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Sample records for experimental trypanosoma cruzi-dependent

  1. Haematology of experimental Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological aberrations associated with human infective trypanosomes were investigated in the vervet monkey model of the Rhodesian sleeping sickness. Four monkeys were infected intravenously with 104 Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and monitored for changes in the blood profile using a haematological ...

  2. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Circulating levels of cyclooxygenase metabolites in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infections

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    Rita L. Cardoni

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available TRYPANOSOMA cruzi induces inflammatory reactions in several tissues. The production of prostaglandin F2α, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α and thromboxane B2, known to regulate the immune response and to participate in inflammatory reactions, was studied in mice experimentally infected with T. cruzi. The generation of nitric oxide (NO, which could be regulated by cyclooxygenase metabolites, was also evaluated. In the acute infection the extension of inflammatory infiltrates in skeletal muscle as well as the circulating levels of cyclooxygenase metabolites and NO were higher in resistant C3H mice than in susceptible BALB/c mice. In addition, the spontaneous release of NO by spleen cells increased earlier in the C3H mouse strain. In the chronic infections, the tissue inflammatory reaction was still prominent in both groups of mice, but a moderate increase of thromboxane B2 concentration and in NO released by spleen cells was observed only in C3H mice. This comparative study shows that these mediators could be mainly related to protective mechanisms in the acute phase, but seem not to be involved in its maintenance in the chronic T. cruzi infections.

  4. Biology of Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi in experimental heterologous mammalian hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, K K; Roy, S; Choudhury, A

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi is a causative agent of the dreadful mammalian disease trypanosomiasis or 'Surra' and carried as a latent parasite in domestic cattle but occasionally proves fatal when transmitted to horses and camel. Sporadic outbreak of 'Surra' to different animals (beside their natural hosts) reminds that T. evansi may be zoonotic, as their close relative cause sleeping sickness to human being. This haemoflagellate is mechanically transmitted by horse fly and its effect on different host varies depending on certain factors including the effectiveness of transmission by mechanical vector, the suitability and susceptibility of the host as well as most importantly the ability of the disease establishment of parasite to adapt itself to the host's resistance, etc. The course of the disease caused by T. evansi is similar to that of human sleeping sickness caused by T. (T.) brucei gambiense. The target organs and symptoms show close similarity. T. evansi can successfully be transmitted among unnatural hosts i.e., other classes of vertebrates, like chicken. In transmission experiments, the unnatural hosts may sometimes induce profound changes in the biology of trypanosomes. Hence, in present study the observations are the biology of different morphological changes of T. evansi as well as its ability of disease formation within some heterologous mammal viz., albino rat, guineapig, bandicoot, mongoose, domestic cat and common monkey. Blood smears of infected albino rats, bandicoot, and mongoose revealed only monomorphic form. Interestingly, blood smears of infected cat and monkey, T. evansi shows slender trypomastigote form and short intermediate form whereas organ smears shows other two forms of haemoflagellate viz., sphaeromastigote and amastigote form. The haemoflagellate maintains a common reproductive cycle in all the experimental heterologous hosts whereas disease symptoms differ. T. evansi infected cat and monkey shows nervous symptoms. Infected

  5. The Effect of Garlic Extracts on Experimental Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-trypanosomal effect of aqueous and methanolic extracts of garlic were studied in Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rabbits. With the establishment of infection, parasitaemia, anaemia, leucopenia, neutropenia and lymphocytosis developed. There was decrease in total serum protein, albumin and increase in ...

  6. Aspects of resistance to experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Viviane Liotti

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease, a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has a wide distribution in Latin America and extends from the southern part of the United States to Argentina. A number of 10 million of infected people is estimated and another 25 million exposed to the risk. Although discovered over a century, Chagas disease is still a serious infection that causes great socioeconomic impact, with no effective treatment at the chronic phase and in which, a lack of scientific knowledge can be observed. The main goal of this work was that obtaining and using consomic strain of mice, the resistance could be investigated. Consomic strains were produced by programmed mating, in which the animals were monitored with DNA polymorphic markers, and one of his chromosomes was replaced by his homologue from another strain. As parental, were used, the inbred strains C57BL/6/J Unib with resistant phenotype (donor) and as receiver, the A/JUnib strain, that has a susceptible phenotype. These models were used to produce five consomic strains: for the chromosomes 7 (CSs7), 11 (CSs11), 14 (CSs14), 17 (CSs17) and 19 (CSs19), described by Passos et al. (2003) as important in controlling infection caused by the Y strain of T. cruzi. In experimental testing, the consomics were inoculated intraperitoneally at doses of 10 1 , 10 2 , 10 3 and 10 4 using as control, animals from both parental lines. In all consomics, resistance was higher than that observed in the susceptible parental. In a second protocol, the consomics were mated with scheduled associations and the progenies were challenged with inocula employing increasing doses of trypomastigotes. The resistance observed in this group was also higher than that observed in the parental with susceptible phenotype. The observed results demonstrate that the use of the consomic strains that were produced order to assess the contribution of each chromosome in the resistance, as well as the effects of association between chromosomes are an

  7. Trypanosoma avium: experimental transmission from black flies to canaries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votýpka, Jan; Svobodová, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 2 (2004), s. 147-151 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/00/1094 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 147/2002/B-BIO Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Trypanosoma * birds * transmission Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.060, year: 2004

  8. Aspects of resistance to experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi; Aspectos da resistencia a infecao experimental com Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Viviane Liotti

    2010-07-01

    Chagas disease, a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has a wide distribution in Latin America and extends from the southern part of the United States to Argentina. A number of 10 million of infected people is estimated and another 25 million exposed to the risk. Although discovered over a century, Chagas disease is still a serious infection that causes great socioeconomic impact, with no effective treatment at the chronic phase and in which, a lack of scientific knowledge can be observed. The main goal of this work was that obtaining and using consomic strain of mice, the resistance could be investigated. Consomic strains were produced by programmed mating, in which the animals were monitored with DNA polymorphic markers, and one of his chromosomes was replaced by his homologue from another strain. As parental, were used, the inbred strains C57BL/6/J Unib with resistant phenotype (donor) and as receiver, the A/JUnib strain, that has a susceptible phenotype. These models were used to produce five consomic strains: for the chromosomes 7 (CSs7), 11 (CSs11), 14 (CSs14), 17 (CSs17) and 19 (CSs19), described by Passos et al. (2003) as important in controlling infection caused by the Y strain of T. cruzi. In experimental testing, the consomics were inoculated intraperitoneally at doses of 10{sup 1}, 10{sup 2}, 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} using as control, animals from both parental lines. In all consomics, resistance was higher than that observed in the susceptible parental. In a second protocol, the consomics were mated with scheduled associations and the progenies were challenged with inocula employing increasing doses of trypomastigotes. The resistance observed in this group was also higher than that observed in the parental with susceptible phenotype. The observed results demonstrate that the use of the consomic strains that were produced order to assess the contribution of each chromosome in the resistance, as well as the effects of association between

  9. Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi in experimentally contaminated drinks Supervivencia de Trypanosoma cruzi en bebidas experimentalmente contaminadas

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    Diana Carolina Suárez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction. Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, transmitted primarily by triatomine insects. However, in 2005, oral transmission was documented in countries where the disease is endemic for Chagas disease. This trend may also occur in Colombia, a situation that motivated epidemiological alerts and the necessity for exploring the risk level of oral, human-to-human infection by T. cruzi.
    Objective. Survival times were established for the T. cruzi strain DS using juices involved in the outbreak of Lebrija County (Cesar, Colombia in 2008.
    Materials and methods. Survival of the T. cruzi strain was evaluated as defined by vitality (forward movement and viability (growth in isolation medium Novy, McNeal and Nicolle/liver infusion tryptose. This strain was molecularly characterized as TCLA, isolated from a patient associated with an outbreak in Aguachica County (Santander, very near Lebrija. Its survival was tested in tangerine juice, guava, soursop (guanábana, water and sugar water.
    Results. The T. cruzi strain DS remained vital in mandarin at room temperature for 72 hr, at refrigerated temperatures for 36 hr;, the soursop (guanábana for 48 hr at room temperature and 384 hr under refrigeration; and guava at both temperatures 24 hr. This strain was viable 2 and 24 hours post-infection in each of the other juices at the two temperature conditions.
    Conclusions: The DS T. cruzi strain survived in all drinks for more than 24 hours post-infection, with a survival time of 384 hr in the juice of soursop (guanábana under refrigeration.

    Introducción. Trypanosoma cruzi es el agente causal de la enfermedad de Chagas, el cual puede ser transmitido por diferentes vías. A partir de 2005 la transmisión oral se incrementó en aquellos países donde la enfermedad es considerada endémica por transmisión vectorial. Colombia no se aparta de esta tendencia, situación que motivó la alerta epidemiol

  10. Genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs and Trypanosoma rangeli genetic groups in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus by PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Amanda R N; Dias, Greicy B M; Kimoto, Karen Y; Steindel, Mário; Grisard, Edmundo C; Toledo, Max Jean O; Gomes, Mônica L

    2016-04-01

    The specific detection and genetic typing of trypanosomes that infect humans, mammalian reservoirs, and vectors is crucial for diagnosis and epidemiology. We utilized a PCR-RFLP assay that targeted subunit II of cytochrome oxidase and 24Sα-rDNA to simultaneously detect and discriminate six Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) and two genetic groups of Trypanosoma rangeli (KP1+/KP1-) in intestinal contents of experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus. The PCR assays showed that in 23 of 29 (79.4%) mixed infections with the six T. cruzi DTUs and mixed infections with individual DTUs and/or groups KP1+ and KP1-, both parasites were successfully detected. In six mixed infections that involved TcIII, the TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI DTUs predominated to the detriment of TcIII, indicating the selection of genetic groups. Interactions between different genetic groups and vectors may lead to genetic selection over TcIII. The elimination of this DTU by the immune system of the vector appears unlikely because TcIII was present in other mixed infections (TcIII/TcIV and TcIII/KP1+). Both molecular markers used in this study were sensitive and specific, demonstrating their usefulness in a wide geographical area where distinct genotypes of these two species are sympatric. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in parasite-vector interactions are still poorly understood, our results indicate a dynamic selection toward specific T. cruzi DTUs in R. prolixus during mixed genotype infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of IL-12 in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection

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    J.S. Silva

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Host resistance to Trypanosoma cruzi infection is dependent on both natural and acquired immune responses. During the early acute phase of infection in mice, natural killer (NK cell-derived IFN-g is involved in controlling intracellular parasite replication, mainly through the induction of nitric oxide biosynthesis by activated macrophages. We have shown that IL-12, a powerful inducer of IFN-g production by NK cells, is synthesized soon after trypomastigote-macrophage interaction. The role of IL-12 in the control of T. cruzi infection in vivo was determined by treating infected mice with anti-IL-12 monoclonal antibody (mAb and analyzing both parasitemia and mortality during the acute phase of infection. The anti-IL-12 mAb-treated mice had higher levels of parasitemia and mortality compared to control mice. Also, treatment of infected mice with mAb specific for IFN-g or TNF-a inhibited the protective effect of exogenous IL-12. On the other hand, TGF-ß and IL-10 produced by infected macrophages inhibited the induction and effects of IL-12. Therefore, while IL-12, TNF-a and IFN-g correlate with resistance to T. cruzi infection, TGF-ß and IL-10 promote susceptibility. These results provide support for a role of innate immunity in the control of T. cruzi infection. In addition to its protective role, IL-12 may also be involved in the modulation of T. cruzi-induced myocarditis, since treatment of infected mice with IL-12 or anti-IL-12 mAb leads to an enhanced or decreased inflammatory infiltrate in the heart, respectively. Understanding the role of the cytokines produced during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection and their involvement in protection and pathogenesis would be essential to devise new vaccines or therapies.

  12. Efecto inmunosupresor de la infección por Trypanosoma musculi (Mastigophora: Trypanosomatidae en la toxoplasmosis experimental Immunosuppressor effect of Trypanosoma musculi (Mastigophora: Trypanosomatidae on experimental toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretta Piccolo-Johanning

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available La prevalencia de infecciones por Toxoplasma gondii en el ser humano es de 5-90% según la zona geográfica; en Costa Rica por ejemplo, la seroprevalencia es de un 58%, por lo que es importante comprender algunos procesos inmunológicos, propios en estas afectaciones parasitarias. Con el objeto de determinar si el Trypanosoma musculi ejerce procesos de inmunosupresión sobre Toxoplasma gondii se realizó un experimento en el que se inocularon ratones Swiss con T. musculi cuatro, cinco, seis y siete días previos a la infección con T. gondii, ocurriendo la inmunosupresión cuando la inoculación con T. musculi fue hecha cuatro días antes. Además, la cantidad de tripomastigotos inoculados no influyó en el proceso. Se probaron tres cepas de T. gondii aisladas de las heces de un gato casero (TFC, de un Leopardus pardalis (TLP, de un Leopardus wiedii y de la carne de un Bos taurus (TBT. La cepa TLP resultó ser muy patógena, matando a los animales en un tiempo corto, independientemente de la inoculación con T. musculi; para las otras cepas se mantuvo el patrón de inmunosupresión en los ratones. Se reporta entonces un modelo experimental de inmunosupresión, aspecto muy en boga en este momento, por su relación con enfermedades que inducen esta condición en el ser humano, especialmente a enfermedades como el cáncer y el SIDA. Este modelo es más fácil de aplicar experimentalmente que el correspondiente con T. lewisi previamente descrito, el cual usa ratas blancas de más difícil manejo que los ratones usados en este estudio.The immunosuppression caused by species of the gender Trypanosoma has been widely documented. The influence over experimental infections with Toxoplasma gondii is evident when using Trypanosoma lewisi, a natural parasite of white rats. We decided to test the effect of Trypanosoma musculi from mice, an organism with very similar biological characteristics to T. lewisi, to see if this trypanosomatid could induce a similar

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi-Trypanosoma rangeli co-infection ameliorates negative effects of single trypanosome infections in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Graham, Andrea L; Elliott, Ryan J; Dobson, Andrew P; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, co-infects its triatomine vector with its sister species Trypanosoma rangeli, which shares 60% of its antigens with T. cruzi. Additionally, T. rangeli has been observed to be pathogenic in some of its vector species. Although T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infections are common, their effect on the vector has rarely been investigated. Therefore, we measured the fitness (survival and reproduction) of triatomine species Rhodnius prolixus infected with just T. cruzi, just T. rangeli, or both T. cruzi and T. rangeli. We found that survival (as estimated by survival probability and hazard ratios) was significantly different between treatments, with the T. cruzi treatment group having lower survival than the co-infected treatment. Reproduction and total fitness estimates in the T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatments were significantly lower than in the co-infected and control groups. The T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatment group fitness estimates were not significantly different from each other. Additionally, co-infected insects appeared to tolerate higher doses of parasites than insects with single-species infections. Our results suggest that T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infection could ameliorate negative effects of single infections of either parasite on R. prolixus and potentially help it to tolerate higher parasite doses.

  14. Experimental transmission of the parasitic flagellates Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli between triatomine bugs or mice and captive neotropical bats

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    Maurice E Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli-like trypanosomes have been found in a variety of neotropical bat species. In this study, bats (Artibeus lituratus, Carollia perspicillata, Desmodus rotundus, Glossophaga soricina, Molossus molossus, Phyllostomus hastatus were maintained under controlled conditions, and experiments were conducted to determine how they might become infected naturally with trypanosomes. All bats were first screened for existing infections by hemoculture and the examination of blood smears, and only apparently uninfected animals were then used in the experiments. Proof was obtained that the triatomine bug Rhodnius prolixus would readily feed upon some of the bats, and two species became infected after being bitten by bugs infected with T. rangeli. Some bats also became infected by ingesting R. prolixus carrying T. cruzi, or following subcutaneous or intragastic inoculation with fecal suspensions of R. prolixus containing T. cruzi. P. hastatus became infected after ingesting mice carrying T. cruzi. All of the bats studied inhabit roosts that may be occupied by triatomine bugs and, with the exception of D. rotundus, all also feed to at least some extent upon insects. These findings provide further evidence of how bats may play significant roles in the epidemiology of T. cruzi and T. rangeli in the New World tropics.

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi connatal transmission in dogs with Chagas disease: experimental case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Reyes, Pedro A; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2011-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi connatal transmission was studied in male and female mongrel dogs. Both dogs were experimentally infected, after which on the 20(th) day, lymphoadenomegaly and fever were found. Four months postinfection, they mated. At this time, Chagas disease was confirmed by two different diagnostic tests. The electrocardiogram and echocardiogram taken at the eight postinoculation month showed data consistent with ischemia, local conduction abnormalities and hypertrophy, as well as a diminished ejection fraction and left ventricular dilation, respectively. Four puppies were born and after weaning had weakness, progressive weight loss, and chronic diarrhea. Necropsy of all four showed digestive alterations and cardiac dilation. Serology in the offspring was positive for Chagas disease. The histopathological study demonstrated a cardiac chronic inflammatory process, although no parasites were found. Clinical data and serological determinations are consistent with death from advanced Chagas disease.

  16. Changes in blood sugar levels of rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate and diminazene aceturate

    OpenAIRE

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Omamegbe Joseph Omalathebu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) on blood sugar level of infected rats. Methods: The experiment was done with 42 albino rats grouped into 3 groups of 14 members each. Group A was uninfected (control group), Group B was infected with T. brucei and treated with diminazene aceturate, and Group C was infected with T. brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate. Blood samples were collected from the media canthus of the experimental rats on ...

  17. Evaluation of animal performance, feed intake, and economic losses in sheep experimentally infected with Trypanosoma vivax

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    Parmênedes Dias de Brito

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma vivax is a protozoan originating from the African continent, which, although it has not yet been able to complete its biological cycle in South America, due to the absence of the tsetse fly, can still cause death in ruminants. The objective of this study was to verify the effects of T. vivax on the measurements and indices in sheep that characterize animal performance, as well as on economic losses in meat animals. Twenty intact adult male sheep were used for this study, all of approximately the same ages and weights, reared in confinement, and subjected to the same management and diet, which was balanced and supplemented with adequate minerals. The animals were divided into two groups: the control group (CG and the infected group (IG, which was inoculated intravenously with 1.3 x 105 trypomastigotes of T. vivax. Feed intake was verified daily, whereas the feed conversion (FC, feed efficiency index (FEI, and weight gain were obtained weekly. Total weight gain (TWG was determined after 70 days post-infection. The economic loss was calculated by subtracting the value obtained (IG from the expected value (CG, and the difference was expressed as a percentage. A randomized block design was used to isolate the effect of the initial weight. The means were compared by the Student “t” test at 5%. Of the 10 infected animals, one died from the parasitism, yielding a rate much lower than that observed in natural outbreaks. The groups presented similar feed intakes throughout the experimental period; however, the TWG of the infected group was significantly lower (50.7% than that of the CG. Similarly, the daily weight gain (DWG, feed conversion (FC, and feed efficiency index (FEI of the IG were significantly lower than those of the CG. In addition, the worst rates of FC and FEI coincided with parasitemia peaks and recurrences, probably due to immunological demand and tissue repair. The abdominal circumference of the infected animals was

  18. Experimental transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi through the genitalia of albino mice

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    Herrera Leidi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is usually transmitted by contact with the excreta of infected Triatominae; among non-vectorial infections, direct transmission through coitus has been proposed. We investigated this possibility by instilling, through the external meatus of the vagina and the penis of previously anesthetized NMRI albino mice, blood of mice infected with strains isolated from Didelphis marsupialis (opossum, strain CO57, Rattus rattus (rat, strain CO22 and human (strain EP. Some animals were allowed to copulate the same day of the instillation. In other experiments, the strains were inoculated in the scrotum. To determine the effect of immunosuppression, some mice were treated with cyclophosphamide 30 days post-instillation. Controls were instilled orally and ocularly. Vaginal instillation with strain CO22 produced systemic infection with tropism to the heart, skeletal muscle, skin, duodenum, pancreas, ovary and sternum. Scrotal inoculation with strain EP likewise invaded liver, spleen, lung, lymph nodes and urogenital organs; while strain CO57 invaded skeletal and cardiac muscle, pancreas, testis, and vas deferens. Penile infection with strain CO22 was detected by xenodiagnosis. Immunosuppression did not increase parasitemia of vaginally infected mice or controls. Mating did not produce infection. Our results show that contact of blood trypomastigotes of T. cruzi with genital mucosa can produce blood and tissue infections. These results are discussed in relation to reports of frequent experimental tropism of T. cruzi toward urogenital organs.

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi: Genetic diversity influences the profile of immunoglobulins during experimental infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daniela Maria; Talvani, André; Guedes, Paulo Marcos da Mata; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; de Lana, Marta; Bahia, Maria Terezinha

    2009-01-01

    The clonal evolution model postulated for Trypanosoma cruzi predicts a correlation between the phylogenetic divergence of T. cruzi clonal genotypes and their biological properties. In the present study, the linkage between phylogenetic divergence of the parasite and IgG, IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b response has been evaluated during the acute and chronic phases of the experimental infection. Eight laboratory-cloned stocks representative of this phylogenetic diversity and including the lineages T. cruzi I (genotypes 19 and 20), T. cruzi II (genotype 32) and T. cruzi (genotype 39) have been studied. The results showed that the pattern of humoral immune response was correlated with T. cruzi genotype, and that stocks included in genotype 20 were responsible for the high IgG response in the acute and chronic phases. Moreover, T. cruzi I lineage was more efficient in over-expressing all subclasses of specific anti-parasite IgG than either T. cruzi II or T. cruzi lineages. Curiously, the alteration in the pattern of antibodies induced by Benznidazole treatment was related to the phase of the infection but not to the genotype of the parasite. The data suggest that genotypes of T. cruzi are able to drive levels/subclasses of specific IgG, hence giving rise to further concerns about the sensitivity of serological assays in the diagnosis of human Chagas disease.

  20. Genetic Vaccination against Experimental Infection with Myotropic Parasite Strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Adriano Fernando Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In earlier studies, we reported that a heterologous prime-boost regimen using recombinant plasmid DNA followed by replication-defective adenovirus vector, both containing Trypanosoma cruzi genes encoding trans-sialidase (TS and amastigote surface protein (ASP 2, provided protective immunity against experimental infection with a reticulotropic strain of this human protozoan parasite. Herein, we tested the outcome of genetic vaccination of F1 (CB10XBALB/c mice challenged with myotropic parasite strains (Brazil and Colombian. Initially, we determined that the coadministration during priming of a DNA plasmid containing the murine IL-12 gene improved the immune response and was essential for protective immunity elicited by the heterologous prime-boost regimen in susceptible male mice against acute lethal infections with these parasites. The prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination of resistant female mice led to a drastic reduction in the number of inflammatory infiltrates in cardiac and skeletal muscles during the chronic phase of infection with either strain. Analysis of the electrocardiographic parameters showed that prophylactic vaccination reduced the frequencies of sinus arrhythmia and atrioventricular block. Our results confirmed that prophylactic vaccination using the TS and ASP-2 genes benefits the host against acute and chronic pathologies caused by T. cruzi and should be further evaluated for the development of a veterinary or human vaccine against Chagas disease.

  1. Potential Role of Carvedilol in the Cardiac Immune Response Induced by Experimental Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Aline Luciano Horta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi causes a cardiac infection characterized by an inflammatory imbalance that could become the inciting factor of the illness. To this end, we evaluated the role of carvedilol, a beta-blocker with potential immunomodulatory properties, on the immune response in C57BL/6 mice infected with VL-10 strain of T. cruzi in the acute phase. Animals (n=40 were grouped: (i not infected, (ii infected, (iii infected + carvedilol, and (iv not infected + carvedilol. We analyzed parameters related to parasitemia, plasma levels of TNF, IL-10, and CCL2, and cardiac histopathology after the administration of carvedilol for 30 days. We did not observe differences in the maximum peaks of parasitemia in the day of their detection among the groups. The plasma TNF was elevated at 60 days of infection in mice treated or not with carvedilol. However, we observed a decreased CCL2 level and increased IL-10 levels in those infected animals treated with carvedilol, which impacted the reduction of the inflammatory infiltration in cardiac tissue. For this experimental model, carvedilol therapy was not able to alter the levels of circulating parasites but modulates the pattern of CCL2 and IL-10 mediators when the VL10 strain of T. cruzi was used in C57BL6 mice.

  2. Galectin-3: A Friend but Not a Foe during Trypanosoma cruzi Experimental Infection

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    Aline A. da Silva

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi interacts with host cells, including cardiomyocytes, and induces the production of cytokines, chemokines, metalloproteinases, and glycan-binding proteins. Among the glycan-binding proteins is Galectin-3 (Gal-3, which is upregulated after T. cruzi infection. Gal-3 is a member of the lectin family with affinity for β-galactose containing molecules; it can be found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm and can be either membrane-associated or secreted. This lectin is involved in several immunoregulatory and parasite infection process. Here, we explored the consequences of Gal-3 deficiency during acute and chronic T. cruzi experimental infection. Our results demonstrated that lack of Gal-3 enhanced in vitro replication of intracellular parasites, increased in vivo systemic parasitaemia, and reduced leukocyte recruitment. Moreover, we observed decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in spleen and heart of infected Gal-3 knockout mice. Lack of Gal-3 also led to elevated mast cell recruitment and fibrosis of heart tissue. In conclusion, galectin-3 expression plays a pivotal role in controlling T. cruzi infection, preventing heart damage and fibrosis.

  3. Humoral immune response of horses experimentally infected with Trypanosoma evansi/ Resposta imune humoral de eqüinos infectados experimentalmente com Trypanosoma evansi

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    Lúcia Padilha Cury Thomaz de Aquino

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Six adult horses were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma evansi (106 parasites. Three other adult horses served as negative control. Serum samples of the experimentally infected horses with T. evansi and non-infected controls horses were obtained before inoculation, and daily thereafter until 14 days post infection (DPI. After that time the serum samples were obtained weekly. Sera of the infected and non-infected control horses was tested by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the detection of antibodies against T. evansi. Both ELISA and IFAT detected trypanosomal antibodies shortly after infection and showed progressive increases in antibodies levels during early stages of infection. The responses started on the eighth and eleventh DPI. Maximum IFAT and ELISA values were reached after four weeks of infection and were maintained at this level until the end of the period of study.Seis eqüinos foram inoculados com 106 tripomastigota sangüícolas de Trypanosoma evansi. Três outros animais foram mantidos como testemunhas. Amostras de soro sangüíneo foram obtidas de todos os animais, antes da inoculação, e diariamente até o 14º dia pós inoculação (DPI; após este período uma vez por semana. Pesquisa de anticorpos anti- T. evansi, foram realizadas através da reação de imunofluorescência indireta (RIFI e do ensaio de imunoabsorção enzimática (ELISA. A resposta imune humoral, detectada através da RIFI e do ELISA, iniciou-se, em média, a partir do oitavo DPI, alcançando títulos máximos após quatro semanas de evolução, e os titulos de anticorpos anti- T. evansi mantiveram-se elevadas até o término das observações.

  4. Experimental evidence of biological interactions among different isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi from the Chaco Region.

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    Paula G Ragone

    Full Text Available Many infectious diseases arise from co-infections or re-infections with more than one genotype of the same pathogen. These mixed infections could alter host fitness, the severity of symptoms, success in pathogen transmission and the epidemiology of the disease. Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, exhibits a high biological variability often correlated with its genetic diversity. Here, we developed an experimental approach in order to evaluate biological interaction between three T. cruzi isolates belonging to different Discrete Typing Units (DTUs TcIII, TcV and TcVI. These isolates were obtained from a restricted geographical area in the Chaco Region. Different mixed infections involving combinations of two isolates (TcIII + TcV, TcIII + TcVI and TcV + TcVI were studied in a mouse model. The parameters evaluated were number of parasites circulating in peripheral blood, histopathology and genetic characterization of each DTU in different tissues by DNA hybridization probes. We found a predominance of TcVI isolate in blood and tissues respect to TcIII and TcV; and a decrease of the inflammatory response in heart when the damage of mice infected with TcVI and TcIII + TcVI mixture were compared. In addition, simultaneous presence of two isolates in the same tissue was not detected. Our results show that biological interactions between isolates with different biological behaviors lead to changes in their biological properties. The occurrence of interactions among different genotypes of T. cruzi observed in our mouse model suggests that these phenomena could also occur in natural cycles in the Chaco Region.

  5. Experimental infection of two South American reservoirs with four distinct strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Roellig, Dawn M.; McMillan, Katherine; Ellis, Angela E.; Vandeberg, John L.; Champagne, Donald E.; Yabsley, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc), the causative agent of Chagas disease, is a diverse species with 2 primary genotypes, TcI and TcII, with TcII further subdivided into 5 subtypes (IIa–e). This study evaluated infection dynamics of 4 genetically and geographically diverse T. cruzi strains in 2 South American reservoirs, degus (Octodon degus) and grey short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica). Based on prior suggestions of a genotype-host association, we hypothesized that degus (placental) would more readily become infected with TcII strains while short-tailed opossums (marsupial) would be a more competent reservoir for a TcI strain. Individuals (n = 3) of each species were intraperitoneally inoculated with T. cruzi trypomastigotes of TcIIa [North America (NA)-raccoon (Procyon lotor) origin], TcI [NA-Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana)], TcIIb [South America (SA)-human], TcIIe (SA-Triatoma infestans), or both TcI and TcIIa. Parasitaemias in experimentally infected degus peaked earlier (7–14 days post-inoculation (p.i.)) compared with short-tailed opossums (21–84 days p.i.). Additionally, peak parasitaemias were higher in degus; however, the duration of detectable parasitaemias for all strains, except TcIIa, was greater in short-tailed opossums. Infections established in both host species with all genotypes, except for TcIIa, which did not establish a detectable infection in short-tailed opossums. These results indicate that both South American reservoirs support infections with these isolates from North and South America; however, infection dynamics differed with host and parasite strain. PMID:20128943

  6. Molecular characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Mexican strains and their behavior in the mouse experimental model

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    César Gómez-Hernández

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: For a long time, the importance of Chagas disease in Mexico, where many regarded it as an exotic malady, was questioned. Considering the great genetic diversity among isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi, the importance of this biological characterization, and the paucity of information on the clinical and biological aspects of Chagas disease in Mexico, this study aimed to identify the molecular and biological characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi isolates from different endemic areas of this country, especially of the State of Jalisco. METHODS: Eight Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi strains were biologically and genetically characterized (PCR specific for Trypanosoma cruzi, multiplex-PCR, amplification of space no transcript of the genes of the mini-exon, amplification of polymorphic regions of the mini-exon, classification by amplification of intergenic regions of the spliced leader genes, RAPD - (random amplified polymorphic DNA. RESULTS: Two profiles of parasitaemia were observed, patent (peak parasitaemia of 4.6×10(6 to 10(7 parasites/mL and subpatent. In addition, all isolates were able to infect 100% of the animals. The isolates mainly displayed tropism for striated (cardiac and skeletal muscle. PCR amplification of the mini-exon gene classified the eight strains as TcI. The RAPD technique revealed intraspecies variation among isolates, distinguishing strains isolated from humans and triatomines and according to geographic origin. CONCLUSIONS: The Mexican T. cruzi strains are myotrophic and belong to group TcI.

  7. Carbohydrate metabolism in sheep experimentally infected with “Trypanosoma vivax” Metabolismo de carboidratos em ovinos infectados experimentalmente por “Trypanosoma vivax”

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    Thuanny Lopes Nazaret

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The present research evaluated carbohydrates metabolism alterations in sheep experimentally infected with Trypanosoma vivax. It were used eight male, adult, mixed breed sheep, randomly assigned in two groups: four animals in the witness group and four animals infected with 1x105 T. vivax trypomastigotes. For assessment of plasma glucose and free fatty acids, blood samples were collected from each animal external jugular vein, in both groups, two times before infection and later, in certain days. It was also performed the counting of parasites in the blood, everyday, until 120 days after infection (dpi and, after that, the animals were euthanized and necropsied, with removal of fragments of liver and muscles to perform hepatic and muscular glycogen dosages. The data were evaluated by Wilcoxon test (5% probability. Carbohydrate metabolism disturbances were observed in the infected animals; free fatty acids increased, and both muscular and hepatic glycogen levels decreased, without alteration of plasmatic glucose concentration.A presente pesquisa avaliou alterações no metabolismo de carboidratos em ovinos infectados experimentalmente por Trypanosoma vivax. Foram usados oito ovinos machos, adultos e sem raça definida, divididos aleatoriamente em dois grupos. Foram quatro animais destinados ao grupo testemunho e quatro infectados com 1x105 tripomastigotas de T. vivax. Para avaliação da glicose plasmática e de ácidos graxos livres, foram coletadas amostras de sangue da veia jugular externa de cada animal dos grupos testemunho e infectado, em dois tempos antes da infecção, usadas para estabelecer os valores de referência para a espécie e, posteriormente, em dias determinados. Ainda, foi realizada a contagem dos parasitos no sangue, diariamente, até os 120 dias após a infecção (dpi, quando os animais foram eutanasiados e necropsiados, com a retirada de fragmentos de fígado e músculo para realização das dosagens do glicogênio hep

  8. Novo processo para triagem de medicamentos na infecção experimental pelo Trypanosoma cruzi Proposal of a new process for screening of drugs in experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Rubens Campos

    1991-08-01

    Full Text Available É proposto processo para a triagem da capacidade terapêutica de medicamentos na infecção experimental pelo Trypanosoma cruzi. O método tem base no emprego de triatomíneos parasitados que se alimentam, decorridos períodos diferentes para haver compatibilização com níveis sangüíneos, em camundongos aos quais foi administrado o fármaco sob apreciação; assim, o tubo digestivo do hemíptero participará como estrutura propícia à avaliação. Em observação inicial, ocorreu utilização do benzonidazol, que se mostrou apenas parcialmente ativo, pelo menos de acordo com a maneira de execução do novo procedimento.We propose a screening process for detection of therapeutic activity of drugs against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. It is based on the use of infected tryatominae that are fed on mice which have received the study drug. Blood meals are made at different time schedule in order to adapt with serum drug levels. The digestive tube of the hemyptera will, thus, work as a suitable structure for examination. In a initial observation, benzonidazole was used, and was shown to be only partially active at least in the conditions of this new procedure.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi : a influencia dos linfocitos T na regulação da infecção experimental em camungongo SCID

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    Delma Pagolo Alves

    1998-01-01

    Resumo: Experimentos realizados por ASSIS (1997), com camundongos scm mostraram que, a susceptibilidade desse animal ao Trypanosoma cruzi, era revertida através da repopulação com as células esplênicas da linhagem congênica BALB/c, e que os anticorpos anti- T cruzi transferidos passivamente, controlavam apenas a parasitemia, demonstrando a importância desse modelo experimental, nos estudos das funções dos linfócitos isoladamente na infecção pelo Trypanosoma cruzi. No presente trabalho procura...

  10. Trypanosoma vivax nos tecidos testicular e epididimário de ovinos experimentalmente infectados Trypanosoma vivax in testicular and epidydimal tissues of experimentally infected sheep

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    Francisco Silvestre B. Bezerra

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Quatro ovinos machos, com cerca de 12 meses de idade (Ovinos 1-4, foram infectados por via intravenosa com aproximadamente 1,25x10(5 tripomastigotas de Trypanosoma vivax, outros quatro ovinos (Ovinos 5-8 destinaram-se ao grupo controle. Após a infecção, exames clínicos visando avaliar temperatura retal, freqüências cardíaca e respiratória e parasitemia foram realizados diariamente por 30 dias, tempo estabelecido para o término do experimento. A avaliação do hematócrito foi realizada a cada cinco dias. Ao final do período experimental, os animais foram castrados e os testículos e epidídimos submetidos ao exame anatomopatológico. Amostras destes órgãos dos Ovinos 1, 4 e 5 foram tomadas para a realização da reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR. Os parâmetros clínicos (hipertermia, aumento das freqüências cardíaca e respiratória, aumento de volume dos linfonodos e palidez das mucosas mantiveram-se para o grupo infectado acima dos valores mostrados pelo grupo controle durante todo o período experimental. A parasitemia foi observada a partir do 3º dia pós-infecção (dpi com picos nos 6-10os dpi e nos 15-18os dpi. Os Ovinos 1 e 4 apresentaram, a partir do 25º dpi, anemia acentuada. Macroscopicamente, todos os testículos dos animais do grupo infectado apresentaram-se flácidos e com coloração pálida. Microscopicamente, observaram-se degeneração testicular moderada a acentuada, epididimite multifocal e hiperplasia do epitélio epididimário. A análise por PCR de T. vivax nos tecidos testicular e epididimário resultou em 100% de positividade para ovinos infectados experimentalmente. As lesões epididimárias e testiculares associadas à presença do parasita nesses órgãos, detectada por PCR, sugerem a participação do parasita no mecanismo etiopatogênico de danos reprodutivos.Four adult sheep (number 1, 2, 3 and 4, all males, were inoculated intravenously with 1ml of blood containing 1.25x10(5 trypomastigotes of

  11. Haematological and biochemical changes in experimental Trypanosoma evansi infection in rabbits.

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    Sivajothi, S; Rayulu, V C; Sudhakara Reddy, B

    2015-06-01

    New Zealand white rabbits (N = 4) were challenged with the local strain of Trypanosoma evansi. Each rabbit was infected with 5 × 10(5) trypanosomes subcutaneously. The infection was characterized by intermittent pyrexia, undulating parasitaemia, anorexia and emaciation. The infected rabbits were examined daily for development of clinical signs and infection status by wet blood-films made from the ear veins. Thick and thin blood smears were also examined daily until the end of the experiment for description of blood cells. Differential leukocyte count (DLC) was also done. The parasite was observed in the blood during the acute phase only. Leukocytosis in the acute phase followed by leukopenia during the chronic phase was recognized. Haematological studies revealed reduced TEC, Hb and PCV. The main changes in the erythrocytes were macrocytes, hypochromic cells, Howell-Jolly bodies, target cells, stomatocytes and burr cells. Serum chemistry revealed hypoproteinemia, hypocholesterolaemia, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, elevated creatinine, BUN, increased AST and ALT.

  12. Experimental Trypanosoma evansi infection in donkeys: hematological, biochemical and histopathological changes Infecção experimental em jumentos com Trypanosoma evansi: alterações hematológicas, bioquímicas e histopatológicas

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    F.A. Cadioli

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Five adult donkeys were experimentally infected with Brazilian strain of Trypanosoma evansi originally isolated from a naturally infected dog to study the hematological biochemical and histopathological alterations during the evolution of the disease. The course of the experimental infection was followed up to 145 days. Hematological analyses of the infected donkeys revealed a marked decline in hemoglobin, packed-cell volume, and erythrocyte count. Anemia was observed after successive peaks of parasitemia. Biochemical analyses showed increased levels of icterus index, serum globulins and decreased serum albumin and glucose values. All infected donkeys revealed enlargement of spleen and its white pulp, enlargement of mediastinal lymph nodes and lungs congestion. The main histopathological features consisted of meningoencephalitis. Demyelination in some areas of the cerebellum pediculus and neuropil vacuolization were observed. This study showed that donkeys infected with a Brazilian strain of T. evansi developed a chronic disease.Cinco jumentos, adultos foram infectados experimentalmente com cepa brasileira de Trypanosoma evansi, isolada de um cão naturalmente infectado, com o intuito de observar as alterações hematológicas, bioquímicas e histopatológicas durante a evolução da enfermidade. O curso da infecção experimental foi de 145 dias. Análise hematológica dos jumentos infectados revelou declínio nos valores de hemoglobina, hematócrito e contagem total de eritrócitos. Notou-se anemia após sucessivos picos de parasitemia. Análise bioquímica indicou aumento dos níveis de índice ictérico, globulinas séricas e diminuição dos valores séricos de albumina e glicose. Todos os jumentos infectados apresentaram aumento do baço e de sua polpa branca, aumento de linfonodos mediastínicos e congestão pulmonar. Meningoencefalite foi o principal achado histopatológico. Em algumas áreas do pedículo cerebelar foram observadas

  13. Domestic Pig (Sus scrofa) as an Animal Model for Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauri, Verónica; Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E.; Verastegui, Manuela; Angulo, Noelia; Recuenco, Fernando; Cabello, Ines; Malaga, Edith; Bern, Caryn; Gavidia, Cesar M.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Pigs were infected with a Bolivian strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (genotype I) and evaluated up to 150 days postinoculation (dpi) to determine the use of pigs as an animal model of Chagas disease. Parasitemia was observed in the infected pigs during the acute phase (15–40 dpi). Anti-T.cruzi immunoglobulin M was detected during 15–75 dpi; high levels of anti-T.cruzi immunoglobulin G were detected in all infected pigs from 75 to 150 dpi. Parasitic DNA was observed by western blot (58%, 28/48) and polymerase chain reaction (27%, 13/48) in urine samples, and in the brain (75%, 3/4), spleen (50%, 2/4), and duodenum (25%, 1/4), but no parasitic DNA was found in the heart, colon, and kidney. Parasites were not observed microscopically in tissues samples, but mild inflammation, vasculitis, and congestion was observed in heart, brain, kidney, and spleen. This pig model was useful for the standardization of the urine test because of the higher volume that can be obtained as compared with other small animal models. However, further experiments are required to observe pathological changes characteristic of Chagas disease in humans. PMID:26928841

  14. Biodemes and zymodemes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains: correlations with clinical data and experimental pathology

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    Sonia G. Andrade

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available With the objective of establishing biological and biochemical characteristics of a significant number of Trypanosoma cruzi strains from different geographical areas, 138 strains isolated from naturally infected humans, triatomine or vertebrate hosts were studied; 120 were isolated from different areas of Brazil and 18 from other South and Central American countries. Inocula from triatomine or culture forms were injected into suckling Swiss mice, followed by passages into mice 10 to 12 g. Biological characters and histopathological study permitted the inclusion of the strains into three Types or biodemes: I, II, III. Isoenzymic analysis confirmed a correspondence between the biodemes and zymodemes : Type I and Z2b, Type II and Z2, Type III and Z1. Results showed the ubiquitary distribution of the several types of strains. The predominance of the same Type and zymodeme in one geographical area was confirmed : Type II strains among the human cases from eastern Bahia and east of Goiás; Type III strains from humans of north Brazil and Central America and from silvatic vectors or vertebrates from other geographical areas. The biological types of strains correlate with different histopathological lesions considering cardiac involvement and neuronal lesions. These findings suggest that the biological behavior together with isoenzymes patterns and pathological pictures in the vertebrate host can be an important tool for establishing correlations between strains behavior and clinico-pathological manifestations of Chagas' disease in different geographical areas.Foram estudados os caracteres biológicos e isoenzimáticos de 138 cepas do Trypanosoma cruzi de diferentes áreas geográficas, sendo 120 do Brasil e 18 de outros paises da América do Sul e Central. Camundongos recém-nascidos foram inoculados com formas metacíclicas de triatomineos ou de culturas axenicas, seguindo-se passagem em camundongo de 10 a 12g. Os caracteres biológicos e o estudo

  15. Different genotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi produce distinctive placental environment genetic response in chronic experimental infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juiz, Natalia Anahí; Solana, María Elisa; Acevedo, Gonzalo Raúl; Benatar, Alejandro Francisco; Ramirez, Juan Carlos; da Costa, Priscilla Almeida; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Longhi, Silvia Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Congenital infection of Trypanosoma cruzi allows transmission of this parasite through generations. Despite the problematic that this entails, little is known about the placenta environment genetic response produced against infection. We performed functional genomics by microarray analysis in C57Bl/6J mice comparing placentas from uninfected animals and from animals infected with two different T. cruzi strains: K98, a clone of the non-lethal myotropic CA-I strain (TcI), and VD (TcVI), isolated from a human case of congenital infection. Analysis of networks by GeneMANIA of differentially expressed genes showed that “Secretory Granule” was a pathway down-regulated in both infected groups, whereas “Innate Immune Response” and “Response to Interferon-gamma” were pathways up-regulated in VD infection but not in K98. Applying another approach, the GSEA algorithm that detects small changes in predetermined gene sets, we found that metabolic processes, transcription and macromolecular transport were down-regulated in infected placentas environment and some pathways related to cascade signaling had opposite regulation: over-represented in VD and down-regulated in K98 group. We also have found a stronger tropism to the placental organ by VD strain, by detection of parasite DNA and RNA, suggesting living parasites. Our study is the first one to describe in a murine model the genetic response of placental environment to T. cruzi infection and suggests the development of a strong immune response, parasite genotype-dependent, to the detriment of cellular metabolism, which may contribute to control infection preventing the risk of congenital transmission. PMID:28273076

  16. Neural Damage in Experimental Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infection: Hypothalamic Peptidergic Sleep and Wake-Regulatory Neurons

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    Claudia Laperchia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuron populations of the lateral hypothalamus which synthesize the orexin (OX/hypocretin or melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH peptides play crucial, reciprocal roles in regulating wake stability and sleep. The disease human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, also called sleeping sickness, caused by extracellular Trypanosoma brucei (T. b. parasites, leads to characteristic sleep-wake cycle disruption and narcoleptic-like alterations of the sleep structure. Previous studies have revealed damage of OX and MCH neurons during systemic infection of laboratory rodents with the non-human pathogenic T. b. brucei subspecies. No information is available, however, on these peptidergic neurons after systemic infection with T. b. gambiense, the etiological agent of 97% of HAT cases. The present study was aimed at the investigation of immunohistochemically characterized OX and MCH neurons after T. b. gambiense or T. b. brucei infection of a susceptible rodent, the multimammate mouse, Mastomysnatalensis. Cell counts and evaluation of OX fiber density were performed at 4 and 8 weeks post-infection, when parasites had entered the brain parenchyma from the periphery. A significant decrease of OX neurons (about 44% reduction and MCH neurons (about 54% reduction was found in the lateral hypothalamus and perifornical area at 8 weeks in T. b. gambiense-infected M. natalensis. A moderate decrease (21% and 24% reduction, respectively, which did not reach statistical significance, was found after T. b. brucei infection. In two key targets of diencephalic orexinergic innervation, the peri-suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN region and the thalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVT, densitometric analyses showed a significant progressive decrease in the density of orexinergic fibers in both infection paradigms, and especially during T. b. gambiense infection. Altogether the findings provide novel information showing that OX and MCH neurons are highly vulnerable to chronic

  17. Neural Damage in Experimental Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infection: The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

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    Chiara Tesoriero

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei (T. b. gambiense is the parasite subspecies responsible for most reported cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness. This severe infection leads to characteristic disruption of the sleep-wake cycle, recalling attention on the circadian timing system. Most animal models of the disease have been hitherto based on infection of laboratory rodents with the T. b. brucei subspecies, which is not infectious to humans. In these animal models, functional, rather than structural, alterations of the master circadian pacemaker, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, have been reported. Information on the SCN after infection with the human pathogenic T. b. gambiense is instead lacking. The present study was aimed at the examination of the SCN after T. b. gambiense infection of a susceptible rodent, the multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis, compared with T. b. brucei infection of the same host species. The animals were examined at 4 and 8 weeks post-infection, when parasites (T. b. gambiense or T. b. brucei were detected in the brain parenchyma, indicating that the disease was in the encephalitic stage. Neuron and astrocyte changes were examined with Nissl staining, immunophenotyping and quantitative analyses. Interestingly, significant neuronal loss (about 30% reduction was documented in the SCN during the progression of T. b. gambiense infection. No significant neuronal density changes were found in the SCN of T. b. brucei-infected animals. Neuronal cell counts in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of T. b. gambiense-infected M. natalensis did not point out significant changes, indicating that no widespread neuron loss had occurred in the brain. Marked activation of astrocytes was detected in the SCN after both T. b. gambiense and T. b. brucei infections. Altogether the findings reveal that neurons of the biological clock are highly susceptible to the infection caused by human pathogenic African trypanosomes

  18. Effects of Non-Susceptible Hosts on the Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi of the Vector Triatoma infestans: an Experimental Model

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    Vázquez Diego P

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested experimentally the effects of the presence of non-susceptible hosts on the infection with Trypanosoma cruzi of the vector Triatoma infestans. The experiment consisted in two treatments: with chickens, including two chickens (non-susceptible hosts and two infected guinea pigs (susceptible hosts, and without chickens, including only two infected guinea pigs. The hosts were held unrestrained in individual metal cages inside a closed tulle chamber. A total of 200 uninfected T. infestans third instar nymphs were liberated in each replica, collected on day 14, and examined for infection and blood meal sources on day 32-36. The additional presence of chickens relative to infected guinea pigs: (a significantly modified the spatial distribution of bugs; (b increased significantly the likelihoods of having a detectable blood meal on any host and molting to the next instar; (c did not affect the bugs' probability of death by predation; and (d decreased significantly the overall percentage of T. infestans infected with T. cruzi. The bugs collected from inside or close to the guinea pigs' cages showed a higher infection rate (71-88% than those collected from the chickens' cages (22-32%. Mixed blood meals on chickens and guinea pigs were detected in 12-21% of bugs. Although the presence of chickens would decrease the overall percentage of infected bugs in short term experiments, the high rate of host change of T. infestans would make this difference fade out if longer exposure times had been provided.

  19. IL-6 is Upregulated in Late-Stage Disease in Monkeys Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

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    Dawn Nyawira Maranga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is constrained by lack of simple-to-use diagnostic, staging, and treatment tools. The search for novel biomarkers is, therefore, essential in the fight against HAT. The current study aimed at investigating the potential of IL-6 as an adjunct parameter for HAT stage determination in vervet monkey model. Four adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and treated subcuratively at 28 days after infection (dpi to induce late stage disease. Three noninfected monkeys formed the control group. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals and assessed for various biological parameters. A typical HAT-like infection was observed. The late stage was characterized by significant (P<0.05 elevation of CSF IL-6, white blood cell count, and total protein starting 35 dpi with peak levels of these parameters coinciding with relapse parasitaemia. Brain immunohistochemical staining revealed an increase in brain glial fibrillary acidic protein expression indicative of reactive astrogliosis in infected animals which were euthanized in late-stage disease. The elevation of IL-6 in CSF which accompanied other HAT biomarkers indicates onset of parasite neuroinvasion and show potential for use as an adjunct late-stage disease biomarker in the Rhodesian sleeping sickness.

  20. IL-6 is Upregulated in Late-Stage Disease in Monkeys Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyawira Maranga, Dawn; Kagira, John Maina; Kinyanjui, Christopher Kariuki; Muturi Karanja, Simon; Wangari Maina, Naomi; Ngotho, Maina

    2013-01-01

    The management of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is constrained by lack of simple-to-use diagnostic, staging, and treatment tools. The search for novel biomarkers is, therefore, essential in the fight against HAT. The current study aimed at investigating the potential of IL-6 as an adjunct parameter for HAT stage determination in vervet monkey model. Four adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and treated subcuratively at 28 days after infection (dpi) to induce late stage disease. Three noninfected monkeys formed the control group. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals and assessed for various biological parameters. A typical HAT-like infection was observed. The late stage was characterized by significant (P < 0.05) elevation of CSF IL-6, white blood cell count, and total protein starting 35 dpi with peak levels of these parameters coinciding with relapse parasitaemia. Brain immunohistochemical staining revealed an increase in brain glial fibrillary acidic protein expression indicative of reactive astrogliosis in infected animals which were euthanized in late-stage disease. The elevation of IL-6 in CSF which accompanied other HAT biomarkers indicates onset of parasite neuroinvasion and show potential for use as an adjunct late-stage disease biomarker in the Rhodesian sleeping sickness. PMID:24194772

  1. Use of Tc-rCRP as a target for lytic antibody titration after experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Tatiane; Silva, Gustavo Caetano; Henrique Paiva, Priscila Moraes; Nascentes, Gabriel Antônio Nogueira; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo; Norris, Karen; Meira, Wendell Sérgio Ferreira

    2018-01-01

    Experimental Chagas disease has been used as a model to identify several host/parasite interaction factors involved in immune responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection. One of the factors inherent to this parasite is the complement regulatory protein (Tc-CRP), a major epitope that induces production of lytic antibodies during T. cruzi infections. Previous studies have evaluated the function of Tc-CRP as an antigenic marker via ELISAs, which demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity when compared to other methods. Therefore, this study aimed to assess and compare the levels of lytic antibodies induced by this protein following experimental infection using different T. cruzi strains. Our results demonstrated that infections induced by strains isolated from vectors resulted in subpatent parasitaemia and low reactivity, as assessed by Tc-rCRP ELISAs. On the other hand, mice inoculated with T. cruzi strains isolated from patients developed patent parasitaemia, and presented elevated lytic antibodies titres, as measured by Tc-rCRP ELISA. In addition, comparison between different mouse lineages demonstrated that Balb/c mice were more reactive than C57BL/6 mice in almost all types of infections, except those infected by the AQ-4 strain. Parasites from the Hel strain generated the greatest lytic antibody response in all evaluated models. Therefore, application of sensitive techniques for monitoring immune responses would enable us to establish growth curves for lytic antibodies during the course of the infection, and allow us to discriminate between T. cruzi strains that originate from different hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Trypanosoma amblyommi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Carolina R; Dos Santos, Priscilla N; Cordeiro, Matheus D; Da S Barros, Juliana Helena; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Fonseca, Adivaldo H

    2018-01-01

    Parasites of the genus Trypanosoma are microorganisms that display wide morphological, biological and genetic variability. Here we present the first description of an isolate of the genus Trypanosoma naturally infecting the tick Amblyomma brasiliense . The ticks were collected from a specimen of Tayassu pecari (Queixada, white-lipped peccary) from the Itatiaia National Park, Itatiaia, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate was characterised by molecular, morphometric and biological analyses. A Trypanosoma culture was isolated from crushed nymphal and adult ticks, propagated in the tick cell line IDE8 and maintained in L15B culture medium, incubated at 32 °C. The isolate grew well in L15B medium at 30 °C, 32 °C and 34 °C but not at lower or higher temperatures. The culture remained stable in axenic L15B medium at 30 °C. Cryopreserved cultures retained viability after cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen. Growth in axenic medium and developmental forms of the trypanosomes were analysed. Analysis of the 18S rDNA region confirmed the authenticity of this new species and the nucleotide sequence was deposited in Genbank. The species was named Trypanosoma amblyommi sp. nov. strain C1RJ. Characteristics related to pathogenicity, involvement with vertebrate hosts, epidemiology, developmental cycle and transmission mechanisms are still unknown. Therefore, further studies are necessary to understand aspects of the biological cycle of Trypanosoma amblyommi sp. nov.

  3. Differential parasitological, molecular, and serological detection of Trypanosoma cruzi I, II, and IV in blood of experimentally infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margioto Teston, Ana Paula; Paula de Abreu, Ana; Gruendling, Ana Paula; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Marques de Araújo, Silvana; Jean de Ornelas Toledo, Max

    2016-07-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of American trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease), which affects 6-7 million people worldwide, mainly in Latin America. It presents great genetic and biological variability that plays an important role in the clinical and epidemiological features of the disease. Our working hypothesis is that the genetic diversity of T. cruzi has an important impact on detection of the parasite using diagnostic techniques. The present study evaluated the diagnostic performance of parasitological, molecular, and serological techniques for detecting 27 strains of T. cruzi that belonged to discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI (11 strains), TcII (four strains), and TcIV (12 strains) that were obtained from different hosts in the states of Amazonas and Paraná, Brazil. Blood samples were taken from experimentally infected mice and analyzed by fresh blood examination, hemoculture in Liver Infusion Tryptose (LIT) medium, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Polymerase chain reaction presented the best detection of TcI, with 80.4% positivity. For all of the detection methods, the animals that were inoculated with TcII presented the highest positivity rates (94.1-100%). ELISA that was performed 7 months after inoculation presented a higher detection ability (95.4%) for TcIV. Intra-DTU comparisons showed that the reproducibility of the majority of the results that were obtained with the different methods was weak for TcI and good for TcII and TcIV. Our data indicate that the detection capability of different techniques varies with the DTUs of the parasites in mammalian blood. The implications of these findings with regard to the diagnosis of human T. cruzi infection are discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Efecto inmunosupresor de la infección por Trypanosoma musculi (Mastigophora: Trypanosomatidae en la toxoplasmosis experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretta Piccolo-Johanning

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available La prevalencia de infecciones por Toxoplasma gondii en el ser humano es de 5-90% según la zona geográfica; en Costa Rica por ejemplo, la seroprevalencia es de un 58%, por lo que es importante comprender algunos procesos inmunológicos, propios en estas afectaciones parasitarias. Con el objeto de determinar si el Trypanosoma musculi ejerce procesos de inmunosupresión sobre Toxoplasma gondii se realizó un experimento en el que se inocularon ratones Swiss con T. musculi cuatro, cinco, seis y siete días previos a la infección con T. gondii, ocurriendo la inmunosupresión cuando la inoculación con T. musculi fue hecha cuatro días antes. Además, la cantidad de tripomastigotos inoculados no influyó en el proceso. Se probaron tres cepas de T. gondii aisladas de las heces de un gato casero (TFC, de un Leopardus pardalis (TLP, de un Leopardus wiedii y de la carne de un Bos taurus (TBT. La cepa TLP resultó ser muy patógena, matando a los animales en un tiempo corto, independientemente de la inoculación con T. musculi; para las otras cepas se mantuvo el patrón de inmunosupresión en los ratones. Se reporta entonces un modelo experimental de inmunosupresión, aspecto muy en boga en este momento, por su relación con enfermedades que inducen esta condición en el ser humano, especialmente a enfermedades como el cáncer y el SIDA. Este modelo es más fácil de aplicar experimentalmente que el correspondiente con T. lewisi previamente descrito, el cual usa ratas blancas de más difícil manejo que los ratones usados en este estudio.

  5. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Is Critical for Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokine Response and Resistance to Experimental Trypanosoma congolense Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukwunonso Onyilagha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness poses serious threat to human and animal health in sub-Saharan Africa. Because there is currently no vaccine for preventing this disease and available drugs are not safe, understanding the mechanisms that regulate resistance and/or susceptibility to the disease could reveal novel targets for effective disease therapy and prevention. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP plays a critical role in driving Th2 immune response. Although susceptibility to experimental Trypanosoma congolense infection in mice is associated with excessive proinflammatory responses due in part to impaired Th2 response, the role of TSLP in resistance to African trypanosomiasis has not been well studied. Here, we investigated whether TSLP is critical for maintaining Th2 environment necessary for survival of T. congolense-infected mice. We observed an increased TSLP level in mice after infection with T. congolense, suggesting a role for this cytokine in resistance to the infection. Indeed, TSLPR−/− mice were more susceptible to T. congolense infection and died significantly earlier than their wild-type (WT controls. Interestingly, serum levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α and the frequency of IFN-γ- and TNF-α-producing CD4+ T cells in the spleens and liver were significantly higher in infected TSLPR−/− mice than in the WT control mice. Susceptibility was also associated with excessive M1 macrophage activation. Treatment of TSLPR−/− mice with anti-IFN-γ mAb during infection abolished their enhanced susceptibility to T. congolense infection. Collectively, our study shows that TSLP plays a critical role in resistance to T. congolense infection by dampening the production of proinflammatory cytokines and its associated M1 macrophage activation.

  6. EFICÁCIA DE TRÊS MEDICAMENTOS NO CONTROLE DA INFECÇÃO EXPERIMENTAL POR TRYPANOSOMA EVANSI EM RATOS (RATTUS NORVEGICUS) LINHAGEM WISTAR

    OpenAIRE

    Rovaina Laureano Doyle

    2006-01-01

    Este trabalho objetivou verificar os achados laboratoriais e histológicos da infecção experimental por Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi (Steel, 1885) Balbiani, 1888, em ratos (Rattus norvegicus) da linhagem Wistar, testando a eficácia de três medicamentos. Foram utilizados 40 ratos, divididos em quatro grupos de 10 cada, sendo cada grupo composto por 5 machos e cinco fêmeas, os quais foram tratados com três quimioterápicos distintos após a detecção de parasitemia superior a oit...

  7. Nutritional Status Driving Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi: Lessons from Experimental Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Malafaia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the scientific knowledge about protein-energy and micronutrient malnutrition in the context of Chagas disease, especially in experimental models. The search of articles was conducted using the electronic databases of SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online, PubMed and MEDLINE published between 1960 and March 2010. It was possible to verify that nutritional deficiencies (protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrient malnutrition exert a direct effect on the infection by T. cruzi. However, little is known about the immunological mechanisms involved in the relationship “nutritional deficiencies and infection by T. cruzi”. A hundred years after the discovery of Chagas disease many aspects of this illness still require clarification, including the effects of nutritional deficiencies on immune and pathological mechanisms of T. cruzi infection.

  8. Trypanosoma evansi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The infectivity of an isolate of Trypanosoma evansi was investigated using five infected and four uninfected control. Savannah brown ... The animals were fed grass-hay, ... haemoglobin concentration, leukocyte count as described by Schalmet al. (1975). Total protein was measured using hand refractometer. At the end of six.

  9. Benznidazole/Itraconazole Combination Treatment Enhances Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity in Experimental Chagas Disease.

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    Tassiane Assíria Fontes Martins

    Full Text Available The nitroheterocyclic drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole are first-line drugs available to treat Chagas disease; however, they have limitations, including long treatment courses and toxicity. Strategies to overcome these limitations include the identification of new drugs with specific target profiles, re-dosing regimens for the current drugs, drug repositioning and combination therapy. In this work, we evaluated combination therapy as an approach for optimization of the current therapeutic regimen for Chagas disease. The curative action of benznidazole/itraconazole combinations was explored in an established infection of the mice model with the T. cruzi Y strain. The activities of the benznidazole/itraconazole combinations were compared with the results from those receiving the same dosage of each individual drug. The administration of benznidazole/itraconazole in combination eliminated parasites from the blood more efficiently than each drug alone. Here, there was a significant reduction of the number of treatment days (number of doses necessary to induce parasitemia suppression with the benznidazole/itraconazole combination, as compared to each compound administered alone. These results clearly indicate the enhanced effects of these drugs in combination, particularly at the dose of 75 mg/kg, as the effects observed with the drug combinations were four times more effective than those of each drug used alone. Moreover, benznidazole/itraconazole treatment was shown to prevent or decrease the typical lesions associated with chronic experimental Chagas disease, as illustrated by similar levels of inflammatory cells and fibrosis in the cardiac muscle tissue of healthy and treated mice. These results emphasize the importance of exploring the potential of combination treatments with currently available compounds to specifically treat Chagas disease.

  10. Benznidazole/Itraconazole Combination Treatment Enhances Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity in Experimental Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assíria Fontes Martins, Tassiane; de Figueiredo Diniz, Lívia; Mazzeti, Ana Lia; da Silva do Nascimento, Álvaro Fernando; Caldas, Sérgio; Caldas, Ivo Santana; de Andrade, Isabel Mayer; Ribeiro, Isabela; Bahia, Maria Terezinha

    2015-01-01

    The nitroheterocyclic drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole are first-line drugs available to treat Chagas disease; however, they have limitations, including long treatment courses and toxicity. Strategies to overcome these limitations include the identification of new drugs with specific target profiles, re-dosing regimens for the current drugs, drug repositioning and combination therapy. In this work, we evaluated combination therapy as an approach for optimization of the current therapeutic regimen for Chagas disease. The curative action of benznidazole/itraconazole combinations was explored in an established infection of the mice model with the T. cruzi Y strain. The activities of the benznidazole/itraconazole combinations were compared with the results from those receiving the same dosage of each individual drug. The administration of benznidazole/itraconazole in combination eliminated parasites from the blood more efficiently than each drug alone. Here, there was a significant reduction of the number of treatment days (number of doses) necessary to induce parasitemia suppression with the benznidazole/itraconazole combination, as compared to each compound administered alone. These results clearly indicate the enhanced effects of these drugs in combination, particularly at the dose of 75 mg/kg, as the effects observed with the drug combinations were four times more effective than those of each drug used alone. Moreover, benznidazole/itraconazole treatment was shown to prevent or decrease the typical lesions associated with chronic experimental Chagas disease, as illustrated by similar levels of inflammatory cells and fibrosis in the cardiac muscle tissue of healthy and treated mice. These results emphasize the importance of exploring the potential of combination treatments with currently available compounds to specifically treat Chagas disease.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi and myoid cells from seminiferous tubules: interaction and relation with fibrous components of extracellular matrix in experimental Chagas' disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luiz Otávio Pereira; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lucia; Hardoim, Daiana de Jesús; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Mendes, Verônica Gonçalves; da Costa, Sylvio Celso Gonçalves; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva

    2009-01-01

    The main transmission route of Trypanosoma cruzi is by triatomine bugs. However, T. cruzi is also transmitted through blood transfusion, organ transplantation, ingestion of contaminated food or fluids, or is congenital. Sexual transmission, although suggested since the discovery of Chagas’ disease, has remained unproven. Sexual transmission would require T. cruzi to be located at the testes and ovaries. Here we investigated whether T. cruzi is present in the gonads of mice infected with 104 T. cruzi trypomastigotes from the CL strain. Fourteen days after experimental infection, histopathological examination showed alterations in the extracellular matrix of the lamina propria of the seminiferous tubules. Furthermore, amastigotes were present in seminiferous tubules, within myoid cells, and in the adjacencies of the basal compartment. These results indicate that T. cruzi is able to reach seminiferous tubule lumen, thus suggesting that Chagas’ disease could potentially be transmitted through sexual intercourse. Complementary studies are required to demonstrate that Chagas’ disease can be transmitted by coitus. PMID:19200251

  12. Papel do óxido nítrico no desenvolvimento de lesões cardíacas na fase aguda da infecção experimental pelo Trypanosoma cruzi Role of nitric oxide in the development of cardiac lesions during the acute phase of experimental infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Renata Bibiano Borges

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Chagas é causada pelo Trypanosoma cruzi e o coração é o órgão mais acometido. O óxido nítrico apresenta importante ação anti-Trypanosoma, porém, com pouca evidência de seu papel no mecanismo de lesão tecidual. O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar a contribuição do óxido nítrico no desenvolvimento da inflamação e da fibrose cardíaca na fase aguda da infecção experimental por cepas Y e Colombiana do Trypanosoma cruzi. A inflamação foi significativamente maior nos animais infectados pela cepa Colombiana, comparada com os infectados com a cepa Y, tanto nos animais C57BL/6 (3,98x1,87%; p=0,004 quanto nos animais C57BL/6 deficientes na sintase do óxido nítrico induzível (3,99x2,4%; p=0,013. O parasitismo cardíaco dos animais C57BL/6 deficientes na sintase do óxido nítrico induzível infectados pela cepa Colombiana foi significativamente maior que o destes mesmos animais infectados com a cepa Y (2,78x0,17 ninhos/mm²; p=0,004 assim como, os animais C57BL/6 infectados com a cepa Colombiana (2,78x1,33 ninhos/mm²; p=0,006 ou cepa Y (2,78x0,53 ninhos/mm²; p=0,005. Os dados reforçam o papel do óxido nítrico no controle do parasitismo e sugerem seu papel na proteção tecidual, controlando a inflamação e potencialmente diminuindo lesões cardíacas durante a fase aguda na doença de Chagas experimental.Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and the heart is the organ most affected. Nitric oxide has notable anti-Trypanosoma action, but with little evidence regarding its role in the mechanism for tissue injury. The objective of this study was to analyze the contribution of nitric oxide towards the development of inflammation and cardiac fibrosis during the acute phase of experimental infection by Y and Colombian strains of Trypanosoma cruzi. The inflammation was significantly more intense in animals infected with the Colombian strain, compared with those infected with the Y strain, both in C57BL/6

  13. Immunospecific immunoglobulins and IL-10 as markers for Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense late stage disease in experimentally infected vervet monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, J.M.; Jensen, Henrik Michael Elvang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of IL-10 and immunoglobulin M (IgM) as biomarkers for staging HAT in vervet monkeys, a useful pathogenesis model for humans. METHODS: Vervet monkeys were infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and subsequently given sub-curative and curative treatment 28...... and 140 days post-infection (dpi) respectively. Matched serum and CSF samples were obtained at regular intervals and immunospecific IgM, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IL-10 were quantified by ELISA. RESULTS: There was no detectable immunospecific IgM and IgG in the CSF before 49 dpi. CSF IgM and Ig......G and serum IgM were significantly elevated with peak levels coinciding with meningoencephalitis 98 dpi. The serum IL-10 was upregulated in both early and late disease stage, coinciding with primary and relapse parasitaemia respectively. CSF white cell counts (CSF WCC) were elevated progressively till...

  14. Ação de raios gama sobre formas sanguícolas de Trypanosoma cruzi: estudo experimental em camundongos

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    Gentilda K. F. Takeda

    1986-02-01

    Full Text Available Amostras de sangue de animais infectados com cepa Y de Trypanosoma cruzi foram submetidas, respectivamente, a 200 e 300 krad de radiação gama. Para verificar a eficácia do método na eliminação do parasita, o material foi inoculado em camundongos e os parâmetros utilizados na avaliação foram: parasitemia, cultura, xenodiagnóstico, subinoculação, reinoculação com cepa virulenta e exame anátomo-patológico das vísceras. Os sangues expostos às duas diferentes intensidades de radiação e inoculados em dois períodos após o processo, mostraram-se inócuos quanto a capacidade de produzir infecção nos animais

  15. Aceturato de diminazeno e dipropionato de imidocarb no controle de infecção por Trypanosoma evansi em Rattus norvegicus infectados experimentalmente Diminazene aceturate and imidocarb dipropionate in the control of Trypanosoma evansi infection in Rattus norvegicus experimentally infected

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    Aleksandro Schafer da Silva

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito do aceturato de diminazeno e do dipropionato de imidocarb no controle da infecção por Trypanosoma evansi em ratos (Rattus norvegicus infectados experimentalmente. Cinqüenta e quatro ratos machos foram inoculados via intraperitonial com 104 tripomastigotas de T. evansi/animal. Os ratos foram monitorados diariamente por meio de esfregaço sanguíneo periférico. No momento em que se observassem oito protozoários por campo microscópico de 1000x, era iniciado o tratamento com as drogas (dia zero. O estudo foi dividido em dois protocolos terapêuticos e os fármacos foram administrados via intramuscular. O primeiro protocolo foi aplicado nos grupos A, B, C e D e o segundo protocolo nos grupos E, F, G e H. O grupo controle foi identificado como grupo I, não medicados. No primeiro protocolo, os ratos receberam uma dose única dos fármacos no dia zero e sempre que se observasse T. evansi na circulação periférica. No segundo protocolo, os roedores receberam as mesmas doses, no entanto, por cinco dias consecutivos. No primeiro protocolo, os dois princípios ativos não apresentaram eficácia curativa, ocorrendo reincidência da parasitemia após alguns dias do tratamento. No segundo protocolo, o aceturato de diminazeno eliminou a forma tripomastigota da circulação e os ratos foram eutanasiados após 90 dias do início do tratamento. Os roedores tratados com dipropionato de imidocarb apresentaram recidiva da infecção após 30 dias. Na histopatologia não se observou alteração renal e hepática relacionada à doença ou aos medicamentos testados. Com base nos resultados, foi concluído que o aceturato de diminazeno, quando administrado por cinco dias consecutivos, é efetivo no tratamento da tripanossomose em ratos.The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of diminazene aceturate and imidocarb dipropionate in the control of Trypanosoma evansi infection in rats (Rattus norvegicus

  16. Life cycle of Triatoma ryckmani (Hemiptera: Reduviidae in the laboratory, feeding patterns in nature and experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Rodrigo Zeledón

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A cohort initiated with 121 eggs, yielding 105 first instar nymphs (eclosion rate: 86.78%, allowed us to observe the entire life cycle of Triatoma ryckmani under laboratory conditions (24ºC and 62% relative humidity, by feeding them on anesthetized hamsters. It was possible to obtain 62 adults and the cycle from egg to adult took a mean of 359.69 days with a range of 176-529 days (mortality rate of nymphs: 40.95%. Mean life span of adults was of 81 days for females and 148 days for males. The developmental periods of 4th and 5th nymphs were longer than those of the other instars. This suggests that young siblings have a better chance of taking a hemolymph meal from older ones, in order to survive during fasting periods during prolonged absences of vertebrate hosts from natural ecotopes. The stomach contents of 37 insects showed blood from rodents (15 cases, lizards (7 cases, birds (6 cases and insect hemolymph (7 cases. Out of 10 insects fed by xenodiagnosis on a Trypanosoma cruzi infected mouse, all but one became infected with the parasite.

  17. Comparative parasitaemia and haematology of mice, rats and rabbits experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei and their responses to diminazene diaceturate (Veriben® therapy

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    Amina Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare parasitaemia and haematological changes of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in mice, rats and rabbits and their chemotherapeutic responses to diminazene diaceturate (Veriben® therapy under the same experimental conditions. Methods: A total of 20 adult BALB/c mice, 20 Wister albino rats and 20 New Zealand rabbits of both sexes were used for this study. Each rodent group was divided into four groups (A, B, C and D of five animals each. Animals in Groups A and C were individually infected with 0.5 mL of blood from donor rats containing 1.5 × 106 Trypanosoma brucei brucei, while Groups B and D remained uninfected. Experimental animals were treated thus [Group A (infected and untreated control, Group B (uninfected and untreated control, Group C (infected and treated and Group D (uninfected and treated]. All treatments commenced 12 days after infection. Parasitaemia and haematological parameters were determined every four days till the end of the experiment. Results: The prepatent period for mice and rats was 4 days while that of rabbits was 8 days. Observed clinical signs consisted of pallor of mucous membranes, lethargy and starry hair coat observed mainly among mice and rats, while the rabbits had mainly mild pallor of the ocular mucous membranes. Parasitaemia in Groups A rose significantly by Day 20 post-infection (p.i. in the mice, Day 24 in the rats and Day 28 in rabbits. By these respective days, all the infected untreated animals in Group A died of the infection. However in Group C, parasitaemia declined significantly (P < 0.05 among mice, rats and rabbits and were completely eliminated from peripheral circulation by Days 20, 20 and 24 (p.i. respectively, with no death. An inverse relationship was observed between parasitaemia and the haematological parameters for all the species of the rodents. As parasitaemia increased, the packed cell volume, red blood cell count, haemoglobin concentrations and white blood cell

  18. Cell death and serum markers of collagen metabolism during cardiac remodeling in Cavia porcellus experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E; Gilman, Robert H; Paico, Henry; Yauri, Verónica; Angulo, Noelia; Ccopa, Fredy; Bern, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    We studied cell death by apoptosis and necrosis in cardiac remodeling produced by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In addition, we evaluated collagen I, III, IV (CI, CIII and CIV) deposition in cardiac tissue, and their relationship with serum levels of procollagen type I carboxy-terminal propeptide (PICP) and procollagen type III amino-terminal propeptide (PIIINP). Eight infected and two uninfected guinea pigs were necropsied at seven time points up to one year post-infection. Cell death by necrosis and apoptosis was determined by histopathological observation and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, respectively. Deposition of cardiac collagen types was determined by immunohistochemistry and serum levels of PICP, PIIINP, and anti-T. cruzi IgG1 and IgG2 by ELISA. IgG2 (Th1 response) predominated throughout the course of infection; IgG1 (Th2 response) was detected during the chronic phase. Cardiac cell death by necrosis predominated over apoptosis during the acute phase; during the chronic phase, both apoptosis and necrosis were observed in cardiac cells. Apoptosis was also observed in lymphocytes, endothelial cells and epicardial adipose tissue, especially in the chronic phase. Cardiac levels of CI, CIII, CIV increased progressively, but the highest levels were seen in the chronic phase and were primarily due to increase in CIII and CIV. High serum levels of PICP and PIIINP were observed throughout the infection, and increased levels of both biomarkers were associated with cardiac fibrosis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.038, respectively). These results confirm the role of apoptosis in cell loss mainly during the chronic phase and the utility of PICP and PIIINP as biomarkers of fibrosis in cardiac remodeling during T. cruzi infection.

  19. Cell death and serum markers of collagen metabolism during cardiac remodeling in Cavia porcellus experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagahira E Castro-Sesquen

    Full Text Available We studied cell death by apoptosis and necrosis in cardiac remodeling produced by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In addition, we evaluated collagen I, III, IV (CI, CIII and CIV deposition in cardiac tissue, and their relationship with serum levels of procollagen type I carboxy-terminal propeptide (PICP and procollagen type III amino-terminal propeptide (PIIINP. Eight infected and two uninfected guinea pigs were necropsied at seven time points up to one year post-infection. Cell death by necrosis and apoptosis was determined by histopathological observation and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, respectively. Deposition of cardiac collagen types was determined by immunohistochemistry and serum levels of PICP, PIIINP, and anti-T. cruzi IgG1 and IgG2 by ELISA. IgG2 (Th1 response predominated throughout the course of infection; IgG1 (Th2 response was detected during the chronic phase. Cardiac cell death by necrosis predominated over apoptosis during the acute phase; during the chronic phase, both apoptosis and necrosis were observed in cardiac cells. Apoptosis was also observed in lymphocytes, endothelial cells and epicardial adipose tissue, especially in the chronic phase. Cardiac levels of CI, CIII, CIV increased progressively, but the highest levels were seen in the chronic phase and were primarily due to increase in CIII and CIV. High serum levels of PICP and PIIINP were observed throughout the infection, and increased levels of both biomarkers were associated with cardiac fibrosis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.038, respectively. These results confirm the role of apoptosis in cell loss mainly during the chronic phase and the utility of PICP and PIIINP as biomarkers of fibrosis in cardiac remodeling during T. cruzi infection.

  20. Curcumin Enhances the Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity of Benznidazole-Based Chemotherapy in Acute Experimental Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Rômulo Dias; Sartini, Marcus Vinicius Pessoa; Rodrigues, João Paulo Ferreira; Gonçalves, Reggiani Vilela; Santos, Eliziária Cardoso; Souza, Raquel Lopes Martins; Caldas, Ivo Santana

    2016-06-01

    Although curcumin can increase the effectiveness of drugs against malaria, combination therapies using the molecule have never been investigated in Chagas disease (ChD). Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of curcumin as a complementary strategy to benznidazole (Bz)-based chemotherapy in mice acutely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Eighty-four 12-week-old Swiss mice were equally randomized into seven groups: uninfected (NI), T. cruzi infected and untreated (INF), infected and treated with 100 mg/kg of body weight Bz (B100), 50 mg/kg Bz (B50), 100 mg/kg curcumin (C100), 100 mg/kg Bz plus 100 mg/kg curcumin (B100 plus C100), and 50 mg/kg Bz plus 100 mg/kg curcumin (B50 plus C100). After microscopic identification of blood trypomastigotes (4 days after inoculation), both drugs were administered by gavage once a day for 20 days. Curcumin showed limited antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects when administered alone. When curcumin and Bz were combined, there was a drastic reduction in parasitemia, parasite load, mortality, anti-T. cruzi IgG reactivity, circulating levels of cytokines (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], interleukin 4 [IL-4], and MIP1-α), myocardial inflammation, and morphological and oxidative cardiac injury; these results exceeded the isolated effects of Bz. The combination of Bz and curcumin was also effective at mitigating liver toxicity triggered by Bz, increasing the parasitological cure rate, and preventing infection recrudescence in noncured animals, even when the animals were treated with 50% of the recommended therapeutic dose of Bz. By limiting the toxic effects of Bz and enhancing its antiparasitic efficiency, the combination of the drug with curcumin may be a relevant therapeutic strategy that is possibly better tolerated in ChD treatment than Bz-based monotherapy. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Effect of the Plasmid-DNA Vaccination on Macroscopic and Microscopic Damage Caused by the Experimental Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in the Canine Model

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    Olivia Rodríguez-Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dog is considered the main domestic reservoir for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and a suitable experimental animal model to study the pathological changes during the course of Chagas disease (CD. Vaccine development is one of CD prevention methods to protect people at risk. Two plasmids containing genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (TcSP and an amastigote-specific glycoprotein (TcSSP4 were used as DNA vaccines in a canine model. Splenomegaly was not found in either of the recombinant plasmid-immunized groups; however, cardiomegaly was absent in animals immunized only with the plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene. The inflammation of subendocardial and myocardial tissues was prevented only with the immunization with TcSSP4 gene. In conclusion, the vaccination with these genes has a partial protective effect on the enlargement of splenic and cardiac tissues during the chronic CD and on microscopic hearth damage, since both plasmids prevented splenomegaly but only one avoided cardiomegaly, and the lesions in heart tissue of dog immunized with plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene covered only subepicardial tissue.

  2. Suppression of humoral immunity and lymphocyte responsiveness during experimental trypanosoma cruzi infections Supresión de la inmunidade humoral y de la respuesta linfocitaria durante la infección experimental con Trypanosoma cruzi

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    José A. O'daly

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available C3H/He and C57B1/6 mice were inoculated with 500 Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes (Strain Y. During the acute phase infected mice presented parasitemia and enlargement of lymph nodes and spleens and intracellular parasites were observed in the heart. Examinations of cells derived from spleen and lymph nodes showed increased numbers of IgM and IgG-bearing cells. During the peak of splenomegaly, about day 17 post-infections, splenic lymphocytes showed a marked decrease in responsiveness to T and B-cell mitogens, parasite antigens and plaque forming cells (PFC to sheep red blood cells (SRBC. Unfractionated or plastic adherent splenic cells from mice, obtained during the acute phase were able to suppress the response to mitogens by lymphocytes from uninfected mice. During the chronic phase. Disappearance of parasitemia and intracellular parasites in the hearts as well as a decrease in spleen size, was observed. These changes preceded the complete recovery of responsiveness to mitogens and T. cruzi antigens by C57B1/6 splenic lymphocytes. However, this recovery was only partial in the C3H/He mice, known to be more sensitive to T. cruzi infection. Partial recovery of humoral immune response also occurred in both strains of mice during the chronic phase.Ratones C3H/He y C57B1/6 inoculados con 500 tripomastigotes de la cepa Y de T. cruzi muestran durante la fase aguda de la enferme-dad, parasitemia, aumento del bazo y gânglios linfáticos así como parásitos intracelulares en el corazón. Análisis de las células presentes en ganglios linfáticos y bazo presenta aumento de células IgM e IgG. Cuando la esplenomegalia es mayor, alrededor del día 17 postínfección, los linfocitos esplénicos mostraron un descenso marcado en la respuesta a mitógenos de células B y T, antígenos de T. cruzi y células formadoras de placas contra glóbulos rojos de carnero. Células de bazo o células esplénicas adherentes a plástico, obtenidas de ratones durante

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Ferreira, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    American Trypanosomiasis is an important neglected reemerging tropical parasitism, infecting about 8 million people worldwide. Its agent, Trypanosoma cruzi , exhibits multiple mechanisms to evade the host immune response and infect host cells. An important immune evasion strategy of T. cruzi infective stages is its capacity to inhibit the complement system activation on the parasite surface, avoiding opsonizing, immune stimulating and lytic effects. Epimastigotes, the non-infective form of the parasite, present in triatomine arthropod vectors, are highly susceptible to complement-mediated lysis while trypomastigotes, the infective form, present in host bloodstream, are resistant. Thus T. cruzi susceptibility to complement varies depending on the parasite stage (amastigote, trypomastigotes or epimastigote) and on the T. cruzi strain. To avoid complement-mediated lysis, T. cruzi trypomastigotes express on the parasite surface a variety of complement regulatory proteins, such as glycoprotein 58/68 (gp58/68), T. cruzi complement regulatory protein (TcCRP), trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor (T-DAF), C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT) and T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT). Alternatively, or concomitantly, the parasite captures components with complement regulatory activity from the host bloodstream, such as factor H (FH) and plasma membrane-derived vesicles (PMVs). All these proteins inhibit different steps of the classical (CP), alternative (AP) or lectin pathways (LP). Thus, TcCRP inhibits the CP C3 convertase assembling, gp58/68 inhibits the AP C3 convertase, T-DAF interferes with the CP and AP convertases assembling, TcCRT inhibits the CP and LP, CRIT confers ability to resist the CP and LP, FH is used by trypomastigotes to inhibit the AP convertases and PMVs inhibit the CP and LP C3 convertases. Many of these proteins have similar molecular inhibitory mechanisms. Our laboratory has contributed to elucidate the role of TcCRT in the host-parasite interplay

  4. Expression and production of cardiac angiogenic mediators depend on the Trypanosoma cruzi-genetic population in experimental C57BL/6 mice infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deena; Bajracharya, Bijay; Paula-Costa, Guilherme; Salles, Beatriz C; Leite, Ana Luísa J; Menezes, Ana Paula J; Souza, Débora Ms; Oliveira, Laser Am; Talvani, André

    2017-03-01

    Mammalian cardiac cells are important targets to the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The inflammatory reaction in the host aims at eliminating this parasite, can lead to cell destruction, fibrosis and hypoxia. Local hypoxia is well-defined stimulus to the production of angiogenesis mediators. Assuming that different genetic T. cruzi populations induce distinct inflammation and disease patterns, the current study aims to investigate whether the production of inflammatory and angiogenic mediators is a parasite strain-dependent condition. C57BL/6 mice were infected with the Y and Colombian strains of T. cruzi and euthanized at the 12th and 32nd days, respectively. The blood and heart tissue were processed in immune assays and/or qPCR (TNF, IL-17, IL-10, CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CCR2, CCR5 and angiogenic factors VEGF, Ang-1, Ang-2) and in histological assays. The T. cruzi increased the inflammatory and angiogenic mediators in the infected mice when they were compared to non-infected animals. However, the Colombian strain has led to higher (i) leukocyte infiltration, (ii) cardiac TNF and CCL5 production/expression, (iii) cardiac tissue parasitism, and to higher (iv) ratio between heart/body weights. On the other hand, the Colombian strain has caused lower production and expression VEGF, Ang-1 and Ang-2, when it was compared to the Y strain of the parasite. The present study highlights that the T. cruzi-genetic population defines the pattern of angiogenic/inflammatory mediators in the heart tissue, and that it may contribute to the magnitude of the cardiac pathogenesis. Besides, such assumption opens windows to the understanding of the angiogenic mediator's role in association with the experimental T. cruzi infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevey, Ágata Carolina; Mirkin, Gerardo Ariel; Penas, Federico Nicolás; Goren, Nora Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl) due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE) of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE.

  6. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain

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    Ágata Carolina Cevey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi: experimental Chagas' disease in Rhesus monkeys. II. Ultraestructural and cytochemical studies of peroxidase and acid phosphatase activities

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    Maria de Nazareth Leal de Meirelles

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructural and cytochemical studies of peroxidase and acid phosphatase were performed in skin, lymph node and heart muscle tissue of thesus monkeys with experimental Chagas's disease. At the site of inoculation ther was a proliferative reaction with the presence of immature macrophages revealed by peroxidase technique. At the lymph node a difuse inflammatory exudate with mononuclear cells, fibroblasts and immature activated macrophages reproduces the human patrtern of acute Chagas' disease inflamatory lesions. The hearth muscle cells present different degrees of degenerative alterations and a striking increase in the number of lysosomal profiles that exhibit acid hydrolase reaction product. A strong inflammatory reaction was present due to lymphocytic infiltrate or due to eosinophil granulocytes associated to ruptured cells. The present study provides some experimental evidences that the monkey model could be used as a reliable model to characterize histopathological alterations of the human disease.

  8. Estudo experimental de Zygodontomys lasiurus (Rodentia-cricetidae com cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi Studies on the experimental infection of Zygodontomys lasiurus (Rodentia-Cricetidae with three strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Monamaris M. Borges

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados resultados em relação a infecção expertmental de Zygodontomys lasiurus (Rodentia-Cricetidae com duas cepas de T. cruzi isoladas de casos humanos, Y e Berenice, e uma isolada de um triatomíneo silvestre, chamada costalimai. Foram realizados estudos em relação a evolução da parasitemia, duração da patência e prepatência da infecção. Com o objetivo de verificar a agressividade e tropismo tissular das cepas de T. cruzi nesta espécie de roedor, foram também realizados estudos histopatológicos. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que os níveis de parasitemias foram baixos para as três cepas estudadas. A patência da infecção variou de 14 a 16 dias nos animais inoculados com a cepa Y, 26 a 29 dias com a Berenice e 9 a 13 dias com a costalimai. O período prepatente variou de 3 a 5 dias nos animais inoculados com a cepa Y, de 2 a 6 dias com a cepa Berenice e de 6 a 8 dias com a costalimai. As três cepas apresentaram em Z. lasiurus, comprometimento nitidamente muscular, provocando reações leves, moderadas e intensas.Studies on the experimental infection of Zygodontomys lasiurus (Rodentia-Cricetidae are presented in the current paper. Three strains of T. cruzi were used in the experiments: two, Y and Berenice, were originated from human infection, while the third one was obtained from natural infection in a wild bug Triatoma costalimai. The evolution of the parasitemia was studied and the prepatent and patent periods determined. The tissular tropism and aggressiveness of the strains of T. cruzi were verified through histopathological studies. Results have shown that the parasitemia was always kept at low levels for all the strains. The prepatent period in the infected rodents varied from: 3 to 6 days in the Y strain; 2 to 6 days in the Berenice strain; 6 to 8 in the costalimai strain. The patent period showed the following duration patterns: 14 to 16 days in the Y strain; 26 to 29 in the Berenice strain and 6 to 8

  9. Comparative experimental studies on Trypanosoma isolates in mice and response to diminazene aceturate and isometamidium chloride treatment

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    Muluken Yayeh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study was undertaken from December 2015 to May 2016 with the aim of determining and comparing the pathogenicity and response to diminazene aceturate (DA and isometamidium chloride (ISM treatment in experimentally infected mice with trypanosome isolates from Jawi and Birsheleko areas of northwest Ethiopia. A total of 42 mice were used for the experiment. These mice were randomly assigned in to 7 groups of 6 mice per group. Three of the groups (Group 1, 4 and 5 were inoculated with trypanosome isolated from Jawi and three other groups (Group-2, 6 and 7 were inoculated with trypanosome isolated from Birsheleko and the remaining one group (Group 3 was negative control. Each experimental mice were received 0.3 ml of positive blood at the 105 parasites/ml from donor animals intraperitoneally while negative control group were received 0.3 ml sterile water. The mice were clinically observed daily during the study period. Parameters including level of parasitaemia, body weight, PCV and hemoglobin value were recorded once per week for ten consecutive weeks post infection. Trypanocidal treatment was given on day 21 post infection when peak parasitaemia was detected in groups (Group 4-DA-Jawi, 5-ISM-Jawi, 6-DA-BRSH and 7-ISM-BRSH. The treatment doses for DA was at 28 mg/kg and for ISM at 4 mg/kg. In all experimental groups during study period when the mice showed severe clinical signs and at the end of the experiment they were euthanized with 70% ethanol for gross and histopathological examinations. The parameters measured during the study period revealed markers leading to pathological changes in all infected groups. Parasitaemia were detected early in the Jawi isolate infected groups compared to the Birsheleko groups. All infected mice showed clear clinical manifestation of depression, weight loss, reduction in feed intake and huddled together in the corner of the cage. Significant (P < 0.05 reduction was observed in the mean PCV and

  10. Trypanosoma evansi : A clinical, parasitological and immunological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated the clinical, parasitological and immunological effects of a Venezuelan strain of Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi) throughout in experimentally inoculated rabbits over the course of infection and compared them with the same aspect in healthy animals. Body temperature was recorded in degrees Celsius, animal ...

  11. TNF-α is involved in the abnormal thymocyte migration during experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection and favors the export of immature cells.

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    Ana Rosa Pérez

    Full Text Available Previous studies revealed a significant production of inflammatory cytokines together with severe thymic atrophy and thymocyte migratory disturbances during experimental Chagas disease. Migratory activity of thymocytes and mature T cells seem to be finely tuned by cytokines, chemokines and extracellular matrix (ECM components. Systemic TNF-α is enhanced during infection and appears to be crucial in the response against the parasite. However, it also seems to be involved in disease pathology, since it is implicated in the arrival of T cells to effector sites, including the myocardium. Herein, we analyzed the role of TNF-α in the migratory activity of thymocytes in Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi acutely-infected mice. We found increased expression and deposition of TNF-α in the thymus of infected animals compared to controls, accompanied by increased co-localization of fibronectin, a cell migration-related ECM molecule, whose contents in the thymus of infected mice is also augmented. In-vivo studies showed an enhanced export of thymocytes in T. cruzi-infected mice, as ascertained by intrathymic injection of FITC alone or in combination with TNF-α. The increase of immature CD4(+CD8(+ T cells in secondary lymphoid organs was even more clear-cut when TNF-α was co-injected with FITC. Ex-vivo transmigration assays also revealed higher number of migrating cells when TNF-α was added onto fibronectin lattices, with higher input of all thymocyte subsets, including immature CD4(+CD8(+. Infected animals also exhibit enhanced levels of expression of both mRNA TNF-α receptors in the CD4(+CD8(+ subpopulation. Our findings suggest that in T. cruzi acute infection, when TNF-α is complexed with fibronectin, it favours the altered migration of thymocytes, promoting the release of mature and immature T cells to different compartments of the immune system. Conceptually, this work reinforces the notion that thymocyte migration is a multivectorial biological event

  12. Infecção experimental pelo Trypanosoma cruzi em camundongos: influência do exercício físico versus linhagens e sexos

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    Roberta Cristhiany Occhi Soares

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A doença de Chagas é uma infecção causada pelo Trypanosoma cruzi que afeta oito milhões de pessoas na América Latina. Um fator ligado ao estilo de vida que interfere significativamente na resposta à infecção é o exercício físico, dependendo do tipo, intensidade e frequência da atividade praticada. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência do exercício físico aeróbio moderado crônico pré-infecção na evolução da infecção experimental pelo T. cruzi em camundongos de duas linhagens distintas pertencentes aos dois sexos. MÉTODOS: Camundongos Swiss e BALB/c (machos e fêmeas com 30 dias de idade foram divididos em quatro grupos para cada linhagem e sexo (total de 16 e nomeados como segue: SM (Swiss machos, SF (Swiss fêmeas, BM (BALB/c machos e BF (BALB/c fêmeas. Os grupos foram: NT+NI (não treinado+não infectado, T+NI (treinado+não infectado, NT+I (não treinado+infectado e T+I (treinado+infectado. O programa de exercício físico aeróbio moderado crônico pré-infecção foi realizado durante oito semanas, com uma sessão diária de treinamento, cinco vezes na semana. O inóculo foi de 1.400 tripomastígotas sanguíneos da cepa Y do T. cruzi, via intraperitoneal. Foi avaliado o pico de parasitos, parasitemia total média e as medidas das atividades séricas de CK e CK-MB. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: O treinamento físico promoveu nas duas linhagens e em ambos os sexos redução no pico de parasitos e na parasitemia total média em animais infectados pelo T. cruzi. O treinamento físico promoveu redução nas atividades séricas de CK e CK-MB em animais infectados pelo T. cruzi, de ambos os sexos, das duas linhagens, exceto para fêmeas Swiss na atividade de CK e CK-MB.

  13. Quantitative and histological assessment of maternal-fetal transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in guinea pigs: An experimental model of congenital Chagas disease.

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    Jatziri Torres-Vargas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of Trypanosoma cruzi infection on fertility, gestation outcome, and maternal-fetal transmission in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus.Animals were infected with T. cruzi H4 strain (TcI lineage before gestation (IBG or during gestation (IDG. Tissue and sera samples of dams and fetuses were obtained near parturition.All IBG and IDG dams were seropositive by two tests, and exhibited blood parasite load of 1.62±2.2 and 50.1±62 parasites/μl, respectively, by quantitative PCR. Histological evaluation showed muscle fiber degeneration and cellular necrosis in all infected dams. Parasite nests were not detected in infected dams by histology. However, qPCR analysis detected parasites-eq/g heart tissue of 153±104.7 and 169.3±129.4 in IBG and IDG dams, respectively. All fetuses of infected dams were positive for anti-parasite IgG antibodies and tissue parasites by qPCR, but presented a low level of tissue inflammatory infiltrate. Fetuses of IDG (vs. IBG dams exhibited higher degree of muscle fiber degeneration and cellular necrosis in the heart and skeletal tissues. The placental tissue exhibited no inflammatory lesions and amastigote nests, yet parasites-eq/g of 381.2±34.3 and 79.2±84.9 were detected in IDG and IBG placentas, respectively. Fetal development was compromised, and evidenced by a decline in weight, crow-rump length, and abdominal width in both groups.T. cruzi TcI has a high capacity of congenital transmission even when it was inoculated at a very low dose before or during gestation. Tissue lesions, parasite load, and fetal under development provide evidence for high virulence of the parasite during pregnancy. Despite finding of high parasite burden by qPCR, placentas were protected from cellular damage. Our studies offer an experimental model to study the efficacy of vaccines and drugs against congenital transmission of T. cruzi. These results also call for T. cruzi screening in pregnant women and adequate follow up of

  14. Evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic dipstick test for detection of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi in dogs experimentally infected with isolates obtained from opossums (Didelphis virginiana), armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus), and dogs (Canis familiaris) from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Hill, Roderick; Lewis, Samantha; Barr, Stephen C; Valadas, Samantha; Gennari, Solange Maria; Lindsay, David S

    2011-02-01

    Dogs are reservoir hosts for Trypanosoma cruzi , the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis. A rapid immunochromatographic dipstick test (ICT) is available commercially for canine serological testing. The ICT was developed with the use of sera from South American dogs, but it is not routinely used in the United States. We evaluated the utility of the ICT in detecting anti-T. cruzi antibodies in dogs from the United States. Dogs (N  =  64) were experimentally infected with United States' isolates of T. cruzi from an opossum (Didelphis virginiana), an armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus), and a domestic dog (Canis familiaris), and were tested after experimental infection. Sera from uninfected United States dogs (n  =  79; hemaculture negative) were used as negative controls. In a blind study, sera were tested by the ICT and compared to the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test with the use of Brazil-strain epimastigotes as antigen. The sensitivity of the ICT was 91% and the specificity was 98% in dogs experimentally infected with United States isolates. Our study indicates that the ICT could be a useful screening tool for serological surveillance of canine T. cruzi exposure in the United States.

  15. Endocytosis in Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Narcisa Leal da Cunha e; Sant’Anna, Celso; Pereira, Miria Gomes; Souza, Wanderley de

    2010-01-01

    Endocytic activity is particularly intense in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes, while in amastigotes and trypomastigotes it is untraceable. Cargo molecules enters through the cytostome or flagellar pocket at the parasite anterior region, goes along a branched early endosomal network of tubules and vesicles spread from nuclear periphery to the posterior pole, until delivery to reservosomes, the final compartment. Reservosomes are acid compartments that store protein and lipid cargo and also acc...

  16. Morphological aspects of the myocarditis and myositis in Calomys callosus experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi: fibrogenesis and spontaneous regression of fibrosis

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    Sonia G. Andrade

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available Calomys callosus a wild rodent, is a natural host of Trypanosoma cruzi. Twelve C. callosus were infected with 10(5 trypomastigotes of the F strain (a myotropic strain of T. cruzi. Parasitemia decreased on the 21 st day becoming negative around the 40th day of infection. All animals survived but had positive parasitological tests, until the end of the experiment. The infected animals developed severe inflammation in the myocardium and skeletal muscle. This process was pronounced from the 26 th to the 30th day and gradually subsided from the 50 th day becoming absent or residual on the 64 th day after infection. Collagen was identified by the picro Sirius red method. Fibrogenesis developed early, but regression of fibrosis occurred between the 50th and 64th day. Ultrastructural study disclosed a predominance of macrophages and fibroblasts in the inflammatory infiltrates, with small numbers of lymphocytes. Macrophages had active phagocytosis and showed points of contact with altered muscle cells. Different degrees of matrix expansion were present, with granular and fibrilar deposits and collagen bundles. These alterations subsided by the 64th days. Macrophages seem to be the main immune effector cell in the C. callosus model of infection with T. cruzi. The mechanisms involved in the rapid fibrogenesis and its regression deserve further investigation.

  17. Experimental benznidazole treatment of Trypanosoma cruzi II strains isolated from children of the Jequitinhonha Valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil, with Chagas disease

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    Jaquelline Carla Valamiel de Oliveira-Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi strains from distinct geographic areas show differences in drug resistance and association between parasites genetic and treatment response has been observed. Considering that benznidazole (BZ can reduce the parasite burden and tissues damage, even in not cured animals and individuals, the goal is to assess the drug response to BZ of T. cruzi II strains isolated from children of the Jequitinhonha Valley, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, before treatment. Mice infected and treated with BZ in both phases of infection were compared with the untreated and evaluated by fresh blood examination, haemoculture, polymerase chain reaction, conventional (ELISA and non-conventional (FC-ALTA serologies. In mice treated in the acute phase, a significant decrease in parasitaemia was observed for all strains. Positive parasitological and/or serological tests in animals treated during the acute and chronic (95.1-100% phases showed that most of the strains were BZ resistant. However, beneficial effect was demonstrated because significant reduction (p < 0.05% and/or suppression of parasitaemia was observed in mice infected with all strains (acute phase, associated to reduction/elimination of inflammation and fibrosis for two/eight strains. BZ offered some benefit, even in not cured animals, what suggest that BZ use may be recommended at least for recent chronic infection of the studied region.

  18. Immunohistochemical characterization of mononuclear cells and MHC II expression in the brain of horses with experimental chronic Trypanosoma evansi infection Caracterização imunoistoquímica de células mononucleares e expressão de CMH II no sistema nervoso central de eqüinos com infecção crônica experimental por Trypanosoma evansi

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    Karen R. Lemos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available An histochemical and immunohistochemical study was carried out to evaluate the mechanisms of immune response of horses experimentally infected by Trypanosoma evansi. For this purpose the HE histochemical stain and the avidin biotin peroxidase method were used. To determine the presence and immunoreactivity of immune cells we used anti-major histocompatibility complex II antibodies. Cellular infiltration fenotype was characterized with the aid of anti-CD3 antibody for T lymphocytes and by anti-BLA 36 antibodies for B lymphocytes. Macrophages were marked with an antibody against myeloid/histyocites antigen (clone Mac387. Lesions in the CNS of experimentally infected horses were those of a wide spread non suppurative encephalomyelitis and meningomyelitis. The severity of lesions varied in different parts of the nervous system, reflecting an irregular distribution of inflammatory vascular changes. Lymphoid perivascular cuffs and meningeal infiltrations were of predominantly composed of T and B cells. The parasite, T. evansi, was not identified in these horses tissues.Este estudo objetivou caracterizar a resposta imune celular no sistema nervoso central (SNC de eqüinos com infecção crônica experimental por Trypanosoma evansi. Para este propósito, foram utilizados os métodos histoquímicos (HE e imunoistoquímicos do complexo avidina-biotina peroxidase (ABC. O fenótipo do infiltrado celular foi caracterizado com o auxílio de anticorpos anti - CD3, para linfócitos T e antiBLA36 para linfócitos B. Os macrófagos foram marcados com anticorpo antiantígenos da linhagem mielóide/histiócitos (Clone Mac387. A lesão no sistema nervoso central (SNC dos eqüinos infectados com T. evansi foi caracterizada como meningoencefalite e meningomielite não supurativa. A gravidade das lesões variou em diferentes segmentos do SNC, refletindo distribuição irregular das alterações vasculares. A distribuição de células T e B e antígenos do complexo

  19. Heme A synthesis and CcO activity are essential for Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Marcelo L; Cirulli, Brenda A; Menéndez-Bravo, Simón M; Cricco, Julia A

    2017-06-27

    Trypanosoma cruzi , the causative agent of Chagas disease, presents a complex life cycle and adapts its metabolism to nutrients' availability. Although T. cruzi is an aerobic organism, it does not produce heme. This cofactor is acquired from the host and is distributed and inserted into different heme-proteins such as respiratory complexes in the parasite's mitochondrion. It has been proposed that T. cruzi's energy metabolism relies on a branched respiratory chain with a cytochrome c oxidase-type aa 3 (C c O) as the main terminal oxidase. Heme A, the cofactor for all eukaryotic C c O, is synthesized via two sequential enzymatic reactions catalyzed by heme O synthase (HOS) and heme A synthase (HAS). Previously, TcCox10 and TcCox15 ( Trypanosoma cruzi Cox10 and Cox15 proteins) were identified in T. cruzi They presented HOS and HAS activity, respectively, when they were expressed in yeast. Here, we present the first characterization of TcCox15 in T. cruzi , confirming its role as HAS. It was differentially detected in the different T. cruzi stages, being more abundant in the replicative forms. This regulation could reflect the necessity of more heme A synthesis, and therefore more C c O activity at the replicative stages. Overexpression of a non-functional mutant caused a reduction in heme A content. Moreover, our results clearly showed that this hindrance in the heme A synthesis provoked a reduction on C c O activity and, in consequence, an impairment on T. cruzi survival, proliferation and infectivity. This evidence supports that T. cruzi depends on the respiratory chain activity along its life cycle, being C c O an essential terminal oxidase. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. Avaliação da atividade antiparasitária do alopurinol, referente ao Trypanosoma cruzi, em sistema experimental que utiliza triatomíneos infectados Evaluation of antiparasitic activity of allopurinol, against Trypanosoma cruzi, in experimental system using infected triatomines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Luís Carignani

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliada a atividade antiparasitária do alopurinol, referente ao Trypanosoma cruzi, através de procedimento que depende da utilização de triatomíneos infectados. De acordo com a metodologia usada, o fármaco não eliminou o protozoário do tubo digestivo dos insetos. Não ocorreu, portanto, obtenção de novo subsídio para melhor entendimento da posição do alopurinol no contexto do tratamento etiológico da infecção pelo T. cruzi, porquanto ela continua em foco, se bem que eivada de divergências e contradições.The antiparasitic activity of allopurinol, against Trypanosoma cruzi, was evaluated by a procedure using infected triatomines. This methodology indicated that the drug was unable to eliminate the protozoa in the digestive tract of the insects. Therefore, further knowledge to improve our understanding of allopurinol in the context of the etiologic treatment of infection by T. cruzi was not acquired. Despite this finding the drug continues to be used, even though its performance appears to be full of divergences and contradictions.

  1. Experimental Chemotherapy for Chagas Disease: A Morphological, Biochemical, and Proteomic Overview of Potential Trypanosoma cruzi Targets of Amidines Derivatives and Naphthoquinones

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Solange L.; Batista, Denise G. J.; Batista, Marcos M.; Batista, Wanderson; Daliry, Anissa; de Souza, Elen M.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; Oliveira, Gabriel M.; Salomão, Kelly; Silva, Cristiane F.; Silva, Patricia B.; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, affects approximately eight million individuals in Latin America and is emerging in nonendemic areas due to the globalisation of immigration and nonvectorial transmission routes. Although CD represents an important public health problem, resulting in high morbidity and considerable mortality rates, few investments have been allocated towards developing novel anti-T. cruzi agents. The available therapy for CD is based on two nitro derivatives (benznidazole (Bz) and nifurtimox (Nf)) developed more than four decades ago. Both are far from ideal due to substantial secondary side effects, limited efficacy against different parasite isolates, long-term therapy, and their well-known poor activity in the late chronic phase. These drawbacks justify the urgent need to identify better drugs to treat chagasic patients. Although several classes of natural and synthetic compounds have been reported to act in vitro and in vivo on T. cruzi, since the introduction of Bz and Nf, only a few drugs, such as allopurinol and a few sterol inhibitors, have moved to clinical trials. This reflects, at least in part, the absence of well-established universal protocols to screen and compare drug activity. In addition, a large number of in vitro studies have been conducted using only epimastigotes and trypomastigotes instead of evaluating compounds' activities against intracellular amastigotes, which are the reproductive forms in the vertebrate host and are thus an important determinant in the selection and identification of effective compounds for further in vivo analysis. In addition, due to pharmacokinetics and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion characteristics, several compounds that were promising in vitro have not been as effective as Nf or Bz in animal models of T. cruzi infection. In the last two decades, our team has collaborated with different medicinal chemistry groups to develop preclinical studies for CD and

  2. Experimental Chemotherapy for Chagas Disease: A Morphological, Biochemical, and Proteomic Overview of Potential Trypanosoma cruzi Targets of Amidines Derivatives and Naphthoquinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange L. de Castro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, affects approximately eight million individuals in Latin America and is emerging in nonendemic areas due to the globalisation of immigration and nonvectorial transmission routes. Although CD represents an important public health problem, resulting in high morbidity and considerable mortality rates, few investments have been allocated towards developing novel anti-T. cruzi agents. The available therapy for CD is based on two nitro derivatives (benznidazole (Bz and nifurtimox (Nf developed more than four decades ago. Both are far from ideal due to substantial secondary side effects, limited efficacy against different parasite isolates, long-term therapy, and their well-known poor activity in the late chronic phase. These drawbacks justify the urgent need to identify better drugs to treat chagasic patients. Although several classes of natural and synthetic compounds have been reported to act in vitro and in vivo on T. cruzi, since the introduction of Bz and Nf, only a few drugs, such as allopurinol and a few sterol inhibitors, have moved to clinical trials. This reflects, at least in part, the absence of well-established universal protocols to screen and compare drug activity. In addition, a large number of in vitro studies have been conducted using only epimastigotes and trypomastigotes instead of evaluating compounds' activities against intracellular amastigotes, which are the reproductive forms in the vertebrate host and are thus an important determinant in the selection and identification of effective compounds for further in vivo analysis. In addition, due to pharmacokinetics and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion characteristics, several compounds that were promising in vitro have not been as effective as Nf or Bz in animal models of T. cruzi infection. In the last two decades, our team has collaborated with different medicinal chemistry groups to develop preclinical studies

  3. Experimental Chemotherapy for Chagas Disease: A Morphological, Biochemical, and Proteomic Overview of Potential Trypanosoma cruzi Targets of Amidines Derivatives and Naphthoquinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Solange L; Batista, Denise G J; Batista, Marcos M; Batista, Wanderson; Daliry, Anissa; de Souza, Elen M; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; Oliveira, Gabriel M; Salomão, Kelly; Silva, Cristiane F; Silva, Patricia B; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, affects approximately eight million individuals in Latin America and is emerging in nonendemic areas due to the globalisation of immigration and nonvectorial transmission routes. Although CD represents an important public health problem, resulting in high morbidity and considerable mortality rates, few investments have been allocated towards developing novel anti-T. cruzi agents. The available therapy for CD is based on two nitro derivatives (benznidazole (Bz) and nifurtimox (Nf)) developed more than four decades ago. Both are far from ideal due to substantial secondary side effects, limited efficacy against different parasite isolates, long-term therapy, and their well-known poor activity in the late chronic phase. These drawbacks justify the urgent need to identify better drugs to treat chagasic patients. Although several classes of natural and synthetic compounds have been reported to act in vitro and in vivo on T. cruzi, since the introduction of Bz and Nf, only a few drugs, such as allopurinol and a few sterol inhibitors, have moved to clinical trials. This reflects, at least in part, the absence of well-established universal protocols to screen and compare drug activity. In addition, a large number of in vitro studies have been conducted using only epimastigotes and trypomastigotes instead of evaluating compounds' activities against intracellular amastigotes, which are the reproductive forms in the vertebrate host and are thus an important determinant in the selection and identification of effective compounds for further in vivo analysis. In addition, due to pharmacokinetics and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion characteristics, several compounds that were promising in vitro have not been as effective as Nf or Bz in animal models of T. cruzi infection. In the last two decades, our team has collaborated with different medicinal chemistry groups to develop preclinical studies for CD and

  4. CD8+ T-cells expressing interferon gamma or perforin play antagonistic roles in heart injury in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited cardiomyopathy.

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    Jaline Coutinho Silverio

    Full Text Available In Chagas disease, CD8(+ T-cells are critical for the control of Trypanosoma cruzi during acute infection. Conversely, CD8(+ T-cell accumulation in the myocardium during chronic infection may cause tissue injury leading to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC. Here we explored the role of CD8(+ T-cells in T. cruzi-elicited heart injury in C57BL/6 mice infected with the Colombian strain. Cardiomyocyte lesion evaluated by creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme activity levels in the serum and electrical abnormalities revealed by electrocardiogram were not associated with the intensity of heart parasitism and myocarditis in the chronic infection. Further, there was no association between heart injury and systemic anti-T. cruzi CD8(+ T-cell capacity to produce interferon-gamma (IFNγ and to perform specific cytotoxicity. Heart injury, however, paralleled accumulation of anti-T. cruzi cells in the cardiac tissue. In T. cruzi infection, most of the CD8(+ T-cells segregated into IFNγ(+ perforin (Pfn(neg or IFNγ(negPfn(+ cell populations. Colonization of the cardiac tissue by anti-T. cruzi CD8(+Pfn(+ cells paralleled the worsening of CCC. The adoptive cell transfer to T. cruzi-infected cd8(-/- recipients showed that the CD8(+ cells from infected ifnγ(-/-pfn(+/+ donors migrate towards the cardiac tissue to a greater extent and caused a more severe cardiomyocyte lesion than CD8(+ cells from ifnγ(+/+pfn(-/- donors. Moreover, the reconstitution of naïve cd8(-/- mice with CD8(+ cells from naïve ifnγ(+/+pfn(-/- donors ameliorated T. cruzi-elicited heart injury paralleled IFNγ(+ cells accumulation, whereas reconstitution with CD8(+ cells from naïve ifnγ(-/-pfn(+/+ donors led to an aggravation of the cardiomyocyte lesion, which was associated with the accumulation of Pfn(+ cells in the cardiac tissue. Our data support a possible antagonist effect of CD8(+Pfn(+ and CD8(+IFNγ(+ cells during CCC. CD8(+IFNγ(+ cells may exert a beneficial role, whereas CD8(+Pfn

  5. CD8+ T-Cells Expressing Interferon Gamma or Perforin Play Antagonistic Roles in Heart Injury in Experimental Trypanosoma Cruzi-Elicited Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipitelli, Márcio da Costa; Vinagre, Nathália Ferreira; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-01-01

    In Chagas disease, CD8+ T-cells are critical for the control of Trypanosoma cruzi during acute infection. Conversely, CD8+ T-cell accumulation in the myocardium during chronic infection may cause tissue injury leading to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). Here we explored the role of CD8+ T-cells in T. cruzi-elicited heart injury in C57BL/6 mice infected with the Colombian strain. Cardiomyocyte lesion evaluated by creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme activity levels in the serum and electrical abnormalities revealed by electrocardiogram were not associated with the intensity of heart parasitism and myocarditis in the chronic infection. Further, there was no association between heart injury and systemic anti-T. cruzi CD8+ T-cell capacity to produce interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and to perform specific cytotoxicity. Heart injury, however, paralleled accumulation of anti-T. cruzi cells in the cardiac tissue. In T. cruzi infection, most of the CD8+ T-cells segregated into IFNγ+ perforin (Pfn)neg or IFNγnegPfn+ cell populations. Colonization of the cardiac tissue by anti-T. cruzi CD8+Pfn+ cells paralleled the worsening of CCC. The adoptive cell transfer to T. cruzi-infected cd8 −/− recipients showed that the CD8+ cells from infected ifnγ−/− pfn +/+ donors migrate towards the cardiac tissue to a greater extent and caused a more severe cardiomyocyte lesion than CD8+ cells from ifnγ +/+ pfn −/− donors. Moreover, the reconstitution of naïve cd8 −/− mice with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ +/+ pfn −/− donors ameliorated T. cruzi-elicited heart injury paralleled IFNγ+ cells accumulation, whereas reconstitution with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ −/− pfn +/+ donors led to an aggravation of the cardiomyocyte lesion, which was associated with the accumulation of Pfn+ cells in the cardiac tissue. Our data support a possible antagonist effect of CD8+Pfn+ and CD8+IFNγ+ cells during CCC. CD8+IFNγ+ cells may exert a beneficial role, whereas CD8+Pfn+ may play a

  6. What controls glycolysis in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.; Opperdoes, F.R.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the experimentally determined kinetic properties of the trypanosomal enzymes, the question is addressed of which step limits the glycolytic flux in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei. There appeared to be no single answer; in the physiological range, control shifted between the

  7. Absence of CD4+ T lymphocytes, CD8+ T lymphocytes, or B lymphocytes has different effects on the efficacy of posaconazole and benznidazole in treatment of experimental acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Marcela L; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Alves, Rosana O; Urbina, Julio A; Romanha, Alvaro J

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the influence of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, CD8(+) T lymphocytes, and B lymphocytes on the efficacy of posaconazole (POS) and the reference drug benznidazole (BZ) during treatment of acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection in a murine model. Wild-type mice infected with T. cruzi and treated with POS or BZ presented no parasitemia, 100% survival, and 86 to 89% cure rates, defined as the percentages of animals with negative hemocultures at the end of the observation period. CD4(+)-T-lymphocyte-knockout (KO) mice infected with T. cruzi and treated with BZ or POS controlled parasitemia during treatment, although circulating parasites reappeared after drug pressure cessation, leading to only a 6% survival rate and no cure. CD8(+)-T-lymphocyte-KO mice infected with T. cruzi and treated with POS or BZ had intermediate results, displaying discrete parasitemia after the treatment was ended, 81 and 86% survival, and cure rates of 31 and 66%, respectively. B-lymphocyte-KO mice infected with T. cruzi and treated with BZ relapsed with parasitemia 1 week after the end of treatment and had a 67% survival rate and only a 22% cure rate. In contrast, the activity of POS was much less affected in these animals, with permanent suppression of parasitemia, 100% survival, and a 71% cure rate. Our results demonstrate that abrogation of different lymphocytes' activities has distinct effects on the efficacy of POS and BZ in this experimental model, probably reflecting different parasite stages preferentially targeted by the two drugs and distinct cooperation patterns with the host immune system.

  8. Oral transmission of Chagas disease: importance of Trypanosoma cruzi biodeme in the intragastric experimental infection Transmissão oral da doença de Chagas: importância do biodema do Trypanosoma cruzi na infecção experimental intragástrica

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    Edson Luiz P. CAMANDAROBA

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Oral transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi has been suspected when epidemic episodes of acute infection were observed in areas devoid of domiciled insect vectors. Considering that the distribution of T. cruzi biodemes differs in sylvatic and domestic cycles, results of studies on biodemes can be of interest regarding oral transmission. The infectivity of T. cruzi strains of different biodemes was tested in mice subjected to infection by the digestive route (gavage. Swiss mice were infected either with the Peruvian strain (Biodeme Type I, Z2b or the Colombian strain (Biodeme Type III, Z1, or T. cruzi I; for control, intraperitoneal inoculation was performed in a group of mice. The Colombian strain revealed a similar high infectivity and pathogenicity when either route of infection was used. However, the Peruvian strain showed contrasting levels of infectivity and pathogenicity, being high by intraperitoneal inoculation and low when the gastric route was used. The higher infectivity of the Colombian strain (Biodeme Type III by gastric inoculation is in keeping with its role in the epidemic episodes of acute Chagas disease registered in the literature, since strains belonging to Biodeme III are most often found in sylvatic hosts.A ocorrência de microepidemias de infecção pelo Trypanosoma cruzi atribuidas à ingestão de alimentos contaminados com excreta de vetores ou de reservatórios vertebrados, em áreas rurais chamou a atenção para este tipo não vetorial de transmissão da doença de Chagas. Considerando que cepas de diferentes biodemas se distribuem diferentemente nos ciclos silvestre e domiciliar de transmissão, a ocorrência de microepidemias predominantes em áreas próximas aos ecótopos silvestres pode estar relacionada com a cepa do parasito, tendo-se em conta a predominância do Biodema Tipo III, Z1 nestas áreas. No presente estudo foi investigada a infectividade de cepas do T. cruzi de diferentes biodemas quando inoculadas por via

  9. Effect of trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei mixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Trypanosoma congolense and T. brucei mixed infection on the pattern of haematological changes was demonstrated in a rat model. At the end of 21 days post infection (PI), anaemia which was characterised by drop in the packed cell volume (PCV), was found to be significantly (P<0.05) severer in rats with ...

  10. AUMENTO DA EXPRESSÃO DE ?-CATENINA E CADERINA NO CORAÇÃO DE CAMUNDONGOS NA FASE AGUDA E CRÔNICA DA INFECÇÃO EXPERIMENTAL POR Trypanosoma cruzi UPREGULATION OF ?-CATENIN AND CADHERIN EXPRESSION IN HEARTS OF MICE IN ACUTE AND CHRONIC PHASE OF EXPERIMENTAL Trypanosoma cruzi infection

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    Tatyane Penha Sales

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As proteínas das junções de aderência têm sido associadas ao mecanismo patológico da miocardiopatia chagásica. Objetivando determinar a natureza dessas alterações, infectaram-se dez camundongos machos Swiss Webster com 25 dias de idade por via intraperitoneal com uma cepa tipo III de Trypanosoma cruzi na dose de 1,0 x 104 tripomastigotas/camundongo. Cinco camundongos infectados foram sacrificados no 14° dia (pico de parasitemia de infecção (grupo A e outros cinco camundongos (grupo C três meses após a inoculação, representando a fase crônica da infecção. Inocularam-se dez animais com solução estéril de cloreto de sódio 0,9%, sendo sacrificados no 14° dia (grupo CA e cinco ao final do terceiro mês (grupo CC, para servirem como controles não-infectados. As junções de aderência foram analisadas a partir do lisado total dos corações submetido a western blotting para pan-caderina e β-catenina. A análise do western blotting revelou aumento da expressão de pan-caderina na fase aguda (2,1x ± 0,89, p= 0,048 e crônica (2,1x ± 0,92, p= 0,05 quando comparadas com seus respectivos controles. Em relação à β-catenin, os resultados mostraram o mesmo padrão caracterizado pelo aumento de seus níveis na fase aguda (6,8x ± 4,65, p= 0,047 e crônica (3,65x ± 1,93, p= 0,033 em comparação aos controles. Assim, estes resultados indicam a associação das proteínas de junção de aderência aos eventos patológicos em corações de camundongos infectados por T. cruzi.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Doença de Chagas, junções de aderência, miocardite, western blotting.
    Adherens junctions proteins have also been envolved in pathological mechanism of chagasic myocardiopathy. Aimed to determine the nature of these alterations, ten Swiss Webster male mice, 25 days-old were infected with a Type III strain of Trypanosoma cruzi through intraperitoneal (IP route with 1.0 x 104 trypomastigotes/mouse. Five infected mice were

  11. Trypanosoma (nannomonas) congolense : separation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosoma (nannomonas) congolense : separation of chromosomes of PCR product specific to medium-size chromosome. ... hybridized to medium sized chromosomes2. This cloned fragment can therefore be used as a specific DNA marker for medium –size chromosome 2 of T. congolense. The Kenya Veterinarian Vol.

  12. Immunization of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi polyribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, L L; Leon, W; Chaves, L; Costa, S C; Cruz, M Q; Brascher, H M; Lima, A O

    1980-01-01

    Studies were carried out with a polyribosomal fraction isolated from Trypanosoma cruzi Y epimastigotes, with the intention to determine both its immunogenic activity and the degree of protection it could induce against experimental T. cruzi infection. This fraction was assayed in four groups of mice by using different schedules of vaccination and varying the dose, intervals, and route of administration. Seven days after the last dose, the animals were sacrificed for immunological studies or subjected to challenge with T. cruzi trypomastigotes. The results obtained in all schedules showed that our polyribosomal fraction only induced a weak antibody response, but was capable of evoking an expressive cellular response. It was also shown that this fraction has the capacity of inducing a high degree of protection against T. cruzi infection, as determined by the decrease of parasitemia and the prolonged survival time of immunized animals.

  13. The nuclear proteome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goos, Carina; Dejung, Mario; Janzen, Christian J; Butter, Falk; Kramer, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan flagellate that is transmitted by tsetse flies into the mammalian bloodstream. The parasite has a huge impact on human health both directly by causing African sleeping sickness and indirectly, by infecting domestic cattle. The biology of trypanosomes involves some highly unusual, nuclear-localised processes. These include polycistronic transcription without classical promoters initiated from regions defined by histone variants, trans-splicing of all transcripts to the exon of a spliced leader RNA, transcription of some very abundant proteins by RNA polymerase I and antigenic variation, a switch in expression of the cell surface protein variants that allows the parasite to resist the immune system of its mammalian host. Here, we provide the nuclear proteome of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei, the stage that resides within the tsetse fly midgut. We have performed quantitative label-free mass spectrometry to score 764 significantly nuclear enriched proteins in comparison to whole cell lysates. A comparison with proteomes of several experimentally characterised nuclear and non-nuclear structures and pathways confirmed the high quality of the dataset: the proteome contains about 80% of all nuclear proteins and less than 2% false positives. Using motif enrichment, we found the amino acid sequence KRxR present in a large number of nuclear proteins. KRxR is a sub-motif of a classical eukaryotic monopartite nuclear localisation signal and could be responsible for nuclear localization of proteins in Kinetoplastida species. As a proof of principle, we have confirmed the nuclear localisation of six proteins with previously unknown localisation by expressing eYFP fusion proteins. While proteome data of several T. brucei organelles have been published, our nuclear proteome closes an important gap in knowledge to study trypanosome biology, in particular nuclear-related processes.

  14. Comparative serology techniques for the diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in a rural population from the state of Querétaro, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Villagrán-Herrera

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunological diagnostic methods for Trypanosoma cruzi depend specifically on the presence of antibodies and parasitological methods lack sensitivity during the chronic and “indeterminate” stages of the disease. This study performed a serological survey of 1,033 subjects from 52 rural communities in 12 of the 18 municipalities in the state of Querétaro, Mexico. We detected anti-T. cruzi antibodies using the following tests: indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA, indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA, ELISA and recombinant ELISA (rELISA. We also performed Western blot (WB analysis using iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD, a detoxifying enzyme excreted by the parasite, as the antigen. Positive test results were distributed as follows: ELISA 8%, rELISA 6.2%, IFA and IHA 5.4% in both cases and FeSOD 8%. A comparative study of the five tests was undertaken. Sensitivity levels, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, concordance percentage and kappa index were considered. Living with animals, trips to other communities, gender, age, type of housing and symptomatology at the time of the survey were statistically analysed using SPSS software v.11.5. Detection of the FeSOD enzyme that was secreted by the parasite and used as an antigenic fraction in WBs showed a 100% correlation with traditional ELISA tests.

  15. Effect of Concurrent Trypanosoma brucei Infection on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of concurrent Trypanosoma bruceiinfection on caprine haemonchosis was investigated in Red Sokoto (Maradi) goats infected with either Haemonchus contortus alone or concurrently with Trypanosoma brucei. The goats infected with H. contortus alone manifested clinical disease that was mild and without ...

  16. Comparative haematological changes in experimentally infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of haematological changes in Savannah brown goats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma vivax was carried out using thirty (30) goats aged between 20 and 48 months and average weight of 13.00 kg. The parameters determined before and after infection included ...

  17. Infecção experimental de macacos Cebus apella sp pelo Trypanosoma cruzi (cepa "y" I - curva da parasitemia na fase aguda da doença de Chagas

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    Geraldo Chaia

    1977-04-01

    Full Text Available Sete macacos (Cebus apella sp foram inoculados por via subcutânea peto Trypanosoma cruzi com um número de formas tripomastigotas que variou de 25 x 103 a 5 x 1O6. Um outro primata, também da mesma espécie, foi inoculado por via palpebral com fezes de Triatoma infestans contendo formas de T. cruzi provenientes da mesma cepa "Y". A presença do T. cruzi foi assinalada na maioria dos animais, pela primeira vez, no 8º dia após a infecção. Os picos máximos da parasitemia foram observados entre o 9º e o 12º dia da infecção. O número de tripanosomas caiu acentuadamente do 19º ao 25º dia. Todos os animais infectados sobreviveram. Estudos estão sendo conduzidos com o intuito de se observar o comportamento destes animais na fase crônica da doença.Seven monkeys Cebus apella sp were inoculated by subcutaneous route with an amount of tripomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi ranging from 25 x 10³ to 5 x 1O6. Another primate of the same species was inoculated by palpebral route with feces of Triatoma infestans containing T. cruzi forms originating from the same "Y" strain. The presence of T. cruzi was first observed in most of the animais on the 8th day after the infection. The maximum peaks of parasitemia occurred between the 9th and the 12th day of infection. The number of T. cruzi decreased markedly from the 19th to the 25th day and ail of the infected animais survived. Further studies are being conducted in order to observe the behaviour of these animais in the chronic phase of the disease.

  18. AcSDKP is down-regulated in anaemia induced by Trypanosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the responses of a tetrapeptide, AcSDKP, and IL-10, and their association with bone marrow nucleated cells in a Trypanosoma brucei brucei GVR35 experimental infection model. Methods Mouse infection was done intraperitoneally with 1 × 103 trypanosomes/mL. Mice were either infected or left uninfected (N ...

  19. Sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marcelle; Nitz, Nadjar; Santana, Camilla; Moraes, Aline; Hagström, Luciana; Andrade, Rafael; Rios, Adriano; Sousa, Alessandro; Dallago, Bruno; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Hecht, Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking triatomines, but other routes also have epidemiological importance, such as blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Although the possibility of sexual transmission of T. cruzi has been suggested since its discovery, few studies have been published on this subject. We investigated acquisition of T. cruzi by sexual intercourse in an experimental murine model. Male and female mice in the chronic phase of Chagas disease were mated with naive partners. Parasitological, serological and molecular tests demonstrated the parasites in tissues and blood of partners. These results confirm the sexual transmission of T. cruzi in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Polymerase chain reaction identification of Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase chain reaction identification of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in wild tsetse flies from Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve, Malawi. Janelisa Musaya, John Chisi, Edward Senga, Peter Nambala, Emmanuel Maganga, Enock Matovu, John Enyaru ...

  1. Trypanosoma evansi isolated from capybara (Hidrochaeris hidrochaeris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Muñoz

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the morphological and biometric characteristics of Trypanosoma isolated from 50 capybaras animals, raised in captivity in the Peruvian Amazon. Trypanosoma was found in 14 blood samples using the microhaematocrit, wide drop, and Giemsa-stain methods and T. evansi was identified through morphological details in all 14 positive samples (the subterminal kinetoplast, the developed undulating membrane, and a long free flagellum were used for the identification of the agent.

  2. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid H Gazestani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org.

  3. Nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, Sergio; Pascoalino, Bruno dos Santos; Nardelli, Sheila C

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nucleus in living organisms characterizes the Eukaryote domain. The nucleus compartmentalizes the genetic material surrounded by a double membrane called nuclear envelope. The nucleus has been observed since the advent of the light microscope, and sub-compartments such as nucleoli, diverse nuclear bodies and condensed chromosomes have been later recognized, being part of highly organized and dynamic structure. The significance and function of such organization has increased with the understanding of transcription, replication, DNA repair, recombination processes. It is now recognized as consequence of adding complexity and regulation in more complex eukaryotic cells. Here we provide a description of the actual stage of knowledge of the nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi. As an early divergent eukaryote, it presents unique and/or reduced events of DNA replication, transcription and repair as well as RNA processing and transport to the cytosol. Nevertheless, it shows peculiar structure changes accordingly to the cell cycle and stage of differentiation. T. cruzi proliferates only as epimastigote and amastigote stages, and when these forms differentiate in trypomastigote forms, their cell cycle is arrested. This arrested stage is capable of invading mammalian cells and of surviving harsh conditions, such as the gut of the insect vector and mammalian macrophages. Transcription and replication decrease during transformation in trypomastigotes implicating large alterations in the nuclear structure. Recent evidences also suggest that T. cruzi nucleus respond to oxidative and nutritional stresses. Due to the phylogenetic proximity with other well-known trypanosomes, such as Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, they are expected to have similar nuclear organization, although differences are noticed due to distinct life cycles, cellular organizations and the specific adaptations for surviving in different host environments. Therefore, the general

  4. Inventory of potential vectors of trypanosoma and infection rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trypanosoma's vectors distribution is poorly investigated in Gabon, where Trypanosomiasis historical foci exist. Thus, an active detection of Trypanosoma sp transmission needs to be assessed. Objectives: The present study aims to identify potential vectors of Trypanosoma sp and to evaluate the infection rate ...

  5. Cytokine-dependent and–independent gene expression changes and cell cycle block revealed in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected host cells by comparative mRNA profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burleigh Barbara A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The requirements for growth and survival of the intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi within mammalian host cells are poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to infection serves as a rapid read-out for perturbation of host physiology that, in part, reflects adaptation to the infective process. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide array analysis we identified common and disparate host cell responses triggered by T. cruzi infection of phenotypically diverse human cell types. Results We report significant changes in transcript abundance in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (2852, 2155 and 531 genes respectively; fold-change ≥ 2, p-value T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts and endothelial cells transwell plates were used to distinguish cytokine-dependent and -independent gene expression profiles. This approach revealed the induction of metabolic and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, amino acid catabolism and response to wounding as common themes in T. cruzi-infected cells. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in mitotic cell cycle and cell division predicted that T. cruzi infection may impede host cell cycle progression. The observation of impaired cytokinesis in T. cruzi-infected cells, following nuclear replication, confirmed this prediction. Conclusion Metabolic pathways and cellular processes were identified as significantly altered at the transcriptional level in response to T. cruzi infection in a cytokine-independent manner. Several of these alterations are supported by previous studies of T. cruzi metabolic requirements or effects on the host. However, our methods also revealed a T. cruzi-dependent block in the host cell cycle, at the level of cytokinesis, previously unrecognized for this pathogen-host cell interaction.

  6. The isolation and identification of Trypanosoma cruzi from raccoons in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, B.C.; Bauman, P.M.; Diamond, L.S.; Herman, C.M.

    1958-01-01

    Five raccoons trapped at Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Maryland, were found to have trypanosomes in the blood which were morphologically indistinguishable from Trypanosoma cruzi on stained smears. The organism grew well in culture. It developed and reproduced in Triatoma protracta, T. infestans, T. phyllosoma, and Rhodnius prolixus. Experimental infections were produced in raccoons, opossums, mice, rats, and monkeys by inoculation of blood, culture, and triatome forms. Typical leishmaniform bodies were found in tissue sections of cardiac muscle fibers from naturally and experimentally infected animals. Cross agglutinations carried out with Iiving cultural forms and rabbit antisera demonstrated a close antigenic relationship between the raccoon trypanosome and T. cruzi (Brazil strain). On the basis of (1) morphology, (2) presence of leishmaniform tissue stages, (3) development in triatomes, (4) infectivity to a variety of mammals, (5) culture characteristics, and (6) cross reactions in serological tests, this parasite is considered conspecific with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas, 1909), the causative agent of American human trypanosomiasis.

  7. Pathogenicity of Trypanosoma congolense infection following oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty healthy adult albino rats of both sexes weighing 180-200g were used in two experiments to study the effects of oral calcium chloride treatment on the pathogenicity of Trypanosoma congolense infection. Experiment 1 was terminated at the peak of parasitaemia while experiment II was allowed to run a full course.

  8. Characterization of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense stocks isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense was isolated twice from each of 23 patients in Côte d'Ivoire. Genetic characterization using RAPD (Random Primed Amplified Polymorphic DNA) showed additional variability within a given isoenzyme profile (zymodeme), confirming that this fingerprinting method has a higher discriminative ...

  9. Characterisation of the Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum resistance associated (SRA) gene has been found to confer resistance to the innate trypanolytic factor (TLF) found in normal human serum; thus allowing Trypanosoma brucei brucei to survive exposure to normal human serum. This study was carried out to examine the presence of SRA gene and identify the origin of ...

  10. (puppies) to infection with Trypanosoma congolense

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were undertaken to assess the susceptibility of young local dogs to infection with Trypanosoma congolensei. Six puppies (7 weeks old) were used for the study. Although the puppies became parasitaemic 6 to 7 days post infection, they were tolerant to infection as the parasitaemia remained low through out the first ...

  11. The kinetoplast DNA of Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.C. Frasch; S.L. Hajduk; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Borst (Piet); F. Brunel; J. Davison

    1980-01-01

    textabstractWe have analyzed the kinetoplast DNA for Trypanosoma equiperdum (American Type Culture Collection 30019) and two dyskinetoplastic strains derived from it. The DNA networks from the kinetoplastic strain are made up of catenated mini-circles and maxi-circles, like the networks from the

  12. Structural model of a putrescine-cadaverine permease from Trypanosoma cruzi predicts residues vital for transport and ligand binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soysa, R.; Venselaar, H.; Poston, J.; Ullman, B.; Hasne, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    The TcPOT1.1 gene from Trypanosoma cruzi encodes a high affinity putrescine-cadaverine transporter belonging to the APC (amino acid/polyamine/organocation) transporter superfamily. No experimental three-dimensional structure exists for any eukaryotic member of the APC family, and thus the structural

  13. Exocytosis and protein secretion in Trypanosoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossignol Michel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human African trypanosomiasis is a lethal disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The proteins secreted by T. brucei inhibit the maturation of dendritic cells and their ability to induce lymphocytic allogenic responses. To better understand the pathogenic process, we combined different approaches to characterize these secreted proteins. Results Overall, 444 proteins were identified using mass spectrometry, the largest parasite secretome described to date. Functional analysis of these proteins revealed a strong bias toward folding and degradation processes and to a lesser extent toward nucleotide metabolism. These features were shared by different strains of T. brucei, but distinguished the secretome from published T. brucei whole proteome or glycosome. In addition, several proteins had not been previously described in Trypanosoma and some constitute novel potential therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. Interestingly, a high proportion of these secreted proteins are known to have alternative roles once secreted. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis showed that a significant proportion of proteins in the secretome lack transit peptide and are probably not secreted through the classical sorting pathway. Membrane vesicles from secretion buffer and infested rat serum were purified on sucrose gradient and electron microscopy pictures have shown 50- to 100-nm vesicles budding from the coated plasma membrane. Mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of Trypanosoma proteins in these microvesicles, showing that an active exocytosis might occur beyond the flagellar pocket. Conclusions This study brings out several unexpected features of the secreted proteins and opens novel perspectives concerning the survival strategy of Trypanosoma as well as possible ways to control the disease. In addition, concordant lines of evidence support the original hypothesis of the involvement of microvesicle-like bodies in the

  14. Genitourinary changes in hamsters infected and reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Cabrine-Santos Marlene

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors describe genitourinary changes in male hamsters infected and reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Changes in genital organs have been described in human and in experimental chagasic infection. Genital dysfunctions in chronic chagasic patients affect ejaculation, libido and sexual potency, and testis biopsies may show arrested maturation of germ cells, oligozoospermia and azoospermia. Sixty-five male hamsters were inoculated and reinoculated with 2x10³ trypomastigotes of T. cruzi VIC strain, and 22 non-infected animals constituted the control group. Animals were necropsied and fragments from testis, epididymis, seminal vesicle and bladder were collected and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Peroxidase anti-peroxidase procedure was utilized to detect tissue parasitism. T. cruzi nests were found in testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle of these hamsters. Such parasitism plays a role in the origin of genital lesions observed in humans and laboratory animals during chronic chagasic infection.

  15. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense in Glossina fuscipes fuscipes ( Diptera: Glossinidae ) and Stomoxys flies using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique in southern Sudan.

  16. Valores de transaminasas en cabras criollas infectadas con Trypanosoma vivax Transaminases values in Creole goats infected with Trypanosoma vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Espinoza

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available La presente comunicación reporta los valores de las enzimas transaminasas, Aspartatoaminotransferasa (AST y Alaninaaminotransferasa (ALT encontrados en sueros de cabras infectadas con la cepa de Trypanosoma vivax Stock (TvIIV y sus controles. Las determinaciones se realizaron durante un lapso experimental de diez semanas, divididos en dos períodos iguales (pre y post-infección por intermedio de un método colorimétrico, utilizando kits comerciales. Los datos fueron analizados mediante la prueba t Student's. En el caso de la AST, la comparación de las medias parciales de ambos grupos infectado y control, no indicó diferencias estadísticas. Con respecto a la ALT, la contrastación de las medias parciales de pre y post-infección del grupo de cabras infectadas, señaló diferencias significativas (PThe present communication reports the transaminases enzymes values Aspartatoaminotransferase (AST and Alaninaaminotransferase (ALT in serum from goats infected with the Trypanosoma vivax Stock (TvIIV. The determinations were realized during a ten week experimental period divided into two equal periods (pre- and post-infection by colorimetric method, using commercial kits. The dates were analyzed through the t Student's test. In the AST case, the comparison between partial means of infected and control groups did not show any statistical differences. In relation to ALT, the contrast of partial means to pre- and post-infection from infected goats group indicated significant differences (P<0.01.

  17. 21 CFR 866.3870 - Trypanosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trypanosoma spp. serological reagents. 866.3870 Section 866.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... protozoans belonging to the genus Trypanosoma. Trypanosomiasis in adults is a chronic disease characterized...

  18. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase in the Human Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Anderson, Spencer; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Furtak, Vyacheslav; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R. (Vanderbilt); (NWU); (Meharry)

    2010-09-02

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), which threatens the lives of millions of people and remains incurable in its chronic stage. The antifungal drug posaconazole that blocks sterol biosynthesis in the parasite is the only compound entering clinical trials for the chronic form of this infection. Crystal structures of the drug target enzyme, Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), complexed with posaconazole, another antifungal agent fluconazole and an experimental inhibitor, (R)-4{prime}-chloro-N-(1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imid-azol-1-yl)ethyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (VNF), allow prediction of important chemical features that enhance the drug potencies. Combined with comparative analysis of inhibitor binding parameters, influence on the catalytic activity of the trypanosomal enzyme and its human counterpart, and their cellular effects at different stages of the Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle, the structural data provide a molecular background to CYP51 inhibition and azole resistance and enlighten the path for directed design of new, more potent and selective drugs to develop an efficient treatment for Chagas disease.

  19. Iron-associated biology of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basu, Somsuvro; Horáková, Eva; Lukeš, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1860, č. 2 (2016), s. 363-370 ISSN 0304-4165 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S; GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) COST Action CM1307; European Commission(XE) 316304 - MODBIOLIN Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200961204 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : iron * Fe/S cluster * heme * Trypanosoma * TAO Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.702, year: 2016

  20. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of nicotinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Milena B P; Silva, Cinara V; Bastos, Tanira M; Guimarães, Elisalva T; Figueira, Claudio P; Smirlis, Despina; Azevedo, Walter F

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp. sirtuins has shown promising antiparasitic activity, indicating that these enzymes may be used as targets for drug discovery against trypanosomatid infections. In the present work we carried out a virtual screening focused on the C pocket of Sir2 from Trypanosoma cruzi. Using this approach, the best ligand found was nicotinamide. In vitro tests confirmed the anti-T. cruzi activity of nicotinamide on epimastigote and trypomastigote forms. Moreover, treatment of T. cruzi-infected macrophages with nicotinamide caused a significant reduction in the number of amastigotes. In addition, alterations in the mitochondria and an increase in the vacuolization in the cytoplasm were observed in epimastigotes treated with nicotinamide. Analysis of the complex of Sir2 and nicotinamide revealed the details of the possible ligand-target interaction. Our data reveal a potential use of TcSir2 as a target for anti-T. cruzi drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli induces resistance of guinea pigs to virulent Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, B; Moretti, E; Fretes, R

    2014-01-15

    Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America, is spread in natural environments through animal reservoirs, including marsupials, mice and guinea pigs. Farms breeding guinea pigs for food are located in some Latin-American countries with consequent risk of digestive infection. The aim of this work was to study the effect of vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli in guinea pigs challenged with Trypanosoma cruzi. Animals were vaccinated with fixated epimastigotes of T. rangeli, emulsified with saponin. Controls received only PBS. Before being challenged with T. cruzi, parasitemia, survival rates and histological studies were performed. The vaccinated guinea pigs revealed significantly lower parasitemia than controls (pguinea pigs and dogs. The development of vaccines for use in animals, like domestic dogs and guinea pigs in captivity, opens up new opportunities for preventive tools, and could reduce the risk of infection with T. cruzi in the community. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Studies on the virulence and attenuation of Trypanosoma cruzi using immunodeficient animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basombrío Miguel Ángel

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue invasion and pathology by Trypanosoma cruzi result from an interaction between parasite virulence and host immunity. Successive in vivo generations of the parasite select populations with increasing ability to invade the host. Conversely, prolonged in vitro selection of the parasite produces attenuated sublines with low infectivity for mammals. One such subline (TCC clone has been extensively used in our laboratory as experimental vaccine and tested in comparative experiments with its virulent ancestor (TUL. The experiments here reviewed aimed at the use of immunodeficient mice for testing the infectivity of TCC parasites. It has not been possible to obtain virulent, revertant sublines by prolonged passaged in such mice.

  3. Chloramphenicol-sensitive mitochondrial translation in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabholz, C. E.; Speijer, D.; Schneider, A.

    1999-01-01

    We developed an in organello system to label newly synthesized mitochondrially encoded proteins of Trypanosoma brucei. Highly purified mitochondria, prepared under isotonic conditions, were incubated with radioactive methionine and cysteine in a suitable translation buffer. Analysis of mitochondrial

  4. Production of amastigotes from metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor T Contreras

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to recreate all the developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro have thus far been met with partial success. It is possible, for instance, to produce trypomastigotes in tissue culture and to obtain metacyclic trypomastigotes in axenic conditions. Even though T. cruzi amastigotes are known to differentiate from trypomastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes, it has only been possible to generate amastigotes in vitro from the tissue-culture-derived trypomastigotes. The factors and culture conditions required to trigger the transformation of metacyclic trypomastigotes into amastigotes are as yet undetermined. We show here that pre-incubation of metacyclic trypomastigotes in culture (MEMTAU medium at 37°C for 48 h is sufficient to commit the parasites to the transformation process. After 72 h of incubation in fresh MEMTAU medium, 90% of the metacyclic parasites differentiate into forms that are morphologically indistinguishable from normal amastigotes. SDS-PAGE, Western blot and PAABS analyses indicate that the transformation of axenic metacyclic trypomastigotes to amastigotes is associated with protein, glycoprotein and antigenic modifications. These data suggest that (a T. cruzi amastigotes can be obtained axenically in large amounts from metacyclic trypomastigotes, and (b the amastigotes thus obtained are morphological, biological and antigenically similar to intracellular amastigotes. Consequently, this experimental system may facilitate a direct, in vitro assessment of the mechanisms that enable T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes to transform into amastigotes in the cells of mammalian hosts.

  5. Implication of Apoptosis for the Pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Decote-Ricardo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is induced during the course of immune response to different infectious agents, and the ultimate fate is the recognition and uptake of apoptotic bodies by neighboring cells or by professional phagocytes. Apoptotic cells expose specific ligands to a set of conserved receptors expressed on macrophage cellular surface, which are the main cells involved in the clearance of the dying cells. These scavenger receptors, besides triggering the production of anti-inflammatory factors, also block the production of inflammatory mediators by phagocytes. Experimental infection of mice with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi shows many pathological changes that parallels the evolution of human infection. Leukocytes undergoing intense apoptotic death are observed during the immune response to T. cruzi in the mouse model of the disease. T. cruzi replicate intensely and secrete molecules with immunomodulatory activities that interfere with T cell-mediated immune responses and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. This mechanism of immune evasion allows the infection to be established in the vertebrate host. Under inflammatory conditions, efferocytosis of apoptotic bodies generates an immune-regulatory phenotype in phagocytes, which is conducive to intracellular pathogen replication. However, the relevance of cellular apoptosis in the pathology of Chagas’ disease requires further studies. Here, we review the evidence of leukocyte apoptosis in T. cruzi infection and its immunomodulatory mechanism for disease progression.

  6. Role of dystrophin in acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestio, Lygia M; Celes, Mara R N; Milanezi, Cristiane; Silva, João S; Jelicks, Linda A; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Rossi, Marcos A; Prado, Cibele M

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated loss/reduction of dystrophin in cardiomyocytes in both acute and chronic stages of experimental Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection in mice. The mechanisms responsible for dystrophin disruption in the hearts of mice acutely infected with T. cruzi are not completely understood. The present in vivo and in vitro studies were undertaken to evaluate the role of inflammation in dystrophin disruption and its correlation with the high mortality rate during acute infection. C57BL/6 mice were infected with T. cruzi and killed 14, 20 and 26 days post infection (dpi). The intensity of inflammation, cardiac expression of dystrophin, calpain-1, NF-κB, TNF-α, and sarcolemmal permeability were evaluated. Cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocytes were incubated with serum, collected at the peak of cytokine production and free of parasites, from T. cruzi-infected mice and dystrophin, calpain-1, and NF-κB expression analyzed. Dystrophin disruption occurs at the peak of mortality and inflammation and is associated with increased expression of calpain-1, TNF-α, NF-κB, and increased sarcolemmal permeability in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice at 20 dpi confirmed by in vitro studies. The peak of mortality occurred only when significant loss of dystrophin in the hearts of infected animals occurred, highlighting the correlation between inflammation, dystrophin loss and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Jelicks, Linda A; Shirani, Jamshid; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos; Spray, David C; Factor, Stephen M; Kirchhoff, Louis V; Weiss, Louis M

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is a common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10% to 30% of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important modalities in the evaluation and prognostication of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years.

  8. In vivo trypanocidal activity of Nymphaea lotus Linn. methanol extract against Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Haruna Garba

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antitrypanosomal potentials of methanol extract of Nymphaea lotus Linn. (N. lotus with the aim of obtaining a new lead for formulating safe, inexpensive, nontoxic and readily available trypanocidal drugs. Methods: Seventy percent (v/v (methanol/water crude extract of N. lotus was evaluated for antitrypanosomal activity in experimental trypanosomiasis using Trypanosoma brucei bruceiinfected mice. Infected mice in different groups were administered intraperitoneally 100, 200, 300 and 400 mg/kg body weight/day of the crude for two weeks, while a positive control group was treated with standard drug, berenil. Results: The crude extract at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight/day was more effective than the higher doses in completely clearing parasites from the blood of mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Pre-treatment of healthy mice with the crude extract for 5 days before infection did not prevent the establishment of the infection, indicating that the extract had no prophylactic activity. Subinoculation of the blood and cerebrospinal fluid drawn from the cured mice into healthy mice failed to produce any infection within 50 days post inoculation. Administration of 1 000 mg/kg body weight of the crude extract led to the death of 50% of the experimental animals indicating a high level of toxicity of the extract at higher doses. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potency of the crude extract of N. lotus in treating experimental trypanosomiasis at lower doses.

  9. Proteomics of Trypanosoma evansi infection in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nainita Roy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi infections, commonly called 'surra', cause significant economic losses to livestock industry. While this infection is mainly restricted to large animals such as camels, donkeys and equines, recent reports indicate their ability to infect humans. There are no World Animal Health Organization (WAHO prescribed diagnostic tests or vaccines available against this disease and the available drugs show significant toxicity. There is an urgent need to develop improved methods of diagnosis and control measures for this disease. Unlike its related human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi whose genomes have been fully sequenced T. evansi genome sequence remains unavailable and very little efforts are being made to develop improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. With a view to identify potential diagnostic markers and drug targets we have studied the clinical proteome of T. evansi infection using mass spectrometry (MS.Using shot-gun proteomic approach involving nano-lc Quadrupole Time Of Flight (QTOF mass spectrometry we have identified over 160 proteins expressed by T. evansi in mice infected with camel isolate. Homology driven searches for protein identification from MS/MS data led to most of the matches arising from related Trypanosoma species. Proteins identified belonged to various functional categories including metabolic enzymes; DNA metabolism; transcription; translation as well as cell-cell communication and signal transduction. TCA cycle enzymes were strikingly missing, possibly suggesting their low abundances. The clinical proteome revealed the presence of known and potential drug targets such as oligopeptidases, kinases, cysteine proteases and more.Previous proteomic studies on Trypanosomal infections, including human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi, have been carried out from lab grown cultures. For T. evansi infection this is indeed the first ever proteomic study reported thus far. In addition to providing a

  10. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Habila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs from Cymbopogon citratus (CC, Eucalyptus citriodora (EC, Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED, and Citrus sinensis (CS were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi. The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09% in CS, 6-octenal (77.11% in EC, Eucalyptol (75% in ED, and Citral (38.32% in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy.

  11. Trypanosoma evansi is alike to Trypanosoma brucei brucei in the subcellular localisation of glycolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Andrea Moreno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi, which causes surra, is descended from Trypanosoma brucei brucei, which causes nagana. Although both parasites are presumed to be metabolically similar, insufficient knowledge of T. evansi precludes a full comparison. Herein, we provide the first report on the subcellular localisation of the glycolytic enzymes in T. evansi, which is a alike to that of the bloodstream form (BSF of T. b. brucei: (i fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, phosphoglycerate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase (glycolytic enzymes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (a glycolysis-auxiliary enzyme in glycosomes, (ii enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase, pyruvate kinase (glycolytic enzymes and a GAPDH isoenzyme in the cytosol, (iii malate dehydrogenase in cytosol and (iv glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both glycosomes and the cytosol. Specific enzymatic activities also suggest that T. evansi is alike to the BSF of T. b. brucei in glycolytic flux, which is much faster than the pentose phosphate pathway flux, and in the involvement of cytosolic GAPDH in the NAD+/NADH balance. These similarities were expected based on the close phylogenetic relationship of both parasites.

  12. Comparative studies on the biochemical properties of the malic enzymes from Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Alejandro E; Maugeri, Dante A; Opperdoes, Fred R; Cazzulo, Juan J; Nowicki, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Comparative studies showed that, like Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei exhibits functional cytosolic and mitochondrial malic enzymes (MEs), which are specifically linked to NADP. Kinetic studies provided evidence that T. cruzi and T. brucei MEs display similarly high affinities towards NADP(+) and are also almost equally efficient in catalyzing the production of NADPH. Nevertheless, in contrast to the cytosolic ME from T. cruzi, which is highly activated by l-aspartate (over 10-fold), the T. brucei homologue is slightly more active (50%) in the presence of this amino acid. In T. brucei, both isozymes appear to be clearly more abundant in the insect stage, although they can be immunodetected in the bloodstream forms. By contrast, in T. cruzi the expression of the mitochondrial ME seems to be clearly upregulated in amastigotes, whereas the cytosolic isoform appears to be more abundant in the insect stages of the parasite. It might be hypothesized that in those environments where glucose is very low or absent, these pathogens depend on NADP-linked dehydrogenases such as the MEs for NADPH production, as in those conditions the pentose phosphate pathway cannot serve as a source of essential reducing power. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular diagnosis of cattle trypanosomes in Venezuela: evidences of Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma vivax infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Iglesias, J R; Eleizalde, M C; Reyna-Bello, A; Mendoza, M

    2017-06-01

    In South America Trypanosoma evansi has been determined by molecular methods in cattle from Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Peru, reason for which the presence of this parasite is not excluded in Venezuelan livestock. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform parasitological and molecular diagnosis of cattle trypanosomosis in small livestock units from two regions in this country. The parasitological diagnosis was carried out by MHCT and the molecular by PCR using genus-specific ITS1 primers that differentiate T. vivax and T. evansi infections. 47 cattle were evaluated in the "Laguneta de la Montaña" sector, Miranda State, where 3 animals were diagnosed as positive (6.4 %) by MHCT and 14 (30 %) by PCR as Trypanosoma spp., out of which 9 animals resulted positive for T. vivax , 3 for T. evansi and 2 with double infections. Whilst in the "San Casimiro" sector, State of Aragua, out of the 38 cattle evaluated 7 animals were diagnosed as positive (18.4 %) by MHCT and 19 (50 %) by PCR, determining only the presence of T. evansi in this locality. The molecular diagnosis by PCR using ITS1 primers allowed T. evansi detection in cattle field populations, which suggests the possible role of these animals as reservoirs in the epidemiology of the disease caused by T. evansi in Venezuela.

  14. Flagellar Motility of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ballesteros-Rodea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis. Despite the importance of motility in the parasite life cycle, little is known about T. cruzi motility, and there is no quantitative description of its flagellar beating. Using video microscopy and quantitative vectorial analysis of epimastigote trajectories, we find a forward parasite motility defined by tip-to-base symmetrical flagellar beats. This motion is occasionally interrupted by base-to-tip highly asymmetric beats, which represent the ciliary beat of trypanosomatid flagella. The switch between flagellar and ciliary beating facilitates the parasite's reorientation, which produces a large variability of movement and trajectories that results in different distance ranges traveled by the cells. An analysis of the distance, speed, and rotational angle indicates that epimastigote movement is not completely random, and the phenomenon is highly dependent on the parasite behavior and is characterized by directed and tumbling parasite motion as well as their combination, resulting in the alternation of rectilinear and intricate motility paths.

  15. Gastrointestinal parasites and Trypanosoma evansi in buffaloes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sani, R.A.; Chandrawathani, P.; Rosli, M.

    1990-01-01

    Gastrointestinal parasitism is common in buffalo calves. The effect of helminths on growth was studied by administration of an anthelmintic to buffalo calves following natural infections with gastrointestinal parasites. In studies conducted on calves belonging to an institute and a smallholder farmer, the treated calves showed improved weight gains. Serial parasitic examinations showed these animals had moderate to high faecal counts with Strongyloides, Toxocara vitulorum and Haemonchus eggs and Eimeria oocytes. In another study, there was no live weight advantage in treated over untreated calves. Few animals in this study had evidence of parasites and even those which were infested had low faecal egg counts. Hence, in general, helminths at certain levels of infection do affect the live weight gains of young buffalo calves. The prevalence of Trypanosoma evansi, as assessed parasitologically using the haematocrit centrifugation technique and mice inoculation, was 2.7 and 1%, respectively, in cattle and buffaloes. The serological prevalence using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was 35 and 2% for cattle and buffaloes, respectively. (author). 6 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Differential gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio Krieger

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of epimastigotes into metacyclic trypomastigotes involves changes in the pattern of expressed genes, resulting in important morphological and functional differences between these developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. In order to identify and characterize genes involved in triggering the metacyclogenesis process and in conferring to metacyclic trypomastigotes their stage specific biological properties, we have developed a method allowing the isolation of genes specifically expressed when comparing two close related cell populations (representation of differential expression or RDE. The method is based on the PCR amplification of gene sequences selected by hybridizing and subtracting the populations in such a way that after some cycles of hybridization-amplification genes specific to a given population are highly enriched. The use of this method in the analysis of differential gene expression during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis (6 hr and 24 hr of differentiation and metacyclic trypomastigotes resulted in the isolation of several clones from each time point. Northern blot analysis showed that some genes are transiently expressed (6 hr and 24 hr differentiating cells, while others are present in differentiating cells and in metacyclic trypomastigotes. Nucleotide sequencing of six clones characterized so far showed that they do not display any homology to gene sequences available in the GeneBank.

  17. Protein kinase CK1 from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabokis, Maritza; Kurz, Liliana; Gonzatti, Mary I; Bubis, José

    2003-08-01

    A protein kinase activity, which uses casein as a substrate, has been purified to homogeneity from the epimastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, by sequential chromatography on Q sepharose, heparin sepharose, phenyl sepharose, and alpha-casein agarose. An apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration chromatography and sedimentation analyses demonstrated that the purified native enzyme is a monomer with a sedimentation coefficient of 2.9 S. The hydrodynamic parameters indicated that the shape of the protein is globular with a frictional ratio f/f(o) = 1.36 and a Stokes radius of 27.7 A. When two selective peptide substrates for protein kinases CK1 and CK2 were used (RRKDLHDDEEDEAM. SITA and RRRADDSDDDDD, respectively), the purified kinase was shown to predominantly phosphorylate the CK1-specific peptide. Additionally, the enzyme was inhibited by N-(2-amino-ethyl)-5-chloroisoquinoline-8-sulfonamide, a specific inactivator of CK1s from mammals. Based on these results, we concluded that the purified kinase corresponds to a parasite CK1.

  18. Studies on the glycosome of Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Glycosomes (microbodies) have been purified from bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei by an improved procedure involving freezing and thawing live organisms in 15% glycerol prior to cell disruption. Highly purified organelles of bloodstream form T. brucei contain 11 major proteins of which 8 tentatively identified glycolytic enzymes make up about 90% of the total glycosomal protein. Treatment of these intact isolated organelles with the bisimidoester dimethylsuberimidate (DMSI) resulted in crosslinking of all glycosomal proteins into a large complex suggestive of juxtapositioning of the glycosomal proteins. The crosslinked complex was capable of catalyzing the multienzyme conversion of glucose to glycerol-3-phosphate but did not possess any special kinetic features different from those of the unaggregated enzymes represented by solubilized glycosomes. The multienzyme reaction had a lab phase associated with it and [ 14 C]-glucose label incorporation into sugar phosphate intermediates was effectively competed by unlabeled intermediates. Glycosomes were also purified from culture form T. brucei by several different procedures. Comparison of highly purified organelles from the two different life stages of the organism showed reduced specific activities and contents of the early glycolytic enzymes in organelles from the culture form with a decrease from 87% to 35% of the contribution of glycolytic enzymes to the total glycosomal protein

  19. Leukocyte changes in pregnant Yankasa ewes experimentally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pregnancy and trypanosomosis are associated with leukocyte changes. The leukocyte response of pregnant Yankasa ewes during experimental Trypanosoma evansi infection was determined using twenty pregnant ewes. They ewes were divided into 3 groups with 6 ewes in group A, while groups B and C were made up of ...

  20. Avaliação do trato digestório de cães Beagle infectados com as cepas Y ou Berenice-78 do Trypanosoma cruzi nas fases aguda ou crônica da doença de chagas experimental.

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, Nívia Carolina Nogueira de

    2011-01-01

    Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas. Núcleo de Pesquisas em Ciências Biológicas, Pró-Reitoria de Pesquisa e Pós Graduação, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto. O protozoário hemoflagelado Trypanosoma cruzi, agente etiológico da doença de Chagas, apresenta uma ampla variabilidade intraespecífica que determina a existência de subpopulações com características genéticas, morfológicas, moleculares e bioquímicas distintas. Este polimorfismo tem sido associado ao desenvolvimento das ...

  1. Genetic engineering of Trypanosoma (Dutonella vivax and in vitro differentiation under axenic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D'Archivio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma vivax is one of the most common parasites responsible for animal trypanosomosis, and although this disease is widespread in Africa and Latin America, very few studies have been conducted on the parasite's biology. This is in part due to the fact that no reproducible experimental methods had been developed to maintain the different evolutive forms of this trypanosome under laboratory conditions. Appropriate protocols were developed in the 1990s for the axenic maintenance of three major animal Trypanosoma species: T. b. brucei, T. congolense and T. vivax. These pioneer studies rapidly led to the successful genetic manipulation of T. b. brucei and T. congolense. Advances were made in the understanding of these parasites' biology and virulence, and new drug targets were identified. By contrast, challenging in vitro conditions have been developed for T. vivax in the past, and this per se has contributed to defer both its genetic manipulation and subsequent gene function studies. Here we report on the optimization of non-infective T. vivax epimastigote axenic cultures and on the process of parasite in vitro differentiation into metacyclic infective forms. We have also constructed the first T. vivax specific expression vector that drives constitutive expression of the luciferase reporter gene. This vector was then used to establish and optimize epimastigote transfection. We then developed highly reproducible conditions that can be used to obtain and select stably transfected mutants that continue metacyclogenesis and are infectious in immunocompetent rodents.

  2. Digital holographic microscopy for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites in fresh blood mounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, G. G.; Monaldi, A. C.; Alanís, E. E.

    2012-03-01

    An off-axis holographic microscope, in a transmission mode, calibrated to automatically detect the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood is developed as an alternative diagnosis tool for Chagas disease. Movements of the microorganisms are detected by measuring the phase shift they produce on the transmitted wave front. A thin layer of blood infected by Trypanosoma cruzi parasites is examined in the holographic microscope, the images of the visual field being registered with a CCD camera. Two consecutive holograms of the same visual field are subtracted point by point and a phase contrast image of the resulting hologram is reconstructed by means of the angular spectrum propagation algorithm. This method enables the measurement of phase distributions corresponding to temporal differences between digital holograms in order to detect whether parasites are present or not. Experimental results obtained using this technique show that it is an efficient alternative that can be incorporated successfully as a part of a fully automatic system for detection and counting of this type of microorganisms.

  3. EPIDEMIOLOGÍA MOLECULAR DE TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI

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    Felipe Guhl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Chagas causada por el parásito Trypanosoma cruzi es una zoonosis compleja, ampliamente distribuida en el continente americano. La infección puede ser adquirida a través de las heces de insectos triatominos, transfusión de sangre, trasplante de órganos, vía oral, por transmisión congénita y por accidentes de laboratorio. El completo entendimiento de la etiología y epidemiología de la enfermedad de Chagas a través de su distribución geográfica es complejo y permanece bajo intensa investigación hasta la actualidad. Los recientes estudios sobre la variabilidad genética del parásito han dado nuevas luces de los diferentes escenarios de los ciclos de transmisión de la enfermedad y su patogénesis en humanos. El propósito principal para la caracterización molecular de T.cruzi y sus múltiples genotipos está dirigido hacia su asociación con la clínica y la patogenesis de la enfermedad, así como al esclarecimiento de los diferentes escenarios de transmisión y los aspectos coevolutivos relacionados con reservorios e insectos vectores. La caracterización molecular de los diferentes aislamientos a partir de humanos, insectos y reservorios, ha permitido identificar la amplia variabilidad genética del parásito, abriendo nuevos caminos hacia la búsqueda de nuevos blancos terapéuticos y pruebas diagnósticas más específicas que contribuyan a mitigar la enfermedad de Chagas.

  4. Targeting polyamine transport in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Chantal; Phanstiel, Otto; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2018-03-10

    Polyamines play critical roles as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, the human parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is auxotrophic for polyamines. Therefore, their intracellular availability depends exclusively on polyamine transport and inhibition of these uptake processes can alter the viability of the parasite. The polyamine analogues used in this work were successfully tested as antiproliferative agents in cancer cells, bacteria, fungi and also showed a potent antiplasmodial effect. We evaluated the activity of these compounds on polyamine transport in T. cruzi and assessed the effects on parasite viability. Three polyamine derivatives, AMXT1501, Ant4 and Ant44, inhibited the putrescine transport in epimastigotes (the insect stage of T. cruzi) with calculated IC 50 values of 2.43, 5.02 and 3.98 μM, respectively. In addition, only Ant4 and Ant44 inhibited spermidine transport with IC 50 of 8.78 μM and 13.34 μM, respectively. The Ant4 analogue showed a high trypanocidal effect on trypomastigotes (the bloodstream stage of T. cruzi) with an IC 50 of 460 nM, (SI = 12.7) while in epimastigotes the IC 50 was significantly higher (16.97 μM). In addition, we studied the effect of the combination of benznidazole, a drug used in treating Chagas disease, with Ant4 on the viability of epimastigotes. The combined treatment produced a significant increase on the inhibition of parasites growth compared with individual treatments. In summary, these results suggest that Ant4, a putrescine conjugate, is a promising compound for the treatment of Chagas disease because it showed a potent trypanocidal effect via its inhibition of polyamine import. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute central nervous system infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and AIDS

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    Pasquale Gallo

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available The acute infection of the CNS by Trypanosoma cruzi acquired by blood transfusion is uncommon. The concomitance of AIDS in the patient reported shows the importance of cellular immunity in restriction of this parasite, and reinforces the problem of blood transfusion in endemic zones.

  6. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense in Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Diptera: ... in nature are considered epidemiologically important. (Leak and Rowlands, 1997). ... The classical techniques used to detect trypanosome infection in flies (Lloyd and Johnson, 1924) are of limited.

  7. Serum total protein, albumin and globulin levels in Trypanosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of orally administered Scoparia dulcis on Trypanosoma brucei-induced changes in serum total protein, albumin and globulin were investigated in rabbits over a period of twenty eight days. Results obtained show that infection resulted in hyperproteinaemia, hyperglobulinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia. However ...

  8. ( Nigella sativa ) oil on Trypanosoma brucei -infected rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of black seed oil (Nigella sativa oil) on parasitaemia, some serum and liver enzymes as well as some haematological parameters in Trypanosoma brucei-infected rats were investigated. The results show there was low parasitaemia and extension of life span of rats from 12 days of the infected untreated (control) ...

  9. A tropical tale: how Naja nigricollis venom beats Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martos Esteban, Andrea; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Carrington, Mark

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protozoan species capable to infecting insect vectors whose bite further produces African sleeping sickness inhuman beings [1]. During the parasite’s extracellular life in the mammalian host,its outer coat, mainly composed of Variable Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs)...

  10. Role of sialic acids in the midguts of Trypanosoma congolense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Free and total sialic acid concentrations were determined in the midgut extract of Culex pipiense pipiense mosquitoes infected with Trypanosoma congolense. The mean total sialic acid concentrations were found to be 1.5 to 2 fold higher than the mean free sialic acid concentrations in the midgut extracts of all the groups of ...

  11. On – Farm Transplacental Transmission Of Trypanosoma vivax In A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An on –farm study of haemoparasites of third pregnant and puerperal cows was undertaken in settled herds in Zaria (latitude 11o 08\\'N), Northern Nigeria. Trypanosoma vivax infection was found in prepartum cows in two (22.2%) of the herds. An affected dam in one of the herds was delivered of a calf that was infected with ...

  12. Scoparia dulcis reduces the severity of Trypanosoma bruceiinduced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the effect of oral administration of the herb, Scoparia dulcis, on Trypanosoma bruceiinduced changes in plasma lipid profile in rabbits over a period of twenty eight days. Results obtained show that infection with T. brucei resulted in significant increases in plasma total cholesterol, trriacylglycerol, and low ...

  13. Cultivation and multiplication of viable axenic trypanosoma vivax in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosoma vivax was isolated from the blood of an infected laboratory mouse, washed and introduced into the prepared culture media, ME-99 and minimum essential medium (MEM), both containing laboratory prepared (commercial) horse serum and antibiotics (streptomycin and penicillin). The cultures were monitored ...

  14. Roles of triosephosphate isomerase and aerobic metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helfert, S.; Estevez, A.M.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.; Clayton, C.

    2001-01-01

    Kinetoplastid protozoa compartmentalize the first seven enzymes of glycolysis and two enzymes of glycerol metabolism in a microbody, the glycosome. While in its mammalian host, Trypanosoma brucei depends entirely on glucose for ATP generation. Under aerobic conditions, most of the glucose is

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi: avirulence of the PF strain to Callithrix marmosets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Menezes

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Callithrix jacchus geoffroy marmosets (HumBol. 1812 were injected once subcutaneously with 10.000 parasites/g body weight and followed for a period of six months. The PF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi was used. Follow-up was done through blood cultures, xenodiagnosis, serological tests, and ECG. A small number of normaI animais served as control.

  16. Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial respiratome: Composition and organization in procyclic form

    KAUST Repository

    Acestor, Nathalie

    2011-05-24

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is comprised of four different protein complexes (I-IV), which are responsible for electron transport and generation of proton gradient in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. This proton gradient is then used by F oF 1-ATP synthase (complex V) to produce ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, the respiratory complexes I, II, and III were affinity purified from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic form cells and their composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The results along with those that we previously reported for complexes IV and V showed that the respiratome of Trypanosoma is divergent because many of its proteins are unique to this group of organisms. The studies also identified two mitochondrial subunit proteins of respiratory complex IV that are encoded by edited RNAs. Proteomics data from analyses of complexes purified using numerous tagged component proteins in each of the five complexes were used to generate the first predicted protein-protein interaction network of the Trypanosoma brucei respiratory chain. These results provide the first comprehensive insight into the unique composition of the respiratory complexes in Trypanosoma brucei, an early diverged eukaryotic pathogen. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Differential virulence and tsetse fly transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purity K. Gitonga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available African animal trypanosomiasis causes significant economic losses in sub-Saharan African countries because of livestock mortalities and reduced productivity. Trypanosomes, the causative agents, are transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.. In the current study, we compared and contrasted the virulence characteristics of five Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei isolates using groups of Swiss white mice (n = 6. We further determined the vectorial capacity of Glossina pallidipes, for each of the trypanosome isolates. Results showed that the overall pre-patent (PP periods were 8.4 ± 0.9 (range, 4–11 and 4.5 ± 0.2 (range, 4–6 for T. congolense and T. brucei isolates, respectively (p < 0.01. Despite the longer mean PP, T. congolense–infected mice exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05 shorter survival time than T. brucei–infected mice, indicating greater virulence. Differences were also noted among the individual isolates with T. congolense KETRI 2909 causing the most acute infection of the entire group with a mean ± standard error survival time of 9 ± 2.1 days. Survival time of infected tsetse flies and the proportion with mature infections at 30 days post-exposure to the infective blood meals varied among isolates, with subacute infection–causing T. congolense EATRO 1829 and chronic infection–causing T. brucei EATRO 2267 isolates showing the highest mature infection rates of 38.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides further evidence of occurrence of differences in virulence and transmissibility of eastern African trypanosome strains and has identified two, T. congolense EATRO 1829 and T. brucei EATRO 2267, as suitable for tsetse infectivity and transmissibility experiments.

  18. DNA content analysis allows discrimination between Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Lucila Langoni; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Fajardo, Emanuella Francisco; da Silva, Raíssa Bernardes; De Vito, Fernanda Bernadelli; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramírez, Luis Eduardo; Pedrosa, André Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, a human protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Currently the species is divided into six taxonomic groups. The genome of the CL Brener clone has been estimated to be 106.4-110.7 Mb, and DNA content analyses revealed that it is a diploid hybrid clone. Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate that has the same reservoirs and vectors as T. cruzi; however, it is non-pathogenic to vertebrate hosts. The haploid genome of T. rangeli was previously estimated to be 24 Mb. The parasitic strains of T. rangeli are divided into KP1(+) and KP1(-). Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the DNA content in different strains of T. cruzi and T. rangeli by flow cytometry. All T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains yielded cell cycle profiles with clearly identifiable G1-0 (2n) and G2-M (4n) peaks. T. cruzi and T. rangeli genome sizes were estimated using the clone CL Brener and the Leishmania major CC1 as reference cell lines because their genome sequences have been previously determined. The DNA content of T. cruzi strains ranged from 87,41 to 108,16 Mb, and the DNA content of T. rangeli strains ranged from 63,25 Mb to 68,66 Mb. No differences in DNA content were observed between KP1(+) and KP1(-) T. rangeli strains. Cultures containing mixtures of the epimastigote forms of T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains resulted in cell cycle profiles with distinct G1 peaks for strains of each species. These results demonstrate that DNA content analysis by flow cytometry is a reliable technique for discrimination between T. cruzi and T. rangeli isolated from different hosts.

  19. Differential virulence and tsetse fly transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei strains

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    Purity K. Gitonga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available African animal trypanosomiasis causes significant economic losses in sub-Saharan African countries because of livestock mortalities and reduced productivity. Trypanosomes, the causative agents, are transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.. In the current study, we compared and contrasted the virulence characteristics of five Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei isolates using groups of Swiss white mice (n = 6. We further determined the vectorial capacity of Glossina pallidipes, for each of the trypanosome isolates. Results showed that the overall pre-patent (PP periods were 8.4 ± 0.9 (range, 4–11 and 4.5 ± 0.2 (range, 4–6 for T. congolense and T. brucei isolates, respectively (p < 0.01. Despite the longer mean PP, T. congolense–infected mice exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05 shorter survival time than T. brucei–infected mice, indicating greater virulence. Differences were also noted among the individual isolates with T. congolense KETRI 2909 causing the most acute infection of the entire group with a mean ± standard error survival time of 9 ± 2.1 days. Survival time of infected tsetse flies and the proportion with mature infections at 30 days post-exposure to the infective blood meals varied among isolates, with subacute infection–causing T. congolense EATRO 1829 and chronic infection–causing T. brucei EATRO 2267 isolates showing the highest mature infection rates of 38.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides further evidence of occurrence of differences in virulence and transmissibility of eastern African trypanosome strains and has identified two, T. congolense EATRO 1829 and T. brucei EATRO 2267, as suitable for tsetse infectivity and transmissibility experiments.

  20. Differential virulence and tsetse fly transmissibility of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitonga, Purity K; Ndung'u, Kariuki; Murilla, Grace A; Thande, Paul C; Wamwiri, Florence N; Auma, Joanna E; Ngae, Geoffrey N; Kibugu, James K; Kurgat, Richard; Thuita, John K

    2017-06-27

    African animal trypanosomiasis causes significant economic losses in sub-Saharan African countries because of livestock mortalities and reduced productivity. Trypanosomes, the causative agents, are transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.). In the current study, we compared and contrasted the virulence characteristics of five Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei isolates using groups of Swiss white mice (n = 6). We further determined the vectorial capacity of Glossina pallidipes, for each of the trypanosome isolates. Results showed that the overall pre-patent (PP) periods were 8.4 ± 0.9 (range, 4-11) and 4.5 ± 0.2 (range, 4-6) for T. congolense and T. brucei isolates, respectively (p < 0.01). Despite the longer mean PP, T. congolense-infected mice exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05) shorter survival time than T. brucei-infected mice, indicating greater virulence. Differences were also noted among the individual isolates with T. congolense KETRI 2909 causing the most acute infection of the entire group with a mean ± standard error survival time of 9 ± 2.1 days. Survival time of infected tsetse flies and the proportion with mature infections at 30 days post-exposure to the infective blood meals varied among isolates, with subacute infection-causing T. congolense EATRO 1829 and chronic infection-causing T. brucei EATRO 2267 isolates showing the highest mature infection rates of 38.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Therefore, our study provides further evidence of occurrence of differences in virulence and transmissibility of eastern African trypanosome strains and has identified two, T. congolense EATRO 1829 and T. brucei EATRO 2267, as suitable for tsetse infectivity and transmissibility experiments.

  1. ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY ON TISSUE ALTERATIONS CAUSED BY TRYPANOSOMATIDS IN EXPERIMENTAL MURINE INFECTIONS

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    Héctor José Finol

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructural study in different tissues of mice experimentally infected with isolates of Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania mexicana reveals changes in cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle fibers and hepatic, adrenal, kidney and spleen cells. Some were cytoarchitectural changes and other consisted of necrosis. Alterations were also found in microvasculature.The mononuclear cell infiltrate included neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages. This work shows that various mice tissues are important target for trypanosomatids.

  2. Effects of betamethasone on the course of experimentai. Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Frederico G.C. Abath

    1986-09-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, the effect of betamethasone administered in the early post- acute infection of mice by Trypanosoma cruzi was studied. This drug was administered during 30 days after the 42nd day of infection in a dose of 0.15 mg/day. The betamethasone treatment did not cause fresh outbreaks of parasitemia and the histopathological findings in the chronic phase were not different from those in the control group. The higher cumulative mortality after treatment in the experimental group was due to superimposed bacterial infections. Outbred albino mice infected with low numbers ofY strain Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes were not suitable models for Chagas' disease, since after 7 months of observation only mild histological lesions developed in all the animais. Prolonged betamethasone treatment of mice infected with low numbers o/Trypanosoma cruzi of the Y strain, during the post-acute phase did not aggravate the course of infection.Foram estudados os efeitos da betametasona administrada na fase pós-aguda imediata de uma infecção pelo T. cruzi em camundongos. O tratamento consistiu de 30 doses diárias de 0,15 mg de betametasona, a partir de 42° dia de infecção, não havendo aparecimento de novos surtos de parasitemia. No tempo de duração do experimento (7 meses não houve diferença entre as lesões histopatológicas dos animais tratados e dos não tratados. O grupo experimental apresentou uma maior mortalidade acumulada no 75º dia de infecção, o que pode ser atribuído a infecções bacterianas associadas. Por outro lado, camundongos albinos "outbred", infectados com baixo inóculo, não se apresentaram como bom modelo de doença de Chagas, já que não desenvolveram lesões importantes nem na fase aguda nem após 7 meses de infecção. Em conclusão, o tratamento imunosupressivo prolongado, após a fase aguda de uma infecção mínima com a cepa Ydo T. cruzi não tem influência sobre o curso da infecção, pelo menos no que tange

  3. A recombinant protein based on Trypanosoma cruzi P21 enhances phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Adele A; Clemente, Tatiana M; Dos Santos, Marlus A; Machado, Fabrício C; Gomes, Rafael G B; Moreira, Heline Hellen T; Cruz, Mário C; Brígido, Paula C; Dos Santos, Paulo C F; Martins, Flávia A; Bahia, Diana; Maricato, Juliana T; Janini, Luiz M R; Reboredo, Eduardo H; Mortara, Renato A; da Silva, Claudio V

    2012-01-01

    P21 is a secreted protein expressed in all developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the recombinant protein based on P21 (P21-His(6)) on inflammatory macrophages during phagocytosis. Our results showed that P21-His(6) acts as a phagocytosis inducer by binding to CXCR4 chemokine receptor and activating actin polymerization in a way dependent onthe PI3-kinase signaling pathway. Thus, our results shed light on the notion that native P21 is a component related to T. cruzi evasion from the immune response and that CXCR4 may be involved in phagocytosis. P21-His(6) represents an important experimental control tool to study phagocytosis signaling pathways of different intracellular parasites and particles.

  4. A recombinant protein based on Trypanosoma cruzi P21 enhances phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele A Rodrigues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: P21 is a secreted protein expressed in all developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the recombinant protein based on P21 (P21-His(6 on inflammatory macrophages during phagocytosis. FINDINGS: Our results showed that P21-His(6 acts as a phagocytosis inducer by binding to CXCR4 chemokine receptor and activating actin polymerization in a way dependent onthe PI3-kinase signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, our results shed light on the notion that native P21 is a component related to T. cruzi evasion from the immune response and that CXCR4 may be involved in phagocytosis. P21-His(6 represents an important experimental control tool to study phagocytosis signaling pathways of different intracellular parasites and particles.

  5. Removal of Trypanosoma cruzi by white cell-reduction filters: an electronmicroscopic study

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    Fabron Junior Antonio

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available White cell (WBC-reduction filters have been shown to be effective in removing infectious agents from infected blood products. In this study, the mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi retention by WBC-reduction filters were assessed. Human packed red blood cell (PRBC and platelet concentrate (PC samples were contaminated with T. cruzi organisms (Y strain; 3.4 x 10(6/ml, and then filtered using WBC-reduction experimental filters that provided about 3 log10 WBC removal. Transmission electron microscopy sections showed that T. cruzi parasites were removed from contaminated PRBC and PC samples primarily by mechanical mechanism without interacting with filter fibbers or blood cells. In addition, we found that T. cruzi parasites were also removed by a direct fibber adhesion. These data indicate that T. cruzi parasites are removed from infected blood not only by mechanical mechanism but also by biological mechanism probably mediated by parasite surface proteins.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi Disrupts Thymic Homeostasis by Altering Intrathymic and Systemic Stress-Related Endocrine Circuitries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepletier, Ailin; de Carvalho, Vinicius Frias; e Silva, Patricia Machado Rodrigues; Villar, Silvina; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Savino, Wilson; Morrot, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that experimental infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is associated with changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Increased glucocorticoid (GC) levels are believed to be protective against the effects of acute stress during infection but result in depletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes by apoptosis, driving to thymic atrophy. However, very few data are available concerning prolactin (PRL), another stress-related hormone, which seems to be decreased during T. cruzi infection. Considering the immunomodulatory role of PRL upon the effects caused by GC, we investigated if intrathymic cross-talk between GC and PRL receptors (GR and PRLR, respectively) might influence T. cruzi-induced thymic atrophy. Using an acute experimental model, we observed changes in GR/PRLR cross-activation related with the survival of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes during infection. These alterations were closely related with systemic changes, characterized by a stress hormone imbalance, with progressive GC augmentation simultaneously to PRL reduction. The intrathymic hormone circuitry exhibited an inverse modulation that seemed to counteract the GC-related systemic deleterious effects. During infection, adrenalectomy protected the thymus from the increase in apoptosis ratio without changing PRL levels, whereas an additional inhibition of circulating PRL accelerated the thymic atrophy and led to an increase in corticosterone systemic levels. These results demonstrate that the PRL impairment during infection is not caused by the increase of corticosterone levels, but the opposite seems to occur. Accordingly, metoclopramide (MET)-induced enhancement of PRL secretion protected thymic atrophy in acutely infected animals as well as the abnormal export of immature and potentially autoreactive CD4+CD8+ thymocytes to the periphery. In conclusion, our findings clearly show that Trypanosoma cruzi subverts mouse thymus homeostasis by altering intrathymic and systemic stress

  7. Recent, independent and anthropogenic origins of Trypanosoma cruzi hybrids.

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    Michael D Lewis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The single celled eukaryote Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasite transmitted by numerous species of triatomine bug in the Americas, causes Chagas disease in humans. T. cruzi generally reproduces asexually and appears to have a clonal population structure. However, two of the six major circulating genetic lineages, TcV and TcVI, are TcII-TcIII inter-lineage hybrids that are frequently isolated from humans in regions where chronic Chagas disease is particularly severe. Nevertheless, a prevalent view is that hybridisation events in T. cruzi were evolutionarily ancient and that active recombination is of little epidemiological importance. We analysed genotypes of hybrid and non-hybrid T. cruzi strains for markers representing three distinct evolutionary rates: nuclear GPI sequences (n = 88, mitochondrial COII-ND1 sequences (n = 107 and 28 polymorphic microsatellite loci (n = 35. Using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches we dated key evolutionary events in the T. cruzi clade including the emergence of hybrid lineages TcV and TcVI, which we estimated to have occurred within the last 60,000 years. We also found evidence for recent genetic exchange between TcIII and TcIV and between TcI and TcIV. These findings show that evolution of novel recombinants remains a potential epidemiological risk. The clearly distinguishable microsatellite genotypes of TcV and TcVI were highly heterozygous and displayed minimal intra-lineage diversity indicative of even earlier origins than sequence-based estimates. Natural hybrid genotypes resembled typical meiotic F1 progeny, however, evidence for mitochondrial introgression, absence of haploid forms and previous experimental crosses indicate that sexual reproduction in T. cruzi may involve alternatives to canonical meiosis. Overall, the data support two independent hybridisation events between TcII and TcIII and a recent, rapid spread of the hybrid progeny in domestic transmission cycles

  8. Studies in search of a suitable experimental insect model for xenodiagnosis of hosts with Chagas' disease: 3 - On the interaction of vector species and parasite strain in the reaction of bugs to infection by Trypanosoma cruzi Estudos em busca de um inseto modelo experimental para xenodiagnóstico em hospedeiros com doença de Chagas: 3 - A interação entre a espécie vetora e a cepa do parasito na reação do vetor à infecção com Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Perlowagora-Szumlewicz

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of nine vector species of Chagas' disease to infection by seven different Trypanosoma cruzi strains; Berenice, Y, FL, CL, S. Felipe, Colombiana and Gávea, are examined and compared. On the basis of the insects' ability to establish and maintain the infection, vector species could be divided into two distinct groups which differ in their reaction to an acute infection by T. cruzi. While the proportion of positive bugs was found to be low in Triatoma infestans and Triatoma dimidiata it was high, ranging from 96.9% to 100% in the group of wild (Rhodnius neglectus, Triatoma rubrovariaand essentially sylvatic vectors in process of adaptation to human dwellings, maintained under control following successful insecticidal elimination of Triatoma infestans (Panstrongylus megistus, Triatoma sordida and Triatoma pseudomaculata. An intermediate position is held by Triatoma brasiliensis and Rhodnius prolixus. This latter has been found to interchange between domestic and sylvatic environments. The most important finding is the strikingly good reaction between each species of the sylvatic bugs and practically all T. cruzi strains herein studied, thus indicating that the factors responsible for the excellent reaction of P.megistus to infection by Y strain, as previously reported also come into operation in the reaction of the same vector species to acute infections by five of the remaining T.cruzi strains. Comparison or data reported by other investigators with those herein described form the basis of the discussion of Dipetalogaster maximus as regards its superiority as a xenodiagnostic agent.É examinada e comparada a reação de nove espécies vetoras da doença de Chagas à infecção, por sete diferentes cepas do T.cruzi (Berenice, Y, FL, CL, São Felipe, Colombiana e Gávea. Com base na habilidade em estabelecer e manter a infecção, as espécies vetoras podem ser divididas em dois grupos distintos, que diferem em suas reações à infec

  9. Effective gene delivery to Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes through nucleofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Lugo, Lisandro; Díaz-Olmos, Yirys; Sáenz-García, José; Probst, Christian Macagnan; DaRocha, Wanderson Duarte

    2017-06-01

    New opportunities have raised to study the gene function approaches of Trypanosoma cruzi after its genome sequencing in 2005. Functional genomic approaches in Trypanosoma cruzi are challenging due to the reduced tools available for genetic manipulation, as well as to the reduced efficiency of the transient transfection conducted through conventional methods. The Amaxa nucleofector device was systematically tested in the present study in order to improve the electroporation conditions in the epimastigote forms of T. cruzi. The transfection efficiency was quantified using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as reporter gene followed by cell survival assessment. The herein used nucleofection parameters have increased the survival rates (>90%) and the transfection efficiency by approximately 35%. The small amount of epimastigotes and DNA required for the nucleofection can turn the method adopted here into an attractive tool for high throughput screening (HTS) applications, and for gene editing in parasites where genetic manipulation tools remain relatively scarce. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of Trypanosoma cruzi phosphofructokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Evelyn; Lander, Noelia; Ramirez, Jose Luis

    2009-08-01

    The characterisation of the gene encoding Trypanosoma cruzi CL Brener phosphofructokinase (PFK) and the biochemical properties of the expressed enzyme are reported here. In contradiction with previous reports, the PFK genes of CL Brener and YBM strain T. cruzi were found to be similar to their Leishmania mexicana and Trypanosoma brucei homologs in terms of both kinetic properties and size, with open reading frames encoding polypeptides with a deduced molecular mass of 53,483. The predicted amino acid sequence contains the C-terminal glycosome-targeting tripeptide SKL; this localisation was confirmed by immunofluorescence assays. In sequence comparisons with the genes of other eukaryotes, it was found that, despite being an adenosine triphosphate-dependent enzyme, T. cruzi PFK shows significant sequence similarity with inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent PFKs.

  11. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of Trypanosoma cruzi phosphofructokinase

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    Evelyn Rodríguez

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The characterisation of the gene encoding Trypanosoma cruzi CL Brener phosphofructokinase (PFK and the biochemical properties of the expressed enzyme are reported here. In contradiction with previous reports, the PFK genes of CL Brener and YBM strain T. cruzi were found to be similar to their Leishmania mexicana and Trypanosoma brucei homologs in terms of both kinetic properties and size, with open reading frames encoding polypeptides with a deduced molecular mass of 53,483. The predicted amino acid sequence contains the C-terminal glycosome-targeting tripeptide SKL; this localisation was confirmed by immunofluorescence assays. In sequence comparisons with the genes of other eukaryotes, it was found that, despite being an adenosine triphosphate-dependent enzyme, T. cruzi PFK shows significant sequence similarity with inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent PFKs.

  12. Surface electrical charge of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains

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    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Bloodstream trypomastigotes of some Trypanosoma cruzi strains were processed through DEAE-cellulose columns under standardized conditions. The results obtained suggest mainly that these strains present different surface charges, that there are subpopulations of bloodstream trypomastigotes as regards electrical charges and that the broad forms are less negative than the slender ones.Tripomastigotas sanguíneos de algumas cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi foram processadas em colunas de DEAE-celulose sob condições padronizadas. Os resultados obtidos sugerem principalmente que estas cepas possuem cargas superficiais diferentes, que em relação a este aspecto existem subpopulações de tripomastigotas e que as formas largas são menos negativas do que as finas.

  13. Trypanosoma brucei solanesyl-diphosphate synthase localizes to the mitochondrion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lai, D.-H.; Bontempi, E. J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 2 (2012), s. 189-192 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * Sleeping sickness * Ubiquinone * Solanesyl-diphosphate synthase * Digitonin permeabilization * In situ tagging Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.734, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166685112000539

  14. Trypanosoma brucei Mitochondrial Respiratome: Composition and Organization in Procyclic Form

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acestor, N.; Zíková, Alena; Dalley, R. A.; Anupama, A.; Panigrahi, A. K.; Stuart, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 9 (2011), s. 1-14 ISSN 1535-9476 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/09/P563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : SUCCINATE DEHYDROGENASE * EDITED MESSENGER-RNA * COMPLEX-I * TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI * UBIQUINONE OXIDOREDUCTASE * TAP-TAG * PROTEIN INTERACTION * ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE * STATISTICAL-MODEL * MASS-SPECTROMETRY Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.398, year: 2011

  15. Immunotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection with DNA Vaccines in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dumonteil, Eric; Escobedo-Ortegon, Javier; Reyes-Rodriguez, Norma; Arjona-Torres, Arletty; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathology of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy are still debated, and the controversy has interfered with the development of new treatments and vaccines. Because of the potential of DNA vaccines for immunotherapy of chronic and infectious diseases, we tested if DNA vaccines could control an ongoing Trypanosoma cruzi infection. BALB/c mice were infected with a lethal dose (5 × 104 parasites) as a model of acute infection, and then they were treated with two injecti...

  16. Plant-like traits associated with metabolism of Trypanosoma parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Hannaert, Véronique; Saavedra, Emma; Duffieux, Francis; Szikora, Jean-Pierre; Rigden, Daniel J.; Michels, Paul A. M.; Opperdoes, Fred R.

    2003-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites cause serious diseases among humans, livestock, and plants. They belong to the order of the Kinetoplastida and form, together with the Euglenida, the phylum Euglenozoa. Euglenoid algae possess plastids capable of photosynthesis, but plastids are unknown in trypanosomatids. Here we present molecular evidence that trypanosomatids possessed a plastid at some point in their evolutionary history. Extant trypanosomatid parasites, such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania, contain ...

  17. The sequence and analysis of Trypanosoma brucei chromosome II

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sayed, Najib M. A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Song, Jinming; MacLeod, Annette; Bringaud, Frederic; Larkin, Christopher; Wanless, David; Peterson, Jeremy; Hou, Lihua; Taylor, Sonya; Tweedie, Alison; Biteau, Nicolas; Khalak, Hanif G.; Lin, Xiaoying; Mason, Tanya

    2003-01-01

    We report here the sequence of chromosome II from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The 1.2-Mb pairs encode about 470 predicted genes organised in 17 directional clusters on either strand, the largest cluster of which has 92 genes lined up over a 284-kb region. An analysis of the GC skew reveals strand compositional asymmetries that coincide with the distribution of protein-coding genes, suggesting these asymmetries may be the result of transcription-couple...

  18. Betulinic acid induces cell death by necrosis in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Paloma Leão; Souza, Racquel Oliveira da Silva; Tessarolo, Louise Donadello; de Menezes, Ramon Róseo Paula Pessoa Bezerra; Sampaio, Tiago Lima; Canuto, Jader Almeida; Martins, Alice Maria Costa

    2017-10-01

    Chagas' disease is a neglected disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and constitutes a serious health problem worldwide. The treatment is limited, with variable efficacy of benznidazole and nifurtimox. Betulinic Acid (BA), a triterpene, can be found in medicinal herbs and has a wide variety of biological and pharmacological activities. The objective was to evaluate betulinic acid effects on the cell death mechanism in Trypanosoma cruzi strain Y. BA inhibited the growth of epimastigotes in periods of 24h (IC 50 =73.43μM), 48h (IC 50 =119.8μM) and 72h (IC 50 =212.2μM) of incubation; of trypomastigotes (IC 50 =51.88μM) in periods of 24h and intracellular amastigotes (IC 50 =25.94μM) in periods of 24 and 48h of incubation, no toxicity on LLC-MK 2 cells at the concentrations used. Analysis of the possible mechanism of parasite cell death showed alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential, alterations in cell membrane integrity, an increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species and increase swelling of the reservosomes. In conclusion, betulinic acid was be able to inhibition all developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain with necrotic mechanism and involvement of mitochondrial membrane potential alteration and increase in reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation and spatial organization of PCNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Doris; Gassen, Alwine [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology II, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Janzen, Christian J., E-mail: christian.janzen@uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei (TbPCNA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA is a suitable marker to detect replication in T. brucei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to closely related parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani. -- Abstract: As in most eukaryotic cells, replication is regulated by a conserved group of proteins in the early-diverged parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Only a few components of the replication machinery have been described in this parasite and regulation, sub-nuclear localization and timing of replication are not well understood. We characterized the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T. brucei (TbPCNA) to establish a spatial and temporal marker for replication. Interestingly, PCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to the closely related parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani. TbPCNA foci are clearly detectable during S phase of the cell cycle but in contrast to T. cruzi they are not preferentially located at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, PCNA seems to be degraded when cells enter G2 phase in T. brucei suggesting different modes of replication regulation or functions of PCNA in these closely related eukaryotes.

  20. A rare case of human trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma evansi

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    Powar R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human trypanosoma infections like the ones seen in Africa and South America are unknown in India. The only exception in literature is of two documented cases of a self-limiting febrile illness, being attributed to Trypanosoma lewisi like parasites. We are reporting an unusual case of trypanosomiasis from the rural parts of Chandrapur district in Maharashtra. An adult male farmhand who used to practice veterinary medicine also, presented with history of febrile episodes on and off since five months and drowsiness before admission to this Institute. Though routine blood and other investigations were within normal limits, the peripheral smear showed a large number of trypanosomes which morphologically resembled the species Trypanosoma evansi , the aetiological agent of surra - a form of animal trypanosomiasis. A battery of assays covering the spectrum of parasitology, serology, and molecular biology confirmed the infecting parasite to be T. evansi . Failure to demonstrate the central nervous system (CNS involvement, as evidenced by the absence of parasite in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF advocated the use of suramin - the drug of choice in early stage African trypanosomiasis without any CNS involvement. Suramin achieved cure in our patient. The case is being reported because of its unique nature as the patient was not immunocompromised and showed infestation with a parasite which normally does not affect human beings.

  1. Vaccination of dogs with Trypanosoma rangeli induces antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area of Córdoba, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Beatriz; Marini, Vanina; Gauna, Diego; Frias, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Dogs play a major role in the domestic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, acting as reservoirs. In a previous work we have developed a model of vaccination of dogs in captivity with nonpathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli epimastigotes, resulting in the production of protective antibodies against T. cruzi, with dramatic decrease of parasitaemia upon challenge with 100,000 virulent forms of this parasite. The aim of this work was to evaluate the immunogenicity of this vaccine in dogs living in a rural area. Domestic dogs, free from T. cruzi infection, received three immunisations with fixed T. rangeli epimastigotes. Dogs were not challenged with T. cruzi, but they were left in their environment. This immunisation induced antibodies against T. cruzi for more than three years in dogs in their natural habitat, while control dogs remained serologically negative.

  2. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase is an essential enzyme for the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloatti, Andres [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Gupta, Shreedhara; Gualdron-Lopez, Melisa; Nguewa, Paul A. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Altabe, Silvia G. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Deumer, Gladys; Wallemacq, Pierre [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, LTAP, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Uttaro, Antonio D., E-mail: toniuttaro@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Inhibiting {Delta}9 desaturase drastically changes T. brucei's fatty-acid composition. {yields} Isoxyl specifically inhibits the {Delta}9 desaturase causing a growth arrest. {yields} RNA interference of desaturase expression causes a similar effect. {yields} Feeding T. brucei-infected mice with Isoxyl decreases the parasitemia. {yields} 70% of Isoxyl-treated mice survived the trypanosome infection. -- Abstract: Trypanosoma brucei, the etiologic agent of sleeping sickness, is exposed to important changes in nutrients and temperature during its life cycle. To adapt to these changes, the fluidity of its membranes plays a crucial role. This fluidity, mediated by the fatty-acid composition, is regulated by enzymes named desaturases. We have previously shown that the oleoyl desaturase is essential for Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei. In this work, we present experimental support for the relevance of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) for T. brucei's survival, in both its insect or procyclic-form (PCF) and bloodstream-form (BSF) stages. We evaluated this essentiality in two different ways: by generating a SCD knocked-down parasite line using RNA interference, and by chemical inhibition of the enzyme with two compounds, Isoxyl and a thiastearate with the sulfur atom at position 10 (10-TS). The effective concentration for 50% growth inhibition (EC{sub 50}) of PCF was 1.0 {+-} 0.2 {mu}M for Isoxyl and 5 {+-} 2 {mu}M for 10-TS, whereas BSF appeared more susceptible with EC{sub 50} values 0.10 {+-} 0.03 {mu}M (Isoxyl) and 1.0 {+-} 0.6 {mu}M (10-TS). RNA interference showed to be deleterious for both stages of the parasite. In addition, T. brucei-infected mice were fed with Isoxyl, causing a reduction of the parasitemia and an increase of the rodents' survival.

  3. Triatomine bugs, their microbiota and Trypanosoma cruzi: asymmetric responses of bacteria to an infected blood meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián; Villavicencio, Bianca; Correia, Nathália; Costa, Jane; Haag, Karen L

    2016-12-09

    Triatomine bugs (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) are vectors of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. The study of triatomine gut microbiota has gained relevance in the last years due to its possible role in vector competence and prospective use in control strategies. The objective of this study is to examine changes in the gut microbiota composition of triatomines in response to a T. cruzi-infected blood meal and identifying key factors determining those changes. We sampled colony-reared individuals from six triatomine vectors (Panstrongylus megistus, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma brasiliensis, T. infestans, T. juazeirensis and T. sherlocki) comparing experimentally T. cruzi strain 0354-challenged and non-challenged insects. The microbiota of gut and gonad tissues was characterized using high throughput sequencing of region V3-V4 of bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The triatomine microbiota had a low intra-individual diversity, and a high inter-individual variation within the same host species. Arsenophonous appeared as the dominant triatomine bacterial symbiont in our study (59% of the total 16S coverage), but there were significant differences in the distribution of bacterial genera among vectors. In Rhodnius prolixus the dominant symbiont was Pectobacterium. Trypanosoma cruzi-challenge significantly affects microbiota composition, with challenged vectors harbouring a significantly more diverse bacterial community, both in the gut and the gonads. Our results show that blood-feeding with T. cruzi epimastigotes strongly affects microbiota composition in a species-specific manner. We suggest that triatomine-adapted enterobacteria such as Arsenophonus could be used as stable vectors for genetic transformation of triatomine bugs and control of Chagas disease.

  4. Transcriptional profiling of cattle infected with Trypanosoma congolense highlights gene expression signatures underlying trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility

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    Naessens Jan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT caused by tsetse fly-transmitted protozoa of the genus Trypanosoma is a major constraint on livestock and agricultural production in Africa and is among the top ten global cattle diseases impacting on the poor. Here we show that a functional genomics approach can be used to identify temporal changes in host peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC gene expression due to disease progression. We also show that major gene expression differences exist between cattle from trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible breeds. Using bovine long oligonucleotide microarrays and real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR validation we analysed PBMC gene expression in naïve trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible cattle experimentally challenged with Trypanosoma congolense across a 34-day infection time course. Results Trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle displayed a rapid and distinct transcriptional response to infection, with a ten-fold higher number of genes differentially expressed at day 14 post-infection compared to trypanosusceptible Boran cattle. These analyses identified coordinated temporal gene expression changes for both breeds in response to trypanosome infection. In addition, a panel of genes were identified that showed pronounced differences in gene expression between the two breeds, which may underlie the phenomena of trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility. Gene ontology (GO analysis demonstrate that the products of these genes may contribute to increased mitochondrial mRNA translational efficiency, a more pronounced B cell response, an elevated activation status and a heightened response to stress in trypanotolerant cattle. Conclusion This study has revealed an extensive and diverse range of cellular processes that are altered temporally in response to trypanosome infection in African cattle. Results indicate that the trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle respond more rapidly and with a

  5. Expression, immunolocalization and serodiagnostic value of Tc38630 protein from Trypanosoma congolense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochabo, Kennedy Miyoro; Zhou, Mo; Suganuma, Keisuke; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Inoue, Noboru

    2013-09-01

    Animal African trypanosomosis is a serious constraint to livestock sector development in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease, mainly caused by Trypanosoma congolense, has a limitation in its diagnosis and treatment. There is urgent need for a simple, rapid detection technique to replace the few available serological tests that are of variable sensitivity and specificity. Currently, there is a promising use of recombinant proteins to improve on the trypanosome lysate to detect antibodies. In this respect, we have identified a stage-specific gene that is relatively highly expressed in metacyclic and blood trypomastigotes of T. congolense. According to previously obtained differential protein expression data, the gene TcIL3000.0.38630 (1,236 bp) is by 8.5 times more expressed in metacyclic and blood trypomastigotes than in procyclic trypomastigotes and epimastigotes. The same stage specific expression pattern was shown in Western blot analysis. In addition, in confocal laser scanning microscopy the Tc38630 protein was present in the cytosol and on the cell surface of metacyclic and blood trypomastigotes. Through bioinformatics, the Tc38630 had N-terminal signal sequence, hydrophilic extracellular domain, single transmembrane alpha-helix and short cytoplasmic domain, which is characteristic of the Trypanosoma brucei invariant surface glycoprotein. However, unlike T. brucei invariant surface glycoprotein, the Tc38630 existed as a single copy gene with a probable allelic polymorphism at the Nar I restriction site. The recombinant Tc38630-based ELISA detected antibodies against Tc38630 as early as 7 days post infection in experimentally infected mouse model. Taken together, our results suggest that the Tc38630 is a novel potential diagnostic antigen of Animal African trypanosomosis.

  6. Melophagus ovinus and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium in ovines in the State of Minas Gerais, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, José Oswaldo; Lima, Walter dos Santos; Leite, Antonio César Rios; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi; Torres, Liléia Diotaiuti

    1983-01-01

    Neste trabalho Melophagus ovinus é identificado pela primeira vez no Estado de Minas Gerais e Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium tem sua primeira ocorrência registrada no Brasil.Melophagus ovinus is identified for the first time in Minas Gerais State and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium in Brazil.

  7. Suscetibilidade de Trypanosoma evansi à anfotericina B Trypanosoma evansi susceptibility to amphotericin B

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    Aleksandro Schafer da Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a suscetibilidade do Trypanosoma evansi in vitro e in vivo à anfotericina B. Nos testes in vitro, foram utilizadas quatro concentrações (0,06; 0,25; 1,0; 4,0µg mL-1 de anfotecicina B frente a uma suspensão de T. evansi em solução tampão fosfato rico em glicose (PBS - glicose. Para avaliar a eficácia in vivo, foram utilizados 15 ratos parasitados com T. evansi. Em dois grupos de cinco ratos infectados, doses únicas diárias de 1 (grupo A e de 3mg kg-1 (grupo B foram administradas via intraperitonial durante 10 dias, e a parasitemia foi avaliada por meio de esfregaço sanguíneo. Grupo C (n=5 foi utilizado como grupo controle positivo, infectados com T. evansi e não tratados, e o grupo D (n=5, como controle negativo. Os ensaios in vitro evidenciaram suscetibilidade de 100% do T. evansi à anfotericina B após 7h, em todas as concentrações avaliadas. Nos ratos, nem a maior dose testada curou os roedores, apesar de ter prolongado a vida destes em comparação à vida dos animais infectados, mas não tratados. Foi também investigada a função hepática e renal dos ratos após a terapia, e os parâmetros bioquímicos analisados mantiveram-se dentro da normalidade. Conclui-se que o T. evansi in vitro é suscetível à anfotericina B. A dose 3mg kg-1 testada aumentou a expectativa de vida de ratos infectados, porém não teve efeito curativo.The aim of this study was to evaluate the Trypanosoma evansi susceptibility to amphotericin B in vitro and in vivo. Four concentrations (0.06, 0.25, 1.0, and 4.0µg mL-1 of amphotericin B were tested against a suspension containing T. evansi and phosphate buffer solution with glucose in the in vitro assay. Fifteen rats infected with T. evansi were used for the in vivo assay. Groups A (n=5 and B (n=5 received daily doses of 1 and 3mg kg-1 during 10 days and the parasitemia was estimated daily by microscopic examination of smears. The rats from group C (n=5 were the

  8. Liver retinol and carotenoid concentration of rats experimentally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the liver retinol and carotenoid concentration of rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei. Results of the liver retinol determination showed that T. brucei infection led to a progressively significant (P < 0.01) depletion of liver retinol concentration (body vitamin A status) of infected rats from ...

  9. Flux Analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei Glycolysis Based on a Multiobjective-Criteria Bioinformatic Approach

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    Amine Ghozlane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite of major of interest in discovering new genes for drug targets. This parasite alternates its life cycle between the mammal host(s (bloodstream form and the insect vector (procyclic form, with two divergent glucose metabolism amenable to in vitro culture. While the metabolic network of the bloodstream forms has been well characterized, the flux distribution between the different branches of the glucose metabolic network in the procyclic form has not been addressed so far. We present a computational analysis (called Metaboflux that exploits the metabolic topology of the procyclic form, and allows the incorporation of multipurpose experimental data to increase the biological relevance of the model. The alternatives resulting from the structural complexity of networks are formulated as an optimization problem solved by a metaheuristic where experimental data are modeled in a multiobjective function. Our results show that the current metabolic model is in agreement with experimental data and confirms the observed high metabolic flexibility of glucose metabolism. In addition, Metaboflux offers a rational explanation for the high flexibility in the ratio between final products from glucose metabolism, thsat is, flux redistribution through the malic enzyme steps.

  10. A comparative molecular and 3-dimensional structural investigation into cross-continental and novel avian Trypanosoma spp. in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystal; Thompson, R C Andrew; Botero, Adriana; Kristancic, Amanda; Peacock, Christopher; Kirilak, Yaowanuj; Clode, Peta L

    2017-05-12

    Molecular and structural information on avian Trypanosoma spp. throughout Australia is limited despite their intrinsic value in understanding trypanosomatid evolution, diversity, and structural biology. In Western Australia tissue samples (n = 429) extracted from 93 birds in 25 bird species were screened using generic PCR primers to investigate the diversity of Trypanosoma spp. To investigate avian trypanosome structural biology the first 3-dimensional ultrastructural models of a Trypanosoma spp. (Trypanosoma sp. AAT) isolated from a bird (currawong, Strepera spp.) were generated using focussed ion beam milling combined with scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). Here, we confirm four intercontinental species of avian trypanosomes in native Australian birds, and identify a new avian Trypanosoma. Trypanosome infection was identified in 18 birds from 13 different bird species (19%). A single new genotype was isolated and found to be closely related to T. culicavium (Trypanosoma sp. CC2016 B002). Other Trypanosoma spp. identified include T. avium, T. culicavium, T. thomasbancrofti, Trypanosoma sp. TL.AQ.22, Trypanosoma sp. AAT, and an uncharacterised Trypanosoma sp. (group C-III sensu Zidková et al. (Infect Genet Evol 12:102-112, 2012)), all previously identified in Australia or other continents. Serially-sectioning Trypanosoma sp. AAT epimastigotes using FIB-SEM revealed the disc-shaped kinetoplast pocket attached perpendicular to the branching mitochondrion. Additionally, the universal minicircle sequence within the kinetoplast DNA and the associated binding protein were determined in Trypanosoma sp. AAT. These results indicate that bird trypanosomes are relatively conserved across continents, while being locally diverse, which supports the hypothesis that bird trypanosomes exist as fewer species than described in the literature. Evidence exists that avian Trypanosoma spp. are infecting mammals and could be transmitted by haemadipsid leeches. Trypanosoma sp

  11. Arginine and Lysine Transporters Are Essential for Trypanosoma brucei.

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Christoph; Pereira de Macêdo, Juan; Hürlimann, Daniel; Wirdnam, Corina; Haindrich, Alexander; Suter, Marianne; González Salgado, Amaia; Schmidt, Remo; Inbar, Ehud; Mäser, Pascal; Bütikofer, Peter; Zilberstein, Dan; Rentsch, Doris

    2017-01-01

    For Trypanosoma brucei arginine and lysine are essential amino acids and therefore have to be imported from the host. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants identified cationic amino acid transporters among members of the T. brucei AAAP (amino acid/auxin permease) family. TbAAT5-3 showed high affinity arginine uptake (K m 3.6 ? 0.4 ?M) and high selectivity for L-arginine. L-arginine transport was reduced by a 10-times excess of L-arginine, homo-arginine, canavanine or arg...

  12. Acetate oxidation by bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, R; Cruz, F S; Leon, W; Schmunis, G A

    1979-05-01

    Bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi had a substantial increase in respiration in the presence of acetate. Oxidation of acetate took place via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and involved an antimycin A-sensitive respiratory pathway. Oxygen uptake in the presence of acetate was a sensitive to antimycin A inhibition as was CO2 production. There was a 6--7% residual O2 uptake which was not inhibited by high antimycin concentrations. Human anti-T. cruzi sera had no effect on oxygen uptake.

  13. Atividade tripanocida do plasma humano sobre Trypanosoma evansi em camundongos

    OpenAIRE

    Da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer; Duck, Marcos Rafael Kroeker; Fanfa, Vinicius da Rosa; Otto, Mateus Anderson; Nunes, João Tomaz Schmitt; Tonin, Alexandre Alberto; Jaques, Jeandre Augusto; Paim, Francine Chimelo; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Monteiro, Silvia Gonzalez

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to test an alternative protocol with human plasma to control Trypanosoma evansi infection in mice. Plasma from an apparently 27-year-old healthy male, blood type A+, was used in the study. A concentration of 100 mg.dL-1 apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) was detected in the plasma. Forty mice were divided into four groups with 10 animals each. Group A comprised uninfected animals. Mice from groups B, C and D were inoculated with a T. evansi isolate. Group B was used as a positive cont...

  14. Trypanosoma sp. diversity in Amazonian bats (Chiroptera; Mammalia) from Acre State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Francisco C B; Lisboa, Cristiane V; Xavier, Samanta C C; Dario, Maria A; Verde, Rair de S; Calouro, Armando M; Roque, André Luiz R; Jansen, Ana M

    2017-11-16

    Bats are ancient hosts of Trypanosoma species and their flying ability, longevity and adaptability to distinct environments indicate that they are efficient dispersers of parasites. Bats from Acre state (Amazon Biome) were collected in four expeditions conducted in an urban forest (Parque Zoobotânico) and one relatively more preserved area (Seringal Cahoeira) in Rio Branco and Xapuri municipalities. Trypanosoma sp. infection was detected by hemoculture and fresh blood examination. Isolated parasite species were identified by the similarity of the obtained DNA sequence from 18S rDNA polymerase chain reaction and reference strains. Overall, 367 bats from 23 genera and 32 species were examined. Chiropterofauna composition was specific to each municipality, although Artibeus sp. and Carollia sp. prevailed throughout. Trypanosoma sp. infection was detected in 85 bats (23·2%). The most widely distributed and prevalent genotypes were (in order) Trypanosoma cruzi TcI, T. cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, T. cruzi TcIV and Trypanosoma rangeli. At least one still-undescribed Trypanosoma species was also detected in this study. The detection of T. cruzi TcI and TcIV (the ones associated with Chagas disease in Amazon biome) demonstrates the putative importance of these mammal hosts in the epidemiology of the disease in the Acre State.

  15. Occurrence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C.M.; Bruce, J.I.

    1962-01-01

    During 1954-1960, 2005 mammals of 18 species collected at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Maryland, were examined for trypanosomes. T. cruzi was found in 10 raccoons between October 31 and November 30. Infection occurred in 2 percent of all raccoons sampled, and in 11.3 percent of the 80 raccoons sampled in November. Examination was by direct smears, stained smears and cultures of heart blood. Although, in previous studies, at least two experimentally infected raccoons exhibited extended parasitemia (14 and 8 weeks), no such continuing parasitemia was observed in the natural infections. No trypanosomes were found in any of the other mammals examined.

  16. Relationship between testicular lesion and hormone levels in male rats infected with Trypanosoma evansi

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    LUCIANA FACCIO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between testicular lesions and hormone levels in rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma evansi. For that, the measurement of reproductive hormones, histopathology and biomarkers of cellular injury were carried out in twenty-four animals, which were divided into two groups with 12 animals each. Group A was the negative control, or uninfected, while group B was composed by animals infected with T. evansi. Both groups were divided again into two other subgroups (n=6, from which serum and testicular fragments were collected on days 5 (A1 and B1 and 15 (A2 and B2 post-infection (PI. The morphological analysis showed increased alterations of head and tail of sperm in infected rats when compared with those of the control group. A significant reduction (P<0.01 in the levels of LH, FSH, testosterone and estradiol, associated with an increase in cortisol, was observed in serum of group B when compared with negative control. Additionally, NOx, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were enhanced in testicles, indicating the occurrence of cellular lesion. On histopathology, it was possible to observe testicular degeneration, among other disorders in infected animals. Therefore, based on these results, it is possible to conclude that the experimental infection with T. evansi caused changes in the levels of the main hormones of male rats associated with cellular injury.

  17. Standardization of serological tests for detecting anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in dogs

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    M. A. Lauricella

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the standardization of four serological reactions currently used in human serodiagnosis for the detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in naturally and experimentally infected dogs. Indirect immunofluorescence test (IFAT and hemagglutination test (IHAT were standardized, and complement fixation test (CFT and direct agglutination test (DAT were used for diagnostic confirmation. Four hundred and eighty one mongrel dogs that were studied by xenodiagnosis were used: (1 parasitemic dogs of two localities of endemic area (EA of Santiago del Estero province in Argentina (n = 134; (2 non-parasitemic dogs of the same area (n = 285; (3 dogs experimentally infected with T. cruzi in the patent period (n = 6; (4 non-infected dogs (n = 56 which were born in the city of Buenos Aires (BA, one non-EA for Chagas' disease. For IFAT, parasitemic dogs EA showed 95% of reactive sera. Non parasitemic dogs EA showed 77% of non reactive sera. None sera from BA were reactive for dilutions higher than four. For IHAT, 84% of sera of parasitemic dogs EA showed serological reactivity and among non parasitemic dogs BA, 61% were non reactive, while the remainder showed at most titres of 1/16. The cut-off titres for IFAT and IHAT were 1/16 and 1/32 respectively, and for CFT and DAT 1/1 and 1/128 respectively. Sensitivity for IFAT, IHAT, CF and DAT were 95%, 84%, 97% and 95% respectively.

  18. In vitro drug susceptibility of two strains of the wildlife trypanosome, Trypanosoma copemani: A comparison with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero, Adriana; Keatley, Sarah; Peacock, Christopher; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosomes are blood protozoan parasites that are capable of producing illness in the vertebrate host. Within Australia, several native Trypanosoma species have been described infecting wildlife. However, only Trypanosoma copemani has been associated with pathological lesions in wildlife hosts and more recently has been associated with the drastic decline of the critically endangered woylie (Bettongia penicillata). The impact that some trypanosomes have on the health of the vertebrate host has led to the development of numerous drug compounds that could inhibit the growth or kill the parasite. This study investigated and compared the in vitro susceptibility of two strains of T. copemani (G1 and G2) and one strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (10R26) against drugs that are known to show trypanocidal activity (benznidazole, posaconazole, miltefosine and melarsoprol) and against four lead compounds, two fenarimols and two pyridine derivatives (EPL-BS1937, EPL-BS2391, EPL-BS0967, and EPL-BS1246), that have been developed primarily against T.cruzi. The in vitro cytotoxicity of all drugs against L6 rat myoblast cells was also assessed. Results showed that both strains of T. copemani were more susceptible to all drugs and lead compounds than T. cruzi, with all IC50 values in the low and sub-μM range for both species. Melarsoprol and miltefosine exhibited the highest drug activity against both T. copemani and T. cruzi, but they also showed the highest toxicity in L6 cells. Interestingly, both fenarimol and pyridine derivative compounds were more active against T. copemani and T. cruzi than the reference drugs benznidazole and posaconazole. T. copemani strains exhibited differences in susceptibility to all drugs demonstrating once again considerable differences in their biological behaviour. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi: Transporte de metabolitos esenciales obtenidos del hospedador Trypanosoma cruzi: Transport of essential metabolites acquired from the host

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    Claudio A. Pereira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available El Trypanosoma cruzi es el agente causal de la enfermedad de Chagas, endémica en Argentina y en toda América Latina. Presenta numerosas características metabólicas diferenciales respecto a sus hospedadores insectos y mamíferos. Algunas de estas diferencias fueron consecuencia de millones de años de adaptación al parasitismo en los cuales estos organismos protozoarios reemplazaron, a lo largo de su evolución, muchas rutas metabólicas de biosíntesis por sistemas de transporte de metabolitos desde el hospedador. En esta revisión se describen los avances en el conocimiento de los sistemas de transporte tanto bioquímicos como también de las moléculas involucradas en dichos procesos. Se aborda con especial énfasis los transportadores de aminoácidos y poliaminas de T. cruzi de la familia AAAP (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases ya que parece ser exclusiva de los tripanosomátidos. Teniendo en cuenta que estas moléculas se encuentran completamente ausentes en mamíferos podrían ser consideradas como potenciales blancos contra el Trypanosoma cruzi.Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a disease endemic not only in Argentina but also in all of Latinamerica. T. cruzi presents several metabolic characteristics which are completely absent in its insect vectors and in mammalian hosts. Some of these differences were acquired after millions of years of adaptation to parasitism, during which this protozoan replaced many biosynthetic routes for transport systems. In the present review, we describe the advances in the knowledge of T. cruzi transport processes and the molecules involved. In particular, we focus on aminoacid and polyamine transporters from the AAAP family (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases, because they seem to be exclusive transporters from trypanosomatids. Taking into account that these permeases are completely absent in mammals, they could be considered as a potential target against Trypanosoma cruzi.

  20. Life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi (y strain in mice Ciclo evolutivo do Trypanosoma cruzi (cepa Y no camundongo branco (mus musculus. L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz Silva Pinto

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 1958, we have studied experimental Chagas' disease (CD by subcutaneous inoculation of 1,000 blood forms of Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain in Balb/C. mice. Evolution of parasitemia remained constant, beginning on the 5th and 6th day of the disease, increasing progressively, achieving a maximum on about the 30th day. After another month, only a few forms were present, and they disappeared from the circulation after the third month, as determined from direct examination of slides and the use of a Neubauer Counting Chamber. These events coincided with the appearance of amastigote nests in the tissues (especially the cardiac ones, starting the first week, and following the Gauss parasitemia curve, but they were not in parallel until the chronic stage. In 1997, we began to note the following changes: Parasites appeared in the circulation during the first week and disappeared starting on the 7th day, and there was a coincident absence of the amastigote nests in the tissues. A careful study verified that young forms in the evolutionary cycle of T. cruzi (epi + amastigotes began to appear alongside the trypomastigotes in the circulation on the 5th and 7th post-inoculation day. At the same time, rounded, oval, and spindle shapes were seen circulating through the capillaries and sinusoids of the tissues, principally of the hematopoietic organs. Stasis occurs because the diameter of the circulating parasites is greater than the vessels, and this makes them more visible. Examination of the sternal bone marrow revealed young cells with elongated forms and others truncated in the shape of a "C" occupying the internal surface of the blood cells that had empty central portions (erythrocytes?. We hypothesize that there could be a loss of virulence or mutation of the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi.Desde 1958, nós estudamos a doença de Chagas experimental, inoculando 1.000 formas sanguicolas de Trypanosoma cruzi, Chagas-1909, (cepa Y por via sub-cutânea em

  1. Refractory hypoglycaemia in a dog infected with Trypanosoma congolense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschamps Jack-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20 kg German shepherd dog was presented to a French veterinary teaching hospital for seizures and hyperthermia. The dog had returned 1 month previously from a six-month stay in Senegal and sub-Saharan Africa. Biochemistry and haematology showed severe hypoglycaemia (0.12 g/L, anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Despite administration of large amounts of glucose (30 mL of 30% glucose IV and 10 mL of 70% sucrose by gavage tube hourly, 26 consecutive blood glucose measurements were below 0.25 g/L (except one. Routine cytological examination of blood smears revealed numerous free extracytoplasmic protozoa consistent with Trypanosoma congolense. PCR confirmed a Trypanosoma congolense forest-type infection. Treatment consisted of six injections of pentamidine at 48-hour intervals. Trypanosomes had disappeared from the blood smears four days following the first injection. Clinical improvement was correlated with the normalization of laboratory values. The infection relapsed twice and the dog was treated again; clinical signs and parasites disappeared and the dog was considered cured; however, 6 years after this incident, serological examination by ELISA T. congolense was positive. The status of this dog (infected or non-infected remains unclear. Hypoglycaemia was the most notable clinical feature in this case. It was spectacular in its severity and in its refractory nature; glucose administration seemed only to feed the trypanosomes, indicating that treatment of hypoglycaemia may in fact have been detrimental.

  2. Tridimensional ultrastructure and glycolipid pattern studies of Trypanosoma dionisii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Miriam Pires de Castro; Ramos, Thiago Cesar Prata; Pinheiro, Adriana Maria V N; Bertini, Silvio; Takahashi, Helio Kiyoshi; Straus, Anita Hilda; Haapalainen, Edna Freymuller

    2013-12-01

    Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) dionisii is a non-pathogenic bat trypanosome closely related to Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chaga's disease. Both kinetoplastids present similar morphological stages and are able to infect mammalian cells in culture. In the present study we examined 3D ultrastructure aspects of the two species by serial sectioning epimastigote and trypomastigote forms, and identified common carbohydrate epitopes expressed in T. dionisii, T. cruzi and Leishmania major. A major difference in 3D morphology was that T. dionisii epimastigote forms present larger multivesicular structures, restricted to the parasite posterior region. These structures could be related to T. cruzi reservosomes and are also rich in cruzipain, the major cysteine-proteinase of T. cruzi. We analyzed the reactivity of two monoclonal antibodies: MEST-1 directed to galactofuranose residues of glycolipids purified from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and BST-1 directed to glycolipids purified from T. cruzi epimastigotes. Both antibodies were reactive with T. dionisii epimastigotes by indirect immunofluorescense, but we noted differences in the location and intensity of the epitopes, when compared to T. cruzi. In summary, despite similar features in cellular structure and life cycle of T. dionisii and T. cruzi, we observed a unique morphological characteristic in T. dionisii that deserves to be explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Description of an acidic peptidase, insensitive to classical inhibitors, in protein extracts of Trypanosoma cruzi, from a rural area of Venezuela, where Chagas disease is endemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Edgar Armando; de la Cruz, Henry Samuel; Coita, Blanca Elena

    2013-09-01

    Through two peptidase assay methods, one in liquid-phase and another, in gel-phase (gel zymography), an acid peptidase was detected in protein crude extracts of epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, from a rural area of Venezuela where Chagas disease is endemic. The peptidase shows activity at a pH range between 2.0 and 2.9. Under the experimental conditions described, the acid peptidase was insensitive to usual concentrations of peptidase inhibitors of the types: serine, cysteine, aspartic and metallopeptidases. Nevertheless, like porcine pepsin at pH 2.9, the peptidase was inhibited in the presence of 5mM DTT.

  4. Trypanosoma rangeli (Tejera, 1920 isolated from a sylvatic rodent (Echimys dasythrix in Santa Catarina island, Santa Catarina state: first report of this trypanosome in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Steindel

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available A trypanosome strain isolated from a sylvatic rodent (Echimys dasythrix from Santa Catarina Island (Santa Catarina State, Brazil was characterized by the following methods: experimental transmission and development in invertebrate hosts, morphometry, cross protection, complement sensitivity, lectin agglutination and isoenzyme profiles. Comparasions were made with standard Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli strains. All methods except isoenzyne analysis led to the identification of the isolate as T. rangeli. The isoenzyme differences found could be explained on the basis of polymorphism. Therefore this is the first report of T. rangeli in southern Brazil, increasing the geographical distribution of this parasite.

  5. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalization of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jurgen R.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Michels, Paul A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucel. The recent finding of pore-forming

  6. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalizatin of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J.R.; Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei. The recent finding of pore-forming

  7. In vitro evaluation of the activity of aromatic nitrocompounds against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata B Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen compounds were evaluated for their activity against Trypanosoma cruzi blood stream forms at the concentration of 500 µg/ml. Six compounds were active and re-tested at lower concentrations.

  8. A soluble 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, A; Camacho, A

    1997-01-01

    cellular distribution of enzymic activity was investigated after differential centrifugation of Trypanosoma cell extracts. Reductase activity was primarily associated with the cellular soluble fraction because 95% of the total cellular activity was recovered in the supernatant and was particularly...

  9. Evaluation of the Chagas Stat-Paktm Assay for Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi Antibodies in Wildlife Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabsley, Michael J.; Brown, Emily L.; Roellig, Dawn M.

    2010-01-01

    An immunochromatographic assay (Chagas Stat-Pak™) was evaluated for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in 4 species of wildlife reservoirs. Antibodies to T. cruzi were detected in raccoons (Procyon lotor) (naturally and experimentally infected) and degus (Octodon degu) (experimentally-infected) using the Chagas Stat-Pak. In naturally exposed wild raccoons, the Chagas Stat-Pak had a sensitivity and specificity of 66.7–80.0% and 96.3%, respectively. Compared with indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay results, serocon-version as determined by Chagas Stat-Pak was delayed for experimentally infected raccoons, but occurred sooner in experimentally infected degus. The Chagas Stat-Pak did not detect antibodies in naturally or experimentally infected Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) or in experimentally infected short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica). These data suggest that the Chagas Stat-Pak might be useful in field studies of raccoons and degus when samples would not be available for more-conventional serologic assays. Because this assay did not work on either species of marsupial, the applicability of the assay should be examined before it is used in other wild species. PMID:19016578

  10. QSAR study and conformational analysis of 4-arylthiazolylhydrazones derived from 1-indanones with anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, Guido J; Fabian, Lucas E; Lombardo, Elisa; Finkielsztein, Liliana

    2015-10-12

    A set of 4-arylthiazolylhydrazones derived from 1-indanones (TZHs) previously synthesized and assayed against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, were explored in terms of conformational analysis. We found that TZHs can adopt four minimum energy conformations: cis (A, B and C) and trans. The possible bioactive conformation was selected by a 3D-QSAR model. Different molecular parameters were calculated to produce QSAR second-generation models. These QSAR results are discussed in conjunction with conformational analysis from molecular modeling studies. The main factor to determine the activity of the compounds was the partial charge at the N(3) atom (qN3). The predictive ability of the QSAR equations proposed was experimentally validated. The QSAR models developed in this study will be helpful to design novel potent TZHs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synanthropic rodent reservoirs of Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi in the valley of Caracas, Venezuela

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    Leidi HERRERA

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct blood examination and xenodiagnosis of 47 synanthropic rodents (Rattus rattus, R. norvegicus, Mus musculus captured in the valley of Caracas, Venezuela, revealed trypanosomal infections in 12 R. rattus, 10 with T. lewisi and 2 with T. cruzi. Of the latter the course of parasitemia, the pleomorphism of the bloodstream trypomastigotes, tissue tropism in naturally and experimentally infected rats and mice, host mortality, morphology of fecal parasites in Rhodnius prolixus used for xenodiagnosis, and infectivity of the bug feces for NMRI mice, were all characteristic of Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi. One rat, with a patent parasitemia, had numerous nests of amastigotes in cardiac muscle and moderate parasitism of the smooth muscle of the duodenum and of skeletal muscle. Mice inoculated with fecal flagellates from the bugs had moderate tissue tropism in the same organs and also in the colon and pancreas. The possible role of R. rattus in the establishment of foci of Chagas’ disease in Caracas is discussedExame direto de sangue e xenodiagnóstico de 47 roedores sinantrópicos (Rattus rattus, R. norvegicus, Mus musculus capturados no Vale de Caracas, Venezuela, revelaram infecção por tripanosoma em 12 R. rattus, 10 com T. lewisi e 2 com T. cruzi. Dos últimos o curso de parasitemia, o pleomorfismo dos tripomastigotas na corrente sanguínea, tropismo tissular em ratos e camundongos natural e experimentalmente infectados, mortalidade dos hospedeiros, morfologia dos parasitas fecais em Rhodnius prolixus usados para xenodiagnóstico e infectividade das fezes do "barbeiro" para camundongos NMRI, foram todos característicos de Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi. Um rato com parasitemia patente, tinha numerosos ninhos de amastigotas no músculo cardíaco e parasitismo moderado do músculo liso do duodeno e do músculo esquelético. Camundongos inoculados com flagelados fecais de "barbeiros" tinham tropismo tissular moderado nos mesmos

  12. Using of essential oils in the treatment of mice infected with Trypanosoma evansi

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    Matheus D. Baldissera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to test the effectiveness of copaiba, andiroba and aroeira essential oils for controlling trypanosomosis by Trypanosoma evansi with mice as experimental model. Materials and methods. Sixty-six mice were divided into eleven groups (A to L with six animals each. Group A was the unique composed by healthy and uninfected animals (negative control. Animals in groups B to L were inoculated with 0.1 mL of blood containing 2.7 x 106 trypanosomes. Group B was used as a positive control without treatment. In experiment were tested copaiba (C, D and E, andiroba (F, G and H and aroeira (I, J and L oils at doses of 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 mL kg-1 to infected mice (T. evansi. Results. These protocols did not provide curative efficacy; however, the mice treated with highest dose of copaiba showed a significant increase in the longevity when compared others groups. Conclusions. Previously in our studies, these essential oils have shown trypanocidal activity in vitro, but when they were tested in vivo in mice infected with T. evansi, this trypanocidal activity, or the curative effect was not found, being only able to prolong the lifespan of the animals treated with copaiba oil.

  13. Recently differentiated epimastigotes from Trypanosoma cruzi are infective to the mammalian host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Rafael Luis; Contreras, Víctor Tulio; Marliére, Newmar Pinto; Aparecida Guarneri, Alessandra; Villamizar Silva, Luz Helena; Mazzarotto, Giovanny Augusto Camacho Antevere; Batista, Michel; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Krieger, Marco Aurelio; Probst, Christian Macagnan

    2017-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle in which four distinct developmental forms alternate between the insect vector and the mammalian host. It is assumed that replicating epimastigotes present in the insect gut are not infective to mammalian host, a paradigm corroborated by the widely acknowledged fact that only this stage is susceptible to the complement system. In the present work, we establish a T. cruzi in vitro and in vivo epimastigogenesis model to analyze the biological aspects of recently differentiated epimastigotes (rdEpi). We show that both trypomastigote stages of T. cruzi (cell-derived and metacyclic) are able to transform into epimastigotes (processes termed primary and secondary epimastigogenesis, respectively) and that rdEpi have striking properties in comparison to long-term cultured epimastigotes: resistance to complement-mediated lysis and both in vitro (cell culture) and in vivo (mouse) infectivity. Proteomics analysis of all T. cruzi stages reveled a cluster of proteins that were up-regulated only in rdEpi (including ABC transporters and ERO1), suggesting a role for them in rdEpi virulence. The present work introduces a new experimental model for the study of host-parasite interactions, showing that rdEpi can be infective to the mammalian host. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Binding of triazole-linked galactosyl arylsulfonamides to galectin-3 affects Trypanosoma cruzi cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, Marcelo Fiori; Riul, Thalita B; Oliveira Bortot, Leandro; Andrade, Peterson; Junqueira, Getúlio G; Foca, Giuseppina; Doti, Nunzianna; Ruvo, Menotti; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Carvalho, Ivone; Campo, Vanessa Leiria

    2017-11-01

    The synthesis of the O-3 triazole-linked galactosyl arylsulfonamides 1-7 as potential inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi cell invasion is described. These target compounds were synthesized by Cu(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction ('click chemistry') between different azide arylsulfonamides and the alkyne-based sugar 3-O-propynyl-βGalOMe. Inhibition assays of T. cruzi cell invasion with compounds 1-7 showed reduced values of infection index (∼20) for compounds 3 and 5, bearing the corresponding 5-methylisoxazole and 2,4-dimethoxypyrimidine groups, which also presented higher binding affinities to galectin-3 (EC 50 17-18 μM) in Corning Epic label-free assays. In agreement with experimental results, the assessment of the theoretical binding of compounds 1-7 to galectin-3 by MM/PBSA method displayed higher affinities for compounds 3 (-9.7 kcal/mol) and 5 (-11.1 kcal/mol). Overall, these achievements highlight compounds 3 and 5 as potential T. cruzi cell invasion blockers by means of a galectin-3 binding-related mechanism, revealing galectin-3 as an important host target for design of novel anti-trypanosomal agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Trypanosoma equiperdum Low Molecular Weight Proteins As Candidates for Specific Serological Diagnosis of Dourine

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    Mirella Luciani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of dourine can be difficult because the clinical signs of this disease in horses are similar to those of surra, caused by Trypanosoma evansi. Moreover, T. equiperdum and T. evansi are closely related and, so far, they cannot be distinguished using serological tests. In a previous work, the T. equiperdum protein pattern recognized by antibodies from dourine-infected horses and the humoral immune response kinetics were investigated by immunoblotting assay; a total of 20 sera from naturally and experimentally infected horses and from healthy animals were tested. Immunoblotting analysis showed that antibodies from infected horses specifically bind T. equiperdum low molecular weight proteins (from 16 to 35 kDa, which are not recognized by antibodies from uninfected horses. In this work, we tested other 615 sera (7 from naturally infected horses and 608 sera from healthy horses and donkeys: results confirmed the data obtained previously. In addition, six SDS-PAGE bands with molecular weight ranging from 10 to 37 kDa were analyzed by mass spectrometry, in order to identify immunogenic proteins that could be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis of dourine. A total of 167 proteins were identified. Among them, 37 were found unique for T. equiperdum. Twenty-four of them could represent possible candidate diagnostic antigens for the development of serological tests specific for T. equiperdum.

  16. Side effects of immunization with liver attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi in mice and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basombrío, M A; Besuschio, S; Cossio, P M

    1982-04-01

    Immunity against lethal, bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was achieved in mice by preinoculation of approximately equal to 10(5) culture epimastigotes of an attenuated T. cruzi strain (TCC). The risks of TCC inoculation in terms of pathogenicity or eventual increase in virulence of TCC progeny were evaluated. No pathogenic parasites could be selected from TCC progeny by either mouse, triatome, or culture passages. Immunizing doses of live TCC did not induce in adult mice alterations resembling chronic Chagas' disease, as judged by patterns of mortality, tissue damage, autoantibodies, or parasite recovery. On the basis of the same criteria, However, a remarkable similarity could be established between the disease caused in mice by inoculation of low numbers (10(2)) of pathogenic trypomastigotes and human chronic Chagas' disease. Although patent parasitemias were never revealed in fresh blood mounts obtained from TCC-inoculated mice, a few hemocultures and xenodiagnoses gave positive results, particularly soon after inoculations at birth. The parasites recovered by either method remained in the attenuated, epimastigote stage. In rabbits, no local lesions, fever, weight loss, or histopathological alterations were detected after subcutaneous inoculation of 10(7) TCC organisms, although one fifth of the animals yielded positive hemocultures of epimastigotes. The contrasting host response to cultured epimastigotes as compared with blood trypomastigotes indicates that, in experimental Chagas' disease, immunoprotection is not necessarily associated with immunopathology.

  17. Alterations in pancreatic β cell function and Trypanosoma cruzi infection: evidence from human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufurrena, Quinn; Amjad, Farhad M; Scherer, Philipp E; Weiss, Louis M; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Roth, Jesse; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Kuliawat, Regina

    2017-03-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes a persistent infection, Chagas disease, affecting millions of persons in endemic areas of Latin America. As a result of immigration, this disease has now been diagnosed in non-endemic areas worldwide. Although, the heart and gastrointestinal tract are the most studied, the insulin-secreting β cell of the endocrine pancreas is also a target of infection. In this review, we summarize available clinical and laboratory evidence to determine whether T. cruzi-infection-mediated changes of β cell function is likely to contribute to the development of hyperglycemia and diabetes. Our literature survey indicates that T. cruzi infection of humans and of experimental animals relates to altered secretory behavior of β cells. The mechanistic basis of these observations appears to be a change in stimulus-secretion pathway function rather than the loss of insulin-producing β cells. Whether this attenuated insulin release ultimately contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes in human Chagas disease, however, remains to be determined. Since the etiologies of diabetes are multifactorial including genetic and lifestyle factors, the use of cell- and animal-based investigations, allowing direct manipulation of these factors, are important tools in testing if reduced insulin secretion has a causal influence on diabetes in the setting of Chagas disease. Long-term clinical investigations will be required to investigate this link in humans.

  18. CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: A Path for Vaccine Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Virgilio, Fernando; Pontes, Camila; Dominguez, Mariana Ribeiro; Ersching, Jonatan; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Vasconcelos, José Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8+ T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8+ T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8+ T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine. PMID:25104879

  19. Synthesis and characterization of potent inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydrofolate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schormann, Norbert; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Murugesan, Srinivasan; Senkovich, Olga; Walker, Kiera; Chenna, Bala C.; Shinkre, Bidhan; Desai, Amar; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB)

    2010-09-17

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is a potential target for developing drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have undertaken a detailed structure-activity study of this enzyme. We report here synthesis and characterization of six potent inhibitors of the parasitic enzyme. Inhibitory activity of each compound was determined against T. cruzi and human DHFR. One of these compounds, ethyl 4-(5-[(2,4-diamino-6-quinazolinyl)methyl]amino-2-methoxyphenoxy)butanoate (6b) was co-crystallized with the bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase enzyme of T. cruzi and the crystal structure of the ternary enzyme:cofactor:inhibitor complex was determined. Molecular docking was used to analyze the potential interactions of all inhibitors with T. cruzi DHFR and human DHFR. Inhibitory activities of these compounds are discussed in the light of enzyme-ligand interactions. Binding affinities of each inhibitor for the respective enzymes were calculated based on the experimental or docked binding mode. An estimated 60-70% of the total binding energy is contributed by the 2,4-diaminoquinazoline scaffold.

  20. The Trypanosoma cruzi nucleolus: a morphometrical analysis of cultured epimastigotes in the exponential and stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Cevallos, Ana María; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Hernández, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Our group is interested in rRNA and ribosome biogenesis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Epimastigotes represent an extracellular replicative stage of T. cruzi and can be cultured in axenic media. The growth curve of epimastigotes allows assessment of potential differences in the nucleoli of cells undergoing growth-rate transitions. To establish cellular parameters for studying ribosome biogenesis in T. cruzi, a morphometric analysis of the nucleoli of cultured cells in the exponential and stationary phases was conducted. Electron micrograph-based measurements of nuclear sections from independent cells demonstrated that the nucleolar area is over twofold higher in exponentially growing cells, as compared with epimastigotes in the stationary phase. The granular component of the nucleoli of actively growing cells was the main structural element. Cycloheximide moderately reduced the apparent size of the nucleoli without an apparent disruption of their architecture. Our results provide a firm basis for the establishment of an experimental model to study the organization of the nucleolus during the growth and development of T. cruzi. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Myenteric plexus is differentially affected by infection with distinct Trypanosoma cruzi strains in Beagle dogs

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    Nívia Carolina Nogueira-Paiva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Chagasic megaoesophagus and megacolon are characterised by motor abnormalities related to enteric nervous system lesions and their development seems to be related to geographic distribution of distinct Trypanosoma cruzi subpopulations. Beagle dogs were infected with Y or Berenice-78 (Be-78 T. cruzi strains and necropsied during the acute or chronic phase of experimental disease for post mortem histopathological evaluation of the oesophagus and colon. Both strains infected the oesophagus and colon and caused an inflammatory response during the acute phase. In the chronic phase, inflammatory process was observed exclusively in the Be-78 infected animals, possibly due to a parasitism persistent only in this group. Myenteric denervation occurred during the acute phase of infection for both strains, but persisted chronically only in Be-78 infected animals. Glial cell involvement occurred earlier in animals infected with the Y strain, while animals infected with the Be-78 strain showed reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive area of enteric glial cells in the chronic phase. These results suggest that although both strains cause lesions in the digestive tract, the Y strain is associated with early control of the lesion, while the Be-78 strain results in progressive gut lesions in this model.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi uses macropinocytosis as an additional entry pathway into mammalian host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrias, E S; Reignault, L C; De Souza, W; Carvalho, T M U

    2012-11-01

    Several intracellular pathogens are internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. It is no different with Trypanosoma cruzi. Evidences indicate that T. cruzi entry may occur by endocytosis/phagocytosis or by an active manner. Although macropinocytosis is largely considered an endocytic process where cells internalize only large amounts of solutes, several pathogens use this pathway to enter into host cells. To investigate whether T. cruzi entry into peritoneal macrophages and LLC-MK2 epithelial cells can be also mediated through a macropinocytosis-like process, we used several experimental strategies presently available to characterize macropinocytosis such as the use of different inhibitors. These macropinocytosis' inhibitors blocked internalization of T. cruzi by host cells. To further support this, immunofluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used. Field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed that after treatment, parasites remained attached to the external side of host cell plasma membrane. Proteins such as Rabankyrin 5, tyrosine kinases, Pak1 and actin microfilaments, which participate in macropinosome formation, were localized at T. cruzi entry sites. We also observed co-localization between the parasite and an endocytic fluid phase marker. All together, these results indicate that T. cruzi is able to use multiple mechanisms of penetration into host cell, including macropinocytosis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Estudo sorológico de infecções experimentais por Trypanosoma evansi, em cobaias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Goulart de Oliveira

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparamos os métodos de Imunofluorescência Indireta (IFI, Imunodifusão Radial Dupla e Aglutinação, para a pesquisa de anticorpos em soros, na tripanossomíase experimental por Trypanosoma evansi, em cobaias. Foram obtidas 20 amostras de soro correspondentes às 4 primeiras semanas de infecção. A IFI foi positiva em apenas 6 animais, com títulos variando de 1:4 a 1:16. Os títulos mais altos foram observados na 3ª semana pós-infecção. Anticorpos aglutinantes foram observados a partir da 1ª semana pós-infecção e, após a 2ª semana, todos os animais apresentaram reação de aglutinação positiva, com títulos variando de 1:8.000 a 1:250.000. O tratamento dos soros com 2-Mercapto-etanol inibiu a reação de aglutinação, sugerindo ser IgM a principal classe dos anticorpos presentes no soro dos animais infectados. Não se constatou a presença de anticorpos precipitantes durante todo o curso da infecção.

  4. Influence of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of mice infected by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Maria Moreira da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Enriched environments normally increase behavioral repertoires and diminish the expression of abnormal behaviors and stress-related physiological problems in animals. Although it has been shown that experimental animals infected with microorganisms can modify their behaviors and physiology, few studies have evaluated how environmental enrichment affects these parameters. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of confined mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. METHODS: The behaviors of 20 T. cruzi-infected mice and 20 non-infected mice were recorded during three treatments: baseline, enrichment, and post-enrichment. Behavioral data were collected using scan sampling with instantaneous recording of behavior every 30s, totaling 360h. Plasma TNF, CCL2, and IL-10 levels and parasitemia were also evaluated in infected enriched/non-enriched mice. Behavioral data were evaluated by Friedman’s test and physiological data by one-way ANOVA and area under the curve (AUC analysis. RESULTS: Results showed that environmental enrichment significantly increased exploratory behaviors and diminished inactivity. The use of environmental enrichment did not diminish circulating levels of TNF and IL-10 but diminished circulating levels of CCL2 and parasitemia. CONCLUSIONS: Positive behavioral and physiological effects of environmental enrichment were observed in mice living in enriched cages. Thus, environmental enrichment improved the welfare of these animals.

  5. CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: A Path for Vaccine Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando dos Santos Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8+ T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8+ T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8+ T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine.

  6. Trace minerals in serum of sheep infected with Trypanosoma congolense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neils, J S; Sackey, A K B; Abdullahi, U S; Esievo, K A N

    2007-01-15

    Yankassa sheep (20) were grouped into A and B and infected with Trypanosoma congolense isolated from a cow and maintained in mice. Two milliliter x 10(7) parasites were used to infect group A. The course of the infection and serum trace minerals (Iron, (Fe) and Copper, (Cu) were studied and determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). There was significant drop in concentration of iron (p0.05). The values of the contemporaneously uninfected control sheep were significantly higher for iron and not for copper. Sheep are susceptible to isolate from cow and passaged in mice and with the fluctuating concentrations of Fe and consistency of Cu, it may suggest that these minerals may have a role in the pathogenesis of trypanosomosis due to T. congolense.

  7. Parasite Genome Projects and the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Initiative

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    Wim Degrave

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the human genome project, a great number of genome projects on other "model" organism have been initiated, some of them already completed. Several initiatives have also been started on parasite genomes, mainly through support from WHO/TDR, involving North-South and South-South collaborations, and great hopes are vested in that these initiatives will lead to new tools for disease control and prevention, as well as to the establishment of genomic research technology in developing countries. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, using the clone CL-Brener as starting point, has made considerable progress through the concerted action of more than 20 laboratories, most of them in the South. A brief overview of the current state of the project is given

  8. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense resistance to human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uzureau, Pierrick; Uzureau, Sophie; Lecordier, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    The African parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense accounts for 97% of human sleeping sickness cases. T. b. gambiense resists the specific human innate immunity acting against several other tsetse-fly-transmitted trypanosome species such as T. b. brucei, the causative agent of nagana disease...... in cattle. Human immunity to some African trypanosomes is due to two serum complexes designated trypanolytic factors (TLF-1 and -2), which both contain haptoglobin-related protein (HPR) and apolipoprotein LI (APOL1). Whereas HPR association with haemoglobin (Hb) allows TLF-1 binding and uptake via......GP), which prevents APOL1 toxicity and induces stiffening of membranes upon interaction with lipids. Two additional features contribute to resistance to TLFs: reduction of sensitivity to APOL1 requiring cysteine protease activity, and TbHpHbR inactivation due to a L210S substitution. According...

  9. Mosaic VSGs and the scale of Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation.

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    James P J Hall

    Full Text Available A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct 'mosaic' VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection.

  10. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  11. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  12. Trypanosomosis agglutination card test for Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akol, M N; Olaho-Mukani, W; Odiit, M; Enyaru, J C; Matovu, E; Magona, J; Okitoi, N D

    1999-01-01

    To develop a simple field test for diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in man. Trypanosomosis Agglutination Card Test (TACT) was developed for the diagnosis of sleeping sickness due to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infection, based on stabilised procyclic forms derived from Utat 4.1. Procyclics were fixed in buffered formalin at 4 degrees for 24 hours and further stabilised in acid/alcohol mixture for 30 minutes. The fixed antigen was stained with Coomassie blue and suspended in 0.1 M PBS/sodium azide buffer pH 7.2 at a concentration of 1 x 10(8) trypanosomes/ml and kept at room temperature. This antigen was used to screen 100 sera from rabbits infected with T. b. rhodesiense, eight from normal rabbits, and 220 only sera 60 of which were from sleeping sickness patients, 50 from normal persons and 110 from other parasitic infections. Laboratory testing of the antigen types against the rabbit and human sera infected with cloned variable antigen types of T. b. rhodesiense, was routinely carried on test cards under room temperature. Serum samples from normal and infected rabbits and human subjects. All sera from infected rabbits and 59 from sleeping sickness patients reacted strongly with the antigen showing agglutination reaction which ranged from 1:4 to 1:1024 serum dilution. There was minimal cross reaction with other parasitic infections as follows: one out of 20 malaria patients none of the 20 hookworm patients, one out of 30 for schistosomiasis patients, none of the 10 amoebiasis patients and one out of 20 for filariasis patients. Agglutination titres from all these non-sleeping sickness patients were below 1:16. Based on rabbit positive and negative sera, TACT gave a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 80% while for human sera a sensitivity of 98.3% and specificity of 96% were observed. These preliminary results show that TACT could be a promising screening field test for T. b. rhodesiense sleeping sickness.

  13. Multiple evolutionary origins of Trypanosoma evansi in Kenya.

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    Christine M Kamidi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi is the parasite causing surra, a form of trypanosomiasis in camels and other livestock, and a serious economic burden in Kenya and many other parts of the world. Trypanosoma evansi transmission can be sustained mechanically by tabanid and Stomoxys biting flies, whereas the closely related African trypanosomes T. brucei brucei and T. b. rhodesiense require cyclical development in tsetse flies (genus Glossina for transmission. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary origins of T. evansi. We used 15 polymorphic microsatellites to quantify levels and patterns of genetic diversity among 41 T. evansi isolates and 66 isolates of T. b. brucei (n = 51 and T. b. rhodesiense (n = 15, including many from Kenya, a region where T. evansi may have evolved from T. brucei. We found that T. evansi strains belong to at least two distinct T. brucei genetic units and contain genetic diversity that is similar to that in T. brucei strains. Results indicated that the 41 T. evansi isolates originated from multiple T. brucei strains from different genetic backgrounds, implying independent origins of T. evansi from T. brucei strains. This surprising finding further suggested that the acquisition of the ability of T. evansi to be transmitted mechanically, and thus the ability to escape the obligate link with the African tsetse fly vector, has occurred repeatedly. These findings, if confirmed, have epidemiological implications, as T. brucei strains from different genetic backgrounds can become either causative agents of a dangerous, cosmopolitan livestock disease or of a lethal human disease, like for T. b. rhodesiense.

  14. Evaluación in vitro de la actividad anti Trypanosoma cruzi de aceites esenciales de diez plantas medicinales

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    Juan Rojas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar la actividad anti Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro de los aceites esenciales de 10 plantas medicinales. Además, determinar la actividad citotóxica de los aceites contra células de mamíferos y la actividad modulatoria de los aceites sobre el óxido nítrico. Diseño: Estudio experimental in vitro. Institución: Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas e Instituto de Medicina Tropical, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú. Material biológico: Epimastigotes de Trypanosoma cruzi, células Raw 264.7, aceites esenciales de Mentha X piperita L (menta, Rosmarinus officinalis L (romero, Chenopodium ambrosioides L (paico, Eucaliptus globulus Labill (eucalipto, Artemisia absinthium L (ajenjo, Melissa officinalis L (toronjil, Minthostachys setosa Brig (muña, Cimbopogon citratus (hierba luisa, Aloysia triphylla (cedrón y Mentha spicata L (hierba buena. Método: La actividad tripanocida se evaluó contra epimastigotes cultivados en medio LIT, incubados por 48 horas a 37ºC en incubador humidificado con CO2 al 5%. El cristal violeta se utilizó como control positivo. La actividad citotóxica de los productos contra células mamíferas se evaluó en células RAW 264.7 y la actividad modulatoria de los compuestos sobre óxido nítrico también se determinó en los cultivos de células RAW 264.7. Principales medidas de resultados: Porcentaje de inhibición de viabilidad y CI50. Resultados: Los aceites esenciales de Cymbopogon citratus (hierba luisa y Aloysia triphylla (cedrón inhibieron significativamente el crecimiento de la forma epimastigote de T. cruzi, con una CI50 de 63,09 y 96,49 μg/mL, respectivamente. No hubo variaciσn significativa de la concentraciσn de óxido nítrico y tampoco se evidenció citotoxicidad. Conclusiones: Los aceites esenciales de Cymbopogon citratus y Aloysia triphylla mostraron actividad anti-Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro y no fueron citotóxicas para las células mamíferas.

  15. Semisolid liver infusion tryptose supplemented with human urine allows growth and isolation of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli clonal lineages

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    Emanuella Francisco Fajardo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION This work shows that 3% (v/v human urine (HU in semisolid Liver Infusion Tryptose (SSL medium favors the growth of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli. METHODS Parasites were plated as individual or mixed strains on SSL medium and on SSL medium with 3% human urine (SSL-HU. Isolate DNA was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. RESULTS SSL-HU medium improved clone isolation. PCR revealed that T. cruzi strains predominate on mixed-strain plates. PFGE confirmed that isolated parasites share the same molecular karyotype as parental cell lines. CONCLUSIONS SSL-HU medium constitutes a novel tool for obtaining T. cruzi and T. rangeli clonal lineages.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi, cancer and the Cold War Trypanosoma cruzi, câncer e a Guerra Fria

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    Nikolai Krementsov

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the summer of 1946, the international community of cancer researchers was inspired by the announcement that two Soviet scientists, Nina Kliueva and Grigorii Roskin, had discovered anticancer properties in culture extracts made from the South American protozoan, Trypanosoma cruzi, and had produced a preparation - named after its discoverers KR - which showed clear therapeutic effects on cancer patients. Research teams from various countries enthusiastically pursued the promising new line of investigation. The story of the rise and fall of interest in the anticancer properties of T. cruzi in different countries suggests that during the second half of the twentieth century, the Cold War competition between the superpowers played an important role in shaping the research agendas of cancer studies.No verão de 1946, a comunidade internacional que desenvolve pesquisas sobre o câncer, inspirou-se no anúncio de que dois cientistas soviéticos, Nina Kliueva e Grigorii Roskin, descobriram propriedades anticancerígenas em cultura extraída do protozoário existente na América Latina, o Trypanosoma cruzi e produziram um preparado que foi denominado com as iniciais KR - em sua homenagem. Grupos de pesquisadores de diversos países buscaram com entusiasmo as promessas dessa nova linha de investigação. A história da ascensão e queda do interesse nas propriedades anticâncer do T. cruzzi em diferentes países sugere que durante a segunda metade do século 20, a Guerra Fria teve um papel importante na definição das agendas de pesquisas sobre o câncer.

  17. Infecção via oral por Trypanosoma evansi em animais de laboratório Oral infection by Trypanosoma evansi in rats and mice

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    Aleksandro Schafer da Silva

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Testou-se a infecção de Trypanosoma evansi pela via oral em ratos e camundongos, através de sangue contaminado de ambas as espécies. Dez ratos e dez camundongos foram alocados em quatro grupos iguais A e B (ratos, C e D (camundongos. Os grupos A e C receberam sangue contaminado de um rato e o grupo B e D de um camundongo, através de uma sonda. O volume de sangue administrado foi de 0,2ml, o qual apresentava uma concentração de 10(7 tripanossomas ml-1. Os animais foram mantidos em temperatura e umidade constantes (25°C e 80% UR, sendo realizados esfregaços sanguíneos diários para identificar o período pré-patente e a evolução do parasita na circulação. Nos grupos A e B, o período pré-patente variou de 19 a 25 dias, e o período entre a detecção dos parasitas e a morte dos animais foi em média de 12,7 dias. Os camundongos do grupo C e D não apresentaram infecção pelo parasita, sendo estes avaliados por 60 dias. Os ratos foram susceptíveis a infecção por T. evansi pela via oral; entretanto, os camundongos não se contaminaram com o protozoário por via digestiva.In this research, Trypanosoma evansi infection was tested in rats and mice by oral ingestion of contaminated blood. Groups of ten rats and ten mice were disposed in four experimental groups: A and B (rats, C and D (mice. The groups A and C were contaminated by rat-contaminated blood; B and C groups by mouse-contaminated blood. The blood was given using a probe filled with 0.2ml of contaminated blood with 10(7 trypanosomes ml-1. These animals were maintained at constant temperature and humidity (25°C and 80% UR. Dairy blood smear were done to identify the prepatent period and evolution of parasite in the circulation. In the A and B groups, the pre latency period varied from 19 to 25 days and the period of parasite detection and animals death was an average of 12.7 days. The C and D groups did not present infection by the parasite even when evaluated for 60 days

  18. Melophagus ovinus e Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium em ovinos no Estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil Melophagus ovinus and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium in ovines in the State of Minas Gerais, Brasil

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    José Oswaldo Costa

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho Melophagus ovinus é identificado pela primeira vez no Estado de Minas Gerais e Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium tem sua primeira ocorrência registrada no Brasil.Melophagus ovinus is identified for the first time in Minas Gerais State and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium in Brazil.

  19. Antiprotozoal drug nitazoxanide enhances parasitemia, tissue lesions and mortality caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Reyes, Juan Salvador; Melnikov, Valery; Dobrovinskaya, Oxana; Rodriguez-Hernández, Alejandrina; Wookee-Zea, Cristina; Pimientel-Rodrigez, Víctor; Rueda-Valdovinos, Gabriela; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; López-Lemus, Uriel A; Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Chagas' disease is caused by unicellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). It is endemic throughout Latin America, but nowadays has become a global challenge due to tourism and migration. Non-treated infection may result in health-threatening complications and lead to death. Current medications for this infection are nifurtimox (NFT) and benznidazol. Both drugs may cause side effects and are ineffective in the chronic phase. Therefore, new antichagasic compounds are urgently required. Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is a broad spectrum antiparasitic drug, proposed recently as a potential candidate to be added to the list of essential medicines for integrated neglected tropical disease control and elimination. Although the effect of NTZ against T. cruzi epimastigotes in vitro was reported, the corresponding experiments in animal models of T. cruzi infection have never been undertaken. The present work was designed to fill this gap and evaluate the effect of NTZ on experimental murine trypanosomiasis, in comparison with classical antichagasic agent NFT. Highly sensitive to T. cruzi BALB/c mice were infected using Albarrada T. cruzi strain, recently isolated in Mexico. Experimental groups were either left untreated, or otherwise treated with NFT, NTZ (100 and 1000 mg/kg), or with both drugs simultaneously. The severity of the infection was estimated based on criteria such as parasitemia, lesions in target tissues (heart, muscles and lungs) and mortality. Despite the expected protective effect, NTZ drastically aggravates the course of T. cruzi infection. Namely, parasitemia, tissue lesions and mortality caused by T. cruzi infection were significantly higher in NTZ-treated mice groups, even in comparison with untreated infected animals. NTZ by itself no produced mortality o tissue damage, and NFT showed an expected protective effect. Our results indicate that NTZ cannot be considered for Chagas' disease treatment. Moreover, NTZ should be used with caution in patients

  20. Regulatory Lymphoid and Myeloid Cells Determine the Cardiac Immunopathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

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    Manuel Fresno

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a multisystemic disorder caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which affects ~8 million people in Latin America, killing 7,000 people annually. Chagas disease is one of the main causes of death in the endemic area and the leading cause of infectious myocarditis in the world. T. cruzi infection induces two phases, acute and chronic, where the infection is initially asymptomatic and the majority of patients will remain clinically indeterminate for life. However, over a period of 10–30 years, ~30% of infected individuals will develop irreversible, potentially fatal cardiac syndromes (chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy [CCC], and/or dilatation of the gastro-intestinal tract (megacolon or megaesophagus. Myocarditis is the most serious and frequent manifestation of chronic Chagas heart disease and appears in about 30% of infected individuals several years after infection occurs. Myocarditis is characterized by a mononuclear cell infiltrate that includes different types of myeloid and lymphoid cells and it can occur also in the acute phase. T. cruzi infects and replicates in macrophages and cardiomyocytes as well as in other nucleated cells. The pathogenesis of the chronic phase is thought to be dependent on an immune-inflammatory reaction to a low-grade replicative infection. It is known that cytokines produced by type 1 helper CD4+ T cells are able to control infection. However, the role that infiltrating lymphoid and myeloid cells may play in experimental and natural Chagas disease pathogenesis has not been completely elucidated, and several reports indicate that it depends on the mouse genetic background and parasite strain and/or inoculum. Here, we review the role that T cell CD4+ subsets, myeloid subclasses including myeloid-derived suppressor cells may play in the immunopathogenesis of Chagas disease with special focus on myocarditis, by comparing results obtained with different experimental animal models.

  1. Zoonotic trypanosomes in South East Asia: Attempts to control Trypanosoma lewisi using human and animal trypanocidal drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desquesnes, Marc; Yangtara, Sarawut; Kunphukhieo, Pawinee; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Herder, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    Beside typical human trypanosomes responsible of sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in Latin America, there is a growing number of reported atypical human infections due to Trypanosoma evansi, a livestock parasite, or Trypanosoma lewisi, a rat parasite, especially in Asia. Drugs available for the treatment of T. brucei ssp. in humans are obviously of choice for the control of T. evansi because it is derived from T. brucei. However, concerning T. lewisi, there is an urgent need to determine the efficacy of trypanocidal drugs for the treatment in humans. In a recent study, pentamidine and fexinidazole were shown to have the best efficacy against one stock of T. lewisi in rats. In the present study suramin, pentamidine, eflornitine, nifurtimox, benznidazole and fexinidazole, were evaluated at low and high doses, in single day administration to normal rats experimentally infected with a stock of T. lewisi recently isolated in Thailand. Because none of these treatments was efficient, a trial was made with the most promising trypanocide identified in a previous study, fexinidazole 100mg/kg, in 5 daily administrations. Results observed were unclear. To confirm the efficacy of fexinidazole, a mixed infection protocol was set up in cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed rats. Animals were infected successively by T. lewisi and T. evansi, and received 10 daily PO administrations of 200mg/kg fexinidazole. Drastic effects were observed against T. evansi which was cleared from the rat's blood within 24 to 48h; however, the treatment did not affect T. lewisi which remained in high number in the blood until the end of the experiment. This mixed infection/treatment protocol clearly demonstrated the efficacy of fexinidazole against T. evansi and its inefficacy against T. lewisi. Since animal trypanocides were also recently shown to be inefficient, other protocols as well as other T. lewisi stocks should be investigated in further studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by

  2. A new host of Trypanosoma cruzi from Jujuy, Argentina: octodontomys gliroides (Gervais & D'Orbigny, 1844 (Rodentia, Octodontidae

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    Nicolas J. Schweigmann

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify wild hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi, surveys were conducted in the subandean valleys of Jujuy Province, Argentina, between June 1986 and March 1987. Seventy two mammals from 13 different species were examined by xenodiagnosis. Fifty two of them were mostly roedents trapped at the localities of Maimará, León and Tilcara, and the remainder had been kept in captivity at the Estación Biológica Experimental, in Jujuy. Trypanosoma cruzi infection was detected only in 2 Octodontomys gliroides (2 pos./8 exam. 25% from all 72 examined mammals. Isolates were called Octodontomys Argentina 1 and 2 (OA1 and OA2. Both infected animals were caught at the archaelogical ruin of Pucará, at Tilcara. Repeated searches for triatomines in the ruin itself and in neighbour houses rendered negative results. Groups of mice inoculated with either OA1 or OA2 isolates became infected between 7 (OA1 to 12 days (OA2 postinoculation PI. Parasitemia peaks were observed between day 12th - 14th PI. Scarce amastigote nests were found in myocardium and skeletal muscle. Mortality was observed only for mice inoculated with OA1. Isoenzyme patterns of OA1 and OA2 were identical to one found in dogs and slightly different from that of human parasites in Argentina. Bones from Octodontomys sp., were recently found in a cave, dated 10200-8600 BC, in Pumamarca, near Tilcara, Jujuy. There are evidences that O. gliroides cohabited with man in ancient times and was associated to the domestic cycle of T. cruzi transmission, playing a role like that of domestic cavies. in Bolivia.

  3. Efecto del aceite esencial de Aloysia triphylla britton (cedrón sobre el Trypanosoma cruzi en ratones The effect of the essential oil from Aloysia triphylla britton (lemon verbena on Trypanosoma cruzi in mice

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    Juan Rojas

    2012-03-01

    essential oil 250 mg/kg (G4, uninfected and untreated (G5, and uninfected and treated with 250 mg/kg of Aloysia triphyla (G6. The infection was conducted using 104 blood T. cruzi trypomastigotes and the treatment began on the 8th day post-infection (dpi through 28 dpi. The parasitemia was determined through optical microscopy every 2 days using 5 μL of blood sampled from the tail. In dpi 14, 21 and 28, the blood sample was obtained from the queue for testing creatine kinase-MB, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine, then animals were euthanized and the heart was removed for histopathological study. Results. The essential oil of lemon verbena produced a significant reduction of the parasitemia, 85.4% with the peak at a the dose of 250 mg/ kg. It was also observed a reduction in the number of amastigotes and inflammatory infiltrates in the heart. The creatine kinase-MB plasma levels also decreased at dpi 28 as a result of such treatment. Conclusions. Under experimental conditions, the essential oil of Aloysia triphylla (lemon verbena has in vivo anti-Trypanosoma cruzi effect in mice.

  4. Kinetoplast adaptations in American strains from Trypanosoma vivax

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    Greif, Gonzalo [Unidad de Biología Molecular, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo (Uruguay); Rodriguez, Matías [Sección Biomatemática, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica (Uruguay); Reyna-Bello, Armando [Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida, Carrera en Ingeniería en Biotecnología, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas (Ecuador); Centro de Estudios Biomédicos y Veterinarios, Universidad Nacional Experimental Simón Rodríguez-IDECYT, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Robello, Carlos [Unidad de Biología Molecular, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo (Uruguay); Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República Uruguay (Uruguay); Alvarez-Valin, Fernando, E-mail: falvarez@fcien.edu.uy [Sección Biomatemática, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica (Uruguay)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • American T. vivax strains exhibit a drastic process of mitochondrial genome degradation. • T. vivax mitochondrial genes have among the fastest evolutionary rates in eukaryotes. • High rates of kDNA evolution are associated with relaxation of selective constrains. • Relaxed selective pressures are the result of mechanical transmission. • The evolutionary strategy of T. vivax differs from that of T. brucei-species complex. - Abstract: The mitochondrion role changes during the digenetic life cycle of African trypanosomes. Owing to the low abundance of glucose in the insect vector (tsetse flies) the parasites are dependent upon a fully functional mitochondrion, capable of performing oxidative phosphorylation. Nevertheless, inside the mammalian host (bloodstream forms), which is rich in nutrients, parasite proliferation relies on glycolysis, and the mitochondrion is partially redundant. In this work we perform a comparative study of the mitochondrial genome (kinetoplast) in different strains of Trypanosoma vivax. The comparison was conducted between a West African strain that goes through a complete life cycle and two American strains that are mechanically transmitted (by different vectors) and remain as bloodstream forms only. It was found that while the African strain has a complete and apparently fully functional kinetoplast, the American T. vivax strains have undergone a drastic process of mitochondrial genome degradation, in spite of the recent introduction of these parasites in America. Many of their genes exhibit different types of mutations that are disruptive of function such as major deletions, frameshift causing indels and missense mutations. Moreover, all but three genes (A6-ATPase, RPS12 and MURF2) are not edited in the American strains, whereas editing takes place normally in all (editable) genes from the African strain. Two of these genes, A6-ATPase and RPS12, are known to play an essential function during bloodstream stage

  5. Host stress physiology and Trypanosoma haemoparasite infection influence innate immunity in the woylie (Bettongia penicillata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, Stephanie; Currie, Andrew; Broomfield, Steven; Keatley, Sarah; Jones, Krista; Thompson, R C Andrew; Narayan, Edward; Godfrey, Stephanie S

    2016-06-01

    Understanding immune function is critical to conserving wildlife in view of infectious disease threats, particularly in threatened species vulnerable to stress, immunocompromise and infection. However, few studies examine stress, immune function and infection in wildlife. We used a flow cytometry protocol developed for human infants to assess phagocytosis, a key component of innate immunity, in a critically endangered marsupial, the woylie (Bettongia penicillata). The effects of stress physiology and Trypanosoma infection on phagocytosis were investigated. Blood and faecal samples were collected from woylies in a captive facility over three months. Trypanosoma status was determined using PCR. Faecal cortisol metabolites (FCM) were quantified by enzyme-immunoassay. Mean phagocytosis measured was >90%. An interaction between sex and FCM influenced the percentage of phagocytosing leukocytes, possibly reflecting the influence of sex hormones and glucocorticoids. An interaction between Trypanosoma status and FCM influenced phagocytosis index, suggesting that stress physiology and infection status influence innate immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibody detection in eastern Andalusia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Clotilde; Concha-Valdez, Fanny; Cañas, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Ramón; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Chagas disease caused by the protozoan haemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is no longer found exclusively in Latin America; the disease is occurring in Europe, and Spain is the country with the highest prevalence. Our aim was to detect anti-T. cruzi antibodies in blood donors from southeast Spain, and we performed eight serological diagnostic assays on each of 550 blood samples collected in March-June 2010. Two in-house ELISA methods were used to test against a parasite lysate (ELISA-H) and the semi-purified superoxide dismutase excreted by T. cruzi (ELISA-SODe); we also used the Western blot technique against the same antigen (WB-SODe), indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) and four commercial tests. The serological test results showed a range of seroprevalence values, the lowest being 1.1%, determined by IFA and two commercial tests (Ab rapid and Chagascreen); other values were: 1.3% (commercial ELISA [Chagas ELISA IgG+IgM]); 2.1% (immunochromatographic test [Stick Chagas]); 2.7% (ELISA-H); 4.0% (WB-SODe); and 4.2%, the highest value (ELISA-SODe). The excellent specificity of SODe antigen for the detection of antibodies to T. cruzi in donors lead us to affirm that the serological test performed with this biomarker could provide a useful screening and confirmatory test method for cases of Chagas disease.

  7. Telomeric expression sites are highly conserved in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Christiane Hertz-Fowler

    Full Text Available Subtelomeric regions are often under-represented in genome sequences of eukaryotes. One of the best known examples of the use of telomere proximity for adaptive purposes are the bloodstream expression sites (BESs of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei. To enhance our understanding of BES structure and function in host adaptation and immune evasion, the BES repertoire from the Lister 427 strain of T. brucei were independently tagged and sequenced. BESs are polymorphic in size and structure but reveal a surprisingly conserved architecture in the context of extensive recombination. Very small BESs do exist and many functioning BESs do not contain the full complement of expression site associated genes (ESAGs. The consequences of duplicated or missing ESAGs, including ESAG9, a newly named ESAG12, and additional variant surface glycoprotein genes (VSGs were evaluated by functional assays after BESs were tagged with a drug-resistance gene. Phylogenetic analysis of constituent ESAG families suggests that BESs are sequence mosaics and that extensive recombination has shaped the evolution of the BES repertoire. This work opens important perspectives in understanding the molecular mechanisms of antigenic variation, a widely used strategy for immune evasion in pathogens, and telomere biology.

  8. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi/HIV coinfection in southern Brazil

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    Dulce Stauffert

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease reactivation has been a defining condition for acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Brazil for individuals coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi and HIV since 2004. Although the first coinfection case was reported in the 1980s, its prevalence has not been firmly established. In order to know coinfection prevalence, a cross-sectional study of 200 HIV patients was performed between January and July 2013 in the city of Pelotas, in southern Rio Grande do Sul, an endemic area for Chagas disease. Ten subjects were found positive for T. cruzi infection by chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay and indirect immunofluorescence. The survey showed 5% coinfection prevalence among HIV patients (95% CI: 2.0–8.0, which was 3.8 times as high as that estimated by the Ministry of Health of Brazil. Six individuals had a viral load higher than 100,000 copies per μL, a statistically significant difference for T. cruzi presence. These findings highlight the importance of screening HIV patients from Chagas disease endemic areas.

  9. Specific antibodies induce apoptosis in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Presas, Ana María; Tato, Patricia; Becker, Ingeborg; Solano, Sandra; Copitin, Natalia; Kopitin, Natalia; Berzunza, Miriam; Willms, Kaethe; Hernández, Joselin; Molinari, José Luis

    2010-05-01

    The susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes to lysis by normal or immune sera in a complement-dependent reaction has been reported. Mouse immune sera depleted complement-induced damage in epimastigotes characterized by morphological changes and death. The purpose of this work was to study the mechanism of death in epimastigotes exposed to decomplemented mouse immune serum. Epimastigotes were maintained in RPMI medium. Immune sera were prepared in mice by immunization with whole crude epimastigote extracts. Viable epimastigotes were incubated with decomplemented normal or immune sera at 37 degrees C. By electron microscopy, agglutinated parasites showed characteristic patterns of membrane fusion between two or more parasites; this fusion also produced interdigitation of the subpellicular microtubules. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and annexin V assays. Nuclear features were examined by 4'-,6-diamidino-2'-phenylindole diHCI cytochemistry that demonstrated apoptotic nuclear condensation. Caspase activity was also measured. TUNEL results showed that parasites incubated with decomplemented immune sera took up 26% of specific fluorescence as compared to 1.3% in parasites incubated with decomplemented normal sera. The Annexin-V-Fluos staining kit revealed that epimastigotes incubated with decomplemented immune sera exposed phosphatidylserine on the external leaflet of the plasma membrane. The incubation of parasites with immune sera showed caspase 3 activity. We conclude that specific antibodies are able to induce agglutination and apoptosis in epimastigotes, although the pathway is not elucidated.

  10. Modulation of host cell mechanics by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Adam; Lenormand, Guillaume; Costales, Jaime; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effects of Trypanosoma cruzi on the mechanical properties of infected host cells, cytoskeletal stiffness and remodeling dynamics were measured in parasite-infected fibroblasts. We find that cell stiffness decreases in a time-dependent fashion in T. cruzi-infected human foreskin fibroblasts without a significant change in the dynamics of cytoskeletal remodeling. In contrast, cells exposed to T. cruzi secreted/released components become significantly stiffer within 2 h of exposure and exhibit increased remodeling dynamics. These findings represent the first direct mechanical data to suggest a physical picture in which an intact, stiff, and rapidly remodeling cytoskeleton facilitates early stages of T. cruzi invasion and parasite retention, followed by subsequent softening and disassembly of the cytoskeleton to accommodate intracellular replication of parasites. We further suggest that these changes occur through protein kinase A and inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase signaling pathway. In the context of tissue infection, changes in host cell mechanics could adversely affect the function of the infected organs, and may play an important role on the pathophysiology of Chagas' disease. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Phenolic Constituents of Medicinal Plants with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

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    Ya Nan Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs affect over one billion people all over the world. These diseases are classified as neglected because they impact populations in areas with poor financial conditions and hence do not attract sufficient research investment. Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is one of the NTDs. The current therapeutic interventions for T. brucei infections often have toxic side effects or require hospitalization so that they are not available in the rural environments where HAT occurs. Furthermore, parasite resistance is increasing, so that there is an urgent need to identify novel lead compounds against this infection. Recognizing the wide structural diversity of natural products, we desired to explore and identify novel antitrypanosomal chemotypes from a collection of natural products obtained from plants. In this study, 440 pure compounds from various medicinal plants were tested against T. brucei by in a screening using whole cell in vitro assays. As the result, twenty-two phenolic compounds exhibited potent activity against cultures of T. brucei. Among them, eight compounds—4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 18, 20, and 21—showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei, with IC50 values below 5 µM, ranging from 0.52 to 4.70 μM. Based on these results, we attempt to establish some general trends with respect to structure-activity relationships, which indicate that further investigation and optimization of these derivatives might enable the preparation of potentially useful compounds for treating HAT.

  12. Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi present distinct DNA damage responses.

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    Garcia, Juliana B F; Rocha, João P Vieira da; Costa-Silva, Héllida M; Alves, Ceres L; Machado, Carlos R; Cruz, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi are medically relevant parasites and interesting model organisms, as they present unique biological processes. Despite increasing data regarding the mechanisms of gene expression regulation, there is little information on how the DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in trypanosomatids. We found that L. major presented a higher radiosensitivity than T. cruzi. L. major showed G1 arrest and displayed high mortality in response to ionizing radiation as a result of the inefficient repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Conversely, T. cruzi exhibited arrest in the S/G2 cell cycle phase, was able to efficiently repair DSBs and did not display high rates of cell death after exposure to gamma irradiation. L. major showed higher resistance to alkylating DNA damage, and only L. major was able to promote DNA repair and growth recovery in the presence of MMS. ASF1c overexpression did not interfere with the efficiency of DNA repair in either of the parasites but did accentuate the DNA damage checkpoint response, thereby delaying cell fate after damage. The observed differences in the DNA damage responses of T. cruzi and L. major may originate from the distinct preferred routes of genetic plasticity of the two parasites, i.e., DNA recombination versus amplification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interferon-Gamma Promotes Infection of Astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M.; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi: Inhibition of infection of human monocytes by aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho de Freitas, Rafael; Lonien, Sandra Cristina Heim; Malvezi, Aparecida Donizette; Silveira, Guilherme Ferreira; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Bordignon, Juliano; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2017-11-01

    Cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi and its intracellular replication are essential for progression of the parasite life cycle and development of Chagas disease. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2 ) and other eicosanoids potently modulate host response and contribute to Chagas disease progression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of aspirin (ASA), a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor on the T. cruzi invasion and its influence on nitric oxide and cytokine production in human monocytes. The pretreatment of monocytes with ASA or SQ 22536 (adenylate-cyclase inhibitor) induced a marked inhibition of T. cruzi infection. On the other hand, the treatment of monocytes with SQ 22536 after ASA restored the invasiveness of T. cruzi. This reestablishment was associated with a decrease in nitric oxide and PGE 2 production, and also an increase of interleukin-10 and interleukin-12 by cells pre-treated with ASA. Altogether, these results reinforce the idea that the cyclooxygenase pathway plays a fundamental role in the process of parasite invasion in an in vitro model of T. cruzi infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Geographical Distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Hernán J.; Segovia, Maikell; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Morocoima, Antonio; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio; Martínez, Cinda; Martínez, Clara E.; Garcia, Carlos; Rodríguez, Marlenes; Espinosa, Raul; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Herrera, Leidi; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; Yeo, Matthew; Miles, Michael A.; Feliciangeli, M. Dora

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis native to the Americas and is caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite is also highly genetically diverse, with six discrete typing units (DTUs) reported TcI – TcVI. These DTUs broadly correlate with several epidemiogical, ecological and pathological features of Chagas disease. In this manuscript we report the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Venezuela. The dataset includes 778 samples collected and genotyped over the last twelve years from multiple hosts and vectors, including nine wild and domestic mammalian host species, and seven species of triatomine bug, as well as from human sources. Most isolates (732) can be assigned to the TcI clade (94.1%); 24 to the TcIV group (3.1%) and 22 to TcIII (2.8%). Importantly, among the 95 isolates genotyped from human disease cases, 79% belonged to TcI - a DTU common in the Americas, however, 21% belonged to TcIV- a little known genotype previously thought to be rare in humans. Furthermore, were able to assign multiple oral Chagas diseases cases to TcI in the area around the capital, Caracas. We discuss our findings in the context of T. cruzi DTU distributions elsewhere in the Americas, and evaluate the impact they have on the future of Chagas disease control in Venezuela. PMID:22745843

  16. Polyclonal antibodies for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi circulating antigens.

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    Edith S Málaga-Machaca

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antigens in clinical samples is considered an important diagnostic tool for Chagas disease. The production and use of polyclonal antibodies may contribute to an increase in the sensitivity of immunodiagnosis of Chagas disease.Polyclonal antibodies were raised in alpacas, rabbits, and hens immunized with trypomastigote excreted-secreted antigen, membrane proteins, trypomastigote lysate antigen and recombinant 1F8 to produce polyclonal antibodies. Western blot analysis was performed to determine specificity of the developed antibodies. An antigen capture ELISA of circulating antigens in serum, plasma and urine samples was developed using IgY polyclonal antibodies against T. cruzi membrane antigens (capture antibody and IgG from alpaca raised against TESA. A total of 33 serum, 23 plasma and 9 urine samples were analyzed using the developed test. Among serum samples, compared to serology, the antigen capture ELISA tested positive in 55% of samples. All plasma samples from serology positive subjects were positive in the antigen capture ELISA. All urine positive samples had corresponding plasma samples that were also positive when tested by the antigen capture ELISA.Polyclonal antibodies are useful for detection of circulating antigens in both the plasma and urine of infected individuals. Detection of antigens is direct evidence of the presence of the parasite, and could be a better surrogate of current infection status.

  17. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

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    Anneli Cooper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1. The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite's resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio, which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes.

  18. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Anneli; Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; Veitch, Nicola; Weir, William; Thomson, Russell; Raper, Jayne; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-08-01

    Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite's resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio), which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes.

  19. Interferon-gamma promotes infection of astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Rafael Rodrigues Silva

    Full Text Available The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD. IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO. Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  1. Mast Cell Function and Death in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

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    Meuser-Batista, Marcelo; Corrêa, José Raimundo; Carvalho, Vinícius Frias; de Carvalho Britto, Constança Felícia De Paoli; da Cruz Moreira, Otacilio; Batista, Marcos Meuser; Soares, Maurílio José; Filho, Francisco Alves Farias; e Silva, Patrícia Machado R.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Silva, Robson Coutinho; Henriques-Pons, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Although the roles of mast cells (MCs) are essential in many inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, their role in Trypanosoma cruzi–induced cardiomyopathy is unexplored. In this study, we treated infected CBA mice with cromolyn, an MC stabilizer, and observed much greater parasitemia and interferon-γ levels, higher mortality, myocarditis, and cardiac damage. Although these data show that MCs are important in controlling acute infection, we observed MC apoptosis in the cardiac tissue and peritoneal cavity of untreated mice. In the heart, pericardial mucosal MC die, perhaps because of reduced amounts of local stem cell factor. Using RT-PCR in purified cardiac MCs, we observed that infection induced transcription of P2X7 receptor and Fas, two molecules reportedly involved in cell death and inflammatory regulation. In gld/gld mice (FasL−/−), apoptosis of cardiac, but not peritoneal, MCs was decreased. Conversely, infection of P2X7−/− mice led to reduced peritoneal, but not cardiac, MC death. These data illustrate the immunomodulatory role played by MCs in T. cruzi infection and the complexity of molecular interactions that control inflammatory pathways in different tissues and compartments. PMID:21819958

  2. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi strain TcIV infects raccoons from Illinois

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    Cailey Vandermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The northern limits of Trypanosoma cruzi across the territory of the United States remain unknown. The known vectors Triatoma sanguisuga and T. lecticularia find their northernmost limits in Illinois; yet, earlier screenings of those insects did not reveal the presence of the pathogen, which has not been reported in vectors or reservoir hosts in this state. OBJECTIVES Five species of medium-sized mammals were screened for the presence of T. cruzi. METHODS Genomic DNA was isolated from heart, spleen and skeletal muscle of bobcats (Lynx rufus, n = 60, raccoons (Procyon lotor, n = 37, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus, n = 5, Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana, n = 3, and a red fox (Vulpes vulpes. Infections were detected targeting DNA from the kinetoplast DNA minicircle (kDNA and satellite DNA (satDNA. The discrete typing unit (DTU was determined by amplifying two gene regions: the Spliced Leader Intergenic Region (SL, via a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and the 24Sα ribosomal DNA via a heminested reaction. Resulting sequences were used to calculate their genetic distance against reference DTUs. FINDINGS 18.9% of raccoons were positive for strain TcIV; the rest of mammals tested negative. MAIN CONCLUSIONS These results confirm for the first time the presence of T. cruzi in wildlife from Illinois, suggesting that a sylvatic life cycle is likely to occur in the region. The analyses of sequences of SL suggest that amplicons resulting from a commonly used multiplex reaction may yield non-homologous fragments.

  4. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Triosephosphate Isomerase

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    Bourguignon SC

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI, EC 5.3.1.1 was purified from extracts of epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. The purification steps included: hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, CM-Sepharose, and high performance liquid gel filtration chromatography. The CM-Sepharose material contained two bands (27 and 25 kDa with similar isoelectric points (pI 9.3-9.5 which could be separated by gel filtration in high performance liquid chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the porcine TPI detected one single polypeptide on western blot with a molecular weight (27 kDa identical to that purified from T. cruzi. These antibodies also recognized only one band of identical molecular weight in western blots of several other trypanosomatids (Blastocrithidia culicis, Crithidia desouzai, Phytomonas serpens, Herpertomonas samuelpessoai. The presence of only one enzymatic form of TPI in T. cruzi epimastigotes was confirmed by agarose gel activity assay and its localization was established by immunocytochemical analysis. The T. cruzi purified TPI (as well as other trypanosomatid' TPIs is a dimeric protein, composed of two identical subunits with an approximate mw of 27,000 and it is resolved on two dimensional gel electrophoresis with a pI of 9.3. Sequence analysis of the N-terminal portion of the 27 kDa protein revealed a high homology to Leishmania mexicana and T. brucei proteins

  5. The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriman, Matthew; Ghedin, Elodie; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Blandin, Gaëlle; Renauld, Hubert; Bartholomeu, Daniella C; Lennard, Nicola J; Caler, Elisabet; Hamlin, Nancy E; Haas, Brian; Böhme, Ulrike; Hannick, Linda; Aslett, Martin A; Shallom, Joshua; Marcello, Lucio; Hou, Lihua; Wickstead, Bill; Alsmark, U Cecilia M; Arrowsmith, Claire; Atkin, Rebecca J; Barron, Andrew J; Bringaud, Frederic; Brooks, Karen; Carrington, Mark; Cherevach, Inna; Chillingworth, Tracey-Jane; Churcher, Carol; Clark, Louise N; Corton, Craig H; Cronin, Ann; Davies, Rob M; Doggett, Jonathon; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Feldblyum, Tamara; Field, Mark C; Fraser, Audrey; Goodhead, Ian; Hance, Zahra; Harper, David; Harris, Barbara R; Hauser, Heidi; Hostetler, Jessica; Ivens, Al; Jagels, Kay; Johnson, David; Johnson, Justin; Jones, Kristine; Kerhornou, Arnaud X; Koo, Hean; Larke, Natasha; Landfear, Scott; Larkin, Christopher; Leech, Vanessa; Line, Alexandra; Lord, Angela; Macleod, Annette; Mooney, Paul J; Moule, Sharon; Martin, David M A; Morgan, Gareth W; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Ormond, Doug; Pai, Grace; Peacock, Chris S; Peterson, Jeremy; Quail, Michael A; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Rajandream, Marie-Adele; Reitter, Chris; Salzberg, Steven L; Sanders, Mandy; Schobel, Seth; Sharp, Sarah; Simmonds, Mark; Simpson, Anjana J; Tallon, Luke; Turner, C Michael R; Tait, Andrew; Tivey, Adrian R; Van Aken, Susan; Walker, Danielle; Wanless, David; Wang, Shiliang; White, Brian; White, Owen; Whitehead, Sally; Woodward, John; Wortman, Jennifer; Adams, Mark D; Embley, T Martin; Gull, Keith; Ullu, Elisabetta; Barry, J David; Fairlamb, Alan H; Opperdoes, Fred; Barrell, Barclay G; Donelson, John E; Hall, Neil; Fraser, Claire M; Melville, Sara E; El-Sayed, Najib M

    2005-07-15

    African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi gene expression in response to gamma radiation.

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    Priscila Grynberg

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is an organism highly resistant to ionizing radiation. Following a dose of 500 Gy of gamma radiation, the fragmented genomic DNA is gradually reconstructed and the pattern of chromosomal bands is restored in less than 48 hours. Cell growth arrests after irradiation but, while DNA is completely fragmented, RNA maintains its integrity. In this work we compared the transcriptional profiles of irradiated and non-irradiated epimastigotes at different time points after irradiation using microarray. In total, 273 genes were differentially expressed; from these, 160 were up-regulated and 113 down-regulated. We found that genes with predicted functions are the most prevalent in the down-regulated gene category. Translation and protein metabolic processes, as well as generation of precursor of metabolites and energy pathways were affected. In contrast, the up-regulated category was mainly composed of obsolete sequences (which included some genes of the kinetoplast DNA, genes coding for hypothetical proteins, and Retrotransposon Hot Spot genes. Finally, the tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1, a gene involved in double-strand DNA break repair process, was up-regulated. Our study demonstrated the peculiar response to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism changes its gene expression to manage such a harmful stress.

  7. mRNA localization mechanisms in Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Lysangela R Alves

    Full Text Available Asymmetric mRNA localization is a sophisticated tool for regulating and optimizing protein synthesis and maintaining cell polarity. Molecular mechanisms involved in the regulated localization of transcripts are widespread in higher eukaryotes and fungi, but not in protozoa. Trypanosomes are ancient eukaryotes that branched off early in eukaryote evolution. We hypothesized that these organisms would have basic mechanisms of mRNA localization. FISH assays with probes against transcripts coding for proteins with restricted distributions showed a discrete localization of the mRNAs in the cytoplasm. Moreover, cruzipain mRNA was found inside reservosomes suggesting new unexpected functions for this vacuolar organelle. Individual mRNAs were also mobilized to RNA granules in response to nutritional stress. The cytoplasmic distribution of these transcripts changed with cell differentiation, suggesting that localization mechanisms might be involved in the regulation of stage-specific protein expression. Transfection assays with reporter genes showed that, as in higher eukaryotes, 3'UTRs were responsible for guiding mRNAs to their final location. Our results strongly suggest that Trypanosoma cruzi have a core, basic mechanism of mRNA localization. This kind of controlled mRNA transport is ancient, dating back to early eukaryote evolution.

  8. Evidence for viable and stable triploid Trypanosoma congolense parasites.

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    Tihon, Eliane; Imamura, Hideo; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Van Den Abbeele, Jan

    2017-10-10

    Recent whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis identified a viable triploid strain of Trypanosoma congolense. This triploid strain BANANCL2 was a clone of the field isolate BANAN/83/CRTRA/64 that was collected from cattle in Burkina Faso in 1983. We demonstrated the viability and stability of triploidy throughout the complete life-cycle of the parasite by infecting tsetse flies with the triploid clone BANANCL2. Proboscis-positive tsetse flies efficiently transmitted the parasites to mice resulting in systemic infections. WGS of the parasites was performed at all life-cycle stages, and a method based on a block alternative allele frequency spectrum was developed to efficiently detect the ploidy profiles of samples with low read depth. This approach confirmed the triploid profile of parasites throughout their life-cycle in the tsetse fly and the mammalian host, demonstrating that triploidy is present at all stages and is stable over time. The presence of viable field-isolated triploid parasites indicates another possible layer of genetic diversity in natural T. congolense populations. The comparison between triploid and diploid parasites provides a unique model system to study the impact of chromosome copy number variations in African trypanosomes. In addition, the consequences of triploidy can be further investigated using this stable triploid model.

  9. Crystal Structure of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Hexane

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    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Maldonado, Ernesto; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Rodriguez-Romero, Adela

    1999-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents, the x-ray structure of some monomeric enzymes in organic solvents was determined. However, it remained to be explored whether the structure of oligomeric proteins is also amenable to such analysis. The field acquired new perspectives when it was proposed that the x-ray structure of enzymes in nonaqueous media could reveal binding sites for organic solvents that in principle could represent the starting point for drug design. Here, a crystal of the dimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase from the pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi was soaked and diffracted in hexane and its structure solved at 2- angstrom resolution. Its overall structure and the dimer interface were not altered by hexane. However, there were differences in the orientation of the side chains of several amino acids, including that of the catalytic Glu-168 in one of the monomers. No hexane molecules were detected in the active site or in the dimer interface. However, three hexane molecules were identified on the surface of the protein at sites, which in the native crystal did not have water molecules. The number of water molecules in the hexane structure was higher than in the native crystal. Two hexanes localized at <4 angstrom from residues that form the dimer interface; they were in close proximity to a site that has been considered a potential target for drug design.

  10. Imidazolium compounds are active against all stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Faral-Tello, Paula; Liang, Mary; Mahler, Graciela; Wipf, Peter; Robello, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Imidazolium salts are best known for their applications in organic synthesis as room-temperature ionic liquids, or as precursors of stable carbenes, but they also show important biological properties such as anti-oxidative effects, induction of mitochondrial membrane permeabilisation and inhibition of the infection cycle of Plasmodium falciparum. For these reasons, and since chemotherapy for Chagas disease is inefficient, the aim of this study was to test the use of imidazolium compounds against the kinetoplastid haemoflagellate aetiological agent for this disease, namely Trypanosoma cruzi. The results show that five of the tested compounds are more effective than the reference drug benznidazole against the epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. Moreover, intracellular amastigotes were also affected by the compounds, which showed lower toxicity in host cells. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the tested agents induced alterations of the kinetoplast and particularly of the mitochondria, leading to extraordinary swelling of the organelle. These results further demonstrate that the test agents with the best profile are those bearing symmetrical bulky substituents at N(1) and N(3), displaying promising activity against all forms of T. cruzi, interesting selectivity indexes and exceptional activity at low doses. Accordingly, these agents represent promising candidates for the treatment of Chagas disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of diaryldiazepines.

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    Menezes, Júlio César L; Vaz, Luana Beatriz A; de Abreu Vieira, Paula Melo; da Silva Fonseca, Kátia; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Taylor, Jason G

    2014-12-23

    Chagas disease is a so-called "neglected disease" and endemic to Latin America. Nifurtimox and benznidazole are drugs that have considerable efficacy in the treatment of the acute phase of the disease but cause many significant side effects. Furthermore, in the Chronic Phase its efficiency is reduced and their therapeutic effectiveness is dependent on the type of T. cruzi strain. For this reason, the present work aims to drive basic research towards the discovery of new chemical entities to treat Chagas disease. Differently substituted 5,7-diaryl-2,3-dihydro-1,4-diazepines were synthesized by cyclocondensation of substituted flavones with ethylenediamine and tested as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi candidates. Epimastigotes of the Y strain from T. cruzi were used in this study and the number of parasites was determined in a Neubauer chamber. The most potent diaryldiazepine that reduced epimastigote proliferation exhibited an IC50 value of 0.25 μM, which is significantly more active than benznidazole.

  12. Synthesis and Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity of Diaryldiazepines

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    Júlio César L. Menezes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a so-called “neglected disease” and endemic to Latin America. Nifurtimox and benznidazole are drugs that have considerable efficacy in the treatment of the acute phase of the disease but cause many significant side effects. Furthermore, in the Chronic Phase its efficiency is reduced and their therapeutic effectiveness is dependent on the type of T. cruzi strain. For this reason, the present work aims to drive basic research towards the discovery of new chemical entities to treat Chagas disease. Differently substituted 5,7-diaryl-2,3-dihydro-1,4-diazepines were synthesized by cyclocondensation of substituted flavones with ethylenediamine and tested as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi candidates. Epimastigotes of the Y strain from T. cruzi were used in this study and the number of parasites was determined in a Neubauer chamber. The most potent diaryldiazepine that reduced epimastigote proliferation exhibited an IC50 value of 0.25 μM, which is significantly more active than benznidazole.

  13. Diterpenoids from Azorella compacta (Umbelliferae active on Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Araya Jorge E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of natural products isolated from Azorella compacta was evaluated, with particular emphasis on their effect against intracellular amastigotes. Five diterpenoids from A. compacta derived from mulinane and azorellane were isolated and identified. Only two products, named azorellanol (Y-2 and mulin-11,3-dien-20-oic acid (Y-5, showed trypanocidal activity against all stages of T. cruzi including intracellular amastigotes. At 10 µM, these compounds displayed a strong lytic activity. It ranged from 88.4 ± 0.6 to 99.0 ± 1 % for all strains and stages evaluate, with an IC50 /18 h values of 20-84 µM and 41-87 µM, respectively. The development of intracellular amastigotes was also inhibited by nearly 60% at 25 µM. The trypanocidal molecules Y-2 and Y-5 did show different degrees of cytotoxicity depending on the cell line tested, with an IC50 /24 h ranging from 33.2 to 161.2 µM. We evaluated the effect of diterpenoids against intracellular T. cruzi forms by immunofluorescent identification of a specific membrane molecular marker (Ssp-4 antigen of the T. cruzi amastigote forms. The accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements were found to be outstanding when examined by confocal microscopy.

  14. Exosome secretion affects social motility in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Dror Eliaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV secreted by pathogens function in a variety of biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, exosome secretion is induced by stress that affects trans-splicing. Following perturbations in biogenesis of spliced leader RNA, which donates its spliced leader (SL exon to all mRNAs, or after heat-shock, the SL RNA is exported to the cytoplasm and forms distinct granules, which are then secreted by exosomes. The exosomes are formed in multivesicular bodies (MVB utilizing the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT, through a mechanism similar to microRNA secretion in mammalian cells. Silencing of the ESCRT factor, Vps36, compromised exosome secretion but not the secretion of vesicles derived from nanotubes. The exosomes enter recipient trypanosome cells. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that cells secreting exosomes or purified intact exosomes affect social motility (SoMo. This study demonstrates that exosomes are delivered to trypanosome cells and can change their migration. Exosomes are used to transmit stress signals for communication between parasites.

  15. Early Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Reprograms Human Epithelial Cells

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    María Laura Chiribao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has the peculiarity, when compared with other intracellular parasites, that it is able to invade almost any type of cell. This property makes Chagas a complex parasitic disease in terms of prophylaxis and therapeutics. The identification of key host cellular factors that play a role in the T. cruzi invasion is important for the understanding of disease pathogenesis. In Chagas disease, most of the focus is on the response of macrophages and cardiomyocytes, since they are responsible for host defenses and cardiac lesions, respectively. In the present work, we studied the early response to infection of T. cruzi in human epithelial cells, which constitute the first barrier for establishment of infection. These studies identified up to 1700 significantly altered genes regulated by the immediate infection. The global analysis indicates that cells are literally reprogrammed by T. cruzi, which affects cellular stress responses (neutrophil chemotaxis, DNA damage response, a great number of transcription factors (including the majority of NFκB family members, and host metabolism (cholesterol, fatty acids, and phospholipids. These results raise the possibility that early host cell reprogramming is exploited by the parasite to establish the initial infection and posterior systemic dissemination.

  16. Crystal structure of arginine methyltransferase 6 from Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Chongyuan Wang

    Full Text Available Arginine methylation plays vital roles in the cellular functions of the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei. The T. brucei arginine methyltransferase 6 (TbPRMT6 is a type I arginine methyltransferase homologous to human PRMT6. In this study, we report the crystal structures of apo-TbPRMT6 and its complex with the reaction product S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH. The structure of apo-TbPRMT6 displays several features that are different from those of type I PRMTs that were structurally characterized previously, including four stretches of insertion, the absence of strand β15, and a distinct dimerization arm. The comparison of the apo-TbPRMT6 and SAH-TbPRMT6 structures revealed the fine rearrangements in the active site upon SAH binding. The isothermal titration calorimetry results demonstrated that SAH binding greatly increases the affinity of TbPRMT6 to a substrate peptide derived from bovine histone H4. The western blotting and mass spectrometry results revealed that TbPRMT6 methylates bovine histone H4 tail at arginine 3 but cannot methylate several T. brucei histone tails. In summary, our results highlight the structural differences between TbPRMT6 and other type I PRMTs and reveal that the active site rearrangement upon SAH binding is important for the substrate binding of TbPRMT6.

  17. The morphology of ovine Trypanosoma melophagium (zoomastigophorea: kinetoplastida).

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    Büscher, G; Friedhoff, K T

    1984-02-01

    Morphologic and biometric data on bloodstream stages of Trypanosoma melophagium are presented. An increasing parasitemia with 111 trypomastigote stages of T. melophagium were found in Giemsa-stained thin blood smears taken from a splenectomized, cortisone-treated sheep recently infested with Melophagus ovinus infected with T. melophagium . The arithmetic mean and standard deviation in micron of the distances between posterior end and kinetoplast were 14.7 and 2.9, from the kinetoplastic to the center of the nucleus 5.1 and 1.1, and from there to the anterior end 19.5 and 1.9. The free flagellum measured 6.0 microns +/- 1.6 microns. The median and the range of the central 70% of values (median +/- 35%) of the nuclear index were 1.1 and 0.9-1.2 and of the kinetoplastic index 3.8 and 3.3-4.9. The same data in microns for the maximal width were 3.1 and 2.1-4.6, and for the width at the level of the nucleus 2.9 and 2.2-4.6. The larger and smaller diameters of the nucleus measured 2.6 (2.2-3.7) micron and 1.7 (1.3-1.7) micron, respectively. The corresponding kinetoplast diameters were 1.1 (0.9-1.3) microns and 0.9 (0.6-0.9) micron, respectively.

  18. The sequence and analysis of Trypanosoma brucei chromosome II

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    El-Sayed, Najib M. A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Song, Jinming; MacLeod, Annette; Bringaud, Frederic; Larkin, Christopher; Wanless, David; Peterson, Jeremy; Hou, Lihua; Taylor, Sonya; Tweedie, Alison; Biteau, Nicolas; Khalak, Hanif G.; Lin, Xiaoying; Mason, Tanya; Hannick, Linda; Caler, Elisabet; Blandin, Gaëlle; Bartholomeu, Daniella; Simpson, Anjana J.; Kaul, Samir; Zhao, Hong; Pai, Grace; Aken, Susan Van; Utterback, Teresa; Haas, Brian; Koo, Hean L.; Umayam, Lowell; Suh, Bernard; Gerrard, Caroline; Leech, Vanessa; Qi, Rong; Zhou, Shiguo; Schwartz, David; Feldblyum, Tamara; Salzberg, Steven; Tait, Andrew; Turner, C. Michael R.; Ullu, Elisabetta; White, Owen; Melville, Sara; Adams, Mark D.; Fraser, Claire M.; Donelson, John E.

    2003-01-01

    We report here the sequence of chromosome II from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The 1.2-Mb pairs encode about 470 predicted genes organised in 17 directional clusters on either strand, the largest cluster of which has 92 genes lined up over a 284-kb region. An analysis of the GC skew reveals strand compositional asymmetries that coincide with the distribution of protein-coding genes, suggesting these asymmetries may be the result of transcription-coupled repair on coding versus non-coding strand. A 5-cM genetic map of the chromosome reveals recombinational ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ regions, the latter of which is predicted to include the putative centromere. One end of the chromosome consists of a 250-kb region almost exclusively composed of RHS (pseudo)genes that belong to a newly characterised multigene family containing a hot spot of insertion for retroelements. Interspersed with the RHS genes are a few copies of truncated RNA polymerase pseudogenes as well as expression site associated (pseudo)genes (ESAGs) 3 and 4, and 76 bp repeats. These features are reminiscent of a vestigial variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression site. The other end of the chromosome contains a 30-kb array of VSG genes, the majority of which are pseudogenes, suggesting that this region may be a site for modular de novo construction of VSG gene diversity during transposition/gene conversion events. PMID:12907728

  19. Characterization of TcCYC6 from Trypanosoma cruzi, a gene with homology to mitotic cyclins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, María Agostina; Laverrière, Marc; Schenkman, Sergio; Wehrendt, Diana Patricia; Tellez-Iñón, María Teresa; Potenza, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is a protozoan parasite with a life cycle that alternates between replicative and non-replicative forms, but the components and mechanisms that regulate its cell cycle are poorly described. In higher eukaryotes, cyclins are proteins that activate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), by associating with them along the different stages of the cell cycle. These cyclin-CDK complexes exert their role as major modulators of the cell cycle by phosphorylating specific substrates. For the correct progression of the cell cycle, the mechanisms that regulate the activity of cyclins and their associated CDKs are diverse and must be controlled precisely. Different types of cyclins are involved in specific phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle, preferentially activating certain CDKs. In this work, we characterized TcCYC6, a putative coding sequence of T. cruzi which encodes a protein with homology to mitotic cyclins. The overexpression of this sequence, fused to a tag of nine amino acids from influenza virus hemagglutinin (TcCYC6-HA), showed to be detrimental for the proliferation of epimastigotes in axenic culture and affected the cell cycle progression. In silico analysis revealed an N-terminal segment similar to the consensus sequence of the destruction box, a hallmark for the degradation of several mitotic cyclins. We experimentally determined that the TcCYC6-HA turnover decreased in the presence of proteasome inhibitors, suggesting that TcCYC6 degradation occurs via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The results obtained in this study provide first evidence that TcCYC6 expression and degradation are finely regulated in T. cruzi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. La enfermedad del adyuvante en ratas infectadas experimentalmente con Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Silvia Revelli

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la evolución de la artritis por adyuvante en ratas que habían sido infectadas previamente con Trypanosoma cruzi, con el objeto de evaluar su competencia inmunológica a través de la respuesta artrítica. La artritis por adyuvante se indujo en ratas adultas, endocriadas de ambos sexos, con 0.1 mi de adyuvante completo de Freund en la almohadilla plantar, en 2 lotes: a inyectadas 90 días antes con 1 x 10(6 T. cruzi y b testigos normales simultáneos. Se midieron, la lesión artrítica macroscópicamente con una escala semicuantitativa, y con microscopía óptica la histopatología de la lesión local y la del corazón, a los 180 días post-infecoión. La magnitud de las lesiones artríticas en las ratas con T. cruzi fue significativamente menor (p < 0.001 que la de los testigos, en todo el período. El infiltrado inflamatorio local, formado por linfocitos, plasmocitos y macrófagos fue significativamente menor (p < 0.001 en las ratas chagásicas, con respecto al de los testigos. Se postula que en las ratas que recibieron T. cruzi la respuesta artrítica menor podría deberse a una competición antigénica con los determinantes del parásito o a mecanismos inmunosupresores que interfieren en la producción de la entidad experimental.

  1. A semantic problem solving environment for integrative parasite research: identification of intervention targets for Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Priti P Parikh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the biology of parasites requires a sophisticated and integrated computational platform to query and analyze large volumes of data, representing both unpublished (internal and public (external data sources. Effective analysis of an integrated data resource using knowledge discovery tools would significantly aid biologists in conducting their research, for example, through identifying various intervention targets in parasites and in deciding the future direction of ongoing as well as planned projects. A key challenge in achieving this objective is the heterogeneity between the internal lab data, usually stored as flat files, Excel spreadsheets or custom-built databases, and the external databases. Reconciling the different forms of heterogeneity and effectively integrating data from disparate sources is a nontrivial task for biologists and requires a dedicated informatics infrastructure. Thus, we developed an integrated environment using Semantic Web technologies that may provide biologists the tools for managing and analyzing their data, without the need for acquiring in-depth computer science knowledge.We developed a semantic problem-solving environment (SPSE that uses ontologies to integrate internal lab data with external resources in a Parasite Knowledge Base (PKB, which has the ability to query across these resources in a unified manner. The SPSE includes Web Ontology Language (OWL-based ontologies, experimental data with its provenance information represented using the Resource Description Format (RDF, and a visual querying tool, Cuebee, that features integrated use of Web services. We demonstrate the use and benefit of SPSE using example queries for identifying gene knockout targets of Trypanosoma cruzi for vaccine development. Answers to these queries involve looking up multiple sources of data, linking them together and presenting the results.The SPSE facilitates parasitologists in leveraging the growing, but disparate

  2. Simulating the complex cell design of Trypanosoma brucei and its motility.

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    Davod Alizadehrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flagellate Trypanosoma brucei, which causes the sleeping sickness when infecting a mammalian host, goes through an intricate life cycle. It has a rather complex propulsion mechanism and swims in diverse microenvironments. These continuously exert selective pressure, to which the trypanosome adjusts with its architecture and behavior. As a result, the trypanosome assumes a diversity of complex morphotypes during its life cycle. However, although cell biology has detailed form and function of most of them, experimental data on the dynamic behavior and development of most morphotypes is lacking. Here we show that simulation science can predict intermediate cell designs by conducting specific and controlled modifications of an accurate, nature-inspired cell model, which we developed using information from live cell analyses. The cell models account for several important characteristics of the real trypanosomal morphotypes, such as the geometry and elastic properties of the cell body, and their swimming mechanism using an eukaryotic flagellum. We introduce an elastic network model for the cell body, including bending rigidity and simulate swimming in a fluid environment, using the mesoscale simulation technique called multi-particle collision dynamics. The in silico trypanosome of the bloodstream form displays the characteristic in vivo rotational and translational motility pattern that is crucial for survival and virulence in the vertebrate host. Moreover, our model accurately simulates the trypanosome's tumbling and backward motion. We show that the distinctive course of the attached flagellum around the cell body is one important aspect to produce the observed swimming behavior in a viscous fluid, and also required to reach the maximal swimming velocity. Changing details of the flagellar attachment generates less efficient swimmers. We also simulate different morphotypes that occur during the parasite's development in the tsetse fly, and

  3. The Ly49E receptor inhibits the immune control of acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection

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    Jessica Filtjens

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi circulates in the blood upon infection and invades a variety of cells. Parasites intensively multiply during the acute phase of infection and persist lifelong at low levels in tissues and blood during the chronic phase. Natural killer (NK and NKT cells play an important role in the immune control of T. cruzi infection, mainly by releasing the cytokine IFN-γ that activates the microbicidal action of macrophages and other cells and shapes a protective type 1 immune response. The mechanisms by which immune cells are regulated to produce IFN-γ during T. cruzi infection are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA is induced early upon T. cruzi infection, and remains elevated until day 20 post inoculation. We previously demonstrated that the inhibitory receptor Ly49E, which is expressed, among others, on NK and NKT cells, is triggered by uPA. Therefore, we compared wild type (WT to Ly49E knockout (KO mice for their control of experimental T. cruzi infection. Our results show that young, i.e. 4- and 6-week-old, Ly49E KO mice control the infection better than WT mice, indicated by a lower parasite load and less cachexia. The beneficial effect of Ly49E depletion is more obvious in 4-week-old male than in female mice and weakens in 8-week-old mice. In young mice, the lower T. cruzi parasitemia in Ly49E KO mice is paralleled by higher IFN-γ production compared to their WT controls. Our data indicate that Ly49E receptor expression inhibits the immune control of T. cruzi infection. This is the first demonstration that the inhibitory Ly49E receptor can interfere with the immune response to a pathogen in vivo.

  4. Virulence and pathogenicity of three Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense stabilates in a Swiss white mouse model

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    Christopher Kariuki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A key objective in basic research on human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is developing a cheap and reliable experimental model of the disease for use in pathogenesis and drug studies. Objective: With a view to improving current models, a study was undertaken to characterise the virulence and pathogenicity of three Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense stabilates, labelled as International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI-2918, ILRI-3953, and Institute of Primate Research (IPR-001, infected into Swiss white mice. Methods: Swiss white mice were infected intraperitoneally with trypanosomes and observedfor parasitaemia using wet blood smears obtained by tail snipping. Induction of late-stagedisease was undertaken using diminazene aceturate (40 mg/kg, Berenil with curativetreatment done using melarsoprol (3.6 mg/kg, Arsobal. Results: The prepatent period for the stabilates ranged from three to four days with mean peak parasitaemia ranging from Log10 6.40 to 8.36. First peak parasitaemia for all stabilates varied between six and seven days post infection (DPI followed by secondary latency in ILRI-2918 (15–17 DPI and IPR-001 (17–19 DPI. Survival times ranged from six DPI (ILRI-3953 to 86 DPI (IPR-001. Hindleg paresis was observed in both ILRI-3953 (at peak parasitaemia and ILRI-2918 (after relapse parasitaemia. Mice infected with IPR-001 survived until 54 DPI when curative treatment was undertaken. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the stabilates ILRI-2918 and ILRI-3953 were unsuitable for modelling late-stage HAT in mice. The stabilate IPR-001 demonstrated the potential to induce chronic trypanosomiasis in Swiss white mice for use in development of a late-stage model of HAT.

  5. Pentamidine exerts in vitro and in vivo anti Trypanosoma cruzi activity and inhibits the polyamine transport in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, María V; Miranda, Mariana R; Campos-Estrada, Carolina; Reigada, Chantal; Maya, Juan D; Pereira, Claudio A; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Pentamidine is an antiprotozoal and fungicide drug used in the treatment of leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis. Despite its extensive use as antiparasitic drug, little evidence exists about the effect of pentamidine in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Recent studies have shown that pentamidine blocks a polyamine transporter present in Leishmania major; consequently, its might also block these transporters in T. cruzi. Considering that T. cruzi lacks the ability to synthesize putrescine de novo, the inhibition of polyamine transport can bring a new therapeutic target against the parasite. In this work, we show that pentamidine decreases, not only the viability of T. cruzi trypomastigotes, but also the parasite burden of infected cells. In T. cruzi-infected mice pentamidine decreases the inflammation and parasite burden in hearts from infected mice. The treatment also decreases parasitemia, resulting in an increased survival rate. In addition, pentamidine strongly inhibits the putrescine and spermidine transport in T. cruzi epimastigotes and amastigotes. Thus, this study points to reevaluate the utility of pentamidine and introduce evidence of a potential new action mechanism. In the quest of new therapeutic strategies against Chagas disease, the extensive use of pentamidine in human has led to a well-known clinical profile, which could be an advantage over newly synthesized molecules that require more comprehensive trials prior to their clinical use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

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    Fabrício C. Dias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate. HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2 genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection.

  7. Molecular basis of mammalian cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Nobuko Yoshida

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, depends on a series of events involving interactions of diverse parasite molecules with host components. Here we focus on the mechanisms of target cell invasion by metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT and mammalian tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCT. During MT or TCT internalization, signal transduction pathways are activated both in the parasite and the target cell, leading to Ca2+ mobilization. For cell adhesion, MT engage surface glycoproteins, such as gp82 and gp35/50, which are Ca2+ signal-inducing molecules. In T. cruzi isolates that enter host cells in gp82-mediated manner, parasite protein tyrosine kinase as well as phospholipase C are activated, and Ca2+ is released from I P3-sensitive stores, whereas in T. cruzi isolates that attach to target cells mainly through gp35/50, the signaling pathway involving adenylate cyclase appears to be stimulated, with Ca2+ release from acidocalciosomes. In addition, T. cruzi isolate-dependent inhibitory signals, mediated by MT-specific gp90, may be triggered both in the host cell and the parasite. The repertoire of TCT molecules implicated in cell invasion includes surface glycoproteins of gp85 family, with members containing binding sites for laminin and cytokeratin 18, enzymes such as cruzipain, trans-sialidase, and an oligopeptidase B that generates a Ca2+-agonist from a precursor molecule.O estabelecimento da infecção por Trypanosoma cruzi, o agente da doença de Chagas, depende de uma série de eventos envolvendo interações de diversas moléculas do parasita com componentes do hospedeiro. Focalizamos aqui os mecanismos de invasão celular por tripomastigotas metacíclicos (TM e por tripomastigotas de cultura de tecido (TCT. Durante a internalização de TM ou TCT, vias de transdução de sinal são ativadas tanto no parasita como na célula alvo, acarretando a mobilização de Ca2+. Para adesão, TM utiliza as glicoprote

  8. Eco-epidemiological aspects of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli and their vector (Rhodnius pallescens in Panama Generalidades do Trypanosoma cruzi, do Trypanosoma rangeli e do seu vetor (Rhodnius pallescens no Panamá

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    Ana Maria de Vasquez

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The eco-epidemiology of T. cruzi infection was investigated in the Eastern border of the Panama Canal in Central Panama. Between 1999 and 2000, 1110 triatomines were collected: 1050 triatomines (94.6% from palm trees, 27 (2.4% from periurban habitats and 33 (3.0% inside houses. All specimens were identified as R. pallescens. There was no evidence of vector domiciliation. Salivary glands from 380 R. pallescens revealed a trypanosome natural infection rate of 7.6%, while rectal ampoule content from 373 triatomines was 45%. Isoenzyme profiles on isolated trypanosomes demonstrated that 85.4% (n = 88 were T. cruzi and 14.6% (n = 15 were T. rangeli. Blood meal analysis from 829 R. pallescens demonstrated a zoophilic vector behavior, with opossums as the preferential blood source. Seroprevalence in human samples from both study sites was less than 2%. Our results demonstrate that T. cruzi survives in the area in balanced association with R. pallescens, and with several different species of mammals in their natural niches. However, the area is an imminent risk of infection for its population, consequently it is important to implement a community educational program regarding disease knowledge and control measures.A epidemiologia da infecção do T. cruzi foi investigada na margem oriental do canal do Panamá, na região central da Republica do Panamá. A informação obtida durante o estudo avaliou fatores de risco da doença de Chagas nesta área. Entre 1999 e 2000, 1110 triatomíneos foram coletados: 1050 triatomíneos (94,6% em palmeiras, 27 (2,4% em habitats periurbanos e 33 (3,0% no interior de casas. Todos os espécimens foram identificados como R. pallescens. Não havia nenhuma evidência de domiciliação do vetor. O exame de glândulas salivares de 380 R. pallescens revelaram taxa de infecção natural por Trypanosoma de 7,6%, mas o conteúdo da ampola rectal de 373 triatomíneos mostrou 45% de positividade. Os perfis de isoenzimas em

  9. Active transcription and ultrastructural changes during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

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    Ludmila R.P. Ferreira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of proliferating epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi , the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas’ disease, into the infective and non-proliferating metacyclic forms can be reproduced in the laboratory by incubating the cells in a chemically-defined medium that mimics the urine of the insect vector. Epimastigotes have a spherical nucleus, a flagellum protruding from the middle of the protozoan cell, and a disk-shaped kinetoplast - an organelle that corresponds to the mitochondrial DNA. Metacyclic trypomastigotes have an elongated shape with the flagellum protruding from the posterior portion of the cell and associated with a spherical kinetoplast. Here we describe the morphological events of this transformation and characterize a novel intermediate stage by three-dimensional reconstruction of electron microscope serial sections. This new intermediate stage is characterized by a kinetoplast compressing an already elongated nucleus, indicating that metacyclogenesis involves active movements of the flagellar structure relative to the cell body. As transcription occurs more intensely in proliferating epimastigotes than in metacyclics, we also examined the presence of RNA polymerase II and measured transcriptional activity during the differentiation process. Both the presence of the enzyme and transcriptional activity remain unchanged during all steps of metacyclogenesis. RNA polymerase II levels and transcriptional activity only decrease after metacyclics are formed. We suggest that transcription is required during the epimastigote-to-metacyclic trypomastigote differentiation process, until the kinetoplast and flagellum reach the posterior position of the parasites in the infective form.A diferenciação de formas epimastigotas (proliferativas do Trypanosoma cruzi, parasita protozoário causador da doença de Chagas, em formas metacíclicas tripomastigotas (infectivas e não proliferativas, pode ser reproduzida em laborat

  10. New Trypanosoma evansi Type B Isolates from Ethiopian Dromedary Camels.

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    Hadush Birhanu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma (T. evansi is a dyskinetoplastic variant of T. brucei that has gained the ability to be transmitted by all sorts of biting flies. T. evansi can be divided into type A, which is the most abundant and found in Africa, Asia and Latin America and type B, which has so far been isolated only from Kenyan dromedary camels. This study aimed at the isolation and the genetic and phenotypic characterisation of type A and B T. evansi stocks from camels in Northern Ethiopia.T. evansi was isolated in mice by inoculation with the cryopreserved buffy coat of parasitologically confirmed animals. Fourteen stocks were thus isolated and subject to genotyping with PCRs targeting type-specific variant surface glycoprotein genes, mitochondrial minicircles and maxicircles, minisatellite markers and the F1-ATP synthase γ subunit gene. Nine stocks corresponded to type A, two stocks were type B and three stocks represented mixed infections between A and B, but not hybrids. One T. evansi type A stock was completely akinetoplastic. Five stocks were adapted to in vitro culture and subjected to a drug sensitivity assay with melarsomine dihydrochloride, diminazene diaceturate, isometamidium chloride and suramin. In vitro adaptation induced some loss of kinetoplasts within 60 days. No correlation between drug sensitivity and absence of the kinetoplast was observed. Sequencing the full coding sequence of the F1-ATP synthase γ subunit revealed new type-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms and deletions.This study addresses some limitations of current molecular markers for T. evansi genotyping. Polymorphism within the F1-ATP synthase γ subunit gene may provide new markers to identify the T. evansi type that do not rely on variant surface glycoprotein genes or kinetoplast DNA.

  11. Sympatry influence in the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with triatomine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworak, Elaine Schultz; Araújo, Silvana Marques de; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Massago, Miyoko; Ferreira, Érika Cristina; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is widely distributed in nature, circulating between triatomine bugs and sylvatic mammals, and has large genetic diversity. Both the vector species and the genetic lineages of T. cruzi present a varied geographical distribution. This study aimed to verify the influence of sympatry in the interaction of T. cruzi with triatomines. Methods: The behavior of the strains PR2256 (T. cruzi II) and AM14 (T. cruzi IV) was studied in Triatoma sordida (TS) and Rhodnius robustus (RR). Eleven fifth-stage nymphs were fed by artificial xenodiagnosis with 5.6 × 103 blood trypomastigotes/0.1mL of each T. cruzi strain. Every 20 days, their excreta were examined for up to 100 days, and every 30 days, the intestinal content was examined for up to 120 days, by parasitological (fresh examination and differential count with Giemsa-stained smears) and molecular (PCR) methods. Rates of infectivity, metacyclogenesis and mortality, and mean number of parasites per insect and of excreted parasites were determined. Sympatric groups RR+AM14 and TS+PR2256 showed higher values of the four parameters, except for mortality rate, which was higher (27.3%) in the TS+AM14 group. General infectivity was 72.7%, which was mainly proven by PCR, showing the following decreasing order: RR+AM14 (100%), TS+PR2256 (81.8%), RR+PR2256 (72.7%) and TS+AM14 (36.4%). Our working hypothesis was confirmed once higher infectivity and vector capacity (flagellate production and elimination of infective metacyclic forms) were recorded in the groups that contained sympatric T. cruzi lineages and triatomine species.

  12. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

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    Vanrell, María Cristina; Losinno, Antonella Denisse; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura Virginia; Carrillo, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients) to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression. PMID:29091711

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi contains two galactokinases; molecular and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-Rojas, Ángel E; González-Marcano, Eglys B; Valera-Vera, Edward A; Acosta, Héctor R; Quiñones, Wilfredo A; Burchmore, Richard J S; Concepción, Juan L; Cáceres, Ana J

    2016-10-01

    Two different putative galactokinase genes, found in the genome database of Trypanosoma cruzi were cloned and sequenced. Expression of the genes in Escherichia coli resulted for TcGALK-1 in the synthesis of a soluble and active enzyme, and in the case of TcGALK-2 gene a less soluble protein, with predicted molecular masses of 51.9kDa and 51.3kDa, respectively. The Km values determined for the recombinant proteins were for galactose 0.108mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.091mM (TcGALK-2) and for ATP 0.36mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.1mM (TcGALK-2). Substrate inhibition by ATP (Ki 0.414mM) was only observed for TcGALK-2. Gel-filtration chromatography showed that natural TcGALKs and recombinant TcGALK-1 are monomeric. In agreement with the possession of a type-1 peroxisome-targeting signal by both TcGALKs, they were found to be present inside glycosomes using two different methods of subcellular fractionation in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Both genes are expressed in epimastigote and trypomastigote stages since the respective proteins were immunodetected by western blotting. The T. cruzi galactokinases present their highest (52-47%) sequence identity with their counterpart from Leishmania spp., followed by prokaryotic galactokinases such as those from E. coli and Lactococcus lactis (26-23%). In a phylogenetic analysis, the trypanosomatid galactokinases form a separate cluster, showing an affiliation with bacteria. Epimastigotes of T. cruzi can grow in glucose-depleted LIT-medium supplemented with 20mM of galactose, suggesting that this hexose, upon phosphorylation by a TcGALK, could be used in the synthesis of UDP-galactose and also as a possible carbon and energy source. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Arginine and Lysine Transporters Are Essential for Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Mathieu, Christoph; Macêdo, Juan P; Hürlimann, Daniel; Wirdnam, Corina; Haindrich, Alexander C; Suter Grotemeyer, Marianne; González-Salgado, Amaia; Schmidt, Remo S; Inbar, Ehud; Mäser, Pascal; Bütikofer, Peter; Zilberstein, Dan; Rentsch, Doris

    2017-01-01

    For Trypanosoma brucei arginine and lysine are essential amino acids and therefore have to be imported from the host. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants identified cationic amino acid transporters among members of the T. brucei AAAP (amino acid/auxin permease) family. TbAAT5-3 showed high affinity arginine uptake (Km 3.6 ± 0.4 μM) and high selectivity for L-arginine. L-arginine transport was reduced by a 10-times excess of L-arginine, homo-arginine, canavanine or arginine-β-naphthylamide, while lysine was inhibitory only at 100-times excess, and histidine or ornithine did not reduce arginine uptake rates significantly. TbAAT16-1 is a high affinity (Km 4.3 ± 0.5 μM) and highly selective L-lysine transporter and of the compounds tested, only L-lysine and thialysine were competing for L-lysine uptake. TbAAT5-3 and TbAAT16-1 are expressed in both procyclic and bloodstream form T. brucei and cMyc-tagged proteins indicate localization at the plasma membrane. RNAi-mediated down-regulation of TbAAT5 and TbAAT16 in bloodstream form trypanosomes resulted in growth arrest, demonstrating that TbAAT5-mediated arginine and TbAAT16-mediated lysine transport are essential for T. brucei. Growth of induced RNAi lines could partially be rescued by supplementing a surplus of arginine or lysine, respectively, while addition of both amino acids was less efficient. Single and double RNAi lines indicate that additional low affinity uptake systems for arginine and lysine are present in T. brucei.

  15. Congenital Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission in Santa Cruz, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Caryn; Verastegui, Manuela; Gilman, Robert H.; LaFuente, Carlos; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Calderon, Maritza; Pacori, Juan; Abastoflor, Maria del Carmen; Aparicio, Hugo; Brady, Mark F.; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Angulo, Noelia; Marcus, Sarah; Sterling, Charles; Maguire, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Background We conducted a study of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Our objective was to apply new tools to identify weak points in current screening algorithms, and find ways to improve them. Methods Women presenting for delivery were screened by rapid and conventional serological tests. For infants of infected mothers, blood specimens obtained on days 0, 7, 21, 30, 90, 180, and 270 were concentrated and examined microscopically; serological tests were performed for the day 90, 180, and 270 specimens. Maternal and infant specimens, including umbilical tissue, were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the kinetoplast minicircle and by quantitative PCR. Results Of 530 women, 154 (29%) were seropositive. Ten infants had congenital T. cruzi infection. Only 4 infants had positive results of microscopy evaluation in the first month, and none had positive cord blood microscopy results. PCR results were positive for 6 (67%) of 9 cord blood and 7 (87.5%) of 8 umbilical tissue specimens. PCR-positive women were more likely to transmit T. cruzi than were seropositive women with negative PCR results (P < .05). Parasite loads determined by quantitative PCR were higher for mothers of infected infants than for seropositive mothers of uninfected infants (P < .01). Despite intensive efforts, only 58% of at-risk infants had a month 9 specimen collected. Conclusions On the basis of the low sensitivity of microscopy in cord blood and high rate of loss to follow-up, we estimate that current screening programs miss one-half of all infected infants. Molecular techniques may improve early detection. PMID:19877966

  16. Prevalence of Trypanosoma vivax in cattle in central Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadl, M.; Babiker, H.I.; Bakheit, M.A.; A Rahman, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The study was conducted to validate an antibody-detection ELISA test (Ab-ELISA) using pre-coated ELISA plates with crude antigen preparation of Trypanosoma vivax and to study the prevalence of T. vivax infection in central Sudan. A total of 704 blood samples were collected from cattle in central Sudan, a known endemic area of T. vivax infection. Additionally, 74 blood samples were collected from northern Sudan (Atbra town), an area presumed to be T. vivax-free. Sera were collected during the period September 1998 to May 1999 during three different seasons (summer, autumn and winter). Under the existing laboratory conditions, the test showed a clear distinction between different controls, i.e. strong positive control (C++), weak positive control (C+), negative control (C-) and the conjugate control (Cc). A percent positivity of 25% was taken as a cut-off value to determine the positivity or negativity of the test. The acceptable optical density range of strong positive control (C++) was 0.65-1.22. Lower and upper percent positivity limits for different controls were also determined. The study showed that T. vivax is endemic in central Sudan with 1.4% prevalence based on parasitological examination and 29.26% on Ab-ELISA. The infection rate was significantly higher during the autumn and winter than in summer. Young cattle showed significantly lower infection rates than adults as indicated by both the parasitological and the Ab-ELISA test. In relation to husbandry practice, migratory cattle showed significantly higher rates of prevalence than resident cattle. There was no significant difference in average packed red cell volume (PCV) values between ELISA positive and ELISA negative animals. Calves of less than one year of age showed significantly lower PCV values when belonging to migratory herds than to resident herds. (author)

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi maxicircle heterogeneity in Chagas disease patients from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Julio César; Valadares, Helder M S; D'Avila, Daniella A; Baptista, Rodrigo P; Moreno, Margoth; Galvão, Lúcia M C; Chiari, Egler; Sturm, Nancy R; Gontijo, Eliane D; Macedo, Andrea M; Zingales, Bianca

    2009-07-15

    The majority of individuals in the chronic phase of Chagas disease are asymptomatic (indeterminate form, IF). Each year, approximately 3% of them develop lesions in the heart or gastrointestinal tract. Cardiomyopathy (CCHD) is the most severe manifestation of Chagas disease. The factors that determine the outcome of the infection are unknown, but certainly depend on complex interactions amongst the genetic make-up of the parasite, the host immunogenetic background and environment. In a previous study we verified that the maxicircle gene NADH dehydrogenase (mitochondrial complex I) subunit 7 (ND7) from IF isolates had a 455 bp deletion compared with the wild type (WT) ND7 gene from CCHD strains. We proposed that ND7 could constitute a valuable target for PCR assays in the differential diagnosis of the infective strain. In the present study we evaluated this hypothesis by examination of ND7 structure in parasites from 75 patients with defined pathologies, from Southeast Brazil. We also analysed the structure of additional mitochondrial genes (ND4/CR4, COIII and COII) since the maxicircle is used for clustering Trypanosoma cruzi strains into three clades/haplogroups. We conclude that maxicircle genes do not discriminate parasite populations which induce IF or CCHD forms. Interestingly, the great majority of the analysed isolates belong to T. cruzi II (discrete typing unit, (DTU) IIb) genotype. This scenario is at variance with the prevalence of hybrid (DTU IId) human isolates in Bolivia, Chile and Argentina. The distribution of WT and deleted ND7 and ND4 genes in T. cruzi strains suggests that mutations in the two genes occurred in different ancestrals in the T. cruzi II cluster, allowing the identification of at least three mitochondrial sub-lineages within this group. The observation that T. cruzi strains accumulate mutations in several genes coding for complex I subunits favours the hypothesis that complex I may have a limited activity in this parasite.

  18. Sialic Acid Glycobiology Unveils Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Membrane Physiology.

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    Andrés B Lantos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the flagellate protozoan agent of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is unable to synthesize sialic acids de novo. Mucins and trans-sialidase (TS are substrate and enzyme, respectively, of the glycobiological system that scavenges sialic acid from the host in a crucial interplay for T. cruzi life cycle. The acquisition of the sialyl residue allows the parasite to avoid lysis by serum factors and to interact with the host cell. A major drawback to studying the sialylation kinetics and turnover of the trypomastigote glycoconjugates is the difficulty to identify and follow the recently acquired sialyl residues. To tackle this issue, we followed an unnatural sugar approach as bioorthogonal chemical reporters, where the use of azidosialyl residues allowed identifying the acquired sugar. Advanced microscopy techniques, together with biochemical methods, were used to study the trypomastigote membrane from its glycobiological perspective. Main sialyl acceptors were identified as mucins by biochemical procedures and protein markers. Together with determining their shedding and turnover rates, we also report that several membrane proteins, including TS and its substrates, both glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, are separately distributed on parasite surface and contained in different and highly stable membrane microdomains. Notably, labeling for α(1,3Galactosyl residues only partially colocalize with sialylated mucins, indicating that two species of glycosylated mucins do exist, which are segregated at the parasite surface. Moreover, sialylated mucins were included in lipid-raft-domains, whereas TS molecules are not. The location of the surface-anchored TS resulted too far off as to be capable to sialylate mucins, a role played by the shed TS instead. Phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase-C activity is actually not present in trypomastigotes. Therefore, shedding of TS occurs via microvesicles instead of as a fully

  19. Metalloproteases in Trypanosoma rangeli-infected Rhodnius prolixus

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    D Feder

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Protease activities in the haemolymph and fat body in a bloodsucking insect, Rhodnius prolixus, infected with Trypanosoma rangeli, were investigated. After SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis containing gelatin as substrate, analysis of zymograms performed on samples of different tissues of controls and insects inoculated or orally infected with short or long epimastigotes of T. rangeli, demonstrated distinct patterns of protease activities: (i proteases were detected in the haemolymph of insects which were fed on, or inoculated with, short epimastigotes of T. rangeli (39 kDa and 33 kDa, respectively, but they were not observed in the fat body taken from these insects; (ii protease was also presented in the fat bodies derived from naive insects or controls inoculated with sterile phosphate-saline buffer (49 kDa, but it was not detected in the haemolymph of these insects; (iii no protease activity was observed in both haemolymph and fat bodies taken from insects inoculated with, or fed on, long epimastigotes of T. rangeli. Furthermore, in short epimastigotes of T. rangeli extracts, three bands of the protease activities with apparent molecular weights of 297, 198 and 95 kDa were detected while long epimastigotes preparation presented only two bands of protease activities with molecular weights of 297 and 198 kDa. The proteases from the insect infected with T. rangeli and controls belong to the class of either metalloproteases or metal-activated enzymes since they are inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline. The significance of these proteases in the insects infected with short epimastigotes of T. rangeli is discussed in relation to the success of the establishment of infection of these parasites in its vector, R. prolixus.

  20. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Vanrell

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression.

  1. Immunotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi infection with DNA vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, Eric; Escobedo-Ortegon, Javier; Reyes-Rodriguez, Norma; Arjona-Torres, Arletty; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathology of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy are still debated, and the controversy has interfered with the development of new treatments and vaccines. Because of the potential of DNA vaccines for immunotherapy of chronic and infectious diseases, we tested if DNA vaccines could control an ongoing Trypanosoma cruzi infection. BALB/c mice were infected with a lethal dose (5 x 10(4) parasites) as a model of acute infection, and then they were treated with two injections of 100 microg of plasmid DNA 1 week apart, beginning on day 5 postinfection. Control mice had high levels of parasitemia and mortality and severe cardiac inflammation, while mice treated with plasmid DNA encoding trypomastigote surface antigen 1 or Tc24 had reduced parasitemia and mild cardiac inflammation and >70% survived the infection. The efficacy of the immunotherapy also was significant when it was delayed until days 10 and 15 after infection. Parasitological analysis of cardiac tissue of surviving mice indicated that most mice still contained detectable parasite kinetoplast DNA but fewer mice contained live parasites, suggesting that there was efficient but not complete parasite elimination. DNA vaccine immunotherapy was also evaluated in CD1 mice infected with a low dose (5 x 10(2) parasites) as a model of chronic infection. Immunotherapy was initiated on day 70 postinfection and resulted in improved survival and reduced cardiac tissue inflammation. These results suggest that DNA vaccines have strong potential for the immunotherapy of T. cruzi infection and may provide new alternatives for the control of Chagas' disease.

  2. Rab23 is a flagellar protein in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Field Mark C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab small GTPases are important mediators of membrane transport, and orthologues frequently retain similar locations and functions, even between highly divergent taxa. In metazoan organisms Rab23 is an important negative regulator of Sonic hedgehog signaling and is crucial for correct development and differentiation of cellular lineages by virtue of an involvement in ciliary recycling. Previously, we reported that Trypanosoma brucei Rab23 localized to the nuclear envelope 1, which is clearly inconsistent with the mammalian location and function. As T. brucei is unicellular the potential that Rab23 has no role in cell signaling was possible. Here we sought to further investigate the role(s of Rab23 in T. brucei to determine if Rab23 was an example of a Rab protein with divergent function in distinct taxa. Methods/major findings The taxonomic distribution of Rab23 was examined and compared with the presence of flagella/cilia in representative taxa. Despite evidence for considerable secondary loss, we found a clear correlation between a conventional flagellar structure and the presence of a Rab23 orthologue in the genome. By epitope-tagging, Rab23 was localized and found to be present at the flagellum throughout the cell cycle. However, RNAi knockdown did not result in a flagellar defect, suggesting that Rab23 is not required for construction or maintenance of the flagellum. Conclusions The location of Rab23 at the flagellum is conserved between mammals and trypanosomes and the Rab23 gene is restricted to flagellated organisms. These data may suggest the presence of a Rab23-mediated signaling mechanism in trypanosomes.

  3. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanrell, María Cristina; Losinno, Antonella Denisse; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura Virginia; Carrillo, Carolina; Romano, Patricia Silvia

    2017-11-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients) to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression.

  4. Phospholipase A1: a novel virulence factor in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaunzarán, María Laura; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth; Lammel, Estela María; Giménez, Guadalupe; Bott, Emanuel; Barbieri, Manuel Alejandro; de Isola, Elvira Luisa Durante

    2013-02-01

    Phospholipase A1 (PLA1) has been described in the infective stages of Trypanosoma cruzi as a membrane-bound/secreted enzyme that significantly modified host cell lipid profile with generation of second lipid messengers and concomitant activation of protein kinase C. In the present work we determined higher levels of PLA1 expression in the infective amastigotes and trypomastigotes than in the non-infective epimastigotes of lethal RA strain. In addition, we found similar expression patterns but distinct PLA1 activity levels in bloodstream trypomastigotes from Cvd and RA (lethal) and K98 (non-lethal) T. cruzi strains, obtained at their corresponding parasitemia peaks. This fact was likely due to the presence of different levels of anti-T. cruzi PLA1 antibodies in sera of infected mice, that modulated the enzyme activity. Moreover, these antibodies significantly reduced in vitro parasite invasion indicating the participation of T. cruzi PLA1 in the early events of parasite-host cell interaction. We also demonstrated the presence of lysophospholipase activity in live infective stages that could account for self-protection against the toxic lysophospholipids generated by T. cruzi PLA1 action. At the genome level, we identified at least eight putative genes that codify for T. cruzi PLA1 with high amino acid sequence variability in their amino and carboxy-terminal regions; a putative PLA1 selected gene was cloned and expressed as a recombinant protein that possessed PLA1 activity. Collectively, the results presented here point out at T. cruzi PLA1 as a novel virulence factor implicated in parasite invasion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein 3-nitrotyrosine formation during Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Naviliat

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (·NO is a diffusible messenger implicated in Trypanosoma cruzi resistance. Excess production of ·NO and oxidants leads to the generation of nitrogen dioxide (·NO2, a strong nitrating agent. Tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification resulting from the addition of a nitro (-NO2 group to the ortho-position of tyrosine residues. Detection of protein 3-nitrotyrosine is regarded as a marker of nitro-oxidative stress and is observed in inflammatory processes. The formation and role of nitrating species in the control and myocardiopathy of T. cruzi infection remain to be studied. We investigated the levels of ·NO and protein 3-nitrotyrosine in the plasma of C3H and BALB/c mice and pharmacologically modulated their production during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. We also looked for protein 3-nitrotyrosine in the hearts of infected animals. Our results demonstrated that C3H animals produced higher amounts of ·NO than BALB/c mice, but their generation of peroxynitrite was not proportionally enhanced and they had higher parasitemias. While N G-nitro-arginine methyl ester treatment abolished ·NO production and drastically augmented the parasitism, mercaptoethylguanidine and guanido-ethyl disulfide, at doses that moderately reduced the ·NO and 3-nitrotyrosine levels, paradoxically diminished the parasitemia in both strains. Nitrated proteins were also demonstrated in myocardial cells of infected mice. These data suggest that the control of T. cruzi infection depends not only on the capacity to produce ·NO, but also on its metabolic fate, including the generation of nitrating species that may constitute an important element in parasite resistance and collateral myocardial damage.

  6. Secretome analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi by proteomics studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Yves Brossas

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a debilitating often fatal disease resulting from infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Chagas disease is endemic in 21 countries of the Americas, and it is an emerging disease in other countries as a result of migration. Given the chronic nature of the infection where intracellular parasites persist for years, the diagnosis of T. cruzi by direct detection is difficult, whereas serologic tests though sensitive may yield false-positive results. The development of new rapid test based on the identification of soluble parasitic antigens in serum would be a real innovation in the diagnosis of Chagas disease.To identify new soluble biomarkers that may improve diagnostic tests, we investigated the proteins secreted by T. cruzi using mass spectrometric analyses of conditioned culture media devoid of serum collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from infected Vero cells. In addition, we compared the secretomes of two T. cruzi strains from DTU Tc VI (VD and CL Brener.Analysis of the secretome collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from Vero cells led to the identification of 591 T. cruzi proteins. Three hundred sixty three proteins are common to both strains and most belong to different multigenic super families (i.e. TcS, GP63, MASP, and DGF1. Ultimately we have established a list of 94 secreted proteins, common to both DTU Tc VI strains that do not belong to members of multigene families.This study provides the first comparative analysis of the secretomes from two distinct T. cruzi strains of DTU TcVI. This led us to identify a subset of common secreted proteins that could potentially serve as serum markers for T. cruzi infection. Their potential could now be evaluated, with specific antibodies using sera collected from patients and residents from endemic regions.

  7. Secretome analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi by proteomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossas, Jean-Yves; Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Bisio, Margarita Maria Catalina; Chapelle, Manuel; Marinach-Patrice, Carine; Bordessoules, Mallaury; Palazon Ruiz, George; Vion, Jeremy; Paris, Luc; Altcheh, Jaime; Mazier, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is a debilitating often fatal disease resulting from infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Chagas disease is endemic in 21 countries of the Americas, and it is an emerging disease in other countries as a result of migration. Given the chronic nature of the infection where intracellular parasites persist for years, the diagnosis of T. cruzi by direct detection is difficult, whereas serologic tests though sensitive may yield false-positive results. The development of new rapid test based on the identification of soluble parasitic antigens in serum would be a real innovation in the diagnosis of Chagas disease. To identify new soluble biomarkers that may improve diagnostic tests, we investigated the proteins secreted by T. cruzi using mass spectrometric analyses of conditioned culture media devoid of serum collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from infected Vero cells. In addition, we compared the secretomes of two T. cruzi strains from DTU Tc VI (VD and CL Brener). Analysis of the secretome collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from Vero cells led to the identification of 591 T. cruzi proteins. Three hundred sixty three proteins are common to both strains and most belong to different multigenic super families (i.e. TcS, GP63, MASP, and DGF1). Ultimately we have established a list of 94 secreted proteins, common to both DTU Tc VI strains that do not belong to members of multigene families. This study provides the first comparative analysis of the secretomes from two distinct T. cruzi strains of DTU TcVI. This led us to identify a subset of common secreted proteins that could potentially serve as serum markers for T. cruzi infection. Their potential could now be evaluated, with specific antibodies using sera collected from patients and residents from endemic regions.

  8. Functional characterization of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Furtado

    Full Text Available The oxidative lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG is removed during base excision repair by the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1. This lesion can erroneously pair with adenine, and the excision of this damaged base by Ogg1 enables the insertion of a guanine and prevents DNA mutation. In this report, we identified and characterized Ogg1 from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (TcOgg1, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Like most living organisms, T. cruzi is susceptible to oxidative stress, hence DNA repair is essential for its survival and improvement of infection. We verified that the TcOGG1 gene encodes an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase by complementing an Ogg1-defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Heterologous expression of TcOGG1 reestablished the mutation frequency of the yeast mutant ogg1(-/- (CD138 to wild type levels. We also demonstrate that the overexpression of TcOGG1 increases T. cruzi sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2. Analysis of DNA lesions using quantitative PCR suggests that the increased susceptibility to H(2O(2 of TcOGG1-overexpressor could be a consequence of uncoupled BER in abasic sites and/or strand breaks generated after TcOgg1 removes 8-oxoG, which are not rapidly repaired by the subsequent BER enzymes. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that TcOGG1-overexpressors have reduced levels of 8-oxoG both in the nucleus and in the parasite mitochondrion. The localization of TcOgg1 was examined in parasite transfected with a TcOgg1-GFP fusion, which confirmed that this enzyme is in both organelles. Taken together, our data indicate that T. cruzi has a functional Ogg1 ortholog that participates in nuclear and mitochondrial BER.

  9. THERAPEUTIC ACTION OF N-PHENYLGLYCINEAMIDE-p-ARSONIC ACID (TRYPARSAMIDE) UPON EXPERIMENTAL INFECTIONS OF TRYPANOSOMA RHODESIENSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, L; Brown, W H

    1921-01-31

    A series of experiments was carried out to determine the effects of tryparsamide upon the infections produced in various species of animals by Tr. rhodesiense. The strain of trypanosome used was one which possessed a very low virulence for guinea pigs, was fairly virulent for mice and rats, and highly virulent for rabbits. Therapeutic experiments carried out on 24 hour infections in mice and rats showed that cures could be obtained in this class of infections by the administration of a single large dose of the drug amounting to approximately two-thirds of the maximum tolerable dose, as contrasted with similar results in cases of gambiense infections from approximately one-ninth and one-fifth of this dose respectively. With advanced infections in rabbits, there appeared to be no single dose of the drug capable of insuring a cure which could be administered with safety, although some cures were obtainable with doses approximating the maximum tolerable dose. Treatment of these infections could be carried to a successful conclusion, however, by an intensive system of treatment in which large doses of the drug were administered at short intervals of time, and even relapses yielded to this treatment in some instances. The employment of such a method of treatment was possible on account of the unusual tolerance exhibited by animals to this drug, a fact which was previously emphasized.

  10. Highly diluted medication reduces parasitemia and improves experimental infection evolution by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleixo Denise

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no published information about the use of different protocols to administer a highly diluted medication. Evaluate the effect of different protocols for treatment with biotherapic T. cruzi 17 dH (BIOTTc17dH on clinical/parasitological evolution of mice infected with T. cruzi-Y strain. Methods A blind, randomized controlled trial was performed twice, using 60 28-day-old male Swiss mice infected with T. cruzi-Y strain, in five treatment groups: CI - treated with a 7% ethanol-water solution, diluted in water (10 μL/mL ad libitum; BIOTPI - treated with BIOTTc17dH in water (10 μL/mL ad libitum during a period that started on the day of infection; BIOT4DI - treated with BIOTTc17dH in water (10 μL/mL ad libitum beginning on the 4th day of infection; BIOT4-5–6 - treated with BIOTTc17dH by gavage (0.2 mL/ animal/day on the 4th, 5th and 6th days after infection; BIOT7-8–9 - treated with BIOTTc17dH by gavage (0.2 mL/ animal/day on the 7th, 8th and 9th days after infection. We evaluated: parasitemia; total parasitemia (Ptotal; maximum peak of parasites; prepatent period (PPP - time from infection to detection of the parasite in blood; patent period (PP - period when the parasitemia can be detected in blood; clinical aspects; and mortality. Results Parasitological parameters in the BIOTPI and mainly in the BIOT4PI group showed better evolution of the infection compared to the control group (CI, with lower Ptotal, lower maximum peak of parasites, higher PPP, lower PP and longer survival times. These animals showed stable body temperature and higher weight gain and water consumption, with more animals having normal-appearing fur for longer periods. In contrast, groups BIOT4-5–6 and BIOT7-8–9 showed worse evolution of the infection compared to the control group, considering both parasitological and clinical parameters. The correlation analysis combined with the other data from this study indicated that the prepatent period is the best parameter to evaluate the effect of a medication in this model. Conclusions The BIOT4DI group showed the best clinical and parasitological evolution, with lower parasitemia and a trend toward lower mortality and a longer survival period. The prepatent period was the best parameter to evaluate the effect of a medication in this model.

  11. Efficacy of some essential oils in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of orally administered Cymbopogon citratus, Zingiber officinale and Syzygium aromaticum essential oils (EOs) in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Methods: Three experiments were conducted with 48 Swiss mice each. The animals were inoculated with 2 x 106 metacyclic ...

  12. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alkhaldi, A.A.M.; Martínek, Jan; Panicucci, Brian; Dardonville, C.; Zíková, Alena; de Koning, H.P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2016), s. 23-34 ISSN 2211-3207 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1205 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * mitochondrion * FoF1 ATPase * succinate dehydrogenase * phosphonium salt * SDH complex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.809, year: 2016

  13. Novel molecular mechanism for targeting the parasite Trypanosoma brucei with snake venom toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martos Esteban, Andrea; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Carrington, Mark

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protozoan species capable to infecting insect vectors whose bite further produces African sleeping sickness inhuman beings. During parasites’extracellular lives in the mammalian host, its outer coat, mainly composedof Variable surface glycoproteins (VSGs)[2], und...

  14. Lack of evidence for integration of Trypanosoma cruzi minicircle DNA in South American human genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flegontova, Olga; Lukeš, Julius; Flegontov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2012), s. 437-441 ISSN 0020-7519 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma cruzi * Kinetoplast minicircle * Chagas disease * Horizontal gene transfer * Human genome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.637, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020751912000781

  15. Particle-bound enzymes in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opperdoes, F. R.; Borst, P.; Spits, H.

    1977-01-01

    We have screened the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei for the presence of enzymes that could serve as markers for the microbodies and the highly repressed mitochondrion of this organism. None of seven known microbody enzymes were detected at all, but glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase, ATPase,

  16. Contribution of glucose transport to the control of the glycolytic flux in Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.M.; Walsh, M.C.; ter Kuile, B.; Mensonides, F.I.C.; Michels, P.A.M.; Opperdoes, F.R.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of glucose transport across the plasma membrane of the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei was modulated by titration of the hexose transporter with the inhibitor phloretin, and the effect on the glycolytic flux was measured. A rapid glucose uptake assay was developed to measure the

  17. The promoter for a variant surface glycoprotein gene expression site in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomerdijk, J. C.; Ouellette, M.; ten Asbroek, A. L.; Kieft, R.; Bommer, A. M.; Clayton, C. E.; Borst, P.

    1990-01-01

    The variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene 221 of Trypanosoma brucei is transcribed as part of a 60 kb expression site (ES). We have identified the promoter controlling this multigene transcription unit by the use of 221 chromosome-enriched DNA libraries and VSG gene 221 expression site

  18. Galactonolactone oxidoreductase from Trypanosoma cruzi employs a FAD cofactor for the synthesis of vitamin C.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudryashova, E.V.; Leferink, N.G.H.; Slot, I.G.M.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas' disease, is unable to salvage vitamin C (l-ascorbate) from its environment and relies on de novo synthesis for its survival. Because humans lack the capacity to synthesize ascorbate, the trypanosomal enzymes involved in ascorbate biosynthesis are

  19. Functions and cellular localization of cysteine desulfurase and selenocysteine lyase in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poliak, Pavel; Van Hoewyk, D.; Oborník, Miroslav; Zíková, Alena; Stuart, K. D.; Tachezy, J.; Pilon, M.; Lukeš, Julius

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 277, č. 2 (2010), s. 383-393 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Fe–S cluster * mitochondrion * RNAi * selenoprotein * Trypanosoma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.129, year: 2010

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi in the chicken model: Chagas-like heart disease in the absence of parasitism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teixeira, A.R.L.; Gomes, C.; Nitz, N.; Sousa, A.O.; Alvez, R.M.; Guimaro, M.C.; Cordeiro, C.; Bernal, F.M.; Rosa, A.C.; Hejnar, Jiří; Leonardecz, E.; Hecht, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2011), e1000 ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Chagas disease * Trypanosoma cruzi * kDNA minicircles * inbred chicken Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  1. Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with oligochromatography for detection of Trypanosoma brucei in clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugasa, Claire M.; Laurent, Thierry; Schoone, Gerard J.; Kager, Piet A.; Lubega, George W.; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular tools, such as real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and PCR, have been developed to detect Trypanosoma brucei parasites in blood for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Despite good sensitivity, these techniques are not implemented in HAT control

  2. Risk Factors and Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection of Dutch Blood Donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, Ed; Hogema, Boris M.; Molier, Michel; Bart, Aldert; Zaaijer, Hans L.

    2016-01-01

    Blood donors unaware of Trypanosoma cruzi infection may donate infectious blood. Risk factors and the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in at-risk Dutch blood donors were studied to assess whether specific blood safety measures are warranted in the Netherlands. Birth in a country endemic for Chagas

  3. The effect of the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone on the cell cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, E.; Barrera, P.; Tonn, C.; Nieto, M.; Sartor, T.; Sosa, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous natural compounds have been used against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. Here, we studied the effect of the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone on growth and morphology of parasites synchronized with hydroxyurea, at different periods of time after removal of the nucleotide.

  4. Maxi-circles and mini-circles in kinetoplast DNA from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Leon; A.C.C. Frasch; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); F. Fase-Fowler; P. Borst (Piet); F. Brunel; J. Davison

    1980-01-01

    textabstractMaxi-circles are a minor component of kinetoplast DNAs from all trypanosomatids studied, but they have not previously been found in Trypanosoma cruzi; We have spread intact kinetoplast DNA from the epimastigotes of strain Y in protein monolayers and analysed the mini-circle networks by

  5. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado-Guerrrero, Ramón; Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of the recombinant soluble enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) from Trypanosoma cruzi has been performed. The enzyme catalyzes the normal anabolic reaction and the reductant is NADPH. It also catalyzes the oxidation of mevalonate but at a lower...

  6. Characterization and immobilization of engineered sialidases from Trypanosoma rangeli for transsialylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Birgitte; González-Delgado, Isabel; Holck, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    A sialidase (EC 3.2.1.18; GH 33) from non-pathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli has been engineered with the aim of improving its transsialylation activity. Recently, two engineered variants containing 15 and 16 amino acid substitutions, respectively, were found to exhibit significantly improved...

  7. Isolation of a human serum-resistant Trypanosoma brucei from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A strain of trypanosome was isolated from one of the trade pigs held at the Orie Orba market lairage in Udenu Local Government Area of Enugu State. It was identified by its motility in wet blood film and morphological characteristics in Giemsa-stained thin blood film as Trypanosoma brucei. To further characterize the ...

  8. Mixed infection with Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii induces protection: Involvement of cross-reactive antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joerink, M.; Groeneveld, A.; Ducro, B.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    Mixed infections with Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) are commonly found in nature. So far, in the laboratory, only mono-parasitic infections have been examined in more detail. We studied the influence of mixed rather than mono-parasitic infections

  9. Analysis of the mitochondrial maxicircle of Trypanosoma lewisi, a neglected human pathogen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lin, R.-H.; Lai, D.-H.; Zheng, L.-L.; Wu, J.; Lukeš, Julius; Hide, G.; Lun, Z.-R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, 30 December 2015 (2015), s. 665 ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma lewisi * Kinetoplast maxicircle * Mitochondrial DNA * RNA editing * Palindrome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2015

  10. Futile import of tRNAs and proteins into the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei evansi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paris, Zdeněk; Hashimi, Hassan; Lun, Sijia; Alfonzo, J. D.; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 176, č. 2 (2011), 116-120 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * tRNA * Protein import * Mitochondrion * Kinetoplast Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.551, year: 2011

  11. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote cell surface proteins by two complementary methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sébastien; Motta, Flávia N

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, a neglected infectious illness that affects millions of people, mostly in Latin America. Here, the cell surface subproteome of the T. cruzi epimastigote life form was characterized. In order to prepare samples enriched in epimastigote...

  12. Non-cytochrome mediated mitochondrial ATP production in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienen, E. J.; Maturi, R. K.; Pollakis, G.; Clarkson, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    The life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei brucei involves a series of differentiation steps characterized by marked changes in mitochondrial development and function. The bloodstream forms of this parasite completely lack cytochromes and have not been considered to have any Krebs cycle function. It has

  13. Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelden, van S.W.H.; Fast, B.; Vogt, A.; Meer, van der P.; Saas, J.; Hellemond, van J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.; Boshart, M.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of a functional Krebs cycle for energy generation in the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated under physiological conditions during logarithmic phase growth of a pleomorphic parasite strain. Wild type procyclic cells and mutants with targeted deletion of the gene

  14. Dynamic Modelling under Uncertainty : The Case of Trypanosoma brucei Energy Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achcar, Fiona; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Barrett, Michael P.; Breitling, Rainer; Papin, Jason A.

    Kinetic models of metabolism require detailed knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, due to measurement errors or lack of data this knowledge is often uncertain. The model of glycolysis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei is a particularly well analysed example of a quantitative

  15. Trypanocidal activity of human plasma on Trypanosoma evansi in mice Atividade tripanocida do plasma humano sobre Trypanosoma evansi em camundongos

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    Aleksandro Schafer Da Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to test an alternative protocol with human plasma to control Trypanosoma evansi infection in mice. Plasma from an apparently 27-year-old healthy male, blood type A+, was used in the study. A concentration of 100 mg.dL-1 apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1 was detected in the plasma. Forty mice were divided into four groups with 10 animals each. Group A comprised uninfected animals. Mice from groups B, C and D were inoculated with a T. evansi isolate. Group B was used as a positive control. At three days post-infection (DPI, the mice were administered intraperitoneally with human plasma. A single dose of 0.2 mL plasma was given to those in group C. The mice from group D were administered five doses of 0.2 mL plasma with a 24 hours interval between the doses. Group B showed high increasing parasitemia that led to their death within 5 DPI. Both treatments eliminated parasites from the blood and increased the longevity of animals. An efficacy of 50 (group C and 80% (group D of human plasma trypanocidal activity was found using PCR. This therapeutic success was likely achieved in the group D due to their higher levels of APOL1 compared with group C.Este estudo teve como objetivo testar um protocolo alternativo com plasma humano para controlar a infecção por Trypanosoma evansi em camundongos. O plasma foi oriundo de um homem aparentemente saudável, com idade entre 27 anos e tipo de sangue A+. Foi detectada uma concentração de 100 mg.dL -1 de apolipoproteína L1 (APOL1 no plasma. Quarenta camundongos foram divididos em quatro grupos, contendo dez animais cada. Grupo A, composto de animais não infectados. Os roedores dos grupos B, C e D foram inoculados intraperitonealmente com um isolado de T. evansi. O Grupo B foi usado como um controle positivo. Três dias pós-infecção (DPI, os camundongos foram tratados com plasma humano. Uma dose única de 0,2 mL de plasma foi administrada nos roedores do grupo C. Os ratos do grupo D receberam cinco

  16. Efficacy of a series of alpha-pyrone derivatives against Leishmania (L.) infantum and Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempone, Andre Gustavo; Ferreira, Daiane Dias; Lima, Marta Lopes; Costa Silva, Thais Alves; Borborema, Samanta E T; Reimão, Juliana Quero; Galuppo, Mariana K; Guerra, Juliana Mariotti; Russell, Angelie J; Wynne, Graham M; Lai, Roy Y L; Cadelis, Melissa M; Copp, Brent R

    2017-10-20

    The neglected tropical diseases Chagas disease and leishmaniasis affect together more than 20 million people living mainly in developing countries. The mainstay of treatment is chemotherapy, however the drugs of choice, which include benznidazole and miltefosine, are toxic and have numerous side effects. Safe and effective therapies are urgently needed. Marine alpha-pyrones have been previously identified as scaffolds with potential antiprotozoan activities. In this work, using a phenotypic screen, twenty-seven examples of 3-substituted 4-hydroxy-6-methyl alpha-pyrones were synthesized and their antiparasitic efficacy evaluated against Leishmania (L.) infantum and Trypanosoma cruzi in order to evaluate structure-activity relationships within the series. The mechanism of action and the in vivo efficacy of the most selective compound against T. cruzi were evaluated using different techniques. In vitro data indicated that compounds 8, 15, 25, 26 and 28 presented IC 50 values in the range between 13 and 54 μM against L. infantum intracellular amastigotes. Among them, hexanoyl substituted pyrone 8 was the most selective and potent, with a Selectivity Index (SI) > 14. Fifteen of the alpha-pyrones were effective against T. cruzi trypomastigotes, with 3-undecanoyl (11) and 3-tetradecanoyl (12) substituted pyrones being the most potent against trypomastigotes, with IC 50 values of 1 and 2 μM, respectively, and SI higher than 70. Using flow cytometry and fluorescent-based assays, pyrone 12 was found to induce hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential of T. cruzi, without affecting plasma membrane permeability. An experimental acute phase-murine model, demonstrated that in vivo dosing of 12 (30 mg/kg/day; 5 days), had no efficacy at the first parasitemia onset of T. cruzi, but reduced the second onset by 55% (p cruzi, and that one analogue exhibited moderate and non-toxic in vivo efficacy against T. cruzi is encouraging, and suggests that

  17. The use of yellow fluorescent hybrids to indicate mating in Trypanosoma brucei

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    Ferris Vanessa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei undergoes genetic exchange in its insect vector, the tsetse fly, by an unknown mechanism. The difficulties of working with this experimental system of genetic exchange have hampered investigation, particularly because the trypanosome life cycle stages involved cannot be cultured in vitro and therefore must be examined in the insect. Searching for small numbers of hybrid trypanosomes directly in the fly has become possible through the incorporation of fluorescent reporter genes, and we have previously carried out a successful cross using a reporter-repressor strategy. However, we could not be certain that all fluorescent trypanosomes observed in that cross were hybrids, due to mutations of the repressor leading to spontaneous fluorescence, and we have therefore developed an alternative strategy. Results To visualize the production of hybrids in the fly, parental trypanosome clones were transfected with a gene encoding Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP or Red Fluorescent Protein (RFP. Co-infection of flies with red and green fluorescent parental trypanosomes produced yellow fluorescent hybrids, which were easily visualized in the fly salivary glands. Yellow trypanosomes were not seen in midgut or proventricular samples and first appeared in the glands as epimastigotes as early as 13 days after fly infection. Cloned progeny originating from individual salivary glands had yellow, red, green or no fluorescence and were confirmed as hybrids by microsatellite, molecular karyotype and kinetoplast (mitochondrial DNA analyses. Hybrid clones showed biparental inheritance of both nuclear and kinetoplast genomes. While segregation and reassortment of the reporter genes and microsatellite alleles were consistent with Mendelian inheritance, flow cytometry measurement of DNA content revealed both diploid and polyploid trypanosomes among the hybrid progeny clones. Conclusion The strategy of using production of yellow hybrids

  18. Does native Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin mediate growth inhibition of a mammary tumor during infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abello-Cáceres, Paula; Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier; Rosas, Carlos; Maldonado, Ismael; Aguilar-Guzmán, Lorena; González, Carlos; Ramírez, Galia; Ferreira, Jorge; Ferreira, Arturo

    2016-09-13

    For several decades now an antagonism between Trypanosoma cruzi infection and tumor development has been detected. The molecular basis of this phenomenon remained basically unknown until our proposal that T. cruzi Calreticulin (TcCRT), an endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone, translocated-externalized by the parasite, may mediate at least an important part of this effect. Thus, recombinant TcCRT (rTcCRT) has important in vivo antiangiogenic and antitumor activities. However, the relevant question whether the in vivo antitumor effect of T. cruzi infection is indeed mediated by the native chaperone (nTcCRT), remains open. Herein, by using specific modified anti-rTcCRT antibodies (Abs), we have neutralized the antitumor activity of T. cruzi infection and extracts thereof, thus identifying nTcCRT as a valid mediator of this effect. Polyclonal anti-rTcCRT F(ab')2 Ab fragments were used to reverse the capacity of rTcCRT to inhibit EAhy926 endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, as detected by BrdU uptake. Using these F(ab')2 fragments, we also challenged the capacity of nTcCRT, during T. cruzi infection, to inhibit the growth of an aggressive mammary adenocarcinoma cell line (TA3-MTXR) in mice. Moreover, we determined the capacity of anti-rTcCRT Abs to reverse the antitumor effect of an epimastigote extract (EE). Finally, the effects of these treatments on tumor histology were evaluated. The rTcCRT capacity to inhibit ECs proliferation was reversed by anti-rTcCRT F(ab')2 Ab fragments, thus defining them as valid probes to interfere in vivo with this important TcCRT function. Consequently, during infection, these Ab fragments also reversed the in vivo experimental mammary tumor growth. Moreover, anti-rTcCRT Abs also neutralized the antitumor effect of an EE, again identifying the chaperone protein as an important mediator of this anti mammary tumor effect. Finally, as determined by conventional histological parameters, in infected animals and in those treated with EE

  19. Control and regulation of gene expression: quantitative analysis of the expression of phosphoglycerate kinase in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J.R.; Stewart, M.; Luu, V.-D.; van Tuijl, J.H.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Clayton, C.; Bakker, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Isoenzymes of phosphoglycerate kinase in Trypanosoma brucei are differentially expressed in its two main life stages. This study addresses how the organism manages to make sufficient amounts of the isoenzyme with the correct localization, which processes (transcription, splicing, and RNA

  20. Infecção tripla por Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium vivax e P. falciparum: relato de caso Triple infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum: case report

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    Andrea Silvestre Lobão Costa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente registro acerca da identificação de infecção aguda de dois plasmódios e um Trypanosoma constitui evento raro. Pré-escolar, sexo feminino, 5 anos de idade, apresentou síndrome febril; foi submetida a exame de gota espessa no qual foram identificadas formas assexuadas e sexuadas de Plasmodium vivax e P. falciparum, respectivamente, além de tripomastigotas sanguíneos de Trypanosoma cruzi. No peridomicílio, foram encontrados insetos da espécie Rhodnius sp. Os autores reforçam a importância dos estudos dos ciclos peridomiciliares de T. cruzi em ambientes silvestres na Amazônia e discutem a importância da estratégia de vigilância continuada de Trypanosomas spp. nos exames de gota espessa.This report describes a rare case of acute infection caused by two Plasmodia and one Trypanosoma. 5 year-old female patient attending kindergarten presented persistent fever syndrome. She was submitted to thick smear exam, in which asexual and sexual forms of Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum were detected, respectively, as well as trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi. Rhodnius sp. triatomines were found in the vicinity. The authors reinforce the importance of investigating the domiciliary cycles of T. cruzi in the Amazon region. Moreover, we discuss the importance of continuous monitoring of Trypanosomas spp. in thick smear exams.

  1. Action of the medicine Canova® on peritoneal resident macrophages infected with Trypanosoma cruzi = Ação do medicamento Canova® em macrófagos peritoniais residentes infectados por Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Vanessa Tagawa Cardoso de Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20 million of people are chronically infected withTrypanosoma cruzi in Latin America. The present work investigated the action of the homeopathic medicine Canova® on in vitro experimental infections with T. cruzi Y strain, using Swiss mice resident peritoneal macrophages. Our results demonstrated that Canova®induced a decrease in the production of H2O2 and TNF-a at 20 and 40% concentrations when compared to the control RPMI. However, when compared with this medicine excipient, a significant decrease in these mediators was observed with Canova® at 40% concentration only. The production of NO and phagocytic activity were not affected. TNF-a inhibits T. cruzi replication in peritoneal macrophages in vitro, becoming an important agent of infection control by this parasite. Within this context, Canova®, unlike what has been reported with other infections, would function as a stimulator of the infection, since it inhibited the production of TNF-α by peritoneal resident macrophages in vitro. Further studies should be carried out with elicited macrophages, in order to confirm the inhibitoryactivity of Canova® on the production of TNF-α and other mediators in macrophages infected by T. cruzi.Aproximadamente 20 milhões de pessoas são cronicamente infectadas pelo Trypanosoma cruzi na América Latina. O presente trabalhoinvestigou a ação do medicamento homeopático Canova® em infecções experimentais “in vitro” com Trypanosoma cruzi, cepa Y, usando macrófagos residentes peritoniais de camundongos Swiss. Os resultados indicaram que Canova® induz a diminuição significativa da produção de H2O2 e TNF-α em concentrações de 20 e 40%, quando comparado com ocontrole RPMI. Quando comparado com o excipiente do medicamento, observou-se diminuição na concentração destes mediadores apenas na concentração de 40%. A produção de NO e a atividade fagocítica não foram afetadas. TNF-α inibe a replicação do protozoário em

  2. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidani, Kárita C. F.; Bavia, Lorena; Ambrosio, Altair R.; de Messias-Reason, Iara J.

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD), a neglected sickness that affects around 6–8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP), lectin (LP), and alternative (AP). The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion of plasma

  3. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Kárita C. F. Lidani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD, a neglected sickness that affects around 6–8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP, lectin (LP, and alternative (AP. The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion

  4. The Complement System: A Prey ofTrypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidani, Kárita C F; Bavia, Lorena; Ambrosio, Altair R; de Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD), a neglected sickness that affects around 6-8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP), lectin (LP), and alternative (AP). The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion of plasma

  5. Nitric oxide-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, A. B.; Kitice, N. A.; Pelegrino, M. T.; Lancheros, C. A. C.; Yamauchi, L. M.; Pinge-Filho, P.; Yamada-Ogatta, S. F.

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), and the disease remains a major health problem in many Latin American countries. Several papers report that the killing of the parasite is dependent on the production of nitric oxide (NO). The endogenous free radical NO is an important cellular signalling molecule that plays a key role in the defense against pathogens, including T. cruzi. As T. cruzi is able to compromise host macrophages decreasing endogenous NO production, the administration of exogenous NO donors represents an interesting strategy to combat Chagas disease. Thus, the aims of this study were to prepare and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of NO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against T. cruzi. Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles composed of chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate(TPP) were prepared and used to encapsulate mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), which is a thiol-containing molecule. Nitrosation of free thiols (SH) groups of MSA were performed by the addition of equimolar amount of sodium nitrite (NaNO2), leading to the formation of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles. These polymeric nanoparticles act as spontaneous NO donors, with free NO release. The results show the formation of nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 270 to 500 nm, average of polydispersity index of 0.35, and encapsulation efficiency in the range of 99%. The NO release kinetics from the S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles showed sustained and controlled NO release over several hours. The microbicidal activity of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles was evaluated by incubating NO-releasing nanoparticles (200 - 600 μg/mL) with replicative and non-infective epimastigote, and non-replicative and infective trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. In addition, a significant decrease in the percentage of macrophage-infected (with amastigotes) and

  6. Diverse inhibitor chemotypes targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51.

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    Shamila S Gunatilleke

    Full Text Available Chagas Disease, a WHO- and NIH-designated neglected tropical disease, is endemic in Latin America and an emerging infection in North America and Europe as a result of population moves. Although a major cause of morbidity and mortality due to heart failure, as well as inflicting a heavy economic burden in affected regions, Chagas Disease elicits scant notice from the pharmaceutical industry because of adverse economic incentives. The discovery and development of new routes to chemotherapy for Chagas Disease is a clear priority.The similarity between the membrane sterol requirements of pathogenic fungi and those of the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas human cardiopathy, has led to repurposing anti-fungal azole inhibitors of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51 for the treatment of Chagas Disease. To diversify the therapeutic pipeline of anti-Chagasic drug candidates we exploited an approach that included directly probing the T. cruzi CYP51 active site with a library of synthetic small molecules. Target-based high-throughput screening reduced the library of ∼104,000 small molecules to 185 hits with estimated nanomolar K(D values, while cross-validation against T. cruzi-infected skeletal myoblast cells yielded 57 active hits with EC(50 <10 µM. Two pools of hits partially overlapped. The top hit inhibited T. cruzi with EC(50 of 17 nM and was trypanocidal at 40 nM.The hits are structurally diverse, demonstrating that CYP51 is a rather permissive enzyme target for small molecules. Cheminformatic analysis of the hits suggests that CYP51 pharmacology is similar to that of other cytochromes P450 therapeutic targets, including thromboxane synthase (CYP5, fatty acid ω-hydroxylases (CYP4, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17 and aromatase (CYP19. Surprisingly, strong similarity is suggested to glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferase, which is unrelated to CYP51 by sequence or structure. Lead compounds developed by pharmaceutical

  7. Transmission of Donor-Derived Trypanosoma cruzi and Subsequent Development of Chagas Disease in a Lung Transplant Recipient

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    A. B. Corey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Donor infection status should be considered when accepting an organ for transplant. Here we present a case of Chagas disease developing after a lung transplant where the donor was known to be Trypanosoma cruzi antibody positive. The recipient developed acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection with reactivation after treatment. Chagas disease-positive donors are likely to be encountered in the United States; donor targeted screening is needed to guide decisions regarding organ transplant and posttransplant monitoring.

  8. Efecto anti-Trypanosoma cruzi del aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf (hierba luisa en ratones Balb/c

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    Juan Rojas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la actividad anti-Trypanosoma cruzi in vivo del aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus en ratones Balb/c. Diseño: Estudio experimental, prospectivo. Institución: Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas e Instituto de Medicina Tropical de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú. Material biológico: Aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus; ratones albinos Balb/c. Intervenciones: Los animales fueron asignados aleatoriamente a seis grupos de 15 ratones cada uno: infectados y no tratados (G1, infectados y tratados con benznidazol 100 mg/kg (G2, infectados y tratados con aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus 100 mg/kg y 250 mg/kg (G3 y G4, respectivamente, no infectados y no tratados (G5, y no infectados y tratados con 250 mg de Cymbopogon citratus (G6. La infección con T. cruzi se realizó con 10(4 trypomastigotes sanguíneos y el tratamiento empezó en el 8º día post infección (dpi hasta el 28° dpi. La parasitemia se determinó con microscopia óptica cada dos días en 5 µL de sangre de la cola. En el 14°, 21° y 28° dpi, cinco animales de cada grupo fueron sacrificados y se removió el corazón para estudio histopatológico. Principales medidas de resultados: Parasitemia, número de nidos de amastigotes e infiltrados inflamatorios. Resultados: El aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus 250 mg/kg/día produjo una reducción significativa en el pico de parasitemia desde 113,92 ± 25,66 hasta 74,60 ± 12,37 tripomastigotes/mL (p < 0,05. Con 100 mg/kg/día se produjo una reducción hasta 77,40 ± 14,93 tripomastigotes/ mL (p < 0,05. También redujo el número de amastigotes y de infiltrados inflamatorios en el corazón. Conclusiones: El aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus tuvo efecto anti-Trypanosoma cruzi en ratones Balb/c en lo referente a la disminución de la parasitemia, el número de nidos de amastigotes y los resultados inflamatorios.

  9. Ethyl Pyruvate Emerges as a Safe and Fast Acting Agent against Trypanosoma brucei by Targeting Pyruvate Kinase Activity.

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    Netsanet Worku

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT also called sleeping sickness is an infectious disease in humans caused by an extracellular protozoan parasite. The disease, if left untreated, results in 100% mortality. Currently available drugs are full of severe drawbacks and fail to escape the fast development of trypanosoma resistance. Due to similarities in cell metabolism between cancerous tumors and trypanosoma cells, some of the current registered drugs against HAT have also been tested in cancer chemotherapy. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the simple ester, ethyl pyruvate, comprises such properties.The current study covers the efficacy and corresponding target evaluation of ethyl pyruvate on T. brucei cell lines using a combination of biochemical techniques including cell proliferation assays, enzyme kinetics, phasecontrast microscopic video imaging and ex vivo toxicity tests. We have shown that ethyl pyruvate effectively kills trypanosomes most probably by net ATP depletion through inhibition of pyruvate kinase (Ki = 3.0±0.29 mM. The potential of ethyl pyruvate as a trypanocidal compound is also strengthened by its fast acting property, killing cells within three hours post exposure. This has been demonstrated using video imaging of live cells as well as concentration and time dependency experiments. Most importantly, ethyl pyruvate produces minimal side effects in human red cells and is known to easily cross the blood-brain-barrier. This makes it a promising candidate for effective treatment of the two clinical stages of sleeping sickness. Trypanosome drug-resistance tests indicate irreversible cell death and a low incidence of resistance development under experimental conditions.Our results present ethyl pyruvate as a safe and fast acting trypanocidal compound and show that it inhibits the enzyme pyruvate kinase. Competitive inhibition of this enzyme was found to cause ATP depletion and cell death. Due to its ability to easily cross

  10. Congenital Chagas disease as an ecological model of interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi parasites, pregnant women, placenta and fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the main ecological interactions between the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and its hosts, the mother and the fetus, leading to the transmission and development of congenital Chagas disease. One or several infecting strains of T. cruzi (with specific features) interact with: (i) the immune system of a pregnant woman whom responses depend on genetic and environmental factors, (ii) the placenta harboring its own defenses, and, finally, (iii) the fetal immune system displaying responses also susceptible to be modulated by maternal and environmental factors, as well as his own genetic background which is different from her mother. The severity of congenital Chagas disease depends on the magnitude of such final responses. The paper is mainly based on human data, but integrates also complementary observations obtained in experimental infections. It also focuses on important gaps in our knowledge of this congenital infection, such as the role of parasite diversity vs host genetic factors, as well as that of the maternal and placental microbiomes and the microbiome acquisition by infant in the control of infection. Investigations on these topics are needed in order to improve the programs aiming to diagnose, manage and control congenital Chagas disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Trisomy and chromosome size changes in hybrid trypanosomes from a genetic cross between Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and T. b. brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, W; Garside, L; Bailey, M

    1992-04-01

    Further analysis of hybrid clones from an experimental cross of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense 058 and T. b. brucei 196 shows 2 of the hybrid clones to have DNA contents about 1.5 times parental values. This represents over 40,000 kb of extra DNA. Comparison of the molecular karyotypes of parental and progeny trypanosomes shows that the bulk of the extra DNA constitutes chromosomes greater than 1 Mb in size, although a small proportion can be accounted for by an increased number of mini-chromosomes. The 2 hybrid clones have 3 alleles at several loci for housekeeping genes as shown by RFLP and isoenzyme analysis. Trisomy of the chromosome carrying phosphoglycerate kinase and tubulin genes and that carrying the phospholipase C gene was demonstrated by analysis of molecular karyotypes. These chromosomes appear prone to substantial size alterations associated with genetic exchange. Our results for one of the hybrid clones are completely consistent with it being triploid and the product of fusion of haploid and diploid nuclei.

  12. Enalapril in Combination with Benznidazole Reduces Cardiac Inflammation and Creatine Kinases in Mice Chronically Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penitente, Arlete Rita; Leite, Ana Luísa Junqueira; de Paula Costa, Guilherme; Shrestha, Deena; Horta, Aline Luciano; Natali, Antônio J.; Neves, Clóvis A.; Talvani, Andre

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi triggers an inflammatory process in mammalian heart causing events such as fibrosis, changes in the architecture and functionality in this organ. Enalapril, an angiotensin II-converting enzyme inhibitor, is a drug prescribed to ameliorate this heart dysfunction, and appears to exert a potential role in immune system regulation. Our aim was to evaluate the chronic cardiac inflammatory parameters after therapeutic treatment with enalapril and benznidazole in C57BL/6 mice infected with the VL-10 strain of T. cruzi. After infection, animals were treated with oral doses of enalapril (25 mg/kg), benznidazole (100 mg/kg), or both during 30 days. Morphometric parameters and levels of chemokines (CCL2, CCL5), IL-10, creatine kinases (CKs), and C-reactive protein were evaluated in the heart and serum at the 120th day of infection. Enalapril alone or in combination with benznidazole did not change the number of circulating parasites, but reduced cardiac leukocyte recruitment and total collagen in the cardiac tissue. Interestingly, the combination therapy (enalapril/benznidazole) also reduced the levels of chemokines, CK and CK-MB, and C-reactive proteins in chronic phase. In conclusion, during the chronic experimental T. cruzi infection, the combination therapy using enalapril plus benznidazole potentiated their immunomodulatory effects, resulting in a low production of biomarkers of cardiac lesions. PMID:26350447

  13. Structural model of a putrescine-cadaverine permease from Trypanosoma cruzi predicts residues vital for transport and ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysa, Radika; Venselaar, Hanka; Poston, Jacqueline; Ullman, Buddy; Hasne, Marie-Pierre

    2013-06-15

    The TcPOT1.1 gene from Trypanosoma cruzi encodes a high affinity putrescine-cadaverine transporter belonging to the APC (amino acid/polyamine/organocation) transporter superfamily. No experimental three-dimensional structure exists for any eukaryotic member of the APC family, and thus the structural determinants critical for function of these permeases are unknown. To elucidate the key residues involved in putrescine translocation and recognition by this APC family member, a homology model of TcPOT1.1 was constructed on the basis of the atomic co-ordinates of the Escherichia coli AdiC arginine/agmatine antiporter crystal structure. The TcPOT1.1 homology model consisted of 12 transmembrane helices with the first ten helices organized in two V-shaped antiparallel domains with discontinuities in the helical structures of transmembrane spans 1 and 6. The model suggests that Trp241 and a Glu247-Arg403 salt bridge participate in a gating system and that Asn245, Tyr148 and Tyr400 contribute to the putrescine-binding pocket. To test the validity of the model, 26 site-directed mutants were created and tested for their ability to transport putrescine and to localize to the parasite cell surface. These results support the robustness of the TcPOT1.1 homology model and reveal the importance of specific aromatic residues in the TcPOT1.1 putrescine-binding pocket.

  14. Effects of dietary selenium supplementation on parasitemia, anemia and serum proteins of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, J I; Okeke, M C; Ngene, A A; Omeje, J N; Abonyi, F O

    2013-10-01

    Trypanosomosis has been associated with immunosuppression, anemia and oxidative damage while selenium possesses both immunostimulatory and antioxidative effects. This study was designed to assess the effect of dietary selenium supplementation on parasitemia, anemia, survival pattern and serum protein profiles of trypanosome-infected rats. Twenty five rats, divided into five groups (A-E) of 5 each, were treated as follows: 4, 8 and 16 ppm (ppm) of selenium in their feed, respectively throughout the experimental period and were infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei on day 14 post supplementation, infected not supplemented and the negative control. Supplementation at 4 and 8 ppm increased the packed cell volume (PCV) and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration on day 7 of supplementation (PS) when compared with the unsupplemented groups. Following infection on day 14 PS, the PCV, Hb of 16 ppm and infected not supplemented groups were significantly (P Supplementation did not lead to significant (P > 0.05) changes on the total protein, albumin and globulin by day 14 PS. Infection, however, caused significant (P > 0.05) decrease in the total protein and albumin from day 28. The supplementation did not significantly (P > 0.05) increase the pre-patent period but caused a significant reduction in the parasitemia levels and increased survival intervals. Dietary selenium supplementation, from the results, may show promise in the management of African trypanosomosis as the supplementation was able to: reduce anemia and parasitemia and increase survival intervals of trypanosome infected rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pre-treatment with curcumin modulates acetylcholinesterase activity and proinflammatory cytokines in rats infected with Trypanosoma evansi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkmer, Patrícia; Silva, Cássia B da; Paim, Francine C; Duarte, Marta M M F; Castro, Verônica; Palma, Heloisa E; França, Raqueli T; Felin, Diandra V; Siqueira, Lucas C; Lopes, Sonia T A; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Monteiro, Silvia G; Mazzanti, Cinthia M

    2013-04-01

    The potent activity against Trypanosomes and health beneficial effects of curcumin (Cur) has been demonstrated in various experimental models. In this study, we evaluated the in vivo effect of Cur as trypanocide and as potential anti-inflammatory agent, through the evaluation of immunomodulatory mechanisms in rats infected with Trypanosoma evansi. Daily oral Cur was administered at doses of 0, 20 or 60mg/kg as preventive treatment (30 and 15days pre infection) and as treatment (post infection). The treatment of the groups continued until the day of euthanasia. Fifteen days after inoculation, parasitemia, plasma proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6), anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) and blood acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) were analyzed. Pretreatment with Cur reduced parasitemia and lethality. Cur inhibited AChE activity and improved immunological response by cytokines proinflammatory, fundamental during T. evansi infection. We found that Cur is not so important as an antitrypanosomal activity but as immunomodulator agent. These findings reveal that the preventive use of Cur stimulates anti-inflammatory mechanisms, reducing an excessive inflammatory response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular and biological characterization of a highly pathogenic Trypanosoma cruzi strain isolated from a patient with congenital infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Bisio, Margarita; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; Altcheh, Jaime; Solana, María Elisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2018-03-01

    Although many Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) strains isolated from a wide range of hosts have been characterized, there is a lack of information about biological features from vertically transmitted strains. We describe the molecular and biological characteristics of the T. cruzi VD strain isolated from a congenital Chagas disease patient. The VD strain was typified as DTU TcVI; in vitro sensitivity to nifurtimox (NFX) and beznidazole (BZ) were 2.88 μM and 6.19 μM respectively, while inhibitory concentrations for intracellular amastigotes were 0.24 μM for BZ, and 0.66 μM for NFX. Biological behavior of VD strain was studied in a mouse model of acute infection, resulting in high levels of parasitemia and mortality with a rapid clearence of bloodstream trypomastigotes when treated with BZ or NFX, preventing mortality and reducing parasitic load and intensity of inflammatory infiltrate in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Treatment-induced parasitological cure, evaluated after immunossupression were 41% and 35% for BZ and NFX treatment respectively, suggesting a partial response to these drugs in elimination of parasite burden. This exhaustive characterization of this T. cruzi strain provides the basis for inclusion of this strain in a panel of reference strains for drug screening and adds a new valuable tool for the study of experimental T. cruzi infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Urine and Saliva Samples in Nonhuman Primate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maina Ngotho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is a vector-borne parasitic zoonotic disease. The disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is the most prevalent in Africa. Early diagnosis is hampered by lack of sensitive diagnostic techniques. This study explored the potential of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR in the detection of T. b. gambiense infection in a vervet monkey HAT model. Six vervet monkeys were experimentally infected with T. b. gambiense IL3253 and monitored for 180 days after infection. Parasitaemia was scored daily. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, saliva, and urine samples were collected weekly. PCR and LAMP were performed on serum, CSF, saliva, and urine samples. The detection by LAMP was significantly higher than that of parasitological methods and PCR in all the samples. The performance of LAMP varied between the samples and was better in serum followed by saliva and then urine samples. In the saliva samples, LAMP had 100% detection between 21 and 77 dpi, whereas in urine the detection it was slightly lower, but there was over 80% detection between 28 and 91 dpi. However, LAMP could not detect trypanosomes in either saliva or urine after 140 and 126 dpi, respectively. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of LAMP in diagnosis of HAT using saliva and urine samples.

  18. Serial heart rate changes in rats inoculated by conjunctival instillation of Trypanosoma cruzi obtained from bug faeces Alterações do ritmo cardíaco de ratos infectados pela via conjuntival por Trypanosoma cruzi obtidos de fezes de triatomíneos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalinda Ollarves

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac effects of experimentally induced myocarditis, when the parasite is obtained from mouse blood, are well known. However, the consequences of the infection when the parasites are obtained from bug faeces are less well defined. In the present investigation, we have used the "Y" strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, which was maintained in Rhodnius prolixus by repeated passages in mice. The faeces of 30 infected bugs were collected, the number of parasites counted and 4,000 parasites inoculated by the conjunctival route in 60 rats. Twenty-nine other rats received faeces from noninfected bugs (sham-inoculated controls and 40 were used as normal controls. The heart rate of the three groups of animals was recorded under general anesthesia with ether. The heart rate, at day 0 pre-inoculation, was similar in the three groups of animals (Controls: 379 ± 27 beats/min Mean ± SD; Sham-inoculated: 366 ± 31; Infected: 351 ± 29 (p> 0.05. In the infected animals, the mean heart rate began to increase significantly by day 12 following infection (375 ± 31, reaching the highest values between days 18 (390 ± 33 and 21 (403 ± 33 and returned to baseline by day 30 (359 ± 28 (pOs efeitos da miocardite chagásica experimental, produzida por Trypanosoma cruzi proveniente do sangue de camundongos são bem conhecidos. O mesmo não ocorre quando a inoculação é feita com Trypanosoma cruzi proveniente de fezes do vetor. No presente estudo, usamos a variedade "Y" do Trypanosoma cruzi mantida em Rodhnius prolixus por repetidas passagens em camundongos. As fezes de 30 insetos parasitados foram coletadas e contados os parasitas. O estudo foi desenvolvido em três grupos de ratos. O primeiro, controle, formado por 40 animais, o segundo, por 29 animais que receberam fezes de insetos não infectados (controle falso inoculado e o terceiro grupo constituído por 60 ratos inoculados com 4.000 parasitas, por via conjuntival. Em todos os animais, após anestesia geral

  19. Resposta eritropoética de ratos em diferentes graus de parasitemia por Trypanosoma evansi Erithropoietic response in Trypanosoma evansi infected rats with different parasitaemia intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Wolkmer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O Trypanosoma evansi é um protozoário hemoflagelado que causa, em várias espécies, uma doença caracterizada por altos níveis de parasitemia, com rápido desenvolvimento de anemia. Este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar a relação entre o grau de parasitemia e a alteração na eritropoese de ratos (Rattus norvegicus da linhagem Wistar infectados experimentalmente com T. evansi. Foram utilizados 42 ratos, dos quais 36 foram inoculados pela via intraperitoneal com 0,2ml de sangue, contendo 2,5 x 104 parasitas. Seis ratos não-inoculados foram utilizados como controles. Após inoculação, a parasitemia foi avaliada a cada 12h. Os grupos para análise foram estipulados de acordo com a média de tripanossomas em 10 campos homogêneos focados aleatoriamente, sendo: A, controle; B, animais que apresentaram um grau de parasitemia entre 1-10 tripanossomas/campo; C, ratos com 11-20 tripanossomas/campo; D, ratos com 21-30 tripanossomas/campo; E, ratos com 31-40 tripanossomas/campo; F, 41-50 tripanossomas/campo; e G, ratos com mais de 51 tripanossomas/campo. Quando os animais apresentaram o número de protozoários equivalente ao grupo, foram coletadas amostras de sangue para realização de hemograma e dosagem de ferro, e foi realizada citologia de medula óssea para avaliação da relação mielóide:eritróide. A análise estatística mostrou redução significativa das hemácias e do hematócrito a partir de 31 tripanossomas/campo (grupos E, F e G; PTrypanosoma evansi is a flagellate protozoan that causes a disease characterized by high parasitemia and acute anemia in various species. This study was aimed at evaluating and establishing a relationship between different parasitemia levels and eritropoyesis in Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus experimentally infected by T. evansi. Forty two animals were used. In 36 animals parasites were inoculated by intraperitoneal blood injection of 0.2ml containing 2.5x104 parasites. Six non-inoculated animals

  20. Molecular characterization and interactome analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi tryparedoxin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Diego G; Piñeyro, María Dolores; Iglesias, Alberto A; Guerrero, Sergio A; Robello, Carlos

    2015-04-29

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, possesses two tryparedoxins (TcTXNI and TcTXNII), belonging to the thioredoxin superfamily. TXNs are oxidoreductases which mediate electron transfer between trypanothione and peroxiredoxins. This constitutes a difference with the host cells, in which these activities are mediated by thioredoxins. These differences make TXNs an attractive target for drug development. In a previous work we characterized TcTXNI, including the redox interactome. In this work we extend the study to TcTXNII. We demonstrate that TcTXNII is a transmembrane protein anchored to the surface of the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, with a cytoplasmatic orientation of the redox domain. It would be expressed during the metacyclogenesis process. In order to continue with the characterization of the redox interactome of T. cruzi, we designed an active site mutant TcTXNII lacking the resolving cysteine, and through the expression of this mutant protein and incubation with T. cruzi proteins, heterodisulfide complexes were isolated by affinity chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. This allowed us to identify sixteen TcTXNII interacting proteins, which are involved in a wide range of cellular processes, indicating the relevance of TcTXNII, and contributing to our understanding of the redox interactome of T. cruzi. T. cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, constitutes a major sanitary problem in Latin America. The number of estimated infected persons is ca. 8 million, 28 million people are at risk of infection and ~20,000 deaths occur per year in endemic regions. No vaccines are available at present, and most drugs currently in use were developed decades ago and show variable efficacy with undesirable side effects. The parasite is able to live and prolipherate inside macrophage phagosomes, where it is exposed to cytotoxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, derived from macrophage activation. Therefore, T. cruzi

  1. Rational Design of a New Trypanosoma rangeli Trans-Sialidase for Efficient Sialylation of Glycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jers, Carsten; Michalak, Malwina; Larsen, Dorte Møller

    2014-01-01

    sialidase, and we hypothesised that this motif is important for trans-sialidase activity. The 197–203 motif is strongly positively charged with a marked change in hydrogen bond donor capacity as compared to the sialidase. To investigate the role of this motif, we expressed and characterised a T. rangeli...... is important in association with human milk oligosaccharides, and Tr13 was shown to sialylate a number of established and potential prebiotics. Initial evaluation of prebiotic potential using pure cultures demonstrated, albeit not selectively, growth of Bifidobacteria. Since the 197–203 motif stands out......This paper reports rational engineering of Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase to develop an effective enzyme for a potentially important type of reactivity: production of sialylated prebiotic glycans. The Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase and the homologous T. rangeli sialidase has previously been used...

  2. Quantitative enzymatic production of sialylated galactooligosaccharides with an engineered sialidase from Trypanosoma rangeli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Birgitte; Holck, Jesper; Perna, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    be produced from κ(kappa)-casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP), a sialylated side stream component from cheese-making, by sialidase-catalyzed transsialylation. Using a rationally designed mutant of the sialidase from Trypanosoma rangeli, Tr13, with enhanced transsialylation activity, six different GOS preparations...... with a varying degree of polymerization (DP) were effectively sialylated with molar yields of 20-30% on the CGMP sialyl in batch reactions. The rate of sialylation of the individual DPs was largely dependent on the DP distribution in each GOS preparation, and Tr13 catalysis did not discriminate against large GOS...... molecules, providing the novelty point that GOS molecules are sialylated independently of their size by Tr13. Using CGMP, GOS, and Tr13, the production of gram-scale quantities of sialyl-GOS was achieved in 20L volume reactions. Compared to the benchmark transsialidase from pathogenic Trypanosoma cruzi...

  3. Inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi growth in vitro by Solanum alkaloids: a comparison with ketoconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chataing, B; Concepción, J L; Lobatón, R; Usubillaga, A

    1998-02-01

    The glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine, alpha-solamargine, alpha-solanine, solasonine, sycophantine, and tomatine, as well as the aglycones demissidine, solanidine, solanocapsine, solasodine, tomatidine, and veratrine were tested as growth inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi, strain EP, in LIT medium. Their activity was compared with the antifungal ketoconazole. Glycoalkaloids containing alpha-chacotriose showed trypanolytic activity against the epimastigote form and trypanocidal activity against the bloodstream and metacyclic trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi in culture medium in micromolar concentrations. Ketoconazole showed a lower activity, at the same concentrations of alpha-chaconine and alpha-solamargine. The observations indicate that the initial target of the compound is at the membrane level with a concomitant change in the parasite morphology. Moreover, internal compartments of the parasites were observed to be affected by the drugs, revealing the dissolution of some organelles as mitocondrias and glycosomes.

  4. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru [Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Tokuoka, Keiji [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Uchiyama, Nahoko [Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Okamoto, Naoki; Okano, Yousuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Inaka, Koji [Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Urade, Yoshihiro [Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Inoue, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: inouet@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    Old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Old yellow enzyme (OYE) is an NADPH oxidoreductase that contains a flavin mononucleotide as a prosthetic group. The OYE from Trypanosoma cruzi, which produces prostaglandin F{sub 2α}, a potent mediator of various physiological and pathological processes, from prostaglandin H2. The protein was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.3, b = 78.8, c = 78.8 Å, β = 93.4° and two molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystals were suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies and diffracted to 1.70 Å resolution. A Patterson search method is in progress using the structure of OYE from Pseudomonas putida as a starting model.

  5. A case of Trypanosoma congolense savannah type infection and its management in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kimeli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of Trypanosoma congolense savannah type infection in a 4-year old German shepherd dog weighing 26-kg was presented to the Small Animal Clinic, University of Nairobi, Kenya, with the history of anorexia and difficulty in breathing. The clinical manifestations were fever, pale mucous membrane, dyspnea and wasting. Blood examination revealed the existence of trypanosome parasites, and showed mild anemia. Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS based polymerase chain reaction confirmed the presence of Trypanosoma congolense savannah type. Along with supporting therapy, the case was successfully managed using diminazene aceturate injection (dosed at 3.5 mg/kg body weight through intramuscular route. Complete recovery of the case was observed on day 6 of post-treatment.

  6. Comprehensive glycoprofiling of the epimastigote and trypomastigote stages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, Maria Julia Manso; Kawahara, Rebeca; Viner, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle involving insect and mammalian hosts and distinct developmental stages. During T. cruzi developmental stages, glycoproteins play important role in the host-parasite interaction, such as cellular recognition, host......-specific characterization of the N- and O-linked glycan heterogeneity in the two life stages of T. cruzi was achieved by intact glycopeptide analysis, revealing 144/466 unique N-linked and 10/97 unique O-linked intact glycopeptides in epimastigotes/trypomastigotes, respectively. Conclusively, this study documents...... the significant T. cruzi stage-specific expression of glycoproteins that can help to better understand the T. cruzi phenotype and response caused by the interaction with different hosts during its complex life cycle. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Chagas disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is a neglected...

  7. A monoclonal antibody marker for the exclusion-zone filaments of Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Bonhivers, Mélanie; Landrein, Nicolas; Decossas, Marion; Robinson, Derrick R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei is a haemoflagellate pathogen of man, wild animals and domesticated livestock in central and southern Africa. In all life cycle stages this parasite has a single mitochondrion that contains a uniquely organised genome that is condensed into a flat disk-like structure called the kinetoplast. The kinetoplast is essential for insect form procyclic cells and therefore is a potential drug target. The kinetoplast is unique in nature because it consists of nove...

  8. Side effects of immunization with liver attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi in mice and rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Basombrío, M A; Besuschio, S; Cossio, P M

    1982-01-01

    Immunity against lethal, bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was achieved in mice by preinoculation of approximately equal to 10(5) culture epimastigotes of an attenuated T. cruzi strain (TCC). The risks of TCC inoculation in terms of pathogenicity or eventual increase in virulence of TCC progeny were evaluated. No pathogenic parasites could be selected from TCC progeny by either mouse, triatome, or culture passages. Immunizing doses of live TCC did not induce in adult mice alterations res...

  9. First Case of Natural Infection in Pigs: Review of Trypanosoma cruzi Reservoirs in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz María Salazar-Schettino

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological research project was performed in the State of Morelos including collection of samples for blood smears and culture, serological tests, and xenodiagnoses from a total of 76 domestic and peridomestic mammals. Two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi were isolated by haemocultures; one from a pig (Sus scrofa, the first case of natural infection reported in Mexico, and the other from a dog (Canis familiaris. This study summarizes current information in Mexico concerning confirmed reservoirs of T. cruzi

  10. Aparasitemic serological suspects in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis : a potential human reservoir of parasites ?

    OpenAIRE

    Koffi, Mathurin; Solano, Philippe; Denizot, M.; Courtin, D.; Garcia, André; Lejon, V.; Buscher, P.; Cuny, Gérard; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The serological and parasitological tests used for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) diagnosis have low specificity and sensitivity, respectively, and in the field, control program teams are faced with subjects with positive serology but negative parasitology who remain untreated. The aim of this work was to explore, using PCR tool, the significance of these aparasitemic serological suspects. Since discordant PCR results have been observed earlier with different...

  11. Expression and cellular trafficking of GP82 and GP90 glycoproteins during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa Leal; Yoshida, Nobuko; Franco da Silveira, Jos?

    2013-01-01

    Background: the transformation of noninfective epimastigotes into infective metacyclic trypomastigotes (metacyclogenesis) is a fundamental step in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, comprising several morphological and biochemical changes. GP82 and GP90 are glycoproteins expressed at the surface of metacyclic trypomastigote, with opposite roles in mammalian cell invasion. GP82 is an adhesin that promotes cell invasion, while GP90 acts as a negative regulator of parasite internalization. Our...

  12. The Small Chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei Involved in Antigenic Variation Are Constructed Around Repetitive Palindromes

    OpenAIRE

    Wickstead, Bill; Ersfeld, Klaus; Gull, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Most eukaryotic genomes contain large regions of satellite DNA. These arrays are often associated with essential chromosomal functions, but remain largely absent from genome projects because of difficulties in cloning and sequence assembly. The numerous small chromosomes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei fall into this category, yet are critical to understanding the genome because of their role in antigenic variation. Their relatively small size, however, makes them particularly amenable to ...

  13. Disparate phenotypic effects from the knockdown of various Trypanosoma brucei cytochrome c oxidase subunits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gnipová, Anna; Panicucci, Brian; Paris, Zdeněk; Verner, Zdeněk; Horváth, A.; Lukeš, Julius; Zíková, Alena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 184, č. 2 (2012), s. 90-98 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500960901; GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * RNA interference * Mitochondrion * Respiratory complexes * Cytochrome c oxidase Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.734, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166685112001065#

  14. DEAD-box RNA helicase is dispensable for mitochondrial translation in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Richterová, Lenka; Vávrová, Zuzana; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 1 (2011), 300-303 ISSN 0014-4894 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * Mitochondrial translation * RNA helicase * Cytochrome c oxidase * Mitochondrion Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.122, year: 2011

  15. Design of Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase mutants with improved trans-sialidase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Jers, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    A sialidase (EC 3.2.1.18) from the non-pathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli, TrSA, has been shown to exert trans-sialidase activity after mutation of five specific amino acids in the active site (M96V, A98P, S120Y, G249Y, Q284P) to form the so-called TrSA5mut enzyme. By computational and hypothesis...

  16. In Vitro and in Vivo Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity of a Novel Nitro-derivative

    OpenAIRE

    Muelas-Serrano, Susana; Le-Senne, Ana; Fernández-Portillo, Carlos; Nogal, Juan José; Ochoa, Carmen; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    Nitroarylidenemalononitriles and their cyanoacetamide derivatives with remarkable anti-epimastigote properties, were synthesized attempting to obtain new 3,5-diamino-4-(5'-nitroarylidene)-4H-thiadiazine 1,1-dioxide derivatives, which in previous reports had shown anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity. Tests to evaluate the cytotoxicity of compounds were performed on J774 macrophages. 5-nitro-2-thienyl-malononitrile (5NO2TM), was the only product which maintained a high anti-epimastigote activity at...

  17. In vitro activity of Etanidazole against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Petray, Patricia B; Morilla, María J; Corral, Ricardo S; Romero, Eder L

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro action of an hydrosoluble 2-nitroimidazole, Etanidazole (EZL), against Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. EZL displayed lethal activity against isolated trypomastigotes as well as amastigotes of T. cruzi (RA strain) growing in Vero cells or J774 macrophages, without affecting host cell viability. Although not completely equivalent to Benznidazole (BZL), the reference drug for Chagas chemotherapy, EZL takes advantage in exertingits anti-T. cr...

  18. Genetic control of resistance to Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Matyáš; Havelková, Helena; Quan, L.; Svobodová, M.; Jarošíková, T.; Vojtíšková, Jarmila; Stassen, A. P. M.; Demant, P.; Lipoldová, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2011), e1173 ISSN 1935-2735 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520606; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Grant - others:NIH-NCI(US) 1R01CA127162-01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei brucei * mouse recombinant congenic strains * Tbbr Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  19. Landscape epidemiology in urban environments: The example of rodent-borne Trypanosoma in Niamey, Niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Kadaouré, Ibrahima; Godefroid, Martin; Dobigny, Gauthier

    2017-10-05

    Trypanosomes are protozoan parasites found worldwide, infecting humans and animals. In the past decade, the number of reports on atypical human cases due to Trypanosoma lewisi or T. lewisi-like has increased urging to investigate the multiple factors driving the disease dynamics, particularly in cities where rodents and humans co-exist at high densities. In the present survey, we used a species distribution model, Maxent, to assess the spatial pattern of Trypanosoma-positive rodents in the city of Niamey. The explanatory variables were landscape metrics describing urban landscape composition and physiognomy computed from 8 land-cover classes. We computed the metrics around each data location using a set of circular buffers of increasing radii (20m, 40m, 60m, 80m and 100m). For each spatial resolution, we determined the optimal combination of feature class and regularization multipliers by fitting Maxent with the full dataset. Since our dataset was small (114 occurrences) we expected an important uncertainty associated to data partitioning into calibration and evaluation datasets. We thus performed 350 independent model runs with a training dataset representing a random subset of 80% of the occurrences and the optimal Maxent parameters. Each model yielded a map of habitat suitability over Niamey, which was transformed into a binary map implementing a threshold maximizing the sensitivity and the specificity. The resulting binary maps were combined to display the proportion of models that indicated a good environmental suitability for Trypanosoma-positive rodents. Maxent performed better with landscape metrics derived from buffers of 80m. Habitat suitability for Trypanosoma-positive rodents exhibited large patches linked to urban features such as patch richness and the proportion of landscape covered by concrete or tarred areas. Such inferences could be helpful in assessing areas at risk, setting of monitoring programs, public and medical staff awareness or even

  20. The diversity and expansion of the trans-sialidase gene family is a common feature in Trypanosoma cruzi clade members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Cortez, Danielle R; Lima, Fábio M; Cortez, Caroline; Ramírez, José Luis; Martins, Andre G; Serrano, Myrna G; Teixeira, Marta M G; da Silveira, José Franco

    2016-01-01

    Trans-sialidase (TS) is a polymorphic protein superfamily described in members of the protozoan genus Trypanosoma. Of the eight TS groups recently described, TS group I proteins (some of which have catalytic activity) are present in the distantly related Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi phylogenetic clades, whereas other TS groups have only been described in some species belonging to the T. cruzi clade. In the present study we analyzed the repertoire, distribution and phylogenetic relationships of TS genes among species of the T. cruzi clade based on sequence similarity, multiple sequence alignment and tree-reconstruction approaches using TS sequences obtained with the aid of PCR-based strategies or retrieved from genome databases. We included the following representative isolates of the T. cruzi clade from South America: T. cruzi, T. cruzi Tcbat, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma conorhini. The cloned sequences encoded conserved TS protein motifs Asp-box and VTVxNVxLYNR but lacked the FRIP motif (conserved in TS group I). The T. conorhini sequences were the most divergent. The hybridization patterns of TS probes with chromosomal bands confirmed the abundance of these sequences in species in the T. cruzi clade. Divergence and relationship analysis placed most of the TS sequences in the groups defined in T. cruzi. Further examination of members of TS group II, which includes T. cruzi surface glycoproteins implicated in host cell attachment and invasion, showed that sequences of T. cruzi Tcbat grouped with those of T. cruzi genotype TcI. Our analysis indicates that different members of the T. cruzi clade, with different vertebrate hosts, vectors and pathogenicity, share the extensive expansion and sequence diversification of the TS gene family. Altogether, our results are congruent with the evolutionary history of the T. cruzi clade and represent a contribution to the understanding of the molecular

  1. Secondary metabolites from Vietnamese marine invertebrates with activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; No, Joo Hwan; Luyen, Bui Thi Thuy; Yang, Gyongseon; Byun, Soo Young; Goo, Junghyun; Kim, Kyung Tae; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Van Minh, Chau; Schmidt, Thomas J; Kang, Jong Seong; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-06-11

    Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM). Laevigatol B (1) and 5α-cholest-8(14)-ene-3β,7α-diol (5) exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  2. Humoral Immune Response Kinetics in Philander opossum and Didelphis marsupialis Infected and Immunized by Trypanosoma cruzi Employing an Immunofluorescence Antibody Test

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    Ana Paula Legey

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Philander opossum and Didelphis marsupialis considered the most ancient mammals and an evolutionary success, maintain parasitism by Trypanosoma cruzi without developing any apparent disease or important tissue lesion. In order to elucidate this well-balanced interaction, we decided to compare the humoral immune response kinetics of the two didelphids naturally and experimentally infected with T. cruzi and immunized by different schedules of parasite antigens, employing an indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT. Both didelphids responded with high serological titers to different immunization routes, while the earliest response occurred with the intradermic route. Serological titers of naturally infected P. opossum showed a significant individual variation, while those of D. marsupialis remained stable during the entire follow-up period. The serological titers of the experimentally infected animals varied according to the inoculated strain. Our data suggest that (1 IFAT was sensitive for follow-up of P. opossum in natural and experimental T. cruzi infections; (2 both P. opossum and D. marsupialis are able to mount an efficient humoral immune response as compared to placental mammals; (3 experimentally infected P. opossum and D. marsupialis present distinct patterns of infection, depending on the subpopulation of T. cruzi, (4 the differences observed in the humoral immune responses between P. opossum and D. marsupialis, probably, reflect distinct strategies selected by these animals during their coevolution with T. cruzi.

  3. An Anti-proteome Nanobody Library Approach Yields a Specific Immunoassay for Trypanosoma congolense Diagnosis Targeting Glycosomal Aldolase.

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    Steven Odongo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases pose a severe worldwide threat to human and livestock health. While early diagnosis could enable prompt preventive interventions, the majority of diseases are found in rural settings where basic laboratory facilities are scarce. Under such field conditions, point-of-care immunoassays provide an appropriate solution for rapid and reliable diagnosis. The limiting steps in the development of the assay are the identification of a suitable target antigen and the selection of appropriate high affinity capture and detection antibodies. To meet these challenges, we describe the development of a Nanobody (Nb-based antigen detection assay generated from a Nb library directed against the soluble proteome of an infectious agent. In this study, Trypanosoma congolense was chosen as a model system.An alpaca was vaccinated with whole-parasite soluble proteome to generate a Nb library from which the most potent T. congolense specific Nb sandwich immunoassay (Nb474H-Nb474B was selected. First, the Nb474-homologous sandwich ELISA (Nb474-ELISA was shown to detect experimental infections with high Positive Predictive Value (98%, Sensitivity (87% and Specificity (94%. Second, it was demonstrated under experimental conditions that the assay serves as test-of-cure after Berenil treatment. Finally, this assay allowed target antigen identification. The latter was independently purified through immuno-capturing from (i T. congolense soluble proteome, (ii T. congolense secretome preparation and (iii sera of T. congolense infected mice. Subsequent mass spectrometry analysis identified the target as T. congolense glycosomal aldolase.The results show that glycosomal aldolase is a candidate biomarker for active T. congolense infections. In addition, and by proof-of-principle, the data demonstrate that the Nb strategy devised here offers a unique approach to both diagnostic development and target discovery that could be widely applied to other infectious

  4. Study of plasma protein binding activity of isometamidium and its impact on anthelmintic activity using trypanosoma induced calf model

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    Suprita Sinha

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of present study was to determine Plasma Protein Binding (PPB activity and its effect on clinical efficacy of isometamidium after intramuscular administration in calves. The binding of drugs to plasma proteins is an important factor in controlling the availability and distribution of drugs. In general, PPB reduces the free fraction of drug available for therapeutic activity, since only the non-protein bound drug is pharmacologically active. Materials and Methods: Six calves were used for PPB study and eighteen for clinical efficacy. Isometamidium was administered @ 0.5mg/kg intramuscularly as a single dose for PPB study. Equilibrium dialysis technique was used to determine the PPB activity. For clinical efficacy, infection with Trypanosoma was induced in calves of two groups, untreated control and experimental group. Infection was confirmed after 28 days by mice inoculation test. Isometamidium @ 0.5mg/kg was administered to experimental group. Haematoobiochemical and mice inoculation tests were performed after 7 days of drug administration (Day 35. Result: The percentage of PPB activity of isometamidium was 86.71 ± 0.59 to 93.03 ± 0.63% against the concentration 9.76± 0.84 to 4.39 ± 0.20 g ml-1. Higher percentage of PPB activity (>86% suggests greater duration of safety by this drug. It was found that anthelmintic activity of isometamidium was substantially affected by higher PPB. Conclusion: It was concluded that isometamidium has greater plasma protein binding capacity which did not hamper clinical efficacy of drug. [Vet World 2013; 6(7.000: 444-448

  5. Crassiflorone derivatives that inhibit Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH) and Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase (TcTR) and display trypanocidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliassi, Elisa; Fiorani, Giulia; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Bergamini, Christian; Fato, Romana; Bianchini, Giulia; Carlos Menéndez, J; Molina, Maria Teresa; López-Montero, Eulogio; Falchi, Federico; Cavalli, Andrea; Gul, Sheraz; Kuzikov, Maria; Ellinger, Bernhard; Witt, Gesa; Moraes, Carolina B; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Borsari, Chiara; Costi, Maria Paola; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2017-12-01

    Crassiflorone is a natural product with anti-mycobacterial and anti-gonorrhoeal properties, isolated from the stem bark of the African ebony tree Diospyros crassiflora. We noticed that its pentacyclic core possesses structural resemblance to the quinone-coumarin hybrid 3, which we reported to exhibit a dual-targeted inhibitory profile towards Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH) and Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase (TcTR). Following this basic idea, we synthesized a small library of crassiflorone derivatives 15-23 and investigated their potential as anti-trypanosomatid agents. 19 is the only compound of the series showing a balanced dual profile at 10 μM (% inhibition TbGAPDH  = 64% and % inhibition TcTR  = 65%). In phenotypic assay, the most active compounds were 18 and 21, which at 5 μM inhibited Tb bloodstream-form growth by 29% and 38%, respectively. Notably, all the newly synthesized compounds at 10 μM did not affect viability and the status of mitochondria in human A549 and 786-O cell lines, respectively. However, further optimization that addresses metabolic liabilities including solubility, as well as cytochromes P450 (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) inhibition, is required before this class of natural product-derived compounds can be further progressed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural characterization reveals a novel bilobed architecture for the ectodomains of insect stage expressed Trypanosoma brucei PSSA-2 and Trypanosoma congolense ISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Raghavendran; Goomeshi Nobary, Sarah; Eyford, Brett A; Pearson, Terry W; Boulanger, Martin J

    2016-12-01

    African trypanosomiasis, caused by parasites of the genus Trypanosoma, is a complex of devastating vector-borne diseases of humans and livestock in sub-Saharan Africa. Central to the pathogenesis of African trypanosomes is their transmission by the arthropod vector, Glossina spp. (tsetse fly). Intriguingly, the efficiency of parasite transmission through the vector is reduced following depletion of Trypanosoma brucei Procyclic-Specific Surface Antigen-2 (TbPSSA-2). To investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of TbPSSA-2, we determined the crystal structures of its ectodomain and that of its homolog T. congolense Insect Stage Antigen (TcISA) to resolutions of 1.65 Å and 2.45 Å, respectively using single wavelength anomalous dispersion. Both proteins adopt a novel bilobed architecture with the individual lobes displaying rotational flexibility around the central tether that suggest a potential mechanism for coordinating a binding partner. In support of this hypothesis, electron density consistent with a bound peptide was observed in the inter-lob cleft of a TcISA monomer. These first reported structures of insect stage transmembrane proteins expressed by African trypanosomes provide potentially valuable insight into the interface between parasite and tsetse vector. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  7. Cão naturalmente infectado por Trypanosoma evansi em Santa Maria, RS, Brasil Dog naturally infected by Trypanosoma evansi in Santa Maria, RS, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Franciscato

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se, neste trabalho, as alterações hematológicas e o proteinograma de um cão naturalmente infectado por Trypanosoma evansi. Este animal apresentou anemia normocítica normocrômica, leucopenia com linfopenia seguida por neutropenia e linfocitose; trombocitopenia; hiperproteinemia com aumento das frações beta e gama globulinas e hipoalbuminemia. Por ser este o primeiro relato de infecção por T. evansi em cães no município de Santa Maria, RS, destaca-se a sua importância epidemiológica, alertando os médicos veterinários para a existência de reservatórios do parasita na região e para a possibilidade de novos achados laboratoriais.This paper describes the hematological alterations and proteinogram of a dog naturally infected by Trypanosoma evansi. This dog was presented with normochromic-normocytic anemia, leucopenia with lymphopenia followed for neutrophenia and lymphocitosis; and trombocitopenia. Hyperproteinemia with an increase of beta and gamma globulin fractions and hypoalbuminemia. By being the first case reported of T. evansi infection in dogs in Santa Maria, RS, Brazil, the epidemiological significance of such findings will alert the veterinarians to the existence of a possible parasite's reservoir in the region warning to the possibility of new laboratory findings.

  8. Study of optically trapped living Trypanosoma cruzi/Trypanosoma rangeli - Rhodnius prolixus interactions by real time confocal images using CdSe quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Faustino, W. M.; Jacob, G. J.; Fontes, A.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.

    2008-08-01

    One of the fundamental goals in biology is to understand the interplay between biomolecules of different cells. This happen, for example, in the first moments of the infection of a vector by a parasite that results in the adherence to the cell walls. To observe this kind of event we used an integrated Optical Tweezers and Confocal Microscopy tool. This tool allow us to use the Optical Tweezers to trigger the adhesion of the Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli parasite to the intestine wall cells and salivary gland of the Rhodnius prolixus vector and to, subsequently observe the sequence of events by confocal fluorescence microscopy under optical forces stresses. We kept the microorganism and vector cells alive using CdSe quantum dot staining. Besides the fact that Quantum Dots are bright vital fluorescent markers, the absence of photobleaching allow us to follow the events in time for an extended period. By zooming to the region of interested we have been able to acquire confocal images at the 2 to 3 frames per second rate.

  9. Experimental Chagas' disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta de Lana

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of experimental Chagas' disease in 64 out-bred young dogs. Twenty-nine animals were inoculated with the Be-62 and 35 with Be-78 Trypanosoma cruzi strains. Twenty-six were infected with blood trypomastigotes by different inoculation routes and 38 with metacyclic trypomastigotes from the vector via the conjunctival route. Twenty of the 26 dogs infected with blood trypomastigotes were autopsied during the acute phase. Eleven died spontaneously and nine were sacrificed. Six remained alive until they died suddenly (two or were autopsied (four. Twelve of the 38 dogs infected with metacyclic trypomastigotes evolved naturally to the chronic phase and remained alive for 24-48 months. The parasitemia, clinical aspects and serology (IgM and IgG as well as electrocardiogram, hemogram and heart anatomo-histopathologic patterns of acute and chronic cardiac forms of Chagas' disease as seen in human infections, were reproduced. The most important finding is the reproductibility of diffuse fibrosing chronic chagasic cardiopathy in all dogs infected with Be-78 T. cruzi strain autopsied between the 90th and 864th days of infection. Thus, the dog can be considered as a suitable experimental model to study Chagas' disease according to the requisites of the World Health Organization (1984. Futhermore the animal is easily obtained and easy to handle and maintain in experimental laboratory conditions.

  10. Synergism between 9-deazainosine and DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine in treatment of experimental African trypanosomiasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bacchi, C J; Berens, R L; Nathan, H C; Klein, R S; Elegbe, I A; Rao, K V; McCann, P P; Marr, J J

    1987-01-01

    Kinetoplastid hemoflagellates are sensitive to growth inhibition by various purine analogs. In this study the activities of 9-deazainosine (9-DINO), formycin B, and sinefungin were compared in experimental murine Trypanosoma brucei subsp. brucei infections, both singly and in combination with the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO, eflornithine). Used singly, all of the purine analogs were able to suppress an acute T. brucei subsp. brucei infection. 9-DIN...

  11. EXTINCTION OF EXPERIMENTAL TRIATOMA INFESTANS POPULATIONS FOLLOWING CONTINUOUS EXPOSURE TO DOGS WEARING DELTAMETHRIN-TREATED COLLARS

    OpenAIRE

    REITHINGER, RICHARD; CEBALLOS, LEONARDO; STARIOLO, RAÚL; DAVIES, CLIVE R.; GÜRTLER, RICARDO E.

    2006-01-01

    Dogs are domestic reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. We evaluated the effect of deltamethrin-treated dog collars (DTDCs) over time on the population dynamics of Triatoma infestans, a main T. cruzi vector. Forty founder bugs of mixed life stages were allowed to colonize mud-thatched experimental huts and exposed continuously to either uncollared control dogs (N = 3) or dogs wearing DTDCs (N = 7) for a period of up to 196 days. When compared with bugs...

  12. Trypanocidal drugs for chronic asymptomatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Juan Carlos; Perez, Juan Guillermo; Cortes, Olga Lucia; Riarte, Adelina; Pepper, Micah; Marin-Neto, Jose Antonio; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2014-05-27

    Prevention of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) by treating infected populations with trypanocidal therapy (TT) remains a challenge. Despite a renewed enthusiasm for TT, uncertainty regarding its efficacy, concerns about its safety and limited availability remain barriers for a wider use of conventional drugs. We have updated a previous version of this review. To systematically search, appraise, identify and extract data from eligible studies comparing the outcome of cohorts of seropositive individuals to Trypanosoma cruzi exposed to TT versus placebo or no treatment. We sought eligible studies in electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 1, 2014); MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to January week 5 2014); EMBASE (Ovid, 1980 to 2014 week 6) and LILACS (up to 6 May 2010)) by combining terms related with the disease and the treatment. The search also included a Google search, handsearch for references in review or selected articles, and search of expert files. We applied no language restrictions. Review authors screened the retrieved references for eligibility (those dealing with human participants treated with TT) and then assessed the pre-selected studies in full for inclusion. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies that provided data on either mortality or clinical progression of CCC after at least four years of follow-up. Teams of two review authors independently carried out the study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment, with a referee resolving disagreement within the pairs. Data collection included study design, characteristics of the population and interventions or exposures and outcome measures. We defined categories of outcome data as parasite-related (positive serology, xenodiagnosis or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after TT) and participant-related (including efficacy outcomes such as progression towards CCC, all-cause mortality and side effects of TT). We reported

  13. Stomoxys calcitrans as possible vector of Trypanosoma evansi among camels in an affected area of the Canary Islands, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noé Francisco Rodríguez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Trypanosoma evansi was first identified in the Canary Islands in 1997, and is still present in a small area of the Archipelago. To date, the disease has exclusively affected camel herds, and has not been detected in any other animal hosts. However potential vectors of Trypanosoma evansi must be identified. Methods One Nzi trap was placed on a camel farm located in the infected area for a period of one year. Results Two thousand five hundred and five insects were trapped, of which Stomoxys calcitrans was the sole hematophagous vector captured. Conclusions Stomoxys calcitrans could be exclusively responsible for the transmission of Trypanosoma evansi among camels in the surveyed area, as other species do not seem to be infected by S. calcitrans in the presence of camels.

  14. Infecção tripla por Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium vivax e P. falciparum: relato de caso Triple infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Silvestre Lobão Costa; Valdira Cardoso Santos; Paoola Cristina Vieira Amorim; José Eduardo Santos; Ana Yecê das Neves Pinto

    2012-01-01

    O presente registro acerca da identificação de infecção aguda de dois plasmódios e um Trypanosoma constitui evento raro. Pré-escolar, sexo feminino, 5 anos de idade, apresentou síndrome febril; foi submetida a exame de gota espessa no qual foram identificadas formas assexuadas e sexuadas de Plasmodium vivax e P. falciparum, respectivamente, além de tripomastigotas sanguíneos de Trypanosoma cruzi. No peridomicílio, foram encontrados insetos da espécie Rhodnius sp. Os autores reforçam a importâ...

  15. Estudo do papel funcional da cisteína sintase e da cistationina B-sintase na resposta ao estresse oxidativo e nitrosativo em leishmania (viannia) braziliensis, trypanosoma rangeli e trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Calderon, Ibeth Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Tese (doutorado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biotecnologia e Biociências, Florianópolis, 2014 Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, Trypanosoma rangeli e o Trypanosoma cruzi são parasitos hemoflagelados pertencentes à Ordem Kinetoplastida, família Trypanosomatidae, capazes de infectar insetos, animais silvestres e domésticos, assim como o homem. Durante seu ciclo de vida, estes parasitos são expostos a uma grande quanti...

  16. Sobre o encontro do Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma renjifoi Deane 1961, infectando Proechimys longicaudatus (Rodentia-Echimyidae A new host for Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma renjifoi Deane, 1961, infecting Proechimys longicaudatus (Rodentia - Echimyidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva A. Mello

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available É relatado o encontro do roedor Proechimys longicaudatus, capturado na Fazenda Água Limpa, Brasília-DF (Brasil, naturalmente infectado pelo Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma renjifoi. Este é o primeiro relato do T. (H. renjifoi na região do Brasil Central.A Proechimys longicaudatus rodent was found naturally infected with Trypanosoma (Herpetosoma renjifoi Deane in 1961. It was captured on the Água Limpa farm near Brasilia, the Federal District. This is the first account of this trypanosome in Central Brazil, and P. longicaudatus is a new host for this blood parasite.

  17. The conduction system of the heart in mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi: histopathological lesions and electrocardiographic correlations

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    Sonia G. Andrade

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic focal and diffuse myiocarditis with interstitial fibrosis developed in Swiss outbred mice and in the inbred AKR and A/J strains of mice which were chronically infected with several Trypanosoma cruzi strains belonging to three biological types (Type I, II and III. High incidence of electrocardiographic changes with predominance of intraventricular conduction disturbances, 1st. and 2nd. degree AV block, arrhythmias, comparable with those found in human Chagas' disease, were also present. Morphological study of the conduction tissue of the heart revealed inflammatory and fibrotic changes. The presence of inflammation in the inter-atrial septum almost always coincided with the inflammatory involvement of the ventricular conduction system. Focal inflammation was associated with vacuolization and focal necrosis of the specific fibers. Most of the lesions were seen affecting the His bundel (76.3% of the cases, the right bundle branch (73.3%, AV node (43.9% and left bundle branch (37.5%. Correlation between morphological changes in the conduction tissue and electrocardiographic alteration occured in 53.0 to 62.5% of the cases, according to the experimental groups.Em camundongos suiços não isogênicos e em camundongos isogênicos das linhagens AKR e A/J, cronicamente infectados com cepas do Trypanosoma cruzi representativas de três tipos biológicos (Tipos I, II e III foi observada uma miocardite crônica difusa e focal com graus variáveis de fibrose intersticial. Observou-se alta incidência de alterações eletrocardiográficas com predominância de distúrbios da condução intraventricular, bloqueios A-V de 1º e 2º graus e arritmias, comparáveis às encontradas na doença de Chagas humana. O estudo histopatológico do sistema de condução do coração mostrou alterações inflamatórias e fibróticas. A presença de inflamação no septo inter-atrial em geral coincidiu com o envolvimento do sistema de condução pelo processo inflamat

  18. Functional and structural insights revealed by molecular dynamics simulations of an essential RNA editing ligase in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommie E Amaro

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing ligase 1 (TbREL1 is required for the survival of both the insect and bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for the devastating tropical disease African sleeping sickness. The type of RNA editing that TbREL1 is involved in is unique to the trypanosomes, and no close human homolog is known to exist. In addition, the high-resolution crystal structure revealed several unique features of the active site, making this enzyme a promising target for structure-based drug design. In this work, two 20 ns atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations are employed to investigate the dynamics of TbREL1, both with and without the ATP substrate present. The flexibility of the active site, dynamics of conserved residues and crystallized water molecules, and the interactions between TbREL1 and the ATP substrate are investigated and discussed in the context of TbREL1's function. Differences in local and global motion upon ATP binding suggest that two peripheral loops, unique to the trypanosomes, may be involved in interdomain signaling events. Notably, a significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme's active site occurs during the apo simulations, opening an additional cavity adjacent to the ATP binding site that could be exploited in the development of effective inhibitors directed against this protozoan parasite. Finally, ensemble averaged electrostatics calculations over the MD simulations reveal a novel putative RNA binding site, a discovery that has previously eluded scientists. Ultimately, we use the insights gained through the MD simulations to make several predictions and recommendations, which we anticipate will help direct future experimental studies and structure-based drug discovery efforts against this vital enzyme.

  19. Captopril increases the intensity of monocyte infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and induces human T helper type 17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho dos Santos, J S; Menezes, C A S; Villani, F N A; Magalhães, L M D; Scharfstein, J; Gollob, K J; Dutra, W O

    2010-12-01

    The anti-hypertensive drug captopril is used commonly to reduce blood pressure of patients with severe forms of Chagas disease, a cardiomyopathy caused by chronic infection with the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Captopril acts by inhibiting angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the vasopressor metallopeptidase that generates angiotensin II and promotes the degradation of bradykinin (BK). Recent studies in mice models of Chagas disease indicated that captopril can potentiate the T helper type 1 (Th1)-directing natural adjuvant property of BK. Equipped with kinin-releasing cysteine proteases, T. cruzi trypomastigotes were shown previously to invade non-professional phagocytic cells, such as human endothelial cells and murine cardiomyocytes, through the signalling of G protein-coupled bradykinin receptors (B(2) KR). Monocytes are also parasitized by T. cruzi and these cells are known to be important for the host immune response during infection. Here we showed that captopril increases the intensity of T. cruzi infection of human monocytes in vitro. The increased parasitism was accompanied by up-regulated expression of ACE in human monocytes. While T. cruzi infection increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by monocytes significantly, compared to uninfected cells, T. cruzi infection in association with captopril down-modulated IL-10 expression by the monocytes. Surprisingly, studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that addition of the ACE inhibitor in association with T. cruzi increased expression of IL-17 by CD4(+) T cells in a B(2) KR-dependent manner. Collectively, our results suggest that captopril might interfere with host-parasite equilibrium by enhancing infection of monocytes, decreasing the expression of the modulatory cytokine IL-10, while guiding development of the proinflammatory Th17 subset. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2010 British Society for Immunology.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi: gene expression surveyed by proteomic analysis reveals interaction between different genotypes in mixed in vitro cultures.

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    Alexandre Machin

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the comportment in in vitro culture of 2 different genotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, pertaining to 2 major genetic subdivisions (near-clades of this parasite. One of the stocks was a fast-growing one, highly virulent in mice, while the other one was slow-growing, mildly virulent in mice. The working hypothesis was that mixtures of genotypes interact, a pattern that has been observed by us in empirical experimental studies. Genotype mixtures were followed every 7 days and characterized by the DIGE technology of proteomic analysis. Proteic spots of interest were characterized by the SAMESPOT software. Patterns were compared to those of pure genotypes that were also evaluated every 7 days. One hundred and three spots exhibited changes in time by comparison with T = 0. The major part of these spots (58% exhibited an under-expression pattern by comparison with the pure genotypes. 32% of the spots were over-expressed; 10% of spots were not different from those of pure genotypes. Interestingly, interaction started a few minutes after the mixtures were performed. We have retained 43 different proteins that clearly exhibited either under- or over-expression. Proteins showing interaction were characterized by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF. Close to 50% of them were either tubulins or heat shock proteins. This study confirms that mixed genotypes of T. cruzi interact at the molecular level. This is of great interest because mixtures of genotypes are very frequent in Chagas natural cycles, both in insect vectors and in mammalian hosts, and may play an important role in the transmission and severity of Chagas disease. The methodology proposed here is potentially applicable to any micropathogen, including fungi, bacteria and viruses. It should be of great interest in the case of bacteria, for which the epidemiological and clinical consequences of mixed infections could be underestimated.

  1. Where do Trypanosoma cruzi go? The distribution of parasites in blood components from fractionated infected whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancino-Faure, Beatriz; Fisa, Roser; Riera, Cristina; Girona-Llobera, Enrique; Jimenez-Marco, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Platelets (PLTs) are the blood component most frequently involved in Trypanosoma cruzi transfusion transmission cases reported in the literature, although whole blood (WB) and red blood cells (RBCs) have also been incriminated. However, there is little knowledge of the parasite distribution among blood components. The aim of this study was to investigate in which blood component T. cruzi parasites concentrate the most, after fractionating artificially T. cruzi-infected WB. The T. cruzi parasite load was studied by a specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in WB, buffy coat (BC), PLT concentrates, RBCs before and after leukoreduction, and plasma (PL). The parasite load in WB experimentally infected with 1.5 × 10(6) parasites (2.78 × 10(3) parasite equivalents/mL) was unevenly distributed among the separated blood components. The highest level was found in the BC (6.94 × 10(3) parasite equivalents/mL) and RBCs before leukoreduction by filtration (2.51 × 10(3) parasite equivalents/mL), after which RBCs presented a 99.9% reduction in parasite levels. Both PL and PLTs, partially leukoreduced by centrifugation but nonfiltered, had low parasite levels, the lowest concentration being in PL. The highest parasite concentration was detected in the BC, followed by RBCs before leukoreduction. There is a notable risk of transfusion-transmitted Chagas disease associated with nonleukoreduced RBCs. Leukoreduction may be an effective prevention strategy for transfusion-transmitted T. cruzi infection, especially in endemic countries and in nonendemic countries with a high rate of immigration from Latin America. © 2016 AABB.

  2. Infecção tripla por Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium vivax e P. falciparum: relato de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Costa,Andrea Silvestre Lobão; Santos,Valdira Cardoso; Amorim,Paoola Cristina Vieira; Santos,José Eduardo; Pinto,Ana Yecê das Neves

    2012-01-01

    O presente registro acerca da identificação de infecção aguda de dois plasmódios e um Trypanosoma constitui evento raro. Pré-escolar, sexo feminino, 5 anos de idade, apresentou síndrome febril; foi submetida a exame de gota espessa no qual foram identificadas formas assexuadas e sexuadas de Plasmodium vivax e P. falciparum, respectivamente, além de tripomastigotas sanguíneos de Trypanosoma cruzi. No peridomicílio, foram encontrados insetos da espécie Rhodnius sp. Os autores reforçam a importâ...

  3. Utilización de Lepidium peruvianum maca, como medio de cultivo para el crecimiento de Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Saldaña C, Charles; Córdova P, Ofelia; Instituto de Investigación en Microbiología y Parasitología Tropical. Universidad Nacional de Trujillo. La Libertad, Perú.; Vargas V, Franklin; Instituto de Investigación en Microbiología y Parasitología Tropical. Universidad Nacional de Trujillo. La Libertad, Perú.

    2006-01-01

    Por sus características nutritivas de alto valor, se ensayó la posible utilidad del Lepidium peruvianum maca, como un medio para cultivar Trypanosoma cruzi. Bajo condiciones experimentales se procedió a incubar epimastigotes de T. cruzi en cuatro medios de cultivo bifásicos diferentes, a base de Lepidium peruvianum maca, los cuales fueron comparados con el medio de cultivo BHI como control. La incorporación de maca como medio de cultivo permitió el crecimiento de Trypanosoma cruzi; se determi...

  4. Infecção natural por Trypanosoma evansi em cães Natural infection by Trypanosoma evansi in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Braccini Colpo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho relata duas infecções naturais por Trypanosoma evansi em cães, que vieram a óbito no município de Uruguaiana, RS. Os animais oriundos da zona rural foram recebidos no hospital veterinário da Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS, em diferentes datas, apresentando apatia, febre e aumento dos linfonodos submandibulares. No esfregaço sangüíneo, foram identificadas formas flageladas pertencentes à espécie T. evansi. A verificação desses casos serve de alerta aos proprietários de animais e médicos veterinários para a presença da doença na região e salienta a necessidade de maiores investigações na epidemiologia da parasitose e criação de medidas profiláticas que evitem novas infecções.The present paper describes cases of natural infection by Trypanosoma evansi in dogs that eventually died in Uruguaiana, in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The animals from the rural zone were admitted to the Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS Veterinary Hospital presenting the following clinical signs: apathy, fever and enlargement of the submandibular lymphonodes. Flagellated forms in the blood films were identified as belonging to the species T. evansi. The discovery of these cases raises an allert to the presence of the disease in the area, emphasizing the need for further investigation of the epidemiology of the infection and also the study of prophylathic measures to prevent new cases.

  5. Synergy testing of FDA-approved drugs identifies potent drug combinations against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D Planer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 8 million persons, mainly in Latin America, are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Existing antiparasitic drugs for Chagas disease have significant toxicities and suboptimal effectiveness, hence new therapeutic strategies need to be devised to address this neglected tropical disease. Due to the high research and development costs of bringing new chemical entities to the clinic, we and others have investigated the strategy of repurposing existing drugs for Chagas disease. Screens of FDA-approved drugs (described in this paper have revealed a variety of chemical classes that have growth inhibitory activity against mammalian stage Trypanosoma cruzi parasites. Aside from azole antifungal drugs that have low or sub-nanomolar activity, most of the active compounds revealed in these screens have effective concentrations causing 50% inhibition (EC50's in the low micromolar or high nanomolar range. For example, we have identified an antihistamine (clemastine, EC50 of 0.4 µM, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, EC50 of 4.4 µM, and an antifolate drug (pyrimethamine, EC50 of 3.8 µM and others. When tested alone in the murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, most compounds had insufficient efficacy to lower parasitemia thus we investigated using combinations of compounds for additive or synergistic activity. Twenty-four active compounds were screened in vitro in all possible combinations. Follow up isobologram studies showed at least 8 drug pairs to have synergistic activity on T. cruzi growth. The combination of the calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, plus the antifungal drug, posaconazole, was found to be more effective at lowering parasitemia in mice than either drug alone, as was the combination of clemastine and posaconazole. Using combinations of FDA-approved drugs is a promising strategy for developing new treatments for Chagas disease.

  6. Secondary Metabolites from Vietnamese Marine Invertebrates with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Phuong Thao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 < 5.0 μg/mL. Among the compounds isolated from these extracts, laevigatol B (1 from Lobophytum crassum and L. laevigatum, (24S-ergost-4-ene-3-one (2 from Sinularia dissecta, astropectenol A (3 from Astropecten polyacanthus, and cholest-8-ene-3β,5α,6β,7α-tetraol (4 from Diadema savignyi showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM. Laevigatol B (1 and 5α-cholest-8(14-ene-3β,7α-diol (5 exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  7. Andrographolide induces oxidative stress-dependent cell death in unicellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Malabika; Parai, Debaprasad; Dhar, Pranab; Roy, Manab; Barik, Rajib; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2017-12-01

    African sleeping sickness is a parasitic disease in humans and livestock caused by Trypanosoma brucei throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Absence of appropriate vaccines and prevalence of drug resistance proclaim that a new way of therapeutic interventions is essential against African trypanosomiasis. In the present study, we have looked into the effect of andrographolide (andro), a diterpenoid lactone from Andrographis paiculata on Trypanosoma brucei PRA 380. Although andro has been recognized as a promosing anti-cancer drug, its usefulness against Trypanosoma spp remained unexplored. Andro showed promising anti-trypanosomal activity with an IC 50 value of 8.3μM assessed through SYBR Green cell viability assay and also showed no cytotoxicity towards normal murine macrophages. Cell cycle analysis revealed that andro could induce sub-G 0 /G 1 phase arrest. Flow cytometric analysis also revealed that incubation with andro caused exposure of phosphatidyl serine to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane in T. brucei PCF. This event was preceded by andro-induced depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δym) and elevation of cytosolic calcium. Andro also caused elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as lipid peroxidation level, and depletion in reduced thiol levels. Taken together, these data indicate that andro has promising antitrypanosomal activity mediated by promoting oxidative stress and depolarizing the mitochondrial membrane potential and thereby triggering an apoptosis-like programmed cell death. Therefore, this study merits further investigation to the therapeutic possibility of using andro for the treatment of African trypanosomiasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria P Sülsen

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin

  9. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sülsen, Valeria P; Puente, Vanesa; Papademetrio, Daniela; Batlle, Alcira; Martino, Virginia S; Frank, Fernanda M; Lombardo, María E

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin accomplished its antiparasitic

  10. Vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi among captive Neotropical primates in a Brazilian zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuzzi-Souza, Thaís Tâmara Castro; Nitz, Nadjar; Knox, Monique Britto; Reis, Filipe; Hagström, Luciana; Cuba, César A Cuba; Hecht, Mariana Machado; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2016-01-26

    Neotropical primates are important sylvatic hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. Infection is often subclinical, but severe disease has been described in both free-ranging and captive primates. Panstrongylus megistus, a major T. cruzi vector, was found infesting a small-primate unit at Brasília zoo (ZooB), Brazil. ZooB lies close to a gallery-forest patch where T. cruzi circulates naturally. Here, we combine parasitological and molecular methods to investigate a focus of T. cruzi infection involving triatomine bugs and Neotropical primates at a zoo located in the Brazilian Savannah. We assessed T. cruzi infection in vectors using optical microscopy (n = 34) and nested PCR (n = 50). We used quantitative PCR (qPCR) to examine blood samples from 26 primates and necropsy samples from two primates that died during the study. We determined parasite lineages in five vectors and two primates by comparing glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6pi) gene sequences. Trypanosoma cruzi was found in 44 vectors and 17 primates (six genera and eight species); one Mico chrysoleucus and one Saguinus niger had high parasitaemias. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was detected in three primates born to qPCR-negative mothers at ZooB and in the two dead specimens. One Callithrix geoffroyi became qPCR-positive over a two-year follow-up. All G6pi sequences matched T. cruzi lineage TcI. Our findings strongly suggest vector-borne T. cruzi transmission within a small-primate unit at ZooB - with vectors, and perhaps also parasites, presumably coming from nearby gallery forest. Periodic checks for vectors and parasites would help eliminate T. cruzi transmission foci in captive-animal facilities. This should be of special importance for captive-breeding programs involving endangered mammals, and would reduce the risk of accidental T. cruzi transmission to keepers and veterinarians.

  11. Metabolic labeling with (14C)-glucose of bloodstream and cell culture trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederkremer, R.M. de; Groisman, J.F.; Lima, C.; Katzin, A.

    1990-01-01

    Trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi from infected mouse blood and from cell culture were metabolically labeled by incubation with D-( 14 C)-glucose. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of lysates from parasites of two strains (RA and CA 1 ) showed a significantly different pattern. The difference was mainly quantitative when the blood and cell culture trypomastigotes of the RA strain were compared. Analysis of the culture medium by paper electrophoresis showed an anionic exometabolite only in the blood forms of both strains. (Author) [es

  12. Structural insights into the catalytic mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, María Fernanda; Watts, Andrew G; Damager, Iben; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Nguyen, Tong; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Paris, Gastón; Frasch, A Carlos; Withers, Stephen G; Alzari, Pedro M

    2004-05-01

    Sialidases are a superfamily of sialic-acid-releasing enzymes that are of significant interest due to their implication as virulence factors in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. However, extensive studies of viral and microbial sialidases have failed to provide a comprehensive picture of their mechanistic properties, in part because the structures of competent enzyme-substrate complexes and reaction intermediates have never been described. Here we report these structures for the Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase (TcTS), showing that catalysis by sialidases occurs via a similar mechanism to that of other retaining glycosidases, but with some intriguing differences that may have evolved in response to the substrate structure.

  13. Acerca del ciclo evolutivo del Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi Chagas 1909, en sus fases tisular y hematica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilio Romaña

    1956-06-01

    Full Text Available El autor pasa en revista los trabajos publicados sobre el ciclo evolutivo del Trypanosoma (S. cruzi en el huésped vertebrado, desde el descubrimiento de la enfermedad hasta nuestros días. Luego analiza las ideas de los autores modernos, fundadas en gran parte en las observaciones que ya en 1914 realizaron MAYER y ROCHA LIMA de las cuales participan actualmente ROMAÑA y MEYER, ELKELES y WOOD. Finalmente expressa que a partir de los tripanosomas infectantes los parásitos que penetram en el protoplasma celular pueden seguir dos mecanismos en su evolución hacia cuerpos leishmanioides: 1.º Por "regresión fusiforme" y 2.º por "regresión orbicular"; llegados a la forma leishmanioide los parásitos se multiplican por división binaria, una vez lleno el protoplasma celular, siguen un processo inverso de transformación hacia tripanosoma que puede seguir igualmente dos mecanismos diversos: 1. "progresión fusiforme" y 2.º "progresión orbicular". Estos diversos mecanismos de transformación están esquematizados en la fig. N.º 1 del trabajo.The author reviews published works about the evolutive cycle of the Trypanosoma cruzi in the vertebrate host, from the discovery of the disease to our days. Then, he analyzes the ideas of the modern authors who based themselves on the observations made formerly, in 1914, by MAYER & ROCHA LIMA, ideas that ROMAÑA and MEYER, ELKELES and WOOD agree at the present time. Last, he states that, from the infective trypanosomas, the parasites which enter the cellular protoplasma may follow two systems to perform their evolution up to leishmanioid bodies: 1.] by fusiform regression, 2.º by an orbicular regression. Once the parasites reach the leishmanioid forms, they multiply by binary division. When the celular protoplasm is filled up with the parasites, these follow an inverted transformation up to trypanosoma state, following also two systems; similar to the repression 1.º a fusiform progression, 2.º an

  14. A Proline Racemase Based PCR for Identification of Trypanosoma vivax in Cattle Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Fikru, Regassa; Hagos, Ashenafi; Rogé, Stijn; Reyna-Bello, Armando; Gonzatti, Mary Isabel; Merga, Bekana; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Büscher, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to develop a Trypanosoma vivax (T. vivax) specific PCR based on the T. vivax proline racemase (TvPRAC) gene. Forward and reverse primers were designed that bind at 764-783 bp and 983-1002 bp of the gene. To assess its specificity, TvPRAC PCR was conducted on DNA extracted from different haemotropic pathogens: T. vivax from Nigeria, Ethiopia and Venezuela, T. congolense Savannah type, T. brucei brucei, T. evansi, T. equiperdum, T. theileri, Theileria parva, Anaplasma marg...

  15. Evaluation of the toxicity of 3-allyl-beta-lapachone against Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A M; Vasconcellos, M E; Docampo, R; Cruz, F S; de Souza, W; Leon, W

    1980-06-01

    In vitro incubation of Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain) with 3-allyl-beta-lapachone was followed by: (1) growth inhibition of epimastigotes, (2) damage to cellular membranes, especially of the mitochondria, alterations in the chromatin structure and swelling of mitochondria, (3) increase in the respiratory rate, (4) increase in the rate of H2O2 generation by the epimastigotes, (5) increase of the rate of lipid peroxidation as detected by malonyldialdehyde formation, (6) decrease or total disappearance of trypomastigotes from mouse-infected blood. This drug might therefore be useful in preventing transmission of Chagas' disease during blood transfusion. It is not, however, active against infections in mice.

  16. A haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor conveys innate immunity to Trypanosoma brucei in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; De Muylder, Géraldine; Nielsen, Marianne J

    2008-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is lysed by apolipoprotein L-I, a component of human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles that are also characterized by the presence of haptoglobin-related protein. We report that this process is mediated by a parasite glycoprotein receptor, which...... binds the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex with high affinity for the uptake and incorporation of heme into intracellular hemoproteins. In mice, this receptor was required for optimal parasite growth and the resistance of parasites to the oxidative burst by host macrophages. In humans, the trypanosome...

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi: curso da infecção em camundongos depletados de plaquetas

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Margareth; Irulegui, Ione; Deane, Maria P.; Ruiz, Rita de Cassia

    1992-01-01

    The effect of platelet depletion on the course of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in BALB/c mice was investigated. Thrombocytopenia was achieved by inoculation of rabbit anti-platelet IgG during the parasitemic phase of the infection. The number of parasites in the blood of anti-platelet IgG treated was significantly higher than that of non-treated control mice, during the phase of high parasitemia. Cumulative mortality of platelet-depleted mice was consistently but not significantly higher than ...

  18. Avances en el estudio de la Adenilato Quinasa Nuclear de Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Cámara, María de los Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, el agente etiológico del Mal de Chagas es un eucariota inferior en donde el control de la expresión génica recae mayormente en mecanismos postraduccionales. Durante todo su ciclo de vida se observan fluctuaciones en la expresión génica. En la presente tesis se realizó el estudio de una adenilato quinasa nuclear (TcADKn) que se encuentra involucrada en la biogénesis ribosomal. Las adenilato quinasas nucleares han sido descriptas en muy pocos organismos, se las ha asociado al...

  19. Enantiomers of nifurtimox do not exhibit stereoselective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity, toxicity, or pharmacokinetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Carolina B; White, Karen L; Braillard, Stéphanie; Perez, Catherine; Goo, Junghyun; Gaspar, Luis; Shackleford, David M; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Thompson, R C Andrew; Freitas-Junior, Lucio; Charman, Susan A; Chatelain, Eric

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of improving the available drugs for the treatment of Chagas disease, individual enantiomers of nifurtimox were characterized. The results indicate that the enantiomers are equivalent in their in vitro activity against a panel of Trypanosoma cruzi strains; in vivo efficacy in a murine model of Chagas disease; in vitro toxicity and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion characteristics; and in vivo pharmacokinetic properties. There is unlikely to be any therapeutic benefit of an individual nifurtimox enantiomer over the racemic mixture. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Medicinal plants of Chile: evaluation of their anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Orlando M; Maya, Juan D; Ferreira, Jorge; Christen, Philippe; San Martin, José; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo; Morello, Antonio; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    The extracts of several plants of Central Chile exhibited anti-Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes activity. Most active extracts were those obtained from Podanthus ovatifolius, Berberis microphylla, Kageneckia oblonga, and Drimys winteri. The active extract of Drimys winteri (IC50 51.2 microg/mL) was purified and three drimane sesquiterpenes were obtained: polygodial, drimenol, and isodrimenin. Isodrimenin and drimenol were found to be active against the trypomastigote form of T. cruzi with IC50 values of 27.9 and 25.1 microM, respectively.

  1. 2-Pyridyl thiazoles as novel anti-Trypanosoma cruzi agents: structural design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Marcos Veríssimo de Oliveira; de Siqueira, Lucianna Rabelo Pessoa; da Silva, Elany Barbosa; Costa, Lívia Bandeira; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; Rabello, Marcelo Montenegro; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; da Cruz, Luana Faria; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; de Castro, Maria Carolina Accioly Brelaz; Bernhardt, Paul V; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima

    2014-10-30

    The present work reports on the synthesis, anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activities and docking studies of a novel series of 2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3-thiazoles derived from 2-pyridine thiosemicarbazone. The majority of these compounds are potent cruzain inhibitors and showed excellent inhibition on the trypomastigote form of the parasite, and the resulting structure-activity relationships are discussed. Together, these data present a novel series of thiazolyl hydrazones with potential effects against Chagas disease and they could be important leads in continuing development against Chagas disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. L-arginine supplementation reduces mortality and improves disease outcome in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Carbajosa, Sofía; Rodríguez-Angulo, Héctor O.; Gea, Susana; Chillón-Marinas, Carlos; Poveda, Cristina; Maza, María C.; Colombet, Diana; Fresno, Manuel; Gironès, Núria

    2018-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is a neglected disease that affects about 7 million people in Latin America, recently emerging on other continents due to migration. As infection in mice is characterized by depletion of plasma L-arginine, the effect on infection outcome was tested in mice with or without L-arginine supplementation and treatment with 1400W, a specific inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). We found that levels of L-arginine and citrulline were reduced i...

  3. Features of host cell invasion by different infective forms of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortara Renato A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Through its life cycle from the insect vector to mammalian hosts Trypanosoma cruzi has developed clever strategies to reach the intracellular milieu where it grows sheltered from the hosts' immune system. We have been interested in several aspects of in vitro interactions of different infective forms of the parasite with cultured mammalian cells. We have observed that not only the classically infective trypomastigotes but also amastigotes, originated from the extracellular differentiation of trypomastigotes, can infect cultured cells. Interestingly, the process of invasion of different parasite infective forms is remarkably distinct and also highly dependent on the host cell type.

  4. Histopathologic identification of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' encephalitis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimath Alyemni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' encephalitis is an uncommon manifestation of T. cruzi infection, typically seen in immunocompromised patients. Encephalitis results from the reactivation of chronic infection predominately in individuals from endemic areas. Increased awareness of this complication is essential especially with increased migration of patients from endemic areas with concomitant HIV infection. Here we report a case of Chagas' encephalitis in an AIDS patient from Mexico in which there was no evidence of acute serologic, CSF, or blood infection by T. cruzi trypomastigotes.

  5. AFAP-1L1-mediated actin filaments crosslinks hinder Trypanosoma cruzi cell invasion and intracellular multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Karine Canuto Loureiro; Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; da Silva, Aline Alves; Quintal, Amanda Pifano Neto; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Host actin cytoskeleton polymerization has been shown to play an important role during Trypanosoma cruzi internalization into mammalian cell. The structure and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in cells are regulated by a vast number of actin-binding proteins. Here we aimed to verify the impact of AFAP-1L1, during invasion and multiplication of T. cruzi. Knocking-down AFAP-1L1 increased parasite cell invasion and intracellular multiplication. Thus, we have shown that the integrity of the machinery formed by AFAP-1L1 in actin cytoskeleton polymerization is important to hinder parasite infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Trypanosoma (Duttonella vivax: its biology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and introduction in the New World - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Alves Rosa Osório

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The biology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic techniques, and history of the introduction of Trypanosoma (Duttonella vivax in the New World are reviewed. The two main immunological responses of trypanosome-infected animals - antibody production and immunodepression - are discussed in the context of how these responses play a role in disease tolerance or susceptibility. Isolation and purification of T. vivax are briefly discussed. The recent reports of bovine trypanosomiasis diagnosed in cattle on farms located in the Pantanal region of the states of Mato Grosso do Sul and Mato Grosso, Brazil, are also discussed.

  7. Alterações quantitativas das células de purkinje na moléstia de chagas experimental no camundongo Quantitative study of Purkinje cells in the acute phase of experimental Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edymar Jardim

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available O autor estudou quantitativamente as células de Purkinje em cortes semi-seriados do cerebelo de camundongos inoculados experimentalmente com T. cruzi,tendo verificado considerável destruição neuronal na fase aguda da enfermidade.A quantitative study of Purkinje cells was done through semi-serial sections of cerebellum of mice experimentally innoculated by Trypanosoma cruzi. Avery marked neuronal destruction was found in the acute phase of Chagas' disease.

  8. Rodent-borne Trypanosoma from cities and villages of Niger and Nigeria: A special role for the invasive genus Rattus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatard, C; Garba, M; Gauthier, P; Hima, K; Artige, E; Dossou, D K H J; Gagaré, S; Genson, G; Truc, P; Dobigny, G

    2017-07-01

    Although they are known to sometimes infect humans, atypical trypanosomes are very poorly documented, especially in Africa where one lethal case has yet been described. Here we conducted a survey of rodent-borne Trypanosoma in 19 towns and villages of Niger and Nigeria, with a special emphasis on Niamey, the capital city of Niger. The 1298 rodents that were captured yielded 189 qPCR-positive animals from 14 localities, thus corresponding to a 14.6% overall prevalence. Rats, especially black rats, displayed particularly elevated prevalence (27.4%), with some well sampled sites showing 40-50% and up to 68.8% of Trypanosoma-carrying individuals. Rattus were also characterized by significantly lower Ct values than in the other non-Rattus species. DNA sequences could be obtained for 43 rodent-borne Trypanosoma and corresponded to 41 T. lewisi (all from Rattus) and 2 T. microti (from Cricetomys gambianus). These results, together with data compiled from the available literature, suggest that Rattus may play a particular role for the maintaining and circulation of Trypanosoma, especially T. lewisi, in Africa. Taken into account its strong abilities to invade coastal and inland regions of the continent, we believe that this genus deserves a particular attention in regards to potentially under-looked but emerging atypical trypanosome-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. THE CYTOSOLIC AND GLYCOSOMAL GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE FROM TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI - KINETIC-PROPERTIES AND COMPARISON WITH HOMOLOGOUS ENZYMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAMBEIR, AM; LOISEAU, AM; KUNTZ, DA; VELLIEUX, FM; MICHELS, PAM; OPPERDOES, FR

    1991-01-01

    The protozoan haemoflagellate Trypanosoma brucei has two NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes, each with a different localization within the cell. One isoenzyme is found in the cytosol, as in other eukaryotes, while the other is found in the glycosome, a microbody-like

  10. Mitochondrial translation factors of Trypanosoma brucei: elongation factor-Tu has a unique subdomain that is essential for its function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cristodero, M.; Mani, J.; Oeljeklaus, S.; Aeberhard, L.; Hashimi, Hassan; Ramrath, D.J.F.; Lukeš, Julius; Warscheid, B.; Schneider, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2013), s. 744-755 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mitochondrial translation * Trypanosoma brucei * EF-Tu Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.026, year: 2013

  11. The vaccination of human beings with a live avirulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi: a new series of volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Menezes

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Five human volunteers were vaccinated with a live avirulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and followed-up for one year. Except for a few cases of questionable results presented by only one Laboratory, ali the other clinicai, parasitological and serological tests remained negative during that period.

  12. A variant surface glycoprotein of Trypanosoma brucei is synthesized with a hydrophobic carboxy-terminal extension from purified glycoprotein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Boothroyd; G.A.M. Cross; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Borst (Piet)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractSequential expression of variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs) enables the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei to evade the immune response of its mammalian hosts. Studies of several VSGs, which have been isolated as soluble molecules following disruption of cells in the absence of

  13. Sesquiterpene lactones and the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone affect the intracellular and extracellular stages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, E.; Barrera, P.; Salinas, R.; Vega, I.; Nieto, M.; Tonn, C.; Kemmerling, U.; Mortara, R.A.; Sosa, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is a major health problem in Latin America and is caused by the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Although many drugs have been used to alleviate the disease, these have been ineffective in the chronic phase and have also presented numerous side effects on patients. In this study

  14. The Importance of the 45 S Ribosomal Small Subunit-related Complex for Mitochondrial Translation in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ridlon, L.; Škodová, I.; Pan, S.; Lukeš, Julius; Maslov, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 288, č. 46 (2013), s. 32963-32978 ISSN 1083-351X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA MŠk LH12104 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Leish * Mitochondria * Protein Synthesis * Ribonuclear Protein (RNP) * Trypanosoma brucei * Trypanosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. Trypanosoma nupelianus sp. n. (Protozoa, Kinetoplastida parasitizing rhinelepis aspera (Osteichthyes, Loricariidae from Paraná river, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Eiras

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available It is described Trypanosoma nupelianus sp. n. parasitizing Rhinelepis aspera taken from Paraná river (Itaipu reservoir, Brazil. Morphometric characters such as body length, width of the body and nucleus dimensions show that T. nupelianus sp. n. is different from other trypanosomes described for fishes from tropical regions.

  16. Optimizing the biocatalytic productivity of an engineered sialidase from Trypanosoma rangeli for 3′-sialyllactose production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Birgitte; Luo, Jianquan; Nyffenegger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    An engineered sialidase, Tr6, from Trypanosoma rangeli was used for biosynthetic production of 3′-sialyllactose, a human milk oligosaccharide case compound, from casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) and lactose, components abundantly present in industrial dairy side streams. Four different enzyme re...

  17. Molecular cloning and functional characterisation of a cathepsin L-like proteinases from the fish kinetoplastid parasite Trypanosoma carassii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruszczyk, A.; Forlenza, M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma carassii is a fish kinetoplastid parasite that belongs to the family Trypanosomatida. In the present study we cloned a cathepsin L-like proteinase from T. carassii. The nucleotide sequence of 1371 bp translated into a preproprotein of 456 amino acids. The preproprotein contained the

  18. Antichagasic Activity of Komaroviquinone Is Due to Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Catalyzed by Trypanosoma cruzi Old Yellow Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kabututu, Zakayi; Kubata, Bruno K.; Kiuchi, Fumiyuki; Ito, Michiho; Nakajima-Shimada, Junko; Aoki, Takashi; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Martin, Samuel K.; Honda, Gisho; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    A novel potent trypanocidal diterpene, komaroviquinone, was reduced by Trypanosoma cruzi old yellow enzyme (TcOYE) to its semiquinone radical. The reductase activity in trypanosome lysates was completely immunoabsorbed by anti-TcOYE antibody. Since TcOYE is expressed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle, komaroviquinone is an interesting candidate for developing new antichagasic drugs.

  19. Effects of organic solvents on the enzyme activity of Trypanosoma cruzi glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in calorimetric assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Henrik; Cheleski, J; Zottis, A

    2007-01-01

    OH), in the isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) kinetic assays for the catalyzed reaction of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Trypanosoma cruzi. The solvent effects on T. cruzi GAPDH had not yet been studied. This enzyme was shown here to be affected by the organic solvents content up to 5...

  20. Insight into the exoproteome of the tissue-derived trypomastigote form of trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Ricart, Carlos A O; Machado, Mara O

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, one of the major neglected infectious diseases. It has the potential to infect any nucleated mammalian cell. The secreted/excreted protein repertoire released by T. cruzi trypomastigotes is crucial in host-pathogen interactions...

  1. Variations in maxi-circle and mini-circle sequences in kinetoplast DNAs from different Trypanosoma brucei strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Borst (Piet); F. Fase-Fowler; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.C.C. Frasch

    1980-01-01

    textabstractWe have compared a total of 30 recognition sites for eight restriction endonucleases on the 20-kilobase-pair maxi-circle of kinetoplast DNAs from five different Trypanosoma brucei strains. In addition to three polymorphic sites were have found a 5 kilobase-pair region that is not cleaved

  2. Phylogeny and morphological variability of trypanosomes from African pelomedusid turtles with redescription of Trypanosoma mocambicum Pienaar, 1962

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořáková, N.; Čepička, I.; Qablan, M. A.; Gibson, W.; Blažek, Radim; Široký, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 166, č. 6 (2015), s. 599-608 ISSN 1434-4610 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Trypanosoma * turtle * Pelusios * polymorphism * phylogeny * SSU rRNA gene Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.898, year: 2015

  3. Adaptations in the glucose metabolism of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei isolates from Tsetse flies and during differentiation of bloodstream forms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grinsven, K.W.A.; van den Abbeele, J.; van den Bossche, P.; van Hellemond, J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei isolated from the midguts of infected tsetse flies, or freshly transformed from a strain that is close to field isolates, do not use a complete Krebs cycle. Furthermore, short stumpy bloodstream forms produce acetate and are apparently metabolically preadapted

  4. The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei: new tricks from an old dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Katherine S.; Hill, Kent L.

    2010-01-01

    African trypanosomes, i.e. Trypanosoma brucei and related sub-species, are devastating human and animal pathogens that cause significant human mortality and limit sustained economic development in sub-Saharan Africa. Trypanosoma brucei is a highly motile protozoan parasite and coordinated motility is central to both disease pathogenesis in the mammalian host and parasite development in the tsetse fly vector. Since motility is critical for parasite development and pathogenesis, understanding unique aspects of the T. brucei flagellum may uncover novel targets for therapeutic intervention in African sleeping sickness. Moreover, studies of conserved features of the T. brucei flagellum are directly relevant to understanding fundamental aspects of flagellum and cilium function in other eukaryotes, making T. brucei an important model system. The T. brucei flagellum contains a canonical 9 + 2 axoneme, together with additional features that are unique to kinetoplastids and a few closely-related organisms. Until recently, much of our knowledge of the structure and function of the trypanosome flagellum was based on analogy and inference from other organisms. There has been an explosion in functional studies in T. brucei in recent years, revealing conserved as well as novel and unexpected structural and functional features of the flagellum. Most notably, the flagellum has been found to be an essential organelle, with critical roles in parasite motility, morphogenesis, cell division and immune evasion. This review highlights recent discoveries on the T. brucei flagellum. PMID:18472102

  5. The Dialogue of the Host-Parasite Relationship: Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Carlos Gustavo Vieira; Castro Lima, Ana Karina; dos Santos, Rosiane Freire; Da-Silva, Silvia Amaral Gonçalves; Dutra, Patrícia Maria Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular protozoa Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi and the causative agents of Leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, belong to the Trypanosomatidae family. Together, these two neglected tropical diseases affect approximately 25 million people worldwide. Whether the host can control the infection or develops disease depends on the complex interaction between parasite and host. Parasite surface and secreted molecules are involved in triggering specific signaling pathways essential for parasite entry and intracellular survival. The recognition of the parasite antigens by host immune cells generates a specific immune response. Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have a multifaceted repertoire of strategies to evade or subvert the immune system by interfering with a range of signal transduction pathways in host cells, which causes the inhibition of the protective response and contributes to their persistence in the host. The current therapeutic strategies in leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are very limited. Efficacy is variable, toxicity is high, and the emergence of resistance is increasingly common. In this review, we discuss the molecular basis of the host-parasite interaction of Leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi infection and their mechanisms of subverting the immune response and how this knowledge can be used as a tool for the development of new drugs. PMID:26090399

  6. Antiparasitic evaluation of betulinic acid derivatives reveals effective and selective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meira, Cássio Santana; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana; Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with several biological properties already described, including antiparasitic activity. Here, the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of betulinic acid and its semi-synthetic amide derivatives (BA1-BA8) was investigated. The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity and selectivity were enhanced in semi-synthetic derivatives, specially on derivatives BA5, BA6 and BA8. To understand the mechanism of action underlying betulinic acid anti-T. cruzi activity, we investigated ultrastructural changes by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies showed that trypomastigotes incubated with BA5 had membrane blebling, flagella retraction, atypical cytoplasmic vacuoles and Golgi cisternae dilatation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that parasite death is mainly caused by necrosis. Treatment with derivatives BA5, BA6 or BA8 reduced the invasion process, as well as intracellular parasite development in host cells, with a potency and selectivity similar to that observed in benznidazole-treated cells. More importantly, the combination of BA5 and benznidazole revealed synergistic effects on trypomastigote and amastigote forms of T. cruzi. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BA5 compound is an effective and selective anti-T. cruzi agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Polyamine Transporter: Its Role on Parasite Growth and Survival Under Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Chantal; Sayé, Melisa; Vera, Edward Valera; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Polyamines are polycationic compounds that play a critical role as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, T. cruzi is auxotrophic for polyamines because of its inability to synthesize putrescine due to the lack of both, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase; therefore, the intracellular availability of polyamines depends exclusively on transport processes. In this work, the polyamine transporter TcPAT12 was overexpressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes demonstrating that growth rates at different concentrations of polyamines strongly depend on the regulation of the polyamine transport. In addition, parasites overexpressing TcPAT12 showed a highly increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and the trypanocidal drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole, which act by oxidative stress and interfering the synthesis of polyamine derivatives, respectively. Finally, the presence of putative polyamine transporters was analyzed in T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major genomes identifying 3-6 genes in these trypanosomatids.

  8. Silent Human Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infections around the Old Gboko Sleeping Sickness Focus in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karshima Solomon Ngutor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes Gambian trypanosomosis, a disease ravaging affected rural parts of Sub-Saharan Africa. We screened 1200 human blood samples for T. b. gambiense using the card agglutination test for trypanosomosis, characterized trypanosome isolates with Trypanosoma gambiense serum glycoprotein-PCR (TgsGP-PCR, and analyzed our data using Chi square and odds ratio at 95% confidence interval for statistical association. Of the 1200 samples, the CATT revealed an overall infection rate of 1.8% which ranged between 0.0% and 3.5% across study sites. Age and sex based infection rates ranged between 1.2% and 2.3%. We isolated 7 (33.3% trypanosomes from the 21 seropositive samples using immunosuppressed mice which were identified as T. b. gambiense group 1 by TgsGP-PCR. Based on study sites, PCR revealed an overall infection rate of 0.6% which ranged between 0.0% and 1.5%. Females and males revealed PCR based infection rates of 0.3% and 0.8%, respectively. Infection rates in adults (1.3% and children (0.1% varied significantly (p<0.05. We observed silent T. b. gambiense infections among residents of this focus. Risks of disease development into the second fatal stage in these patients who may also serve as reservoirs of infection in the focus exist.

  9. Chemical constituents from Waltheria indica exert in vitro activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretton, Sylvian; Bréant, Lise; Pourrez, Lucie; Ambuehl, Chiara; Perozzo, Remo; Marcourt, Laurence; Kaiser, Marcel; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Six extracts from the roots and the aerial parts of Waltheria indica L. (Malvaceae) were screened for their in vitro antitrypanosomal activity towards Trypanosoma brucei brucei STIB 427 strain, T. brucei rhodesiense STIB 900 and Trypanosoma cruzi Tulahuen C4. The dichloromethane extract from the roots showed the highest activity against T. cruzi (IC50=0.74 μg/mL) as well as a good selectivity index (SI value of 35). Based on these results, this extract was fractionated and led to the isolation of three alkaloids (adouetin X (1), waltheriones A (2) and C (3)) and three pentacyclic triterpene derivatives (betulinic acid (4), 3β-acetoxy-27-trans-caffeoyloxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid methyl ester (5) and 3β-acetoxy-27-cis-caffeoyloxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid methyl ester (6)) identified by 1D and 2D NMR, UV, IR and MS analyses. Among these, waltherione C exhibited the highest and selective antitrypanosomal activity towards T. cruzi (IC50=1.93 μM) with low cytotoxicity (IC50=101.23 μM), resulting in a selectivity index value of 52. Waltherione C conforms to hit activity criteria with respect to T. cruzi as required by the WHO/TDR. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Studies on Trypanosoma rangeli Tejera, 1920: V - Developmental pattern in the alimentary canal of Rhodnius prolixus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Añez

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available The morphological sequence of Trypanosoma rangeli development in the alimentary canal of Rhodnius prolixus, is described, with observation made in dissected guts from 6 hours to 45 days post-infection. No metacyclic-forms are produced in the digestive tract at any time, and transmission by the contaminative route must be considered atypical. Amastigotes appear to be an essential stage in the development of T. rangeli in the gut of R. prolixus. The epidemiological importance of the developmental pattern of T. rangeli in the vector´s gut is discussed, and its usefulness for aging infection is considered.A seqüência do desenvolvimento morfológico do Trypanosoma rangeli no canal alimentar do Rhodnius prolixus, é descrita, segundo observações, em intestinos dissecados desde 6 horas até 45 dias pós-infecção. Não se produzem formas metacíclicas no trato digestivo em tempo algum, e a transmissão por via contaminativa deve-se considerar atípica. Os amastigotos aparentam ser um estágio essencial no desenvolvimento do T. rangeli no intestino do R. prolixus. A importância epidemiológica do padrão de desenvolvimento do T. rangeli é discutida e a sua utilidade na determinação da idade na infecção é considerada.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi: strain selection by diferent schedules of mouse passage of an initially mixed infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Deane

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available From an initial double infection in mice, established by simultaneous and equivalent inocula of bloodstream forms of strains Y and F of Trypanosoma cruzi, two lines were derived by subinoculations: one (W passaged every week, the other (M every month. Through biological and biochemical methods only the Y strain was identified at the end of the 10th and 16th passages of line W and only the F strain at the 2nd and 4th passages of line M. The results illustrate strain selection through laboratory manipulation of initially mixed populations of T. cruzi.De uma infecção inicialmente dupla em camundongo, estabelecida por inóculo simultaneo e equivalente de formas sanguíneas das cepas Y e F de Trypanosoma cruzi, duas linhagens foram originadas por subinoculações: uma (W passada casa semana, a outra (M cada mês. Por métodos biológicos e bioquímicos apenas a cepa Y foi identificada ao fim a 10a. e 16a. passagens da linhagem W e apenas a cepa F na 2a. e 4a.passagens de linhagem M. Os resultados demonstram a seleção de cepas através de manipulação em laboratorio de populações inicialmente mistas de T. cruzi.

  12. Haematological response of snow barbell, Schizothorax plagiostomus Heckel, naturally infected with a new Trypanosoma species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Aamir; Ahmed, Imtiaz

    2016-09-01

    The present study deals with the description of a new piscine trypanosome species found infecting the fresh water fish Schizothorax plagiostomus Heckel from river Jhelum, Srinagar, J&K, India and evaluating the haematological parameters of the infected fish. Haematological examination of S. plagiostomus revealed 61.1 % infection with an intensity of 1-9 trypanosomes/100 RBC's. Small (26.9 ± 1.39 µm) and large (47.17 ± 3.50 µm) forms of the trypanosome were observed in light microscopy investigations, revealing the dimorphic nature of the species. The trypanosome species was found to be distinct from the other related dimorphic species in morphometric dimensions including cell length, cell breadth, kinetoplast index, flagellar index, and cytological peculiarities, respectively. The detailed descriptions of the two morphological forms found in the blood of S. plagiostomus are provided. Based on the geographical location, morphometrics, cytological peculiarities, host status and comparative study, the new species is named Trypanosoma kashmirensis n. sp. The parasitic infestation caused a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in red blood cell counts, haematocrit and haemoglobin concentrations while, the leucocyte (WBC) count, mean cellular volume and mean cellular haemoglobin showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the infected fish as compared to the non-infected. The above alterations of the haematological parameters could be used as an important tool for the indication of Trypanosoma infection in the fish.

  13. Plants of Brazilian restingas with tripanocide activity against Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Robson Xavier; Souza, André Luis Almeida; Lima, Barbara; Tietbohl, Luis Armando Candido; Fernandes, Caio Pinho; Amaral, Raquel Rodrigues; Ruppelt, Bettina Monika; Santos, Marcelo Guerra; Rocha, Leandro

    2017-12-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi affecting millions of people, and widespread throughout Latin America. This disease exhibits a problematic chemotherapy. Benznidazole, which is the drug currently used as standard treatment, lamentably evokes several adverse reactions. Among other options, natural products have been tested to discover a novel therapeutic drug for this disease. A lot of plants from the Brazilian flora did not contain studies about their biological effects. Restinga de Jurubatiba from Brazil is a sandbank ecosystem poorly studied in relation to plant biological activity. Thus, three plant species from Restinga de Jurubatiba were tested against in vitro antiprotozoal activity. Among six extracts obtained from leaves and stem parts and 2 essential oils derived from leave parts, only 3 extracts inhibited epimastigote proliferation. Substances present in the extracts with activity were isolated (quercetin, myricetin, and ursolic acid), and evaluated in relation to antiprotozoal activity against epimastigote Y and Dm28 Trypanosoma cruzi strains. All isolated substances were effective to reduce protozoal proliferation. Essentially, quercetin and myricetin did not cause mammalian cell toxicity. In summary, myricetin and quercetin molecule can be used as a scaffold to develop new effective drugs against Chagas's disease.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Trypanosoma cruzi and Triatoma dimidiata in costal Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yim Yan; Sornosa Macias, Karen Jeniffer; Guale Martínez, Doris; Solorzano, Luis F; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Herrera, Claudia; Dumonteil, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. In Ecuador, Triatoma dimidiata and Rhodnius ecuadoriensis are the main vector species, responsible for over half of the cases of T. cruzi infection in the country. T. dimidiata is believed to have been introduced in Ecuador during colonial times, and its elimination from the country is thus believed to be feasible. We investigated here the molecular ecology of T. dimidiata and T. cruzi in costal Ecuador to further guide control efforts. Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS-2) of 23 specimens from Progreso, Guayas, unambiguously supported the likely importation of T. dimidiata from Central America to Ecuador. The observation of a very high parasite infection rate (54%) and frequent feeding on humans (3/5) confirmed a continued risk of transmission to humans. All genotyped parasites corresponded to TcI DTU and Trypanosoma rangeli was not detected in T. dimidiata. TcI subgroups corresponded to TcIa (25%), and mixed infections with TcIa and TcId (75%). Further studies should help clarify T. cruzi genetic structure in the country, and the possible impact of the introduction of T. dimidiata on the circulating parasite strains. The elevated risk posed by this species warrants continuing efforts for its control, but its apparent mobility between peridomestic and domestic habitats may favor reinfestation following insecticide spraying. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Molecular Docking of New Benzenesulfonylhydrazone as Potential anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Jimenez, Silvia; Moreno-Herrera, Antonio; Reyes-Olivares, Rogelio; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Edith; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Oliveira, Eduardo A Gamosa de; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Lima, Lidia M; Palos, Isidro; Rivera, Gildardo

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is a public health problem caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Cruzain is a pharmacological target for designing a new drug against this parasite. Hydrazone and Nacylhydrazone derivatives have been traditionally associated as potential Cruzain inhibitors. Additionally, benzenesulfonyl derivatives show trypanocidal activity. Therefore, in this study, the combination of both structures has been taken into account for drug design. Seven benzenesulfonylhydrazone (BS-H) and seven N-propionyl benzenesulfonylhydrazone (BS-NAH) derivatives were synthetized and elucidated by infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and elemental analysis. All compounds were evaluated biologically in vitro against two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi (NINOA and INC-5), which are endemic in Mexico, and compared with the reference drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole. In order to gain insight into the putative molecular origin of the trypanocidal properties of these derivatives, docking studies were carried out with Cruzain. Compounds 4 and 6 (BS-H) and 10, 12-14 (BS-NAH) showed the best biological activity against NINOA and INC-5 strains, respectively. Compound 13 was the most potent trypanocidal compound showing a LC50 of 0.06 µM against INC-5 strain. However, compound 4 showed the best activity against both strains (LC50 activity. Benzenesulfonyl and N-propionyl benzenesulfonyl hydrazone derivatives are good options for developing new trypanocidal agents. Particularly, compound 4 could be considered a lead compound. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

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    Adélle Burger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c.

  17. A search for Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense diagnostic antigens by proteomic screening and targeted cloning.

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    Theresa Manful

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The only available diagnostic method for East African trypanosomiasis is light microscopy of blood samples. A simple immunodiagnostic would greatly aid trypanosomiasis control. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To find trypanosome proteins that are specifically recognised by sera from human sleeping sickness patients, we have screened the Trypanosoma brucei brucei proteome by Western blotting. Using cytosolic, cytoskeletal and glycosomal fractions, we found that the vast majority of abundant trypanosome proteins is not specifically recognised by patient sera. We identified phosphoglycerate kinase (PGKC, heat shock protein (HSP70, and histones H2B and H3 as possible candidate diagnostic antigens. These proteins, plus paraflagellar rod protein 1, rhodesain (a cysteine protease, and an extracellular fragment of the Trypanosoma brucei nucleoside transporter TbNT10, were expressed in E. coli and tested for reactivity with patient and control sera. Only TbHSP70 was preferentially recognized by patient sera, but the sensitivity and specificity were insufficient for use of TbHSP70 alone as a diagnostic. Immunoprecipitation using a native protein extract revealed no specifically reacting proteins. CONCLUSIONS: No abundant T. brucei soluble, glycosomal or cytoskeletal protein is likely to be useful in diagnosis. To find useful diagnostic antigens it will therefore be necessary to use more sophisticated proteomic methods, or to test a very large panel of candidate proteins.

  18. Expression, purification and crystallization of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase complexed with orotate

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    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Takashima, Eizo; Osanai, Arihiro; Shimizu, Hironari [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi [Department of Parasitology, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Harada, Shigeharu [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Kita, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kitak@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis and redox homeostasis, was crystallized in complex with its first reaction product, orotate. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and the only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine. DHOD from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcDHOD) has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of the TcDHOD–orotate complex were grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystals diffract to better than 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation (λ = 0.900 Å). X-ray diffraction data were collected at 100 K and processed to 1.9 Å resolution with 98.2% completeness and an overall R{sub merge} of 7.8%. The TcDHOD crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.87, b = 71.89, c = 123.27 Å. The presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit (2 × 34 kDa) gives a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 2.2 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 44%.

  19. Trypanosoma cf. varani in an imported ball python (Python reginus) from Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Takano, Ai; Kawabata, Hiroki; Une, Yumi; Watanabe, Haruo; Mukhtar, Maowia M

    2009-08-01

    Peripheral blood from a ball python (Python reginus) imported from Ghana was cultured in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK) medium for Borrelia spp. isolation, resulting in the prominent appearance of free, and clusters of, trypanosomes in a variety of morphological forms. The molecular phylogenetic characterization of these cultured trypanosomes, using the small subunit rDNA, indicated that this python was infected with a species closely related to Trypanosoma varani Wenyon, 1908, originally described in the Nile monitor lizard (Varanus niloticus) from Sudan. Furthermore, nucleotide sequences of glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of both isolates showed few differences. Giemsa-stained blood smears, prepared from the infected python 8 mo after the initial observation of trypanosomes in hemoculture, contained trypomastigotes with a broad body and a short, free flagellum; these most closely resembled the original description of T. varani, or T. voltariae Macfie, 1919 recorded in a black-necked spitting cobra (Naja nigricollis) from Ghana. It is highly possible that lizards and snakes could naturally share an identical trypanosome species. Alternatively, lizards and snakes in the same region might have closely related, but distinct, Trypanosoma species as a result of sympatric speciation. From multiple viewpoints, including molecular phylogenetic analyses, reappraisal of trypanosome species from a wide range of reptiles in Africa is needed to clarify the relationship of recorded species, or to unmask unrecorded species.

  20. Antibody Maturation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcipar, Iván S.; Risso, Marikena G.; Silber, Ariel M.; Revelli, Silvia; Marcipar, Alberto J.

    2001-01-01

    The study of antibody avidity changes during infection has improved the understanding of the pathologic processes involved in several infectious diseases. In some infections, like toxoplasmosis, this information is being used for diagnostic purposes. Results of the evolution of antibody avidity for different specific antigens in Trypanosome cruzi-infected rats are presented. A Western blotting technique, combined with avidity analysis to identify antigens that elicit high-avidity antibodies, is suggested. In this system, antibodies showed high avidity values only during the chronic phase of infection and only in relation to antibodies against 21-, 33-, 41-, 42-, 56-, 58-, 66-, and 72-kDa antigens. Finally, a 97-kDa T. cruzi antigen, which was recognized by high-avidity antibodies and occurred in noninfected rats, was identified. These results allow us to evaluate the different antigens in chagasic infection. Our results show that with the correct choice of antigen it is possible to detect differences in maturation of antibodies and to discriminate, in an experimental model, between recent (acute) and chronic infections. PMID:11427430

  1. Trypanosoma teixeirae: A new species belonging to the T. cruzi clade causing trypanosomosis in an Australian little red flying fox (Pteropus scapulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Amanda D; Mackie, John T; Stenner, Robyn; Gillett, Amber; Irwin, Peter; Ryan, Una

    2016-06-15

    Little is known about the genetic diversity and pathogenicity of trypanosomes in Australian bats. Recently a novel trypanosome species was identified in an adult female little red flying fox (Pteropus scapulatus) with clinical and pathological evidence of trypanosomosis. The present study used morphology and molecular methods to demonstrate that this trypanosome is a distinct species and we propose the name Trypanosoma teixeirae sp. n. Morphological comparison showed that its circulating trypomastigotes were significantly different from those of Trypanosoma pteropi and Trypanosoma hipposideri, two species previously described from Australian bats. Genetic information was not available for T. pteropi and T. hipposideri but phylogenetic analyses at the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and glycosomal glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) loci indicated that T. teixeirae sp. n. was genetically distinct and clustered with other bat-derived trypanosome species within the Trypanosoma cruzi clade. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Encephalitozonn cuniculi, Sarcocystis neurona, Besnoitia darlingi, and Neospora caninum in North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana, from Southern Louisian

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the prevalence of antibodies to zoonotic protozoan parasites (Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Encephalitozoon cuniculi) and protozoan’s of veterinary importance (Neospora caninum, Sarcocystis neurona and Besnoitia darlingi) in a population of North American opossums (Didelphis...

  3. Southern plains woodrats (Neotoma micropus) from southern Texas are important reservoirs of two genotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi and host of a putative novel Trypanosoma species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Roxanne A; Kjos, Sonia; Ellis, Angela E; Barnes, John C; Yabsley, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, is an important public health and veterinary pathogen. Although human cases are rare in the United States, infections in wildlife, and in some areas domestic dogs, are common. In 2008 and 2010, we investigated T. cruzi prevalence in possible vertebrate reservoirs in southern Texas, with an emphasis on southern plains woodrats (Neotoma micropus). Infection status was determined using a combination of culture isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and serologic testing. Based on PCR and/or culture, T. cruzi was detected in 35 of 104 (34%) woodrats, 3 of 4 (75%) striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), 12 of 20 (60%) raccoons (Procyon lotor), and 5 of 28 (18%) other rodents including a hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus), rock squirrel (Otospermophilus variegatus), black rat (Rattus rattus), and two house mice (Mus musculus). Additionally, another Trypanosoma species was detected in 41 woodrats, of which 27 were co-infected with T. cruzi. Genetic characterization of T. cruzi revealed that raccoon, rock squirrel, and cotton rat isolates were genotype TcIV, while woodrats and skunks were infected with TcI and TcIV. Based on the Chagas Stat-Pak assay, antibodies were detected in 27 woodrats (26%), 13 raccoons (65%), 4 skunks (100%), and 5 other rodents (18%) (two white-ankled mice [Peromyscus pectoralis laceianus], two house mice, and a rock squirrel). Seroprevalence based on indirect immunofluorescence antibody testing was higher for both woodrats (37%) and raccoons (90%), compared with the Chagas Stat-Pak. This is the first report of T. cruzi in a hispid cotton rat, black rat, rock squirrel, and white-ankled mouse. These data indicate that based on culture and PCR testing, the prevalence of T. cruzi in woodrats is comparable with other common reservoirs (i.e., raccoons and opossums) in the United States. However, unlike raccoons and opossums, which tend to be infected with a particular genotype, southern

  4. Pre-exposure to faeces or saliva of Triatoma dimidiata decreases parasitemia in mice challenged with Trypanosoma cruzi: a description of the inflammatory reaction at the inoculation site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteon, Victor; Quen-Rámirez, Enrique; Macedo-Reyes, Veronica; Lopez, Ruth; Acosta-Viana, Karla; Pennigton, Pamela; Ramos-Ligonio, Angel

    2016-10-01

    Under natural conditions, Trypanosoma cruzi infection is transmitted to mammals when faeces contaminated with metacyclic trypomastigotes gain access through skin lesions, mucosa or bite wounds. Natural infection of bugs with T. cruzi can vary greatly from less than 1% up to 70%, depending on triatomine species: in the case of Triatoma dimidiata, the percentage of infection is around 30%. In this work uses biological fluids (saliva and faeces) from Triatoma dimidiata to inoculate experimental animals once or multiple times, before inoculation with faeces contaminated with metacyclic trypomastigotes discrete type unit Ia (TcI). The site of infection was analyzed for histological changes based on hematoxile-eosine technique and toluide blue stain for mast cells. Inoculation with saliva led to the recruitment of eosinophils and mononuclear cells at the inoculation site, whereas inoculation with faeces led to the recruitment of neutrophils. Mice inoculated multiple times exhibited a strong inflammatory reaction from the first hour. Mono- or multi-exposure to T. dimidiata fluids before inoculation with metacyclic trypomastigotes helped to control the level of parasitemia. Previous contact with saliva or faeces of T. dimidiata reduces parasitemia in T. cruzi I -infected mice.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Leontopithecus rosalia at the Reserva Biológica de Poço das Antas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Lisboa Cristiane V

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild golden lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia -- endangered primates that are native to the Brazilian Atlantic coastal forest -- were surveyed for the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi with the use of Giemsa-stained blood smears, hemocultures and an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFAT. Positive IFAT with titers ranging from 1:20 to 1:1280 were observed in 52% of the 118 wild tamarins examined and the parasite was isolated from 38 tamarins. No patent parasitemia was observed among the tamarins from which T. cruzi was isolated. Serum conversion and positive hemoculture was observed for three animals that had yielded negative results some months earlier, which indicates that T. cruzi is actively transmitted among tamarins. In contrast to observations with other sylvatic isolates, those from the tamarins were significantly more virulent and most of them produced mortality in experimentally infected Swiss mice. Some variation in the kDNA restriction profiles among the isolates was observed. Electrophoresis with GPI, G6PDH, IDH, MDH and ME enzymes showed a Z2 profile.

  6. Dynamics of Lymphocyte Populations during Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: From Thymocyte Depletion to Differential Cell Expansion/Contraction in Peripheral Lymphoid Organs

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    Alexandre Morrot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of the immune responses in infectious diseases is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we review current findings on the dynamics of lymphocyte subpopulations following experimental acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. In the thymus, although the negative selection process of the T-cell repertoire remains operational, there is a massive thymocyte depletion and abnormal release of immature CD4+CD8+ cells to peripheral lymphoid organs, where they acquire an activated phenotype similar to activated effector or memory T cells. These cells apparently bypassed the negative selection process, and some of them are potentially autoimmune. In infected animals, an atrophy of mesenteric lymph nodes is also observed, in contrast with the lymphocyte expansion in spleen and subcutaneous lymph nodes, illustrating a complex and organ specific dynamics of lymphocyte subpopulations. Accordingly, T- and B-cell activation is seen in subcutaneous lymph nodes and spleen, but not in mesenteric lymph nodes. Lastly, although the function of peripheral CD4+CD8+ T-cell population remains to be defined in vivo, their presence may contribute to the immunopathological events found in both murine and human Chagas disease.

  7. 4-Aminopyridyl-based CYP51 inhibitors as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug leads with improved pharmacokinetic profile and in vivo potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Claudia M; Vieira, Debora F; Choi, Jun Yong; Kellar, Danielle; Cameron, Michael D; Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Gut, Jiri; Johnston, Jonathan B; Lin, Li; Khan, Susan; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R; Podust, Larissa M

    2014-08-28

    CYP51 is a P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the sterol components of eukaryotic cell membranes. CYP51 inhibitors have been developed to treat infections caused by fungi, and more recently the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. To specifically optimize drug candidates for T. cruzi CYP51 (TcCYP51), we explored the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a N-indolyl-oxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based scaffold originally identified in a target-based screen. This scaffold evolved via medicinal chemistry to yield orally bioavailable leads with potent anti-T. cruzi activity in vivo. Using an animal model of infection with a transgenic T. cruzi Y luc strain expressing firefly luciferase, we prioritized the biaryl and N-arylpiperazine analogues by oral bioavailability and potency. The drug-target complexes for both scaffold variants were characterized by X-ray structure analysis. Optimization of both binding mode and pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds led to potent inhibitors against experimental T. cruzi infection.

  8. Unraveling the differences of the hydrolytic activity of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase and Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase: a quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A; Pierdominici-Sottile, Gustavo; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2014-06-05

    Chagas' disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a lethal, chronic disease that currently affects more than 10 million people in Central and South America. The trans-sialidase from Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, TcTS) is a crucial enzyme for the survival of this parasite: sialic acids from the host are transferred to the cell surface glycoproteins of the trypanosome, thereby evading the host's immune system. On the other hand, the sialidase of T. rangeli (TrSA), which shares 70% sequence identity with TcTS, is a strict hydrolase and shows no trans-sialidase activity. Therefore, TcTS and TrSA represent an excellent framework to understand how different catalytic activities can be achieved with extremely similar structures. By means of combined quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM, SCC-DFTB/Amberff99SB) calculations and umbrella sampling simulations, we investigated the hydrolysis mechanisms of TcTS and TrSA and computed the free energy profiles of these reactions. The results, together with our previous computational investigations, are able to explain the catalytic mechanism of sialidases and describe how subtle differences in the active site make TrSA a strict hydrolase and TcTS a more efficient trans-sialidase.

  9. Acute Chagas outbreaks: molecular and biological features of Trypanosoma cruzi isolates, and clinical aspects of acute cases in Santander, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Martha Lucía; Leal, Sandra; Mantilla, Julio César; Molina-Berríos, Alfredo; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo; Solari, Aldo; Escobar, Patricia; González Rugeles, Clara Isabel

    2015-11-26

    Outbreaks of acute Chagas disease associated with oral transmission are easily detected nowadays with trained health personnel in areas of low endemicity, or in which the vector transmission has been interrupted. Given the biological and genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi, the high morbidity, mortality, and the observed therapeutic failure, new characteristics of these outbreaks need to be addressed at different levels, both in Trypanosoma cruzi as in patient response. The aim of this work was to evaluate the patient's features involved in six outbreaks of acute Chagas disease which occurred in Santander, Colombia, and the characteristics of Trypanosoma cruzi clones isolated from these patients, to establish the potential relationship between the etiologic agent features with host behavior. The clinical, pathological and epidemiological aspects of outbreaks were analyzed. In addition, Trypanosoma cruzi clones were biologically characterized both in vitro and in vivo, and the susceptibility to the classical trypanocidal drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole was evaluated. Trypanosoma cruzi clones were genotyped by means of mini-exon intergenic spacer and cytochrome b genes sequencing. All clones were DTU I, and based on the mini-exon intergenic spacer, belong to two genotypes: G2 related with sub-urban, and G11 with rural outbreaks. Girón outbreak clones with higher susceptibility to drugs presented G2 genotype and C/T transition in Cyt b. The outbreaks affected mainly young population (±25.9 years), and the mortality rate was 10 %. The cardiac tissue showed intense inflammatory infiltrate, myocardial necrosis and abundant amastigote nests. However, although the gastrointestinal tissue was congestive, no inflammation or parasites were observed. Although all clones belong to DTU I, two intra-DTU genotypes were found with the sequencing of the mini-exon intergenic spacer, however there is no strict correlation between genetic groups, the cycles of the parasite or

  10. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene as a DNA barcode for discriminating Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs and closely related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marina Silva; Morelli, Karina Alessandra; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2017-10-16

    The DNA barcoding system using the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mitochondrial gene (cox1 or COI) is highly efficient for discriminating vertebrate and invertebrate species. In the present study, we examined the suitability of cox1 as a marker for Trypanosoma cruzi identification from other closely related species. Additionally, we combined the sequences of cox1 and the nuclear gene glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) to evaluate the occurrence of mitochondrial introgression and the presence of hybrid genotypes. Sixty-two isolates of Trypanosoma spp. obtained from five of the six Brazilian biomes (Amazon Forest, Atlantic Forest, Caatinga, Cerrado and Pantanal) were sequenced for cox1 and GPI gene fragments. Phylogenetic trees were reconstructed using neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, parsimony and Bayesian inference methods. Molecular species delimitation was evaluated through pairwise intraspecific and interspecific distances, Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery, single-rate Poisson Tree Processes and multi-rate Poisson Tree Processes. Both cox1 and GPI genes recognized and differentiated T. cruzi, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii and Trypanosoma rangeli. Cox1 discriminated Tcbat, TcI, TcII, TcIII and TcIV. Additionally, TcV and TcVI were identified as a single group. Cox1 also demonstrated diversity in the discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI, TcII and TcIII and in T. c. marinkellei and T. rangeli. Cox1 and GPI demonstrated TcI and TcII as the most genetically distant branches, and the position of the other T. cruzi DTUs differed according to the molecular marker. The tree reconstructed with concatenated cox1 and GPI sequences confirmed the separation of the subgenus Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) sp. and the T. cruzi DTUs TcI, TcII, TcIII and TcIV. The evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was informative for DTU differentiation using both genes. In the cox1 analysis, one SNP differentiated heterozygous hybrids from TcIV sequences

  11. Aquaporin 2 mutations in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense field isolates correlate with decreased susceptibility to pentamidine and melarsoprol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice E Graf

    Full Text Available The predominant mechanism of drug resistance in African trypanosomes is decreased drug uptake due to loss-of-function mutations in the genes for the transporters that mediate drug import. The role of transporters as determinants of drug susceptibility is well documented from laboratory-selected Trypanosoma brucei mutants. But clinical isolates, especially of T. b. gambiense, are less amenable to experimental investigation since they do not readily grow in culture without prior adaptation. Here we analyze a selected panel of 16 T. brucei ssp. field isolates that (i have been adapted to axenic in vitro cultivation and (ii mostly stem from treatment-refractory cases. For each isolate, we quantify the sensitivity to melarsoprol, pentamidine, and diminazene, and sequence the genomic loci of the transporter genes TbAT1 and TbAQP2. The former encodes the well-characterized aminopurine permease P2 which transports several trypanocides including melarsoprol, pentamidine, and diminazene. We find that diminazene-resistant field isolates of T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense carry the same set of point mutations in TbAT1 that was previously described from lab mutants. Aquaglyceroporin 2 has only recently been identified as a second transporter involved in melarsoprol/pentamidine cross-resistance. Here we describe two different kinds of TbAQP2 mutations found in T. b. gambiense field isolates: simple loss of TbAQP2, or loss of wild-type TbAQP2 allele combined with the formation of a novel type of TbAQP2/3 chimera. The identified mutant T. b. gambiense are 40- to 50-fold less sensitive to pentamidine and 3- to 5-times less sensitive to melarsoprol than the reference isolates. We thus demonstrate for the first time that rearrangements of the TbAQP2/TbAQP3 locus accompanied by TbAQP2 gene loss also occur in the field, and that the T. b. gambiense carrying such mutations correlate with a significantly reduced susceptibility to pentamidine and melarsoprol.

  12. A population study of the minicircles in Trypanosoma cruzi: predicting guide RNAs in the absence of empirical RNA editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westenberger Scott J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structurally complex network of minicircles and maxicircles comprising the mitochondrial DNA of kinetoplastids mirrors the complexity of the RNA editing process that is required for faithful expression of encrypted maxicircle genes. Although a few of the guide RNAs that direct this editing process have been discovered on maxicircles, guide RNAs are mostly found on the minicircles. The nuclear and maxicircle genomes have been sequenced and assembled for Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, however the complement of 1.4-kb minicircles, carrying four guide RNA genes per molecule in this parasite, has been less thoroughly characterised. Results Fifty-four CL Brener and 53 Esmeraldo strain minicircle sequence reads were extracted from T. cruzi whole genome shotgun sequencing data. With these sequences and all published T. cruzi minicircle sequences, 108 unique guide RNAs from all known T. cruzi minicircle sequences and two guide RNAs from the CL Brener maxicircle were predicted using a local alignment algorithm and mapped onto predicted or experimentally determined sequences of edited maxicircle open reading frames. For half of the sequences no statistically significant guide RNA could be assigned. Likely positions of these unidentified gRNAs in T. cruzi minicircle sequences are estimated using a simple Hidden Markov Model. With the local alignment predictions as a standard, the HMM had an ~85% chance of correctly identifying at least 20 nucleotides of guide RNA from a given minicircle sequence. Inter-minicircle recombination was documented. Variable regions contain species-specific areas of distinct nucleotide preference. Two maxicircle guide RNA genes were found. Conclusion The identification of new minicircle sequences and the further characterization of all published minicircles are presented, including the first observation of recombination between minicircles. Extrapolation suggests a level of 4

  13. Priming astrocytes with TNF enhances their susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi infection and creates a self-sustaining inflammatory milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andrea Alice; Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Gibaldi, Daniel; Mariante, Rafael Meyer; Dos Santos, Jessica Brandão; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Moreira, Otacílio Cruz; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2017-09-06

    In conditions of immunosuppression, the central nervous sty 5ystem (CNS) is the main target tissue for the reactivation of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. In experimental T. cruzi infection, interferon gamma (IFNγ) + microglial cells surround astrocytes harboring amastigote parasites. In vitro, IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi, and IFNγ-stimulated infected astrocytes are implicated as potential sources of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Pro-inflammatory cytokines trigger behavioral alterations. In T. cruzi-infected mice, administration of anti-TNF antibody hampers depressive-like behavior. Herein, we investigated the effects of TNF on astrocyte susceptibility to T. cruzi infection and the regulation of cytokine production. Primary astrocyte cultures of neonatal C57BL/6 and C3H/He mice and the human U-87 MG astrocyte lineage were infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain. Cytokine production, particularly TNF, and TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1/p55) expression were analyzed. Recombinant cytokines (rIFNγ and rTNF), the anti-TNF antibody infliximab, and the TNFR1 modulator pentoxifylline were used to assess the in vitro effects of TNF on astrocyte susceptibility to T. cruzi infection. To investigate the role of TNF on CNS colonization by T. cruzi, infected mice were submitted to anti-TNF therapy. rTNF priming of mouse and human astrocytes enhanced parasite/astrocyte interaction (i.e., the percentage of astrocytes invaded by trypomastigote parasites and the number of intracellular parasite forms/astrocyte). Furthermore, T. cruzi infection drove astrocytes to a pro-inflammatory profile with TNF and interleukin-6 production, which was amplified by rTNF treatment. Adding rTNF prior to infection fueled parasite growth and trypomastigote egression, in parallel with increased TNFR1 expression. Importantly, pentoxifylline inhibited the TNF-induced increase in astrocyte susceptibility to T. cruzi invasion. In T. cruzi-infected mice

  14. Effects of IFN-γ coding plasmid supplementation in the immune response and protection elicited by Trypanosoma cruzi attenuated parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Mesías, Andrea C; Parodi, Cecilia; Cimino, Rubén O; Pérez Brandán, Carolina; Diosque, Patricio; Basombrío, Miguel Ángel

    2017-11-25

    Previous studies showed that a naturally attenuated strain from Trypanosoma cruzi triggers an immune response mainly related to a Th2-type profile. Albeit this, a strong protection against virulent challenge was obtained after priming mice with this attenuated strain. However, this protection is not enough to completely clear parasites from the host. In T. cruzi infection, early Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is critical to lead type 1 responses able to control intracellular parasites. Therefore we evaluated whether the co-administration of a plasmid encoding murine IFN-γ could modify the immune response induced by infection with attenuated parasites and improve protection against further infections. C57BL/6J mice were infected intraperitoneally with three doses of live attenuated parasites in combination with plasmid pVXVR-mIFN-γ. Before each infection dose, sera samples were collected for parasite specific antibodies determination and cytokine quantification. To evaluate the recall response to T. cruzi, mice were challenged with virulent parasites 30 days after the last dose and parasite load in peripheral blood and heart was evaluated. As determined by ELISA, significantly increase in T. cruzi specific antibodies response was detected in the group in which pVXVR-mIFN-γ was incorporated, with a higher predominance of IgG2a subtype in comparison to the group of mice only inoculated with attenuated parasites. At our limit of detection, serum levels of IFN-γ were not detected, however a slight decrease in IL-10 concentrations was observed in groups in which pVXVR-mIFN-γ was supplemented. To analyze if the administration of pVXVR-mIFN-γ has any beneficial effect in protection against subsequent infections, all experimental groups were submitted to a lethal challenge with virulent bloodstream trypomastigotes. Similar levels of challenge parasites were detected in peripheral blood and heart of mice primed with attenuated parasites alone or combined with plasmid DNA

  15. A rapid method for testing in vivo the susceptibility of different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi to active chemotherapeutic agents

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    Leny S. Filardi

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available A method is described which permits to determine in vivo an in a short period of time (4-6 hours the sensitivity of T. cruzo strains to known active chemotherapeutic agents. By using resistant- and sensitive T. cruzi stains a fairly good correlation was observed between the results obtained with this rapid method (which detects activity against the circulating blood forms and those obtained with long-term schedules which involve drug adminstration for at least 20 consecutive days and a prolonged period of assessment. This method may be used to characterize susceptibility to active drugs used clinically, provide infomation on the specific action against circulating trypomastigotes and screen active compounds. Differences in the natural susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi strains to active drugs have been already reported using different criteria, mostly demanding long-term study of the animal (Hauschka, 1949; Bock, Gonnert & Haberkorn, 1969; Brener, Costa & Chiari, 1976; Andrade & Figueira, 1977; Schlemper, 1982. In this paper we report a method which detects in 4-6 hours the effect of drugs on bloodstream forms in mice with established T. cruzi infections. The results obtained with this method show a fairly good correlation with those obtained by prolonged treatment schedules used to assess the action of drugs in experimental Chagas' disease and may be used to study the sensitivity of T. cruzi strains to active drugs.No presente trabalho descreve-se um metodo que permite determinar in vivo e em curto espaço de tempo (4-6 horas a sensibilidade de cepas de T. cruzi a agentes terapeuticos ativos na doença de Chagas. Usando-se cepas sensíveis e resistentes aos medicamentos foi possível observar uma boa correlação entre os resultados obtidos com o método rápido (que detecta atividade contra as formas circulantes do parasita e aqueles obtidos com esquema de acao prolongada que envolve a administração da droga por 20 dias e posterior avalia

  16. Capacité de reproduction de la souris et infection aiguë par Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Mjihdi, Abdelkarim

    2004-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi est un parasite protozoaire à multiplication intracellulaire, agent de la maladie de Chagas, infectant 16 à 18 millions de personnes en Amérique latine. Il peut être transmis de la mère infectée au fœtus dans 2 à 10 % des cas, mais ses autres effets sur la gestation ont été peu étudiés. Par ailleurs, les cytokines ont des effets sur la gestation. Certaines d’entre elles, comme l’interleukine-1, l’IL-4, l’IL-5, l’IL-10, le GM-CSF et le TGF-b2, sont bénéfiques pour la gestatio...

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the Mexican state of Guerrero: a seroepidemiological (ELISA) survey of 20 communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, N; Morales, A; Nava, E; Martinez, E; Rodriguez, I; Young, P; Howard, M K; Miles, M A

    1990-10-01

    The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyse 4372 blood samples from residents of 978 households in 20 representative communities in the Mexican state of Guerrero. Seventy-five individuals had very high titres of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi. Samples with intermediate optical density values, despite overlapping values with several control positives on a single-well test, did not sustain their positivity at high dilutions. 'Intermediate positives' had a different distribution among the 20 communities to samples sustaining reactivity at high dilutions, indicating possible cross-reactivity with another infectious agent. The finding of seropositive children under the age of 10 years in the Costa Chica, Acapulco and the Tierra Caliente regions, with family clustering of putative cases, indicates that recent transmission must be considered. Very few people interviewed in the 20 communities knew the triatomine bug could transmit a disease.

  18. The skunk Conepatus chinga as new host of Trypanosoma cruzi in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrokovsky, S M; Schweigmann, N J; Riarte, A; Alberti, A; Conti, O; Montoya, S; Wisnivesky-Colli, C

    1991-08-01

    We report the first systematic epidemiological research carried out in Argentina on the skunk Conepatus chinga. Forty-nine animals were captured in the settlements of Amamá, Trinidad, and nearby forested areas located in the Department of Moreno, Province of Santiago del Estero, between April 1985 and May 1989. Isolation of parasites was done through xenodiagnosis, and their identification as Trypanosoma cruzi was achieved by biological and biochemical criteria. The isolate was highly virulent and pathogenic in inoculated C3H mice. Prevalence was 4.1% (2 of 49). Two facts account for a possible domestic source of infection: both infected skunks were captured near Trinidad, in an area that had never been treated with insecticides, and electrophoretic isoenzyme patterns of the parasites isolated from the skunks were identical to those found in humans. Because extensive deforestation probably would increase the distribution area of C. chinga, further investigation should be performed to evaluate the epidemiological role of this wild mammal.

  19. First report of surra (Trypanosoma evansi infection) in a Tunisian dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rjeibi, Mohamed Ridha; Ben Hamida, Taoufik; Dalgatova, Zara; Mahjoub, Tarek; Rejeb, Ahmed; Dridi, Walid; Gharbi, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma evansi, the agent of surra, is a salivarian trypanosome, originating from Africa. Surra is a major disease in camels, equines and dogs, in which it can often be fatal in the absence of treatment. Animals exhibit nonspecific clinical signs (anaemia, loss of weight and abortion). In the present survey, a blood sample was collected in Sousse (Central Tunisia) from a dog that presented clinical signs of trypanosomiasis. Giemsa-stained blood smears and PCR were performed. ITS1 sequences from blood had 99.8 and 99.5% homology with published T. evansi sequences from cattle and camels, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T. evansi in a Tunisian dog. PMID:25654368

  20. Enzyme catalysed production of sialylated human milk oligosaccharides and galactooligosaccharides by Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Jesper; Larsen, Dorte Møller; Michalak, Malwina

    2014-01-01

    A Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase (E.C. 3.2.1.18) was cloned into Pichia pastoris and expressed. The pH and temperature optimum of the enzyme was determined as pH 5.7 and 30°C. Using casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) and lactose as sialyl-donor and acceptor respectively, the optimal donor....../acceptor ratio for the trans-sialidase catalysed 3′-sialyllactose production was found to be 1:4. Quantitative amounts of 3′-sialyllactose were produced from CGMP and lactose at a yield of 40mg/g CGMP. The 3′-sialyllactose obtained exerted a stimulatory effect on selected probiotic strains, including different...

  1. A Brief View of the Surface Membrane Proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech-Canul, Ángel de la Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas' disease which affects millions of people around the world mostly in Central and South America. T. cruzi expresses a wide variety of proteins on its surface membrane which has an important role in the biology of these parasites. Surface molecules of the parasites are the result of the environment to which the parasites are exposed during their life cycle. Hence, T. cruzi displays several modifications when they move from one host to another. Due to the complexity of this parasite's cell surface, this review presents some membrane proteins organized as large families, as they are the most abundant and/or relevant throughout the T. cruzi membrane. PMID:28656101

  2. Nanoemulsions of sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase inhibitors strongly inhibit the growth of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Alane Beatriz; da Silva Cardoso, Verônica; Ricci Junior, Eduardo; Dos Santos, Elisabete Pereira; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2018-12-01

    Sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors targeting the α-class enzyme from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, responsible of Chagas disease, were recently reported. Although many such derivatives showed low nanomolar activity in vitro, they were inefficient anti-T. cruzi agents in vivo. Here, we show that by formulating such sulfonamides as nanoemulsions in clove (Eugenia caryophyllus) oil, highly efficient anti-protozoan effects are observed against two different strains of T. cruzi. These effects are probably due to an enhanced permeation of the enzyme inhibitor through the nanoemulsion formulation, interfering in this way with the life cycle of the pathogen either by inhibiting pH regulation or carboxylating reactions in which bicarbonate/CO 2 are involved. This type of formulation of sulfonamides with T. cruzi CA inhibitory effects may lead to novel therapeutic approaches against this orphan disease.

  3. Role of Trypanosoma cruzi Trans-sialidase on the Escape from Host Immune Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardy, Ana F. F. R.; Freire-de-Lima, Celio G.; Pérez, Ana R.; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, affecting millions of people throughout Latin America. The parasite dampens host immune response causing modifications in diverse lymphoid compartments, including the thymus. T. cruzi trans-sialidase (TS) seems to play a fundamental role in such immunopathological events. This unusual enzyme catalyses the transference of sialic acid molecules from host glycoconjugates to acceptor molecules placed on the parasite surface. TS activity mediates several biological effects leading to the subversion of host immune system, hence favoring both parasite survival and the establishment of chronic infection. This review summarizes current findings on the roles of TS in the immune response during T. cruzi infection. PMID:27047464

  4. [Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the rural population of Sucre State, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jordán, Noris; Berrizbeitia, Mariolga; Rodríguez, Jessicca; Concepción, Juan Luis; Cáceres, Ana; Quiñones, Wilfredo

    2017-10-26

    The current study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Sucre State, Venezuela, and its association with epidemiological risk factors. The cluster sampling design allowed selecting 96 villages and 576 dwellings in the State's 15 municipalities. A total of 2,212 serum samples were analyzed by ELISA, HAI, and IFI. Seroprevalence in Sucre State was 3.12%. Risk factors associated with T. cruzi infection were: accumulated garbage, flooring and wall materials, type of dwelling, living in a house with wattle and daub walls and/or straw roofing, living in a house with risky walls and roofing, risky buildings and wattle and daub outbuildings, poultry inside the human dwelling, and presence of firewood. Infection was associated with individual age, and three seropositive cases were found in individuals less than 15 years of age. Sucre State has epidemiological factors that favor the risk of acquiring T. cruzi infection.

  5. Changes in Trypanosoma cruzi kinetoplast DNA minicircles induced by environmental conditions and subcloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, A M; De Almeida, D F; von Krüger, W M

    1994-01-01

    Reversible changes in kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircles sequences were observed in clones of Trypanosoma cruzi strain Y, following a number of passages during exponential growth phase or after subcloning in blood-free medium. kDNA restriction patterns of clones were similar to those of the original uncloned strain, while subclones presented distinct kDNA restriction patterns. Homology experiments demonstrated strong hybridization between kDNA with the same electrophoretic mobility patterns while only weak signals were observed with kDNA of different patterns. The changes observed, which are unprecedented in T. cruzi clones, characterize transkinetoplastidy, and seem to be associated with similarly reversible changes both in zymodeme and in infectivity.

  6. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei

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    Michael Wink

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, quinine, ajmalicine, ergotamine, harmine, vinblastine, vincristine, colchicine, chaconine, demissidine and veratridine induced programmed cell death, whereas quinolizidine, tropane, terpene and piperidine alkaloids were mostly inactive. Effective PCD induction (EC50 below 10 µM was caused in T. brucei by chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, and chaconine. The active alkaloids can be characterized by their general property to inhibit protein biosynthesis, to intercalate DNA, to disturb membrane fluidity or to inhibit microtubule formation.

  7. Autonomic Dysfunction and Risk Factors Associated with Trypanosoma cruzi Infection among Children in Arequipa, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Natalie M.; Kawai, Vivian; Gilman, Robert H.; Bocangel, Cesar; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Cabrera, Lilia; Levy, Michael Z.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan Geny; Delgado, Freddy; Rosenthal, Lauren; Pinedo-Cancino, Vivian V.; Steurer, Francis; Seitz, Amy E.; Maguire, James H.; Bern, Caryn

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease affects an estimated 8 million people in Latin America. Infected individuals have 20–30% lifetime risk of developing cardiomyopathy, but more subtle changes in autonomic responses may be more frequent. We conducted a matched case-control study of children in Arequipa, Peru, where triatomine infestation and Trypanosoma cruzi infection are emerging problems. We collected data on home environment, history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and autonomic testing. Signs of triatomine infestation and/or animals sleeping in the child's room and household members with Chagas disease were associated with increased infection risk. Electrocardiogram findings did not differ between cases and controls. However, compared with control children, infected children had blunted autonomic responses by three different measures, the Valsalva maneuver, the cold pressor test, and the orthostatic test. T. cruzi-infected children show autonomic dysfunction, although the prognostic value of this finding is not clear. Sustained vector control programs are essential to decreasing future T. cruzi infections. PMID:21212207

  8. Mapping replication dynamics in Trypanosoma brucei reveals a link with telomere transcription and antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Rebecca; Marques, Catarina A; Paape, Daniel; Prorocic, Marko; Zurita-Leal, Andrea C; Campbell, Samantha J; Lapsley, Craig; Dickens, Nicholas; McCulloch, Richard

    2016-05-26

    Survival of Trypanosoma brucei depends upon switches in its protective Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat by antigenic variation. VSG switching occurs by frequent homologous recombination, which is thought to require locus-specific initiation. Here, we show that a RecQ helicase, RECQ2, acts to repair DNA breaks, including in the telomeric site of VSG expression. Despite this, RECQ2 loss does not impair antigenic variation, but causes increased VSG switching by recombination, arguing against models for VSG switch initiation through direct generation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). Indeed, we show DSBs inefficiently direct recombination in the VSG expression site. By mapping genome replication dynamics, we reveal that the transcribed VSG expression site is the only telomeric site that is early replicating - a differential timing only seen in mammal-infective parasites. Specific association between VSG transcription and replication timing reveals a model for antigenic variation based on replication-derived DNA fragility.

  9. Characterization of Trypanosoma rangeli Strains Isolated in Central and South America: an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisard Edmundo C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagelate parasite that infects domestic and sylvatic animals, as well as man, in Central and South America. T. rangeli has an overlapping distribution with T. cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, sharing several animal reservoirs and triatomine vectors. We have isolated T. rangeli strains in the State of Santa Catarina, in southern Brazil, which dramatically increased the distribution area of this parasite. This brief review summarizes several studies comparing T. rangeli strains isolated in Santa Catarina with others isolated in Colombia, Honduras and Venezuela. The different methods used include indirect immunofluorescence and western blot assays, lectin agglutination, isoenzyme electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, triatomine susceptibility, in vitro cell infection assays, and mini-exon gene analysis.

  10. The cyclical development of Trypanosoma vivax in the tsetse fly involves an asymmetric division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cher Pheng Ooi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma vivax is the most prevalent trypanosome species in African cattle. It is thought to be transmitted by tsetse flies after cyclical development restricted to the vector mouthparts. Here, we investigated the kinetics of T. vivax development in Glossina morsitans morsitans by serial dissections over one week to reveal differentiation and proliferation stages. After 3 days, stable numbers of attached epimastigotes were seen proliferating by symmetric division in the cibarium and proboscis, consistent with colonisation and maintenance of a parasite population for the remaining lifespan of the tsetse fly. Strikingly, some asymmetrically dividing cells were also observed in proportions compatible with a continuous production of pre- metacyclic trypomastigotes. The involvement of this asymmetric division in T. vivax metacyclogenesis is discussed and compared to other trypanosomatids.

  11. The Cyclical Development of Trypanosoma vivax in the Tsetse Fly Involves an Asymmetric Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Cher-Pheng; Schuster, Sarah; Cren-Travaillé, Christelle; Bertiaux, Eloise; Cosson, Alain; Goyard, Sophie; Perrot, Sylvie; Rotureau, Brice

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma vivax is the most prevalent trypanosome species in African cattle. It is thought to be transmitted by tsetse flies after cyclical development restricted to the vector mouthparts. Here, we investigated the kinetics of T. vivax development in Glossina morsitans morsitans by serial dissections over 1 week to reveal differentiation and proliferation stages. After 3 days, stable numbers of attached epimastigotes were seen proliferating by symmetric division in the cibarium and proboscis, consistent with colonization and maintenance of a parasite population for the remaining lifespan of the tsetse fly. Strikingly, some asymmetrically dividing cells were also observed in proportions compatible with a continuous production of pre- metacyclic trypomastigotes. The involvement of this asymmetric division in T. vivax metacyclogenesis is discussed and compared to other trypanosomatids.

  12. First report of surra (Trypanosoma evansi infection in a Tunisian dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rjeibi Mohamed Ridha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi, the agent of surra, is a salivarian trypanosome, originating from Africa. Surra is a major disease in camels, equines and dogs, in which it can often be fatal in the absence of treatment. Animals exhibit nonspecific clinical signs (anaemia, loss of weight and abortion. In the present survey, a blood sample was collected in Sousse (Central Tunisia from a dog that presented clinical signs of trypanosomiasis. Giemsa-stained blood smears and PCR were performed. ITS1 sequences from blood had 99.8 and 99.5% homology with published T. evansi sequences from cattle and camels, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T. evansi in a Tunisian dog.

  13. Screening of Trypanosoma cruzi glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Leite

    Full Text Available The inhibitory activity of crude extracts of Meliaceae and Rutaceae plants on glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated at 100 μg/mL. Forty-six extracts were tested and fifteen of them showed significant inhibitory activity (IA % > 50. The majority of the assayed extracts of Meliaceae plants (Cedrela fissilis, Cipadessa fruticosa and Trichilia ramalhoi showed high ability to inhibit the enzymatic activity. The fractionation of the hexane extract from branches of C. fruticosa led to the isolation of three flavonoids: flavone, 7-methoxyflavone and 3',4',5',5,7-pentamethoxyflavone. The two last compounds showed high ability to inhibit the gGAPDH activity. Therefore, the assayed Meliaceae species could be considered as a promising source of lead compounds against Chagas' disease.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIPARASITIC ACTIVITY OF BENZOPHENONE THIOSEMICARBAZONES ON Trypanosoma brucei brucei

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    Georges C. Accrombessi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure of four synthesized thiosemicarbazones, substituted or not, of benzophenone has been confirmed by spectrometrical analysis IR, NMR 1H and 13C. Their anti-trypanosomal activities were evaluated on Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among these compounds, benzophenone 4 phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 4 has the highest activity with the half-inhibitory concentration (IC50 = 8.48 micromolar (µM. Benzophenone 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 3 and benzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1 showed moderate anti-trypanosomal activity with IC50 values equal to 23.27 µM and 67.17 µM respectively. Benzophenone 2 methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 2 showed no activity up to IC50 = 371.74 µM.

  15. Mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi Placenta Invasion and Infection: The Use of Human Chorionic Villi Explants

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    Ricardo E. Fretes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease, endemic in Latin America, is associated with premature labor and miscarriage. During vertical transmission the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi crosses the placental barrier. However, the exact mechanism of the placental infection remains unclear. We review the congenital transmission of T. cruzi, particularly the role of possible local placental factors that contribute to the vertical transmission of the parasite. Additionally, we analyze the different methods available for studying the congenital transmission of the parasite. In that context, the ex vivo infection with T. cruzi trypomastigotes of human placental chorionic villi constitutes an excellent tool for studying parasite infection strategies as well as possible local antiparasitic mechanisms.

  16. Biological characterization of a b-galactosidase expressing clone of Trypanosoma cruzi CL strain

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    Le-Senne Ana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Clone CL B5 of Trypanosoma cruzi is a beta-galactosidase expressing organism that was genetically transfected to be used for in vitro pharmacological screening. Biological parameters were determined, evaluating growth kinetics of epimastigotes, metacyclogenesis, infectivity to mammalian cell lines, parasitemia kinetics in mice and sensibility to nifurtimox and benznidazole. Differences in relation to other strains and CL parental strain were found, the most important being the incapability to produce death to mice in spite of the high inoculum used. However, it possesses the required features to be used for in vitro drug screening. Data obtained demonstrate that heterogeneity of T. cruzi appears even among clones of the same strain, and that these differences found do not prevent the use of clone CL B5 for the purpose that was engineered.

  17. Trypanosoma Cruzi Cyp51 Inhibitor Derived from a Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Screen Hit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiung-Kuang; Doyle, Patricia S.; Yermalitskaya, Liudmila V.; Mackey, Zachary B.; Ang, Kenny K.H.; McKerrow, James H.; Podust, Larissa M.; (Vanderbilt); (UCSF)

    2009-02-18

    The two front-line drugs for chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections are limited by adverse side-effects and declining efficacy. One potential new target for Chagas disease chemotherapy is sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in biosynthesis of membrane sterols. In a screening effort targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis CYP51 (CYP51{sub Mt}), we previously identified the N-[4-pyridyl]-formamide moiety as a building block capable of delivering a variety of chemotypes into the CYP51 active site. In that work, the binding modes of several second generation compounds carrying this scaffold were determined by high-resolution co-crystal structures with CYP51{sub Mt}. Subsequent assays against the CYP51 orthologue in T. cruzi, CYP51{sub Tc}, demonstrated that two of the compounds tested in the earlier effort bound tightly to this enzyme. Both were tested in vitro for inhibitory effects against T. cruzi and the related protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. One of the compounds had potent, selective anti-T. cruzi activity in infected mouse macrophages. Cure of treated host cells was confirmed by prolonged incubation in the absence of the inhibiting compound. Discrimination between T. cruzi and T. brucei CYP51 by the inhibitor was largely based on the variability (phenylalanine versus isoleucine) of a single residue at a critical position in the active site. CYP51{sub Mt}-based crystal structure analysis revealed that the functional groups of the two tightly bound compounds are likely to occupy different spaces in the CYP51 active site, suggesting the possibility of combining the beneficial features of both inhibitors in a third generation of compounds to achieve more potent and selective inhibition of CYP51{sub Tc}. Enzyme sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) is a well-established target for anti-fungal therapy and is a prospective target for Chagas disease therapy. We previously identified a

  18. Gene-deleted live-attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as vaccines to protect against Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Valdéz, Fernando J; Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Ferreira, Arturo; Basombrío, Miguel Ángel

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This illness is now becoming global, mainly due to congenital transmission, and so far, there are no prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines available to either prevent or treat Chagas disease. Therefore, different approaches aimed at identifying new protective immunogens are urgently needed. Live vaccines are likely to be more efficient in inducing protection, but safety issues linked with their use have been raised. The development of improved protozoan genetic manipulation tools and genomic and biological information has helped to increase the safety of live vaccines. These advances have generated a renewed interest in the use of genetically attenuated parasites as vaccines against Chagas disease. This review discusses the protective capacity of genetically attenuated parasite vaccines and the challenges and perspectives for the development of an effective whole-parasite Chagas disease vaccine.

  19. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of 10 medicinal plants used in northeast Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Garza, Zinnia Judith; Bazaldúa-Rodríguez, Aldo Fabio; Quintanilla-Licea, Ramiro; Galaviz-Silva, Lucio

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to screen the trypanocidal activity of plants used in traditional Mexican medicine for the treatment of various diseases related to parasitic infections. Cultured Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes were incubated for 96h with different concentrations of methanolic extracts obtained from Artemisia mexicana, Castela texana, Cymbopogon citratus, Eryngium heterophyllum, Haematoxylum brasiletto, Lippia graveolens, Marrubium vulgare, Persea americana, Ruta chalepensis and Schinus molle. The inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined for each extract via a colorimetric method. Among the evaluated species, the methanolic extracts of E. heterophyllum, H. brasiletto, M. vulgare and S. molle exhibited the highest trypanocidal activity, showing percentages of growth inhibition between 88 and 100% at a concentration of 150μg/ml. These medicinal plants may represent a valuable source of new bioactive compounds for the therapeutic treatment of trypanosomiasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi natural clones from the state of Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Barnabé

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen Trypanosoma cruzi stocks from the state of Paraíba, Brazil, isolated from man, wild mammals, and triatomine bugs were studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and random primed amplified polymorphic DNA. Despite the low number of stocks, a notable genetic, genotypic, and phylogenetic diversity was recorded. The presence of the two main phylogenetic subdivisions, T. cruzi I and II, was recorded. The strong linkage disequilibrium observed in the population under survey suggests that T. cruzi undergoes predominant clonal evolution in this area too, although this result should be confirmed by a broader sample. The pattern of clonal variation does not suggests a recent origin by founder effect with a limited number of different genotypes.