cancer biology, the use of this cell source is increasingly perceived as a major contributing factor to the dismal failure rate of oncology drugs in drug development. Backing this notion is the increasing evidence that tumors possess intrinsic heterogeneity, which predominantly homogeneous cancer cell lines poorly reflect. Tumor heterogeneity contributes to therapeutic resistance in patients. To overcome this limitation, cancer cell lines are beginning to be replaced by primary tumor cell sources, in the form of patient-derived xenografts and organoids cultures. Moving forward, we propose that further advances in tumor engineering would require that tumor heterogeneity (tumor variants) be taken into consideration together with tumor complexity (tumor-stroma interactions). In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of what has been achieved in recapitulating tumor complexity, and discuss the importance of incorporating tumor heterogeneity into 3D in vitro tumor models. This

  10. Drug delivery to solid tumors: the predictive value of the multicellular tumor spheroid model for nanomedicine screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millard M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Marie Millard,1,2 Ilya Yakavets,1–3 Vladimir Zorin,3,4 Aigul Kulmukhamedova,1,2,5 Sophie Marchal,1,2 Lina Bezdetnaya1,2 1Centre de Recherche en Automatique de Nancy, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique UMR 7039, Université de Lorraine, 2Research Department, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France; 3Laboratory of Biophysics and Biotechnology, 4International Sakharov Environmental Institute, Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus; 5Department of Radiology, Medical Company Sunkar, Almaty, Kazakhstan Abstract: The increasing number of publications on the subject shows that nanomedicine is an attractive field for investigations aiming to considerably improve anticancer chemotherapy. Based on selective tumor targeting while sparing healthy tissue, carrier-mediated drug delivery has been expected to provide significant benefits to patients. However, despite reduced systemic toxicity, most nanodrugs approved for clinical use have been less effective than previously anticipated. The gap between experimental results and clinical outcomes demonstrates the necessity to perform comprehensive drug screening by using powerful preclinical models. In this context, in vitro three-dimensional models can provide key information on drug behavior inside the tumor tissue. The multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS model closely mimics a small avascular tumor with the presence of proliferative cells surrounding quiescent cells and a necrotic core. Oxygen, pH and nutrient gradients are similar to those of solid tumor. Furthermore, extracellular matrix (ECM components and stromal cells can be embedded in the most sophisticated spheroid design. All these elements together with the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs play a key role in drug transport, and therefore, the MCTS model is appropriate to assess the ability of NP to penetrate the tumor tissue. This review presents recent developments in MCTS models for a

  11. A mathematical model for IL-6-mediated, stem cell driven tumor growth and targeted treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nör, Jacques Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    Targeting key regulators of the cancer stem cell phenotype to overcome their critical influence on tumor growth is a promising new strategy for cancer treatment. Here we present a modeling framework that operates at both the cellular and molecular levels, for investigating IL-6 mediated, cancer stem cell driven tumor growth and targeted treatment with anti-IL6 antibodies. Our immediate goal is to quantify the influence of IL-6 on cancer stem cell self-renewal and survival, and to characterize the subsequent impact on tumor growth dynamics. By including the molecular details of IL-6 binding, we are able to quantify the temporal changes in fractional occupancies of bound receptors and their influence on tumor volume. There is a strong correlation between the model output and experimental data for primary tumor xenografts. We also used the model to predict tumor response to administration of the humanized IL-6R monoclonal antibody, tocilizumab (TCZ), and we found that as little as 1mg/kg of TCZ administered weekly for 7 weeks is sufficient to result in tumor reduction and a sustained deceleration of tumor growth. PMID:29351275

  12. A model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with tumor microenvironment in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Bassem; Bor-Angelier, Catherine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Breast carcinomas are cancers that arise from the epithelial cells of the breast, which are the cells that line the lobules and the lactiferous ducts. Breast carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer and can be divided into different subtypes based on architectural features and growth patterns, recognized during a histopathological examination. Tumor microenvironment (TME) is the cellular environment in which tumor cells develop. Being composed of various cell types having different biological roles, TME is recognized as playing an important role in the progression of the disease. The architectural heterogeneity in breast carcinomas and the spatial interactions with TME are, to date, not well understood. Developing a spatial model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with TME can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, generating histological synthetic datasets can contribute to validating, and comparing analytical methods that are used in digital pathology. In this work, we propose a modeling method that applies to different breast carcinoma subtypes and TME spatial distributions based on mathematical morphology. The model is based on a few morphological parameters that give access to a large spectrum of breast tumor architectures and are able to differentiate in-situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS) and histological subtypes of invasive carcinomas such as ductal (IDC) and lobular carcinoma (ILC). In addition, a part of the parameters of the model controls the spatial distribution of TME relative to the tumor. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing morphological features between real and simulated images.

  13. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  14. Numerical modeling of fluid flow in solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soltani

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of interstitial fluid flow is developed, based on the application of the governing equations for fluid flow, i.e., the conservation laws for mass and momentum, to physiological systems containing solid tumors. The discretized form of the governing equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, is developed for a predefined tumor geometry. The interstitial fluid pressure and velocity are calculated using a numerical method, element based finite volume. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a homogeneous solid tumor demonstrate that, in a uniformly perfused tumor, i.e., one with no necrotic region, because of the interstitial pressure distribution, the distribution of drug particles is non-uniform. Pressure distribution for different values of necrotic radii is examined and two new parameters, the critical tumor radius and critical necrotic radius, are defined. Simulation results show that: 1 tumor radii have a critical size. Below this size, the maximum interstitial fluid pressure is less than what is generally considered to be effective pressure (a parameter determined by vascular pressure, plasma osmotic pressure, and interstitial osmotic pressure. Above this size, the maximum interstitial fluid pressure is equal to effective pressure. As a consequence, drugs transport to the center of smaller tumors is much easier than transport to the center of a tumor whose radius is greater than the critical tumor radius; 2 there is a critical necrotic radius, below which the interstitial fluid pressure at the tumor center is at its maximum value. If the tumor radius is greater than the critical tumor radius, this maximum pressure is equal to effective pressure. Above this critical necrotic radius, the interstitial fluid pressure at the tumor center is below effective pressure. In specific ranges of these critical sizes, drug amount and therefore therapeutic effects are higher because the opposing force, interstitial fluid

  15. Experimental Data in Vehicle Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasikova Maria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is about a vehicle model which is created in software Matlab Simscape Driveline. In this model the motor is created like a subsystem by Simulink blocks and input data were measured by single roller dynamometer for cars (SRD. Measured data are the input into the model by Lookup Table block. The vehicle model is made by gear, differential, tire and vehicle body blocks. We studied the forces on tires, the vehicle velocity and the slip.

  16. In Vivo Imaging of Experimental Melanoma Tumors using the Novel Radiotracer 68Ga-NODAGA-Procainamide (PCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertész, István; Vida, András; Nagy, Gábor; Emri, Miklós; Farkas, Antal; Kis, Adrienn; Angyal, János; Dénes, Noémi; Szabó, Judit P; Kovács, Tünde; Bai, Péter; Trencsényi, György

    2017-01-01

    The most aggressive form of skin cancer is the malignant melanoma. Because of its high metastatic potential the early detection of primary melanoma tumors and metastases using non-invasive PET imaging determines the outcome of the disease. Previous studies have already shown that benzamide derivatives, such as procainamide (PCA) specifically bind to melanin pigment. The aim of this study was to synthesize and investigate the melanin specificity of the novel 68 Ga-labeled NODAGA-PCA molecule in vitro and in vivo using PET techniques. Procainamide (PCA) was conjugated with NODAGA chelator and was labeled with Ga-68 ( 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA). The melanin specificity of 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA was tested in vitro , ex vivo and in vivo using melanotic B16-F10 and amelanotic Melur melanoma cell lines. By subcutaneous and intravenous injection of melanoma cells tumor-bearing mice were prepared, on which biodistribution studies and small animal PET/CT scans were performed for 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA and 18 FDG tracers. 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA was produced with high specific activity (14.9±3.9 GBq/µmol) and with excellent radiochemical purity (98%PCA uptake of B16-F10 cells was significantly ( p ≤0.01) higher than Melur cells. Ex vivo biodistribution and in vivo PET/CT studies using subcutaneous and metastatic tumor models showed significantly ( p ≤0.01) higher 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA uptake in B16-F10 primary tumors and lung metastases in comparison with amelanotic Melur tumors. In experiments where 18 FDG and 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA uptake of B16-F10 tumors was compared, we found that the tumor-to-muscle (T/M) and tumor-to-lung (T/L) ratios were significantly ( p ≤0.05 and p ≤0.01) higher using 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA than the 18 FDG accumulation. Our novel radiotracer 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA showed specific binding to the melanin producing experimental melanoma tumors. Therefore, 68 Ga-NODAGA-PCA is a suitable diagnostic radiotracer for the detection of melanoma tumors and metastases in vivo .

  17. Glioma Surgical Aspirate: A Viable Source of Tumor Tissue for Experimental Research

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    Perry F. Bartlett

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer research has been hampered by a paucity of viable clinical tissue of sufficient quality and quantity for experimental research. This has driven researchers to rely heavily on long term cultured cells which no longer represent the cancers from which they were derived. Resection of brain tumors, particularly at the interface between normal and tumorigenic tissue, can be carried out using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA that deposits liquid (blood and irrigation fluid and resected tissue into a sterile bottle for disposal. To determine the utility of CUSA-derived glioma tissue for experimental research, we collected 48 CUSA specimen bottles from glioma patients and analyzed both the solid tissue fragments and dissociated tumor cells suspended in the liquid waste fraction. We investigated if these fractions would be useful for analyzing tumor heterogeneity, using IHC and multi-parameter flow cytometry; we also assessed culture generation and orthotopic xenograft potential. Both cell sources proved to be an abundant, highly viable source of live tumor cells for cytometric analysis, animal studies and in-vitro studies. Our findings demonstrate that CUSA tissue represents an abundant viable source to conduct experimental research and to carry out diagnostic analyses by flow cytometry or other molecular diagnostic procedures.

  18. Glioma Surgical Aspirate: A Viable Source of Tumor Tissue for Experimental Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Bryan W.; Stringer, Brett W.; Wilson, John; Jeffree, Rosalind L.; Jamieson, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer research has been hampered by a paucity of viable clinical tissue of sufficient quality and quantity for experimental research. This has driven researchers to rely heavily on long term cultured cells which no longer represent the cancers from which they were derived. Resection of brain tumors, particularly at the interface between normal and tumorigenic tissue, can be carried out using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA) that deposits liquid (blood and irrigation fluid) and resected tissue into a sterile bottle for disposal. To determine the utility of CUSA-derived glioma tissue for experimental research, we collected 48 CUSA specimen bottles from glioma patients and analyzed both the solid tissue fragments and dissociated tumor cells suspended in the liquid waste fraction. We investigated if these fractions would be useful for analyzing tumor heterogeneity, using IHC and multi-parameter flow cytometry; we also assessed culture generation and orthotopic xenograft potential. Both cell sources proved to be an abundant, highly viable source of live tumor cells for cytometric analysis, animal studies and in-vitro studies. Our findings demonstrate that CUSA tissue represents an abundant viable source to conduct experimental research and to carry out diagnostic analyses by flow cytometry or other molecular diagnostic procedures

  19. A novel xenograft model in zebrafish for high-resolution investigating dynamics of neovascularization in tumors.

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    Chengjian Zhao

    Full Text Available Tumor neovascularization is a highly complex process including multiple steps. Understanding this process, especially the initial stage, has been limited by the difficulties of real-time visualizing the neovascularization embedded in tumor tissues in living animal models. In the present study, we have established a xenograft model in zebrafish by implanting mammalian tumor cells into the perivitelline space of 48 hours old Tg(Flk1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos. With this model, we dynamically visualized the process of tumor neovascularization, with unprecedented high-resolution, including new sprouts from the host vessels and the origination from VEGFR2(+ individual endothelial cells. Moreover, we quantified their contributions during the formation of vascular network in tumor. Real-time observations revealed that angiogenic sprouts in tumors preferred to connect each other to form endothelial loops, and more and more endothelial loops accumulated into the irregular and chaotic vascular network. The over-expression of VEGF165 in tumor cells significantly affected the vascularization in xenografts, not only the number and size of neo-vessels but the abnormalities of tumor vascular architecture. The specific inhibitor of VEGFR2, SU5416, significantly inhibited the vascularization and the growth of melanoma xenografts, but had little affects to normal vessels in zebrafish. Thus, this zebrafish/tumor xenograft model not only provides a unique window to investigate the earliest events of tumoral neoangiogenesis, but is sensitive to be used as an experimental platform to rapidly and visually evaluate functions of angiogenic-related genes. Finally, it also offers an efficient and cost-effective means for the rapid evaluation of anti-angiogenic chemicals.

  20. Human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes cooperatively regulate prostate tumor growth in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Michael D; Harui, Airi

    2015-01-01

    The complex interactions that occur between human tumors, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the systemic immune system are likely to define critical factors in the host response to cancer. While conventional animal models have identified an array of potential anti-tumor therapies, mouse models often fail to translate into effective human treatments. Our goal is to establish a humanized tumor model as a more effective pre-clinical platform for understanding and manipulating TIL. The immune system in NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγnull (NSG) mice was reconstituted by the co-administration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) or subsets (CD4+ or CD8+) and autologous human dendritic cells (DC), and animals simultaneously challenged by implanting human prostate cancer cells (PC3 line). Tumor growth was evaluated over time and the phenotype of recovered splenocytes and TIL characterized by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Serum levels of circulating cytokines and chemokines were also assessed. A tumor-bearing huPBL-NSG model was established in which human leukocytes reconstituted secondary lymphoid organs and promoted the accumulation of TIL. These TIL exhibited a unique phenotype when compared to splenocytes with a predominance of CD8+ T cells that exhibited increased expression of CD69, CD56, and an effector memory phenotype. TIL from huPBL-NSG animals closely matched the features of TIL recovered from primary human prostate cancers. Human cytokines were readily detectible in the serum and exhibited a different profile in animals implanted with PBL alone, tumor alone, and those reconstituted with both. Immune reconstitution slowed but could not eliminate tumor growth and this effect required the presence of CD4+ T cell help. Simultaneous implantation of human PBL, DC and tumor results in a huPBL-NSG model that recapitulates the development of human TIL and allows an assessment of tumor and immune system interaction that cannot be carried out in humans

  1. Biological models in vivo for boron neutronic capture studies as tumors therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreimann, Erica L.; Dagrosa, Maria A.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Itoiz, Maria E.; Pisarev, Mario A.; Farias, Silvia S.; Garavaglia, Ricardo N.; Batistoni, Daniel A.

    1999-01-01

    The use of experimental models for Boron Neutronic Capture studies as Tumors Therapy have as two main objectives: 1) To contribute to the basic knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved to increase the method therapeutical advantage, and 2) To explore the possible application of this therapeutic method to other pathologies. In this frame it was studied the carcinogenesis model of hamster cheek pouch, a type of human buccal cancer. Biodistribution studies of boron compound were performed in tumor, blood and in different precancerous and normal tissues as well as BNCT studies. Results validated this method for BNCT studies and show the capacity of the oral mucosa tumors of selectively concentrate the boron compound, showing a deleterious clear effect on the tumor after 24 hours with BNCT treatment. (author)

  2. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  3. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  4. Modeling the Effect of Tumor Size in Early Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschraegen, Claire; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Cserni, Gábor; Gordon, Richard; Royce, Melanie E.; Vlastos, Georges; Tai, Patricia; Storme, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Summary Background Data: The purpose of this study was to determine the type of relationship between tumor size and mortality in early breast carcinoma. Methods: The data was abstracted from 83,686 cases registered in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of women diagnosed with primary breast carcinoma between 1988 and 1997 presenting with a T1–T2 lesion and no metastasis in whom axillary node dissection was performed: 58,070 women were node-negative (N0) and 25,616 were node-positive (N+). End point was death from any cause. Tumor size was modeled as a continuous variable by proportional hazards using a generalized additive models procedure. Results: Functionally, a Gompertzian expression exp(-exp(-(size-15)/10)) provided a good fit to the effect of tumor size (in millimeters) on mortality, irrespective of nodal status. Quantitatively, for tumor size between 3 and 50 mm, the increase of crude cumulative death rate (number of observed deaths divided by the number of patients at risk) increased with size from 10% to 25% for N0 and from 20% to 40% for N+. Conclusions: The functional relationship of tumor size with mortality is concordant with current knowledge of tumor growth. However, its qualitative and quantitative independence of nodal status is in contradiction with the prevailing concept of sequential disease progression from primary tumor to regional nodes. This argues against the perception that nodal metastases are caused by the primary tumor. PMID:15650642

  5. Effect of interventional treatment with p53 on the invasion and metastasis of VX2 liver tumor in experimental rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Caixia; Feng Yan; Gu Tao; Li Chunmei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of interventional treatment with p53 on the invasion and metastasis of VX2 liver tumor in experimental rabbits. Methods: VX2 carcinoma cells were surgically implanted into the left hepatic lobe in 48 New Zealand white rabbits, and the rabbit hepatic carcinoma models were thus established. The rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups with 12 rabbits in each group. After hepatic arterial catheterization was completed physiological saline (control group), Lipiodol (Group A), Ad-p53 (Group B) and Lipiodol+Ad-p53 (Group C) were respectively infused into the rabbits of four groups via common hepatic artery. One week after the procedure the rabbits were sacrificed and the livers were removed for the determination of matrix metalloprotein-2 (MMP-2), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of the tumor with immunohistochemistry technique. Results: The tumor growth in study groups (group A, B and C) was markedly suppressed, which was significantly different in comparison with that in control group (P 0.05). The positive rates of MMP-2, PCNA and VEGF in group B and C were significantly lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). The positive rates of MMP-2, PCNA and VEGF of the rabbits with metastasis were markedly higher than those without metastasis(P < 0.05). MMP-2 bore a certain relationship with VEGF and PCNA (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The increase of the positive rates of MMP-2, PCNA and VEGF indicates that the tumor possesses higher possibility for developing metastasis, proliferation and vascular formation. The interventional treatment with Adp53 or Lipiodol+Ad-p53 can inhibit the growth, metastasis and vascular formation of VX2 liver tumor in experimental rabbits. (J Intervent Radiol, 2010, 19 : 800-804) (authors)

  6. Anti-tumor immunity generated by photodynamic therapy in a metastatic murine tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a modality for the treatment of cancer involving excitation of photosensitizers with harmless visible light producing reactive oxygen species. The major biological effects of PDT are apoptosis of tumor cells, destruction of the blood supply and activation of the immune system. The objective of this study is to compare in an animal model of metastatic cancer, PDT alone and PDT combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY). Since the tumor we used is highly metastatic, it is necessary to generate anti-tumor immunity using PDT to both cure the primary tumor and prevent death from metastasis. This immunity may be potentiated by low dose CY. In our model we used J774 cells (a Balb/c reticulum cell sarcoma line with the characteristics of macrophages) and the following PDT regimen: benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD, 2mg/kg injected IV followed after 15 min by 150 J/cm2 of 690-nm light). CY (50 mg/kg i.p.) was injected 48 hours before light delivery. BPD-PDT led to complete regression of the primary tumor in more than half the mice but no permanent cures were obtained. BPD-PDT in combination with CY led to 60% permanent cures. CY alone gave no permanent cures but did provide a survival advantage. To probe permanent immunity cured animals were rechallenged with the same tumor cell line and the tumors were rejected in 71% of mice cured with BPD-PDT plus CY. We conclude that BPD-PDT in combination with CY gives best overall results and that this is attributable to immunological response activation in addition to PDT-mediated destruction of the tumor.

  7. An interdisciplinary computational/experimental approach to evaluate drug-loaded gold nanoparticle tumor cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Louis T; England, Christopher G; Wu, Min; Lowengrub, John; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Clinical translation of cancer nanotherapy has largely failed due to the infeasibility of optimizing the complex interaction of nano/drug/tumor/patient parameters. We develop an interdisciplinary approach modeling diffusive transport of drug-loaded gold nanoparticles in heterogeneously-vascularized tumors. Materials & methods: Evaluated lung cancer cytotoxicity to paclitaxel/cisplatin using novel two-layer (hexadecanethiol/phosphatidylcholine) and three-layer (with high-density-lipoprotein) nanoparticles. Computer simulations calibrated to in-vitro data simulated nanotherapy of heterogeneously-vascularized tumors. Results: Evaluation of free-drug cytotoxicity between monolayer/spheroid cultures demonstrates a substantial differential, with increased resistance conferred by diffusive transport. Nanoparticles had significantly higher efficacy than free-drug. Simulations of nanotherapy demonstrate 9.5% (cisplatin) and 41.3% (paclitaxel) tumor radius decrease. Conclusion: Interdisciplinary approach evaluating gold nanoparticle cytotoxicity and diffusive transport may provide insight into cancer nanotherapy. PMID:26829163

  8. Modeling and Targeting MYC Genes in Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Sonja; Bolin, Sara; Weishaupt, Holger; Swartling, Fredrik J.

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumors are the second most common group of childhood cancers, accounting for about 20%–25% of all pediatric tumors. Deregulated expression of the MYC family of transcription factors, particularly c-MYC and MYCN genes, has been found in many of these neoplasms, and their expression levels are often correlated with poor prognosis. Elevated c-MYC/MYCN initiates and drives tumorigenesis in many in vivo model systems of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, inhibition of their oncogenic function is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we explore the roles of MYC oncoproteins and their molecular targets during the formation, maintenance, and recurrence of childhood brain tumors. We also briefly summarize recent progress in the development of therapeutic approaches for pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity in these tumors. PMID:28333115

  9. Mathematical and Computational Modeling for Tumor Virotherapy with Mediated Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timalsina, Asim; Tian, Jianjun Paul; Wang, Jin

    2017-08-01

    We propose a new mathematical modeling framework based on partial differential equations to study tumor virotherapy with mediated immunity. The model incorporates both innate and adaptive immune responses and represents the complex interaction among tumor cells, oncolytic viruses, and immune systems on a domain with a moving boundary. Using carefully designed computational methods, we conduct extensive numerical simulation to the model. The results allow us to examine tumor development under a wide range of settings and provide insight into several important aspects of the virotherapy, including the dependence of the efficacy on a few key parameters and the delay in the adaptive immunity. Our findings also suggest possible ways to improve the virotherapy for tumor treatment.

  10. Predicting anti-tumor effect of deoxypodophyllotoxin in NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice based on in vitro pharmacodynamics and physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Zhao, Kaijing; Liu, Fei; Li, Ying; Zhong, Zeyu; Hong, Shijin; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Li

    2018-04-04

    Anti-tumor evaluation in tumor-bearing mouse is time- and energy-consuming. We aimed to investigate whether in vivo anti-tumor efficacy could be predicted based on in vitro pharmacodynamics using deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a developing anti-tumor candidate, as a model compound. Proliferation kinetics of monolayer cultivated NCI-H460 cells under various DPT concentrations was quantitatively investigated accompanied by calibration curves. Koch's two-phase natural growth model combined with sigmoid Emax model, i.e. dM/dt=2λ 0 λ 1 M/(λ 1 +2λ 0 M)-EmaxC γ /(EC 50 γ +C γ )·M, was introduced to describe cell proliferation (M) against time under DPT treatment (C). Estimated in vitro pharmacodynamic parameters were: EC 50 , 8.97 nM; Emax, 0.820 day -1 and γ, 7.13. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model including tumor compartment was introduced, which could predict DPT disposition in plasma, tumor tissue and main normal tissues of NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice following single dose. In vivo pharmacodynamic model and parameters were assumed the same as in vitro ones, and linked with simulated tumor pharmacokinetic profiles by PBPK model, to build a physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model. After estimating natural growth parameters (λ 0 and λ 1 ), we desirably predicted the tumor growth in NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice during multi-dose DPT treatment, both in this study and literature, by the PBPK-PD model. The model was further successfully applied to predict tumor growth in SGC-7901 tumor-bearing mice. These data indicated that in vivo anti-tumor efficacy might be predicted based on in vitro cytotoxic assays via PBPK-PD model approach. The approach was demonstrated reasonable and applicable, which might facilitate and accelerate anti-cancer candidate screening and dose regimen design in drug discovery process. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. A theoretical model for the effects of reduced hemoglobin-oxygen affinity on tumor oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Secomb, Timothy W.; Hsu, Richard; Lin, P.-S.; Venitz, Jurgen; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a theoretical model for oxygen delivery to tumors, and to use the model to simulate the effects of changing the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen on tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: Hemoglobin affinity is expressed in terms of P 50 , the partial pressure of oxygen (Po 2 ) at half saturation. Effects of changing P 50 on arterial Po 2 are predicted using an effective vessel approach to describe diffusive oxygen transport in the lungs, assuming fixed systemic oxygen demand and fixed blood flow rate. The decline in oxygen content of blood as it flows through normal tissue before entering the tumor region is assumed fixed. The hypoxic fraction of the tumor region is predicted using a three-dimensional simulation of diffusion from a network of vessels whose geometry is derived from observations of tumor microvasculature in the rat. Results: In air-breathing rats, predicted hypoxic fraction decreases with moderate increases in P 50 , but increases with further increases of P 50 , in agreement with previous experimental results. In rats breathing hyperoxic gases, and in humans breathing either normoxic or hyperoxic gases, increased P 50 is predicted to improve tumor oxygenation. Conclusions: The results support the administration of synthetic agents to increase P 50 during radiation treatment of tumors

  12. A fractional motion diffusion model for grading pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, M Muge; Wang, He; Sui, Yi; Engelhard, Herbert H; Li, Yuhua; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel fractional motion (FM) diffusion model for distinguishing low- versus high-grade pediatric brain tumors; and to investigate its possible advantage over apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and/or a previously reported continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) diffusion model. With approval from the institutional review board and written informed consents from the legal guardians of all participating patients, this study involved 70 children with histopathologically-proven brain tumors (30 low-grade and 40 high-grade). Multi- b -value diffusion images were acquired and analyzed using the FM, CTRW, and mono-exponential diffusion models. The FM parameters, D fm , φ , ψ (non-Gaussian diffusion statistical measures), and the CTRW parameters, D m , α , β (non-Gaussian temporal and spatial diffusion heterogeneity measures) were compared between the low- and high-grade tumor groups by using a Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon U test. The performance of the FM model for differentiating between low- and high-grade tumors was evaluated and compared with that of the CTRW and the mono-exponential models using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The FM parameters were significantly lower ( p  CTRW model. Similar to the CTRW model, the FM model can improve differentiation between low- and high-grade pediatric brain tumors over ADC.

  13. More Reasonable Animal Model for Study the Effect of Pneumoperitoneum on Abdominal Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qijun, Lv; Jiang, Du; Chongshu, Wang

    2018-01-27

    Background: Many animal experimental studies showed that abdominal tumor cells will be widely spread during laparoscopic treatment and grow into metastases. These results are different from clinical observations. There is a hypothesis that too much tumor cells was injected in the animals lead to the results of theses bias. We aim to learn the difference of abdominal cavity volume between human body and the nude mice and to determine reasonable amount of tumor cells in the animal experiments. Methods: The insufflated CO2 volume which represents the capacity of the abdominal cavity was recorded during laparoscopic process in 212 patients and 20 nude mice respectively, the relative volume of nude mice and human body was calculated.Based on data from the literature and this study , the amount of tumor cells in the animal experiments was determined.According to these data, we set up a new animal model and a traditional one respectively,and compared the rate of successful modeling and tumor formation between two animal models. Results: The intraperitoneal volumes of humans and nude mice were 3.01±0.36 L and 0.011±0.001 L respectively.The number of tumor cells that be uesd in animal should be approximately 0.26×105 in terms of known data in human beings.Compared with the traditional animal model which formed a large number of intraperitoneal tumor metastasis, the new animal model was shows more moderately,and the rate of successful modeling was similar. Conclusion: In animal experiments, to simulate the clinical situation, about 0.26×105 tumor cells should be inject in peritoneal cavity of the nude mice. Creative Commons Attribution License

  14. Transcription factor Runx2 knockdown regulates colon cancer transplantation tumor growth in vitro: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu1

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of transcription factor Runx2 knockdown on colon cancer transplantation tumor growth in vitro. Methods: Colon cancer cell lines HT29 were cultured and transfected with negative control (NC - shRNA plasmids and Runx2-shRNA plasmids respectively, the colon cancer cells transfected with shRNA were subcutaneously injected into C57 nude mice, and they were included in NC group and Runx2 knockdown group respectively. 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks after model establishment, serum was collected to determine the contents of tumor markers, and tumor lesions were collected to determine proliferation and apoptosis gene expression. Results: CCSA-2, CEA and CA19-9 levels in serum as well as Rac1, Wnt3a, PLD2 and FAM96B protein expression in transplantation tumor lesions of Runx2 knockdown group were significantly lower than those of NC group while MS4A12, ASPP2 and Fas protein expression in transplantation tumor lesions of Runx2 knockdown group were significantly higher than those of NC group. Conclusion: Transcription factor Runx2 knockdown could inhibit the colon cancer transplantation tumor growth in vitro.

  15. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G.; Helland, Åslaug; Rye, Inga H.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; Van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L.; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution

  16. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What is lacking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Leccia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs, and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs. Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of ACTH-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely functional, i.e producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism. In contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in PKA, Wnt/β-catenin and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered of adrenocortical tumors by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases.

  17. Model refinement for offshore platforms: Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Chen, Zongli; Wu, Yanjian

    2017-08-01

    Offshore jacket platforms are widely used in offshore oil and gas exploitation. Finite element models of such structures need to have many degrees of freedom (DOFs) to represent the geometrical detail of complex structures, thereby leading to incompatibility in the number of DOFs of experimental models. To bring them both to the same order while ensuring that the essential eigen- properties of the refined model match those of experimental models, an extended model refinement procedure is presented in this paper. Vibration testing of an offshore jacket platform model is performed to validate the applicability of the proposed approach. A full-order finite element model of the platform is established and then tuned to meet the measured modal properties identified from the acceleration signals. Both model reduction and modal expansion methods are investigated, as well as various scenarios of sensor arrangements. Upon completion of the refinement, the updated jacket platform model matches the natural frequencies of the measured model well.

  18. Small Animal [18F]FDG PET Imaging for Tumor Model Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2008-01-01

    PET allows non-invasive, quantitative and repetitive imaging of biological function in living animals. Small animal PET imaging with [ 18 F]FDG has been successfully applied to investigation of metabolism, receptor, ligand interactions, gene expression, adoptive cell therapy and somatic gene therapy. Experimental condition of animal handling impacts on the biodistribution of [ 18 F]FDG in small animal study. The small animal PET and CT images were registered using the hardware fiducial markers and small animal contour point. Tumor imaging in small animal with small animal [ 18 F]FDG PET should be considered fasting, warming, and isoflurane anesthesia level. Registered imaging with small animal PET and CT image could be useful for the detection of tumor. Small animal experimental condition of animal handling and registration method will be of most importance for small lesion detection of metastases tumor model

  19. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Mathematical modeling of interleukin-27 induction of anti-tumor T cells response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Ling Liao

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which promotes Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activities, such as Interferon-[Formula: see text] secretion. For this reason Interleukin-12 could be a powerful therapeutic agent for cancer treatment. However, Interleukin-12 is also excessively toxic. Interleukin-27 is an immunoregulatory cytokine from the Interleukin-12 family, but it is not as toxic as Interleukin-12. In recent years, Interleukin-27 has been considered as a potential anti-tumor agent. Recent experiments in vitro and in vivo have shown that cancer cells transfected with IL-27 activate CD8+ T cells to promote the secretion of anti-tumor cytokines Interleukin-10, although, at the same time, IL-27 inhibits the secretion of Interferon-[Formula: see text] by CD8+ T cells. In the present paper we develop a mathematical model based on these experimental results. The model involves a dynamic network which includes tumor cells, CD8+ T cells and cytokines Interleukin-27, Interleukin-10 and Interferon-[Formula: see text]. Simulations of the model show how Interleukin-27 promotes CD8+ T cells to secrete Interleukin-10 to inhibit tumor growth. On the other hand Interleukin-27 inhibits the secretion of Interferon-[Formula: see text] by CD8+ T cells which somewhat diminishes the inhibition of tumor growth. Our numerical results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data. We use the model to design protocols of IL-27 injections for the treatment of cancer and find that, for some special types of cancer, with a fixed total amount of drug, within a certain range, continuous injection has better efficacy than intermittent injections in reducing the tumor load while the treatment is ongoing, although the decrease in tumor load is only temporary.

  1. A mechanistic tumor penetration model to guide antibody drug conjugate design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Vasalou

    Full Text Available Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs represent novel anti-cancer modalities engineered to specifically target and kill tumor cells expressing corresponding antigens. Due to their large size and their complex kinetics, these therapeutic agents often face heterogeneous distributions in tumors, leading to large untargeted regions that escape therapy. We present a modeling framework which includes the systemic distribution, vascular permeability, interstitial transport, as well as binding and payload release kinetics of ADC-therapeutic agents in mouse xenografts. We focused, in particular, on receptor dynamics such as endocytic trafficking mechanisms within cancer cells, to simulate their impact on tumor mass shrinkage upon ADC administration. Our model identified undesirable tumor properties that can impair ADC tissue homogeneity, further compromising ADC success, and explored ADC design optimization scenarios to counteract upon such unfavorable intrinsic tumor tissue attributes. We further demonstrated the profound impact of cytotoxic payload release mechanisms and the role of bystander killing effects on tumor shrinkage. This model platform affords a customizable simulation environment which can aid with experimental data interpretation and the design of ADC therapeutic treatments.

  2. Tumor dormancy and frailty models: A novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancoita, Paola M V; Valberg, Morten; Demicheli, Romano; Biganzoli, Elia; Di Serio, Clelia

    2017-03-01

    Frailty models are here proposed in the tumor dormancy framework, in order to account for possible unobservable dependence mechanisms in cancer studies where a non-negligible proportion of cancer patients relapses years or decades after surgical removal of the primary tumor. Relapses do not seem to follow a memory-less process, since their timing distribution leads to multimodal hazards. From a biomedical perspective, this behavior may be explained by tumor dormancy, i.e., for some patients microscopic tumor foci may remain asymptomatic for a prolonged time interval and, when they escape from dormancy, micrometastatic growth results in a clinical disease appearance. The activation of the growth phase at different metastatic states would explain the occurrence of metastatic recurrences and mortality at different times (multimodal hazard). We propose a new frailty model which includes in the risk function a random source of heterogeneity (frailty variable) affecting the components of the hazard function. Thus, the individual hazard rate results as the product of a random frailty variable and the sum of basic hazard rates. In tumor dormancy, the basic hazard rates correspond to micrometastatic developments starting from different initial states. The frailty variable represents the heterogeneity among patients with respect to relapse, which might be related to unknown mechanisms that regulate tumor dormancy. We use our model to estimate the overall survival in a large breast cancer dataset, showing how this improves the understanding of the underlying biological process. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  3. Advantages of a dual-tracer model over reference tissue models for binding potential measurement in tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, K M; Samkoe, K S; Klubben, W S; Hasan, T; Pogue, B W

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of tumor molecular expression in vivo could have a significant impact for informing and monitoring immerging targeted therapies in oncology. Molecular imaging of targeted tracers can be used to quantify receptor expression in the form of a binding potential (BP) if the arterial input curve or a surrogate of it is also measured. However, the assumptions of the most common approaches (reference tissue models) may not be valid for use in tumors. In this study, the validity of reference tissue models is investigated for use in tumors experimentally and in simulations. Three different tumor lines were grown subcutaneously in athymic mice and the mice were injected with a mixture of an epidermal growth factor receptor- (EGFR-) targeted fluorescent tracer and an untargeted fluorescent tracer. A one-compartment plasma input model demonstrated that the transport kinetics of both tracers were significantly different between tumors and all potential reference tissues, and using the reference tissue model resulted in a theoretical underestimation in BP of 50 ± 37%. On the other hand, the targeted and untargeted tracers demonstrated similar transport kinetics, allowing a dual-tracer approach to be employed to accurately estimate binding potential (with a theoretical error of 0.23 ± 9.07%). These findings highlight the potential for using a dual-tracer approach to quantify receptor expression in tumors with abnormal hemodynamics, possibly to inform the choice or progress of molecular cancer therapies. PMID:23022732

  4. Ovarian tumor attachment, invasion and vascularization reflect unique microenvironments in the peritoneum:Insights from xenograft and mathematical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara P. Steinkamp

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer relapse is often characterized by metastatic spread throughout the peritoneal cavity with tumors attached to multiple organs. In this study, interaction of ovarian tumor cells with the peritoneal tumor microenvironment was evaluated in a xenograft model based on intraperitoneal injection of fluorescent SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cells. Intra-vital microscopy of mixed GFP-RFP cell populations injected into the peritoneum demonstrated that tumor cells aggregate and attach as mixed spheroids, emphasizing the importance of homotypic adhesion in tumor formation. Electron microscopy provided high resolution structural information about local attachment sites. Experimental measurements from the mouse model were used to build a three-dimensional cellular Potts ovarian tumor model (OvTM that examines ovarian tumor cell attachment, chemotaxis, growth and vascularization. OvTM simulations provide insight into the relative influence of tumor cell-cell adhesion, oxygen availability, and local architecture on tumor growth and morphology. Notably, tumors on the mesentery, omentum or spleen readily invade the open architecture, while tumors attached to the gut encounter barriers that restrict invasion and instead rapidly expand into the peritoneal space. Simulations suggest that rapid neovascularization of SKOV3.ip1 tumors is triggered by constitutive release of angiogenic factors in the absence of hypoxia. This research highlights the importance of cellular adhesion and tumor microenvironment in the seeding of secondary ovarian tumors on diverse organs within the peritoneal cavity. Results of the OvTM simulations indicate that invasion is strongly influenced by features underlying the mesothelial lining at different sites, but is also affected by local production of chemotactic factors. The integrated in vivo mouse model and computer simulations provide a unique platform for evaluating targeted therapies for ovarian cancer relapse.

  5. Cytoreductive Chemotherapy Improves the Biodistribution of Antibodies Directed Against Tumor Necrosis in Murine Solid Tumor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Julie K.; Khawli, Leslie A.; Park, Ryan; Wu, Brian W.; Li, Zibo; Canter, David; Conti, Peter S.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2013-01-01

    Current strategies in cancer treatment employ combinations of different treatment modalities, which include chemotherapy, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgery. Consistent with that approach, the present study demonstrates how chemotherapeutic agents can potentiate the delivery of radiolabeled, necrosis-targeting antibodies (chTNT-3, NHS76) to tumor. All chemotherapeutics in this study (5-fluorouracil, etoposide, vinblastine, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin) resulted in statistically significant increases in tumor uptake of radiolabeled antibodies and their F(ab')2 fragments compared to no pretreatment with chemotherapy. Labeled antibodies were administered at various time points following a single dose of chemotherapy in multiple tumor models, and the biodistribution of the antibodies were determined by measuring radioactivity in harvested tissues. MicroPET/CT was also done to demonstrate clinical relevancy of using chemotherapy pretreatment to increase antibody uptake. Results of biodistribution and imaging data reveal specific time frames following chemotherapy when necrosis-targeting antibodies are best delivered, either for imaging or radiotherapy. Thus, the present work offers the prospect of using cytoreductive chemotherapy to increase tumor accumulation of select therapeutic antibodies, especially when combined with other forms of immunotherapy, for the successful treatment of solid tumors. PMID:24130055

  6. Cellular Interaction and Tumoral Penetration Properties of Cyclodextrin Nanoparticles on 3D Breast Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Varan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilic cyclodextrins are biocompatible oligosaccharides that can be used for drug delivery especially for the delivery of drugs with solubility problems thanks to their unique molecular structures. In this paper, Paclitaxel was used as a model anticancer drug to determine the inclusion complex properties of amphiphilic cyclodextrins with different surface charge. Paclitaxel-loaded cyclodextrin nanoparticles were characterized in terms of mean particle diameter, zeta potential, encapsulation efficacy, drug release profile and cell culture studies. It was determined that the nanoparticles prepared from the inclusion complex according to characterization studies have a longer release profile than the conventionally prepared nanoparticles. In order to mimic the tumor microenvironment, breast cancer cells and healthy fibroblast cells were used in 3-dimensional (3D cell culture studies. It was determined that the activities of nanoparticles prepared by conventional methods behave differently in 2-dimensional (2D and 3D cell cultures. In addition, it was observed that the nanoparticles prepared from the inclusion complex have a stronger anti-tumoral activity in the 3D multicellular tumor model than the drug solution. Furthermore, polycationic amphiphilic cyclodextrin nanoparticles can diffuse and penetrate through multilayer cells in a 3D tumor model, which is crucial for an eventual antitumor effect.

  7. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-06

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease.

  8. Experimental study of chemical embolus therapy combined with radiotherapy for VX2 bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Kazuo; Ishii, Yoshiaki

    2000-01-01

    We conducted an experimental study, using a combination of coarse crystal cisplatin and radiotherapy for bone tumors, to evaluate the possibility of the clinical application of chemical embolus therapy in the field of orthopedic surgery. Experimental femoral bone tumors were produced, in rabbits, using VX2 carcinoma. The rabbits were allocated to five groups: untreated control, embolus, chemical embolus, irradiation alone, and chemical embolus and irradiation combination. These therapies were evaluated comparatively, in terms of local antitumor effects (including body weight, X-ray findings, angiography, and histopathology) and in terms of inhibition of pulmonary metastasis. Local antitumor effects, as evaluated by all parameters, except for body weight, were significantly greater for the chemical and irradiation combination group than for the chemical embolus, irradiation alone, untreated control, and embolus groups. There was no significant difference in the inhibition of pulmonary metastasis among the chemical embolus and irradiation combination, chemical embolus, and irradiation alone groups. These findings demonstrated the synergistic effect of the combination of chemical embolus therapy and radiotherapy. In this study, however, no significant difference was found between the chemical embolus therapy alone and the combination therapy groups in the inhibitory effect on pulmonary tumor metastasis, suggesting the need to conduct combination therapy repeatedly in the clinical setting. (author)

  9. Tropism of the in situ growth from biopsies of childhood neuroectodermal tumors following transplantation into experimental teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Seema; Hultman, Isabell; Cedervall, Jessica; Ali, Rouknuddin Q; Fuchs, Gabriel; Gustavsson, Bengt; Asmundsson, Jurate; Sandstedt, Bengt; Kogner, Per; Ährlund-Richter, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Experimental teratoma induced from human pluripotent stem cells with normal karyotype can be described as a failed embryonic process and includes besides advanced organoid development also large elements of tissue with a prolonged occurrence of immature neural components. Such immature components, although benign, exhibit strong morphological resemblance with tumors of embryonic neuroectodermal origin. Here, we demonstrate that biopsy material from childhood tumors of neural embryonic origin transplanted to mature experimental teratoma can show an exclusive preference for matching tissue. Tumor specimens from five children with; Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (sPNET); Pilocytic astrocytoma of the brainstem; Classic medulloblastoma; peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPNET) or neuroblastoma (NB), respectively, were transplanted. Analysis of up to 120 sections of each tumor revealed an engraftment for three of the transplanted tumors: pPNET, sPNET, and NB, with a protruding growth from the latter two that were selected for detailed examination. The histology revealed a strict tropism with a non-random integration into what morphologically appeared as matched embryonic microenvironment recuperating the patient tumor histology. The findings suggest specific advantages over xenotransplantation and lead us to propose that transplantation to the human embryonic microenvironment in experimental teratoma can be a well-needed complement for preclinical in vivo studies of childhood neuroectodermal tumors. © 2013 UICC.

  10. Understanding Leadership: An Experimental-Experiential Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, George T.

    2014-01-01

    Books about leadership are dangerous to readers who fantasize about being leaders or apply leadership ideas as if they were proven formulas. As an antidote, I offer an experimental framework in which any leadership-management model can be tested to gain experiential understanding of the model. As a result one can gain reality-based insights about…

  11. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. W. Nigg

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF INFESTATION IN OVINE OESTROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA MOŢ

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The experimental model was been performed on 20 youth sheep, between 10-11months aged who were divided in two groups. The first group (10 animals containsonly healthy animals and represented the control group. The second group(experimental contains experimental infested animals with Oestrus ovis larvae, offirst stadium of evolution. Each sheep was been inoculated with 30 larvae onintranasal way. After three months from experimental infestation, the animals werebeen slaughtered and was made the necropsy. Were evaluated themorphopathological alterations and were been discovered the Oestrus ovis larvae.From the inoculated larvae 3 months ago were been founded 57.66 %. From these,16 % were on I stadium, 37.33 % II stadium and 4.33 % III stadium of evolution. Noclinical evident sign was observed in experimental infested sheep. This fact is inconcordance with other researchers observations, who demonstrated that theclinical reproduction of disease can be obtain only after 3-4 experimentaladministrations of Oestrus ovis larvae.

  13. Establishment and characterization of intraperitoneal xenograft models by co-injection of human tumor cells and extracellular matrix gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAO, YUQIN; ZHOU, YONGJUN; SU, XIAOLAN; DAI, LEI; YU, LIN; DENG, HONGXIN; GOU, LANTU; YANG, JINLIANG

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a feasible intraperitoneal (i.p.) xenograft model in nude mice is a good strategy to evaluate the antitumor effect of drugs in vivo. However, the manipulation of human cancer cells in establishing a stable peritoneal carcinomatosis model in nude mice is problematic. In the present study, the ovarian and colorectal peritoneal tumor models were successfully established in nude mice by co-injection of human tumor cells and extracellular matrix gel. In ovarian tumor models, the mean number tumor nodes was significantly higher in the experimental group (intraperitoneal tumor cell co-injection with ECM gel) compared with the PBS control group on the 30th day (21.0±3.0 vs. 3.6±2.5; P<0.05). The same results were observed in the colorectal peritoneal tumor models on the 28th day. The colorectal peritoneal tumor model was further used to evaluate the chemotherapy effect of irinotecan (CPT-11). The mean weight of peritoneal tumor nodes in CPT-11 treatment group was significantly less than that of the control group (0.81±0.16 vs. 2.18±0.21 g; P<0.05). The results confirmed the value of these i.p. xenograft models in nude mice as efficient and feasible tools for preclinical evaluation. PMID:26788149

  14. Experimental Models for Evaluation of Nanoparticles in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesharwani, Prashant; Ghanghoria, Raksha; Jain, Narendra K

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs), the submicron-sized colloidal particles, have recently generated enormous interest among biomedical scientists, particularly in cancer therapy. A number of models are being used for exploring NPs safety and efficacy. Recently, cancer cell lines have explored as prominent experimental models for evaluating pharmacokinetic parameters, cell viability, cytotoxicity and drug efficacy in tumor cells. This review aims at thorough compilation of various cancer cell lines and in vivo models for evaluation of efficacy of NPs on one platform. This will provide a basis to explore and improvise pre-clinical models as a prelude to successful cancer research. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Experimental model of chronic pancreatitis, a review - Does it really exist?

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Riaz; Ochi, Koji; Harada, Hideo; Tanaka, Juntaro; Mizushima, Takaaki; Matsumoto, Shuji; Seno, Toshinobu; Ichimura, Mitsuko; Akiyama, Tsuneo; Yokota, Satoshi

    1995-01-01

    Experimental model of pancreatitis is mandatory for elucidating the pathobiology of the disease and also to see the response of a novel treatment. In addition, the need for an animal model of chronic pancreatitis is further strengthened by the relative inaccessibility and paucity of the human pancreatitis tissue. Whereas various models of acute pancreatitis and also of exocrine pancreatic tumor have been described, chronic pancr-eatitis has not been consistently reproduced in experimental ani...

  16. Biokinetic models for radionuclides in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcillo, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    The biokinetic models for many radionuclides are, to a large extent, based on data obtained in experimental animals. The methods used in the experimental development of a biokinetic model can be classified in two groups (i) those applied during the experimental work, which include the activity determination of a given radionuclide at different times and in different biological media such as blood, serum, organs/tissues, urine, bile and faeces and (ii) those methods used for the analysis and study of the experimental data, based in mathematical tools. Some of these methods are reviewed,with special emphasis in the whole body macro autoradiography. To conclude, the contribution that this type of studies can have in two fields of radiation protection is discussed, namely optimization of dosimetric evaluations and decorporation of radionuclides. (Author)

  17. Dynamic modeling of lung tumor motion during respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriakou, E; McKenzie, D R, E-mail: e.kyriakou@physics.usyd.edu.au, E-mail: d.mckenzie@physics.usyd.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-05-21

    A dynamic finite element model of the lung that incorporates a simplified geometry with realistic lung material properties has been developed. Observations of lung motion from respiratory-gated computed tomography were used to provide a database against which the predictions of the model are assessed. Data from six patients presenting with lung tumors were processed to give sagittal sections of the lung containing the tumor as a function of the breathing phase. Statistical shape modeling was used to outline the diaphragm, the tumor volume and the thoracic wall at each breathing phase. The motion of the tumor in the superior-inferior direction was plotted against the diaphragm displacement. The finite element model employed a simplified geometry in which the lung material fills a rectangular volume enabling two-dimensional coordinates to be used. The diaphragm is represented as a piston, driving the motion. Plots of lung displacement against diaphragm displacement form hysteresis loops that are a sensitive indicator of the characteristics of the motion. The key parameters of lung material that determine the motion are the density and elastic properties of lung material and the airway permeability. The model predictions of the hysteresis behavior agreed well with observation only when lung material is modeled as viscoelastic. The key material parameters are suggested for use as prognostic indicators of the progression of disease and of changes arising from the response of the lung to radiation treatment.

  18. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  19. Dendritic cell-based vaccines for the therapy of experimental tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piasecka, E.P.; Indrová, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2010), s. 257-268 ISSN 1750-743X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520807; GA ČR GA301/09/1024; GA MZd NS10660 Grant - others:Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education(PL) NN401235334 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : dendritic cells * preparation of vaccines * experimental tumors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.542, year: 2010

  20. Dynamics of melanoma tumor therapy with vesicular stomatitis virus: explaining the variability in outcomes using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, D M; Offord, C P; Dev, J; Bajzer, Z; Vile, R G; Dingli, D

    2012-05-01

    Tumor selective, replication competent viruses are being tested for cancer gene therapy. This approach introduces a new therapeutic paradigm due to potential replication of the therapeutic agent and induction of a tumor-specific immune response. However, the experimental outcomes are quite variable, even when studies utilize highly inbred strains of mice and the same cell line and virus. Recognizing that virotherapy is an exercise in population dynamics, we utilize mathematical modeling to understand the variable outcomes observed when B16ova malignant melanoma tumors are treated with vesicular stomatitis virus in syngeneic, fully immunocompetent mice. We show how variability in the initial tumor size and the actual amount of virus delivered to the tumor have critical roles on the outcome of therapy. Virotherapy works best when tumors are small, and a robust innate immune response can lead to superior tumor control. Strategies that reduce tumor burden without suppressing the immune response and methods that maximize the amount of virus delivered to the tumor should optimize tumor control in this model system.

  1. Applications of Magnetic Resonance in Model Systems: Tumor Biology and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Gillies

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A solid tumor presents a unique challenge as a system in which the dynamics of the relationship between vascularization, the physiological environment and metabolism are continually changing with growth and following treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS studies have demonstrated quantifiable linkages between the physiological environment, angiogenesis, vascularization and metabolism of tumors. The dynamics between these parameters continually change with tumor aggressiveness, tumor growth and during therapy and each of these can be monitored longitudinally, quantitatively and non-invasively with MRI and MRS. An important aspect of MRI and MRS studies is that techniques and findings are easily translated between systems. Hence, pre-clinical studies using cultured cells or experimental animals have a high connectivity to potential clinical utility. In the following review, leaders in the field of MR studies of basic tumor physiology using pre-clinical models have contributed individual sections according to their expertise and outlook. The following review is a cogent and timely overview of the current capabilities and state-of-the-art of MRI and MRS as applied to experimental cancers. A companion review deals with the application of MR methods to anticancer therapy.

  2. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Cell Proliferation in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Edinger

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the mechanisms of neoplastic disease and enhancing our ability to intervene in these processes requires an increased understanding of cellular and molecular changes as they occur in intact living animal models. We have begun to address these needs by developing a method of labeling tumor cells through constitutive expression of an optical reporter gene, noninvasively monitoring cellular proliferation in vivo using a sensitive photon detection system. A stable line of HeLa cells that expressed a modified firefly luciferase gene was generated, proliferation of these cells in irradiated severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice was monitored. Tumor cells were introduced into animals via subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous inoculation and whole body images, that revealed tumor location and growth kinetics, were obtained. The number of photons that were emitted from the labeled tumor cells and transmitted through murine tissues was sufficient to detect 1×103 cells in the peritoneal cavity, 1×104 cells at subcutaneous sites and 1×106 circulating cells immediately following injection. The kinetics of cell proliferation, as measured by photon emission, was exponential in the peritoneal cavity and at subcutaneous sites. Intravenous inoculation resulted in detectable colonies of tumor cells in animals receiving more than 1×103 cells. Our demonstrated ability to detect small numbers of tumor cells in living animals noninvasively suggests that therapies designed to treat minimal disease states, as occur early in the disease course and after elimination of the tumor mass, may be monitored using this approach. Moreover, it may be possible to monitor micrometastases and evaluate the molecular steps in the metastatic process. Spatiotemporal analyses of neoplasia will improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, this method will accelerate development of novel therapeutic

  3. Effect of policosanol on experimental thrombosis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal, D; Arruzazabala, M L; Más, R; Molina, V; Valdés, S

    1994-05-01

    Policosanol is a natural product, obtained from sugar cane wax (Saccharum officinarum L.) with which cholesterol-lowering effects have been demonstrated in experimental models, healthy volunteers and hypercholesterolemic patients. The effects of policosanol on experimental venous and arterial thrombosis in rats were investigated. Policosanol (25 mg/kg) significantly decreased the thrombus weight, in the venous thrombosis models, the protective effect persisting until 4 h after its oral administration. Policosanol (25 mg/kg single dose) was able to reduce rectal temperature variation induced by arterial thrombosis. Also at the same dose policosanol increased 6-keto-PGF1 alpha serum levels in rats.

  4. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  5. Computational Model for Tumor Oxygenation Applied to Clinical Data on Breast Tumor Hemoglobin Concentrations Suggests Vascular Dilatation and Compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Welter

    Full Text Available We present a computational model for trans-vascular oxygen transport in synthetic tumor and host tissue blood vessel networks, aiming at qualitatively explaining published data of optical mammography, which were obtained from 87 breast cancer patients. The data generally show average hemoglobin concentration to be higher in tumors versus host tissue whereas average oxy-to total hemoglobin concentration (vascular segment RBC-volume-weighted blood oxygenation can be above or below normal. Starting from a synthetic arterio-venous initial network the tumor vasculature was generated by processes involving cooption, angiogenesis, and vessel regression. Calculations of spatially resolved blood flow, hematocrit, oxy- and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood and tissue oxygenation were carried out for ninety tumor and associated normal vessel networks starting from various assumed geometries of feeding arteries and draining veins. Spatial heterogeneity in the extra-vascular partial oxygen pressure distribution can be related to various tumor compartments characterized by varying capillary densities and blood flow characteristics. The reported higher average hemoglobin concentration of tumors is explained by growth and dilatation of tumor blood vessels. Even assuming sixfold metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in tumorous versus host tissue, the predicted oxygen hemoglobin concentrations are above normal. Such tumors are likely associated with high tumor blood flow caused by high-caliber blood vessels crossing the tumor volume and hence oxygen supply exceeding oxygen demand. Tumor oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration below normal could only be achieved by reducing tumor vessel radii during growth by a randomly selected factor, simulating compression caused by intra-tumoral solid stress due to proliferation of cells and extracellular matrix. Since compression of blood vessels will impede chemotherapy we conclude that tumors with oxy- to total

  6. Fluctuation of Parameters in Tumor Cell Growth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bao-Quan; Wang, Xian-Ju; Liu, Guo-Tao; Liu, Liang-Gang

    2003-07-01

    We study the steady state properties of a logistic growth model in the presence of Gaussian white noise. Based on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation the steady state solution of the probability distribution function and its extrema have been investigated. It is found that the fluctuation of the tumor birth rate reduces the population of the cells while the fluctuation of predation rate can prevent the population of tumor cells from going into extinction. Noise in the system can induce the phase transition. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 10275099 and Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province of China under Grant Nos. 021707 and 001182

  7. Resistance of novel mouse strains different in MHC class I and the NKC domain to the development of experimental tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišerová, Anna; Richter, Jan; Čapková, Katarína; Bieblová, Jana; Mikyšková, Romana; Reiniš, Milan; Indrová, Marie

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the immunological mechanisms critical for tumor progression, we bred novel mouse strains, different in the NKC and H-2D domains. We used inbreeding to generate hybrids of Balb/c and C57BL/6 of stable H-2Db+d-NK1.1neg and H-2Db-d+NK1.1high phenotypes. We analyzed the growth of three established MHC class I-deficient tumor cell lines: TC-1/A9 tumor (HPV-associated) and B16F10 melanoma, both syngeneic to C57BL/6, and the MCB8 (3-methycholanthrene-induced tumor) syngeneic to Balb/c. Furthermore, we induced colorectal carcinoma by azoxymethane-DSS treatment to test the susceptibility to chemically-induced primary cancer. We found that the novel strains spontaneously regressed the tumor transplants syngeneic to both Balb/c (MCB8) and C57BL/6 (B16F10 and TC-1/A9) mice. The H2-Db+d-NK1.1neg, but not the H2-Db-d+NK1.1high strain was also highly resistant to chemically-induced colorectal cancer in comparison to the parental mice. The immune changes during TC-1/A9 cancer development involved an increase of the NK cell distribution in the peripheral blood and spleen along with higher expression of NKG2D activation antigen; this was in correlation with the time-dependent rise of cytotoxic activity in comparison to C57BL/6 mice. The TC-1/A9 cancer regression was accompanied by higher proportion of B cells in the spleen and B220+/CD86+ activated antigen-presenting B cells distributed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the periphery. The changes in the T-cell population were represented mainly by the prevalence of T helper cells reflected by grown CD4/CD8 ratio, most prominent in the b+d-NK1.1neg strain. The results of the present study imply usefulness of the two novel mouse strains as an experimental model for further studies of tumor resistance mechanisms.

  8. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-06

    Jan 6, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 86; Issue 2. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model physics in inverse see-saw motivated SO(10) GUT. Ram Lal Awasthi. Special: Supersymmetric Unified Theories and Higgs Physics Volume 86 Issue 2 February 2016 pp 223- ...

  9. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-06

    Jan 6, 2016 ... Dirac mass MH = ±M + μS/2. As μS does not play much role in any other prediction, we assume that it fits the neutrino oscillation data and one can determine it by inverting the inverse see-saw formula and using experimental results of neutrino masses and mixings. The model achieves precision gauge ...

  10. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it…

  11. Dendritic Cells in the Context of Human Tumors: Biology and Experimental Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovitz, Ilan; Melzer, Susanne; Amar, Sarah; Bocsi, József; Bloch, Merav; Efroni, Sol; Ram, Zvi; Tárnok, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent and versatile antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the immune system. DC have an exceptional ability to comprehend the immune context of a captured antigen based on molecular signals identified from its vicinity. The analyzed information is then conveyed to other immune effector cells. Such capability enables DC to play a pivotal role in mediating either an immunogenic response or immune tolerance towards an acquired antigen. This review summarizes current knowledge on DC in the context of human tumors. It covers the basics of human DC biology, elaborating on the different markers, morphology and function of the different subsets of human DC. Human blood-borne DC are comprised of at least three subsets consisting of one plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two to three myeloid DC (mDC) subsets. Some tissues have unique DC. Each subset has a different phenotype and function and may induce pro-tumoral or anti-tumoral effects. The review also discusses two methods fundamental to the research of DC on the single-cell level: multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) and image-based cytometry (IC). These methods, along with new genomics and proteomics tools, can provide high-resolution information on specific DC subsets and on immune and tumor cells with which they interact. The different layers of collected biological data may then be integrated using Immune-Cytomics modeling approaches. Such novel integrated approaches may help unravel the complex network of cellular interactions that DC carry out within tumors, and may help harness this complex immunological information into the development of more effective treatments for cancer.

  12. Experimental study of radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose for tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.; Dergilev, A.

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. Radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B 1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 minutes. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D- glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3±0.15MBq and 1.07±0.6MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio- D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  13. Electrochemical desalination of bricks - Experimental and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Gry; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2015-01-01

    Chlorides, nitrates and sulfates play an important role in the salt-decay of porous materials in buildings and monuments. Electrochemical desalination is a technology able to remove salts from such porous materials in order to stop or prevent the decay. In this paper, experimental and numerical......-contaminated bricks with respect to the monovalent ions is discussed. Comparison between the experimental and the simulation results showed that the proposed numerical model is able to predict electrochemical desalination treatments with remarkable accuracy, and it can be used as a predictive tool...

  14. Review of experimental models: sinusitis in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Coura Perez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In order to better understand the pathophysiology of rhinosinusitis, several attempts have been made to create the disease in an animal model. Among the studied rodents each has its advantages and disadvantages. Rabbits are considered more appropriate for studies that require surgical manipulation or invasive procedures. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the most viable experimental model of rhinosinusitis in rabbits to be adopted in future studies. METHODS: An electronic search for studies with experimental models of rhinosinusitis in rabbits published in English and Portuguese between July of 1967 and January of 2013 was conducted in Medline, Pub Med, Cochrane, and CAPES databases, using the keywords "sinusitis", "rabbits", and "polyps". RESULTS: A total of 256 studies were retrieved, but in accordance with the inclusion and exclusion criteria, only ten studies were selected. Many different methods of response assessment were used in these studies. CONCLUSION: To date, there is no ideal experimental model for induction of acute or chronic rhinosinusitis in rabbits, but the rhinogenic model appears to be the most viable option for the continuity of studies of the disease.

  15. [Review of experimental models: sinusitis in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, André Coura; Buzatto, Guilherme Pietrucci; Dantas, Ivan de Picole; Dorgam, João Vicente; Valera, Fabiana Cardoso Pereira; Tamashiro, Edwin; Lima, Wilma Terezinha Anselmo

    2014-01-01

    In order to better understand the pathophysiology of rhinosinusitis, several attempts have been made to create the disease in an animal model. Among the studied rodents each has its advantages and disadvantages. Rabbits are considered more appropriate for studies that require surgical manipulation or invasive procedures. To evaluate the most viable experimental model of rhinosinusitis in rabbits to be adopted in future studies. An electronic search for studies with experimental models of rhinosinusitis in rabbits published in English and Portuguese between July of 1967 and January of 2013 was conducted in Medline, Pub Med, Cochrane, and CAPES databases, using the keywords "sinusitis", "rabbits", and "polyps". A total of 256 studies were retrieved, but in accordance with the inclusion and exclusion criteria, only ten studies were selected. Many different methods of response assessment were used in these studies. To date, there is no ideal experimental model for induction of acute or chronic rhinosinusitis in rabbits, but the rhinogenic model appears to be the most viable option for the continuity of studies of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Mathematical modeling of tumor-induced immunosuppression by myeloid-derived suppressor cells: Implications for therapeutic targeting strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatpanahi, Seyed Peyman; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Pooya; Madjidzadeh, Keivan; Hassan, Moustapha; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr

    2018-04-07

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) belong to immature myeloid cells that are generated and accumulated during the tumor development. MDSCs strongly suppress the anti-tumor immunity and provide conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we present a mathematical model based on ordinary differential equations (ODE) to describe tumor-induced immunosuppression caused by MDSCs. The model consists of four equations and incorporates tumor cells, cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), natural killer (NK) cells and MDSCs. We also provide simulation models that evaluate or predict the effects of anti-MDSC drugs (e.g., l-arginine and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)) on the tumor growth and the restoration of anti-tumor immunity. The simulated results obtained using our model were in good agreement with the corresponding experimental findings on the expansion of splenic MDSCs, immunosuppressive effects of these cells at the tumor site and effectiveness of l-arginine and 5-FU on the re-establishment of antitumor immunity. Regarding this latter issue, our predictive simulation results demonstrated that intermittent therapy with low-dose 5-FU alone could eradicate the tumors irrespective of their origins and types. Furthermore, at the time of tumor eradication, the number of CTLs prevailed over that of cancer cells and the number of splenic MDSCs returned to the normal levels. Finally, our predictive simulation results also showed that the addition of l-arginine supplementation to the intermittent 5-FU therapy reduced the time of the tumor eradication and the number of iterations for 5-FU treatment. Thus, the present mathematical model provides important implications for designing new therapeutic strategies that aim to restore antitumor immunity by targeting MDSCs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Method of hyperthermia and tumor size influence effectiveness of doxorubicin release from thermosensitive liposomes in experimental tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerding, Linus; Limmer, Simone; Hossann, Martin; Zengerle, Anja; Wachholz, Kirsten; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Koning, Gerben A; Sroka, Ronald; Lindner, Lars H; Peller, Michael

    2016-01-28

    Systemic chemotherapy of solid tumors could be enhanced by local hyperthermia (HT) in combination with thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as drug carriers. In such an approach, effective HT of the tumor is considered essential for successful triggering local drug release and targeting of the drug to the tumor. To investigate the effect of HT method on the effectiveness of drug delivery, a novel laser-based HT device designed for the use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared systematically with the frequently used cold light lamp and water bath HT. Long circulating phosphatidyldiglycerol-based TSL (DPPG2-TSL) with encapsulated doxorubicin (DOX) were used as drug carrier enabling intravascular drug release. Experiments were performed in male Brown Norway rats with a syngeneic soft tissue sarcoma (BN 175) located on both hind legs. One tumor was heated while the second tumor remained unheated as a reference. Six animals were investigated per HT method. DPPG2-TSL were injected i.v. at a stable tumor temperature above 40°C. Thereafter, temperature was maintained for 60min. Total DOX concentration in plasma, tumor tissue and muscle was determined post therapy by HPLC. Finally, the new laser-based device was tested in a MRI environment at 3T using DPPG2-TSL with encapsulated Gd-based contrast agent. All methods showed effective DOX delivery by TSL with 4.5-23.1ng/mg found in the heated tumors. In contrast, DOX concentration in the non-heated tumors was 0.5±0.1ng/mg. Independent of used HT methods, higher DOX levels were found in the smaller tumors. In comparison water bath induced lowest DOX delivery but still showing fourfold higher DOX concentrations compared to the non-heated tumors. With the laser-based applicator, a 13 fold higher DOX deposition was possible for large tumors and a 15 fold higher for the small tumors, respectively. Temperature gradients in the tumor tissue were higher with the laser and cold light lamp (-0.3°C/mm to -0.5°C/mm) compared to

  18. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Munju; Gillies, Robert J; Rejniak, Katarzyna A

    2013-11-18

    Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  19. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-01-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  20. Experimental "evolutional machines": mathematical and experimental modeling of biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilkov, A. V.; Loginov, I. A.; Morozova, E. V.; Shuvaev, A. N.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    Experimentalists possess model systems of two major types for study of evolution continuous cultivation in the chemostat and long-term development in closed laboratory microecosystems with several trophic structure If evolutionary changes or transfer from one steady state to another in the result of changing qualitative properties of the system take place in such systems the main characteristics of these evolution steps can be measured By now this has not been realized from the point of view of methodology though a lot of data on the work of both types of evolutionary machines has been collected In our experiments with long-term continuous cultivation we used the bacterial strains containing in plasmids the cloned genes of bioluminescence and green fluorescent protein which expression level can be easily changed and controlled In spite of the apparent kinetic diversity of evolutionary transfers in two types of systems the general mechanisms characterizing the increase of used energy flow by populations of primer producent can be revealed at their study According to the energy approach at spontaneous transfer from one steady state to another e g in the process of microevolution competition or selection heat dissipation characterizing the rate of entropy growth should increase rather then decrease or maintain steady as usually believed The results of our observations of experimental evolution require further development of thermodynamic theory of open and closed biological systems and further study of general mechanisms of biological

  1. Oxygen distribution in tumors: A qualitative analysis and modeling study providing a novel Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerlöf, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    end, due to anoxia, but smaller tumors showed undisturbed oxygen distributions. The six different models with correlated parameters generated three classes of oxygen distributions. The first was a hypothetical, negative covariance between vessel proximity and pO 2 (VPO-C scenario); the second was a hypothetical positive covariance between vessel proximity and pO 2 (VPO+C scenario); and the third was the hypothesis of no correlation between vessel proximity and pO 2 (UP scenario). The VPO-C scenario produced a distinctly different oxygen distribution than the two other scenarios. The shape of the VPO-C scenario was similar to that of the nonvariable DOC model, and the larger the tumor, the greater the similarity between the two models. For all simulations, the mean oxygen tension decreased and the hypoxic fraction increased with tumor size. The absorbed dose required for definitive tumor control was highest for the VPO+C scenario, followed by the UP and VPO-C scenarios. Conclusions: A novel MC algorithm was presented which simulated oxygen distributions and radiation response for various biological parameter values. The analysis showed that the VPO-C scenario generated a clearly different oxygen distribution from the VPO+C scenario; the former exhibited a lower hypoxic fraction and higher radiosensitivity. In future studies, this modeling approach might be valuable for qualitative analyses of factors that affect oxygen distribution as well as analyses of specific experimental and clinical situations

  2. Calcium-activated potassium channels mediated blood-brain tumor barrier opening in a rat metastatic brain tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong John M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB impedes the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors. While adequate delivery of drugs occurs in systemic tumors, the BTB limits delivery of anti-tumor agents into brain metastases. Results In this study, we examined the function and regulation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa channels in a rat metastatic brain tumor model. We showed that intravenous infusion of NS1619, a KCa channel agonist, and bradykinin selectively enhanced BTB permeability in brain tumors, but not in normal brain. Iberiotoxin, a KCa channel antagonist, significantly attenuated NS1619-induced BTB permeability increase. We found KCa channels and bradykinin type 2 receptors (B2R expressed in cultured human metastatic brain tumor cells (CRL-5904, non-small cell lung cancer, metastasized to brain, human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC and human lung cancer brain metastasis tissues. Potentiometric assays demonstrated the activity of KCa channels in metastatic brain tumor cells and HBMEC. Furthermore, we detected higher expression of KCa channels in the metastatic brain tumor tissue and tumor capillary endothelia as compared to normal brain tissue. Co-culture of metastatic brain tumor cells and brain microvessel endothelial cells showed an upregulation of KCa channels, which may contribute to the overexpression of KCa channels in tumor microvessels and selectivity of BTB opening. Conclusion These findings suggest that KCa channels in metastatic brain tumors may serve as an effective target for biochemical modulation of BTB permeability to enhance selective delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to metastatic brain tumors.

  3. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database: A Comprehensive Resource for Mouse Models of Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J

    2017-11-01

    Research using laboratory mice has led to fundamental insights into the molecular genetic processes that govern cancer initiation, progression, and treatment response. Although thousands of scientific articles have been published about mouse models of human cancer, collating information and data for a specific model is hampered by the fact that many authors do not adhere to existing annotation standards when describing models. The interpretation of experimental results in mouse models can also be confounded when researchers do not factor in the effect of genetic background on tumor biology. The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) database is an expertly curated, comprehensive compendium of mouse models of human cancer. Through the enforcement of nomenclature and related annotation standards, MTB supports aggregation of data about a cancer model from diverse sources and assessment of how genetic background of a mouse strain influences the biological properties of a specific tumor type and model utility. Cancer Res; 77(21); e67-70. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Tumor mouse model confirms MAGE-A3 cancer immunotherapeutic as an efficient inducer of long-lasting anti-tumoral responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Gérard

    Full Text Available MAGE-A3 is a potential target for immunotherapy due to its tumor-specific nature and expression in several tumor types. Clinical data on MAGE-A3 immunotherapy have raised many questions that can only be addressed by using animal models. In the present study, different aspects of the murine anti-tumor immune responses induced by a recombinant MAGE-A3 protein (recMAGE-A3 in combination with different immunostimulants (AS01, AS02, CpG7909 or AS15 were investigated.Based on cytokine profile analyses and protection against challenge with MAGE-A3-expressing tumor, the combination recMAGE-A3+AS15 was selected for further experimental work, in particular to study the mechanisms of anti-tumor responses. By using MHC class I-, MHC class II-, perforin-, B-cell- and IFN-γ- knock-out mice and CD4+ T cell-, CD8+ T cell- and NK cell- depleted mice, we demonstrated that CD4+ T cells and NK cells are the main anti-tumor effectors, and that IFN-γ is a major effector molecule. This mouse tumor model also established the need to repeat recMAGE-A3+AS15 injections to sustain efficient anti-tumor responses. Furthermore, our results indicated that the efficacy of tumor rejection by the elicited anti-MAGE-A3 responses depends on the proportion of tumor cells expressing MAGE-A3.The recMAGE-A3+AS15 cancer immunotherapy efficiently induced an antigen-specific, functional and long-lasting immune response able to recognize and eliminate MAGE-A3-expressing tumor cells up to several months after the last immunization in mice. The data highlighted the importance of the immunostimulant to induce a Th1-type immune response, as well as the key role played by IFN-γ, CD4+ T cells and NK cells in the anti-tumoral effect.

  5. Ischemic postconditioning: experimental models and protocol algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyschally, Andreas; van Caster, Patrick; Iliodromitis, Efstathios K; Schulz, Rainer; Kremastinos, Dimitrios T; Heusch, Gerd

    2009-09-01

    Ischemic postconditioning, a simple mechanical maneuver at the onset of reperfusion, reduces infarct size after ischemia/reperfusion. After its first description in 2003 by Zhao et al. numerous experimental studies have investigated this protective phenomenon. Whereas the underlying mechanisms and signal transduction are not yet understood in detail, infarct size reduction by ischemic postconditioning was confirmed in all species tested so far, including man. We have now reviewed the literature with focus on experimental models and protocols to better understand the determinants of protection by ischemic postconditioning or lack of it. Only studies with infarct size as unequivocal endpoint were considered. In all species and models, the duration of index ischemia and the protective protocol algorithm impact on the outcome of ischemic postconditioning, and gender, age, and myocardial temperature contribute.

  6. Dynamic {sup 11}C-methionine PET analysis has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas: an experimental study using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji; Hatano, Toshiyuki [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan); Yi, Min; Kohanawa, Masashi [Hokkaido University, Department of Advanced Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nishijima, Ken-ichi [Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    We evaluated whether the dynamic profile of L-{sup 11}C-methionine ({sup 11}C-MET) may have an additional value in differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas in experimental rat models by small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Rhodococcus aurantiacus and allogenic rat C6 glioma cells were inoculated, respectively, into the right and left calf muscles to generate a rat model bearing both granulomas and tumors (n = 6). Ten days after the inoculations, dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET was performed by small animal PET up to 120 min after injection of {sup 11}C-MET. The next day, after overnight fasting, the rats were injected with {sup 18}F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG), and dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET was performed up to 180 min. The time-activity curves, static images, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) in the lesions were calculated. {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma showed a slow exponential clearance after an initial distribution, while the uptake in the tumor gradually increased with time. The dynamic pattern of {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma was significantly different from that in the tumor (p < 0.001). In the static analysis of {sup 11}C-MET, visual assessment and SUV analysis could not differentiate the tumor from the granuloma in all cases, although the mean SUV in the granuloma (1.48 {+-} 0.09) was significantly lower than that in the tumor (1.72 {+-} 0.18, p < 0.01). The dynamic patterns, static images, and mean SUVs of {sup 18}F-FDG in the granuloma were similar to those in the tumor (p = NS). Dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomatous lesions, which deserves further elucidation in clinical settings. (orig.)

  7. Compartment model predicts VEGF secretion and investigates the effects of VEGF Trap in tumor-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey D Finley

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, is important in tumor growth and metastasis. A key regulator of angiogenesis is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, which has been targeted in numerous anti-angiogenic therapies aimed at inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. Systems biology approaches, including computational modeling, are useful for understanding this complex biological process and can aid in the development of novel and effective therapeutics that target the VEGF family of proteins and receptors. We have developed a computational model of VEGF transport and kinetics in the tumor-bearing mouse, which includes three compartments: normal tissue, blood, and tumor. The model simulates human tumor xenografts and includes human (VEGF121 and VEGF165 and mouse (VEGF120 and VEGF164 isoforms. The model incorporates molecular interactions between these VEGF isoforms and receptors (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, as well as co-receptors (NRP1 and NRP2. We also include important soluble factors: soluble VEGFR1 (sFlt-1 and α-2-macroglobulin. The model accounts for transport via macromolecular transendothelial permeability, lymphatic flow, and plasma clearance. We have fit the model to available in vivo experimental data on the plasma concentration of free VEGF Trap and VEGF Trap bound to mouse and human VEGF in order to estimate the rates at which parenchymal cells (myocytes and tumor cells and endothelial cells secrete VEGF. Interestingly, the predicted tumor VEGF secretion rates are significantly lower (0.007 – 0.023 molecules/cell/s, depending on the tumor microenvironment than most reported in vitro measurements (0.03 – 2.65 molecules/cell/s. The optimized model is used to investigate the interstitial and plasma VEGF concentrations and the effect of the VEGF-neutralizing agent, VEGF Trap (aflibercept. This work complements experimental studies performed in mice and provides a framework with which to examine the effects of

  8. Tocotrienol-adjuvanted dendritic cells inhibit tumor growth and metastasis: a murine model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitti Rahma Abdul Hafid

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL from 4T1 cells (DC+TL once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF inhibited (p<0.05 tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05 levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05 by CD8(+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines.

  9. A deep learning model integrating FCNNs and CRFs for brain tumor segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaomei; Wu, Yihong; Song, Guidong; Li, Zhenye; Zhang, Yazhuo; Fan, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Accurate and reliable brain tumor segmentation is a critical component in cancer diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment outcome evaluation. Build upon successful deep learning techniques, a novel brain tumor segmentation method is developed by integrating fully convolutional neural networks (FCNNs) and Conditional Random Fields (CRFs) in a unified framework to obtain segmentation results with appearance and spatial consistency. We train a deep learning based segmentation model using 2D image patches and image slices in following steps: 1) training FCNNs using image patches; 2) training CRFs as Recurrent Neural Networks (CRF-RNN) using image slices with parameters of FCNNs fixed; and 3) fine-tuning the FCNNs and the CRF-RNN using image slices. Particularly, we train 3 segmentation models using 2D image patches and slices obtained in axial, coronal and sagittal views respectively, and combine them to segment brain tumors using a voting based fusion strategy. Our method could segment brain images slice-by-slice, much faster than those based on image patches. We have evaluated our method based on imaging data provided by the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Challenge (BRATS) 2013, BRATS 2015 and BRATS 2016. The experimental results have demonstrated that our method could build a segmentation model with Flair, T1c, and T2 scans and achieve competitive performance as those built with Flair, T1, T1c, and T2 scans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Seclazone Reactor Modeling And Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinga, T. [ETH-Zuerich (Switzerland); Olalde, G. [CNRS Odeillo (France); Steinfeld, A. [PSI and ETHZ (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    A numerical model is formulated for the SOLZINC solar chemical reactor for the production of Zn by carbothermal reduction of ZnO. The model involves solving, by the finite-volume technique, a 1D unsteady state energy equation that couples heat transfer to the chemical kinetics for a shrinking packed bed exposed to thermal radiation. Validation is accomplished by comparison with experimentally measured temperature profiles and Zn production rates as a function of time, obtained for a 5-kW solar reactor tested at PSI's solar furnace. (author)

  11. Portable gamma probe for radioimmune localization of experimental colon tumor xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.R.; Thurston, M.O.; Hinkle, G.H. Jr.; Martin, D.T.; Haagensen, D.E. Jr.; Houchens, D.; Tuttle, S.E.; Martin, E.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Tumor radioimmune detection as presently practiced utilizes a gamma scintillation camera to image tumors. A major clinical limitation is the inability to detect tumors smaller than 2 cm. This limitation is due in part to the inverse square law which states. A hand-held gamma-detecting probe (GDP) suitable for intraoperative use has been developed. The GDP can be placed near radioactive tumors and take advantage of the inverse square law in a way not possible with external scanning cameras. The use of radiolabeled baboon carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific antisera produced increased tumor isotope localization in CEA-producing tumors compared to the injection of nonspecific antisera. Tumor isotope-antisera localization was not influenced by tumor volume or time since tumor implantation. The GDP probe counts demonstrated a high degree of correlation with gamma well tissue counts. The probe was able to detect preferential tumor localization in doses lower than could be detected with external scintillation cameras

  12. Experimental In Vivo Models of Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Segal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Candidiasis is a multifaceted fungal disease including mucosal-cutaneous, visceral, and disseminated infections caused by yeast species of the genus Candida. Candida infections are among the most common human mycoses. Candida species are the third to fourth most common isolates from bloodstream infections in neutropenic or immunocompromised hospitalized patients. The mucosal-cutaneous forms—particularly vaginal infections—have a high prevalence. Vaginitis caused by Candida species is the second most common vaginal infection. Hence, candidiasis is a major subject for research, including experimental in vivo models to study pathogenesis, prevention, or therapy of the disease. The following review article will focus on various experimental in vivo models in different laboratory animals, such as mammals (mice, rats, rabbits, the fruit fly–Drosophila melanogaster, the larvae of the moth Galleria mellonella, or the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The review will describe the induction of the different clinical forms of candidiasis in the various models and the validity of such models in mimicking the human clinical situations. The use of such models for the assessment of antifungal drugs, evaluation of potential vaccines to protect before candidiasis, exploration of Candida virulence factors, and comparison of pathogenicity of different Candida species will be included in the review. All of the above will be reported as based on published studies of numerous investigators as well as on the research of the author and his group.

  13. Evaluation of Tumor Angiogenesis with a Second-Generation US Contrast Medium in a Rat Breast Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Eun Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Nam Kug; Gong, Gyung Yub [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Tumor angiogenesis is an important factor for tumor growth, treatment response and prognosis. Noninvasive imaging methods for the evaluation of tumor angiogenesis have been studied, but a method for the quantification of tumor angiogenesis has not been established. This study was designed to evaluate tumor angiogenesis in a rat breast tumor model by the use of a contrast enhanced ultrasound (US) examination with a second-generation US contrast agent. The alkylating agent 19N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) was injected into the intraperitoneal cavity of 30-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats. Three to four months later, breast tumors were detected along the mammary lines of the rats. A total of 17 breast tumors larger than 1 cm in nine rats were evaluated by gray-scale US, color Doppler US and contrast-enhanced US using SonoVue. The results were recorded as digital video images; time-intensity curves and hemodynamic parameters were analyzed. Pathological breast tumor specimens were obtained just after the US examinations. The tumor specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and the expression of CD31, an endothelial cell marker, was determined by immunohistochemical staining. We also evaluated the pathological diagnosis of the tumors and the microvessel density (MVD). Spearman's correlation and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used for the analysis. The pathological diagnoses were 11 invasive ductal carcinomas and six benign intraductal epithelial proliferations. The MVD did not correlate with the pathological diagnosis. However, blood volume (BV) showed a statistically significant correlation with MVD (Spearman's correlation, p < 0.05). Contrast-enhanced US using a second-generation US contrast material was useful for the evaluation of tumor angiogenesis of breast tumors in the rat.

  14. Endometriose: modelo experimental em ratas Endometriosis: experimental model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schor

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: divulgar a metodologia da indução de endometriose experimental em animais de laboratório. Método: utilizamos ratas albinas, virgens, adultas de aproximadamente três meses de idade, que foram inicialmente anestesiadas pelo éter etílico. Aberta a cavidade abdominal, identificamos os cornos uterinos e retiramos um fragmento de aproximadamente 4 cm do corno uterino direito. Esse fragmento foi mergulhado em solução fisiológica e sob lupa estereoscópica foi separado o endométrio do miométrio e feitos retângulos de aproximadamente 4 por 5 mm. Esses foram fixados por meio de fio de sutura, sobre vasos sangüíneos visíveis a olho nu, na parede lateral do abdômen, tomando-se sempre o cuidado de manter a porção do endométrio livre voltada para a luz da cavidade abdominal. Após 21 dias os animais foram novamente operados para verificarmos o tamanho dos implantes e para retirada do endométrio ectópico para análise histológica. Resultados: macroscopicamente observamos crescimento significativo dos implantes endometriais. Ao exame microscópico pudemos observar a presença de epitélio glandular e estroma semelhantes ao do endométrio tópico. Conclusões: o modelo utilizado reproduz a doença, em ratas, sendo método auxiliar de valia para estudar esta afecção, principalmente a ação de medicamentos sobre esses implantes.Purpose: to demonstrate the experimental endometriosis induction in animals. Method: we used adult female Wistar rats weighing 200 - 250 g anesthetized with ethyl ether to open the abdominal cavity. After identifying the uterine horns, we removed an approximately 4 cm fragment from the right uterine horn. This fragment was placed in physiological saline and, with the aid of a stereoscopic magnifying glass, the endometrium was separated from the myometrium and cut into rectangles of approximately 4 x 5 mm. These rectangles were fastened to the lateral abdominal wall near great blood vessels, taking care

  15. Systemic Distribution and Tumor Localization of Adoptively Transferred Lymphocytes in Mice: Comparison with Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Melder

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which tumors are able to evade cellular immune responses are still largely unknown. It is likely, however, that the initial recruitment of lymphocytes to tumor vessels is limited by cell retention in normal tissue, which results in a low flux of these cells into the tumor vasculature. We grew MCaIV. (20mouse mammary carcinoma tumors in the leg of SCID mice and injected 111In-oxine-labeled, primed T lymphocytes directed against the tumor intravenously. The systemic distribution of cells in normal organs was similar between mice injected with primed and control lymphocyte populations, except for a delayed clearance of primed lymphocytes from the lungs. Kinetics of lymphocyte localization to the tumor were identical between the primed and control lymphocyte populations. Splenectomy before the injection of primed lymphocytes increased delivery of cells to the lungs and liver after 1 hour with no significant improvement in tumor localization. Within 24 to 168 hours after injection, localization of cells in the liver of splenectomized mice was higher than in the control group. However, no significant difference in tumor localization was observed between groups. A physiologically based compartmental model of lymphocyte distribution predicted the compartmental sequestration and identified model parameters critical for experimental planning and therapeutic optimization.

  16. Models for Experimental High Density Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradecki, Tomasz; Swoboda, Julia; Nowak, Katarzyna; Dziechciarz, Klaudia

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the effects of research on models of high density housing. The authors present urban projects for experimental high density housing estates. The design was based on research performed on 38 examples of similar housing in Poland that have been built after 2003. Some of the case studies show extreme density and that inspired the researchers to test individual virtual solutions that would answer the question: How far can we push the limits? The experimental housing projects show strengths and weaknesses of design driven only by such indexes as FAR (floor attenuation ratio - housing density) and DPH (dwellings per hectare). Although such projects are implemented, the authors believe that there are reasons for limits since high index values may be in contradiction to the optimum character of housing environment. Virtual models on virtual plots presented by the authors were oriented toward maximising the DPH index and DAI (dwellings area index) which is very often the main driver for developers. The authors also raise the question of sustainability of such solutions. The research was carried out in the URBAN model research group (Gliwice, Poland) that consists of academic researchers and architecture students. The models reflect architectural and urban regulations that are valid in Poland. Conclusions might be helpful for urban planners, urban designers, developers, architects and architecture students.

  17. Experimental animal modelling for TB vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research for a novel vaccine to prevent tuberculosis is an urgent medical need. The current vaccine, BCG, has demonstrated a non-homogenous efficacy in humans, but still is the gold standard to be improved upon. In general, the main indicator for testing the potency of new candidates in animal models is the reduction of the bacillary load in the lungs at the acute phase of the infection. Usually, this reduction is similar to that induced by BCG, although in some cases a weak but significant improvement can be detected, but none of candidates are able to prevent establishment of infection. The main characteristics of several laboratory animals are reviewed, reflecting that none are able to simulate the whole characteristics of human tuberculosis. As, so far, no surrogate of protection has been found, it is important to test new candidates in several models in order to generate convincing evidence of efficacy that might be better than that of BCG in humans. It is also important to investigate the use of “in silico” and “ex vivo” models to better understand experimental data and also to try to replace, or at least reduce and refine experimental models in animals.

  18. Surface physics theoretical models and experimental methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mamonova, Marina V; Prudnikova, I A

    2016-01-01

    The demands of production, such as thin films in microelectronics, rely on consideration of factors influencing the interaction of dissimilar materials that make contact with their surfaces. Bond formation between surface layers of dissimilar condensed solids-termed adhesion-depends on the nature of the contacting bodies. Thus, it is necessary to determine the characteristics of adhesion interaction of different materials from both applied and fundamental perspectives of surface phenomena. Given the difficulty in obtaining reliable experimental values of the adhesion strength of coatings, the theoretical approach to determining adhesion characteristics becomes more important. Surface Physics: Theoretical Models and Experimental Methods presents straightforward and efficient approaches and methods developed by the authors that enable the calculation of surface and adhesion characteristics for a wide range of materials: metals, alloys, semiconductors, and complex compounds. The authors compare results from the ...

  19. Relations between radiobiological hypoxia and nuclear magnetic resonance-imaged blood microcirculation in experimental tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Sachiko; Ando, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of hypoxic cells subjected to radiation were investigated and compared with those of microcirculation for two murine fibrosarcomas growing in C3H mice. Small NFSa tumors, growing in air-breathing mice, developed a radioresistant tail on the survival curve. The tail was indistinguishably parallel to a survival curve for an artificially hypoxic tumor. As the NFSa tumors increased in size, the hypoxic tail moved upward with no change of Do, resulting in increase of hypoxic fraction from 3.9% to 40%. The R1137 tumors had no radioresistant tail nor hypoxic fraction regardless of tumor size. However, large-sized R1137 tumors developed a significant number of radioresistant, hypoxic cells with an intermediate Do, and were effectively sensitized by administrating misonidazole before irradiation. Thus, the NFSa tumors were fractionally hypoxic, and the large R1137 tumors had intermediate hypoxia. Measurement of tumor microcirculation by gadolinium-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance indicated that both blood flow and blood volume decreased significantly when the NFSa tumor grew large. Similar reduction in these microcirculation parameters was also observed for the R1137 tumor. The small-sized NFSa tumor had relatively larger blood volume and faster blood flow than the small-sized R1137 tumor. When large-sized tumors were compared to each other, the NFSa again had better blood flow than the R1137. However, the blood volume in the large-sized tumors was significantly (p<0.05) smaller for the NFSa tumor than for the R1137 tumor. It was concluded that blood flow could not be a single determinant for tumor hypoxia, and the difference between fractional hypoxia and intermediate hypoxia would be reflected in the ratio of blood flow to blood volume. (author)

  20. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagane, Masaki, E-mail: nagane@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Yasui, Hironobu, E-mail: yassan@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Yamamori, Tohru, E-mail: yamamorit@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Zhao, Songji, E-mail: zsi@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji, E-mail: kuge@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Central Institute of Isotope Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Tamaki, Nagara, E-mail: natamaki@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kameya, Hiromi, E-mail: kameya@affrc.go.jp [Food Safety Division, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan); Nakamura, Hideo, E-mail: naka@science-edu.org [Department of Chemistry, Hokkaido University of Education, Hakodate (Japan); Fujii, Hirotada, E-mail: hgfujii@sapmed.ac.jp [Center for Medical Education, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Inanami, Osamu, E-mail: inanami@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  1. Implementation of plaid model biclustering method on microarray of carcinoma and adenoma tumor gene expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardaneswari, Gianinna; Bustamam, Alhadi; Sarwinda, Devvi

    2017-10-01

    A Tumor is an abnormal growth of cells that serves no purpose. Carcinoma is a tumor that grows from the top of the cell membrane and the organ adenoma is a benign tumor of the gland-like cells or epithelial tissue. In the field of molecular biology, the development of microarray technology is used in the data store of disease genetic expression. For each of microarray gene, an amount of information is stored for each trait or condition. In gene expression data clustering can be done with a bicluster algorithm, thats clustering method which not only the objects to be clustered, but also the properties or condition of the object. This research proposed Plaid Model Biclustering as one of biclustering method. In this study, we discuss the implementation of Plaid Model Biclustering Method on microarray of Carcinoma and Adenoma tumor gene expression data. From the experimental results, we found three biclusters are formed by Carcinoma gene expression data and four biclusters are formed by Adenoma gene expression data.

  2. Comparison of Kinetic Models for Dual-Tracer Receptor Concentration Imaging in Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzei, Nazanin; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Elliott, Jonathan T; Holt, Robert W; Gunn, Jason R; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W; Tichauer, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    Molecular differences between cancerous and healthy tissue have become key targets for novel therapeutics specific to tumor receptors. However, cancer cell receptor expression can vary within and amongst different tumors, making strategies that can quantify receptor concentration in vivo critical for the progression of targeted therapies. Recently a dual-tracer imaging approach capable of providing quantitative measures of receptor concentration in vivo was developed. It relies on the simultaneous injection and imaging of receptor-targeted tracer and an untargeted tracer (to account for non-specific uptake of the targeted tracer). Early implementations of this approach have been structured on existing “reference tissue” imaging methods that have not been optimized for or validated in dual-tracer imaging. Using simulations and mouse tumor model experimental data, the salient findings in this study were that all widely used reference tissue kinetic models can be used for dual-tracer imaging, with the linearized simplified reference tissue model offering a good balance of accuracy and computational efficiency. Moreover, an alternate version of the full two-compartment reference tissue model can be employed accurately by assuming that the K1s of the targeted and untargeted tracers are similar to avoid assuming an instantaneous equilibrium between bound and free states (made by all other models). PMID:25414912

  3. Experimental model of arteriovenous fistula in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Dae Chul; Seo, Dong Man; Kim, Hyun Jin and others

    1997-01-01

    To establish an experimental model of arteriovenous fistula in pigs. Ten fistulas were created in eight pigs, and angiography was performed 3 to 5 days after surgery. A follow-up angiogram of three fistulas was obtained 2 to 12 weeks later. In one animal, pathologic examination showed occlusion 8 weeks after a successful operations. Eight angiograms of nine fistulas in seven pigs were obtained; one animal died due to cardiac failure. In six pigs, high-flow fistulas were shown to be present, and in two, the fistulas were slow flow; a pseudoaneurysm was seen in one. A follow-up angiogram obtained in three cases showed occlusion of the fistula. Pathologic examination of one animal showed fibrosis in the occluded portion of the fistula. An arteriovenous fistula model was surgically established in 80% of cases; during follow-up, three fistulas were seen to be occluded due to fibrosis. This model can therefore be used within one week of surgery

  4. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejal Desai

    Full Text Available Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2 and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper

  5. MR Vascular Fingerprinting in Stroke and Brain Tumors Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasson, B; Pannetier, N; Coquery, N; Boisserand, Ligia S B; Collomb, Nora; Schuff, N; Moseley, M; Zaharchuk, G; Barbier, E L; Christen, T

    2016-11-24

    In this study, we evaluated an MRI fingerprinting approach (MRvF) designed to provide high-resolution parametric maps of the microvascular architecture (i.e., blood volume fraction, vessel diameter) and function (blood oxygenation) simultaneously. The method was tested in rats (n = 115), divided in 3 models: brain tumors (9 L, C6, F98), permanent stroke, and a control group of healthy animals. We showed that fingerprinting can robustly distinguish between healthy and pathological brain tissues with different behaviors in tumor and stroke models. In particular, fingerprinting revealed that C6 and F98 glioma models have similar signatures while 9 L present a distinct evolution. We also showed that it is possible to improve the results of MRvF and obtain supplemental information by changing the numerical representation of the vascular network. Finally, good agreement was found between MRvF and conventional MR approaches in healthy tissues and in the C6, F98, and permanent stroke models. For the 9 L glioma model, fingerprinting showed blood oxygenation measurements that contradict results obtained with a quantitative BOLD approach. In conclusion, MR vascular fingerprinting seems to be an efficient technique to study microvascular properties in vivo. Multiple technical improvements are feasible and might improve diagnosis and management of brain diseases.

  6. Toward in vivo lung's tissue incompressibility characterization for tumor motion modeling in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Samani, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    the tumor motion trajectory and its final locations obtained from simulations with and without considering tissue incompressibility variation were very different. For example, tumor displacements in the z direction were −11.23 and −38.10 mm obtained with the Marlow hyperelastic material model in conjunction with constant and variable Poisson's ratio, respectively. By comparing the acquired 4D-CT image sequence of the porcine lung with their image sequence counterparts obtained from the hyperelastic model with constant and variable Poisson's ratio, it was shown that using variable tissue incompressibility reduced errors significantly in tumor motion prediction. Conclusions: This investigation demonstrates the importance of incompressibility variation estimation and utilization for accurate tumor tracking in computer assisted lung external beam radiation therapy. An optimization framework was developed to estimate a Poisson's ratio function in terms of respiration cycle time using experimental image data of the lung. Utilizing this function along with respiratory system FE modeling may lead to more effective tumor targeting, hence potentially improving the outcome of lung external beam radiation therapy techniques. This is particularly true for stereotactic body radiation therapy where only one or a few fraction treatments are applied, precluding the possibility of averaging out dosimetric deviations introduced by the respiratory motion.

  7. Cell Competition Drives the Formation of Metastatic Tumors in a Drosophila Model of Epithelial Tumor Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M; Herranz, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging. The mechan......Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging....... The mechanisms that allow for ongoing cell competition during adult life could, in principle, contribute to tumorigenesis. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis has been lacking. Here, we provide evidence that cell competition drives tumor formation in a Drosophila model of epithelial cancer. Cells...... of the Septin family protein Peanut. Cytokinesis failure due to downregulation of Peanut is required for tumorigenesis. This study provides evidence that the cellular mechanisms that drive cell competition during normal tissue growth can be co-opted to drive tumor formation and metastasis. Analogous mechanisms...

  8. Superficial tension: experimental model with simple materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintori Ferreira, María Alejandra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work appears a didactic offer based on an experimental activity using materials of very low cost, orientated to achieving that the student understand and interpret the phenomenon of superficial tension together with the importance of the modeling in sciences. It has as principal aim of education bring the student over to the mechanics of the static fluids and the intermolecular forces, combining scientific contents with questions near to the student what provides an additional motivation to the reflection of the scientific investigation.

  9. Microspheres labelled with short-lived isotopes: Development and application for tumors treatment (Experimental study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdovsky, B.Y.; Rosiev, R.A.; Goncharova, A.Y.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Petriev, V.M.; Grigoriev, A.N.; Schischkanov, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of the conducted studies strongly suggests the possibility of usage of the domestic protein microspheres as a vehicle for radionuclide. The neutron-activating method of RPP production enables to utilize a broad spectrum of short-living isotopes that can be delivered into the target organ and anchored there for a long time. Good treatment results were obtained in case of the experimentally induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats after intraarticular loading of 165 Dy-hMSA. Mathematical calculations show that homogeneous distribution of RPP in human articulation cavity with the square of 100 cm 2 can be achieved when the quantity of administered particles exceeds 3000. On the example of 165 Dy-hMSA energy characteristic distribution we demonstrated that the absorbed dose for damaged cells at 2mm distance from the radioactive source is 7 times less than the one for a sphere of 2mm diameter. Analysis of dosimetric data in case of intratumoral loading of 165 Dy-hMSA also point out the necessity of the absorbed dose calculation methods taking into account the distance from the source and possible heterogeneity of RPP distribution inside the tumor to be employed. The prolonged RPP detention in the target causing no essential morphological and functional changes was achieved by embolization on the level of septal and interlobular arteries and of efferent arterioles in the animal's renal. The uniformity of microsphere distribution in the organ and their accumulation in tumors depends on the number of particles being administered. Investigations carried out suggest the efficacy of radionuclide therapy application for treatment of oncological and heavy somatic diseases. They also indicate the necessity of further investigations aimed to optimize the usage of microspheres as a radionuclide carrier usage and to work out the criteria of dosimetric planning

  10. Microspheres labelled with short-lived isotopes: Development and application for tumors treatment (Experimental study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdovsky, B.Y.; Rosiev, R.A.; Goncharova, A.Y.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Petriev, V.M.; Grigoriev, A.N.; Schischkanov, N.G. [Medical Radiological Research Centre RAMS, Kaluga Region, (Russian Federation)

    1997-10-01

    Analysis of the conducted studies strongly suggests the possibility of usage of the domestic protein microspheres as a vehicle for radionuclide. The neutron-activating method of RPP production enables to utilize a broad spectrum of short-living isotopes that can be delivered into the target organ and anchored there for a long time. Good treatment results were obtained in case of the experimentally induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats after intraarticular loading of {sup 165}Dy-hMSA. Mathematical calculations show that homogeneous distribution of RPP in human articulation cavity with the square of 100 cm{sup 2} can be achieved when the quantity of administered particles exceeds 3000. On the example of {sup 165}Dy-hMSA energy characteristic distribution we demonstrated that the absorbed dose for damaged cells at 2mm distance from the radioactive source is 7 times less than the one for a sphere of 2mm diameter. Analysis of dosimetric data in case of intratumoral loading of {sup 165}Dy-hMSA also point out the necessity of the absorbed dose calculation methods taking into account the distance from the source and possible heterogeneity of RPP distribution inside the tumor to be employed. The prolonged RPP detention in the target causing no essential morphological and functional changes was achieved by embolization on the level of septal and interlobular arteries and of efferent arterioles in the animal`s renal. The uniformity of microsphere distribution in the organ and their accumulation in tumors depends on the number of particles being administered. Investigations carried out suggest the efficacy of radionuclide therapy application for treatment of oncological and heavy somatic diseases. They also indicate the necessity of further investigations aimed to optimize the usage of microspheres as a radionuclide carrier usage and to work out the criteria of dosimetric planning 25 refs.

  11. Selection and Validation of Predictive Models of Radiation Effects on Tumor Growth Based on Noninvasive Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, E A B F; Oden, J T; Wohlmuth, B; Shahmoradi, A; Hormuth, D A; Yankeelov, T E; Scarabosio, L; Horger, T

    2017-12-01

    The use of mathematical and computational models for reliable predictions of tumor growth and decline in living organisms is one of the foremost challenges in modern predictive science, as it must cope with uncertainties in observational data, model selection, model parameters, and model inadequacy, all for very complex physical and biological systems. In this paper, large classes of parametric models of tumor growth in vascular tissue are discussed including models for radiation therapy. Observational data is obtained from MRI of a murine model of glioma and observed over a period of about three weeks, with X-ray radiation administered 14.5 days into the experimental program. Parametric models of tumor proliferation and decline are presented based on the balance laws of continuum mixture theory, particularly mass balance, and from accepted biological hypotheses on tumor growth. Among these are new model classes that include characterizations of effects of radiation and simple models of mechanical deformation of tumors. The Occam Plausibility Algorithm (OPAL) is implemented to provide a Bayesian statistical calibration of the model classes, 39 models in all, as well as the determination of the most plausible models in these classes relative to the observational data, and to assess model inadequacy through statistical validation processes. Discussions of the numerical analysis of finite element approximations of the system of stochastic, nonlinear partial differential equations characterizing the model classes, as well as the sampling algorithms for Monte Carlo and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods employed in solving the forward stochastic problem, and in computing posterior distributions of parameters and model plausibilities are provided. The results of the analyses described suggest that the general framework developed can provide a useful approach for predicting tumor growth and the effects of radiation.

  12. Graphical Models for Quasi-Experimental Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongnam; Steiner, Peter M.; Hall, Courtney E.; Su, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and quasi-experimental designs play a central role in estimating cause-effect relationships in education, psychology, and many other fields of the social and behavioral sciences. This paper presents and discusses the causal graphs of experimental and quasi-experimental designs. For quasi-experimental designs the authors demonstrate…

  13. Choindroitinase ABC I-Mediated Enhancement of Oncolytic Virus Spread and Anti Tumor Efficacy: A Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangjin; Lee, Hyun Geun; Dmitrieva, Nina; Kim, Junseok; Kaur, Balveen; Friedman, Avner

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are genetically engineered viruses that are designed to kill cancer cells while doing minimal damage to normal healthy tissue. After being injected into a tumor, they infect cancer cells, multiply inside them, and when a cancer cell is killed they move on to spread and infect other cancer cells. Chondroitinase ABC (Chase-ABC) is a bacterial enzyme that can remove a major glioma ECM component, chondroitin sulfate glycosoamino glycans from proteoglycans without any deleterious effects in vivo. It has been shown that Chase-ABC treatment is able to promote the spread of the viruses, increasing the efficacy of the viral treatment. In this paper we develop a mathematical model to investigate the effect of the Chase-ABC on the treatment of glioma by oncolytic viruses (OV). We show that the model's predictions agree with experimental results for a spherical glioma. We then use the model to test various treatment options in the heterogeneous microenvironment of the brain. The model predicts that separate injections of OV, one into the center of the tumor and another outside the tumor will result in better outcome than if the total injection is outside the tumor. In particular, the injection of the ECM-degrading enzyme (Chase-ABC) on the periphery of the main tumor core need to be administered in an optimal strategy in order to infect and eradicate the infiltrating glioma cells outside the tumor core in addition to proliferative cells in the bulk of tumor core. The model also predicts that the size of tumor satellites and distance between the primary tumor and multifocal/satellite lesions may be an important factor for the efficacy of the viral therapy with Chase treatment. PMID:25047810

  14. Choindroitinase ABC I-mediated enhancement of oncolytic virus spread and anti tumor efficacy: a mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangjin Kim

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses are genetically engineered viruses that are designed to kill cancer cells while doing minimal damage to normal healthy tissue. After being injected into a tumor, they infect cancer cells, multiply inside them, and when a cancer cell is killed they move on to spread and infect other cancer cells. Chondroitinase ABC (Chase-ABC is a bacterial enzyme that can remove a major glioma ECM component, chondroitin sulfate glycosoamino glycans from proteoglycans without any deleterious effects in vivo. It has been shown that Chase-ABC treatment is able to promote the spread of the viruses, increasing the efficacy of the viral treatment. In this paper we develop a mathematical model to investigate the effect of the Chase-ABC on the treatment of glioma by oncolytic viruses (OV. We show that the model's predictions agree with experimental results for a spherical glioma. We then use the model to test various treatment options in the heterogeneous microenvironment of the brain. The model predicts that separate injections of OV, one into the center of the tumor and another outside the tumor will result in better outcome than if the total injection is outside the tumor. In particular, the injection of the ECM-degrading enzyme (Chase-ABC on the periphery of the main tumor core need to be administered in an optimal strategy in order to infect and eradicate the infiltrating glioma cells outside the tumor core in addition to proliferative cells in the bulk of tumor core. The model also predicts that the size of tumor satellites and distance between the primary tumor and multifocal/satellite lesions may be an important factor for the efficacy of the viral therapy with Chase treatment.

  15. Cat Mammary Tumors: Genetic Models for the Human Counterpart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Adega

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The records are not clear, but Man has been sheltering the cat inside his home for over 12,000 years. The close proximity of this companion animal, however, goes beyond sharing the same roof; it extends to the great similarity found at the cellular and molecular levels. Researchers have found a striking resemblance between subtypes of feline mammary tumors and their human counterparts that goes from the genes to the pathways involved in cancer initiation and progression. Spontaneous cat mammary pre-invasive intraepithelial lesions (hyperplasias and neoplasias and malignant lesions seem to share a wide repertoire of molecular features with their human counterparts. In the present review, we tried to compile all the genetics aspects published (i.e., chromosomal alterations, critical cancer genes and their expression regarding cat mammary tumors, which support the cat as a valuable alternative in vitro cell and animal model (i.e., cat mammary cell lines and the spontaneous tumors, respectively, but also to present a critical point of view of some of the issues that really need to be investigated in future research.

  16. MR staging of malignant musculoskeletal tumors: An experimental study on MR and pathologic correlation of rabbit VX-2 carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Chung, Sung Hoon; KIm, Cheol Woo; Kim, Seong Moon; Im, Jung Gi; Han, Man Chung

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability of MR imaging in tissue characterization and depiction of tumor boundaries, we performed MR pathologic correlation using parosteally implanted VX-2 carcinoma in 17 rabbit thighs. T1-weighted, T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted axial images were obtained 10-30 days after tumor implantation. After the animals were killed, frozen and sectioned along the MR imaging planes, and histopathologic examination were done. For accurate MR pathologic correlation, rabbit were fixed on the cardboard plate to minimize position change during the procedure. Tumor boundaries depicted on MR images were larger than those depicted on the specimen. Small tumors were surrounded by capsule-like loose connective tissue. Loose connective tissue became compact with tumor growth. This connective tissue showed high signal intensity on both T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted images. Muscle atrophy with fatty tissue accumulation around the tumor also contributed to the high signal intensity on MR images. Peritumoral edema and inflammatory reaction were not remarkable. Six of 8 cases with bone marrow fibrosis were detected on MR images. We concluded that peritumoral loose connective tissue and muscle atrophy exaggerated the size of experimentally induced malignant musculoskeletal tumors on MR images

  17. Green tea, red wine and lemon extracts reduce experimental tumor growth and cancer drug toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaletok, S P; Gulua, L; Wicker, L; Shlyakhovenko, V A; Gogol, S; Orlovsky, O; Karnaushenko, O V; Verbinenko, A; Milinevska, V; Samoylenko, O; Todor, I; Turmanidze, T

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate antitumor effect of plant polyphenol extracts from green tea, red wine lees and/or lemon peel alone and in combination with antitumor drugs on the growth of different transplanted tumors in experimental animals. Green tea extract (GTE) was prepared from green tea infusion. GTE-based composites of red wine (GTRW), lemon peel (GTRWL) and/or NanoGTE as well as corresponding nanocomposites were prepared. The total polyphenolics of the different GTE-based extracts ranged from 18.0% to 21.3%. The effects of GTE-based extracts were studied in sarcoma 180, Ehrlich carcinoma, B16 melanoma, Ca755 mammary carcinoma, P388 leukemia, L1210 leukemia, and Guerin carcinoma (original, cisplatin-resistant and doxorubicin-resistant variants). The extracts were administered as 0.1% solution in drinking water (0.6-1.0 mg by total polyphenolics per mouse per day and 4.0-6.3 mg per rat per day). Tumor growth inhibition (TGI) in mice treated with NanoGTE, cisplatin or cisplatin + NanoGTE was 27%, 55% and 78%, respectively, in Sarcoma 180%, 21%, 45% and 59%, respectively, in Ehrlich carcinoma; and 8%, 13% and 38%, respectively in B16 melanoma. Composites of NanoGTE, red wine, and lemon peel (NanoGTRWL) enhanced the antitumor effects of cyclophosphamide in mice with Ca755 mammary carcinoma. The treatment with combination of NanoGTE and inhibitors of polyamines (PA) synthesis (DFMO + MGBG) resulted in significant TGI of P388 leukemia (up to 71%) and L1210 leukemia. In rats transplanted with Guerin carcinoma (parental strain), treatment with GTRW or GTE alone resulted in 25-28% TGI vs. 55-68% TGI in cisplatin-treated animals. The inhibition observed in the case of combination of GTE or GTRW with cisplatin was additive giving 81-88% TGI. Similar effects were observed when combinations of the cytostatics with GTE (or NanoGTE) were tested against cisplatin- or doxorubicin-resistant Guerin carcinoma. Moreover, the plant extracts lowered side toxicity of the drugs. Treatment with GTE

  18. Experimental Oral Candidiasis in Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Yuthika H.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.

    2001-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is as much the final outcome of the vulnerability of the host as of the virulence of the invading organism. We review here the extensive literature on animal experiments mainly appertaining to the host predisposing factors that initiate and perpetuate these infections. The monkey, rat, and mouse are the choice models for investigating oral candidiasis, but comparisons between the same or different models appear difficult, because of variables such as the study design, the number of animals used, their diet, the differences in Candida strains, and the duration of the studies. These variables notwithstanding, the following could be concluded. (i) The primate model is ideal for investigating Candida-associated denture stomatitis since both erythematous and pseudomembranous lesions have been produced in monkeys with prosthetic plates; they are, however, expensive and difficult to obtain and maintain. (ii) The rat model (both Sprague-Dawley and Wistar) is well proven for observing chronic oral candidal colonization and infection, due to the ease of breeding and handling and their ready availability. (iii) Mice are similar, but in addition there are well characterized variants simulating immunologic and genetic abnormalities (e.g., athymic, euthymic, murine-acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and severe combined immunodeficient models) and hence are used for short-term studies relating the host immune response and oral candidiasis. Nonetheless, an ideal, relatively inexpensive model representative of the human oral environment in ecological and microbiological terms is yet to be described. Until such a model is developed, researchers should pay attention to standardization of the experimental protocols described here to obtain broadly comparable and meaningful data. PMID:11292645

  19. Repopulation of interacting tumor cells during fractionated radiotherapy: stochastic modeling of the tumor control probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakir, Hatim; Hlatky, Lynn; Li, Huamin; Sachs, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    Optimal treatment planning for fractionated external beam radiation therapy requires inputs from radiobiology based on recent thinking about the "five Rs" (repopulation, radiosensitivity, reoxygenation, redistribution, and repair). The need is especially acute for the newer, often individualized, protocols made feasible by progress in image guided radiation therapy and dose conformity. Current stochastic tumor control probability (TCP) models incorporating tumor repopulation effects consider "stem-like cancer cells" (SLCC) to be independent, but the authors here propose that SLCC-SLCC interactions may be significant. The authors present a new stochastic TCP model for repopulating SLCC interacting within microenvironmental niches. Our approach is meant mainly for comparing similar protocols. It aims at practical generalizations of previous mathematical models. The authors consider protocols with complete sublethal damage repair between fractions. The authors use customized open-source software and recent mathematical approaches from stochastic process theory for calculating the time-dependent SLCC number and thereby estimating SLCC eradication probabilities. As specific numerical examples, the authors consider predicted TCP results for a 2 Gy per fraction, 60 Gy protocol compared to 64 Gy protocols involving early or late boosts in a limited volume to some fractions. In sample calculations with linear quadratic parameters α = 0.3 per Gy, α∕β = 10 Gy, boosting is predicted to raise TCP from a dismal 14.5% observed in some older protocols for advanced NSCLC to above 70%. This prediction is robust as regards: (a) the assumed values of parameters other than α and (b) the choice of models for intraniche SLCC-SLCC interactions. However, α = 0.03 per Gy leads to a prediction of almost no improvement when boosting. The predicted efficacy of moderate boosts depends sensitively on α. Presumably, the larger values of α are the ones appropriate for individualized

  20. Repopulation of interacting tumor cells during fractionated radiotherapy: Stochastic modeling of the tumor control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakir, Hatim; Hlatky, Lynn; Li, Huamin; Sachs, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Optimal treatment planning for fractionated external beam radiation therapy requires inputs from radiobiology based on recent thinking about the “five Rs” (repopulation, radiosensitivity, reoxygenation, redistribution, and repair). The need is especially acute for the newer, often individualized, protocols made feasible by progress in image guided radiation therapy and dose conformity. Current stochastic tumor control probability (TCP) models incorporating tumor repopulation effects consider “stem-like cancer cells” (SLCC) to be independent, but the authors here propose that SLCC-SLCC interactions may be significant. The authors present a new stochastic TCP model for repopulating SLCC interacting within microenvironmental niches. Our approach is meant mainly for comparing similar protocols. It aims at practical generalizations of previous mathematical models. Methods: The authors consider protocols with complete sublethal damage repair between fractions. The authors use customized open-source software and recent mathematical approaches from stochastic process theory for calculating the time-dependent SLCC number and thereby estimating SLCC eradication probabilities. As specific numerical examples, the authors consider predicted TCP results for a 2 Gy per fraction, 60 Gy protocol compared to 64 Gy protocols involving early or late boosts in a limited volume to some fractions. Results: In sample calculations with linear quadratic parameters α = 0.3 per Gy, α/β = 10 Gy, boosting is predicted to raise TCP from a dismal 14.5% observed in some older protocols for advanced NSCLC to above 70%. This prediction is robust as regards: (a) the assumed values of parameters other than α and (b) the choice of models for intraniche SLCC-SLCC interactions. However, α = 0.03 per Gy leads to a prediction of almost no improvement when boosting. Conclusions: The predicted efficacy of moderate boosts depends sensitively on α. Presumably, the larger values of α are

  1. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  2. Toxicity of Nanoparticles and an Overview of Current Experimental Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field having potential applications in many areas. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied for cell toxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Tetrazolium-based assays such as MTT, MTS, and WST-1 are used to determine cell viability. Cell inflammatory response induced by NPs is checked by measuring inflammatory biomarkers, such as IL-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor, using ELISA. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay is used for cell membrane integrity. Different types of cell cultures, including cancer cell lines have been employed as in vitro toxicity models. It has been generally agreed that NPs interfere with either assay materials or with detection systems. So far, toxicity data generated by employing such models are conflicting and inconsistent. Therefore, on the basis of available experimental models, it may be difficult to judge and list some of the more valuable NPs as more toxic to biological systems and vice versa. Considering the potential applications of NPs in many fields and the growing apprehensions of FDA about the toxic potential of nanoproducts, it is the need of the hour to look for new internationally agreed free of bias toxicological models by focusing more on in vivo studies.

  3. Tumor penetration with intact MAb and fragments demonstrated in vitro on tumor spheroids and in vivo in the nude mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchegger, F.; Halpern, S.E.; Sutherland, R.M.; Schreyer, M.; Mach, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Tumor spheroids grown in culture represent a good in vitro model for the study of tumor penetration phenomena of potential radiotherapeutics. Using this system, it was found that Fab-fragments penetrate tumors more quickly and deeply than complete antibodies. These results were confirmed in tumor bearing nephrectomized nude mice

  4. [Skin defect modeling in experimental animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleshko, A N; Kornienko, V V; Tkachenko, Yu A; Kurganskaya, V A

    2015-02-01

    To assess the skin regeneration and explore new medical devices for the treatment of skin defects is necessary to conduct long-term experiments using laboratory animals. Currently, there are many methods for skin trauma modeling but most of them have disadvantages that limit their use. The purpose of this work - the development of an experimental model of the formation of skin defect of various etiologies with the specified parameters of depth and area of damage to the absence of systemic effects on the animal's body. We have developed an installation that allows us to form a skin defect of mechanical, thermal and chemical etiology with area from 1.76 cm2 to 2.0 cm2. The experiment was conducted on 18 male laboratory rats to examine the effectiveness of current method and control the depth and area of the defect. As a result of the new methodology, we were able to carry out simulation skin injuries of different etiology on laboratory animals in the short term and reduce the severity of injuries to extend the life span of animals to monitor the repair processes, as well as to standardize the modeling of injuries according to the criteria of area and depth of the defect.

  5. Modeling a nuclear reactor for experimental purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility is a scale model of a commercial PWR and is as fully functional and operational as the generic commercial counterpart. LOFT was designed and built for experimental purposes as part of the overall NRC reactor safety research program. The purpose of LOFT is to assess the capability of reactor safety systems to perform their intended functions during occurrences of off-normal conditions in a commercial nuclear reactor. Off-normal conditions arising from large and small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA), operational transients, and anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) were to be investigated. This paper describes the LOFT model of the generic PWR and summarizes the experiments that have been conducted in the context of the significant findings involving the complex transient thermal-hydraulics and the consequent effects on the commercial reactor analytical licensing techniques. Through these techniques the validity of the LOFT model as a scaled counterpart of the generic PWR is shown

  6. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  7. Modeling tumor-associated edema in gliomas during anti-angiogenic therapy and its impact on imageable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eHawkins-Daarud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically-driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor-cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR for tumors with lower proliferation rates.

  8. Effect of magnetic field on oxygen pressure, radiosensitivity and growth of some experimental tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, B.N.; Kauashev, S.K.

    The effect of variation of partial oxygen pressure in liquid media and directly in living tumors was investigated to determine the effect of a permanent magnetic field on these changes. Partial oxygen pressure increases significantly in Pliss lymphosarcoma and RS-1 tumors when exposed to a magnetic field and decreases after the magnetic field is removed. The variation of partial oxygen pressure is similar in Walker carcinosarcoma, but is different for living and killed rats. The growth rate of tumors decreases appreciably after each session of combination magnetic and radiation effects with an increase of partial oxygen pressure in magnetized tumors. Periodic one-hour magnetic exposure preceding irradiation causes a marked zigzag growth of tumors, while 5- and 30- minute exposure to a permanent magnetic field has essentially no effect on tumor growth.

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) inhibits tumor development from precancerous tissue: An experimental study that supports a potential new application of BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti Hughes, A.; Heber, E.M. [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, E. [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Department of Research and Production Reactors, Ezeiza Atomic Center, CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Nigg, D.W. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States); Calzetta, O.; Blaumann, H.; Longhino, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Bariloche Atomic Center, CNEA, Rio Negro (Argentina); Nievas, S.I. [Department of Chemistry, CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Aromando, R.F. [Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Itoiz, M.E. [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Trivillin, V.A. [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schwint, A.E. [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: schwint@cnea.gov.ar

    2009-07-15

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), GB-10 (Na{sub 2}{sup 10}B{sub 10}H{sub 10}) and (GB-10+BPA) to control tumors, with no normal tissue radiotoxicity, in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Herein we developed a novel experimental model of field-cancerization and precancerous lesions (globally termed herein precancerous tissue) in the hamster cheek pouch to explore the long-term potential inhibitory effect of the same BNCT protocols on the development of second primary tumors from precancerous tissue. Clinically, second primary tumor recurrences occur in field-cancerized tissue, causing therapeutic failure. We performed boron biodistribution studies followed by in vivo BNCT studies, with 8 months follow-up. All 3 BNCT protocols induced a statistically significant reduction in tumor development from precancerous tissue, reaching a maximum inhibition of 77-100%. The inhibitory effect of BPA-BNCT and (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT persisted at 51% at the end of follow-up (8 months), whereas for GB-10-BNCT it faded after 2 months. Likewise, beam-only elicited a significant but transient reduction in tumor development. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was observed. At 8 months post-treatment with BPA-BNCT or (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT, the precancerous pouches that did not develop tumors had regained the macroscopic and histological appearance of normal (non-cancerized) pouches. A potential new clinical application of BNCT would lie in its capacity to inhibit local regional recurrences.

  10. A new survival model for hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in tumor-bearing rats in the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelz, Joerg OW; Doerfer, Joerg; Hohenberger, Werner; Meyer, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Cytoreduction followed by hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) improves survival in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal origin. Animal models are important in the evaluation of new treatment modalities. The purpose of this study was to devise an experimental setting which can be routinely used for the investigation of HIPEC in peritoneal carcinomatosis. A new peritoneal perfusion system in tumor bearing rats were tested. For this purpose CC531 colon carcinoma cells were implanted intraperitoneally in Wag/Rija rats. After 10 days of tumor growth the animals were randomized into three groups of six animals each: group 1: control (n = 6), group 2: HIPEC with mitomycin C in a concentration of 15 mg/m 2 (n = 6), group III: mitomycin C i.p. as monotherapy in a concentration of 10 mg/m 2 (n = 6). After 10 days, total tumor weight and the extent of tumor spread, as classified by the modified Peritoneal Cancer Index (PCI), were assessed by autopsy of the animals. No postoperative deaths were observed. Conjunctivitis, lethargy and loss of appetite were the main side effects in the HIPEC group. No severe locoregional or systemic toxity was observed. All control animals developed massive tumor growth. Tumor load was significantly reduced in the treatment group and was lowest in group II. The combination of hyperthermia with MMC resulted in an increased tumoricidal effect in the rat model. The presented model provides an opportunity to study the mechanism and effect of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy and new drugs for this treatment modality

  11. Effects of Anethole in Nociception Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Mileni Versuti Ritter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the antinociceptive activity of anethole (anethole 1-methoxy-4-benzene (1-propenyl, major compound of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum, in different experimental models of nociception. The animals were pretreated with anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg one hour before the experiments. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of anethole, the open field test was conducted. Anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg showed an antinociceptive effect in the writhing model induced by acetic acid, in the second phase of the formalin test (125 and 250 mg/kg in the test of glutamate (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg, and expresses pain induced by ACF (250 mg/kg. In contrast, anethole was not able to increase the latency time on the hot plate and decrease the number of flinches during the initial phase of the formalin test in any of the doses tested. It was also demonstrated that anethole has no association with sedative effects. Therefore, these data showed that anethole, at all used doses, has no sedative effect and has an antinociceptive effect. This effect may be due to a decrease in the production/release of inflammatory mediators.

  12. Effects of anethole in nociception experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alessandra Mileni Versuti; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Otani, Fernando; de Oliveira, Rubia Maria Weffort; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive activity of anethole (anethole 1-methoxy-4-benzene (1-propenyl)), major compound of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum), in different experimental models of nociception. The animals were pretreated with anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) one hour before the experiments. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of anethole, the open field test was conducted. Anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in the writhing model induced by acetic acid, in the second phase of the formalin test (125 and 250 mg/kg) in the test of glutamate (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg), and expresses pain induced by ACF (250 mg/kg). In contrast, anethole was not able to increase the latency time on the hot plate and decrease the number of flinches during the initial phase of the formalin test in any of the doses tested. It was also demonstrated that anethole has no association with sedative effects. Therefore, these data showed that anethole, at all used doses, has no sedative effect and has an antinociceptive effect. This effect may be due to a decrease in the production/release of inflammatory mediators.

  13. Tendon healing in vivo. An experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, S O; Lundborg, G; Lohmander, L S

    1989-01-01

    Flexor tendon segments were incubated in a diffusion chamber in the subcutis of rabbits. Tendons incubated up to 6 weeks in the diffusion chamber showed proliferating and migrating cells from the epitenon cell layer as well as viable endotenon cells. Explants frozen in liquid nitrogen prior to incubation showed no signs of extrinsic cell contamination and remained non-viable indicating that no cell penetration occurred through the Millipore filter and that cell division seen in non-frozen and incubated tendons was an expression of intrinsic cellular proliferative capacity of the tendon. In tendon segments incubated in chambers for three weeks, collagen synthesis was reduced by 50% and the rate of cell proliferation measured as 3H-thymidine incorporation, was 15 times that of native tendons. Frozen and incubated tendons showed only traces of remaining matrix synthesis or cell proliferation. With this experimental model we have histologically and biochemically shown that tendons may survive and heal while the nutrition exclusively could be based on diffusion and the tendons have an intrinsic capacity of healing. The described model enables further studies on tendon healing and its regulation.

  14. Anti-granuloma activity of Coriandrum sativum in experimental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vinod; Singh, Surender; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coriandrum sativum has been used in the traditional systems of medicine for management of arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. Objectives: In this study, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activities of Coriandrum sativum hydroalcoholic extract (CSHE) in experimental models. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of CSHE was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema model and the anti-granuloma activity of CSHE was evaluated using the subcutaneous cotton pellet implantation-induced granuloma formation and stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with complete Freund's adjuvant. Serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, IL-1 β levels, and peritoneal macrophage expression of TNF-R1 were evaluated as markers of global inflammation. Results: CSHE at the highest dose tested (32 mg/kg) produced a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in paw edema after carrageenan administration. CSHE treatment also reduced dry granuloma weight in all treated animals. Serum IL-6 and IL-1 β levels were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the CSHE (32 mg/kg)-treated group as compared to control. Although there was an increase in serum TNF-α level in the CSHE-treated group as compared to control, TNF-R1 expression on peritoneal macrophages was found to be reduced. Conclusion: Thus, the result of this study demonstrates the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activities of CSHE in experimental models, and validates its traditional use for the management of arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. PMID:23741156

  15. Experimental models for Murray’s law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Dai; Kunita, Itsuki; Fricker, Mark D.; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Transport networks are ubiquitous in multicellular organisms and include leaf veins, fungal mycelia and blood vessels. While transport of materials and signals through the network plays a crucial role in maintaining the living system, the transport capacity of the network can best be understood in terms of hydrodynamics. We report here that plasmodium from the large, single-celled amoeboid Physarum was able to construct a hydrodynamically optimized vein-network when evacuating biomass from confined arenas of various shapes through a narrow exit. Increasingly thick veins developed towards the exit, and the network spanned the arena via repetitive bifurcations to give a branching tree. The Hausdorff distance from all parts of the plasmodium to the vein network was kept low, whilst the hydrodynamic conductivity from distal parts of the network to the exit was equivalent, irrespective of the arena shape. This combination of spatial patterning and differential vein thickening served to evacuate biomass at an equivalent rate across the entire arena. The scaling relationship at the vein branches was determined experimentally to be 2.53-3.29, consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. Furthermore, we show that mathematical models for self-organised, adaptive transport in Physarum simulate the experimental network organisation well if the scaling coefficient of the current-reinforcement rule is set to 3. In simulations, this resulted in rapid development of an optimal network that minimised the combined volume and frictional energy in comparison with other scaling coefficients. This would predict that the boundary shear forces within each vein are constant throughout the network, and would be consistent with a feedback mechanism based on a sensing a threshold shear at the vein wall.

  16. Experimental study on anti-tumor effect of pcEgr-IFNγ gene-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Congmei; Li Xiuyi; Liu Shuzheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the anti-tumor effect of IFN γ gene-radiotherapy to murine melanoma and its immunologic mechanism. Methods: pcEgr-IFNγ plasmids were injected locally into tumor, and 36 hours later, the tumors were given 20 Gy X-ray irradiation. Tumor growth at different time, IFN γ expression 3 days later and immunologic indexes 15 days later were detected. Results: At 3-15 days after pcEgr-IFNγ gene-radiotherapy, the tumor growth rate was lower than that of irradiation alone group. It was also lower than that of gene therapy alone group and control plasmid combined with X-ray irradiation group significantly. Day 3 tumor IFN γ expression was higher than that of plasmid treatment alone group. NK activity, IL-2 and IFN γ secretion activities were higher than those of gene therapy alone and irradiation alone groups significantly. Conclusion: The antitumor effect of IFN γ gene-radiotherapy is better than that of either of them applied solely. Its mechanism might be concerned with the higher expression of IFN γ induced by irradiation in tumors and activation of anti-tumor immunologic functions

  17. Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood accounting for approximately 8-10% of all pediatric malignancies and 15% of cancer deaths in...participants were able to present their results to date at the annual American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting in April, 2015.  How...individual tumors. Using IHC techniques we will measure tumor response spatial patterns ( bread loafing fixed tumor tissue). We will use IHC

  18. Use of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside during local hyperthermia: effects on tumor temperature and tumor response in a rat tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krossnes, Baard Kronen; Mella, Olav; Dahl, Olav

    1996-01-01

    .3 and 0.4 deg. C higher during SNP infusion in the MFF and pentobarbital group, respectively. Conclusion: We have developed a small animal model in inbred rats feasible for exploring the influence of a stable blood pressure reduction induced by SNP, on the effect of HT given alone or in combination with other treatment modalities to a transplantable tumor. The greatly increased cytotoxic effect of local waterbath HT in the present tumor response experiments is probably a consequence of increased tumor temperature during SNP infusion

  19. The T61 human breast cancer xenograft: an experimental model of estrogen therapy of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, N; Spang-Thomsen, M; Cullen, K

    1996-01-01

    Endocrine therapy is one of the principal treatment modalities of breast cancer, both in an adjuvant setting and in advanced disease. The T61 breast cancer xenograft described here provides an experimental model of the effects of estrogen treatment at a molecular level. T61 is an estrogen receptor...... positive tumor which was originally derived from a T1N0M0 invasive ductal cancer and has been carried as a serially transplanted xenograft in nude mice. T61 is a hormone sensitive tumor whose growth is suppressed by both estrogen and tamoxifen, in contrast to other estrogen receptor positive tumors...... growth is also inhibited in animals treated with a monoclonal antibody which blocks binding of ligand to the IGF-I receptor, which mediates the mitogenic signal of bound IGF-II through autophosphorylation of its intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. These results demonstrate the utility of the T61 model...

  20. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fecher

    Full Text Available Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and -testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future.

  1. MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors with endoluminal, intraluminal and interstitial catheter-based ultrasound devices: preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena J.; Jones, Peter; Hensley, Daniel; Holbrook, Andrew; Plata, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided thermal interventions have been proposed for potential palliative and curative treatments of pancreatic tumors. Catheter-based ultrasound devices offer the potential for temporal and 3D spatial control of the energy deposition profile. The objective of this study was to apply theoretical and experimental techniques to investigate the feasibility of endogastric, intraluminal and transgastric catheter-based ultrasound for MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. The transgastric approach involves insertion of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator (array of 1.5 mm OD x 10 mm transducers, 360° or sectored 180°, ~7 MHz frequency, 13-14G cooling catheter) directly into the pancreas, either endoscopically or via image-guided percutaneous placement. An intraluminal applicator, of a more flexible but similar construct, was considered for endoscopic insertion directly into the pancreatic or biliary duct. An endoluminal approach was devised based on an ultrasound transducer assembly (tubular, planar, curvilinear) enclosed in a cooling balloon which is endoscopically positioned within the stomach or duodenum, adjacent to pancreatic targets from within the GI tract. A 3D acoustic bio-thermal model was implemented to calculate acoustic energy distributions and used a FEM solver to determine the transient temperature and thermal dose profiles in tissue during heating. These models were used to determine transducer parameters and delivery strategies and to study the feasibility of ablating 1-3 cm diameter tumors located 2-10 mm deep in the pancreas, while thermally sparing the stomach wall. Heterogeneous acoustic and thermal properties were incorporated, including approximations for tumor desmoplasia and dynamic changes during heating. A series of anatomic models based on imaging scans of representative patients were used to investigate the three approaches. Proof of concept (POC) endogastric and transgastric applicators were fabricated and experimentally

  2. The combination of IL-21 and IFN-alpha boosts STAT3 activation, cytotoxicity and experimental tumor therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten W; Søndergaard, Henrik; Woetmann, Anders

    2008-01-01

    such as IFN-alpha and IL-2 have multiple and severe side effects. Accordingly, they are generally used at sub-optimal doses, which limit their clinical efficacy. Here we hypothesized that a combination of IFN-alpha and IL-21, a novel cytokine of the IL-2 family with anti-cancer effects, will increase the anti......-cancer efficacy at sub-optimal cytokine doses. We show that the combined stimulation of target-cells with IFN-alpha and IL-21 triggers an increased STAT3 activation whereas the activation of other STATs including STAT1/2 is unaffected. In parallel, the combined stimulation with IFN-alpha and IL-21 triggers...... a selective increase in MHC class I expression and NK- and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In an experimental in vivo model of renal carcinoma, the combined treatment of IFN-alpha and IL-21 also produces a significant anti-cancer effect as judged by an inhibition of tumor growth and an increased survival...

  3. Causation of nervous system tumors in children: insights from traditional and genetically engineered animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, Jerry M.

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric neurogenic tumors include primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs), especially medulloblastoma; ependymomas and choroid plexus papillomas; astrocytomas; retinoblastoma; and sympathetic neuroblastoma. Meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors, although uncommon in childhood, are also significant because they can result from exposures of children to ionizing radiation. Specific chromosomal loci and specific genes are related to each of these tumor types. Virtually all these genes appear to act as tumor suppressor genes, which are inactivated in tumor cells by mutations or by chromosomal loss. In genetically engineered mice, some genes that are clearly associated with specific human tumors (e.g., RB1 in retinoblastoma and NF2 in meningiomas and schwannomas) have no such effect. Other genetic constructs in mice involving the genes p53, ptc1, and Nf1 have produced tumors remarkably similar to some of the human pediatric neoplasms. Some of these tumors become clinically apparent after only a few weeks, while the mice are still juveniles, especially when two or more tumor suppressor genes are inactivated in the same genetic construct. Conversely, at least one genetic pathway in rodents involving point mutation in the coding region of a transforming gene (neu in malignant schwannomas) does not appear to operate in any human tumors. The nervous system is markedly susceptible to experimental carcinogenesis during early life in rodents, dogs, primates, and other nonhuman species, and there is no obvious reason why this generalization should not also apply to humans. However, except for therapeutic ionizing radiation, no physical, chemical, or biological cause of human pediatric nervous system tumors is known. The failure of experimental transplacental carcinogenesis to mirror human pediatric experience more closely may reflect the need for multiple mutational events in target cells, and for experimental carcinogens that are capable of causing the full spectrum of

  4. Transgenic expression of soluble human CD5 enhances experimentally-induced autoimmune and anti-tumoral immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fenutría

    Full Text Available CD5 is a lymphoid-specific transmembrane glycoprotein constitutively expressed on thymocytes and mature T and B1a lymphocytes. Current data support the view that CD5 is a negative regulator of antigen-specific receptor-mediated signaling in these cells, and that this would likely be achieved through interaction with CD5 ligand/s (CD5L of still undefined nature expressed on immune or accessory cells. To determine the functional consequence of loss of CD5/CD5L interaction in vivo, a new transgenic mouse line was generated (shCD5EμTg, expressing a circulating soluble form of human CD5 (shCD5 as a decoy to impair membrane-bound CD5 function. These shCD5EμTg mice showed an enhanced response to autologous antigens, as deduced from the presentation of more severe forms of experimentally inducible autoimmune disease (collagen-induced arthritis, CIA; and experimental autoimmune encephalitis, EAE, as well as an increased anti-tumoral response in non-orthotopic cancer models (B16 melanoma. This enhancement of the immune response was in agreement with the finding of significantly reduced proportions of spleen and lymph node Treg cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+, and of peritoneal IL-10-producing and CD5+ B cells, as well as an increased proportion of spleen NKT cells in shCD5EμTg mice. Similar changes in lymphocyte subpopulations were observed in wild-type mice following repeated administration of exogenous recombinant shCD5 protein. These data reveal the relevant role played by CD5/CD5L interactions on the homeostasis of some functionally relevant lymphocyte subpopulations and the modulation of immune responses to autologous antigens.

  5. Effects of Mechanical Properties on Tumor Invasion: Insights from a Cellular Model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, YZ

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the regulating mechanism of tumor invasion is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical applications. Previous in vivo experiments have shown that invasive cancer cells dissociate from the primary tumor and invade into the stroma, forming an irregular invasive morphology. Although cell movements involved in tumor invasion are ultimately driven by mechanical forces of cell-cell interactions and tumor-host interactions, how these mechanical properties affect tumor invasion is still poorly understood. In this study, we use a recently developed two-dimensional cellular model to study the effects of mechanical properties on tumor invasion. We study the effects of cell-cell adhesions as well as the degree of degradation and stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM). Our simulation results show that cell-cell adhesion relationship must be satisfied for tumor invasion. Increased adhesion to ECM and decreased adhesion among tumor cells result in invasive tumor behaviors. When this invasive behavior occurs, ECM plays an important role for both tumor morphology and the shape of invasive cancer cells. Increased stiffness and stronger degree of degradation of ECM promote tumor invasion, generating more aggressive tumor invasive morphologies. It can also generate irregular shape of invasive cancer cells, protruding towards ECM. The capability of our model suggests it a useful tool to study tumor invasion and might be used to propose optimal treatment in clinical applications.

  6. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Chauviere

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth.

  7. Investigation of HIFU-induced anti-tumor immunity in a murine tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyerly H Kim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is an emerging non-invasive treatment modality for localized treatment of cancers. While current clinical strategies employ HIFU exclusively for thermal ablation of the target sites, biological responses associated with both thermal and mechanical damage from focused ultrasound have not been thoroughly investigated. In particular, endogenous danger signals from HIFU-damaged tumor cells may trigger the activation of dendritic cells. This response may play a critical role in a HIFU-elicited anti-tumor immune response which can be harnessed for more effective treatment. Methods Mice bearing MC-38 colon adenocarcinoma tumors were treated with thermal and mechanical HIFU exposure settings in order to independently observe HIFU-induced effects on the host's immunological response. In vivo dendritic cell activity was assessed along with the host's response to challenge tumor growth. Results Thermal and mechanical HIFU were found to increase CD11c+ cells 3.1-fold and 4-fold, respectively, as compared to 1.5-fold observed for DC injection alone. In addition, thermal and mechanical HIFU increased CFSE+ DC accumulation in draining lymph nodes 5-fold and 10-fold, respectively. Moreover, focused ultrasound treatments not only caused a reduction in the growth of primary tumors, with tumor volume decreasing by 85% for thermal HIFU and 43% for mechanical HIFU, but they also provided protection against subcutaneous tumor re-challenge. Further immunological assays confirmed an enhanced CTL activity and increased tumor-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells in the mice treated by focused ultrasound, with cytotoxicity induced by mechanical HIFU reaching as high as 27% at a 10:1 effector:target ratio. Conclusion These studies present initial encouraging results confirming that focused ultrasound treatment can elicit a systemic anti-tumor immune response, and they suggest that this immunity is closely related to

  8. Block of purinergic P2X7R inhibits tumor growth in a C6 glioma brain tumor animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jae K; Jantaratnotai, Nattinee; Serrano-Perez, Maria C; McGeer, Patrick L; McLarnon, James G

    2011-01-01

    We examined the expression and pharmacological modulation of the purinergic receptor P2X7R in a C6 glioma model. Intrastriatal injection of C6 cells induced a time-dependent growth of tumor; at 2 weeks postinjection immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated higher levels of P2X7R in glioma-injected versus control vehicle-injected brains. P2X7R immunoreactivity colocalized with tumor cells and microglia, but not endogenous astrocytes. Intravenous administration of the P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG) inhibited tumor growth in a spatially dependent manner from the C6 injection site. Treatment with BBG reduced tumor volume by 52% versus that in controls. Double immunostaining indicated that BBG treatment did not alter microgliosis, astrogliosis, or vasculature vessels in C6-injected animals. In vitro, BBG reduced the expression of P2X7R and glioma chemotaxis induced by the P2X7R ligand, 2',3'-O-(4-benzoyl-benzoyl)adenosine triphosphate (BzATP). Immunohistochemical staining of human glioblastoma tissue samples demonstrated greater expression of P2X7R compared to control nontumor samples. These results suggest that the efficacy of BBG in inhibiting tumor growth is primarily mediated by direct actions of the compound on P2X7R in glioma cells and that pharmacological inhibition of this purinergic receptor might serve as a strategy to slow the progression of brain tumors.

  9. Modeling tissue contamination to improve molecular identification of the primary tumor site of metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Martin; Perell, Katharina; Nielsen, Finn Cilius

    2014-01-01

    with any predictor model. The usability of the model is illustrated on primary tumor site identification of liver biopsies, specifically, on a human dataset consisting of microRNA expression measurements of primary tumor samples, benign liver samples and liver metastases. For a predictor trained on primary...... tumor and benign liver samples, the contamination model decreased the test error on biopsies from liver metastases from 77 to 45%. A further reduction to 34% was obtained by including biopsies in the training data....

  10. Coupled Hybrid Continuum-Discrete Model of Tumor Angiogenesis and Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lyu

    Full Text Available The processes governing tumor growth and angiogenesis are codependent. To study the relationship between them, we proposed a coupled hybrid continuum-discrete model. In this model, tumor cells, their microenvironment (extracellular matrixes, matrix-degrading enzymes, and tumor angiogenic factors, and their network of blood vessels, described by a series of discrete points, were considered. The results of numerical simulation reveal the process of tumor growth and the change in microenvironment from avascular to vascular stage, indicating that the network of blood vessels develops gradually as the tumor grows. Our findings also reveal that a tumor is divided into three regions: necrotic, semi-necrotic, and well-vascularized. The results agree well with the previous relevant studies and physiological facts, and this model represents a platform for further investigations of tumor therapy.

  11. Tumor microenvironmental changes induced by the sulfamate carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitor S4 in a laryngeal tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tineke W H Meijer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX plays a pivotal role in pH homeostasis, which is essential for tumor cell survival. We examined the effect of the CAIX inhibitor 4-(3'(3",5"-dimethylphenyl-ureidophenyl sulfamate (S4 on the tumor microenvironment in a laryngeal tumor model by analyzing proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, hypoxia, metabolism and CAIX ectodomain shedding. METHODS: SCCNij202 tumor bearing-mice were treated with S4 for 1, 3 or 5 days. CAIX ectodomain shedding was measured in the serum after therapy. Effects on tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, hypoxia (pimonidazole and CAIX were investigated with quantitative immunohistochemistry. Metabolic transporters and enzymes were quantified with qPCR. RESULTS: CAIX ectodomain shedding decreased after treatment with S4 (p<0.01. S4 therapy did neither influence tumor cell proliferation nor the amount of apoptosis and necrosis. Hypoxia (pimonidazole and CAIX expression were also not affected by S4. CHOP and MMP9 mRNA as a reference of intracellular pH did not change upon treatment with S4. Compensatory mechanisms of pH homeostasis at the mRNA level were not observed. CONCLUSION: As the clinical and biological meaning of the decrease in CAIX ectodomain shedding after S4 therapy is not clear, studies are required to elucidate whether the CAIX ectodomain has a paracrine or autocrine signaling function in cancer biology. S4 did not influence the amount of proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis and hypoxia. Therefore, it is unlikely that S4 can be used as single agent to influence tumor cell kill and proliferation, and to target primary tumor growth.

  12. Experimental induction of bone tumors by short-lived bone-seeking radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gössner, W; Hug, O; Luz, A; Müller, W A

    1976-01-01

    Single and repeated applications of 224Ra and single applications of 227Th to more than 600 female NMRI mice 3 - 4 weeks old, and to male NMRI mice have led to a high rate of osteosarcomas. Tumor incidence is dose-related. 227Th is more carcinogenic than 224Ra which induced the highest tumor incidence of 60% after a single injection of 5 muCi per Kg body weight or more. Repeated injections of 224Ra to female mice yielded a tumor incidence of up to 92%. Most of these osteosarcomas consist of well-differentiated bone-forming osteoplastic tissue. Half of the tumors occurred in the spine, particularly in the lumbar region. In protraction experiments, multifocal osteosarcomas have been observed. Less than 10% of the mice with osteosarcoma had developed metastases in lung, spleen, liver, and kidney. The possible mechanisms of the protraction effect are discussed.

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Cross-Talk Between Endothelial and Tumor Cells Highlights Counterintuitive Effects of VEGF-Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Harsh; Jackson, Trachette

    2017-04-24

    Tumor growth and progression are critically dependent on the establishment of a vascular support system. This is often accomplished via the expression of pro-angiogenic growth factors, including members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family of ligands. VEGF ligands are overexpressed in a wide variety of solid tumors and therefore have inspired optimism that inhibition of the different axes of the VEGF pathway-alone or in combination-would represent powerful anti-angiogenic therapies for most cancer types. When considering treatments that target VEGF and its receptors, it is difficult to tease out the differential anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects of all combinations experimentally because tumor cells and vascular endothelial cells are engaged in a dynamic cross-talk that impacts key aspects of tumorigenesis, independent of angiogenesis. Here we develop a mathematical model that connects intracellular signaling responsible for both endothelial and tumor cell proliferation and death to population-level cancer growth and angiogenesis. We use this model to investigate the effect of bidirectional communication between endothelial cells and tumor cells on treatments targeting VEGF and its receptors both in vitro and in vivo. Our results underscore the fact that in vitro therapeutic outcomes do not always translate to the in vivo situation. For example, our model predicts that certain therapeutic combinations result in antagonism in vivo that is not observed in vitro. Mathematical modeling in this direction can shed light on the mechanisms behind experimental observations that manipulating VEGF and its receptors is successful in some cases but disappointing in others.

  14. Changes in tumor oxygenation during a combined treatment with fractionated irradiation and hyperthermia: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywietz, F; Reeker, W; Kochs, E

    1997-01-01

    To determine the influence of adjuvant hyperthermia on the oxygenation status of fractionated irradiated tumors. Oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in rat rhabdomyosarcomas (R1H) was measured sequentially at weekly intervals during a fractionated irradiation with 60Co-gamma-rays (60 Gy/20f/4 weeks) in combination with local hyperthermia (8 f(HT) at 43 degrees C, 1 h/4 weeks). Tumors were heated twice weekly with a 2450 MHz microwave device at 43 degrees C, 1 h starting 10 min after irradiation. The pO2 measurements (pO2-histograph, Eppendorf, Germany) were performed in anesthetized animals during mechanical ventilation and in hemodynamic steady state. All tumor pO2 measurements were correlated to measurements of the arterial oxygen partial pressure (paO2) determined by a blood gas analyzer. The oxygenation status of R1H tumors decreased continuously from the start of the combined treatment, with increasing radiation dose and number of heat fractions. In untreated controls a median tumor pO2 of 23 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SEM) was measured. Tumor pO2 decreased to 11 +/- 2 mmHg after 30 Gy + 4 HT (2 weeks), and to 6 +/- 2 mmHg after 60 Gy + 8HT (4 weeks). The increase in the frequency of pO2-values below 5 mmHg and the decrease in the range of the pO2 histograms [delta p(10/90)] further indicated that tumor hypoxia increased relatively rapidly from the start of combined treatment. After 60 Gy + 8HT 48 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM) of the pO2-values recorded were below 5 mmHg. These findings suggest that adjuvant hyperthermia to radiotherapy induces greater changes in tumor oxygenation than radiation alone [cf. (39)]. This might be of importance for the temporary application of hyperthermia in the course of a conventional radiation treatment.

  15. Using Positron Emission Tomography with [18F]FDG to Predict Tumor Behavior in Experimental Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M. Burt

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between FDG uptake as determined by positron emission tomography (PET imaging and rates of tumor growth, cellular GLUT1 transporter density, and the activities of hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase in a solid tumor implant model. Five different human colorectal xenografts of different growth properties were implanted in athymic rats and evaluated by dynamic 18F-FDG-PET. The phosphorylating and dephosphorylating activities of the key glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase, were measured in these tumor types by spectrophotometric assays and the expression of GLUT1 glucose transporter protein was determined by immunohistochemistry. Correlations among FDG accumulation, hexokinase activity, and tumor doubling time are reported in these colon xenografts. The results indicate that the activity of tumor hexokinase may be a marker of tumor growth rate that can be determined by 18F-FDG-PET imaging. PET scanning may not only be a useful tool for staging patients for extent of disease, but may provide important prognostic information concerning the proliferative rates of malignancies.

  16. In vitro tumor models: advantages, disadvantages, variables, and selecting the right platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moriah eKatt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In vitro tumor models have provided important tools for cancer research and serve as low-cost screening platforms for drug therapies; however, cancer recurrence remains largely unchecked due to metastasis, which is the cause of the majority of cancer related deaths. The need for an improved understanding of the progression and treatment of cancer has pushed for increased accuracy and physiological relevance of in vitro tumor models. As a result, in vitro tumor models have concurrently increased in complexity and their output parameters further diversified, since these models have progressed beyond simple proliferation, invasion, and cytotoxicity screens and have begun recapitulating critical steps in the metastatic cascade, such as intravasation, extravasation, angiogenesis, matrix remodeling, and tumor cell dormancy. Advances in tumor cell biology, 3D cell culture, tissue engineering, biomaterials, microfabrication, and microfluidics have enabled rapid development of new in vitro tumor models that often incorporate multiple cell types, extracellular matrix materials, and spatial and temporal introduction of soluble factors. Other innovations include the incorporation of perfusable microvessels to simulate the tumor vasculature and model intravasation and extravasation. The drive towards precision medicine has increased interest in adapting in vitro tumor models for patient-specific therapies, clinical management, and assessment of metastatic potential. Here, we review the wide range of current in vitro tumor models and summarize their advantages, disadvantages, and suitability in modeling specific aspects of the metastatic cascade and drug treatment.

  17. The Use of Porous Scaffold as a Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human cancer is a three-dimensional (3D structure consisting of neighboring cells, extracellular matrix, and blood vessels. It is therefore critical to mimic the cancer cells and their surrounding environment during in vitro study. Our aim was to establish a 3D cancer model using a synthetic composite scaffold. Methods. High-density low-volume seeding was used to promote attachment of a non-small-cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460 to scaffolds. Growth patterns in 3D culture were compared with those of monolayers. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to compare the expression of Ki67, CD44, and carbonic anhydrase IX. Results. NCI-H460 readily attached to the scaffold without surface pretreatment at a rate of 35% from a load of 1.5 × 106 cells. Most cells grew vertically to form clumps along the surface of the scaffold, and cell morphology resembled tissue origin; 2D cultures exhibited characteristics of adherent epithelial cancer cell lines. Expression patterns of Ki67, CD44, and CA IX varied markedly between 3D and monolayer cultures. Conclusions. The behavior of cancer cells in our 3D model is similar to tumor growth in vivo. This model will provide the basis for future study using 3D cancer culture.

  18. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  19. Injury Based on Its Study in Experimental Models

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    M. Mendes-Braz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the numerous experimental models used to study the complexity of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Although experimental models of hepatic I/R injury represent a compromise between the clinical reality and experimental simplification, the clinical transfer of experimental results is problematic because of anatomical and physiological differences and the inevitable simplification of experimental work. In this review, the strengths and limitations of the various models of hepatic I/R are discussed. Several strategies to protect the liver from I/R injury have been developed in animal models and, some of these, might find their way into clinical practice. We also attempt to highlight the fact that the mechanisms responsible for hepatic I/R injury depend on the experimental model used, and therefore the therapeutic strategies also differ according to the model used. Thus, the choice of model must therefore be adapted to the clinical question being answered.

  20. Selective experimental review of the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-02-01

    Before disussing experimental comparisons with the Standard Model, (S-M) it is probably wise to define more completely what is commonly meant by this popular term. This model is a gauge theory of SU(3)/sub f/ x SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1) with 18 parameters. The parameters are α/sub s/, α/sub qed/, theta/sub W/, M/sub W/ (M/sub Z/ = M/sub W//cos theta/sub W/, and thus is not an independent parameter), M/sub Higgs/; the lepton masses, M/sub e/, Mμ, M/sub r/; the quark masses, M/sub d/, M/sub s/, M/sub b/, and M/sub u/, M/sub c/, M/sub t/; and finally, the quark mixing angles, theta 1 , theta 2 , theta 3 , and the CP violating phase delta. The latter four parameters appear in the quark mixing matrix for the Kobayashi-Maskawa and Maiani forms. Clearly, the present S-M covers an enormous range of physics topics, and the author can only lightly cover a few such topics in this report. The measurement of R/sub hadron/ is fundamental as a test of the running coupling constant α/sub s/ in QCD. The author will discuss a selection of recent precision measurements of R/sub hadron/, as well as some other techniques for measuring α/sub s/. QCD also requires the self interaction of gluons. The search for the three gluon vertex may be practically realized in the clear identification of gluonic mesons. The author will present a limited review of recent progress in the attempt to untangle such mesons from the plethora q anti q states of the same quantum numbers which exist in the same mass range. The electroweak interactions provide some of the strongest evidence supporting the S-M that exists. Given the recent progress in this subfield, and particularly with the discovery of the W and Z bosons at CERN, many recent reviews obviate the need for further discussion in this report. In attempting to validate a theory, one frequently searches for new phenomena which would clearly invalidate it. 49 references, 28 figures

  1. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

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    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  2. An experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis

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    Saruc M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates that acute pancreatitis is a complication of massive hemolysis with a prevalence of about 20%. We describe an experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis. Hemolytic anemia was induced in rats by a single ip injection of 60 mg/kg of 20 mg/ml acetylphenylhydrazine (APH in 20% (v/v ethanol on the first experimental day (day 0. One hundred and fifty Wistar albino rats weighing 180-200 g were divided into three groups of 50 animals each: groups 1, 2 and 3 were injected ip with APH, 20% ethanol, and physiological saline, respectively. Ten rats from each group were sacrificed on study days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic tissue tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and platelet-activating factor (PAF contents were determined and a histological examination of the pancreas was performed. No hemolysis or pancreatitis was observed in any of the rats in groups 2 and 3. In group 1, massive hemolysis was observed in 35 (70% of 50 rats, moderate hemolysis in seven (14%, and no hemolysis in eight (16%. Thirty-three of 35 (94.2% rats with massive hemolysis had hyperamylasemia, and 29 of these rats (82.8% had histologically proven pancreatitis. The most severe pancreatitis occurred on day 3, as demonstrated by histology. Tissue TNF-alpha and PAF levels were statistically higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Acute massive hemolysis induced acute pancreatitis, as indicated by histology, in almost 80% of cases. Hemolysis may induce acute pancreatitis by triggering the release of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines.

  3. Thermal dosimetry studies of ultrasonically induced hyperthermia in normal dog brain and in experimental brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britt, R.H.; Pounds, D.W.; Stuart, J.S.; Lyons, B.E.; Saxer, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    In a series of 16 acute experiments on pentobarbital anesthetized dogs, thermal distributions generated by ultrasonic heating using a 1 MHz PZT transducer were compared with intensity distributions mapped in a test tank. Relatively flat distributions from 1 to 3 cm have been mapped in normal dog brain using ''shaped'' intensity distributions generated from ultrasonic emission patterns which are formed by the interaction between compressional, transverse and flexural modes activated within the crystal. In contrast, these same intensity distributions generated marked temperature variations in 3 malignant brain tumors presumably due to variations in tumor blood flow. The results of this study suggest that a practical clinical system for uniform heating of large tumor volumes with varying volumes and geometries is not an achievable goal. The author's laboratory is developing a scanning ultrasonic rapid hyperthermia treatment system which will be able to sequentially heat small volume of tumor tissue either to temperatures which will sterilize tumor or to a more conventional thermal dose. Time-temperature studies of threshold for thermal damage in normal dog brain are currently in progress

  4. Effect of Irradiation on Tumor Microenvironment and Bone Marrow Cell Migration in a Preclinical Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, Jonathan L. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Krueger, Sarah A.; Hanna, Alaa [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Raffel, Thomas R. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Wilson, George D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Madlambayan, Gerard J. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian, E-mail: Brian.Marples@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To characterize the tumor microenvironment after standard radiation therapy (SRT) and pulsed radiation therapy (PRT) in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) allografts. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous LLC tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice. Standard RT or PRT was given at 2 Gy/d for a total dose of 20 Gy using a 5 days on, 2 days off schedule to mimic clinical delivery. Radiation-induced tumor microenvironment changes were examined after treatment using flow cytometry and antibody-specific histopathology. Normal tissue effects were measured using noninvasive {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography after naïve animals were given whole-lung irradiation to 40 Gy in 4 weeks using the same 2-Gy/d regimens. Results: Over the 2 weeks of therapy, PRT was more effective than SRT at reducing tumor growth rate (0.31 ± 0.02 mm{sup 3}/d and 0.55 ± 0.04 mm{sup 3}/d, respectively; P<.007). Histopathology showed a significant comparative reduction in the levels of Ki-67 (14.5% ± 3%), hypoxia (10% ± 3.5%), vascular endothelial growth factor (2.3% ± 1%), and stromal-derived factor-1α (2.5% ± 1.4%), as well as a concomitant decrease in CD45{sup +} bone marrow–derived cell (BMDC) migration (7.8% ± 2.2%) after PRT. The addition of AMD3100 also decreased CD45{sup +} BMDC migration in treated tumors (0.6% ± 0.1%). Higher vessel density was observed in treated tumors. No differences were observed in normal lung tissue after PRT or SRT. Conclusions: Pulsed RT–treated tumors exhibited slower growth and reduced hypoxia. Pulsed RT eliminated initiation of supportive mechanisms utilized by tumors in low oxygen microenvironments, including angiogenesis and recruitment of BMDCs.

  5. Mitigating Errors in External Respiratory Surrogate-Based Models of Tumor Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, Kathleen T.; McAvoy, Thomas J.; George, Rohini; Dieterich, Sonja; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of tumor site, measurement precision, tumor–surrogate correlation, training data selection, model design, and interpatient and interfraction variations on the accuracy of external marker-based models of tumor position. Methods and Materials: Cyberknife Synchrony system log files comprising synchronously acquired positions of external markers and the tumor from 167 treatment fractions were analyzed. The accuracy of Synchrony, ordinary-least-squares regression, and partial-least-squares regression models for predicting the tumor position from the external markers was evaluated. The quantity and timing of the data used to build the predictive model were varied. The effects of tumor–surrogate correlation and the precision in both the tumor and the external surrogate position measurements were explored by adding noise to the data. Results: The tumor position prediction errors increased during the duration of a fraction. Increasing the training data quantities did not always lead to more accurate models. Adding uncorrelated noise to the external marker-based inputs degraded the tumor–surrogate correlation models by 16% for partial-least-squares and 57% for ordinary-least-squares. External marker and tumor position measurement errors led to tumor position prediction changes 0.3–3.6 times the magnitude of the measurement errors, varying widely with model algorithm. The tumor position prediction errors were significantly associated with the patient index but not with the fraction index or tumor site. Partial-least-squares was as accurate as Synchrony and more accurate than ordinary-least-squares. Conclusions: The accuracy of surrogate-based inferential models of tumor position was affected by all the investigated factors, except for the tumor site and fraction index.

  6. Experimentally Induced Mammalian Models of Glaucoma

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    Makoto Ishikawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of animal models have been used to study glaucoma. Although these models provide valuable information about the disease, there is still no ideal model for studying glaucoma due to its complex pathogenesis. Animal models for glaucoma are pivotal for clarifying glaucoma etiology and for developing novel therapeutic strategies to halt disease progression. In this review paper, we summarize some of the major findings obtained in various glaucoma models and examine the strengths and limitations of these models.

  7. Mechanisms of tumor necrosis in photodynamic therapy with a chlorine photosensitizer: experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Bigbov, Elmir N.

    2011-02-01

    A photodynamic therapy experiment on 118 inbred white mice with transplanted Ehrlich's tumor (mouse mammary gland adenocarcinoma) is performed to reveal mechanisms of necrosis formation. In 7-10 days the tumor of 1-1.5 cm diameter is formed under skin at the injection point, and PDT procedure is applied. There were used a chlorine type photosensitizer RadachlorineTM and 662 nm wavelength diode laser. The drug is injected by intravenously at the dose of 40 mg/kg; the irradiation is executed in 2-2.5 hours at the surface dose of about 200 J/cm2. Each of the mice had a photochemical reaction in form of destructive changes at the irradiation region with subsequent development of dry coagulation necrosis. After rejection of the necrosis there occurred epithelization of defect tissues in a tumor place. Histological investigations were conducted in different follow-up periods, in 5 and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after irradiation. They included optical microscopy, immune marker analysis, morphometry with measurements of volume density of epithelium, tumor stroma and necroses, vascular bed. The investigations showed that an important role in damaging mechanisms of photodynamic action belongs to hypoxic injuries of tumor mediated by micro vascular disorders and blood circulatory disturbances. The injuries are formed in a few stages: microcirculation angiospasm causing vessel paresis, irreversible stases in capillaries, diapedetic hemorrhages, thromboses, and thrombovasculitis. It is marked mucoid swelling and fibrinoid necrosis of vascular tissue. Progressive vasculitises result in total vessel obliteration and tumor necrosis.

  8. Blocking Tumor Necrosis Factor α Enhances CD8 T-cell-Dependent Immunity in Experimental Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Florie; Rochotte, Julia; Colacios, Céline; Montfort, Anne; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise; Touriol, Christian; Rochaix, Philippe; Lajoie-Mazenc, Isabelle; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Levade, Thierry; Benoist, Hervé; Ségui, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    TNF plays a dual, still enigmatic role in melanoma, either acting as a cytotoxic cytokine or favoring a tumorigenic inflammatory microenvironment. Herein, the tumor growth of melanoma cell lines expressing major histocompatibility complex class I molecules at high levels (MHC-I(high)) was dramatically impaired in TNF-deficient mice, and this was associated with enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Immunodepletion of CD8 T cells fully restored melanoma growth in TNF(-/-) mice. Systemic administration of Etanercept inhibited MHC-I(high) melanoma growth in immunocompetent but not in immunodeficient (IFNγ(-/-), nude, or CD8(-/-)) mice. MHC-I(high) melanoma growth was also reduced in mice lacking TNF-R1, but not TNF-R2. TNF(-/-) and TNF-R1(-/-) mice as well as Etanercept-treated WT mice displayed enhanced intratumor content of high endothelial venules surrounded by high CD8(+) T-cell density. Adoptive transfer of activated TNF-R1-deficient or -proficient CD8(+) T cells in CD8-deficient mice bearing B16K1 tumors demonstrated that TNF-R1 deficiency facilitates the accumulation of live CD8(+) T cells into the tumors. Moreover, in vitro experiments indicated that TNF triggered activated CD8(+) T cell death in a TNF-R1-dependent manner, likely limiting the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in TNF/TNF-R1-proficient animals. Collectively, our observations indicate that TNF-R1-dependent TNF signaling impairs tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T-cell accumulation and may serve as a putative target to favor CD8(+) T-cell-dependent immune response in melanoma. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Methodological fundamentals of experimental magneto-therapy of tumors (historical essay

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    Alla I. Shikhlyarova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights the key stages on the way of a proper understanding of the magnetic field anti-tumor influence mechanisms on the level of an organism as an integrated system and its individual subsystems. The experiments in animals have shown that the processes of the malignant tumor growth inhibition are closely related to the formation of the stable state of the activation reaction at high reactivity levels. It is noted that the induction of such adaptational reaction depends on a specified selection of parameters of exposure intensities and magnetic field frequency, taking into account the law of nonlinearity of an exposure effect and adequacy with endogenous rhythms.

  10. Development of NMR imaging using CEST agents: application to brain tumor in a rodent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, J.

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed at developing saturation transfer imaging of lipoCEST contrast agents for the detection of angiogenesis in a U87 mouse brain tumor model. A lipoCEST with a sensitivity threshold of 100 pM in vitro was optimized in order to make it compatible with CEST imaging in vivo. Thanks to the development of an experimental setup dedicated to CEST imaging, we evaluated lipoCEST to detect specifically tumor angiogenesis. We demonstrated for the first time that lipoCEST visualization was feasible in vivo in a mouse brain after intravenous injection. Moreover, the integrin α v β 3 over expressed during tumor angiogenesis can be specifically targeted using a functionalized lipoCEST with RGD peptide. The specific association between the RGD-lipoCEST and its target α v β 3 was confirmed by immunohistochemical data and fluorescence microscopy. Finally, in order to tend to a molecular imaging protocol by CEST-MRI, we developed a quantification tool of lipoCEST contrast agents. This tool is based on modeling of proton exchange processes in vivo. By taking into account both B0 and B1 fields inhomogeneities which can dramatically alter CEST contrast, we showed that the accuracy of our quantification tool was 300 pM in vitro. The tool was applied on in vivo data acquired on the U87 mouse model and the maximum concentration of RGD-lipoCEST linked to their molecular targets was evaluated to 1.8 nM. (author) [fr

  11. Dynamic vehicle model for handling performance using experimental data

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    SangDo Na

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An analytical vehicle model is essential for the development of vehicle design and performance. Various vehicle models have different complexities, assumptions and limitations depending on the type of vehicle analysis. An accurate full vehicle model is essential in representing the behaviour of the vehicle in order to estimate vehicle dynamic system performance such as ride comfort and handling. An experimental vehicle model is developed in this article, which employs experimental kinematic and compliance data measured between the wheel and chassis. From these data, a vehicle model, which includes dynamic effects due to vehicle geometry changes, has been developed. The experimental vehicle model was validated using an instrumented experimental vehicle and data such as a step change steering input. This article shows a process to develop and validate an experimental vehicle model to enhance the accuracy of handling performance, which comes from precise suspension model measured by experimental data of a vehicle. The experimental force data obtained from a suspension parameter measuring device are employed for a precise modelling of the steering and handling response. The steering system is modelled by a lumped model, with stiffness coefficients defined and identified by comparing steering stiffness obtained by the measured data. The outputs, specifically the yaw rate and lateral acceleration of the vehicle, are verified by experimental results.

  12. Microencapsulated tumor assay: Evaluation of the nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-Zhe; Cheng, Dong-Feng; Ye, Jin-Hua; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Shi, Min-Min; Han, Bao-San; Peng, Cheng-Hong

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish a more stable and accurate nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer using cancer cell microencapsulation. METHODS: The assay is based on microencapsulation technology, wherein human tumor cells are encapsulated in small microcapsules (approximately 420 μm in diameter) constructed of semipermeable membranes. We implemented two kinds of subcutaneous implantation models in nude mice using the injection of single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells. The size of subcutaneously implanted tumors was observed on a weekly basis using two methods, and growth curves were generated from these data. The growth and metastasis of orthotopically injected single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells were evaluated at four and eight weeks postimplantation by positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan and necropsy. The pancreatic tumor samples obtained from each method were then sent for pathological examination. We evaluated differences in the rates of tumor incidence and the presence of metastasis and variations in tumor volume and tumor weight in the cancer microcapsules vs single-cell suspensions. RESULTS: Sequential in vitro observations of the microcapsules showed that the cancer cells in microcapsules proliferated well and formed spheroids at days 4 to 6. Further in vitro culture resulted in bursting of the membrane of the microcapsules and cells deviated outward and continued to grow in flasks. The optimum injection time was found to be 5 d after tumor encapsulation. In the subcutaneous implantation model, there were no significant differences in terms of tumor volume between the encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells and cells alone and rate of tumor incidence. There was a significant difference in the rate of successful implantation between the cancer cell microencapsulation group and the single tumor-cell suspension group (100% vs 71.43%, respectively, P = 0.0489) in the orthotropic implantation model. The former method

  13. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer

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    Sara Caceres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6–8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 106 IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors.

  14. An artificial blood vessel implanted three-dimensional microsystem for modeling transvascular migration of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Ying; Pei, Ying; Xie, Min; Jin, Zi-He; Xiao, Ya-Shi; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Li-Na; Li, Yan; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2015-02-21

    Reproducing a tumor microenvironment consisting of blood vessels and tumor cells for modeling tumor invasion in vitro is particularly challenging. Here, we report an artificial blood vessel implanted 3D microfluidic system for reproducing transvascular migration of tumor cells. The transparent, porous and elastic artificial blood vessels are obtained by constructing polysaccharide cellulose-based microtubes using a chitosan sacrificial template, and possess excellent cytocompatibility, permeability, and mechanical characteristics. The artificial blood vessels are then fully implanted into the collagen matrix to reconstruct the 3D microsystem for modeling transvascular migration of tumor cells. Well-defined simulated vascular lumens were obtained by proliferation of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) lining the artificial blood vessels, which enables us to reproduce structures and functions of blood vessels and replicate various hemodynamic parameters. Based on this model, the adhesion and transvascular migration of tumor cells across the artificial blood vessel have been well reproduced.

  15. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reduce Progression of Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease but Develop Wilms’ Tumors

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    Heloisa Cristina Caldas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic effect of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSs on the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD has not yet been demonstrated. In this study, we sought to assess whether treatment with iPSs retards progression of CKD when compared with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs. Untreated 5/6 nephrectomized rats were compared with CKD animals receiving BMSCs or iPSs. Renal function, histology, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression were studied. Implanted iPSs were tracked by the SRY gene expression analysis. Both treatments minimized elevation in serum creatinine, significantly improved clearance, and slowed down progression of disease. The proteinuria was reduced only in the iPS group. Both treatments reduced glomerulosclerosis, iPSs decreased macrophage infiltration, and TGF-β was reduced in kidneys from the BMSC group. Both types of treatments increased VEGF gene expression, TGF-β was upregulated only in the iPS group, and IL-10 had low expression in both groups. The SRY gene was found in 5/8 rats treated with iPSs. These 5 animals presented tumors with histology and cells highly staining positive for PCNA and Wilms’ tumor protein antibody characteristics of Wilms’ tumor. These results suggest that iPSs may be efficient to retard progression of CKD but carry the risk of Wilms’ tumor development.

  16. View-Angle Tilting and Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction for Artifact Reduction in MRI: Experimental Sequence Optimization for Orthopaedic Tumor Endoprostheses and Clinical Application.

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    Pia M Jungmann

    Full Text Available MRI plays a major role in follow-up of patients with malignant bone tumors. However, after limb salvage surgery, orthopaedic tumor endoprostheses might cause significant metal-induced susceptibility artifacts.To evaluate the benefit of view-angle tilting (VAT and slice-encoding metal artifact correction (SEMAC for MRI of large-sized orthopaedic tumor endoprostheses in an experimental model and to demonstrate clinical benefits for assessment of periprosthetic soft tissue abnormalities.In an experimental setting, tumor endoprostheses (n=4 were scanned at 1.5T with three versions of optimized high-bandwidth turbo-spin-echo pulse sequences: (i standard, (ii VAT and (iii combined VAT and SEMAC (VAT&SEMAC. Pulse sequences included coronal short-tau-inversion-recovery (STIR, coronal T1-weighted (w, transverse T1-w and T2-w TSE sequences. For clinical evaluation, VAT&SEMAC was compared to conventional metal artifact-reducing MR sequences (conventional MR in n=25 patients with metal implants and clinical suspicion of tumor recurrence or infection. Diameters of artifacts were measured quantitatively. Qualitative parameters were assessed on a five-point scale (1=best, 5=worst: "image distortion", "artificial signal changes at the edges" and "diagnostic confidence". Imaging findings were correlated with pathology. T-tests and Wilcoxon-signed rank tests were used for statistical analyses.The true size of the prostheses was overestimated on MRI (P<0.05. A significant reduction of artifacts was achieved by VAT (P<0.001 and VAT&SEMAC (P=0.003 compared to the standard group. Quantitative scores improved in the VAT and VAT&SEMAC group (P<0.05. On clinical MR images, artifact diameters were significantly reduced in the VAT&SEMAC-group as compared with the conventional-group (P<0.001. Distortion and artificial signal changes were reduced and diagnostic confidence improved (P<0.05. In two cases, tumor-recurrence, in ten cases infection and in thirteen cases other

  17. Modeling the Interplay Between Tumor Volume Regression and Oxygenation in Uterine Cervical Cancer During Radiotherapy Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Riboldi, Marco; Ciardo, Delia; Cattani, Federica; Cecconi, Agnese; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a patient-specific mathematical model to predict the evolution of uterine cervical tumors at a macroscopic scale, during fractionated external radiotherapy. The model provides estimates of tumor regrowth and dead-cell reabsorption, incorporating the interplay between tumor regression rate and radiosensitivity, as a function of the tumor oxygenation level. Model parameters were estimated by minimizing the difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes, these latter being obtained from a set of 154 serial cone-beam computed tomography scans acquired on 16 patients along the course of the therapy. The model stratified patients according to two different estimated dynamics of dead-cell removal and to the predicted initial value of the tumor oxygenation. The comparison with a simpler model demonstrated an improvement in fitting properties of this approach (fitting error average value <5%, p < 0.01), especially in case of tumor late responses, which can hardly be handled by models entailing a constant radiosensitivity, failing to model changes from initial severe hypoxia to aerobic conditions during the treatment course. The model predictive capabilities suggest the need of clustering patients accounting for cancer cell line, tumor staging, as well as microenvironment conditions (e.g., oxygenation level).

  18. Differentiating between borderline and invasive malignancies in ovarian tumors using a multivariate logistic regression model

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    Jiabin Chen

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Differentiation between borderline and invasive ovarian tumors can be achieved using a model based on the following criteria: menopausal status; cancer antigen 125 level; and ultrasound parameters. The model is helpful to oncologists and patients in the initial evaluation phase of ovarian tumors.

  19. Analytical techniques for boron and boron 10 analysis in a solid experimental tumor EO.771

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porschen, W.; Marx, J.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    If a tumor can be preferentially loaded with a suitable boron-10 compound and irradiated with thermal neutrons, malignant cells can be selectively destroyed via the α-particle + Li 7-nucleus from the reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li. Neutron capture therapy with two boron-10 amino acid analogs of low toxicity has been tested in recent years: (a) trimethylamine carboxyborane, (A3) and (b) amine-carboxyborane, (A7). Now the boron-10 glycineamide analog (A8), amineboryl carboxamide has been synthsized; it contains 13.81% boron (90% Boron 10+10% Boron 11) and shows a very low toxicity in mice. The effects of this compund were tested on the syngeneic solid adenocarcinoma EO 771 on the right hind leg of male C57 BL/6J mice under standard conditions, by measuring tumor volume growth delay and cell cycle changes using flow cytometry. Boron distribution between tumor and muscle was analyzed by emission spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) following injection of a suspension of peanut oil emulsion. In addition, boron-10 concentration in the tumor were analyzed with prompt γ-activation analysis and neutron capture radiography (Kodak-Pathe LR115) at the MRR reactor in Brookhaven after i.p. injection of 0.4 mg/g A8. Application of A8 alone (0.4 mg/g i.p.) or thermal neutron irradiation of the tumor EO. 771 produced a tumor growth delay of 1-2 days for tumor volume doubling. Application of the boron 10 glycine-amide analog A8 i.p. plus 5x10 12 n/cm 2 resulted in a growth delay of 3-6 days. In contrast intratumoral application of A8 plus 4x10 12 n/cm 2 neutrons gave a growth delay of 7-14 days; the fraction of (G2+M) cells rose from 35% (neutrons alone) to 52%, as evaluated from flow cytometry. (orig.)

  20. Effect of transarterial pulsed perfusion with heated saline on tumor vascular permeability in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Wei; Li Jinghua; Feng Dayun; Wan Yi; Liu Yufeng; Yang Qingfeng; Cheng Jianwei; Zhao Siyuan; Zhang Hongxin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of transarterial pulsed perfusion with 60 °C saline on vascular permeability of tumor tissue, as well as its hepatic and renal toxicity, in a rabbit VX2 liver model. Materials and methods: VX2 carcinomas were grown in rabbit livers, forty male New Zealand white tumor-bearing rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, followed by transarterial perfusion with 37 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (control 1 group), transarterial pulsed perfusion with 37 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (control 2 group), transarterial continuous perfusion with 60 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (TCP group), transarterial pulsed perfusion with 60 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (TPP group), the duration of time for tumor tissues in the range 43–45 °C of the treated groups was measured with needle thermometer during perfusion. Vascular permeability was assessed using the extravasation of Evans blue (EB) dye in the tumor or normal liver tissues of the four groups separately, the tumor or normal liver tissues of the four groups were estimated by histopathologic examination, and hepatic and renal toxicity was evaluated by means of blood biochemical analysis. The vascular endothelial cells in the tumor were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: The duration of time for tumor tissues in the range 43–45 °C of TPP group showed significantly longer than that of TCP group (12.3 ± 3.3 min vs. 5.7 ± 2.5 min) (P 0.05), and there was no significant difference in the serum BUN, Cr levels among the four groups at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 h after perfusion. Observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in liver tissue and tumor tissue. TEM indicating the endothelial cell gap was broadened and the endothelial cells’ microvillus was decreased after heated perfusion. Conclusions: The vascular permeability of the rabbit VX2 tumor was significantly increased after transarterial pulsed perfusion with 60 °C saline without

  1. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  2. Optimal definition of biological tumor volume using positron emission tomography in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ingrid; Wang, Hao; Huso, David; Wahl, Richard L

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the study is to investigate (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET)'s ability to delineate the viable portion of a tumor in an animal model using cross-sectional histology as the validation standard. Syngeneic mammary tumors were grown in female Lewis rats. Macroscopic histological images of the transverse tumor sections were paired with their corresponding FDG micro-PET slices of the same cranial-caudal location to form 51 pairs of co-registered images. A binary classification system based on four FDG-PET tumor contouring methods was applied to each pair of images: threshold based on (1) percentage of maximum tumor voxel counts (Cmax), (2) percentage of tumor peak voxel counts (Cpeak), (3) multiples of liver mean voxel counts (Cliver) derived from PERCIST, and (4) an edge-detection-based automated contouring system. The sensitivity, which represented the percentage of viable tumor areas correctly delineated by the gross tumor area (GTA) generated from a particular tumor contouring method, and the ratio (expressed in percentage) of the overestimated areas of a gross tumor area (GTAOE)/whole tumor areas on the macroscopic histology (WTAH), which represented how much a particular GTA extended into the normal structures surrounding the primary tumor target, were calculated. The receiver operating characteristic curves of all pairs of FDG-PET images have a mean area under the curve value of 0.934 (CI of 0.911-0.954), for representing how well each contouring method accurately delineated the viable tumor area. FDG-PET single value threshold tumor contouring based on 30 and 35 % of tumor Cmax or Cpeak and 6 × Cliver + 2 × SD achieved a sensitivity greater than 90 % with a GTAOE/WTAH ratio less than 10 %. Contouring based on 50 % of Cmax or Cpeak had a much lower sensitivity of 67.2-75.6 % with a GTAOE/WTAH ratio of 1.1-1.7 %. Automated edge detection was not reliable in this system. Single

  3. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J. M.; Custidiano, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  4. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J M; Custidiano, E R

    2011-01-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  5. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDiarmid, Jennifer A; Langova, Veronika; Bailey, Dale; Pattison, Scott T; Pattison, Stacey L; Christensen, Neil; Armstrong, Luke R; Brahmbhatt, Vatsala N; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Harrison, Matthew T; Costa, Marylia; Mugridge, Nancy B; Sedliarou, Ilya; Grimes, Nicholas A; Kiss, Debra L; Stillman, Bruce; Hann, Christine L; Gallia, Gary L; Graham, Robert M; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox) to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers. EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry) and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume) were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973). No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs). Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On this basis, we have designed a Phase 1 clinical study of EGFR

  6. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A MacDiarmid

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers.EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973. No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs.Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On this basis, we have designed a Phase 1 clinical study of

  7. Septic arthritis: immunopathogenesis, experimental models and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthritis is an inflammatory disease of the joints that is started by an infection whose most common agent is Staphylococcus aureus. In this review we discuss some of the most arthritogenic bacterial factors and the contribution of innate and specific immune mechanisms to joint destruction. Special emphasis is given to the induction of experimental arthritis by S. aureus in mice. The improvement of therapy by association of antibiotics with down-modulation of immunity is also included. PMID:24822058

  8. Experimental comparison of models for ultrafast impact ionization is silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-01-01

    We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses....

  9. Multiresolution texture models for brain tumor segmentation in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Ahmed, Shaheen; Hossen, Jakir

    2011-01-01

    In this study we discuss different types of texture features such as Fractal Dimension (FD) and Multifractional Brownian Motion (mBm) for estimating random structures and varying appearance of brain tissues and tumors in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We use different selection techniques including KullBack - Leibler Divergence (KLD) for ranking different texture and intensity features. We then exploit graph cut, self organizing maps (SOM) and expectation maximization (EM) techniques to fuse selected features for brain tumors segmentation in multimodality T1, T2, and FLAIR MRI. We use different similarity metrics to evaluate quality and robustness of these selected features for tumor segmentation in MRI for real pediatric patients. We also demonstrate a non-patient-specific automated tumor prediction scheme by using improved AdaBoost classification based on these image features.

  10. Predictive models for lymph node metastases in patients with testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yun; Hedgire, Sandeep; Prapruttam, Duangkamon; Harisinghani, Mukesh

    2015-10-01

    To develop predictive models for lymph node (LN) metastasis in testicular germ cell tumors. 291 patients with testicular germ cell tumors were included, which were divided into seminomatous and nonseminomatous groups. For screening the risk factors for LN metastasis, the tumor-related characteristics (including histopathological information and tumor markers) alpha fetoprotein and the lymph node-related features on CT were compared between metastatic cases and nonmetastatic cases. Two logistic regression models were built for each histological group, one depending on all tumor- and lymph node-related risk factors (Model 1) and another only on tumor-related factors (Model 2). Receivers operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate the predictive abilities of these models. 117 positive nodes/regions were identified in 68 patients, including 51 metastases and 17 occult metastases. Based on the selected independent risk factors, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of Models 1 and 2 in seminomatous and nonseminomatous groups were (95.5%, 95.3%, 95.3%, 77.8%, and 99.2%), (63.6%, 83.6%, 80.7%, 40.0%, and 93.0%), (93.5%, 94.7%, 94.3%, 89.6%, and 96.8%), and (89.1%, 44.2%, 58.9%, 43.6%, and 89.4%), respectively. Two predictive models for each seminomatous and nonseminomatous testicular tumor were established based on lymph node- and tumor-related risk factors. In patients with tumor and lymph node-related risk factors, regular CT surveillance is likely sufficient for predicting LN status, while in the patients without any tumor and lymph node-related risk factors a long interval-time CT follow-up should be considered. Additionally, right side tumors tend to involve contralateral LNs compared to left side ones. Positive inguinal LNs more frequently occur in patients with a history of groin surgery.

  11. Efficacy of magnetoacustoradiation treatment of experimental M-1, PC-1 tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chizh, D.V.; Krutilina, N.I.

    2011-01-01

    The urgency of the struggle against malignant tumors is determined by a stable growth of cancer incidence, high level of disability and morbidity, the cost and difficulty of treatment. The influence of low-frequency ultrasound and alternating magnetic field on transplanted tumors of sarcoma M-1 and alveolar liver cancer PC-1 together with radiation therapy at a SFD of 5 Gy and 20 Gy was investigated in the experiments on animals. It was established that the influence of the above physical factors inhibited sarcoma M-1 and alveolar liver cancer PC-1 growth, prolonged the life and survival of the animals of the investigated groups when compared to the intact controls, which definitely expanded the ideas about the capabilities of ultrasound and magnetic fields in cancer treatment.

  12. The quaternary state of polymerized human hemoglobin regulates oxygenation of breast cancer solid tumors: A theoretical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Julia A.; Baek, Jin Hyen; Yalamanoglu, Ayla; Buehler, Paul W.; Gilkes, Daniele M.; Palmer, Andre F.

    2018-01-01

    A major constraint in the treatment of cancer is inadequate oxygenation of the tumor mass, which can reduce chemotherapeutic efficacy. We hypothesize that polymerized human hemoglobin (PolyhHb) can be transfused into the systemic circulation to increase solid tumor oxygenation, and improve chemotherapeutic outcomes. By locking PolyhHb in the relaxed (R) quaternary state, oxygen (O2) offloading at low O2 tensions (20 mm Hg) is facilitated with tense (T) state PolyhHb. Therefore, R-state PolyhHb may deliver significantly more O2 to hypoxic tissues. Biophysical parameters of T and R-state PolyhHb were used to populate a modified Krogh tissue cylinder model to assess O2 transport in a tumor. In general, we found that increasing the volume of transfused PolyhHb decreased the apparent viscosity of blood in the arteriole. In addition, we found that PolyhHb transfusion decreased the wall shear stress at large arteriole diameters (>20 μm), but increased wall shear stress for small arteriole diameters (state PolyhHb may be more effective than T-state PolyhHb for O2 delivery at similar transfusion volumes. Reduction in the apparent viscosity resulting from PolyhHb transfusion may result in significant changes in flow distributions throughout the tumor microcirculatory network. The difference in wall shear stress implies that PolyhHb may have a more significant effect in capillary beds through mechano-transduction. Periodic top-load transfusions of PolyhHb into mice bearing breast tumors confirmed the oxygenation potential of both PolyhHbs via reduced hypoxic volume, vascular density, tumor growth, and increased expression of hypoxia inducible genes. Tissue section analysis demonstrated primary PolyhHb clearance occurred in the liver and spleen indicating a minimal risk for renal damage. PMID:29414985

  13. Recombinant human endostatin normalizes tumor vasculature and enhances radiation response in xenografted human nasopharyngeal carcinoma models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxic tumor cells can reduce the efficacy of radiation. Antiangiogenic therapy may transiently "normalize" the tumor vasculature to make it more efficient for oxygen delivery. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the recombinant human endostatin (endostar can create a "vascular normalization window" to alleviate hypoxia and enhance the inhibitory effects of radiation therapy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transient changes in morphology of tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor cell fraction in response to endostar were detected in mice bearing CNE-2 and 5-8F human NPC xenografts. Various treatment schedules were tested to assess the influence of endostar on the effect of radiation therapy. Several important factors relevant to the angiogenesis were identified through immunohistochemical staining. During endostar treatment, tumor vascularity decreased, while the basement membrane and pericyte coverage associated with endothelial cells increased, which supported the idea of vessel normalization. Hypoxic tumor cell fraction also decreased after the treatment. The transient modulation of tumor physiology caused by endostar improved the effect of radiation treatment compared with other treatment schedules. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-14 decreased, while the level of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF increased. CONCLUSIONS: Endostar normalized tumor vasculature, which alleviated hypoxia and significantly sensitized the function of radiation in anti-tumor in human NPC. The results provide an important experimental basis for combining endostar with radiation therapy in human NPC.

  14. Referent 3D tumor model at cellular level in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaic, R.; Ilic, R.D.; Petrovic, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim Conventional internal dosimetry has a lot of limitations because of tumor dose nonuniformity. The best approach for absorbed dose at cellular level for different tumors in radionuclide therapy calculation is Monte Carlo method. The purpose of this study is to introduce referent tumor 3D model at cellular level for Monte Carlo simulation study in radionuclide therapy. Material and Methods The moment when tumor is detectable and when same therapy can start is time period in which referent 3D tumor model at cellular level was defined. In accordance with tumor growth rate at that moment he was a sphere with same radius (10 000 μm). In that tumor there are cells or cluster of cells, which are randomly distributed spheres. Distribution of cells/cluster of cells can be calculated from histology data but it was assumed that this distribution is normal with the same mean value and standard deviation (100±50 mm). Second parameter, which was selected to define referent tumor, is volume density of cells (30%). In this referent tumor there are no necroses. Stroma is defined as space between spheres with same concentration of materials as in spheres. Results: Referent tumor defined on this way have about 2,2 10 5 cells or cluster of cells random distributed. Using this referent 3D tumor model and for same concentration of radionuclides (1:100) and energy of beta emitters (1000 keV) which are homogeneously distributed in labeled cells absorbed dose for all cells was calculated. Simulations are done using FOTELP Monte Carlo code, which is modified for this purposes. Results of absorbed dose in cells are given in numerical values (1D distribution) and as the images (2D or 3D distributions). Conclusion Geometrical module for Monte Carlo simulation study can be standardized by introducing referent 3D tumor model at cellular level. This referent 3D tumor model gives most realistic presentation of different tumors at the moment of their detectability. Referent 3D tumor model at

  15. A comparative study of two prediction models for brain tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Deqi; Tran, Loc; Wang, Jihong; Li, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) technique together with traditional T1 or T2 weighted MRI scans supplies rich information sources for brain cancer diagnoses. These images form large-scale, high-dimensional data sets. Due to the fact that significant correlations exist among these images, we assume low-dimensional geometry data structures (manifolds) are embedded in the high-dimensional space. Those manifolds might be hidden from radiologists because it is challenging for human experts to interpret high-dimensional data. Identification of the manifold is a critical step for successfully analyzing multimodal MR images. We have developed various manifold learning algorithms (Tran et al. 2011; Tran et al. 2013) for medical image analysis. This paper presents a comparative study of an incremental manifold learning scheme (Tran. et al. 2013) versus the deep learning model (Hinton et al. 2006) in the application of brain tumor progression prediction. The incremental manifold learning is a variant of manifold learning algorithm to handle large-scale datasets in which a representative subset of original data is sampled first to construct a manifold skeleton and remaining data points are then inserted into the skeleton by following their local geometry. The incremental manifold learning algorithm aims at mitigating the computational burden associated with traditional manifold learning methods for large-scale datasets. Deep learning is a recently developed multilayer perceptron model that has achieved start-of-the-art performances in many applications. A recent technique named "Dropout" can further boost the deep model by preventing weight coadaptation to avoid over-fitting (Hinton et al. 2012). We applied the two models on multiple MRI scans from four brain tumor patients to predict tumor progression and compared the performances of the two models in terms of average prediction accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and precision. The quantitative performance metrics were

  16. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C.; Cha, Chae Y.; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S.; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these

  17. Increased Plasma Colloid Osmotic Pressure Facilitates the Uptake of Therapeutic Macromolecules in a Xenograft Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hofmann

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP is a characteristic of most solid tumors. Clinically, TIFP may hamper the uptake of chemotherapeutic drugs into the tumor tissue reducing their therapeutic efficacy. In this study, a means of modulating TIFP to increase the flux of macromolecules into tumor tissue is presented, which is based on the rationale that elevated plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP pulls water from tumor interstitium lowering the TIFP. Concentrated human serum albumin: (20% HSA, used as an agent to enhance COP, reduced the TIFP time-dependently from 8 to 2 mm Hg in human tumor xenograft models bearing A431 epidermoid vulva carcinomas. To evaluate whether this reduction facilitates the uptake of macromolecules, the intratumoral distribution of fluorescently conjugated dextrans (2.5 mg/ml and cetuximab (2.0 mg/ml was probed using novel time domain nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. This method permitted discrimination and semiquantification of tumor-accumulated conjugate from background and unspecific probe fluorescence. The coadministration of 20% HSA together with either dextrans or cetuximab was found to lower the TIFP significantly and increase the concentration of the substances within the tumor tissue in comparison to control tumors. Furthermore, combined administration of 20%HSA plus cetuximab reduced the tumor growth significantly in comparison to standard cetuximab treatment. These data demonstrate that increased COP lowers the TIFP within hours and increases the uptake of therapeutic macromolecules into the tumor interstitium leading to reduced tumor growth. This model represents a novel approach to facilitate the delivery of therapeutics into tumor tissue, particularly monoclonal antibodies.

  18. Histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen independent prostate cancer tumors: evaluation in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Delgado-Enciso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meclofenamic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has shown therapeutic potential for different types of cancers, including androgen-independent prostate neoplasms. The antitumor effect of diverse nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been shown to be accompanied by histological and molecular changes that are responsible for this beneficial effect. The objective of the present work was to analyze the histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer. Tumors were created in a nude mouse model using PC3 cancerous human cells. Meclofenamic acid (10 mg/kg/day; experimental group, n=5 or saline solution (control group, n=5 was administered intraperitoneally for twenty days. Histological analysis was then carried out on the tumors, describing changes in the cellular architecture, fibrosis, and quantification of cellular proliferation and tumor vasculature. Meclofenamic acid causes histological changes that indicate less tumor aggression (less hypercellularity, fewer atypical mitoses, and fewer nuclear polymorphisms, an increase in fibrosis, and reduced cellular proliferation and tumor vascularity. Further studies are needed to evaluate the molecular changes that cause the beneficial and therapeutic effects of meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  19. Effectivity of pazopanib treatment in orthotopic models of human testicular germ cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juliachs, Mercè; Viñals, Francesc; Vidal, August; Muro, Xavier Garcia del; Piulats, Josep M; Condom, Enric; Casanovas, Oriol; Graupera, Mariona; Germà, Jose R; Villanueva, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance in testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) is still a clinical challenge, and one associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this work was to test pazopanib, an anti-tumoral and anti-angiogenic multikinase inhibitor, and its combination with lapatinib (an anti-ErbB inhibitor) in mouse orthotopic models of human testicular GCTs. We used two different models of human testicular GCTs orthotopically grown in nude mice; a CDDP-sensitive choriocarcinoma (TGT38) and a new orthotopic model generated from a metastatic GCT refractory to first-line CDDP chemotherapy (TGT44). Nude mice implanted with these orthotopic tumors were treated with the inhibitors and the effect on tumoral growth and angiogenesis was evaluated. TGT44 refractory tumor had an immunohistochemical profile similar to the original metastasis, with characteristics of yolk sac tumor. TGT44 did not respond when treated with cisplatin. In contrast, pazopanib had an anti-angiogenic effect and anti-tumor efficacy in this model. Pazopanib in combination with lapatinib in TGT38, an orthotopic model of choriocarcinoma had an additive effect blocking tumor growth. We present pazopanib as a possible agent for the alternative treatment of CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-refractory GCT patients, alone or in combination with anti-ErbB therapies

  20. GROWTH FACTORS AND COX2 IN WOUND HEALING: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY WITH EHRLICH TUMORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Flávio L L; Artigiani-Neto, Ricardo; Lopes-Filho, Gaspar de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Healing is an innate biological phenomenon, and carcinogenesis acquired, but with common humoral and cellular elements. Carcinogenesis interferes negatively in healing. To evaluate the histological changes in laparotomy scars of healthy Balb/c mice and with an Ehrlich tumor in its various forms of presentation. Fifty-four mice were divided into three groups of 18 animals. First group was the control; the second had Ehrlich tumor with ascites; and the third had the subcutaneous form of this tumor. Seven days after tumor inoculation, all 54 mice were submitted to laparotomy. All of the animals in the experiment were operated on again on 7th day after surgery, with resection of the scar and subsequent euthanasia of the animal. The scars were sent for histological assessment using immunohistochemical techniques to evaluate Cox-2 (cyclooxygenase 2), VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) and FGF (fibroblast growth factor). Semi-quantitatively analysis was done in the laparotomy scars and in the abdominal walls far away from the site of the operation. Assessing the weight of the animals, the correct inoculation of the tumor and weight gain in the group with tumoral ascites was observed. The histological studies showed that groups with the tumor showed a statistically significant higher presence of Cox-2 compared to the control. In the Cox-2 analysis of the abdominal wall, the ascites group showed the most significant difference. VEGF did not present any significant differences between the three groups, regardless of the site. The FGF showed a significant increase in animals with the tumor. Histological findings in both laparotomy scar and the abdominal wall showed that with Ehrlich's neoplasia there was an exacerbated inflammatory response, translated by more intense expression of Cox-2 and greater fibroblast proliferation, translated by more intense expression of FGF, that is, it stimulated both the immediate inflammatory reactions, observed with Cox-2 reactions, and

  1. Tumor affinity of radiolabeled peanut agglutinin compared with that of Ga-67 citrate in animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Aburano, T.; Watanabe, N.; Kawabata, S.; Ishida, H.; Mukai, K.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.

    1985-01-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binds avidly to the immunodominant group of the tumor associated T antigen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oncodiagnostic potential of radiolabeled PNA in animal models. PNA was labeled with I-125 or I-131 by Iodogen and also with In-111 by cyclic DTPA anhydride. The biological activity of PNA was examined by a hemaglutination titer with a photometer before and after labeling. Animal tumor models used were Lewis Lung Cancer(LLC), B-16 Melanotic Melanoma(MM), Yoshida Sarcoma(YS), Ehrlich Ascites Tumor(EAT and Hepatoma AH109A(HAH). Inflammatory tissue induced by turpentine oil was used as an abscess model. Serial scintigraphic images were obtained following IV injections of 100 μCi of I-131 or In-111-DTPA-PNA. The tumor affinity of Ga-67 citrate was studied to compare that of radiolabeled PNA. Tissue biodistribution was studied in EAT bearing mice. All of these tumor models except HAH were clearly visible by radiolabeled PNA without subtraction techniques. In the models of LLC and EAT, PNA showed the better accumulation into the tumor tissue than Ga-67 citrate. In YS and MM, PNA represented almost the same accumulation as Ga-67 citrate. The localization of PNA into abscess tissue wasn't found although Ga-67 citrate markedly accumulated into abscess tissue as well as tumor tissue. The clearance of PNA from tumor was slower than those from any other organs. Tumor to muscle ratio was 5.1 at 48hrs. and tumor to blood ratio increased with time to 2.3 at 96hrs. These results suggested that radiolabeled PNA may have a potential in the detection of tumor

  2. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and dive...

  3. Experimental Verification of the Transient Model in an Enrichment Circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandino, Maria; Brasnarof, Daniel; Delmastro, Dario

    2003-01-01

    In the present work an experimental closed loop representing a single stage of an uranium gaseous diffusion enrichment cascade is described, loop that is used to experimentally validate an analytical model that describes the dynamics inside such a loop.The conditions established inside the experimental loop after a few working hours were reproduced by the analytical model, leaving the slower thermal phenomena taking place for future studies.Two kinds of perturbations were experimentally introduced: a change in the range of operation of one of the compressors and the addition of mass into the loop.Numerical and experimental results are compared and presented in this work. The analytical model proposed was verified against these two changes, with very good agreement in the time response and measured values.This analytical model allows us to determine the characteristic time response of the system

  4. An experimental comparison of modelling techniques for speaker ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Most of the existing modelling techniques for the speaker recognition task make an implicit assumption of sufficient data for speaker modelling and hence may lead to poor modelling under limited data condition. The present work gives an experimental evaluation of the modelling techniques like Crisp Vector Quantization ...

  5. An experimental comparison of modelling techniques for speaker ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Most of the existing modelling techniques for the speaker recog- nition task make an implicit assumption of sufficient data for speaker modelling and hence may lead to poor modelling under limited data condition. The present work gives an experimental evaluation of the modelling techniques like Crisp.

  6. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes.

  7. Computational and Experimental Evaluations of a Novel Thermo-Brachytherapy Seed for Treatment of Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, Gregory R.

    Hyperthermia has long been known as a radiation therapy sensitizer of high potential; however successful delivery of this modality and integrating it with radiation have often proved technically difficult. We present the dual-modality thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, based on the ubiquitous low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy permanent implant, as a simple and effective combination of hyperthermia and radiation therapy. Heat is generated from a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic core within the seed, which produces Joule heating by eddy currents. A strategically-selected Curie temperature provides thermal self-regulation. In order to obtain a uniform and sufficiently high temperature distribution, additional hyperthermia-only (HT-only) seeds are proposed to be used in vacant spots within the needles used to implant the TB seeds; this permits a high seed density without the use of additional needles. Experimental and computational studies were done both to optimize the design of the TB and HT-only seeds and to quantitatively assess their ability to heat and irradiate defined, patient-specific targets. Experiments were performed with seed-sized ferromagnetic samples in tissue-mimicking phantoms heated by an industrial induction heater. The magnetic and thermal properties of the seeds were studied computationally in the finite element analysis (FEA) solver COMSOL Multiphysics, modelling realistic patient-specific seed distributions. These distributions were derived from LDR permanent prostate implants previously conducted at our institution; various modifications of the seeds' design were studied. The calculated temperature distributions were analyzed by generating temperature-volume histograms, which were used to quantify coverage and temperature homogeneity for a range of blood perfusion rates, as well as for a range of seed Curie temperatures and thermal power production rates. The impact of the interseed attenuation and scatter (ISA) effect on radiation dose distributions

  8. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ICONE, 15

    2007-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (''thermal striping'') in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums

  9. Scaled experimental modeling of VHTR plenum flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreery, Glenn E.; Condie, Keith G.; Schultz, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. Various scaled heated and unheated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification ('thermal striping') in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the buoyancy effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, scaling distortions will occur due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the upper plenum than in the prototype in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums. (author)

  10. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  11. Multiple-Tumor Analysis with MS_Combo Model (Use with BMDS Wizard)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exercises and procedures on setting up and using the MS_Combo Wizard. The MS_Combo model provides BMD and BMDL estimates for the risk of getting one or more tumors for any combination of tumors observed in a single bioassay.

  12. A Mathematical Model of Prostate Tumor Growth Under Hormone Therapy with Mutation Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Youshan; Guo, Qian; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-04-01

    This paper extends Jackson’s model describing the growth of a prostate tumor with hormone therapy to a new one with hypothetical mutation inhibitors. The new model not only considers the mutation by which androgen-dependent (AD) tumor cells mutate into androgen-independent (AI) ones but also introduces inhibition which is assumed to change the mutation rate. The tumor consists of two types of cells (AD and AI) whose proliferation and apoptosis rates are functions of androgen concentration. The mathematical model represents a free-boundary problem for a nonlinear system of parabolic equations, which describe the evolution of the populations of the above two types of tumor cells. The tumor surface is a free boundary, whose velocity is equal to the cell’s velocity there. Global existence and uniqueness of solutions of this model is proved. Furthermore, explicit formulae of tumor volume at any time t are found in androgen-deprived environment under the assumption of radial symmetry, and therefore the dynamics of tumor growth under androgen-deprived therapy could be predicted by these formulae. Qualitative analysis and numerical simulation show that controlling the mutation may improve the effect of hormone therapy or delay a tumor relapse.

  13. Efficient experimental designs for sigmoidal growth models

    OpenAIRE

    Dette, Holger; Pepelyshev, Andrey

    2005-01-01

    For the Weibull- and Richards-regression model robust designs are determined by maximizing a minimum of D- or D1-efficiencies, taken over a certain range of the non-linear parameters. It is demonstrated that the derived designs yield a satisfactory solution of the optimal design problem for this type of model in the sense that these designs are efficient and robust with respect to misspecification of the unknown parameters. Moreover, the designs can also be used for testing the postulated for...

  14. Experimental and modelling studies of infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giudici, M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation describes a study of infiltration in the unsaturated soil with the objective of estimating the recharge to a phreatic aquifer. The study area is at the border of the city of Milan (Northern Italy), which draws water for both domestic and industrial purposes from ground water resources located beneath the urban area. The rate of water pumping from the aquifer system has been varying during the XX century, depending upon the number of inhabitants and the development of industrial activities. This caused variations with time of the depth of the water table below the ground surface and in turn some emergencies: the two most prominent episodes correspond to the middle '70s, when the water table in the city centre was about 30 m below the undisturbed natural conditions, and to the last decade, when the water table has raised at a rate of approximately 1 m/year and caused infiltrations in deep constructions (garages and building foundations, the underground railways, etc.). We have developed four ground water flow models at different scales, which share some characteristics: they are based on quasi-3D approximation (horizontal flow in the aquifers and vertical flow in the aquitards), conservative finite-differences schemes for regular grid with square cells in the horizontal plane and are implemented with proprietary computer codes. Among the problems that were studied for the development of these models, I recall some numerical problems, related to the behaviour of the phreatic aquifer under conditions of strong exploitation. Model calibration and validation for ModMil has been performed with a two-stage process, i.e., using some of the available data for model calibration and the remaining data for model validation. The application of geophysical exploration techniques, in particular seismic and geo-electrical prospecting, has been very useful to complete the data and information on the hydro-geological structure obtained from stratigraphic logs

  15. Resonant spectra of malignant breast cancer tumors using the three-dimensional electromagnetic fast multipole model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shenawee, Magda

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an intensive numerical study of the resonance scattering of malignant breast cancer tumors. The three-dimensional electromagnetic model, based on the equivalence theorem, is used to obtain induced electric and magnetic currents on breast and tumor surfaces. The results show that the nonspherical malignant tumor can be characterized, based on its spectra, regardless of orientation, incident polarization, or incident or scattered directions. The spectra of the tumor depend solely upon its physical characteristics (i.e., shape and electrical properties); however, their locations are not functions of the depth of the tumor beneath the breast surface. This paper can be a guide in the selection of the frequency range at which the tumor resonates to produce the maximum signature at the receiver.

  16. Tumor-immune interaction, surgical treatment, and cancer recurrence in a mathematical model of melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Eikenberry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is a cancer of the skin arising in the melanocytes. We present a mathematical model of melanoma invasion into healthy tissue with an immune response. We use this model as a framework with which to investigate primary tumor invasion and treatment by surgical excision. We observe that the presence of immune cells can destroy tumors, hold them to minimal expansion, or, through the production of angiogenic factors, induce tumorigenic expansion. We also find that the tumor-immune system dynamic is critically important in determining the likelihood and extent of tumor regrowth following resection. We find that small metastatic lesions distal to the primary tumor mass can be held to a minimal size via the immune interaction with the larger primary tumor. Numerical experiments further suggest that metastatic disease is optimally suppressed by immune activation when the primary tumor is moderately, rather than minimally, metastatic. Furthermore, satellite lesions can become aggressively tumorigenic upon removal of the primary tumor and its associated immune tissue. This can lead to recurrence where total cancer mass increases more quickly than in primary tumor invasion, representing a clinically more dangerous disease state. These results are in line with clinical case studies involving resection of a primary melanoma followed by recurrence in local metastases.

  17. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rymaszewski, Amy L.; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Jarzembowski, Jason A.; Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A. Jr.; Vikis, Haris G.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting

  18. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase in models of lung tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymaszewski, Amy L; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P; Gelman, Andrew E; Jarzembowski, Jason A; Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Vikis, Haris G

    2014-05-09

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting.

  19. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rymaszewski, Amy L.; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Gelman, Andrew E. [Department of Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Jarzembowski, Jason A. [Department of Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A. Jr. [Department of Surgery and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Vikis, Haris G., E-mail: hvikis@mcw.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting.

  20. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L. Rymaszewski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC, a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting.

  1. Experimental Measurement, Analysis and Modelling of Dependency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We propose a direct method of measurement of the total emissivity of opaque samples on a range of temperature around the ambient one. The method rests on the modulation of the temperature of the sample and the infra-red signal processing resulting from the surface of the sample we model the total emissivity obtained ...

  2. Isothermal coarse mixing: experimental and CFD modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbertson, M.A.; Kenning, D.B.R.; Hall, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    A plane, two-dimensional flow apparatus has been built which uses a jet of solid 6mm diameter balls to model a jet of molten drops falling into a tank of water to study premixing prior to a vapour explosion. Preliminary experiments with unheated stainless steel balls are here compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations by the code CHYMES. (6 figures) (Author)

  3. Mathematical modeling of tumor-associated macrophage interactions with the cancer microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlbacher, Grace; Curtis, Louis T; Lowengrub, John; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2018-01-30

    Immuno-oncotherapy has emerged as a promising means to target cancer. In particular, therapeutic manipulation of tumor-associated macrophages holds promise due to their various and sometimes opposing roles in tumor progression. It is established that M1-type macrophages suppress tumor progression while M2-types support it. Recently, Tie2-expressing macrophages (TEM) have been identified as a distinct sub-population influencing tumor angiogenesis and vascular remodeling as well as monocyte differentiation. This study develops a modeling framework to evaluate macrophage interactions with the tumor microenvironment, enabling assessment of how these interactions may affect tumor progression. M1, M2, and Tie2 expressing variants are integrated into a model of tumor growth representing a metastatic lesion in a highly vascularized organ, such as the liver. Behaviors simulated include M1 release of nitric oxide (NO), M2 release of growth-promoting factors, and TEM facilitation of angiogenesis via Angiopoietin-2 and promotion of monocyte differentiation into M2 via IL-10. The results show that M2 presence leads to larger tumor growth regardless of TEM effects, implying that immunotherapeutic strategies that lead to TEM ablation may fail to restrain growth when the M2 represents a sizeable population. As TEM pro-tumor effects are less pronounced and on a longer time scale than M1-driven tumor inhibition, a more nuanced approach to influence monocyte differentiation taking into account the tumor state (e.g., under chemotherapy) may be desirable. The results highlight the dynamic interaction of macrophages within a growing tumor, and, further, establish the initial feasibility of a mathematical framework that could longer term help to optimize cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Inflammatory Cytokine Pattern Is Sex-Dependent in Mouse Cutaneous Melanoma Experimental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Surcel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the evaluation of inflammatory cytokines in mouse cutaneous melanoma experimental model, as markers of disease evolution. Moreover, to test our experimental model, we have used low doses of dacarbazine (DTIC. C57 BL/6J mouse of both sexes were subjected to experimental cutaneous melanoma and treated with low doses of DTIC. Clinical parameters and serum cytokines were followed during tumor evolution and during DTIC therapy. Cytokine/chemokine pattern was assessed using xMAP technology and the following molecules were quantified: interleukins (IL-1-beta, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (p70, interferon (IFN-gamma, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC. Significant differences were found between normal females and males mice, female mice having a statistically higher serum concentration of IL-1-beta compared to male mice, while males have a significantly higher concentration of MIP-1-alpha. During melanoma evolution in the female group, IL-1-beta, MIP-1-alpha, and KC circulatory levels were found 10-fold increased, while other cytokines doubled their values. In the male mice group, only circulatory KC increased 4 times, while IL-1-beta and TNF-alpha doubled their circulatory values. Various serum cytokines correlated with the disease evolution in cutaneous melanoma mouse model.

  5. Unimpaired Autoreactive T-Cell Traffic Within the Central Nervous System During Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Mediated inhibition of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korner, Heinrich; Goodsall, Anna L.; Lemckert, Frances A.; Scallon, Bernard J.; Ghrayeb, John; Ford, Andrew L.; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.

    1995-11-01

    The critical role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as a mediator in autoimmune inflammatory processes is evident from in vivo studies with TNF-blocking agents. However, the mechanisms by which TNF, and possibly also its homologue lymphotoxin α, contributes to development of pathology in rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn disease and in animal models like experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is unclear. Possibilities include regulation of vascular adhesion molecules enabling leukocyte movement into tissues or direct cytokine-mediated effector functions such as mediation of tissue damage. Here we show that administration of a TNF receptor (55 kDa)-IgG fusion protein prevented clinical signs of actively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Significantly, the total number of CD4^+ T lymphocytes isolated from the central nervous system of clinically healthy treated versus diseased control animals was comparable. By using a CD45 congenic model of passively transferred experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis to enable tracking of myelin basic protein-specific effector T lymphocytes, prevention of clinical signs of disease was again demonstrated in treated animals but without quantitative or qualitative impediment to the movement of autoreactive T lymphocytes to and within the central nervous system. Thus, despite the uninterrupted movement of specific T lymphocytes into the target tissue, subsequent disease development was blocked. This provides compelling evidence for a direct effector role of TNF/lymphotoxin α in autoimmune tissue damage.

  6. Establishment of Patient-Derived Tumor Xenograft Models of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer for Preclinical Evaluation of Novel Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joyce F; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Zeng, Qing; Zhou, Shan; Ivanova, Elena; Huang, Wei; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Selfors, Laura M; Shen, Yiping; Pritchard, Colin C; Zheng, Mei; Adleff, Vilmos; Papp, Eniko; Piao, Huiying; Novak, Marian; Fotheringham, Susan; Wulf, Gerburg M; English, Jessie; Kirschmeier, Paul T; Velculescu, Victor E; Paweletz, Cloud; Mills, Gordon B; Livingston, David M; Brugge, Joan S; Matulonis, Ursula A; Drapkin, Ronny

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the United States, with high rates of recurrence and eventual resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Model systems that allow for accurate and reproducible target discovery and validation are needed to support further drug development in this disease. Experimental Design: Clinically annotated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models were generated from tumor cells isolated from the ascites or pleural fluid of patients undergoing clinical procedures. Models were characterized by IHC and by molecular analyses. Each PDX was luciferized to allow for reproducible in vivo assessment of intraperitoneal tumor burden by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Plasma assays for CA125 and human LINE-1 were developed as secondary tests of in vivo disease burden. Results: Fourteen clinically annotated and molecularly characterized luciferized ovarian PDX models were generated. Luciferized PDX models retain fidelity to both the nonluciferized PDX and the original patient tumor, as demonstrated by IHC, array CGH, and targeted and whole-exome sequencing analyses. Models demonstrated diversity in specific genetic alterations and activation of PI3K signaling pathway members. Response of luciferized PDX models to standard-of-care therapy could be reproducibly monitored by BLI or plasma markers. Conclusions: We describe the establishment of a collection of 14 clinically annotated and molecularly characterized luciferized ovarian PDX models in which orthotopic tumor burden in the intraperitoneal space can be followed by standard and reproducible methods. This collection is well suited as a platform for proof-of-concept efficacy and biomarker studies and for validation of novel therapeutic strategies in ovarian cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 23(5); 1263-73. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. 3D modeling of effects of increased oxygenation and activity concentration in tumors treated with radionuclides and antiangiogenic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerloef, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden); Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg, Sweden and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) in response to hypoxia is a fundamental event in the process of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. However, abnormalities in tumor neovasculature often induce increased interstitial pressure (IP) and further reduce oxygenation (pO{sub 2}) of tumor cells. In radiotherapy, well-oxygenated tumors favor treatment. Antiangiogenic drugs may lower IP in the tumor, improving perfusion, pO{sub 2} and drug uptake, by reducing the number of malfunctioning vessels in the tissue. This study aims to create a model for quantifying the effects of altered pO{sub 2}-distribution due to antiangiogenic treatment in combination with radionuclide therapy. Methods: Based on experimental data, describing the effects of antiangiogenic agents on oxygenation of GlioblastomaMultiforme (GBM), a single cell based 3D model, including 10{sup 10} tumor cells, was developed, showing how radionuclide therapy response improves as tumor oxygenation approaches normal tissue levels. The nuclides studied were {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 211}At. The absorbed dose levels required for a tumor control probability (TCP) of 0.990 are compared for three different log-normal pO{sub 2}-distributions: {mu}{sub 1} = 2.483, {sigma}{sub 1} = 0.711; {mu}{sub 2} = 2.946, {sigma}{sub 2} = 0.689; {mu}{sub 3} = 3.689, and {sigma}{sub 3} = 0.330. The normal tissue absorbed doses will, in turn, depend on this. These distributions were chosen to represent the expected oxygen levels in an untreated hypoxic tumor, a hypoxic tumor treated with an anti-VEGF agent, and in normal, fully-oxygenated tissue, respectively. The former two are fitted to experimental data. The geometric oxygen distributions are simulated using two different patterns: one Monte Carlo based and one radially increasing, while keeping the log-normal volumetric distributions intact. Oxygen and activity are distributed, according to the same pattern. Results: As tumor pO{sub 2

  8. Experimental Validation of a Permeability Model for Enrichment Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellano, Pablo; Brasnarof, Daniel; Florido Pablo

    2003-01-01

    An experimental loop with a real scale diffuser, in a single enrichment-stage configuration, was operated with air at different process conditions, in order to characterize the membrane permeability.Using these experimental data, an analytical geometric-and-morphologic-based model was validated.It is conclude that a new set of independent measurements, i.e. enrichment, is necessary in order to fully characterize diffusers, because of its internal parameters are not univocally determinated with permeability experimental data only

  9. New experimental model for training in videosurgery Novo modelo experimental para treinamento em videocirurgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Malta Batista

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a new experimental model of lower cost for training in videosurgery. METHODS: This project was performed at the Nucleus of Experimental Surgery of the Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health, based on previous models described in the literature and under the supervision of the full professor of Operative Technique and Experimental Surgery II. It was made a model cube-shaped, made of wood, with holes distributed in various locations, rubber stoppers for the holes and lined externally with carpet, and internally with laminate. RESULTS: The new experimental model is of low cost and reproduces quite faithfully several videosurgical procedures. CONCLUSION: Medical schools interested in the subject may adopt the new model for training in videosurgery without the need of high costs for making and using these models.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um novo modelo experimental de baixo custo para treinamento em videocirurgia MÉTODOS: Este projeto foi conduzido no Núcleo de Cirurgia Experimental da Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, baseado em modelos prévios descritos na literatura e sob a supervisão do professor titular de Técnica Operatória e Cirurgia Experimental II. Foi feito um modelo em formato de cubo, de madeira, com furos distribuídos em vários locais, tampas de borracha para os orifícios e forrado externamente com carpete e internamente com laminado. RESULTADOS: O novo modelo experimental desenvolvido é de baixo custo e reproduz de forma bastante fiel diversos procedimentos videocirúrgicos. CONCLUSÃO: Faculdades médicas interessadas no tema poderão adotar o novo modelo para o treinamento em videocirurgia sem que sejam necessários gastos elevados para a confecção e o uso desses modelos.

  10. Shigella mediated depletion of macrophages in a murine breast cancer model is associated with tumor regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Galmbacher

    Full Text Available A tumor promoting role of macrophages has been described for a transgenic murine breast cancer model. In this model tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent a major component of the leukocytic infiltrate and are associated with tumor progression. Shigella flexneri is a bacterial pathogen known to specificly induce apotosis in macrophages. To evaluate whether Shigella-induced removal of macrophages may be sufficient for achieving tumor regression we have developed an attenuated strain of S. flexneri (M90TDeltaaroA and infected tumor bearing mice. Two mouse models were employed, xenotransplantation of a murine breast cancer cell line and spontanous breast cancer development in MMTV-HER2 transgenic mice. Quantitative analysis of bacterial tumor targeting demonstrated that attenuated, invasive Shigella flexneri primarily infected TAMs after systemic administration. A single i.v. injection of invasive M90TDeltaaroA resulted in caspase-1 dependent apoptosis of TAMs followed by a 74% reduction in tumors of transgenic MMTV-HER-2 mice 7 days post infection. TAM depletion was sustained and associated with complete tumor regression.These data support TAMs as useful targets for antitumor therapy and highlight attenuated bacterial pathogens as potential tools.

  11. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, {Omega}{sub b}, remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that {Omega}{sub b} {approximately} 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming {Omega}{sub total} = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since {Omega}{sub visible} < {Omega}{sub b}. Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M{sub x} {approx gt} 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z{sup 0} coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for {nu}-masses may imply that the {nu}{sub {tau}} is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Experimental modeling of a deoiling hydrocyclone system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bram, Mads Valentin; Hassan, Abdiladif Ahmed; Hansen, Dennis Severin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocyclones used in offshore oil & gas industries utilizes pressure difference ratio (PDR) control to maintain efficient oil and water separation. This separation will reduce the concentration of oil in the effluent water to fulfill the environmental safety limits of low oil concentrations....... This limitation causes the optimization of the separation process to be an important research. As oscillating flow affects the hydrocyclones performance, it is important to identify the dynamic model of the hydrocyclones to possibly optimize and improve the current PDR control solution. An in-house developed...

  13. Experimental modeling methods in Industrial Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Trebuňa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic approaches to a management system of the present industrial practice, forcing businesses to address management issues in-house continuous improvement of production and non-production processes. Experience has repeatedly demonstrated the need for a system approach not only in analysis but also in the planning and actual implementation of these processes. Therefore, the contribution is focused on the description of the modeling in industrial practice by a system approach, in order to avoid erroneous application of the decision to the implementation phase, and thus prevent any longer applying methods "attempt - fallacy".

  14. CS model coil experimental log book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  15. Ultrasonic characterization of three animal mammary tumors from three-dimensional acoustic tissue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamou, Jonathan M.

    This dissertation investigated how three-dimensional (3D) tissue models can be used to improve ultrasonic tissue characterization (UTC) techniques. Anatomic sites in tissue responsible for ultrasonic scattering are unknown, which limits the potential applications of ultrasound for tumor diagnosis. Accurate 3D models of tumor tissues may help identify the scattering sites. Three mammary tumors were investigated: a rat fibroadenoma, a mouse carcinoma, and a mouse sarcoma. A 3D acoustic tissue model, termed 3D impedance map (3DZM), was carefully constructed from consecutive histologic sections for each tumor. Spectral estimates (scatterer size and acoustic concentration) were obtained from the 3DZMs and compared to the same estimates obtained with ultrasound. Scatterer size estimates for three tumors were found to be similar (within 10%). The 3DZMs were also used to extract tissue-specific scattering models. The scattering models were found to allow clear distinction between the three tumors. This distinction demonstrated that UTC techniques may be helpful for noninvasive clinical tumor diagnosis.

  16. A switching control law approach for cancer immunotherapy of an evolutionary tumor growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doban, Alina I; Lazar, Mircea

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach for tumor immunotherapy which is based on a switching control strategy defined on domains of attraction of equilibria of interest. For this, we consider a recently derived model which captures the effects of the tumor cells on the immune system and viceversa, through predator-prey competition terms. Additionally, it incorporates the immune system's mechanism for producing hunting immune cells, which makes the model suitable for immunotherapy strategies analysis and design. For computing domains of attraction for the tumor nonlinear dynamics, and thus, for deriving immunotherapeutic strategies we employ rational Lyapunov functions. Finally, we apply the switching control strategy to destabilize an invasive tumor equilibrium and steer the system trajectories to tumor dormancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Meyer, Morten; Petterson, Stine Asferg

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking...... invasion and tumor stemness into account. METHODS: Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS) cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains...... of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models. RESULTS: We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice...

  18. Long-term BPA infusions. Evaluation in the rat brain tumor and rat spinal cord models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Joel, D.D.; Morris, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    In the BPA-based dose escalation clinical trial, the observations of tumor recurrence in areas of extremely high calculated tumor doses suggest that the BPA distribution is non-uniform. Longer (6-hour) i.v. infusions of BPA are evaluated in the rat brain tumor and spinal cord models to address the questions of whether long-term infusions are more effective against the tumor and whether long-term infusions are detrimental in the central nervous system. In the rat spinal cord, the 50% effective doses (ED 50 ) for myeloparesis were not significantly different after a single i.p. injection of BPA-fructose or a 6 hour i.v. infusion. In the rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model, BNCT following 2-hr or 6-hr infusions of BPA-F produced similar levels of long term survival. (author)

  19. Clinical and experimental studies on unilateral exophthalmos caused by intraorbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senoo, Kanehito

    1989-01-01

    Twenty eight patients with histologically confirmed intraorbital mass received transcranial surgery. According to the origin of mass, the patients were classified as having primary (15), secondary (4), metastatic (4), or pseudo-tumor (4) masses. Localization of intracranial masses fell into four types: the upper-lateral, medial, retrobulbar-apex, and diffuse types. The most common initial symptoms for the upper-lateral type and for the retrobulbar-apex type were exophtalmos and visual disturbance, respectively. Cranial X-rays and CT revealed bone destruction or proliferation and abnormal calcification in 57% of the patients. CAG revealed tumor stains in 18%. CT revealed the position and involvement of intraorbital mass. The ratio of the intraorbital mass to the orbital cavity area (the M/OC ratio) was calculated at the level of the optic nerve on CT scans. The M/OC ratio was correlated with the degree of impaired visual acuity. When it exceeded 50%, visual function was considerably disturbed. CT failed to discriminate between optic sheath meningioma and pyocele. The success rate of transcranial surgery, as evaluated by visual function recovery rate, was 46%. According to types, it was as high as 70% for the medial type. In an attempt to assess a correlation between the degree of exophthalmos and localization or volume of intraorbital mass, an experiment was made with a dry human skull, silicone rubber eye balls, gelatine and silicone balloons. When a mass more than 3 cm 3 in volume was in the lateral or medial part of the orbit, the rate of pressure increased. When it was in the apex part, the pressure gradually increased. These findings were in accordance with clinical findings. (N.K.) 73 refs

  20. Multiphysics modelling and experimental validation of high concentration photovoltaic modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theristis, Marios; Fernández, Eduardo F.; Sumner, Mike; O'Donovan, Tadhg S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A multiphysics modelling approach for concentrating photovoltaics was developed. • An experimental campaign was conducted to validate the models. • The experimental results were in good agreement with the models. • The multiphysics modelling allows the concentrator’s optimisation. - Abstract: High concentration photovoltaics, equipped with high efficiency multijunction solar cells, have great potential in achieving cost-effective and clean electricity generation at utility scale. Such systems are more complex compared to conventional photovoltaics because of the multiphysics effect that is present. Modelling the power output of such systems is therefore crucial for their further market penetration. Following this line, a multiphysics modelling procedure for high concentration photovoltaics is presented in this work. It combines an open source spectral model, a single diode electrical model and a three-dimensional finite element thermal model. In order to validate the models and the multiphysics modelling procedure against actual data, an outdoor experimental campaign was conducted in Albuquerque, New Mexico using a high concentration photovoltaic monomodule that is thoroughly described in terms of its geometry and materials. The experimental results were in good agreement (within 2.7%) with the predicted maximum power point. This multiphysics approach is relatively more complex when compared to empirical models, but besides the overall performance prediction it can also provide better understanding of the physics involved in the conversion of solar irradiance into electricity. It can therefore be used for the design and optimisation of high concentration photovoltaic modules.

  1. Mathematical Models and the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The use of mathematical models in the experimental analysis of behavior has increased over the years, and they offer several advantages. Mathematical models require theorists to be precise and unambiguous, often allowing comparisons of competing theories that sound similar when stated in words. Sometimes different mathematical models may make…

  2. Experimental Tests of the Algebraic Cluster Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Moshe

    2018-02-01

    The Algebraic Cluster Model (ACM) of Bijker and Iachello that was proposed already in 2000 has been recently applied to 12C and 16O with much success. We review the current status in 12C with the outstanding observation of the ground state rotational band composed of the spin-parity states of: 0+, 2+, 3-, 4± and 5-. The observation of the 4± parity doublet is a characteristic of (tri-atomic) molecular configuration where the three alpha- particles are arranged in an equilateral triangular configuration of a symmetric spinning top. We discuss future measurement with electron scattering, 12C(e,e’) to test the predicted B(Eλ) of the ACM.

  3. CS model coil experimental log book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  4. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, E. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Lormand, G. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Gobin, P.F. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Fougeres, R. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-11-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.).

  5. Modeling the Dichotomy of the Immune Response to Cancer: Cytotoxic Effects and Tumor-Promoting Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Kathleen P; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2017-06-01

    Although the immune response is often regarded as acting to suppress tumor growth, it is now clear that it can be both stimulatory and inhibitory. The interplay between these competing influences has complex implications for tumor development, cancer dormancy, and immunotherapies. In fact, early immunotherapy failures were partly due to a lack in understanding of the nonlinear growth dynamics these competing immune actions may cause. To study this biological phenomenon theoretically, we construct a minimally parameterized framework that incorporates all aspects of the immune response. We combine the effects of all immune cell types, general principles of self-limited logistic growth, and the physical process of inflammation into one quantitative setting. Simulations suggest that while there are pro-tumor or antitumor immunogenic responses characterized by larger or smaller final tumor volumes, respectively, each response involves an initial period where tumor growth is stimulated beyond that of growth without an immune response. The mathematical description is non-identifiable which allows an ensemble of parameter sets to capture inherent biological variability in tumor growth that can significantly alter tumor-immune dynamics and thus treatment success rates. The ability of this model to predict non-intuitive yet clinically observed patterns of immunomodulated tumor growth suggests that it may provide a means to help classify patient response dynamics to aid identification of appropriate treatments exploiting immune response to improve tumor suppression, including the potential attainment of an immune-induced dormant state.

  6. Efficacy of continuous treatment with radiation in a rat brain-tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, K.T.; Kaufman, K.

    1981-01-01

    Rats bearing intracerebral 9L/Ro tumors were treated with 10 daily fractions of cesium-137 gamma-rays, BCNU, or combinations of these to agents beginning on either Day 10 or Day 12 after implantation. The treatments were administered either 5 days/week for 2 weeks, with the weekend off, or 10 consecutive days. The median day of death for untreated tumor-bearing rats was Day 15, so Day 12 tumors can be considered late tumors and Day 10 tumors can be considered moderately early. Although all single- and multiple-agent treatments significantly (p less than 0.05) increased the lifespan of tumor-bearing rats over that of the untreated controls, and all multiple-agent schedules significantly (p less than 0.05) increased the lifespan over that of the single-agent therapies, none of the 10 consecutive day schedules increased the lifespan of tumor-bearing rats significantly (p less than 0.2) over that obtained with the 5-day/week schedules. Thus, the evidence from this tumor model suggests that no significant improvement in lifespan would be expected if malignant brain tumors were treated with radiation 7 days a week, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents such as BCNU

  7. The effect of clomethiazole on plasma concentrations of interleukin-6, -8, -1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and neutrophil adhesion molecule expression during experimental extracorporeal circulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, D

    2012-02-03

    Clomethiazole (CMZ), a neuroprotective drug, has antiinflammatory actions. We investigated the effects of CMZ administration on plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and neutrophil adhesion molecule expression during experimental extracorporeal circulation. Five healthy volunteers each donated 500 mL of blood, which was subsequently divided into equal portions. Identical extracorporeal circuits were simultaneously primed with donated blood (250 mL) and circulated for 2 h at 37 degrees C. CMZ was added to 1 of the circuits of each pair to achieve a total plasma concentration of 40 micro mol\\/L. Blood samples were withdrawn at (i) donation, (ii) immediately after addition of CMZ, and at (iii) 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after commencing circulation. Plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were less in the CMZ group compared with control after 60 min of circulation (2.2 [0.3] versus 3.2 [0.4], 14.9 [4.8] versus 21.9 [18.4], 63.3 [43.5] versus 132.2 [118.9] pg\\/mL, respectively, P < 0.05). After 120 min of circulation, neutrophils from CMZ-treated circuits showed significantly less CD18 expression compared with control (237.5 [97.4] versus 280.5 [111.5], P = 0.03). The addition of CMZ to experimental extracorporeal circuits decreases the inflammatory response. This effect may be of clinical benefit by decreasing inflammatory-mediated neurological injury during cardiopulmonary bypass. IMPLICATIONS: Enhancement of gamma-aminobutyric acid(A)-mediated effects by clomethiazole (CMZ) and associated neuroprotection has been established in animal models of cerebral ischemia. In an ex vivo study, we demonstrated antiinflammatory activity of CMZ in experimental extracorporeal circulation. This represents a potential neuroprotective mechanism of CMZ in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery.

  8. Dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine inhibits tumor growth in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tao; He, Sisi; Shen, Guobo; Ye, Tinghong; Guo, Fuchun; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological factors have been shown to influence tumor progression and therapeutic response. The present study investigated the effect of the dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine on murine breast cancer. The anti‑tumor efficacy of thioridazine was assessed using a murine breast cancer model. Cell apoptosis and proliferation were analyzed in vitro using flow cytometry (FCM) and the MTT assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess Akt, phosphorylated (p)‑Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, p‑STAT3 and p‑p65 in tumor cells following treatment with thioridazine. The Ki67 index and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)‑positive apoptotic cells were assessed in the tumor sections. Thioridazine was found to reduce tumor growth, inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner in vitro. Thioridazine was also found to markedly inhibit tumor proliferation and induce tumor cell apoptosis in vivo as shown by the lower Ki67 index and increase in TUNEL‑positive cells. In addition, thioridazine was observed to inhibit the activation of the canonical nuclear factor κ‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells pathway and exert anti‑tumor effects by remodeling the tumor stroma, as well as inhibit angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In conclusion, thioridazine was found to significantly inhibit breast tumor growth and the potential for thioridazine to be used in cancer therapy may be re‑evaluated and investigated in clinical settings.

  9. Delay equations modeling the effects of phase-specific drugs and immunotherapy on proliferating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, Maria Vittoria; Kuttler, Christina; Zinsl, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present a mathematical model for tumor growth based on the biology of the cell cycle. For an appropriate description of the effects of phase-specific drugs, it is necessary to look at the cell cycle and its phases. Our model reproduces the dynamics of three different tumor cell populations: quiescent cells, cells during the interphase and mitotic cells. Starting from a partial differential equations (PDEs) setting, a delay differential equations (DDE) model is derived for an easier and more realistic approach. Our equations also include interactions of tumor cells with immune system effectors. We investigate the model both from the analytical and the numerical point of view, give conditions for positivity of solutions and focus on the stability of the cancer-free equilibrium. Different immunotherapeutic strategies and their effects on the tumor growth are considered, as well.

  10. Cystatin C deficiency suppresses tumor growth in a breast cancer model through decreased proliferation of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Završnik, Janja; Butinar, Miha; Prebanda, Mojca Trstenjak; Krajnc, Aleksander; Vidmar, Robert; Fonović, Marko; Grubb, Anders; Turk, Vito; Turk, Boris; Vasiljeva, Olga

    2017-09-26

    Cysteine cathepsins are proteases that, in addition to their important physiological functions, have been associated with multiple pathologies, including cancer. Cystatin C (CstC) is a major endogenous inhibitor that regulates the extracellular activity of cysteine cathepsins. We investigated the role of cystatin C in mammary cancer using CstC knockout mice and a mouse model of breast cancer induced by expression of the polyoma middle T oncoprotein (PyMT) in the mammary epithelium. We showed that the ablation of CstC reduced the rate of mammary tumor growth. Notably, a decrease in the proliferation of CstC knockout PyMT tumor cells was demonstrated ex vivo and in vitro , indicating a role for this protease inhibitor in signaling pathways that control cell proliferation. An increase in phosphorylated p-38 was observed in CstC knockout tumors, suggesting a novel function for cystatin C in cancer development, independent of the TGF-β pathway. Moreover, proteomic analysis of the CstC wild-type and knockout PyMT primary cell secretomes revealed a decrease in the levels of 14-3-3 proteins in the secretome of knock-out cells, suggesting a novel link between cysteine cathepsins, cystatin C and 14-3-3 proteins in tumorigenesis, calling for further investigations.

  11. Experimental tests of the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodulman, L.

    1998-01-01

    The title implies an impossibly broad field, as the Standard Model includes the fermion matter states, as well as the forces and fields of SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1). For practical purposes, I will confine myself to electroweak unification, as discussed in the lectures of M. Herrero. Quarks and mixing were discussed in the lectures of R. Aleksan, and leptons and mixing were discussed in the lectures of K. Nakamura. I will essentially assume universality, that is flavor independence, rather than discussing tests of it. I will not pursue tests of QED beyond noting the consistency and precision of measurements of α EM in various processes including the Lamb shift, the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) of the electron, and the quantum Hall effect. The fantastic precision and agreement of these predictions and measurements is something that convinces people that there may be something to this science enterprise. Also impressive is the success of the ''Universal Fermi Interaction'' description of beta decay processes, or in more modern parlance, weak charged current interactions. With one coupling constant G F , most precisely determined in muon decay, a huge number of nuclear instabilities are described. The slightly slow rate for neutron beta decay was one of the initial pieces of evidence for Cabbibo mixing, now generalized so that all charged current decays of any flavor are covered

  12. Experimental tests of the standard model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nodulman, L.

    1998-11-11

    The title implies an impossibly broad field, as the Standard Model includes the fermion matter states, as well as the forces and fields of SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1). For practical purposes, I will confine myself to electroweak unification, as discussed in the lectures of M. Herrero. Quarks and mixing were discussed in the lectures of R. Aleksan, and leptons and mixing were discussed in the lectures of K. Nakamura. I will essentially assume universality, that is flavor independence, rather than discussing tests of it. I will not pursue tests of QED beyond noting the consistency and precision of measurements of {alpha}{sub EM} in various processes including the Lamb shift, the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) of the electron, and the quantum Hall effect. The fantastic precision and agreement of these predictions and measurements is something that convinces people that there may be something to this science enterprise. Also impressive is the success of the ''Universal Fermi Interaction'' description of beta decay processes, or in more modern parlance, weak charged current interactions. With one coupling constant G{sub F}, most precisely determined in muon decay, a huge number of nuclear instabilities are described. The slightly slow rate for neutron beta decay was one of the initial pieces of evidence for Cabbibo mixing, now generalized so that all charged current decays of any flavor are covered.

  13. Dosimetry study of PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy in a mouse tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haixia; Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known in photodynamic therapy (PDT) that there is a large variability between PDT light dose and therapeutic outcomes. An explicit dosimetry model using apparent reacted 1O2 concentration [1O2]rx has been developed as a PDT dosimetric quantity to improve the accuracy of the predicted ability of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, this explicit macroscopic singlet oxygen model was adopted to establish the correlation between calculated reacted [1O2]rx and the tumor growth using Photofrin-mediated PDT in a mouse tumor model. Mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were injected with Photofrin at a dose of 5 mg/kg. PDT was performed 24h later with different fluence rates (50, 75 and 150 mW/cm2) and different fluences (50 and 135 J/cm2) using a collimated light applicator coupled to a 630nm laser. The tumor volume was monitored daily after PDT and correlated with the total light fluence and [1O2]rx. Photophysical parameters as well as the singlet oxygen threshold dose for this sensitizer and the RIF tumor model were determined previously. The result showed that tumor growth rate varied greatly with light fluence for different fluence rates while [1O2]rx had a good correlation with the PDT-induced tumor growth rate. This preliminary study indicated that [1O2]rx could serve as a better dosimetric predictor for predicting PDT outcome than PDT light dose.

  14. Molecular Analysis of Medaka Tumors: New Models for Carcinogenicity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-07

    51 A1 4 INTRODUCTION For over twenty years, tumors in fish and other lower vertebrates and invertebrates have been systematically...class of vertebrates , with over 20,000 described species. Their phylogenetic position relative to the other vertebrates makes them ideal for comparative...provide large numbers of eggs and are easy to culture. The genetics, developmental biology and embryology are well-documented (Yamamoto 1975). Induction

  15. Impact of model defect and experimental uncertainties on evaluated output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neudecker, D.; Capote, R.; Leeb, H.

    2013-01-01

    One of the current major problems in nuclear data evaluation is the unreasonably small evaluated uncertainties often obtained. These small uncertainties are partly attributed to missing correlations of experimental uncertainties as well as to deficiencies of the model employed for the prior information. In this article, both uncertainty sources are included in an evaluation of 55 Mn cross-sections for incident neutrons. Their impact on the evaluated output is studied using a prior obtained by the Full Bayesian Evaluation Technique and a prior obtained by the nuclear model program EMPIRE. It is shown analytically and by means of an evaluation that unreasonably small evaluated uncertainties can be obtained not only if correlated systematic uncertainties of the experiment are neglected but also if prior uncertainties are smaller or about the same magnitude as the experimental ones. Furthermore, it is shown that including model defect uncertainties in the evaluation of 55 Mn leads to larger evaluated uncertainties for channels where the model is deficient. It is concluded that including correlated experimental uncertainties is equally important as model defect uncertainties, if the model calculations deviate significantly from the measurements. -- Highlights: • We study possible causes of unreasonably small evaluated nuclear data uncertainties. • Two different formulations of model defect uncertainties are presented and compared. • Smaller prior than experimental uncertainties cause too small evaluated ones. • Neglected correlations of experimental uncertainties cause too small evaluated ones. • Including model defect uncertainties in the prior improves the evaluated output

  16. Ovarian Tumor-Stroma Interactions in an In Vivo Orthotopic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    dog brain [31]; Ugt8a, transfers galactose to ceramide [32]; Zc4h2, mental retardation [33]; Kctd12b, GABA(B) receptor subunit [34]; Lrrk2...chamber model is to make possible the visualization of tumors that are normally buried and inaccessi- ble, such as pancreatic , prostate or lung tu...angiogenesis and pancreatic tumor growth [78]. Finally, this model is widely used to demonstrate the vascular effects of new anti-angiogenic

  17. Reactive astrocytes potentiate tumor aggressiveness in a murine glioma resection and recurrence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolie, Onyinyechukwu; Bago, Juli R; Schmid, Ralf S; Irvin, David M; Bash, Ryan E; Miller, C Ryan; Hingtgen, Shawn D

    2016-12-01

    Surgical resection is a universal component of glioma therapy. Little is known about the postoperative microenvironment due to limited preclinical models. Thus, we sought to develop a glioma resection and recurrence model in syngeneic immune-competent mice to understand how surgical resection influences tumor biology and the local microenvironment. We genetically engineered cells from a murine glioma mouse model to express fluorescent and bioluminescent reporters. Established allografts were resected using image-guided microsurgery. Postoperative tumor recurrence was monitored by serial imaging, and the peritumoral microenvironment was characterized by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Coculture techniques were used to explore how astrocyte injury influences tumor aggressiveness in vitro. Transcriptome and secretome alterations in injured astrocytes was examined by RNA-seq and Luminex. We found that image-guided resection achieved >90% reduction in tumor volume but failed to prevent both local and distant tumor recurrence. Immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and nestin showed that resection-induced injury led to temporal and spatial alterations in reactive astrocytes within the peritumoral microenvironment. In vitro, we found that astrocyte injury induced transcriptome and secretome alterations and promoted tumor proliferation, as well as migration. This study demonstrates a unique syngeneic model of glioma resection and recurrence in immune-competent mice. Furthermore, this model provided insights into the pattern of postsurgical tumor recurrence and changes in the peritumoral microenvironment, as well as the impact of injured astrocytes on glioma growth and invasion. A better understanding of the postsurgical tumor microenvironment will allow development of targeted anticancer agents that improve surgery-mediated effects on tumor biology. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro

  18. Powered Paraglider Longitudinal Dynamic Modeling and Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Colin P.

    Paragliders and similar controllable decelerators provide the benefits of a compact packable parachute with the improved glide performance and steering of a conventional wing, making them ideally suited for precise high offset payload recovery and airdrop missions. This advantage over uncontrollable conventional parachutes sparked interest from Oklahoma State University for implementation into its Atmospheric and Space Threshold Research Oklahoma (ASTRO) program, where payloads often descend into wooded areas. However, due to complications while building a powered paraglider to evaluate the concept, more research into its design parameters was deemed necessary. Focus shifted to an investigation of the effects of these parameters on the flight behavior of a powered system. A longitudinal dynamic model, based on Lagrange's equation for adaptability when adding free-hanging masses, was developed to evaluate trim conditions and analyze system response. With the simulation, the effects of rigging angle, fuselage weight, center of gravity (cg), and apparent mass were calculated through step thrust input cases. Test flights evaluated the behavior of the paraglider, and the design was revised based on observations and analysis. Rigging angle sets the power-off glide slope as well as thrust capacity and input response damping. At more negative angles the glide slope is steeper, can handle more thrust, and damps quicker at a lower frequency. The fuselage weight, or loading, affects thrust capacity and power-off sink rate, with heavier gliders capable of larger thrust inputs but faster descent speed; however, the glide slope remains unchanged. As the cg position is place forward of the attachment point the incidence angle and thrust line will rotate downward, while the opposite occurs moving aft. For the test vehicle, a slightly forward position allowed for the greatest thrust input, and far forward reduced performance for equivalent thrust compared to far aft. Three test

  19. Pattern recognition of abscesses and brain tumors through MR spectroscopy: Comparison of experimental conditions and radiological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hebling Vieira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The interpretation of brain tumors and abscesses MR spectra is complex and subjective. In clinical practice, different experimental conditions such as field strength or echo time (TE reveal different metabolite information. Our study aims to show in which scenarios magnetic resonance spectroscopy can differentiate among brain tumors, normal tissue and abscesses using classification algorithms. Methods Pairwise classification between abscesses, brain tumor classes, and healthy subjects tissue spectra was performed, also the multiclass classification between meningiomas, grade I-II-III gliomas, and glioblastomas and metastases, in 1.5T short TE (n = 195, 1.5T long TE (n = 231 and 3.0T long TE (n = 59 point resolved spectroscopy setups, using LCModel metabolite concentration as input to classifiers. Results Areas under the curve of the Receiver Operating Characteristic above 0.9 were obtained for the classification between abscesses and all classes except glioblastomas, reaching 0.947 when classifying against metastases, grade I-II gliomas and glioblastomas (0.980, meningiomas and glioblastomas (0.956, grade I-II gliomas and metastases (0.989, meningiomas and metastases (0.990, and between healthy tissue and all other classes in both conditions except for anaplastic astrocytomas in short TE 1.5T setup. When the multiclass classification agrees with radiological diagnosis the accuracy reaches 96.8% for short TE and 98.9% for long TE. Conclusions The results in the three conditions were similar, highlighting comparable quality, robust quantification and good regularization and flexibility in either algorithm. Multiclass classification provides useful information to the radiologist. These findings show the potential of the development of decision support systems as well as tools for the accompaniment of treatments.

  20. Nicotine promotes tumor growth and metastasis in mouse models of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Davis

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine is the major addictive component of tobacco smoke. Although nicotine is generally thought to have limited ability to initiate cancer, it can induce cell proliferation and angiogenesis in a variety of systems. These properties might enable nicotine to facilitate the growth of tumors already initiated. Here we show that nicotine significantly promotes the progression and metastasis of tumors in mouse models of lung cancer. This effect was observed when nicotine was administered through intraperitoneal injections, or through over-the-counter transdermal patches.In the present study, Line1 mouse adenocarcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into syngenic BALB/c mice. Nicotine administration either by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection or transdermal patches caused a remarkable increase in the size of implanted Line1 tumors. Once the tumors were surgically removed, nicotine treated mice had a markedly higher tumor recurrence (59.7% as compared to the vehicle treated mice (19.5%. Nicotine also increased metastasis of dorsally implanted Line1 tumors to the lungs by 9 folds. These studies on transplanted tumors were extended to a mouse model where the tumors were induced by the tobacco carcinogen, NNK. Lung tumors were initiated in A/J mice by i.p. injection of NNK; administration of 1 mg/kg nicotine three times a week led to an increase in the size and the number of tumors formed in the lungs. In addition, nicotine significantly reduced the expression of epithelial markers, E-Cadherin and beta-Catenin as well as the tight junction protein ZO-1; these tumors also showed an increased expression of the alpha(7 nAChR subunit. We believe that exposure to nicotine either by tobacco smoke or nicotine supplements might facilitate increased tumor growth and metastasis.Our earlier results indicated that nicotine could induce invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in cultured lung, breast and pancreatic cancer cells. This study

  1. Vascular Targeting in Pancreatic Cancer: The Novel Tubulin-Binding Agent ZD6126 Reveals Antitumor Activity in Primary and Metastatic Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Kleespies

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available ZD6126 is a novel vascular-targeting agent that acts by disrupting the tubulin cytoskeleton of an immature tumor endothelium, leading to an occlusion of tumor blood vessels and a subsequent tumor necrosis. We wanted to evaluate ZD6126 in primary and metastatic tumor models of human pancreatic cancer. Nude mice were injected orthotopically with L3.6pl pancreatic cancer cells. In single and multiple dosing experiments, mice received ZD6126, gemcitabine, a combination of both agents, or no treatment. For the induction of metastatic disease, additional groups of mice were injected with L3.6pl cells into the spleen. Twenty-four hours after a single-dose treatment, ZD6126 therapy led to an extensive central tumor necrosis, which was not seen after gemcitabine treatment. Multiple dosing of ZD6126 resulted in a significant growth inhibition of primary tumors and a marked reduction of spontaneous liver and lymph node metastases. Experimental metastatic disease could be significantly controlled by a combination of ZD6126 and gemcitabine, as shown by a reduction of the number and size of established liver metastases. As shown by additional in vitro and in vivo experiments, possible mechanisms involve antivascular activities and subsequent antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of ZD6126 on tumor cells, whereas direct activities against tumor cells seem unlikely. These data highlight the antitumor and antimetastatic effects of ZD6126 in human pancreatic cancer and reveal benefits of adding ZD6126 to standard gemcitabine therapy.

  2. Failure of the cultivated mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) to induce tumors in the A/J mouse lung tumor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kirsten; Kristiansen, E.; Meyer, Otto A.

    1997-01-01

    We studied whether the cultivated mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) or 4-(carboxy)phenylhydrazine (CP) induce lung adenomas in the A/J mouse lung tumor model. For 26 weeks female mice were fed a semisynthetic diet where 11 or 22% of the diet was replaced by freeze-dried mushrooms. The intake...... of the mushroom diets was equivalent to an intake of agaritine, the major phenylhydrazine derivative occurring in the mushroom, of 92 or 166 mg/kg body weight per day. The intake of CP was 106 mg/kg body weight per day. Neither the;freeze-dried mushroom nor CP induced statistically significant increased numbers...

  3. An experimental study on the change of the radiosensitivity of several tumor cell lines and primary cultured gingi cal fibrobrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sam Sun; You Dong Soo

    1997-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity data was generated for two human cancer cell lines (KB, RPMI 2650) and human primary gingival fibroblast was tested three times using a viable cell number counting with a hemocytometer, MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol 2-yl]-2,5-dipheny tetrazolium bromide) assay, and LDH (Lactate dehydrogenase) assay. Single irradiation of 2, 4, 6, 10, 15, 20 Gy were applied to the tumor cell lines and the primary cultured gingical fibroblast. The two fractions of 4 Gy an d 10 Gy were separated with a 4 hour time interval. The irradiation was done with 241.5 cGy/min dose rate using 137 Cs MK cell irradiator at room temperature. The obtained results were as followed : 1. There was significantly different viable cell numbers as the amount of radiation dose on the tested cells were cell number counted with a hemocytometer, In fractions, there were more viable cells remaining. 2. Phase-contrast microscopically, radiation-induced morphologic changes were pronounced on the tumor cells, however, almost no differences on the gingival fibroblast. 3. There was significantly different absorbance at 2 Gy on RPMI 2650, 4 Gy on KB and GF in MTT assay. In fractions, the absorbance was significantly higher on KB. 4. The level of extracellular LDH activity in the experimental group was significantly higher in the 2-4 Gy than the control group. 5. The total level of extracellular and intracellular LDH activity was decreased as increased amounts of radiation dose was applied.

  4. The use of Alloxan and Streptozotocin in Experimental Diabetes Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kurçer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease which leads to several acute and chronic complications, morbidity and mortality, and decreased lifespan and quality of life. Therefore, in research studies that aim to enlighten the pathogenesis of diabetes and investigate possible treatment strategies, experimental animal models of diabetes provide many advantages to the investigator. Models of diabetes obtained by chemical induction, diet, surgical manipulations or combination thereof and also new genetically modified animal models are some of the experimental models. Alloxan and streptozotocin (STZ, which are toxic glucose analogues that preferentially accumulate in pancreatic beta cells, are widely used toxic agents to induce experimental diabetes in animals. This review gives an overview on the use of alloxan and STZ to induce chemical diabetes models with reference to their mechanisms, utilizable doses, advantages and disadvantages in diabetes research. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 34-40

  5. Invasiveness and metastasis of retinoblastoma in an orthotopic zebrafish tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Wang, Jian; Cao, Ziquan; Hosaka, Kayoko; Jensen, Lasse; Yang, Huasheng; Sun, Yuping; Zhuang, Rujie; Liu, Yizhi; Cao, Yihai

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a highly invasive malignant tumor that often invades the brain and metastasizes to distal organs through the blood stream. Invasiveness and metastasis of retinoblastoma can occur at the early stage of tumor development. However, an optimal preclinical model to study retinoblastoma invasiveness and metastasis in relation to drug treatment has not been developed. Here, we developed an orthotopic zebrafish model in which retinoblastoma invasion and metastasis can be monitored at a single cell level. We took the advantages of immune privilege and transparent nature of developing zebrafish embryos. Intravitreal implantation of color-coded retinoblastoma cells allowed us to kinetically monitor tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Further, interactions between retinoblastoma cells and surrounding microvasculatures were studied using a transgenic zebrafish that exhibited green fluorescent signals in blood vessels. We discovered that tumor cells invaded neighboring tissues and blood stream when primary tumors were at the microscopic sizes. These findings demonstrate that retinoblastoma metastasis occurs at the early stage and antiangiogenic drugs such as Vegf morpholino and sunitinib could potentially interfere with tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Thus, this orthotopic retinoblastoma model offers a new and unique opportunity to study the early events of tumor invasion, metastasis and drug responses. PMID:26169357

  6. Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence in a model of tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dongxi; Xu, Wei; Sun, Chunyan; Wang, Liang

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon that stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between tumor extinction and recurrence in the model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis–Menten reaction. We analyze the probability transitions between the extinction state and the state of the stable tumor by the Mean First Extinction Time (MFET) and Mean First Return Time (MFRT). It is found that the positional fluctuations hinder the transition, but the environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. The observed behavior could be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer. -- Highlights: ► Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence. ► The probability transitions are investigated. ► The positional fluctuations hinder the transition. ► The environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. ► The observed behavior can be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer.

  7. The Pig as a Large Animal Model for Studying Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr

    The immune system plays a crucial role in cancer development and progression. Cancer immunoediting encompasses three phases: elimination, equilibrium, and escape; together, describing the complex interplay between tumor and immune cells. Specifically, the immune system both protects against cancer...... of autologous tumor cells, underlining the capacity of the Oncopig immune system to mount a cytotoxic anti-tumor response. Using the results from RNA-seq analysis, we propose a potential mechanism for in vivo inhibition of anti-tumor cytotoxicity based on elevated expression of the immunosuppressive genes IDO1...... support that the Oncopig provides a crucial platform for studying anti-tumor immune responses in a large in vivo system, although the model currently only allows preclinical testing of therapeutics against the early stages of cancer....

  8. Microarray profiling shows distinct differences between primary tumors and commonly used preclinical models in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Weining; Iyer, N. Gopalakrishna; Tay, Hsien Ts’ung; Wu, Yonghui; Lim, Tony K. H.; Zheng, Lin; Song, In Chin; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Huynh, Hung; Tan, Patrick O. B.; Chow, Pierce K. H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in therapeutics, outcomes for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain poor and there is an urgent need for efficacious systemic therapy. Unfortunately, drugs that are successful in preclinical studies often fail in the clinical setting, and we hypothesize that this is due to functional differences between primary tumors and commonly used preclinical models. In this study, we attempt to answer this question by comparing tumor morphology and gene expression profiles between primary tumors, xenografts and HCC cell lines. Hep G2 cell lines and tumor cells from patient tumor explants were subcutaneously (ectopically) injected into the flank and orthotopically into liver parenchyma of Mus Musculus SCID mice. The mice were euthanized after two weeks. RNA was extracted from the tumors, and gene expression profiling was performed using the Gene Chip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0. Principal component analyses (PCA) and construction of dendrograms were conducted using Partek genomics suite. PCA showed that the commonly used HepG2 cell line model and its xenograft counterparts were vastly different from all fresh primary tumors. Expression profiles of primary tumors were also significantly divergent from their counterpart patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models, regardless of the site of implantation. Xenografts from the same primary tumors were more likely to cluster together regardless of site of implantation, although heat maps showed distinct differences in gene expression profiles between orthotopic and ectopic models. The data presented here challenges the utility of routinely used preclinical models. Models using HepG2 were vastly different from primary tumors and PDXs, suggesting that this is not clinically representative. Surprisingly, site of implantation (orthotopic versus ectopic) resulted in limited impact on gene expression profiles, and in both scenarios xenografts differed significantly from the original primary tumors, challenging the long

  9. Towards an integrative computational model for simulating tumor growth and response to radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Carlos Sosa; Aubert, Vivien; Ciferri, Nicolas; Hernández, Alfredo; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the response to irradiation in cancer radiotherapy (RT) may help devising new strategies with improved tumor local control. Computational models may allow to unravel the underlying radiosensitive mechanisms intervening in the dose-response relationship. By using extensive simulations a wide range of parameters may be evaluated providing insights on tumor response thus generating useful data to plan modified treatments. We propose in this paper a computational model of tumor growth and radiation response which allows to simulate a whole RT protocol. Proliferation of tumor cells, cell life-cycle, oxygen diffusion, radiosensitivity, RT response and resorption of killed cells were implemented in a multiscale framework. The model was developed in C++, using the Multi-formalism Modeling and Simulation Library (M2SL). Radiosensitivity parameters extracted from literature enabled us to simulate in a regular grid (voxel-wise) a prostate cell tissue. Histopathological specimens with different aggressiveness levels extracted from patients after prostatectomy were used to initialize in silico simulations. Results on tumor growth exhibit a good agreement with data from in vitro studies. Moreover, standard fractionation of 2 Gy/fraction, with a total dose of 80 Gy as a real RT treatment was applied with varying radiosensitivity and oxygen diffusion parameters. As expected, the high influence of these parameters was observed by measuring the percentage of survival tumor cell after RT. This work paves the way to further models allowing to simulate increased doses in modified hypofractionated schemes and to develop new patient-specific combined therapies.

  10. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BCNT) for the Treatment of Liver Metastases: Biodistribution Studies of Boron Compounds in an Experimental Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabalino, Marcela A.; Hughes, Andrea Monti; Molinari, Ana J.; Heber, Elisa M.; Pozzi, Emiliano C.C.; Itoiz, Maria E.; Trivillin, Veronica A.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Cardoso, Jorge E.; Colombo, Lucas L.; Nievas, Susana; Nigg, David W.; Aromando, Romina F.

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of different boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) protocols in an experimental model of oral cancer. BNCT is based on the selective accumulation of 10B carriers in a tumor followed by neutron irradiation. Within the context of exploring the potential therapeutic efficacy of BNCT for the treatment of liver metastases, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in an experimental model of liver metastases in rats. Different boron compounds and administration conditions were assayed to determine which administration protocols would potentially be therapeutically useful in in vivo BNCT studies at the RA-3 nuclear reactor. A total of 70 BDIX rats were inoculated in the liver with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb to induce the development of subcapsular tumor nodules. Fourteen days post-inoculation, the animals were used for biodistribution studies. We evaluated a total of 11 administration protocols for the boron compounds boronophenylalanine (BPA) and GB-10 (Na210B10H10), alone or combined at different dose levels and employing different administration routes. Tumor, normal tissue, and blood samples were processed for boron measurement by atomic emission spectroscopy. Six protocols proved potentially useful for BNCT studies in terms of absolute boron concentration in tumor and preferential uptake of boron by tumor tissue. Boron concentration values in tumor and normal tissues in the liver metastases model show it would be feasible to reach therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3.

  11. Tumor infarction in mice by antibody-directed targeting of tissue factor to tumor vasculature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, XM; Molema, G; King, S; Watkins, L; Edgington, TS; Thorpe, PE

    1997-01-01

    Selective occlusion of tumor vasculature was tested as a therapy for solid tumors in a mouse model. The formation of blood clots (thrombosis) within the tumor Vessels was initiated by targeting the cell surface domain of human tissue factor, by means of a bispecific antibody, to an experimentally

  12. Quantitation and gompertzian analysis of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    to transform the experimental data into useful growth curves. A transformed Gompertz function is used as the basis for calculating relevant parameters pertaining to tumor growth and response to therapy. The calculations are facilitated by use of a computer program which performs the necessary calculations......Human tumor xenografts in immune-deficient animals are used to establish tumor growth curves and for studying the effect of experimental therapy on tumor growth. In this review we describe a method for making serial measurements of tumor size in the nude mouse model as well as methods used...

  13. Quantitation and gompertzian analysis of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    Human tumor xenografts in immune-deficient animals are used to establish tumor growth curves and for studying the effect of experimental therapy on tumor growth. In this review we describe a method for making serial measurements of tumor size in the nude mouse model as well as methods used...... to transform the experimental data into useful growth curves. A transformed Gompertz function is used as the basis for calculating relevant parameters pertaining to tumor growth and response to therapy. The calculations are facilitated by use of a computer program which performs the necessary calculations...

  14. Experimental and modeling studies of mass transfer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gaining a better understanding of mass transfer problems in encapsulated cell systems and in tissue engineering requires both experimental investigations and mathematical modelling. Specific mass transfer studies are reviewed including oxygen transfer in immobilised animal cell culture systems, modelling of ...

  15. Changes in the Structure of the Thymus under Conditions of Various Treatments for Experimental Mammary Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, O V; Kabakov, A V; Poveshchenko, A F; Ishchenko, I Yu; Poveshchenko, O V; Strunkin, D N; Raiter, T V; Michurina, S V; Konenkov, V I

    2017-03-01

    Morphological changes in the thymus of female Wistar rats with experimental mammary gland carcinomas were studied. After adjuvant therapy, the area of the cortical matter and density of parenchymal cells in the thymus decreased, while areas of the medulla, connective tissue, and content of immunoblasts and macrophages increased. In the thymuses of rats receiving exogenous DNA, morphological signs of activation of the lymphoid and epithelial components were found: areas of the cortex and medulla, glandular and connective tissue corresponded to the values in intact animals, the counts of lymphocytes in the central part of the cortical matter and of macrophages in all zones of the thymus increased, and lymphocyte migration from the thymus increased (in comparison with the chemotherapy group).

  16. Ceacam1 separates graft-versus-host-disease from graft-versus-tumor activity after experimental allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney X Lu

    Full Text Available Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT is a potentially curative therapy for a variety of hematologic diseases, but benefits, including graft-versus-tumor (GVT activity are limited by graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD. Carcinoembryonic antigen related cell adhesion molecule 1 (Ceacam1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein found on epithelium, T cells, and many tumors. It regulates a variety of physiologic and pathological processes such as tumor biology, leukocyte activation, and energy homeostasis. Previous studies suggest that Ceacam1 negatively regulates inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease models.We studied Ceacam1 as a regulator of GVHD and GVT after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT in mouse models. In vivo, Ceacam1(-/- T cells caused increased GVHD mortality and GVHD of the colon, and greater numbers of donor T cells were positive for activation markers (CD25(hi, CD62L(lo. Additionally, Ceacam1(-/- CD8 T cells had greater expression of the gut-trafficking integrin α(4β(7, though both CD4 and CD8 T cells were found increased numbers in the gut post-transplant. Ceacam1(-/- recipients also experienced increased GVHD mortality and GVHD of the colon, and alloreactive T cells displayed increased activation. Additionally, Ceacam1(-/- mice had increased mortality and decreased numbers of regenerating small intestinal crypts upon radiation exposure. Conversely, Ceacam1-overexpressing T cells caused attenuated target-organ and systemic GVHD, which correlated with decreased donor T cell numbers in target tissues, and mortality. Finally, graft-versus-tumor survival in a Ceacam1(+ lymphoma model was improved in animals receiving Ceacam1(-/- vs. control T cells.We conclude that Ceacam1 regulates T cell activation, GVHD target organ damage, and numbers of donor T cells in lymphoid organs and GVHD target tissues. In recipients of allo-BMT, Ceacam1 may also regulate tissue radiosensitivity. Because of its expression on both the

  17. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  18. 3D cell culture systems modeling tumor growth determinants in cancer target discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Claudio R; Zimmermann, Miriam; Agarkova, Irina; Kelm, Jens M; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells, cell biological context, heterotypic crosstalk and the microenvironment are key determinants of the multistep process of tumor development. They sign responsible, to a significant extent, for the limited response and resistance of cancer cells to molecular-targeted therapies. Better functional knowledge of the complex intra- and intercellular signaling circuits underlying communication between the different cell types populating a tumor tissue and of the systemic and local factors that shape the tumor microenvironment is therefore imperative. Sophisticated 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) systems provide an emerging tool to model the phenotypic and cellular heterogeneity as well as microenvironmental aspects of in vivo tumor growth. In this review we discuss the cellular, chemical and physical factors contributing to zonation and cellular crosstalk within tumor masses. On this basis, we further describe 3D cell culture technologies for growth of MCTS as advanced tools for exploring molecular tumor growth determinants and facilitating drug discovery efforts. We conclude with a synopsis on technological aspects for on-line analysis and post-processing of 3D MCTS models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Using an experimental model for the study of therapeutic touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daniella Soares; Marta, Ilda Estéfani Ribeiro; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari; de Quadros, Andreza Urba; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos

    2013-02-01

    to verify whether the Paw Edema Model can be used in investigations about the effects of Therapeutic Touch on inflammation by measuring the variables pain, edema and neutrophil migration. this is a pilot and experimental study, involving ten male mice of the same genetic strain and divided into experimental and control group, submitted to the chemical induction of local inflammation in the right back paw. The experimental group received a daily administration of Therapeutic Touch for 15 minutes during three days. the data showed statistically significant differences in the nociceptive threshold and in the paw circumference of the animals from the experimental group on the second day of the experiment. the experiment model involving animals can contribute to study the effects of Therapeutic Touch on inflammation, and adjustments are suggested in the treatment duration, number of sessions and experiment duration.

  20. Modeling of Cracked Beams by the Experimental Design Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Serier

    Full Text Available Abstract The understanding of phenomena, no matter their nature is based on the experimental results found. In the most cases, this requires an important number of tests in order to put a reliable and useful observation served into solving the technical problems subsequently. This paper is based on independent and variables combination resulting from experimentation in a mathematical formulation. Indeed, mathematical modeling gives us the advantage to optimize and predict the right choices without passing each case by the experiment. In this work we plan to apply the experimental design method on the experimental results found by (Deokar, A, 2011, concerning the effect of the size and position of a crack on the measured frequency of a beam console, and validating the mathematical model to predict other frequencies

  1. Intermittent hypoxia increases kidney tumor vascularization in a murine model of sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Vilaseca

    Full Text Available We investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxia (IH, a characteristic feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, on renal cancer progression in an animal and cell model. An in vivo mouse model (Balb/c, n = 50 of kidney cancer was used to assess the effect of IH on tumor growth, metastatic capacity, angiogenesis and tumor immune response. An in vitro model tested the effect of IH on RENCA cells, macrophages and endothelial cells. Tumor growth, metastatic capacity, circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and content of endothelial cells, tumor associated macrophages and their phenotype were assessed in the tumor. In vitro, VEGF cell expression was quantified.Although IH did not boost tumor growth, it significantly increased endothelial cells (p = 0.001 and circulating VEGF (p<0.001 in the in vivo model. Macrophages exposed to IH in vitro increased VEGF expression, whereas RENCA cells and endothelial cells did not. These findings are in keeping with previous clinical data suggesting that OSA has no effect on kidney cancer size and that the association observed between OSA and higher Fuhrman grade of renal cell carcinoma may be mediated though a proangiogenic process, with a key role of macrophages.

  2. Intermittent hypoxia increases kidney tumor vascularization in a murine model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Antoni; Campillo, Noelia; Torres, Marta; Musquera, Mireia; Gozal, David; Montserrat, Josep M; Alcaraz, Antonio; Touijer, Karim A; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxia (IH), a characteristic feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), on renal cancer progression in an animal and cell model. An in vivo mouse model (Balb/c, n = 50) of kidney cancer was used to assess the effect of IH on tumor growth, metastatic capacity, angiogenesis and tumor immune response. An in vitro model tested the effect of IH on RENCA cells, macrophages and endothelial cells. Tumor growth, metastatic capacity, circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and content of endothelial cells, tumor associated macrophages and their phenotype were assessed in the tumor. In vitro, VEGF cell expression was quantified.Although IH did not boost tumor growth, it significantly increased endothelial cells (p = 0.001) and circulating VEGF (p<0.001) in the in vivo model. Macrophages exposed to IH in vitro increased VEGF expression, whereas RENCA cells and endothelial cells did not. These findings are in keeping with previous clinical data suggesting that OSA has no effect on kidney cancer size and that the association observed between OSA and higher Fuhrman grade of renal cell carcinoma may be mediated though a proangiogenic process, with a key role of macrophages.

  3. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  4. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  5. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhar [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity between grain growth experiments and anisotropic three-dimensional simulations.

  6. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhur [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity

  7. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: implications for spatial dose redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Dittmann, Florian; Shih, Helen A; Menze, Bjoern H; Ayache, Nicholas; Konukoglu, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas differ from many other tumors as they grow infiltratively into the brain parenchyma rather than forming a solid tumor mass with a well-defined boundary. Tumor cells can be found several centimeters away from the central tumor mass that is visible using current imaging techniques. The infiltrative growth characteristics of gliomas question the concept of a radiotherapy target volume that is irradiated to a homogeneous dose—the standard in current clinical practice. We discuss the use of the Fisher–Kolmogorov glioma growth model in radiotherapy treatment planning. The phenomenological tumor growth model assumes that tumor cells proliferate locally and migrate into neighboring brain tissue, which is mathematically described via a partial differential equation for the spatio-temporal evolution of the tumor cell density. In this model, the tumor cell density drops approximately exponentially with distance from the visible gross tumor volume, which is quantified by the infiltration length, a parameter describing the distance at which the tumor cell density drops by a factor of e. This paper discusses the implications for the prescribed dose distribution in the periphery of the tumor. In the context of the exponential cell kill model, an exponential fall-off of the cell density suggests a linear fall-off of the prescription dose with distance. We introduce the dose fall-off rate, which quantifies the steepness of the prescription dose fall-off in units of Gy mm −1 . It is shown that the dose fall-off rate is given by the inverse of the product of radiosensitivity and infiltration length. For an infiltration length of 3 mm and a surviving fraction of 50% at 2 Gy, this suggests a dose fall-off of approximately 1 Gy mm −1 . The concept is illustrated for two glioblastoma patients by optimizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose fall-off rate concept reflects the idea that infiltrating gliomas lack a defined boundary and are characterized by a

  8. Investigation of wax precipitation in crude oil: Experimental and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Jafari Behbahani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a series of experiments were carried to investigation of rheological behavior of crude oil using waxy crude oil sample in the absence/presence of flow improver such as ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The rheological data covered the temperature range of 5–30 °C. The results indicated that the performance of flow improver was dependent on its molecular weight. Addition of small quantities of flow improver, can improve viscosity and pour point of crude oil. Also, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model using Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP topology has been developed to account wax appearance temperature and the amount of precipitated wax and the model was verified using experimental data given in this work and reported in the literature. In order to compare the performance of the proposed model based on Artificial Neural Network, the wax precipitation experimental data at different temperatures were predicted using solid solution model and multi-solid phase model. The results showed that the developed model based on Artificial Neural Network can predict more accurately the wax precipitation experimental data in comparison to the previous models such as solid solution and multi-solid phase model with AADs less than 0.5%. Furthermore, the number of parameters required for the Artificial Neural Network (ANN model is less than the studied thermodynamic models.

  9. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Testing of a Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zurkinden, Andrew Stephen; Kramer, Morten; Ferri, Francesco

    numerical values for comparison with the experimental test results which were carried out in the same time. It is for this reason why Chapter 4 does consist exclusively of numerical values. Experimental values and measured time series of wave elevations have been used throughout the report in order to a......) validate the numerical model and b) preform stochastic analysis. The latter technique is introduced in order to optimize the control parameters of the power take off system....

  10. An orthotopic bladder tumor model and the evaluation of intravesical saRNA treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Moo Rim; Yang, Glen; Charisse, Klaus; Epstein-Barash, Hila; Manoharan, Muthiah; Li, Long-Cheng

    2012-07-28

    We present a novel method for treating bladder cancer with intravesically delivered small activating RNA (saRNA) in an orthotopic xenograft mouse bladder tumor model. The mouse model is established by urethral catheterization under inhaled general anesthetic. Chemical burn is then introduced to the bladder mucosa using intravesical silver nitrate solution to disrupt the bladder glycosaminoglycan layer and allows cells to attach. Following several washes with sterile water, human bladder cancer KU-7-luc2-GFP cells are instilled through the catheter into the bladder to dwell for 2 hours. Subsequent growth of bladder tumors is confirmed and monitored by in vivo bladder ultrasound and bioluminescent imaging. The tumors are then treated intravesically with saRNA formulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). Tumor growth is monitored with ultrasound and bioluminescence. All steps of this procedure are demonstrated in the accompanying video.

  11. Optimal experimental designs for inverse quadratic regression models

    OpenAIRE

    Dette, Holger; Kiss, Christine

    2007-01-01

    In this paper optimal experimental designs for inverse quadratic regression models are determined. We consider two different parameterizations of the model and investigate local optimal designs with respect to the $c$-, $D$- and $E$-criteria, which reflect various aspects of the precision of the maximum likelihood estimator for the parameters in inverse quadratic regression models. In particular it is demonstrated that for a sufficiently large design space geometric allocation rules are optim...

  12. Ion thruster modeling: Particle simulations and experimental validations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Joseph; Polk, James; Brinza, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results from ion thruster modeling studies performed in support of NASA's Deep Space 1 mission and NSTAR project. Fully 3-dimensional computer particle simulation models are presented for ion optics plasma flow and ion thruster plume. Ion optics simulation results are compared with measurements obtained from ground tests of the NSTAR ion thruster. Plume simulation results are compared with in-flight measurements from the Deep Space 1 spacecraft. Both models show excellent agreement with experimental data

  13. A simulation model investigating the impact of tumor volume doubling time and mammographic tumor detectability on screening outcomes in women aged 40-49 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stephanie L; Sigal, Bronislava M; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2010-08-18

    Compared with women aged 50-69 years, the lower sensitivity of mammographic screening in women aged 40-49 years is largely attributed to the lower mammographic tumor detectability and faster tumor growth in the younger women. We used a Monte Carlo simulation model of breast cancer screening by age to estimate the median tumor size detectable on a mammogram and the mean tumor volume doubling time. The estimates were calculated by calibrating the predicted breast cancer incidence rates to the actual rates from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database and the predicted distributions of screen-detected tumor sizes to the actual distributions obtained from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC). The calibrated parameters were used to estimate the relative impact of lower mammographic tumor detectability vs faster tumor volume doubling time on the poorer screening outcomes in younger women compared with older women. Mammography screening outcomes included sensitivity, mean tumor size at detection, lifetime gained, and breast cancer mortality. In addition, the relationship between screening sensitivity and breast cancer mortality was investigated as a function of tumor volume doubling time, mammographic tumor detectability, and screening interval. Lowered mammographic tumor detectability accounted for 79% and faster tumor volume doubling time accounted for 21% of the poorer sensitivity of mammography screening in younger women compared with older women. The relative contributions were similar when the impact of screening was evaluated in terms of mean tumor size at detection, lifetime gained, and breast cancer mortality. Screening sensitivity and breast cancer mortality reduction attributable to screening were almost linearly related when comparing annual or biennial screening with no screening. However, when comparing annual with biennial screening, the greatest reduction in breast cancer mortality attributable to screening did not

  14. Inhibition of tumor growth in a glioma model treated with boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Soloway, A.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This investigation attempts to determine whether increased survival time seen when the F98 glioma model is treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a result of inhibition of tumor growth caused by radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cells and normal tissue components. This indirect effect of radiation has been called the tumor bed effect. A series of tumor-bearing rats was studied, using a standardized investigational BNCT protocol consisting of 50 mg/kg of Na2B12H11SH injected intravenously 14 to 17 hours before neutron irradiation at 4 x 10(12) n/cm2. Ten rats, serving as controls, received no treatment either before or after tumor implantation. A second group of 10 rats was treated with BNCT 4 days before tumor implantation; these animals received no further treatment. The remaining group of 10 rats received no pretreatment but was treated with BNCT 10 days after implantation. Histological and ultrastructural analyses were performed in 2 animals from each group 17 days after implantation. Survival times of the untreated control animals (mean, 25.8 days) did not differ statistically from the survival times of the rats in the pretreated group (mean, 25.5 days). The rats treated with BNCT after implantation survived significantly longer (P less than 0.02; mean, 33.2 days) than the controls and the preirradiated animals. Tumor size indices calculated from measurements taken at the time of death were similar in all groups. These results indicate that, with this tumor model, BNCT does not cause a tumor bed effect in cerebral tissue. The therapeutic gains observed with BNCT result from direct effects on tumor cells or on the peritumoral neovascularity

  15. Experimental models of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Brian M; Looney, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  17. Experimental Validation of a Dynamic Model for Lightweight Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gasparetto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the main topics in robotics research is dynamic performance improvement by means of a lightening of the overall system structure. The effective motion and control of these lightweight robotic systems occurs with the use of suitable motion planning and control process. In order to do so, model-based approaches can be adopted by exploiting accurate dynamic models that take into account the inertial and elastic terms that are usually neglected in a heavy rigid link configuration. In this paper, an effective method for modelling spatial lightweight industrial robots based on an Equivalent Rigid Link System approach is considered from an experimental validation perspective. A dynamic simulator implementing the formulation is used and an experimental test-bench is set-up. Experimental tests are carried out with a benchmark L-shape mechanism.

  18. Impact of MR-guided boiling histotripsy in distinct murine tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Martijn; Eikelenboom, Dylan C; van den Bijgaart, Renske J E; Heerschap, Arend; Wesseling, Pieter; den Brok, Martijn H; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Adema, Gosse J

    2017-09-01

    Interest in mechanical high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is rapidly growing. Boiling histotripsy (BH) is applied for mechanical fragmentation of soft tissue into submicron fragments with limited temperature increase using the shock wave and cavitation effects of HIFU. Research on BH has been largely limited to ex vivo experiments. As a consequence, the in vivo pathology after BH treatment and the relation to preexistent tissue characteristics are not well understood. This study reports on in vivo MR guided BH treatment, either with 100 or 200 pulses per focal spot, in three different subcutaneous mouse tumor models: a soft-tissue melanoma (B16OVA), a compact growing thymoma (EL4), and a highly vascularized neuroblastoma (9464D). Extensive treatment evaluation was performed using MR imaging followed by histopathology 2h after treatment. T2 weighted MRI allowed direct in vivo visualization of the BH lesions in all tumor models. The 100-pulse treated area in the B16OVA tumors was larger than the predicted treatment volume (500±10%). For the more compact growing EL4 and 9464D tumors this was 95±13% and 55±33%, respectively. Histopathology after the 100-pulse treatment revealed completely disintegrated lesions in the treated area with sharp borders in the compact EL4 and 9464D tumors, while for B16OVA tumors the lesion contained a mixture of discohesive (partly viable) clusters of cells, micro-vessel remainings, and tumor cell debris. The treatment of B16OVA with 200 pulses increased the fragmentation of tumor tissue. In all tumor types only micro-hemorrhages were detected after ablation (slightly higher after 200-pulse treatment for the highly vascularized 9464D tumors). Collagen staining revealed that the collagen fibers were to a greater or lesser extent still intact and partly clotted together near the lesion border in all tumor models. In conclusion, this study reveals effective mechanical fragmentation of different tumor types using BH without

  19. Analyses of tumor-suppressor genes in germline mouse models of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingqiang; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-suppressor genes are critical regulators of growth and functioning of cells, whose loss of function contributes to tumorigenesis. Accordingly, analyses of the consequences of their loss of function in genetically engineered mouse models have provided important insights into mechanisms of human cancer, as well as resources for preclinical analyses and biomarker discovery. Nowadays, most investigations of genetically engineered mouse models of tumor-suppressor function use conditional or inducible alleles, which enable analyses in specific cancer (tissue) types and overcome the consequences of embryonic lethality of germline loss of function of essential tumor-suppressor genes. However, historically, analyses of genetically engineered mouse models based on germline loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes were very important as these early studies established the principle that loss of function could be studied in mouse cancer models and also enabled analyses of these essential genes in an organismal context. Although the cancer phenotypes of these early germline models did not always recapitulate the expected phenotypes in human cancer, these models provided the essential foundation for the more sophisticated conditional and inducible models that are currently in use. Here, we describe these "first-generation" germline models of loss of function models, focusing on the important lessons learned from their analyses, which helped in the design and analyses of "next-generation" genetically engineered mouse models. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Skov Jensen

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking invasion and tumor stemness into account.Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models.We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice cultures both by confocal time-lapse microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This invasion closely resembled the invasion in vivo. The Ki-67 proliferation indexes in spheroids implanted into brain slices were lower than in free-floating spheroids. The expression of stem cell markers varied between free-floating spheroids, spheroids implanted into brain slices and tumors in vivo.The established invasion model kept in stem cell medium closely mimics tumor cell invasion into the brain in vivo preserving also to some extent the expression of stem cell markers. The model is feasible and robust and we suggest the model as an in vivo-like model with a great potential in glioma studies and drug discovery.

  1. A mouse model of luciferase-transfected stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Carol P Y; Wong, Kwok Chuen; Huang, Lin; Li, Gang; Tsui, Stephen K W; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2015-11-01

    A major barrier towards the study of the effects of drugs on Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCT) has been the lack of an animal model. In this study, we created an animal model in which GCT stromal cells survived and functioned as proliferating neoplastic cells. A proliferative cell line of GCT stromal cells was used to create a stable and luciferase-transduced cell line, Luc-G33. The cell line was characterized and was found that there were no significant differences on cell proliferation rate and recruitment of monocytes when compared with the wild type GCT stromal cells. We delivered the Luc-G33 cells either subcutaneously on the back or to the tibiae of the nude mice. The presence of viable Luc-G33 cells was assessed using real-time live imaging by the IVIS 200 bioluminescent imaging (BLI) system. The tumor cells initially propagated and remained viable on site for 7 weeks in the subcutaneous tumor model. We also tested in vivo antitumor effects of Zoledronate (ZOL) and Geranylgeranyl transferase-I inhibitor (GGTI-298) alone or their combinations in Luc-G33-transplanted nude mice. ZOL alone at 400 µg/kg and the co-treatment of ZOL at 400 µg/kg and GGTI-298 at 1.16 mg/kg reduced tumor cell viability in the model. Furthermore, the anti-tumor effects by ZOL, GGTI-298 and the co-treatment in subcutaneous tumor model were also confirmed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. In conclusion, we established a nude mice model of GCT stromal cells which allows non-invasive, real-time assessments of tumor development and testing the in vivo effects of different adjuvants for treating GCT.

  2. A volume-equivalent spherical necrosis-tumor-normal liver model for estimating absorbed dose in yttrium-90 microsphere therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Hui; Liao, Yi-Jen; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Sun, Shung-Shung; Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh; Hsu, Shih-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic liver tumors are highly malignant tumors in Asia. The incidence of fatal liver cancer is also increasing in the United States. The aim of this study was to establish a spherical tumor model and determine its accuracy in predicting the absorbed dose in yttrium-90 (Y-90) microsphere therapy for liver cancer. Liver morphology can be approximated by a spherical model comprising three concentric regions representing necrotic, tumor, and normal liver tissues. The volumes of these three regions represent those in the actual liver. A spherical tumor model was proposed to calculate the absorbed fractions in the spherical tumor, necrotic, and normal tissue regions. The THORplan treatment planning system and Monte Carlo N-particle extended codes were used for this spherical tumor model. Using the volume-equivalent method, a spherical tumor model was created to calculate the total absorbed fraction [under different tumor-to-healthy-liver ratios (TLRs)]. The patient-specific model (THORplan) results were used to verify the spherical tumor model results. The results for both the Y-90 spectrum and the Y-90 mean energy indicated that the absorbed fraction was a function of the tumor radius and mass. The absorbed fraction increased with tumor radius. The total absorbed fractions calculated using the spherical tumor model for necrotic, liver tumor, and normal liver tissues were in good agreement with the THORplan results, with differences of less than 3% for TLRs of 2-5. The results for the effect of TLR indicate that for the same tumor configuration, the total absorbed fraction decreased with increasing TLR; for the same shell tumor thickness and TLR, the total absorbed fraction was approximately constant; and for tumors with the same radius, the total fraction absorbed by the tumor increased with the shell thickness. The results from spherical tumor models with different tumor-to-healthy-liver ratios were highly consistent with the

  3. Modelling Tumor-induced Angiogenesis: Combination of Stochastic Sprout Spacing and Sprout Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini F.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Angiogenesis initiated by cancerous cells is the process by which new blood vessels are formed to enhance oxygenation and growth of tumor. Objective: In this paper, we present a new multiscale mathematical model for the formation of a vascular network in tumor angiogenesis process. Methods: Our model couples an improved sprout spacing model as a stochastic mathematical model of sprouting along an existing parent blood vessel, with a mathematical model of sprout progression in the extracellular matrix (ECM in response to some tumor angiogenic factors (TAFs. We perform simulations of the siting of capillary sprouts on an existing blood vessel using finite difference approximation of the dynamic equations of some angiogenesis activators and inhibitors. Angiogenesis activators are chemicals secreted by hypoxic tumor cells for initiating angiogenesis, and inhibitors of the angiogenesis are chemicals that are produced around every new sprout during tumor angiogenesis to inhibit the formation of further sprouts as a feedback of sprouting in angiogenesis. Moreover, for modelling sprout progression in ECM, we use three equations for the motility of endothelial cells at the tip of the activated sprouts, the consumption of TAF and the production and uptake of Fibronectin by endothelial cells. Results: Coupling these two basic models not only does provide a better time estimation of angiogenesis process, but also it is more compatible with reality. Conclusion: This model can be used to provide basic information for angiogenesis in the related studies. Related simulations can estimate the position and number of sprouts along parent blood vessel during the initial steps of angiogenesis and models the process of sprout progression in ECM until they vascularize a tumor.

  4. Effects of nursing intervention models on social adaption capability development in preschool children with malignant tumors: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu; Mo, Lin; Tang, Yan; Huang, Xiaoyan; Tan, Juan

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study are to compare the effects of two nursing intervention models on the ability of preschool children with malignant tumors to socialize and to determine if these interventions improved their social adaption capability (SAC) and quality of life. Inpatient preschool children with malignant tumors admitted to the hospital between December 2009 and March 2012 were recruited and randomized into either the experimental or control groups. The control group received routine nursing care, and the experimental group received family-centered nursing care, including physical, psychological, and social interventions. The Infants-Junior Middle School Student's Social-Life Abilities Scale was used to evaluate SAC development of participants. Participants (n = 240) were recruited and randomized into two groups. After the intervention, the excellent and normal SAC rates were 27.5% and 55% in the experimental group, respectively, compared with 2.5% and 32.5% in the control group (p intervention, SAC in experimental group was improved compared with before intervention (54.68 ± 10.85 vs 79.9 ± 22.3, p intervention in the control group (54.70 ± 11.47 vs. 52 ± 15.8, p = 0.38). The family-centered nursing care model that included physical, psychological, and social interventions improved the SAC of children with malignancies compared with children receiving routine nursing care. Establishing a standardized family-school-community-hospital hierarchical multi-management intervention model for children is important to the efficacy of long-term interventions and to the improvement of SAC of children with malignancies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The Dynamics of Glutathione Species and Ophthalmate Concentrations in Plasma from the VX2 Rabbit Model of Secondary Liver Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Available tumor markers have low sensitivity/specificity for the diagnosis of liver tumors. The present study was designed to evaluate the oxidoreductive status of the liver as surrogates of tumor subsistence and growth. Methods. Glutathione species (GSH:GSSG, ophthalmate (OA concentrations, and their turnover were measured in plasma of rabbits (n=6 in their healthy state and in the state of tumor growth after implantation of the VX2 carcinoma in their liver. Tumors were allowed to grow for a period of 14 days when rabbits were sacrificed. Livers were removed and cysteine concentration was measured in liver tissue. Results. Tumor growth was found in 100% of the rabbits. Concentration and labeling of GSH/GSSG were similar in experimental animals before and after tumor implantation and to sham animals. In contrast, OA concentration increased significantly in experimental animals after tumor implantation when compared to same animals prior to tumor implantation and to sham animals (P<.05. The concentration of cysteine, a precursor of GSH, was found to be significantly lower in the liver tissue adjacent to the tumor (P<.05. Conclusion. Disturbances in the oxidoreductive state of livers appear to be a surrogate of early tumor growth.

  6. Experimental modeling of injectivity loss; Modelagem experimental da perda de injetividade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonato, Adriano Jose do Amaral Mello; Silva, Pedro Glauto de Farias e; Gomes, Vanessa Limeira Azevedo; Santos, Adriano dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Produced water reinjection, suspended particles are retained in the porous media causing formation damage and injectivity decline. In general the retention of the particles occurs near the side of injection, this fact occurs in most cases, due to the size exclusion. The modeling of filtration and the consequent formation damage is essential to the project management of water injection in oil reservoirs. Thus, mathematical models are studied to better predict the distribution of particles throughout the porous media and determine the parameters of adjustment to injectivity decline. Among these models, there is the classic model which consists in determining these parameters (coefficient of filtration and formation damage). The methodology used in modeling is given from the equations the mass conservation, kinetic particle retention, the modified Darcy equation and the function formation damage. This study aimed to improve experimental modeling, including development of software for acquisition and processing of experimental data, considering the variable number of pressure measurements along the sample. The software was developed using the Labview 2011 platform and allows the determination of relevant parameters to predict injectivity loss in water injection wells. Furthermore, based on the traditional model of filtration in porous media (including depth filtration and formation of the external plaster), the software was applied to predict injectivity loss in addition to the properties of the grout. Finally, the classical models for transporting suspensions and damage to the formation were observed. (author)

  7. State-Dependent Impulsive Control Strategies for a Tumor-Immune Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Su Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the number of tumor cells leads us to expect more efficient strategies for treatment of tumor. Towards this goal, a tumor-immune model with state-dependent impulsive treatments is established. This model may give an efficient treatment schedule to control tumor’s abnormal growth. By using the Poincaré map and analogue of Poincaré criterion, some conditions for the existence and stability of a positive order-1 periodic solution of this model are obtained. Moreover, we carry out numerical simulations to illustrate the feasibility of our main results and compare fixed-time impulsive treatment effects with state-dependent impulsive treatment effects. The results of our simulations say that, in determining optimal treatment timing, the model with state-dependent impulsive control is more efficient than that with fixed-time impulsive control.

  8. Conditional mouse models demonstrate oncogene-dependent differences in tumor maintenance and recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Furth, Priscilla A

    2003-01-01

    Diversity in the pathophysiology of breast cancer frustrates therapeutic progress. We need to understand how mechanisms activated by specific combinations of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and hormonal signaling pathways govern response to therapy and prognosis. A recent series of investigations conducted by Chodosh and colleagues offers new insights into the similarities and differences between specific oncogenic pathways. Expression of three oncogenes relevant to pathways activated in human breast cancers (c-myc, activated neu and Wnt1) were targeted to murine mammary epithelial cells using the same transgenic tetracycline-responsive conditional gene expression system. While the individual transgenic lines demonstrate similarly high rates of tumor penetrance, rates of oncogene-independent tumor maintenance and recurrence following initial regression are significantly different, and are modifiable by mutations in specific cooperating oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressor gene expression. The experiments make three notable contributions. First, they illustrate that rates of tumor regression and recurrence following initial regression are dependent upon the pathways activated by the initiating oncogene. The experiments also demonstrate that altered expression or mutation of specific cooperating oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes results in different rates of tumor regression and recurrence. Finally, they exemplify the power of conditional mouse models for elucidating how specific molecular mechanisms give rise to the complexity of human cancer

  9. A Western-type diet accelerates tumor progression in an autochthonous mouse model of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llaverias, Gemma; Danilo, Christiane; Wang, Yu; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Daumer, Kristin; Lisanti, Michael P; Frank, Philippe G

    2010-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have provided evidence suggesting an important role for diet and obesity in the development of cancer. Specifically, lipid nutrients of the diet have been identified as important regulators of tumor development and progression. In the present study, we have examined the role of dietary fat and cholesterol in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer using the well-characterized TRAMP mouse model. Consumption of a Western-type diet--that is, enriched in both fat and cholesterol--accelerated prostate tumor incidence and tumor burden compared to mice fed a control chow diet. Furthermore, we also show that this diet increased the extent and the histological grade of prostate tumors. These findings were confirmed by the presence of increased levels of protein markers of advanced tumors in prostates obtained from animals fed a Western-type diet compared to those obtained from control animals. Increased lung metastases in animals fed a Western-type diet were also observed. In addition, we found that with a Western diet, animals bearing tumors presented with reduced plasma cholesterol levels compared with animals fed a control diet. Finally, we show that tumors obtained from animals fed a Western-type diet displayed increased expression of the high-density lipoprotein receptor SR-BI and increased angiogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that dietary fat and cholesterol play an important role in the development of prostate cancer.

  10. Heterotypic mouse models of canine osteosarcoma recapitulate tumor heterogeneity and biological behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milcah C. Scott

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a heterogeneous and rare disease with a disproportionate impact because it mainly affects children and adolescents. Lamentably, more than half of patients with OS succumb to metastatic disease. Clarification of the etiology of the disease, development of better strategies to manage progression, and methods to guide personalized treatments are among the unmet health needs for OS patients. Progress in managing the disease has been hindered by the extreme heterogeneity of OS; thus, better models that accurately recapitulate the natural heterogeneity of the disease are needed. For this study, we used cell lines derived from two spontaneous canine OS tumors with distinctly different biological behavior (OS-1 and OS-2 for heterotypic in vivo modeling that recapitulates the heterogeneous biology and behavior of this disease. Both cell lines demonstrated stability of the transcriptome when grown as orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Consistent with the behavior of the original tumors, OS-2 xenografts grew more rapidly at the primary site and had greater propensity to disseminate to lung and establish microscopic metastasis. Moreover, OS-2 promoted formation of a different tumor-associated stromal environment than OS-1 xenografts. OS-2-derived tumors comprised a larger percentage of the xenograft tumors than OS-1-derived tumors. In addition, a robust pro-inflammatory population dominated the stromal cell infiltrates in OS-2 xenografts, whereas a mesenchymal population with a gene signature reflecting myogenic signaling dominated those in the OS-1 xenografts. Our studies show that canine OS cell lines maintain intrinsic features of the tumors from which they were derived and recapitulate the heterogeneous biology and behavior of bone cancer in mouse models. This system provides a resource to understand essential interactions between tumor cells and the stromal environment that drive the progression and metastatic propensity of

  11. WE-E-17A-01: Characterization of An Imaging-Based Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikarla, V; Jeraj, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the transient dynamics of tumor oxygenation is important when evaluating tumor-vasculature response to anti-angiogenic therapies. An imaging-based tumor-vasculature model was used to elucidate factors that affect these dynamics. Methods: Tumor growth depends on its doubling time (Td). Hypoxia increases pro-angiogenic factor (VEGF) concentration which is modeled to reduce vessel perfusion, attributing to its effect of increasing vascular permeability. Perfused vessel recruitment depends on the existing perfused vasculature, VEGF concentration and maximum VEGF concentration (VEGFmax) for vessel dysfunction. A convolution-based algorithm couples the tumor to the normal tissue vessel density (VD-nt). The parameters are benchmarked to published pre-clinical data and a sensitivity study evaluating the changes in the peak and time to peak tumor oxygenation characterizes them. The model is used to simulate changes in hypoxia and proliferation PET imaging data obtained using [Cu- 61]Cu-ATSM and [F-18]FLT respectively. Results: Td and VD-nt were found to be the most influential on peak tumor pO2 while VEGFmax was marginally influential. A +20 % change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax resulted in +50%, +25% and +5% increase in peak pO2. In contrast, Td was the most influential on the time to peak oxygenation with VD-nt and VEGFmax playing marginal roles. A +20% change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax increased the time to peak pO2 by +50%, +5% and +0%. A −20% change in the above parameters resulted in comparable decreases in the peak and time to peak pO2. Model application to the PET data was able to demonstrate the voxel-specific changes in hypoxia of the imaged tumor. Conclusion: Tumor-specific doubling time and vessel density are important parameters to be considered when evaluating hypoxia transients. While the current model simulates the oxygen dynamics of an untreated tumor, incorporation of therapeutic effects can make the model a potent tool for analyzing

  12. Genetic modelling of PIM proteins in cancer: proviral tagging, cooperation with oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and carcinogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enara eAguirre

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1 as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all 3 isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis.

  13. Experimental measurements and thermodynamic modeling of refrigerant hydrates dissociation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, Hamed; Babaee, Saeedeh; Mohammadi, Amir H.; Naidoo, Paramespri; Ramjugernath, Deresh

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Dissociation conditions of refrigerant hydrates are studied experimentally and theoretically. • Refrigerants R23, R134a, R125a, R22, R410A, R407C and R507C are studied experimentally. • A thermodynamic model able to predict refrigerant hydrates dissociation conditions is proposed. • The results show good agreement between the experimental and predicted values. - Abstract: This study aims to investigate dissociation conditions of refrigerant hydrates both experimentally and theoretically. For this purpose, dissociation conditions of refrigerants R23, R134a, R125a, R22, R410A, R407C and R507C have been measured experimentally. A thermodynamic model that is able to predict refrigerant hydrates dissociation conditions in the various phase equilibrium regions has been proposed as well. Refrigerants modeled in this study include pure refrigerants: R11, R12, R13, R22, R23, R32, R134a, R141b, R143a, R125a, R152a, and mixed refrigerants: R11 + R12, R11 + R114, R12 + R114, R32 + R125a + R134a (R407C), R32 + R125a (R410A). For the modeling of the fluid and hydrate phases, the Peng-Robinson equation of state modified by Stryjek and Vera and the MHV2 G E -EoS mixing rule along with the UNIFAC (original) activity coefficient and van der Waals–Platteeuw (vdW–P) models were employed. The results show good agreement between the experimental and predicted values

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate in different experimental rat models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, Noha M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Egyptian Russian University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Demerdash, Ebtehal [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Rahman, Hanaa M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Egyptian Russian University, Cairo (Egypt); Algandaby, Mardi M. [Department of Biology (Botany), Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Al-Abbasi, Fahad A. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B., E-mail: abnaim@pharma.asu.edu.eg [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-10-01

    Methyl palmitate (MP) and ethyl palmitate (EP) are naturally occurring fatty acid esters reported as inflammatory cell inhibitors. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of MP and EP was evaluated in different experimental rat models. Results showed that MP and EP caused reduction of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia in rats, MP and EP reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). MP and EP decreased NF-κB expression in liver and lung tissues and ameliorated histopathological changes caused by LPS. Topical application of MP and EP reduced ear edema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, MP and EP reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of MP and EP in combating inflammation in several experimental models. -- Highlights: ► Efficacy of MP and EP in combating inflammation was displayed in several models. ► MP and EP reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and prostaglandin E2 level. ► MP and EP decreased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in experimental endotoxemia. ► MP and EP reduced NF-κB expression and histological changes in rat liver and lung. ► MP and EP reduced croton oil-induced ear edema and neutrophil infiltration.

  15. Experimental studies and modeling of an information embedded power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carullo, Stephen Paul

    This thesis develops a model of an electrical power system, with its inherent embedded communication system, for studying the characteristics of power system measurement errors due to communication delays. This model is referred to as an "information embedded power system" to emphasize the addition of a model of the communication system, that delivers measurements to a control center, to the standard model for the energy balance within the power system. These power system measurements are delivered across an Ethernet computer control network. An experimental platform was created in order to experimentally measure and characterize measurement delay errors (MDEs) in this information embedded power system. Several stochastic system models are developed, which are composed of both the physical infrastructure of the power system as well as the embedded computer network communication infrastructure. Both white noise and colored noise models are used to characterize MDEs. This type of analysis is an extension of traditional observability approaches, which usually only assume deterministic steady-state conditions in the power system and do not consider time delays in delivering measurements. The experimental platform is used to validate the developed model.

  16. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Scheepbouwer

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics.

  17. Fluctuations induced extinction and stochastic resonance effect in a model of tumor growth with periodic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongxi; Xu Wei; Guo, Yongfeng; Xu Yong

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a stochastic model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis-Menten reaction with positional and environmental fluctuations under subthreshold periodic treatment. Firstly, the influences of environmental fluctuations on the treatable stage are analyzed numerically. Applying the standard theory of stochastic resonance derived from the two-state approach, we derive the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analytically, which is used to measure the stochastic resonance phenomenon. It is found that the weak environmental fluctuations could induce the extinction of tumor cells in the subthreshold periodic treatment. The positional stability is better in favor of the treatment of the tumor cells. Besides, the appropriate and feasible treatment intensity and the treatment cycle should be highlighted considered in the treatment of tumor cells.

  18. Immunological tumor destruction in a murine melanoma model by targeted LTalpha independent of secondary lymphoid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrama, D.; Voigt, H.; Eggert, A.O.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously demonstrated that targeting lymphotoxin alpha (LTalpha) to the tumor evokes its immunological destruction in a syngeneic B16 melanoma model. Since treatment was associated with the induction of peritumoral tertiary lymphoid tissue, we speculated that the induced immune...... of specific T-cell responses even in the absence of secondary lymphoid organs. In addition, this effect is accompanied by the initiation of tertiary lymphoid tissue at the tumor site in which B and T lymphocytes are compartmentalized in defined areas and which harbor expanded numbers of tumor specific T cells...... as demonstrated by in situ TRP-2/K(b) tetramer staining. Mechanistically, targeted LTalpha therapy seems to induce changes at the tumor site which allows a coordinated interaction of immune competent cells triggering the induction of tertiary lymphoid tissue. CONCLUSION: Thus, our data demonstrate that targeted...

  19. Bi-model processing for early detection of breast tumor in CAD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, Bushra; Sharif, Muhammad; Muhammad, Nazeer

    2017-06-01

    Early screening of skeptical masses in mammograms may reduce mortality rate among women. This rate can be further reduced upon developing the computer-aided diagnosis system with decrease in false assumptions in medical informatics. This method highlights the early tumor detection in digitized mammograms. For improving the performance of this system, a novel bi-model processing algorithm is introduced. It divides the region of interest into two parts, the first one is called pre-segmented region (breast parenchyma) and other is the post-segmented region (suspicious region). This system follows the scheme of the preprocessing technique of contrast enhancement that can be utilized to segment and extract the desired feature of the given mammogram. In the next phase, a hybrid feature block is presented to show the effective performance of computer-aided diagnosis. In order to assess the effectiveness of the proposed method, a database provided by the society of mammographic images is tested. Our experimental outcomes on this database exhibit the usefulness and robustness of the proposed method.

  20. Instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Watanabe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animal models offer possibilities of physiology knowledge, pathogenesis of disease and action of drugs that are directly related to quality nursing care. This integrative review describes the current state of the instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models, including the main recommendations of ethics committees that focus on animal welfare and raises questions about the impact of their findings in nursing care. Data show that, in Brazil, the progress in ethics for the use of animals for scientific purposes was consolidated with Law No. 11.794/2008 establishing ethical procedures, attending health, genetic and experimental parameters. The application of ethics in handling of animals for scientific and educational purposes and obtaining consistent and quality data brings unquestionable contributions to the nurse, as they offer subsidies to relate pathophysiological mechanisms and the clinical aspect on the patient.

  1. The Protective Role of Dexpanthenol on the Endometrial Implants in an Experimentally Induced Rat Endometriosis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu Karapinar, Oya; Pinar, Neslihan; Özgür, Tümay; Özcan, Oğuzhan; Bayraktar, H Suphi; Kurt, Raziye Keskin; Nural, Orhan

    2017-02-01

    Dexpanthenol (Dxp), antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, plays an important role in the repair systems against oxidative stress and inflammatory response. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of Dxp on experimental endometriosis model. A prospective experimental study was conducted in Experimental Animal Laboratory of Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay. Twenty nonpregnant female Wistar albino rats, in which experimental model of endometriosis was surgically induced, were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 was administered 500 mg/kg/d Dxp intraperitoneally for 14 days, and group 2 was given the same amount of saline solution. After 2 weeks of medication, the rats were killed and implant volumes, histopathologic scores; and levels of serum total antioxidant status, total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were evaluated. Plasma and peritoneal fluid levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were analyzed. The endometriotic implant volumes, histopathologic scores, and serum TOS and OSI values were significantly decreased ( P OSI values. Serum and peritoneal fluid TNF-α levels were significantly decreased in the Dxp group. So Dxp decreased oxidative stress.

  2. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE in a Murine Model of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bzorek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT is a relatively new mode of internally targeted radiotherapy currently in clinical trials. In PRRT, ionizing radioisotopes conjugated to somatostatin analogues are targeted to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs via somatostatin receptors. Despite promising clinical results, very little is known about the mechanism of tumor control. By using NCI-H727 cells in an in vivo murine xenograft model of human NETs, we showed that 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT led to increased infiltration of CD86+ antigen presenting cells into tumor tissue. We also found that following treatment with PRRT, there was significantly increased tumor infiltration by CD49b+/FasL+ NK cells potentially capable of tumor killing. Further investigation into the immunomodulatory effects of PRRT will be essential in improving treatment efficacy.

  3. Combination therapy targeting the tumor microenvironment is effective in a model of human ocular melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schafer Peter H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular melanoma is the leading intraocular malignancy. There is no effective treatment for metastatic ocular melanoma. We sought a treatment targeting the tumor microenvironment as well as the tumor cells. Methods Migration of HUVEC cells, the ability of HUVEC cells to form tubes, and proliferative capacity of a human ocular melanoma cell line were tested in the presence of lenalidomide and sorafenib alone and in combination. The compounds were also tested in a rat aortic ring assay and were tested in a highly aggressive human ocular melanoma xenograft model. Results Lenalidomide and Sorafenib inhibit HUVEC ability to migrate and form tubes and when used in combination the inhibition is increased. The agents alone and in combination inhibit outgrowth in the rat aortic ring model. The combination of the agents improved the inhibition over either single agent. In a xenograft model, combination therapy inhibited tumor growth over inhibition by single agent alone in a significant fashion (p Conclusion Lenalidomide and sorafenib are effective at targeting endothelial cells, inhibiting growth of ocular melanoma cells and can inhibit growth of tumors in a xenograft model as well as inhibit development of metastases. Combining these agents works in an additive to synergistic way to inhibit the growth of tumors and development of metastases.

  4. Image-based modeling of tumor shrinkage in head and neck radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao Ming; Xie Yaoqin; Moros, Eduardo G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Xing Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the kinetics of tumor growth/shrinkage represents a critical step in quantitative assessment of therapeutics and realization of adaptive radiation therapy. This article presents a novel framework for image-based modeling of tumor change and demonstrates its performance with synthetic images and clinical cases. Methods: Due to significant tumor tissue content changes, similarity-based models are not suitable for describing the process of tumor volume changes. Under the hypothesis that tissue features in a tumor volume or at the boundary region are partially preserved, the kinetic change was modeled in two steps: (1) Autodetection of homologous tissue features shared by two input images using the scale invariance feature transformation (SIFT) method; and (2) establishment of a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between the images for the remaining spatial points by interpolation. The correctness of the tissue feature correspondence was assured by a bidirectional association procedure, where SIFT features were mapped from template to target images and reversely. A series of digital phantom experiments and five head and neck clinical cases were used to assess the performance of the proposed technique. Results: The proposed technique can faithfully identify the known changes introduced when constructing the digital phantoms. The subsequent feature-guided thin plate spline calculation reproduced the ''ground truth'' with accuracy better than 1.5 mm. For the clinical cases, the new algorithm worked reliably for a volume change as large as 30%. Conclusions: An image-based tumor kinetic algorithm was developed to model the tumor response to radiation therapy. The technique provides a practical framework for future application in adaptive radiation therapy.

  5. Combined thermal and elastic modeling of the normal and tumorous breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray

    2008-03-01

    The abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of a high risk of breast cancer, but an open question is how to quantify the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying physiological/pathological conditions. Previous thermal modeling techniques generally did not utilize the breast geometry determined by the gravity-induced elastic deformations arising from various body postures. In this paper, a 3-D finite-element method is developed for combined modeling of the thermal and elastic properties of the breast, including the mechanical nonlinearity associated with large deformations. The effects of the thermal and elastic properties of the breast tissues are investigated quantitatively. For the normal breast in a standing/sitting up posture, the gravity-induced deformation alone is found to be able to cause an asymmetric temperature distribution even though all the thermal/elastic properties are symmetrical, and this temperature asymmetry increases for softer and more compressible breast tissues. For a tumorous breast, we found that the surface-temperature alterations generally can be recognizable for superficial tumors at depths less than 20 mm. Tumor size plays a less important role than the tumor depth in determining the tumor-induced temperature difference. This result may imply that a higher thermal sensitivity is critical for a breast thermogram system when deeper tumors are present, even if the tumor is relatively large. We expect this new method to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis and treatment of breast tumors.

  6. MicroRNA signature characterizes primary tumors that metastasize in an esophageal adenocarcinoma rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H Zaidi

    Full Text Available To establish a miRNA signature for metastasis in an animal model of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC.The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC has dramatically increased and esophageal cancer is now the sixth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Mortality rates remain high among patients with advanced stage disease and esophagectomy is associated with high complication rates. Hence, early identification of potentially metastatic disease would better guide treatment strategies.The modified Levrat's surgery was performed to induce EAC in Sprague-Dawley rats. Primary EAC and distant metastatic sites were confirmed via histology and immunofluorescence. miRNA profiling was performed on primary tumors with or without metastasis. A unique subset of miRNAs expressed in primary tumors and metastases was identified with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA along with upstream and downstream targets. miRNA-linked gene expression analysis was performed on a secondary cohort of metastasis positive (n=5 and metastasis negative (n=28 primary tumors.The epithelial origin of distant metastasis was established by IF using villin (VIL1 and mucin 5AC (MUC5AC antibodies. miRNome analysis identified four down-regulated miRNAs in metastasis positive primary tumors compared to metastasis negative tumors: miR-92a-3p (p=0.0001, miR-141-3p (p=0.0022, miR-451-1a (p=0.0181 and miR133a-3p (p=0.0304. Six target genes identified in the top scoring networks by IPA were validated as significantly, differentially expressed in metastasis positive primary tumors: Ago2, Akt1, Kras, Bcl2L11, CDKN1B and Zeb2.In vivo metastasis was confirmed in the modified Levrat's model. Analysis of the primary tumor identified a distinctive miRNA signature for primary tumors that metastasized.

  7. Numerical and Experimental Modeling of the Static Response of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents numerical and experimental modeling of the static response of simply supported thin-walled reinforced concrete box girder bridges. The work is executed to verify the validity of software developed by the authors for the finite strip analysis of continuous thin-walled box girder bridges and also to observe ...

  8. Experimental Analysis and Model Validation of an Opaque Ventilated Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, F. Peci; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Natural ventilation is a convenient way of reducing energy consumption in buildings. In this study an experimental module of an opaque ventilated façade (OVF) was built and tested for assessing its potential of supplying free ventilation and air preheating for the building. A numerical model was ...

  9. Active Photonic Crystal Switches: Modeling, Design and Experimental Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Mikkel; Yu, Yi; Kristensen, Philip Trøst

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present recent progress in modeling, design, fabrication and experimental characterization of InP photonic crystal all-optical switches. Novel designs with increased flexibility and performance are presented, and their operation using high speed data signals is analyzed...

  10. An Interactive Multimedia Based Instruction in Experimental Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Nielsen, J.N.; Østergaard, J.

    1997-01-01

    A CD-ROM based interactive multimedia instruction in experimental modelling for Danish Engineering School teachers is described. The content is based on a new sensitivity approach for direct estimation of physical parameters in linear and nonlinear dynamic systems. The presentation is inspired...

  11. Novel sensors for food inspection modelling, fabrication and experimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Abdul Rahman, Mohd Syaifudin; Yu, Pak-Lam

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses presents recent developments of novel planar interdigital sensors for food inspection. It covers the fundamentals of sensors, their design, modelling and simulations, fabrications, characterizations, experimental investigations and analyses. This book will be useful for the engineers and researchers especially higher undergraduate, postgraduate students as well as practitioners working on the development of Electromagnetic Sensors.

  12. Endogenous opioid antagonism in physiological experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Pereira, Manuel P; Andersen, Lars Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double...

  13. Capillary microreactors for lactic acid extraction: experimental and modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanti, Susanti; Winkelman, Jozef; Schuur, Boelo; Heeres, Hero; Yue, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important biobased chemical and, among others, is used for the production of poly-lactic acid. Down-stream processing using state of the art technology is energy intensive and leads to the formation of large amounts of salts. In this presentation, experimental and modeling studies

  14. Pruning Chinese trees : an experimental and modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Bo

    2001-01-01

    Pruning of trees, in which some branches are removed from the lower crown of a tree, has been extensively used in China in silvicultural management for many purposes. With an experimental and modelling approach, the effects of pruning on tree growth and on the harvest of plant material were studied.

  15. Two-phase flow experimental studies in micro-models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karadimitriou, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research project was to put more physics into theories of two-phase flow. The significance of including interfacial area as a separate variable in two-phase flow and transport models was investigated. In order to investigate experimentally the significance of the inclusion of

  16. Experimental study on differential diagnosis of tumor from inflammation by using /sup 125/I labeled Pisum sativum agglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Shuji; Jay, M.

    1987-12-01

    We have reported that Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), a plant lectin which recognizes mannosyl residues, accumulates markedly in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST) and suggested the possibility of applying PSA to tumor imaging radiopharmaceuticals. In the present work, an inflammation was induced by implantation of cotton thread in the left rear leg skeletal muscle of ddY mice and Ehrlich ascites tumor cells were inoculated into the right rear leg. /sup 67/Ga-citrate accumulated in the tumor tissue and the inflammatory lesion to almost equal extents. On the other hand, /sup 125/I-PSA preferentially accumulated in tumor tissues in mice bearing both tumor and inflammation. The results suggest that differential diagnosis of tumor from inflammation using radiolabeled PSA may be possible.

  17. An experimental study on differential diagnosis of tumor from inflammation by using 125I labeled Pisum sativum agglutinin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shuji; Jay, M.

    1987-01-01

    We have reported that Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), a plant lectin which recognizes mannosyl residues, accumulates markedly in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST) and suggested the possibility of applying PSA to tumor imaging radiopharmaceuticals. In the present work, an inflammation was induced by implantation of cotton thread in the left rear leg skeletal muscle of ddY mice and Ehrlich ascites tumor cells were inoculated into the right rear leg. 67 Ga-citrate accumulated in the tumor tissue and the inflammatory lesion to almost equal extents. On the other hand, 125 I-PSA preferentially accumulated in tumor tissues in mice bearing both tumor and inflammation. The results suggest that differential diagnosis of tumor from inflammation using radiolabeled PSA may be possible. (orig.)

  18. Combination use of lentinan with x-ray therapy in mouse experimental tumor system, (2). Combination effect on MM102 syngeneic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiio, Tsuyoshi; Ohishi, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Yoshiharu; Niitsu, Iwayasu; Hayashibara, Hiromi; Yoshihama, Takashi; Moriyuki, Hirobumi

    1988-03-01

    C3H/He mice transplanted syngeneic MM102 tumor subcutaneously in the footpad were used to study the timing of administration of lentinan when combined with local irradiation of X-ray. In combination with 1,000 rads irradiation, the administration of lentinan after X-ray was not effective. When lentinan was administered in combination with 2,000 to 3,000 rads irradiation, the growth of tumor was decreased significantly in comparison with the groups which received radiotherapy alone and those that received lentinan alone. The administration of lentinan before irradiation was effective at the same degree in the group that received lentinan after irradiation. Life prolongation effect was also observed in the group that received lentinan before and after irradiation, and 4 mice among 8 tested mice were survived at 70th day after tumor transplantation.

  19. Systematic integration of experimental data and models in systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peter; Dada, Joseph O; Jameson, Daniel; Spasic, Irena; Swainston, Neil; Carroll, Kathleen; Dunn, Warwick; Khan, Farid; Malys, Naglis; Messiha, Hanan L; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Weichart, Dieter; Winder, Catherine; Wishart, Jill; Broomhead, David S; Goble, Carole A; Gaskell, Simon J; Kell, Douglas B; Westerhoff, Hans V; Mendes, Pedro; Paton, Norman W

    2010-11-29

    The behaviour of biological systems can be deduced from their mathematical models. However, multiple sources of data in diverse forms are required in the construction of a model in order to define its components and their biochemical reactions, and corresponding parameters. Automating the assembly and use of systems biology models is dependent upon data integration processes involving the interoperation of data and analytical resources. Taverna workflows have been developed for the automated assembly of quantitative parameterised metabolic networks in the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML). A SBML model is built in a systematic fashion by the workflows which starts with the construction of a qualitative network using data from a MIRIAM-compliant genome-scale model of yeast metabolism. This is followed by parameterisation of the SBML model with experimental data from two repositories, the SABIO-RK enzyme kinetics database and a database of quantitative experimental results. The models are then calibrated and simulated in workflows that call out to COPASIWS, the web service interface to the COPASI software application for analysing biochemical networks. These systems biology workflows were evaluated for their ability to construct a parameterised model of yeast glycolysis. Distributed information about metabolic reactions that have been described to MIRIAM standards enables the automated assembly of quantitative systems biology models of metabolic networks based on user-defined criteria. Such data integration processes can be implemented as Taverna workflows to provide a rapid overview of the components and their relationships within a biochemical system.

  20. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  1. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Significant Tumor Vascular Dysfunction and Increased Tumor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Expression Induced by High Single-Dose Irradiation in a Pancreatic Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Azusa [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chen, Yonghong; Bu, Jiachuan; Mujcic, Hilda [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wouters, Bradly G. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); DaCosta, Ralph S., E-mail: rdacosta@uhnres.utoronto.ca [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of high-dose irradiation on pancreatic tumor vasculature and microenvironment using in vivo imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: A BxPC3 pancreatic tumor xenograft was established in a dorsal skinfold window chamber model and a subcutaneous hind leg model. Tumors were irradiated with a single dose of 4, 12, or 24 Gy. The dorsal skinfold window chamber model was used to assess tumor response, vascular function and permeability, platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium, and tumor hypoxia for up to 14 days after 24-Gy irradiation. The hind leg model was used to monitor tumor size, hypoxia, and vascularity for up to 65 days after 24-Gy irradiation. Tumors were assessed histologically to validate in vivo observations. Results: In vivo fluorescence imaging revealed temporary vascular dysfunction in tumors irradiated with a single dose of 4 to 24 Gy, but most significantly with a single dose of 24 Gy. Vascular functional recovery was observed by 14 days after irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, irradiation with 24 Gy caused platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium within hours to days after irradiation. Vascular permeability was significantly higher in irradiated tumors compared with nonirradiated controls 14 days after irradiation. This observation corresponded with increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in irradiated tumors. In the hind leg model, irradiation with a single dose of 24 Gy led to tumor growth delay, followed by tumor regrowth. Conclusions: Irradiation of the BxPC3 tumors with a single dose of 24 Gy caused transient vascular dysfunction and increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Such biological changes may impact tumor response to high single-dose and hypofractionated irradiation, and further investigations are needed to better understand the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy.

  2. Discovery of Fully Human Anti-MET Monoclonal Antibodies with Antitumor Activity against Colon Cancer Tumor Models In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Htun van der Horst

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The receptor tyrosine kinase MET is a major component controlling the invasive growth program in embryonic development and in invasive malignancies. The discovery of therapeutic antibodies against MET has been difficult, and antibodies that compete with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF act as agonists. By applying phage technology and cell-based panning strategies, we discovered two fully human antibodies against MET (R13 and R28, which synergistically inhibit HGF binding to MET and elicit antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Cell-based phosphorylation assays demonstrate that R13 and R28 abrogate HGF-induced activation of MET, AKT1, ERK1/2, and HGF-induced migration and proliferation. FACS experiments suggest that the inhibitory effect is mediated by “locking” MET receptor in a state with R13, which then increases avidity of R28 for the extracellular domain of MET, thus blocking HGF binding without activating the receptor. In vivo studies demonstrate that the combination of R13/28 significantly inhibited tumor growth in various colon tumor xenograft models. Inhibition of tumor growth was associated with induction of hypoxia. Global gene expression analysis shows that inhibition of HGF/MET pathway significantly upregulated the tumor suppressors KLF6, CEACAM1, and BMP2, the negative regulator of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase PIK3IP1, and significantly suppressed SCF and SERPINE2, both enhancers of proliferation and invasiveness. Moreover, in an experimental metastasis model, R13/28 increased survival by preventing the recurrence of otherwise lethal lung metastases. Taken together, these results underscore the utility of a dual-antibody approach for targeting MET and possibly other receptor tyrosine kinases. Our approach could be expanded to drug discovery efforts against other cell surface proteins.

  3. Radioimmunotherapy with an antibody to HPV16 E6 oncoprotein is effective in experimental cervical tumor expressing low levels of E6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zewei; Wang, Xing Guo; Einstein, Mark H; Goldberg, Gary L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose HPV16 is associated with ∼50% of all cervical cancers worldwide. The E6 and E7 genes of oncogenic HPV types, such as HPV16, are necessary for the HPV transforming function and tumorogenesis making them ideal targets for novel treatments. Radioimmunotherapy employs systemically administered radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to tumor-associated antigens. Previously we demonstrated in mice that radioimmunotherapy targeting viral antigens with mAb to HPV16 E6 suppressed CasKi cervical tumors expressing high levels of E6 (∼600 copies of HPV per cell). However, that study opened the question whether radioimmunotherapy can suppress the growth of cervical tumors with low E6 and E7 expression, such as may be seen in patients. Experimental Design We evaluated the expression of E6 in patients' tumors and in the SiHa cell line expressing low levels of E6 and E7 (1–2 copies of HPV per cell) and found them comparable. We initiated SiHa tumors in nude mice, radiolabeled C1P5 mAb to E6 with a beta-emitter 188-Rhenium (188Re) and treated tumor-bearing mice with: (1) 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5 alone; (2) proteasome inhibitor MG132 alone; (3) MG132 followed by 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5; (4) unlabeled C1P5; (5) 200 µCi 188Re-18B7 (isotype-matching control mAb); (6) no treatment. 188Re-C1P5 alone and in combination with MG-132 significantly retarded tumor growth compared to all control groups. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the possibility to suppress tumor growth by targeting viral antigens even in cervical tumors with low E6 expression and provide additional evidence for the potential usefulness of radioimmunotherapy targeting HPV-related antigens in the clinic. PMID:20861673

  4. Efficacy of MR imaging for real-time monitoring of percutaneous ethanol injection in the experimental in vivo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Y.; Lufkin, R.B.; Castro, D.J.; Jabour, B.A.; Hirchowiz, S.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that percutaneous alcohol injection is a valuable technique that can cause focal necrosis in deep tumors. This technique has been used for treatment of small hepatic tumors with US guidance. However, inhomogeneous distribution of the injected alcohol and difficulties in identifying the tumor after previous treatments cause incomplete necrosis. In this study, an experimental model was developed to demonstrate the feasibility and sensitivity of MR imaging as a monitoring technique. A 23-gauge MR-compatible needle was placed into the thigh muscle of the rabbit and 1-3 mL sterile absolute alcohol (98%) was injected slowly (within 1-2 minutes). MR imaging was performed before alcohol injection and continued during as well as after injection. A T2-weighted fast spin-echo technique was used. Animals were killed after MR examination, and the alcohol-injected lesions were processed for pathologic examination

  5. Emerging patterns in tumor systems: simulating the dynamics of multicellular clusters with an agent-based spatial agglomeration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansury, Yuri; Kimura, Mark; Lobo, Jose; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2002-12-07

    Brain cancer cells invade early on surrounding parenchyma, which makes it impossible to surgically remove all tumor cells and thus significantly worsens the prognosis of the patient. Specific structural elements such as multicellular clusters have been seen in experimental settings to emerge within the invasive cell system and are believed to express the systems' guidance toward nutritive sites in a heterogeneous environment. Based on these observations, we developed a novel agent-based model of spatio-temporal search and agglomeration to investigate the dynamics of cell motility and aggregation with the assumption that tumors behave as complex dynamic self-organizing biosystems. In this model, virtual cells migrate because they are attracted by higher nutrient concentrations and to avoid overpopulated areas with high levels of toxic metabolites. A specific feature of our model is the capability of cells to search both globally and locally. This concept is applied to simulate cell-surface receptor-mediated information processing of tumor cells such that a cell searching for a more growth-permissive place "learns" the information content of a brain tissue region within a two-dimensional lattice in two stages, processing first the global and then the local input. In both stages, differences in microenvironment characteristics define distinctions in energy expenditure for a moving cell and thus influence cell migration, proliferation, agglomeration, and cell death. Numerical results of our model show a phase transition leading to the emergence of two distinct spatio-temporal patterns depending on the dominant search mechanism. If global search is dominant, the result is a small number of large clusters exhibiting rapid spatial expansion but shorter lifetime of the tumor system. By contrast, if local search is dominant, the trade-off is many small clusters with longer lifetime but much slower velocity of expansion. Furthermore, in the case of such dominant local search

  6. Germline genetic variation modulates tumor progression and metastasis in a mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank J Patel

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine (NE differentiation has gained increased attention as a prostate cancer (PC prognostic marker. The aim of this study is to determine whether host germline genetic variation influences tumor progression and metastasis in C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP8247Ng/J (TRAMP mouse model of aggressive NEPC. TRAMP mice were crossed to the eight progenitor strains of the Collaborative Cross recombinant inbred panel to address this. Tumor growth and metastasis burden were quantified in heterozygous transgene positive F1 male mice at 30 weeks of age. Compared to wild-type C57BL/6J-Tg(TRAMP824Ng/J males, TRAMP x CAST/EiJ, TRAMP x NOD/ShiLtJ and TRAMP x NZO/HlLtJ F1 males displayed significant increases in tumor growth. Conversely, TRAMP x WSB/EiJ and TRAMP x PWK/PhJ F1 males displayed significant reductions in tumor growth. Interestingly, despite reduced tumor burden, TRAMP x WSB/EiJ males had an increased nodal metastasis burden. Patterns of distant pulmonary metastasis tended to follow the same patterns as that of local dissemination in each of the strains. All tumors and metastases displayed positive staining for NE markers, synaptophysin, and FOXA2. These experiments conclusively demonstrate that the introduction of germline variation by breeding modulates tumor growth, local metastasis burden, and distant metastasis frequency in this model of NEPC. These strains will be useful as model systems to facilitate the identification of germline modifier genes that promote the development of aggressive forms of PC.

  7. Three-dimensional in vitro tumor models for cancer research and drug evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xian; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Jia, Xinqiao

    2014-11-15

    Cancer occurs when cells acquire genomic instability and inflammation, produce abnormal levels of epigenetic factors/proteins and tumor suppressors, reprogram the energy metabolism and evade immune destruction, leading to the disruption of cell cycle/normal growth. An early event in carcinogenesis is loss of polarity and detachment from the natural basement membrane, allowing cells to form distinct three-dimensional (3D) structures that interact with each other and with the surrounding microenvironment. Although valuable information has been accumulated from traditional in vitro studies in which cells are grown on flat and hard plastic surfaces (2D culture), this culture condition does not reflect the essential features of tumor tissues. Further, fundamental understanding of cancer metastasis cannot be obtained readily from 2D studies because they lack the complex and dynamic cell-cell communications and cell-matrix interactions that occur during cancer metastasis. These shortcomings, along with lack of spatial depth and cell connectivity, limit the applicability of 2D cultures to accurate testing of pharmacologically active compounds, free or sequestered in nanoparticles. To recapitulate features of native tumor microenvironments, various biomimetic 3D tumor models have been developed to incorporate cancer and stromal cells, relevant matrix components, and biochemical and biophysical cues, into one spatially and temporally integrated system. In this article, we review recent advances in creating 3D tumor models employing tissue engineering principles. We then evaluate the utilities of these novel models for the testing of anticancer drugs and their delivery systems. We highlight the profound differences in responses from 3D in vitro tumors and conventional monolayer cultures. Overall, strategic integration of biological principles and engineering approaches will both improve understanding of tumor progression and invasion and support discovery of more personalized

  8. Stereoscopic virtual reality models for planning tumor resection in the sellar region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shou-sen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is difficult for neurosurgeons to perceive the complex three-dimensional anatomical relationships in the sellar region. Methods To investigate the value of using a virtual reality system for planning resection of sellar region tumors. The study included 60 patients with sellar tumors. All patients underwent computed tomography angiography, MRI-T1W1, and contrast enhanced MRI-T1W1 image sequence scanning. The CT and MRI scanning data were collected and then imported into a Dextroscope imaging workstation, a virtual reality system that allows structures to be viewed stereoscopically. During preoperative assessment, typical images for each patient were chosen and printed out for use by the surgeons as references during surgery. Results All sellar tumor models clearly displayed bone, the internal carotid artery, circle of Willis and its branches, the optic nerve and chiasm, ventricular system, tumor, brain, soft tissue and adjacent structures. Depending on the location of the tumors, we simulated the transmononasal sphenoid sinus approach, transpterional approach, and other approaches. Eleven surgeons who used virtual reality models completed a survey questionnaire. Nine of the participants said that the virtual reality images were superior to other images but that other images needed to be used in combination with the virtual reality images. Conclusions The three-dimensional virtual reality models were helpful for individualized planning of surgery in the sellar region. Virtual reality appears to be promising as a valuable tool for sellar region surgery in the future.

  9. Characterization of a switchable chimeric antigen receptor platform in a pre-clinical solid tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishali Bejestani, Elham; Cartellieri, Marc; Bergmann, Ralf; Ehninger, Armin; Loff, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Spehr, Johannes; Dietrich, Antje; Feldmann, Anja; Albert, Susann; Wermke, Martin; Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bachmann, Michael; von Bonin, Malte

    2017-01-01

    The universal modular chimeric antigen receptor (UniCAR) platform redirects CAR-T cells using a separated, soluble targeting module with a short half-life. This segregation allows precise controllability and flexibility. Herein we show that the UniCAR platform can be used to efficiently target solid cancers in vitro and in vivo using a pre-clinical prostate cancer model which overexpresses prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA). Short-term administration of the targeting module to tumor bearing immunocompromised mice engrafted with human UniCAR-T cells significantly delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival of recipient mice both in a low and high tumor burden model. In addition, we analyzed phenotypic and functional changes of cancer cells and UniCAR-T cells in association with the administration of the targeting module to reveal potential immunoevasive mechanisms. Most notably, UniCAR-T cell activation induced upregulation of immune-inhibitory molecules such as programmed death ligands. In conclusion, this work illustrates that the UniCAR platform mediates potent anti-tumor activity in a relevant in vitro and in vivo solid tumor model.

  10. Tumor-Derived Cell Lines as Molecular Models of Cancer Pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodspeed, Andrew; Heiser, Laura M; Gray, Joe W; Costello, James C

    2016-01-01

    Compared with normal cells, tumor cells have undergone an array of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Often, these changes underlie cancer development, progression, and drug resistance, so the utility of model systems rests on their ability to recapitulate the genomic aberrations observed in primary tumors. Tumor-derived cell lines have long been used to study the underlying biologic processes in cancer, as well as screening platforms for discovering and evaluating the efficacy of anticancer therapeutics. Multiple -omic measurements across more than a thousand cancer cell lines have been produced following advances in high-throughput technologies and multigroup collaborative projects. These data complement the large, international cancer genomic sequencing efforts to characterize patient tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC). Given the scope and scale of data that have been generated, researchers are now in a position to evaluate the similarities and differences that exist in genomic features between cell lines and patient samples. As pharmacogenomics models, cell lines offer the advantages of being easily grown, relatively inexpensive, and amenable to high-throughput testing of therapeutic agents. Data generated from cell lines can then be used to link cellular drug response to genomic features, where the ultimate goal is to build predictive signatures of patient outcome. This review highlights the recent work that has compared -omic profiles of cell lines with primary tumors, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of cancer cell lines as pharmacogenomic models of anticancer therapies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Kinetic modeling of tumor growth and dissemination in the craniospinal axis: implications for craniospinal irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halperin Edward C

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma and other types of tumors that gain access to the cerebrospinal fluid can spread throughout the craniospinal axis. The purpose of this study was to devise a simple multi-compartment kinetic model using established tumor cell growth and treatment sensitivity parameters to model the complications of this spread as well as the impact of treatment with craniospinal radiotherapy. Methods A two-compartment mathematical model was constructed. Rate constants were derived from previously published work and the model used to predict outcomes for various clinical scenarios. Results The model is simple and with the use of known and estimated clinical parameters is consistent with known clinical outcomes. Treatment outcomes are critically dependent upon the duration of the treatment break and the radiosensitivity of the tumor. Cross-plot analyses serve as an estimate of likelihood of cure as a function of these and other factors. Conclusion The model accurately describes known clinical outcomes for patients with medulloblastoma. It can help guide treatment decisions for radiation oncologists treating patients with this disease. Incorporation of other treatment modalities, such as chemotherapy, that enhance radiation sensitivity and/or reduce tumor burden, are predicted to significantly increase the probability of cure.

  12. A preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic guided microwave ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Wang, Guo-Bao; Xiang, Zhan-Wang; Yang, Bin; Xue, Jing-Bing; Mo, Zhi-Qiang; Zhong, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Fan, Wei-Jun

    2016-05-03

    This study sought to prospectively evaluate the feasibility and safety of a preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic(CT) guided microwave(MW) ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors. This mathematic model was a regular cylinder quantifying appropriate puncture routes from the bottom up. A total of 103 patients with hepatic dome tumors were enrolled and randomly divided into 2 groups based on whether this model was used or not: Group A (using the model; n = 43) versus Group B (not using the model; n = 60). All tumors were treated by CT-guided MW ablation and follow-up contrast CT were reviewed. The average number of times for successful puncture, average ablation time, and incidence of right shoulder pain were less in Group A than Group B (1.4 vs. 2.5, P = 0.001; 8.8 vs. 11.1 minutes, P = 0.003; and 4.7% vs. 20%, P = 0.039). The technical success rate was higher in Group A than Group B (97.7% vs. 85.0%, P = 0.032). There were no significant differences between the two groups in primary and secondary technique efficacy rates (97.7% vs. 88.3%, P = 0.081; 90.0% vs. 72.7%, P = 0.314). No major complications occurred in both groups. The mathematic model of regular cylinder is feasible and safe for CT-guided MW ablation in treating hepatic dome tumors.

  13. Innovative Disease Model: Zebrafish as an In Vivo Platform for Intestinal Disorder and Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Wei Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world’s most common cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths, causing more than 50,000 estimated deaths each year. Several risk factors are highly associated with CRC, including being overweight, eating a diet high in red meat and over-processed meat, having a history of inflammatory bowel disease, and smoking. Previous zebrafish studies have demonstrated that multiple oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes can be regulated through genetic or epigenetic alterations. Zebrafish research has also revealed that the activation of carcinogenesis-associated signal pathways plays an important role in CRC. The biology of cancer, intestinal disorders caused by carcinogens, and the morphological patterns of tumors have been found to be highly similar between zebrafish and humans. Therefore, the zebrafish has become an important animal model for translational medical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to elucidate the characteristics of gastrointestinal diseases. This review article focuses on zebrafish models that have been used to study human intestinal disorders and tumors, including models involving mutant and transgenic fish. We also report on xenograft models and chemically-induced enterocolitis. This review demonstrates that excellent zebrafish models can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases and help facilitate the evaluation of novel anti-tumor drugs.

  14. Heterogeneity in Pure Microbial Systems: Experimental Measurements and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabaleiro, Rebeca; Mitchell, Anca M; Smith, Wendy; Wipat, Anil; Ofiţeru, Irina D

    2017-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity influences bioprocess performance in ways that until date are not completely elucidated. In order to account for this phenomenon in the design and operation of bioprocesses, reliable analytical and mathematical descriptions are required. We present an overview of the single cell analysis, and the mathematical modeling frameworks that have potential to be used in bioprocess control and optimization, in particular for microbial processes. In order to be suitable for bioprocess monitoring, experimental methods need to be high throughput and to require relatively short processing time. One such method used successfully under dynamic conditions is flow cytometry. Population balance and individual based models are suitable modeling options, the latter one having in particular a good potential to integrate the various data collected through experimentation. This will be highly beneficial for appropriate process design and scale up as a more rigorous approach may prevent a priori unwanted performance losses. It will also help progressing synthetic biology applications to industrial scale.

  15. Experimentally supported mathematical modeling of continuous baking processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenby Andresen, Mette

    and temperature) and control the process (air flow, temperature, and humidity) are therefore emphasized. The oven is furthermore designed to work outside the range of standard tunnel ovens, making it interesting for manufacturers of both baking products and baking equipment. A mathematical model describing......The scope of the PhD project was to increase knowledge on the process-to-product interactions in continuous tunnel ovens. The work has focused on five main objectives. These objectives cover development of new experimental equipment for pilot plant baking experiments, mathematical modeling of heat...... on mass transfer was examined through comparison of different modeling set-ups and experimental data. It was found that while the baking tray is likely to reduce the evaporation from the bottom surface, it is not correct to assume that no evaporation takes place at the covered surface. Parallel...

  16. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig

  17. Experimental validation of the multiphase extended Leblond's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz-Patrault, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Transformation induced plasticity is a crucial contribution of the simulation of several forming processes involving phase transitions under mechanical loads, resulting in large irreversible strain even though the applied stress is under the yield stress. One of the most elegant and widely used models is based on analytic homogenization procedures and has been proposed by Leblond et al. [1-4]. Very recently, a simple extension of the Leblond's model has been developed by Weisz-Patrault [8]. Several product phases are taken into account and several assumptions are relaxed in order to extend the applicability of the model. The present contribution compares experimental tests with numerical computations, in order to discuss the validity of the developed theory. Thus, experimental results extracted from the existing literature are analyzed. Results show a good agreement between measurements and theoretical computations.

  18. Experimental assessment and modelling of nitrate utilisation for primary sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcioğlu, E; Sözen, S; Orhon, D; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2002-01-01

    Electron acceptor utilisation potential of filtered primary sludge under anoxic conditions was experimentally investigated. Major kinetic and stoichiometric parameters were assessed by means of model evaluation of nitrate profile obtained in batch reactors. ASM1, modified for endogenous decay, and ASM3 were used for model simulation. Both models provided consistent interpretation of experimental data. ASM1 yielded mu(H) and Y(HD) values of 6.1 d(-1) and 0.64 g cell COD(g COD)(-1) respectively for heterotrophic anoxic growth. The corresponding storage mechanism associated with ASM3 could be characterised by a k(STO) of 13 g COD (g COD d)(-1) and a Y(STO) of 0.78 g COD(g COD)(-1). The high k(STO) value suggests re-evaluation of the concept of readily biodegradable substrate as defined in ASM3 and tested in the study.

  19. Experimental, statistical and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1992-01-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared with domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research programme that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models) and the relationship of radon to smoking and other co-pollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. (author)

  20. Physics of human cooperation: experimental evidence and theoretical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Angel

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, many physicists have used evolutionary game theory combined with a complex systems perspective in an attempt to understand social phenomena and challenges. Prominent among such phenomena is the issue of the emergence and sustainability of cooperation in a networked world of selfish or self-focused individuals. The vast majority of research done by physicists on these questions is theoretical, and is almost always posed in terms of agent-based models. Unfortunately, more often than not such models ignore a number of facts that are well established experimentally, and are thus rendered irrelevant to actual social applications. I here summarize some of the facts that any realistic model should incorporate and take into account, discuss important aspects underlying the relation between theory and experiments, and discuss future directions for research based on the available experimental knowledge.

  1. Regression Model Optimization for the Analysis of Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2009-01-01

    A candidate math model search algorithm was developed at Ames Research Center that determines a recommended math model for the multivariate regression analysis of experimental data. The search algorithm is applicable to classical regression analysis problems as well as wind tunnel strain gage balance calibration analysis applications. The algorithm compares the predictive capability of different regression models using the standard deviation of the PRESS residuals of the responses as a search metric. This search metric is minimized during the search. Singular value decomposition is used during the search to reject math models that lead to a singular solution of the regression analysis problem. Two threshold dependent constraints are also applied. The first constraint rejects math models with insignificant terms. The second constraint rejects math models with near-linear dependencies between terms. The math term hierarchy rule may also be applied as an optional constraint during or after the candidate math model search. The final term selection of the recommended math model depends on the regressor and response values of the data set, the user s function class combination choice, the user s constraint selections, and the result of the search metric minimization. A frequently used regression analysis example from the literature is used to illustrate the application of the search algorithm to experimental data.

  2. Short hairpin RNA targeting of fibroblast activation protein inhibits tumor growth and improves the tumor microenvironment in a mouse model

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    Fan Cai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast activation protein (FAP is a specific serine proteaseexpressed in tumor stroma proven to be a stimulatory factor inthe progression of some cancers. The purpose of this studywas to investigate the effects of FAP knockdown on tumorgrowth and the tumor microenvironment. Mice bearing 4T1subcutaneous tumors were treated with liposome-shRNAcomplexes targeting FAP. Tumor volumes and weights weremonitored, and FAP, collagen, microvessel density (MVD,and apoptosis were measured. Our studies showed thatshRNA targeting of FAP in murine breast cancer reduces FAPexpression, inhibits tumor growth, promotes collagenaccumulation (38%, and suppresses angiogenesis (71.7%, aswell as promoting apoptosis (by threefold. We suggest thatFAP plays a role in tumor growth and in altering the tumormicroenvironment. Targeting FAP may therefore represent asupplementary therapy for breast cancer. [BMB Reports 2013;46(5: 252-257

  3. Bigh3 silencing increases retinoblastoma tumor growth in the murine SV40-TAg-Rb model.

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    Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Oberson, Anne; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2017-02-28

    BIGH3, a secreted protein of the extracellular matrix interacts with collagen and integrins on the cell surface. BIGH3 can have opposing functions in cancer, acting either as tumor suppressor or promoter by enhancing tumor progression and angiogenesis. In the eye, BIGH3 is expressed in the cornea and the retinal pigment epithelium and could impact on the development of retinoblastoma, the most common paediatric intraocular neoplasm. Retinoblastoma initiation requires the inactivation of both alleles of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene in the developing retina and tumor progression involves additional genomic changes. To determine whether BIGH3 affects retinoblastoma development, we generated a retinoblastoma mouse model with disruption of the Bigh3 genomic locus. Bigh3 silencing in these mice resulted in enhanced tumor development in the retina. A decrease in apoptosis is involved in the initial events of tumorigenesis, followed by an increased activity of the pro-survival ERK pathway as well as an upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Taken together, these data suggest that BIGH3 acts as a tumor suppressor in the retina.

  4. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

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    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  5. Comparison between model-predicted tumor oxygenation dynamics and vascular-/flow-related Doppler indices.

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    Belfatto, Antonella; Vidal Urbinati, Ailyn M; Ciardo, Delia; Franchi, Dorella; Cattani, Federica; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2017-05-01

    Mathematical modeling is a powerful and flexible method to investigate complex phenomena. It discloses the possibility of reproducing expensive as well as invasive experiments in a safe environment with limited costs. This makes it suitable to mimic tumor evolution and response to radiotherapy although the reliability of the results remains an issue. Complexity reduction is therefore a critical aspect in order to be able to compare model outcomes to clinical data. Among the factors affecting treatment efficacy, tumor oxygenation is known to play a key role in radiotherapy response. In this work, we aim at relating the oxygenation dynamics, predicted by a macroscale model trained on tumor volumetric data of uterine cervical cancer patients, to vascularization and blood flux indices assessed on Ultrasound Doppler images. We propose a macroscale model of tumor evolution based on three dynamics, namely active portion, necrotic portion, and oxygenation. The model parameters were assessed on the volume size of seven cervical cancer patients administered with 28 fractions of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (1.8 Gy/fraction). For each patient, five Doppler ultrasound tests were acquired before, during, and after the treatment. The lesion was manually contoured by an expert physician using 4D View ® (General Electric Company - Fairfield, Connecticut, United States), which automatically provided the overall tumor volume size along with three vascularization and/or blood flow indices. Volume data only were fed to the model for training purpose, while the predicted oxygenation was compared a posteriori to the measured Doppler indices. The model was able to fit the tumor volume evolution within 8% error (range: 3-8%). A strong correlation between the intrapatient longitudinal indices from Doppler measurements and oxygen predicted by the model (about 90% or above) was found in three cases. Two patients showed an average correlation value (50-70%) and the remaining

  6. Development of experimental alloxan model of diabetes mellitus

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    V.V. Semenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the main causes that lead to the disability of diabetic patients is diabetic retinopathy (DR. The relevance of the problem of DR necessitates the development of optimal experimental models on experimental animals to find effective ways of correcting this pathology. The purpose of our work was to develop an experimental alloxan model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM for the study of DR, which would not result in the lethal outcome of experimental animals under the action of alloxan; histological examination of changes in the tissues of the eyeball in the reproduction of the DM model for the selection of new effective methods for the metabolic treatment of DR in the early stages. Materials and methods. The experiment was carried out on white outbred Wistar rats weighing 180–200 g. The first group consisted of 20 animals that were not subjected to any influence, served as a control; second group — 30 animals, in which DM was modeled by administration of alloxan and fructose. Results. When modeling DR, vessel changes in the form of wall fibrosis, edema of the endothelium and vasospasm were found. There was also a decrease in the amount of pigment granules, dystrophic changes in the cells of the ganglionic layer and a layer of retinal rods and cones, which coincides with the descriptions of damage to the coats of the eyeball in patients with DM. Conclusions. In our studies, we have calculated the optimal dose of alloxan administration, which does not lead to the death of rats (the lethality of rats was absent and is an effective model not only of DM in general, but also of DR.

  7. Sensitivity of MRI tumor biomarkers to VEGFR inhibitor therapy in an orthotopic mouse glioma model.

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    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available MRI biomarkers of tumor edema, vascular permeability, blood volume, and average vessel caliber are increasingly being employed to assess the efficacy of tumor therapies. However, the dependence of these biomarkers on a number of physiological factors can compromise their sensitivity and complicate the assessment of therapeutic efficacy. Here we examine the response of these MRI tumor biomarkers to cediranib, a potent vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR inhibitor, in an orthotopic mouse glioma model. A significant increase in the tumor volume and relative vessel caliber index (rVCI and a slight decrease in the water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were observed for both control and cediranib treated animals. This contrasts with a clinical study that observed a significant decrease in tumor rVCI, ADC and volume with cediranib therapy. While the lack of a difference between control and cediranib treated animals in these biomarker responses might suggest that cediranib has no therapeutic benefit, cediranib treated mice had a significantly increased survival. The increased survival benefit of cediranib treated animals is consistent with the significant decrease observed for cediranib treated animals in the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV, relative microvascular blood volume (rMBV, transverse relaxation time (T2, blood vessel permeability (K(trans, and extravascular-extracellular space (ν(e. The differential response of pre-clinical and clinical tumors to cediranib therapy, along with the lack of a positive response for some biomarkers, indicates the importance of evaluating the whole spectrum of different tumor biomarkers to properly assess the therapeutic response and identify and interpret the therapy-induced changes in the tumor physiology.